The East Carolinian, November 12, 1985






�hc HZast Carolinian
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60Vr4- 2 3
Tuesday. November 12, 1985
Greenville, N.C
10 Panes
Circulation 12,000
Ficklen Stadium Due
For Major Expansion
B IH)l (, R()BrRM)
M.fl W
1 he possible expansion of
Ficklen Stadium to 50,000 seats
would enable ECU to atti
more majoi football teams, said
Director o Athletics Ken Kan
Ken Karr
"As w e
expansion of 1 icklen Stadium is
r ma
K a i'
-
35,OOi Kan
15,001
ci Kai addi
I10 s would be add
ed to the north side ol the
stadium. "We would double-
deck the north side, creating a
balcony effect
Kan said the expansion plans
for Ficklen are tentative, bin "we
have identified this as a real need
and have discussed it al various
administrative levels
50,000-seat stadium would
equal the University ol North
Carolina's Kenan Stadium, cur-
rently the state's largest.
karr said a largei stadium is
necessary for ECU to continue to
act major 1-A football
ers.
'The expansion of our facility
is really important. In order to
maximize our chances ol getting
big-name teams, w� need a
stadium thai can hold largei
crowds he said.
Karr added the larger capacity
of I icklen would heip in scht
ing major team- to play at 1 C I
"We had a record ci
i ?5 �4") at the Souli .r olina
md a nea I linsi
Miami. Io gel these pe
.mn to contrast- into the
I9s0s, we need a stadium thai can
er ci ow ds he
such, as Kl
� ging
face
theii
schedules.
"Most schools set their
schedules up to 10 years in ad-
vance. Independents have a more
difficult time. ECU schedules
three to tour years in advance,
but we have some contracts
through 1990 he said.
Former ECU head football
coach and current Auburn head
coach Pat Dye said alter last
Saturday's game, "ECU needs to
increase the sie o its stadium to
50,(XXI That way, it can attract
bigger-name teams. ECU already
has the community support to fill
a 50,000-seat stadium
Karr said he expects the expan-
sion to attract teams such as
North Carolina State, Carolina,
Duke and Wake Forest. The
Pirates have played the Wolf pack
tor 16 years straight in Raleigh.
Karr said the expansion of
ficklen is an indication of the
positive direction in which ECU'S
Athletic Department is moving.
expansion tends to
reflect where our program is go-
ing. I he NCAA's (National Col-
legiate Athletic Association) Pro-
position 48, which requires
athletes to score a minimum of
700 on the S Al and to maintain a
t average or bettei in a core cur-
riculum, is a positive trend for all
colleges, as well
Break Time
JIMLEUTCEN S The East Carolinian
Gay Powell (left), Brian Nause (center) and Clay Howard enjoy the sunshine, while taking a break
on the wail beside the A.J. Fletcher Building, short shorts made a brief reappearance along with
unseasonably warm temperatures. However, cooler weather is anticipated within a few days. Indian
summer may be short-lived this year.
New Media Head Selected
Bv ELIZABETH PAGE
Staff WriKr
The ECl Media Hoard named
rom Luvender I he las- Caroli-
nian's new general manager, in a
close five-to-foui decisioi Mon
day afternoon.
"I'm excited about the new
position said luvender. '
I'm looking forward to the new
tllenge thai tin- position ha
Students Encounter Anxiety
Bv Bl 111 W Kl K
M.H Writ,
a � ry
essful env iron-
met: � " a ademic demands.
lemands and the pressure
to p irding to ill
Ba! . directoi of the EC I
mseling Center.
rhe stresses that affect college
students have been marked on a
ridar and distributed to
�rents of new students at
Guilford Colleg
The idea for the calendar came
from a similar calendar at the
versity of North Carolina al
trlotte.
According to the calendar,
during the first month of school,
students cajr expect to be confus-
ed and depressed when trying to
meet the demands of college and
their parents.
"We all feel the stress ol hav-
ing to meet demands when we
feel unprepared to meet them
1 reshman are leaving home and
establishing themselves in a new
situation and the effect on their
lifestyle will have an effect on
their physical health said
Vv liber Castellow, chairman ol
E( I psychology department.
"Stress develops in September
when students try to adjust to the
role ol a college student from the
role ol child responsible to a
parent said Donald Conde, a
sophomore at ECl .
"1 think October is a hard
month; students are trying io ad-
iiist and having a hard time. Oc
tober stands out as one ol the
harder and most stressful months
of the year. For some students,
homesickness mounts in the mid-
dle and the end of October. Some
students go home for Fall Break
and do not want to come haA
said Kenny Jenkins, residence
director ol Slav and Umstead
dormitories.
ccording to the calendar, by
October, freshman realize that
college is not fun and games.
Problems the students brought
with them from high school and
home may still exist.
"freshman get stressed out
when they realize that they can't
d everything. By October, most
treshman realie that college life
is different Ball said.
Ball said many problems en-
countered in the counseling
center are related to problems the
students have with relationships.
Conflicts and confusions arise
because of the attitudes toward
relationships and sex on the col-
lege campus.
"Men are more oriented
toward non-responsible sex than
women. Nkm are going to press
for sex. Students have a right to
establish ground rules in their
relationships. Stress and dif-
ficulties occur when young men
and women in a relationship "tee
off" one another Ball said.
"Students from conservative
backgrounds have some difficul-
ty adjusting to a liberal college
campus said Jenkins.
"Students with encouragement
from family and friends deal with
social and academic stresses bel-
ter said Cliff Fish, resident
director of Belk dormitory.
The calendar lists November as
a time for depression among
students, as they feel they should
fit in by now. November also br-
ings economic pressure, as money
from summer jobs and parental
support runs low.
"Students begin to realize in
late October and earlv November
that performance in the
classroom is required; before that
social functions had been more
important.
The pressure before the
Christmas holidays mounts as
students tee! the stress brought
on by final exams.
"Students realize that when
they take that final exam there is
no changing the past said Con-
de.
"One of the reasons stress
mounts m December is students
realie that they might have
prepared enough during the
semester for their exams cited
Fish.
As January and February rolls
around, the calendar shows
students with a decrease in
physical activity because ol
weather and the slowing of the
school's social calendar.
With March comes academic
pressure. Seniors worry whether
they have chosen the right major.
the calendar cites.
Guilford College officials
believe drug and alcohol use in-
creases in March.
See STRESS Page 3.
otter
Aftet interv iewii a
plica' ts fot the position, the
board deliberated tor nearly 30
minutes bet ore makil
sion
lW hai I'm I
is set up a period oi observation,
' at'er thai pel -serva-
tion, I'm
necessary
1 u vender.
idual, according to luvender.
He said they include better rela-
tionships with campus organ
"ions a- tar as news coverage is
concerm i. "I'm just looking
better communication w
staff he added.
luvender plans to spend
'wo to three weeks working
with current General Manager
N- ui, learning what is
.�ssary to take over his new
on.
"1 am just glad it's over. It's
been a hectic week tor me said
1 uvender.
"1 would like to commend the
candidates tor their
ettorts he said. "I know the
Media Board had a tough deci-

"I would like to create an at-
phere conducive to team-
work, p r i d e and
nalism said Luvender.
"I'n excited about the
position, and I'm looking for-
ward to the challenge that I know
it's going to bring
New Teacher Plan
Helps Pay Tu ition
Bv 1)AW NF GODWIN
si�f WriCrr
National Education ss
President Mary Hatwood
Futrell has endorsed a plan that
would have college graduates
teach tour years in return for
payment of college tuition.
"Colleges and universities have
to explore new approaches, and I
think this idea has a great deal of
merit Futrell said.
The plan, first proposed by
Frank Newmman, former presi-
dent of the University of Rhode
Island, would have students pay
back loans bv spending one
weekend a month m teacher
training and the summer months
in rural or ghetto schools or help-
ing children with special needs.
Upon graduation, the students
would give back the four vears bv
teaching.
Charles R Coble, dean of the
School of Education at ECU
said, "Incentive grants like the
one proposed by Newman are a
low-cost way to attract students
into teaching
According to Coble, "There is
a teacher shortage right now in
selected locations and in selected
subjects such as math and the
physical serenes and generally in
middie school education "
v oble predicts that in the next
15 vears, the shortage vvill
become more pervasive in most
areas Coble said one of the fac-
tors behind the shoitage is that
the U.S. has a mature teacher
faculty. "Estimates are that due
to retirements in the next five
See NEW Page 5.
SGA Unable To Stop Veto
Future Classroom Building J,M
LHJGSN S -Th�Eat Carolinian
This empty area is the future site for anew classroom building here at ECU. Included in the new
building will be 65 classrooms and laboratories and 180 faculty offices. The new building is scheduled
for completion in August 1987.
By LANCE SEARL
surf Writer
In a close vote. ECU Student
Government Association
legislators were unable to over-
ride a veto that prevents a $1,550
grant from going to the
marketing department at ECU.
The legislature needed a 23 vote
to overturn SGA President David
Brown's veto.
The grant would have been us-
ed to purchase three series of
filmstrips that would have aided
students in marketing and other
related courses.
Gordon Walker, who voiced
support for the appropriations,
said the films would help students
visualize difficult marketing con-
cepts and would add a "spark"
to the courses.
However, Brown's supporters
believed the grant would limit
funs in the SGA budget and
would be unproportional with
other organizations in need of
grants.
According to Scott Irwin, SGA
legislative member, "If 30 per-
cent of the students took
marketing courses and the
marketing department received
$1,500, then if say 60 percent o
the students took English
courses, the English department
could receive $3,000. There isn't
enough money for that
Others simply said that
students pay tuition; funds for
such projects should come from
the university not the students.
In other business. The SGA
apologized to the Homecoming
Steering Committee. Last week,
the body had appropriated the
committee $400 for allegedly
spending more than that was ap-
propriated to them.
However, the SGA Treasurer
mislead the Legislature concern-
ig me budget over-runs leading to
the decision to appropriate the
additional money. More impor-
tant, the SGA learned that the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee, in fact, stayed within the
budget, which led to the apology
clearing the Homecoming Steer-
ing Committee of any budget
over-run.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifiedsio
Editorials4
Features5
Sportsg
The best of men cannot sus-
pend
their fate:
The good die early, and the
bad
die late.
�Daniel Defoe
,

� 1





HE EAST( ARQL INIAN
N() 1 Bi R
lK
Announcements
STUDENT HEALTH
CENTER
T fie Great Ame'
November 2 is' Com to rw
den' Health Center or. the 21st 1
canctv ana information on
ing LKKres avil tv a1 10 00. 1 0
tor Spe ifl rips B i i N
Smoker For more information
ElCSha-Adams at 757 �S4t or Di t D Glover
AI 'n1 6V6I
ROOMMATE PROBLEMS?
Have you been to Menaentian Ian i
There in m showcase . .h a � � Alpha
Ptii Omega s pertei t solution �, s
roommate problems Still ntere!
DetaHsaie also posted informing you on how
to apply 'c youi net roommate Also any
brother ot Apiha pi Omega an
with ne essaf � ntorma'ion
ECU RUGBY
t he Rugby Club will be ho
1 hur Nov 14, at 8 00 p ;�
. let L b'a' v
Anyone intereste
season or gang on the Bahamas
Break Tour is entourage ' ����
nembers attendance s ess I � -
m be shown
NURSING STUDENTS
a ���u- s -g students members ai
members are invited
�- s Thursday 11 U at 7 pm n room 101
"� � s rtg Bu Id ng Evi
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Psi Phi announces its second an
� � unclay
N . �
" -

-
Greens � N
� will be t
���-
OMEGA PSI PHI
On Friday. Nov
� �� �' � i-don.a
Wright c
canned foo ISO Which w
ink "i
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS

NO V 14


SPAN
PAN v
I A

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
T here shall be a meeting Tuesday Nov 13
at 8 00 p "i m the Multi Purpose room ot
Mendenhan Student Center Brian Dollery
est speaker on South Africa we
regret an, mix ups about the cancelled
�St week lm I t successful state
and the sui i eSSful f lertion work
race Call Sandy
- mto
LAW SOCIETY
1 Law So. �
Stevens house tor a COOkOUt on
1 ' Nov is at � 00 p m This is a reguiai
. and we look tor
s to attend This will be av ex
' � i tor us tog. � � � . -other
and too is. uss future meetings ot the S

Bl '58 31SS
AMBASSADORS
� will be a meeting Wed
Nov 13th a1 MendenhaM's multi
purp - ee you there1
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY
ADVISING SESSION
� � " � idvising foi i . � i i � .�
ipy ' lei 'or spring
ursday. N . J
n the Physxal Therapy
Depai Building
Mii
STUDENT ATHLETIC BOARD
Student Athletic Board will meet Von
Nov 18th 1985 m Mendenhall Student Center
in room 221 at 4 00 p m
BALLOON ASCENTION
Sigma Sigma Sigma is sponsenng a
balloon ascention to support their national
philanthropy the Robbie Page Memorial
Inkers are $100 Balloons will be released
at the Tulsa game and the person tttal buys
the balloon that travels the farthest and Tie
person that finds it win S25 each c i
Sigma house for a t.cke'
SEANC
The ECU Chapter of SEANC will meet on
Nov 19. 1985 at 5 30 p m in Brews'er B 102
Area membership is encouraged to attend
uisness session Guests v
Ivan Hill Past state President of Si
f) B Miller Chairman District �A and
David Woods Membership Cha �
� if-
CONCERT
na Unive- ' �
'� be presenting �� la oncert Thursda,
g Nov 14. m the A J Fletcher i-�
HallatB 15 The program will be
trie n i bands of 1 �. � .
from the traditional sound' � ft � �'
Herman and Count Basie Orchestras to the
.���ss've sounds of
- � - ' By Bands " � �
'arge for admission ano s ope' � the
PRE MED
Alpha Epstion Delta �� V net'
meeting on Tuesday N
Flanagan a- � jsua-
i 30 D' ack Allis tirma

pledy.

LSS
- . �
-
Roon � . .
sored by the LeiS I I ��

J100 Of '
LACROSSE CLUB
que�'
� i �
Camp
ACROSS
-
5 Cl
8 Turkisl
��� .
13 Fish eggs
14 Festive
15 F .
18 Heell
� � �
li � �

� � . �

1 123'i


' li�m
;
V �
� �

- �
' II.
DOWN
' f �
v
I Mali � ep pi
� ons
25 Be m debt
26 A1
28 B
30 Younq I .
See
Pane 5 For Solution
PHYSICIANS FOR
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
'� . '�' �

today I - �

l)r I RllSI
College!
Pensive Mood j� number
Don give up. Hie holidays are no! foo far off, and the inevitable task of studvin seems to keen
students occupied more so than the � like to he. However, in the long run. concentration
makes tor a better character, though it �m ,he stud-task is constant haunted hx
procrastination a student's worst enen.
Hooher Memorial Christian Church
Disciples of hi r i ��:
Mil Greenville Blvd 756-2275
Special C ussfs forollege Students
9 45 am. Christian Education tall ages)
11:00 am Worship- Open Communion
X
X
X




s
Hfv. H Varm Kniqhl



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IRTSWORLD
104 E. Red Banks Roa d
presents
LADIES NIGH T
Tuesday Night November 12th
7:00-11:00
College Ladies FREE with Co liege ID
College Men $1.00 with College ID




��






e a o
Nightclub
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25c Wine and Draft all Night Long!
Friday Night
Pre-Game Party with the ECU Cheerleaders
Wear something with ECU on it and
get in for JUST $1.00
Doors Open at 8:00 p.m.
$.1.00 Tall Boys �50c Wine & Draft
$2.50 Pitchers
MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL thru Sept. 30
$2.00 New $1.00 Renewal
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
Beau s a Private Club for Members & Guests
AM ABC Permits
I CONTA
I $105.00
$145.00
GflECAl
tVVVVV
Seafood House
if
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
J Hours4:3C
YA. - NEWLY REl
SHOE O
Name Brar
At Disc out
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
Ladies Dress andl
$1288 ro$l
Large Selection
Tennis Shoes $1
203 West Ninth 3reet
�����8�iiln�)l�������
.1
-





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Out
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I Ht I ASFAKOI INIAN
NOVEMBER 12, 1985
VISE
lo keep
'jiion
UBLE
s ' -
UI QNSI Deta.is In store
�2
L POtO'
' Chips �
tato
ips . . .
99
Pepsi
Free
15
Vicious
?pies .
5S1
i " 'ogenng
Campus Health Costs Rise
KALAMAZOO, Ml (CPS) �
Health center fees on the nation's
campuses arc about to go up, col-
lege health officials across the na-
tion say.
Students at Western Michigan
I niversity, foi example, are pa
ing higher health, center fees this
semester because WMU's in-
surance company wanted to
charge the school $500,000 more
than last year for malpractice in-
sist a nee.
hhough no one has evei ac
cused WMU ol medical malprac-
tice and collegiate malpractice
suits are rare, experts sa
students nationwide soon will
share WMU's misfortune. I he
also predict main campus health-
care facilities will be cutting pro
tms ovei the next few years.
Wh Skyrocketing malprac-
tice insurance rates are affecting
campu-es for the first time tins
yeai. experts explain.
"Where student health centers
have been insulated up to now
from the increase in malpractice
rates, they won't be anymore
sas Steve Blom, director of the
American College Health
Association.
Adds Eugene Marquardt,
president of the University Risk
Managers Association, "If we
can't get it resolved, institutions
will be forced to cut back on
training and health-care treat-
ment. They just will not be in any
position to take chances
Many large schools with
medical training facilities already
have been unable to buy enough
malpractice insurance. Com-
panies are refusing to offer in-
surance in some cases because of
increasingly large court awards to
patients who claim they have
received improper or poor treat-
ment.
In response, college risk
managers across the country cur-
rently are drafting plans to insure
themselves.
Marquardt is confident that,
b adopting new tactics, most
schools will be able to keep their
health-service or medical training
programs going, but it may cost
students more.
He thinks the current insurance
crisis is as severe as any that has
confronted colleges since the
1960s, when student riots sent
property insurance rates through
the roof.
"This crisis has come on
faster, and gone deeper, than
most we've faced Marquardt
says.
Medical malpractice insurance
premiums are increasing as much
as four-fold in less than a year.
Campus insurance rates had
been rising more slowly because
students health centers do not
prov ide the kinds o health care -
such as surgery - that most fre-
quently trigger malpractice
claims.
Moreover, campuses haven't
had main malpractice claims fil-
ed against them.
Nevertheless, campus health
officials sa it's onK a matter of
time before higher malpractice
rates catch up with them.
"1 sense the insurance industry
is saying 'We've got to do
something about these losses
and universities are being swept
up in that concern along with
everybody else Blom says
"1 don't think we're being
singled out says John Hunger-
ford, assistant director of aux-
iliary enterprises at Western
Michigan. "It's applying to all
health-care providers
Michigan schools are among
the first to be notified of substan
tial increases in medical malprat
tice rates because court awards
are particularly high in that state,
as they are in New York and
California.
At Western, the cost of $20
million worth of coverage would
have increased July 1 from
$87,000 to $591,000. University
officials decided to reduce their
coverage and purchased a policy
for $211,000.
Stress Plays Large
Part With Students
� Continued From Page 1.
"By March, students who have
more vested in alcohol or drugs
aren't very interested in school.
Students who ate not achieving
academically by March are trying
to achieve socially, later in the
vear, the student does what he
has succeeded in, whether it be
academics or social situations
Ball said.
I he pressure oi finding a job
hits in April, according to the
calendar. Underclassmen feel
stress when having to decide on
majors and complete pre-
registration lor the next semester
According to Fish, the overall
dynamics of time management
greatly affect the amount oi
stress a student feels. "Pro
gressive sequential planning
relieves or minimizes anxiety
stress said Fish.
"All stress is not bad a
ding to Ball. "A little stress tends
to push students to achieve
more
I he ECU C ounseling Center is
available to students having dif-
ficulties coping with the stress
and pressures of college life. I he
Counseling Center is located in
the Wright Annex. Hours are 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
Read The Classifieds
College Degrees Earn More Respect
W ASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
College degrees are worth n
to male students now than at any
time since the 1960s, the authors
oi a new United States Census
Bureau vtud sav
rhe studv, bv analysts in the
bureau's Department for
Demographic Studies, says as oi
1983, male college graduates
could expect to earn 39 percent
more than men who quit school
: high scho
Male college students'
n iv edge over high school
s declined dutmg the 1970s.
In 1969. male college grads made
ei cent more tha school
ids. In 1979, . fference was
21 percent.
By 198 ad been
reversed. Tie economic edge was
34 percent thai vear.
I he studv Joes not include
tie c ol 1 e g e
es
I he bureau's analysts attribute
the decline and subsequent in-
crease in the value of a degree to
md passage oi
"Baby Boom" generation
through college.
The larger the college
graduating class, the less valuable
a college degree is in the market
place.
Among other conclusions the
analysts found:
�Even states with low levels ol
educational attainment are im-
proving. In 1950. 19 percent oi
South Carolina's aduhs had
graduated from college, com-
pared to 49 percent of Utah's. Bv
19 80, the e x t r em es wer e
represented by Kentucky (53 per-
cent) and Alaska (83 percen
�Black students' graduation rale,
which was 65 percent oi that oi
w lutes in 1940. improved to 96
percent bv 1980.
� I hirl v -two percent oi the
American population has at leas
some college education. Bv com-
parison, 17 percent of hast Ger-
many's, 16 percent oi Sweden's
and percent oi Hungary's
populations have some higher
education.
�In 1940, 38 percent of
Americans at least 29 years old
had a high school diploma, and 6
percent had a college degree. To-
day. 86 percent have a high previously published data,
school diploma and 22 percent a although some new information
college degree. from the National Center tor
Education Statistics was also us
The study relied primarily on ed.
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
Lg. Drink $2.89
al Greenville StQfes Only
Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd 756 6434
2905 E 5th ST 752 5184
CONTACT LENSES
5105.00 DAILY WEAR
$ 145.00 EXTENDED WEAR
- . - ��� jms let ses : jre kit and 1 jj � ��,���
Jenf N �-�� to, . � ippfy
I
OPrOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�C�NTCR
Dr Peter W Hollis
OD
PA
Fhe Fipton Annex
228 Greenville Blvd
-
reenville NC 27834
(OlsT) 756-9404
h.uvkwviVl
CLIFF'S fm�
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
W ashington Highway (N C 33 ExtGreenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Pas! RnerbluffApts.)
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buv Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
S All Transactions Confidential -�$
752-0322
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Slv? Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost Pregnanc Test, Birth Controi. and
Problem Pregnanc Counseling. For further
information call 832-0535 (Toil Free Number
1 800-532 5384) between 9 AM and ! P M
weekdays
tILDQH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
tl7W�tMo90fiSt.
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
KftKsX?K?s5a�5�
SHOE OUTLET
Name Brand S hoes
At DiscountPrices
i
THE
DINNER
PLACE
4 p.m10 p.m.
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
$10 to $20
$10 to $20
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
$1288 to $15.88
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $39.88
12 Block off Evans Street
Monday & Tuesday Night
Fried Shrimp� All You Can Eat $4.50
Wednesday Nigh t
Scallops & Soft Shell Crab Combo $4.50
Thursday Night
Cubbies Cheese Steak $2.50
Friday Night
Cubbies Shrimp Burger $1.50
Daily Special
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00
Hambu rger & French Fries $1.00
Hours:
10:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m.
7 Days A Week
Corner of 5th and Evans Street
Phone: 752-6497








2U?e East ffiarolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
MlKF LUDWK k. stEhio.
Scott Ccxper, v-
John Shannon, amwu
Lorin Pasquai . i �
DeChanhi Johnson, ,�
Tom Norton, rrmmrfM,�m,
JAi olCr W iinagint h.ditor
IOM LUVENDER, �,� ����,
Anthony Martin, Bums !�����
John PETERSON, mnnp
Shannon SHORT, product Ham
Di bbu Stevens, s�
Noember 12, s8.
Ohm o
Pae 4
COMRAPe,Q(JlCK(,lNg�C
S0M6H61R
AfO,NO�, I WISH TOP6F5C7
Acid Rain
7V.C Suffering Effects
The November 8 � 21 issue of
771? Independent, an alternative bi-
weekly newspaper based in
Durham, North Carolina, featured
an article on the acid rain problem
that is currently facing this state. In
the article writer Barry Yeoman
remarked: "When we talk about
acid rain we're talking about more
than dead trees. We're talking
about the deaths of entire
ecological worlds
What Yeoman is referring to is
the fact that acid rain is responsible
for more than defoliated and dying
trees. It is, of course, tragic and sad
that a small forest of red spruces
and Fraser firs, only 72,(XX) acres in
size and completely out of place in
North Carolina, is dying. (Such
evergreens are usually found in
subarctic Canada, but the spruce-
fir ecosystem has survived in the
Blue Ridge and Great Smokies since
the Ice Age due to high altitudes
and heavy cloud cover.) But such
mute tragedies tend to get lost in the
bottom line preoccupied twentieth
century. So, what is really impor-
tant to realize is that acid rain
threateas marine life, regional
economies and communities as well
as trees.
For example, according to Dr.
Jack Durham, acid rain program
manager at the Environmental Pro
tection .Agency's Research Triangle
Park facility, there is increasing
evidence that the effects of acid rain
might spread to lowland commer-
cial forests. Within this region.
North Carolina ranks first in timber
products and third in paper, accor-
ding to Business: North Carolina
magazine. More than 55,(XX) North
Carolinians are employed in these
two industries. Moreover, as Lt
Governor Bob Jordan has pointed
out, acid rain also threatens proper-
ty values since land that cannot
grow trees is worth little.
Acid rain threatens marine life in
two ways. First, as trees die off and
others fail to grow at all or fail to
mature quickly enough to take trie
place of dying trees, soil erosion
results. Because of erosion, streams
become contaminated with silt and
fish die. Secondly, the acidity of tie
rain water itself may harm fish
And finally, because of its acidity,
the rain can wear down soil arid
rocks, releasing toxic metals into
the water. According to a report by
the National Wildlife Federation
"Acid rain may increase weathering
of Anakeesta rock formations in
Smokey Mountain National Park
releasing iron-pyrite, aluminum,
zinc and killing acquatic life The
same report states that "small-
mouth bass in the Lake Chatuge
reservoir, bordering Georgia and
North Carolina, have skeletal
deformities caused by aluminum
toxicity
The ultimate outcome of this
process of water contamination
may be that groundwater which
people depend upon will become
poisoned, making necessar) tie
construction of expensive water
treatment plants. Even bet ore such
plants are constructed main
citizens could suffer the effects rf
drinking contaminated water.
Since acid rain is a by-product of
sulfer dioxide and nitrogen oxides,
which are released into the at-
mosphere by power plants, fac-
tories and automobiles, it is an
outgrowth of the industrial age
Thus scientists claim that the red
legal remedies for acid rain are laws
that would control a whole variety
of pollutants and laws that would
begin to wean us from fossil fuels
Yet, utilities, energy producers and
their friends in Congress have
resisted efforts to tighten emmis-
sion standards. That makes the
Acid Rain Control Act of 1985,
which is presently being considered
by congress, a particularly impor-
tant peice of legislation. Though
Jim Br oy h i 11, the veteran
Republican now vying for Senatcr
John East's seat will be sure to op-
pose that bill, as he was singled out
by the National Clean Air Coalition
for consistently opposing acid rain
controls, North Carolinians should
make their views known to other
congressmen.They should do so by
writing letters urging them to sup-
port strong acid rain legislation.
WHAT? W Fg&SlCK
ANP WANT SOME KELP?
A RSH TO PlSSeCT
PONTW0RRVIMN0T
TAPNG THS5E
WSCUSSlOIUS;

f
I
J
"SBORPFffSWirc
V
Campus Forum
A Poor And JoblessKind of Blues
This is a thank-you letter to all
those who. m hte, would do! hire me
because of lack of experience. It is
meant to thank you tor putting me
where I am today - in an early grave. I
always tned and wanted to he a
honesi man. And. as such, I do not
trv to condone what I did. Yini know
m kids. And chances are that thev
even pla with our kids. In your
eyes, they are probabl) jusi like other
kids.
Oh, hut I wish 1 could have lived to
see them grow up. But such is not ihe
case. Foi I looked high and
work, hut all ot you, who were hir-
ing, said that you could not affoi
tram someone. 1 even applied tor
public aid. Hut ass. to the la
cutbacks, we did not qualify. So I
kept on looking for work. Bui
you gave me the same lame excuses.
Bui while I kept Irving to support mv
family and kept looking tor work.
our tood supply ran out. I tned to ex-
plain to my children that "daddy"
couldn't find any work. But how do
you explain to vour children that
there simplv is no work and no food.
OH! How do you look at vour
children dav after day, watching them
go hungrv, and noi cry yourself to
sleep Or lav awake worrying? Even
though I knew that I'd get caught, ot
worse. I finall) broke down. I sold
what tew personal possessions 1 own-
ed at a pawn shop and, with part ol
the money, 1 bought a small han-
dgun. With the rest. bought a tew
groceries and a bottle of "liquid
courage" - just cheap whiskey. Foi 1
knew that tor what I had to do
tonight, I would need it. So after din-
ner 1 kissed m wife and kids. I knew
that after what I had to do. I might
never return.
I drove into the night. I drove to
the nearest liquor store. I pulled out
mv gun Mid told the clei I
nisi a kid, " Ihis is a i
He vailed the cops aft
boui hall way hkvk,
cops caught up wit
mv gun Bui before I knew
pened, I heard a si ol -
v chest. I
thr . heart, and I was
�� ' Mood' Dead'
But how could � be?! I
till have a familv
� a te to live 1
take. Ican'i be dead! Bui bel
you a qu i You wl
. ' trail mv
How is it i

have enough to waste on taxes
welfa
counterprod
lot mote sense to spend thai a
amount on training and make pei
more productive?
Harrv Fai
eenville Reside
Graffiti
Graffiti is an important ;
culture, literature and persoi i
It allows Us to voice our opini
hear others relieve frustrate
entertain, etc.
But please' Have the decency and
sound mind to leave it in the stacks
and stop usmg it destructively.
example, don't put n on "art work
You know what I am talki ut -
the sculpture in iron: of the
building. If someone sees your face
someday and doesn't like it. should
he or she write on if.1
Jeaneen Linebergei
Senior-Bioloc v
Think

wii

I � � .
D
k t
ed?
II
� �
1 u.
DO YOl I HINK
N o i
Forum Rules
� s Building, j. �� ��
tran 'oyner Libt
f or purposes oj ven h
nclude the nan
cation, . , phom
- ivnature oj the auth
urt- limited to tw
double-spaced or neatly prin i
letters are subject to editit
ty, obscemtv and libel,
attacks will be permute
faculty and staff writing letter
page are ren
to ry five issues
Abortion: What Is God's View On Life?
By MICHAEL GARDNER
At the end of my last article. Abor-
tion Seen As War On The Unborn
(Thursday, October 24, 1985), I sug-
gested that everyone ask him or herself
the question, "What is God's view on
abortion?" I will be addressing this
question today as it would pertain to the
Christian.
What is a Christian, you may ask? A
Christian is an individual who is born-
again of the spirit through his faith in
Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior.
A Christian is also an individual who
believes in the inherent truth of the
Word of God, not someone who picks
and chooses certain items from The Bi-
ble to believe in and disgards the rest.
Hopefully, this article will enable both
Christians and non-Christians to better
understand the moral elements of God's
perspective on the issue of abortion.
First, though, I would like to review
some prominent questions, which have
been used to justify abortion. Then I
will proceed with "God's view" on
abortion.
Question .Does The Bible take a
stand on a woman who's pregnant and
whose unborn baby develops complica-
tions that most likely would lead to
deformity or retardation? The Bible
doesn't change because a baby might be
born with a handicap. What about the
deformities that are not detected before
birth � should these babies be killed in
the delivery room? If we can abort the
defective unborn child, why not just kill
the defective newborn child Where is
the line drawn?
"If we choose to extinguish anyone
who is imperfect, we need to ask
ourselves two significant questions: 1)
Just how perfect does one need to be
before he or she is allowed to live? 2)
Who will have the power to make these
decisions? Does anyone have the right
to play God? (Last Davs Newsletter,
1983)
According to the Bible, in Exodus
4:11, "Who has made man's mouth? Or
who makes him dumb or deaf, or seeing
or blind? Is it not I, the Lord?"
Question 2: If a woman became preg-
nant by rape, what would God want her
to do?
First of all, rape practically never results
in pregnancy, due to all the trauma in-
volved. But if pregnancy should occur,
the woman needs loving support and
assistance, not added guilt from an
abortion. Justice seems warped when an
innocent child is killed for the crime of
its father. Two wrongs never make a
right. Not only would God enable the
woman to forgive the father, but he
would enable her to have a real love for
her child. "If you found out tommor-
row that you were the product of a
rape- would you wish that your mother
had aborted you? (Last Days Newslet-
ter, 1983)
Question 3: Isn't an unborn child
simply a wad of cells that adheres to the
wall of a uterus? An unborn baby is a
unique individual with his or her own
distinct set of chromosomes- different
from any part o' the mother. I he child
has its own blood supplv. and the
child's blood type mav even be different
from the mother's. The child can also
be of the opposite sex from the mother.
"Jesus taught that anyone in distress
is our neighbor, and we must come to
his aid (Luke 10:30-37). Let's do all we
can to help the mother without exter-
minating her baby (Last Days News
letter, 1983)
Question 4: Isn 't legally preventing a
woman from having an abortion an in-
vasion of her privacy? The laws here in
the United States are somewhat
peculiar. They allow police to enter the
privacy of people's houses to stop them
from beating and abusing their
children, and then they use the same
"force of law" to guarantee the
"privacy and right" of would-be
parents to destroy their unborn babies.
If you think about it, "almost all crime
is done in private (i.e murder, theft,
kidnapping, rape, etc.). Does this mean
that if we know it's going on, we turn
our heads and look the other way, so as
not to invade anyone's right to privacy?
Of course not (Last Days Newsletter,
1983)" Abortion is murder, plain and
simple.
Question 5:Should we make abortions
illegal if people will continue to get
them anyway? Yes. Abortions will con-
tinue but not in such high numbers.
"Rape also goes on in spite of our laws-
-should it no longer be a crime? Or
would we spend tax money to buy the
rapist a gc,x.xi clean hotel room to com-
mit his crime inAfter all. 'he is going
to rape people anyway (last Davs
Newsletter. 1983)"
In light o the preceding questions.
let's examine God's view on the aboi
tion issue, according to His Word, in
The Bible.
What happens when a woman becomes
pregnant? Psalm 139:13-14 states, "lor
Thou (God) didst form my inward
parts; Thou didst weave me in my
mother's womb. I will give thanks to
Thee, for I am fearfully and wonderful-
ly made. Wonderful are all Thv works,
and my soul knows it very well
Who grows within the mother? Psalm
139:15-16 describes King David's
prenatal development, stating "Mv
frame was not hidden from Thee (God),
when 1 was made in secret (womb), and
skillfully wrought in the depths of the
earth. Thine eyes have seen mv unform-
ed substance; and in thy book, they
were all written, the days that were or-
dained for me, when as yet there was
not one of them
Therefore, "a human being exists
when God creates him, not at some later
point when he has grown to look like a
newborn or has taken his first breath of
air. God creates human beings at con-
ception (Abortion and Psalm 139,
Christian Action Council) Other
relative verses include Psalm 51:5, Job
3:3 and Matthew 1:18-20.
There are many examples to choose
from in The Bible where God knew a
person before he was born. For in-
stance, God knew Jeremiah whe:
was in his mother's womb; God sa
tified him and ordained him to be a
phet. Jeremiah 1:4-5 states. "Now
Word of the lord came
savingBefore I (God) formed
the womb, I knew you. and before
were born I consecrated you; 1 have ap
pointed you a prophet to the nations
The Bible reveals that John the Bap
tisl was "filled w,th the Holj Spirit,
while yet in his mother's womb (I uke
1:15)
Finally, the most significant example
is stated in Luke 1:31-33 when the at
Gabriel announced to Mary. "Behold.
you will conceive in vour womb and
bear a son, and you shall name Him
lesus He will be great, and will be call-
ed the Son ot the Most High and His
Kingdom will have no end
So vou see. Cod doesn't wail until a
child can hve and move outside the
mother's womb, before He knows �.
hnes it. treats it like a unique human
being.
Onlv God has the right to decide
whether a child lives or dies
(Deuteronomy 32:39). not the parents,
the doctors, or the courts. I prav that
everyone who reads this article will
come to some understanding about
God's view on abortion. "Please trv to
imagine God's grief. He sees it all, vou
know. I wonder if He didn't think a
mother's womb was the safest, most
loving place in the world for a little
baby to be nurtured and protected.
Colleg
HEALTt
COLUf1
I h,

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I he I
Fines Ca
B IKU (, Ht)H Rsii

New Prog
1 South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
5
7S-3t23 bfi
J10
"Mi � � Ig
Joke's On Usg

4





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER C 185
IrSDMEK&P?
� I

id of Blues
Ihink!
a
Forum Rules
u.
en-
n, all let-
. r and
. her
I etters
pages,
ed. All

ienis,
. re iimited
n Life?

anc-
pro-
-the
me
u in
.an-
��l
Bap-
Dther's w 1 Luke
ignificantexample
the angel �Behold, mb and
and all name Him
nd wi11 be call-
v f �. and His
(j"d doesn't wait until a
e and move outside the
before He knows it,
uke a unique human
has the right to decide
ether a child lives or dies
(Deuteronomy 32:39), not the parents,
the doctors, or the courts. I pray that
everyone who reads this article will
ne to some understanding about
� lew on abortion. "Please try to
imagine God's grief. He sees it all, you
know. I wonder if He didn't think a
mother's womb was the safest, most
loving place in the world for a little
babv to be nurtured and protected.
Colleges Say Prosperity Here For Schools
(CPS) Mosf college ad-
ministrators think then schools
are on the brink of a more pro-
sperous era. but thev ptedict
students will pa) foi it by paying
;ven higha tuition over the next
few years.
In a survey bv a group called
Higha Education Panel, a
najoritj ot administrators think
he collegiate fiscal woes of tlu
�asl decades from the hyper
nflation begun by the oil em-
bargo ol 1973 through the federal
budget cuts ol 1981 and the reces-
ol !s82 83 mav be draw-
to a close as legislatures give
re money to campuses and the
improved economy, makes il
ei foi schools to attract dona-
ns
But schools will have to raise
tuition for students anyway, the
respondents said.
To adequately fund private
colleges, for example, tuition will
probably have to rise 1.5 to two
percent faster than the inflation
rate, says Julianne Thrift of the
National Institute of Independent
Colleges arid Universities.
Public college administrators
also say tuition must increase
faster than inflation, although
not as rapidly as in the last four
years.
The reason is that "education
is labor intensive. Industry can
deploy technology to offset labor
costs explains James Buchhol.
a vice chancellor at Washington
University in St. linns, Mo.
Colleges also are trying to
catch up on construction projects
they've delayed since the hard
times began, and trying to im-
prove teacher salaries, which lag-
ged during the high inflation of
the 1970s and early 1980s, Thrift
says.
But Thrift is optimistic because
private colleges tend to do better
when the economy at large does
well.
"Our colleges tend to do very
well when parents have a rosy
outlook on the general economic
climate. Parents react to us like
they do blue chip investments
she observes.
I abor costs and erasing infla-
tion's effects are public school
issues as well, but the improving
� � � SlivStS � � �
the Health Column answers
student's questions and concerns
about health related problems.
Anyone who has a question they
would like answered, or a con-
cern they would like to have
clarified, send your question or
concern to the Health Column,
The East Carolinian, Publica-
tions Building, ECU.
What i stress, and how do I
know if 1 have it?
Stress i- youi body's response
demand. A certain amount
of stress may be helpful. A com
mon example of normal, useful
stress is that which helps you get
a paper written on time or by do-
ing well in a competition. loo
much stress can make you un-
comfortable and can shorten
your life. Common signs of stress
include aches, especially
headaches, neck aches, and back
aches, "nervous stomach diar-
rhea, chesl pains, grouchiness.
eating and drinking too much ot
too little, inability to sit still or
concentrate, insomnia, and hav-
ing vague, inappropriate fears
about known or unknown events.
What can I do to reduce stress?
Sleep at least six to eight hours
a night; sleep is necessatv because
it helps the body restore itself.
Exercise, such as swimming, run-
ning and aerobics, reduces ten-
sion and increases mental alert-
ness. Diet influences your reac-
tion to stress; caffeine increases
feelings of anxiety. Cut down on
sugar, salt, alcohol, junk food
and caffeine.
More important, spend time
alone cacti day to give yourself a
chance to unwind and focus on
yourself. Use your friends as
sounding boards; sharing daily
experiences with them can be
relaxing and helpful at the same
lime.
Consider taking courses in time
management or stress reduction.
health of public colleges also
depends on how much money
their state legislatures give them.
Legislators in states which have
not participated fully in the
economic recovery may not be
able to appropriate as much
money as those in other states.
Last week, Nebraska
legislators, for example, debated
cutting state college budgets
drastically.
New Mexico's public campuses
are so broke that administrators
announced Oct. 23 that they
would no longer make counter
salary offers to faculty members
offered jobs by other schools.
State schools in Michigan and
Ohio have suffered from the
decline of the steel and
automobile industries. Loui-
siana, Texas, Alaska and
Oklahoma, robbed of tax
revenues bv the oil glut, cut their
state college budgets earlier this
year.
Moreover, "higher education
has more competition for state
funds" in all states, notes
Franklin Matsler of Illinois
State's Department of Higher
Lducation Administration, which
monitors state higher education
appropriations around the coun-
try.
Legislators are being pressured
to fund new prisons and ap-
propriate more money to com-
pensate for recent federal cuts in
programs for the poor and the
handicapped, he adds.
Nevertheless, administrators in
prospering states generally are
upbeat about their immediate
fiscal futures.
"We have really seen the
dawn notes Adrian Harris, a
vice chancellor at the University
of California at Los Angeles.
"We had about 17 years drought
beginning with Reagan's gover-
norship
"Under Edmund (Jerry)
Brown, we would be lucky to get
$7 million" for new construction
on all nine schools in the state's
university system, he recalls.
In the last two years, Califor-
nia Governor George Deukme-
jian has budgeted $300 million
for campus construction needs
"He really has covered the water-
front Harris says.
Next, Harris and other of-
ficials in the California university
system plan to ask the legislature
for more money for teaching
assistants.
But some planners remain
skeptical.
Even upbeat private college ad-
ministrators worry about the
deficit.
Fines Can Cause Problems
Bv DOl (, ROBLKM)N
Warning
have outstanding
1 (. I should vicar
immediately: otherwise.
records.
rhese holds will be removed
only after the student has fulfill-
ed his her obligation to the
university. More important,
unless the hold i removed, the
be able to pre- stujent cannot complete the pre-
registration process.
we money, such
overduelibrarv fines and park-
Anna Dougherty, assistant
university will head of circulation at Joyner
placed 'Mi their I ibrary, said students with over-
due books or unpaid fines should
contact the librarv immediately.
"It students have overdue
hooks, they won't be able to pre-
register she said.
Dougherty added that clearing
overdue books and unpaid fines
requites only a tew minutes but
can save time during pre-
registration.
New Program An Alternative
� $, we could experience ov
million new teaching iobs in this
and we simplv don't
people enrolled to
eplace ! hem
Another factor in the shortage
. ipates will be a rise in
�ol population which will
for a tew vears before
to the approximate
�odav
�-lt would be far cheaper to
provide this incentive said Co-
ble, "than it will be to pa to; the
consequences of a declining
teacher pool and the poor in-
struction that results
"The responsibility of schools
of education is to assume a
stronger position academically
and professionally to provide bet-
ter preparations of teachers
Coble said. "Our goal is to
become the very best possible and
to seek the best students - the
most committed, dedicated and
prepared
30-60 OFF
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Joke's On Us
Food Delivery Co.
Delivers For
fottfr fM fiHm.
CHMATOUM EXPRESS
Western Sizzlin
Call
Lunch 757-1973 '����
Monday -DRAFT & DRYER DAY
25$ Draft & 25P for 25
minutes on the Dryers
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DAY
Wash one load of clothes,
the 2nd wash is on us
Wednesday -SOAP & SUDS DAY
75$ Long neck bottle
beer and free soap
Specials Run All Day
Open 8 am - 12 am 7 days a week
2510 E 10th St Greenville, NC
Magozine-
The Minority Affairs Publication of East Carolina University
i.r. a, ric 00, NA JNIVEPSl
:�frVV! E NC I. rfL 55! �' � Sy
has pen ings for the following positions
Associate Editor
Adverti sing Representative
Applications will be available at Expressions Office or the
Media Board Secretary, 2nd floor, Publications Bldg.
Upcoming Events
Films Committee:
A Nos Amours
American Graffitti
The Breakfast Club
Travel Committee:
PARIS AND THE SEINE -
(Presented by Kathy Dusek inHendnx Theatre.
Recreation Comnittee:
Men's Billiards
Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 6 p.m.
Student Center Billiards Room
Turkey Shoot In Bowling
Thursday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m.
Student Center Bowling Alley
Minority Arts Committee:
International Week
Nov. 17 through Nov. 21
The Underground
For Lunch
Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m
Rock wo rid Videos
Thursdays at 1:30 p.m.
Movie Shorts
Wednesday, Nov. 13
8:00 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 14
7&9p.m.
Fri. & Sat.
Nov. 15 & 16
at7&9p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 19
8 p.m.
Special
JAMAICAN EVENING
Featuring "The Amateurs"
Serving non-alcoholic "mocktails"
While They Last!
November 14, 8-10 p.m.

it
OUT
gathering place
Ground Floor, Mendenhall
, Mft
.





THE EAST CAROIINIAN
Entertainment
I)ooiH'st)ur
NO I MHt-K 12, 1985
Page
Larry
Linville At ECU
ByWARRFN BAkfR
and
JSFF CHESTER
�Muff nlrr
This interview with i arr I
ville was broadcast by .
radio station. H ZMB 1 �
view was i ondm ted
Chester, All material in :�
cle may not be rebroadt.
stared in a storage bin, stuj
witt � vt n out ! pro.
lion fur into proportion I
matter, sauteed with garlic
sauce, or judged to bt moronic
without express written
telepathic permission fro
somebody whose name escapes us
at this time, hut we're sure the
person is important.
Jeff ChestertSo whal arc you do-
ing nowadays?
l.arry linvillerEverything.
university thing turned into an
explosion, so I'm having to do
those, plus plays, and I think 1
have four day1- off till the end of
August. It's been one helluva
schedule.
i
MASH '
I 1 :M
i �
R .
MASH
New :�
places, issembled
show. There were a
pie experienced in doing c
because with
1 xcepi the crew,
lls ice, and
:ai make them laugh, because
� ve seen everything,
know you're really fui
J.CV.The character, Fra
B ii ns did you come up with
oi was it in the
plo
L.L.tl had to. We couldn't do
anything that was done in the
ion picture because of pro
gram practices and the censoi
and a that. It had to
mpJetel recreated, bin
!
with the show .
� I
: t
ive to
igain;
' � e names
the basic
else was
�!�( "Wl ai fa orite
" 1 SH '
1 .1 1 Soi mes You
Heai th� Bullei " ! � at's the one
where Hawkeye's friend, who's
ei Haw keye, kisses
Henry Blake mouth, in-
king his hand. I
mean, he's a real lunatic, very
funny. But he's writing a novel
ab the social pom: of view
from the trenches, and he winds
Lip dead on Hawkeye's table.
And that all sounds very grim,
but you find out the picture was
nny. And it was the
perfeel blend ol comedy and
drama and, probably, sheer ter-
ror, which was the thing we were
aftei � me. Gel that blend.
thai mix; and we got close to ii
several times. But with that one.
we hit it dedd on.
J.C.rWh) did you leave MASH?
1 1 �'� I hat's a novel. It's a long
r with a lot ol tributing
factors. Basically, fundamental-
ly, i! was really the tact that the
portrait oi frank Bums was
ie. I: was finished. It was just
time to move on and do other
things.
I hat gives you a career. Other-
wise, you can ride some hot, fast
thing tor live or ten years, at the
max. Unless you've had superb
investment counselors up to that
point, you wmd up not being able
to live the rest oi your life or
retire irrespective oi superstitions
surrounding success on televi-
sion. Some oi the ex-so-called
'television stars' are now poun-
ding nails or working in kitchens
and restaurants which is
something I didn't want to do. I
enjoy acting, so I made some
choices to have a career with
some longevity. Thankfully, it's
working out.
Math Column Debuts
By WIL RAYMOND
and
Staff Reports
Complex mathematical
systems elude visual intuition
when described in purely tradi-
tional symbolic terms. See fig. I.
It is clear that the formula
represents the picture.
Often a fundamentally in-
teresting process is occluded by
stultifying terminology. Yet, if
the process can be explained in a
succinct manner, in a diagram
perhaps, the difficulty in perceiv-
ing the nature of the process
melts away.
A case in point: In the third
grade, I came upon a unique
mathematical problem which was
compreheasible to me visually,
yet whose general aspects I can
only now enjoy.
Take a pencil. Trace fig. 2
without lifting the pencil and
(here is the difficult restraint)
without tracing over the same line
twice.
What? Impossible!
Now, create a house from fig.
2 (This was the original
tmework of the problem).
I race through fig, 3. Visual intui-
tion, as a trial-and-error method,
may solve the problem. But what
about solving the general case'
Through what figures can one
trace such a path?
Graph theory, initiated bv
Ueonhard Euler in 1736, can
determine which figures or
graphs one can trace a line
through without lifting the pencil
or tracing the same line twice.
These paths are called Eulerian
trails, in honor oi Euler.
A graph consists oi two classes
of mathematical objects: venues
and edges. Edges connect vertices
to form figures. For example, a
square has four vertices, one at
each corner, and four edges.
Notice: a path can be traced
around the square without lifting
the pencil. Therefore, the square
has a Eulerian trail. There are
several graphs which have four
vertices and varying numbers of
edges (fig. 4). If a graph has a
Eulerian path, its two basic com-
ponents, vertices and edges, must
satisfy various criteria. What
criteria?
Each vertex must have an edge
attached to it (i.e. there are no
isolated vertices)
Therefore, a graph with four
vertices must have at least three
edges. Note: the maximum
number oi edges connecting four
vertices is M (as in fig. 2). Try
calculating the general rule for
determining the maximum
number ol edges connecting any
number oi vertices.
The degree oi a vertex is the
number oi edges connected to it.
I he square's vertices each have
degree two. figure 2 has four ver-
tices with degree three. Figure 3
has one vertex with degree two
(the peak ot the roof), two with
degree tour (the upper corners),
and two with degree three.
W hat can t he degree of a vertex
tell about the possibility of there
being a Eulerian trail in a graph?
If a vertex has degree one, then
one can only begin or end tracing
at this point. If a vertex has
degree two, then one can ap-
proach along one edge and leave
along the other. There are two
choices as to which edge one
picks.
Finally, a vertex with degree
three presents the most choices of
movement. One can approach
along one edge, leave by another,
but, obviously must (to trace all
edges) finally return along the
odd edge. The case is similar
when one begins by leaving a
vertex of degree three.
Try determining the number of
vertices with degree one, two or
three that can be used to con-
struct a graph with Eulerian trail.
Use three or less of each degree
vertex. Experiment with various
combinations. Can a general rule
be manufactured which will
delineate what graphs have
Eulerian trails?
As a final hint, the initial
motivation for Euler's investiga-
tions, as related by Bela Bollobus
in his Graph Theory, involved the
puzzle of Konigsberg. the
seven bridges on the Pregel, in
the ancient city of Konigsberg
(fig. 5). Could anyone walk
across the bridges so that he
would cross each one once and
only once?"
The answer, no.
llllilllllllUllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiniMHHHMtl
"Amateur" Night
A t Underground
By DAY II) McGINN ESS
M.ff Wrilrt
122L422J222. EL�llKaican Night Thursday
MASH's Frank Burns Speaks
Recently the Greenville 1(1
:ji community has been exposed to
x something it rarely gets more
� than a taste of � reggae music.
On Oct. 27, the Awareness Ait
Ensemble plaved on the patio at
jtj Mendenhall before a crowd id
about 400. Their fluid brand ot
g reggae was both danceable and
"jammin Vocals, guitar, bass
and keyboard showed excellent
:j: speed and dextent v. while keep
�;� mg a smooth and mellow quality.
iji This Thursday, Mendenhall
:�; will sponsor some more ol the
J area's finesi reggae. The Student
jjj Union Coffee Houseomm
j: will hold "Jamaican Night" in
:j The Underground (formerly the
ji Coffee House) a! 8 p.m teatur
y mg Greenville's rock and re.
. band "The Amateurs Admis
� sion will cost SI at the door.
�: In addition, a bartend;
:the Fast Carolina Bartending
j: School will be on hand mi �
:� non-alcohohc beverages
�: I he Amateurs' style ino I
: porates Jamaican reggae i
:with a decidedly American in-
fluence. Their reperti
: from S ant ana to M
� Chuck Berry
Each member
: seems to be doing his
j but at the same time I
� to the band's
I ach musician eontrib ite
concept, but the whole i?
than the sum ot its pa
Shep, the lead singer,
r'er and audiena
plays his drums as though they
were alive, slidin inds
across, pounding a rim-shot i
then leaping into the ail as
crowd goes nu
Mike, the lead guitarist, piays
with a style reminiscent of Carlos
Santana and leaves the audience
breathless. At one show, a man's
law drops as he mumbles. 'Fle's
playing a run tor two minutes us-
ing alternating sevenths In
other words, his girlfriend adds,
"his ass is jammin
Bassist I arrv Graham plays
with a laid-back, easy-going style
that contrasts with and yet com-
plements the high energy Mike-
and shep display. When he leans
back, closes his eyes and begins
jam, one gets the impre
:ou!d do it on one , the
k Perhaps the word that best
describes him is "cool The con-
styles reminds one : wal
1 ntwhistle play
Pete Fownshend.
Craig Gonway, the Amateurs'
drummer, has a style that ra:
m a powerful driving force
more rock oriented material
a back-beat in the reg-
ic H percussion blends
well with Shep's congas
With the addition ol kcyboar-
Debbie Goodwin, the
ateurs' sound has gained a
re full and rounded texture.
uses synthesizers to broaden
mic range
the band's
d ignite its
-� Its members fuse dif-
ng new
surpasses a
De . viduality pre-
Vmateurs don't com-
� - �� with the sole
tig beautiful
mus pleases theii audience
Honors Program Strong
B CIA 1)1 UIHKIll
The reputation of any urn.
ty is based upon its academic
gram and the accomplishmen
its graduates. These are two. im-
portant things that businesses.
employers and graduate schools
all look a: when recruiting new
graduates. A driving force behind
E I 's increasing academic
reputation is the honors pro-
gram, directed bv Dr. David
Sanders.
Begun about 20 years ago when
several students got together to
discuss great books with pro
fessors even though they didn't
get credit for it. the honors pro-
gram has grown to be an impor-
tant part oi FCC. In the late
1960s, oie honors seminar was
offered for credit. Since then, the
program has grown, even surviv-
ing being disbanded in the
because oi a lack
nors seminars are m-
lisciplinary (they can satisfy
G( requirements in various
areas) and are team taught. They
are at the heart of the honors pro-
m, and five seminars are being
ottered lor the spring semester.
In "What's All This buss
About Humanism?" students
Uil !r to determine why
humanism is being considered
somewhat controversial during
the '80s Both sides oi the
liu-nanism issue will be discussed,
so that students can form their
beliefs on the issue.
"Masculinity Femimnitv: New
Perspectives" is a course design-
ed to shed new light on the socio-
biological factors that influence
gender strategies and roles.
rare opportunity exists this
vear in "Astronomy: In Celebra-
see SEMINARS, Page 7
X A
fig. 1
X2AXfA -X-�A
r : :
f�g, 4
Four Legitimate Graphs
Fig. 2
i
2)
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Fig. ,
Fig. 3
That's How You Do It!
A" rt
1

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Man-O-Stick
:
-�����
Tooth
Overkill
Seminars Of
Continued from Pa;t
ol H;
program I
the
ow n solar sv - .
axies (
the firs- ;
register
Mosi -
once, so if there's a ;
want to take, do-
being offered
semester
According to D
eligible studer e with
grade point av
invitations - h be afraid
of taking honors classes. He
the classes �facilitate actual lear-
ning insfead of harder work" and
that "many people make higher
grades in honor classes than tl (
do in regular ones "
Some believe the honors pro-
gram is not oniv boosting the
I
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Bur

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Fig. "
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JAY LENO
Comedy For The Eighties!
Monday, November 25
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students & Guest: $1.50
AMAl s
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ECU FacultyStaff and Dependents:
Public and at Door: $4.00






















Tickets available Monday through Friday from J
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall StudentCenter. Phone 757-6166, ?
ext. 266 for more info.
Sponsored by the Studmt Union Special Events
Committee


m
Yfan-O-Stiek h jarrell & johnson ��. �
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By
BROOKS

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Overkill
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Bv PAUL FR1EDRICH
. A
p. FvrrSTjc! -flu Wofj
ftt�-R(fRte. j
10 Draft "All Rite
& Sigma Tau Gamma
Presen ts
DRAFT NITE
Iwednesdav, November 13, 1985 9:00-1:00 A.M.
Admission SI.50 Guys Sl.OOLadiesj
n & Try : ni. With Our Music-Back GuaraiT' �
-RISK
m;(mi)s
Seminars Offer Rare Opportunity
( ontinued from Pant' 6
fit
� K L il
pre-
� � rsc you
ike don'l couni on il
offered the follow
i ai any other time.
linj to i �� Zanders.
ble students (those with 3 4
le point averages or better oi
r ons) should not be afraid
onors classes. He says
lasse fa ilitate actual lear-
j instead of harder work" and
"many people make higher
trades in honor classes than they
in regular ones
Some believe the honors pro
,1 only boosting the
university's reputation, but is
becoming known nationwide as a
superior program. I hose in the
program state the standards foi
admissions are highei than at
most universities, and the
number ol students involved as a
percentage of the total student
population is highei than the na-
tional average. Also, the
anization is a member of the
National Collegiate Honors
C ouncil (NCHC). One formei
member of the organization,
Rick Atkinson, recently won a
Pulitzer Prize tor journalism.
I he honors program is not on
ly concerned with academics,
though. The last C arolina
Honors Organization tic HO) is
an offshot oi the program aimed
at "bringing students together
socially outside the classroom
according to its president Brian
Burke
1 CHO is just reallv getting
under way this year, even though
it has been officially chartered
tor five years. Nevertheless, the
organization is already
recruiting, remodeling the honors
lounge and planning to host the
1987 state convention of the
NCHC. Burke said future plans
include starting ECHO programs
that affect all ECU students
He'd also like to increase the
number of honors students pai
ticipating in the ECHO.
With the increase in national
attention that the honors p
gram is earning Brian Burke is
running Ux one oi three student
spots on the national executive
council Ol the M H( �it can do
nothing but get better and
enhance tiie image oi the whole
school, members say. If eligible,
you can be a pan oi this group h
simply signing up for an honors
course.
OUR
"NO RISK
GUARANTEE
MARILUON
MISPLACEI HILDHOOD
� � � -


Satisfaction
Guaranteed!
On Sale Throi
KATI BUSH
HOUNPS OF L �VI

SALE
$5.99Each
Cassette or LP
cn
Tl � 'Ifl
Record Bar
THE PLAZA � CAROLINA EAST AAALL
a�
vtsa






IHt t S i AKOI IN1AN
Sports
S(!l MHt K 12, lyx- I'dr '
Fullwood Steals Siow
Junior tailback Brent Fullwood led Auhumwit h 153 yards rushing and
three touchdowns for the 14th-ranked Vtir Ka gles
By SCOTT COOPER
Backup tailback B r e n I
Fullwood rushed tor 153 yards
and three touchdowns on 14 car-
ries as No. 14 Auburn defeated
ECU on their homecoming
weekend.
Fullwood, a junior from Si.
C loud, Ha tilled in lor a slightly
injured Heisman candidate Bo
Jackson. Fullwood lead a potent
Auburn rushing attack (3rd in the
nation, 342.4 yards per game)
that netted 310 vards, compared
to 181 for the Pirates.
After ECU elected to kKkott,
Auburn began on their own 20
vard line. After three first downs
by I he War Eagles, the Buc
defense stiffened as strong safet)
Vernard Wynn and linebacket
Bubba Waters dropped AI
quarterback Pat Washington for
a five-yard loss. With 9:IK left in
the first period, Al "s Colbert
punted into the endone.
The Pirates managed a first
down on a 10-yard pass from
Darrell Speed to spin end loin
Smith. Freshman punter Tim
Wolter than boomed a 60-yard
punt, which was downed on the
War Wagle one-yard line.
�l got a quick first down deep
No. 14 Auburn Tops Bucs
li!?P'R m ,hc!r llu" 't110 Ihen, cored the process, forcing a Chris 19-yard held.
Washington appeared to com- KnaPP field-coal attemnt of K War lay; 14 :
in their own territory, then
Washington appeared to com
plete a short pass to Jackson,
who was stripped oi the ball by
strong safety Essra laliateno.
However, the pass was ruled in-
complete. K I was able to hold
and received the hall on its own
25
Alter tlie Pirates were unable
to move the ball. Wolter nailed a
52-yard punt to the -l 16. I tie
War Eagles responded by driving
4 vards m eight plays, with
1-ullwood scoring from foul
ds out. I Ins gave AT a 7-0
lead, with 14:() remaining in the
second quarter.
After another Woltei punt, it
looked as if -( would take con
trol as the) moved to the E I
43. However, an Aaron tarter
and Willie Mack sack forced M
to punt from their 49.
The Pirates ran into tough. W ai
Eagle defen e as they could not
music a fii m down on either
their next wo possessions.
Big plays in the Fine defense
kepi the Al id to just seven
points nd down and
rom the l 10, Robert
Washington sacked Al 's
Washington On third down.
cored the process, forcing a C hns
Knapp field-goal attempt of J5
yards. Knapp's attempt was
blocked bv the ever present
senior cornerhack Kevm Walker
The War Fagles .
chance at a three pointer I his
time Knapp's 31-yard attempt
was wide left, leaving Al tip 7 '�
at the halt
( )nly down by seven poin
coach Baker felt the Pirates .��
still alive but needed to make
some adjustments.
"We were verv confident at the
half Baker said. "1 felt we
could make some adjust me
and get something
tense
However, Al responded
quickly. On their first pla � I
scrimmage. Fullwood samp'
4 vards fin a Wat 1 agle score,
upping their lead to 14
tter tin teams traded p-
snwis. F C I received the ball
Al 49. After L.n Baker
slashed tor 16 vards u nid-
dle, Darrell Speed ke
and dashed 32 vard
sideline ECl aJ .1 first and-
goal from the Al three with '
left in the third period.
Pirates couldn't fully capita
ird fii
War I agk � 14
� I
w i t h a
FI n ied �
Ho wev
W .i r I .
28-3 ad
third i'��
I he Pira'e- dii I
pressive. but lati
ECl drove 55 � ai I
1ednck Rainbow and Mack en- as thev settled foi a let? H
Bucs mixed
and m
three 1 ick Ai
the ' 1w
l -
i

' 'I appu
pi a � Baker
" r
i row. B
Pirate Defense Shines In Loss To Auburn
By NTOI F COOPER DAVID McGINNESS
Alth iburn ECl M
dicative of a fine
ce Def outstanding
allowing jusi -irteenth ranked team in trie nation. Seniors Robert Washington and Keith Ford had nine tackles piece ti :y ECl
He Bo
lackson, w
18! ; yards pei game, wa he! I
just yard 14 carries.
Howevei d an
tnding performance bv
Auburn backup tailback Brent
Fullwood made Jackson's
ence undamaging to the War
1 C 1 coach ri Bakei thought
that the Pirates gave an outstan-
ding effort, despite losing the
contest.
"I felt our defense plaved e
tionall) well in the first half
Baker said. "I have to take m
off to the defense. I he
coaches really had a fine plan
wcorked out.
"I felt we made a positive ef-
ahurn Baker ad-
ded. "Our defensive tackles
played improved football �
David Plum. Medrick Rainbow
and Walter Bryant all did well.
1 inebackers Waters and
Washington have been playing
well all year and had another fine
game
The Pirate offense, whicl
been struggling all year, was
without the services ol
sophomore quarterback Ron
Jones. Backup quarterbacks Da-
re Speed and Berke Holtzda
were both unable to rally the
Bucs However, coach Baker did
see some positive signs from his
offensive unit.
"Darrell started out very ner-
vous Baker said. �'It's the first
game he's started all season.
Berke was showing signs
'freshman-itis but he showed
after us and reall) hit hard Dye
" ou onlv see that kind ol
effort from a team that has the
greatest respeel ach.
"I; you give Art Baker the
nine, he'll turn that progi
around Dye added. "1
v arolina is in a good location to
�d athletes that van
run i .a see a dream that I saw
yeai have a good
Southern Independent power
C oav-h. Dye, who prolesscd no
wish to beat ECU. likened his vic-
tors over the Pirates to his defeat
' 'he legendary coach Paul
"Bear " Bryai I
slid lach fit van; to
Dye also expressed fond fe
ings toward the Greenville com-
munity, which was his home dur-
ing his six ears at the helm ol
Pirate football progr.r
"('�
e in the w Dye
: enjoy
.
IS W
"If you give Art Baker the time, he'll
turn that program arouid can see a
dream that I saw years ago � to have a
good Southern Independent power. "
�Pat Dye
Tony Baker rambles for
J B HtM)E� T - The EjiI Carolinian
yardage in Saturday's contest.
quite a bit of promise as well.
"We had to play with offensive
linemen who hadn't practiced all
week. Baker continued, "and
they played very well. Greg
Thomas, Ken Bourgeois, Tim
Dumas and Greg Sokolohorsky
really came through for us.
(Snapper) Stuart Ward, who we
weren't even sure would make the
trip, also gave a great effort. We
were getting the kind of efforts
you usually don't get
Auburn head coach and
former ECl' head coach Pat Dye
felt that the Pirates showed their
devotion to coach Baker.
"East Carolina made a foot
ball game out of it. Thev came
go to his grave having iost to
coach. Dye, just like 1 didn't want
to go out there and beat ECL,
but it wasn't up to me, the kids
play the game coach Dye con-
fessed.
JIMLEtftEN S Th�E�itO
Robert Washington (58) id Ron C.ilhax)(85 define gang tackling.
First ECU Open Successful
By DA ID McGINNKss
The first annual ECU I M
Tennis ("lassie was held this
weekend with a draw of "2 par-
ticipants competing in seven dif-
ferent events.
Among the entrants were many
of the 1(1 men's and women's
tennis team members, as well as a
lot of local talent and state-
ranked players.
In the men's open competition.
Greenville's own Alan larfour
defeated Andy King in straight
sets, 6-4, 7-5.
The women's final pitted two
ECU varsity players, Lisa
Eichholz and Ty Myers. Eichholz
downed Myers in three sets 4-6,
6-4, 6-1.
Two former ECU men's team
members, Galen Treble and
Barry Moran narrowly lost to
Norman Bryant and Steve
Walker 4-6, 6-4, 5-7. "It was a
good match said Moran. "The
momentum shifted to us after the
first set but back to them in the
third. We were playing with no-
ad scoring which was unfamiliar
to people who haven't played col
iege tennis recently
In the women's doubles finals,
Wilson natives Linda Horton and
Chris Graham defeated ECU's
Ty Myers and Lisa Eichholz 7-5,
6-4.
The men's 35 singles champion
was John Clayton, a Greenville
resident who topped Larry
Walker 6-1, 6-4.
In the men's 35 doubles, John
Benson and Lee Home needed
three sets to dispose of Cecil Mar-
tin and Paul Tardtf, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.
The mixed doubles finals saw
Henry Hostetler and Margaret
McGlohan defeat Steve Walker
and Jeannie Jones 7-6, 6-2.
Hostetler-McGIohan ousted
ECU's Eichholz-Anthony in the
semi-final match 6-2, 3-6, 6-1 to
reach the championship round.
The tournament was postpon-
ed due to rain a week ago, which
resulted in the dropping out of
about 35 participants. However,
on the whole, both sponsors and
participants were pleased with the
tournament's organization, com-
petition and atmosphere.
"I was a little dissappointed
that we had to postpone the tour-
nament because of the rain said
tournament director Pat Sher-
man, "but we had a really good
tournament. The weather was
beautifulthe level of competi-
tion was really goodand
everyone einjoyed themselves.
Doubles finalist Barry Moran
also thought highly of the tourna-
ment.
"It was a good one said
Moran. "There was no waiting
for courts and there were some
really good matches played
William Grady (40) and the ECU Pirate basket b all team will host the Irish wi i T
Minges Coliseum at 7:30 p.m. Students itadm itted free with a valid ECU ID

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER U198 3
aps Bucs
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will host the Irish National Team tonight in
with - valid ECU ID.
Recommends
YORK � (UPI) Baseball Com-
missioner Peter Ueberroth said
major-league expansion or
relocation "could come as early
as next year
Speaking at a brief news con-
ference following two days of
presentations by 12 cities or
regions seeking big-league fran-
chises, Ueberroth was very
specific in linking expansion and
relocation and in adding, "It may
not come for several years
Phoenix, Buffalo, N.Y New
Orleans, Tampa Bay-St.
Petersburg, Fla New Jersey and
Nashville, Tenn made presenta-
tions as did Columbus, Ohio,
Denver, the Miami, Fla area,
Washington, D.C Indianapolis
and Vancouver, British Colum-
bia.
"One of the cities appeared to
us to have backed off con-
siderably from their interest
Ueberroth said. "Some that we
thought were way-down-line
types of cities surprised us by
their ability to be ready to con-
sider expansion or relocation
much quicker than we had
thought He declined to name
any of them.
He also said the relocation of
existing teams doesn't have to be
completed before expansion fran-
chises are awarded and that
financially troubled teams could
get first crack at the cities seeking
ballclubs.
"If ownership decided that ex-
pansion won't come until 'X'
year, then relocation would have
first shot he said. "If they
decided on a much quicker time
frame for expansion, they
(relocation and expansion) might
be lumped together.
"It's also possible that some
cities might be better for reloca-
tion than expansion and vice ver-
sa. Obviously, if a city has no
facility now, then a relocation is
probably not possible. That city
would be more of an expansion
city than a relocation city. A city
where we could play next week
could have both possibilities
Denver, Vancouver and New
Orleans have ballparks that could
Despite Loss; Rugby
Team Takes Second
house major-league teams im-
mediately. Washington's RFK
Stadium, former home of the
Senators, needs some restructur-
ing of the seating. Each other
community has either a minor-
league park needing major ex-
pansion or no existing stadium at
all.
Buffalo and Phoenix pitched
their weather in earlier sessions
with the Long Range Planning
Committee.
"One floor upstairs are
baseball people making baseball
decisions for the future of their
sport Bob Rich Jr president
of the minor-league Buffalo
Bisons, said in a room on the
48th floor of a skyscraper hous-
ing the offices of Willie, Farr &
Gallagher, a law firm that in-
cludes former Commissioner
Bowie Kuhn as a member.
"The Buffalo jokes not-
withstanding Rich said, "sure
we have snow, but it comes in the
winter, when it's supposed to.
We only had seven games rained
out over the last three years and
no games snowed out
Buffalo's image problem is the
reverse of Phoenix's. The average
August temperature there is 104
degrees.
"There are rumors afoot that
it's warm in Phoenix in the sum-
mertime Mayor Terry Goddard
said with a grin. "We consider
that an advantage, but there are .
those who don't and we had to
talk to the committee about that.
"There was concern that we
wouldn't be able to build a fan
base during July and August, but
we feel the fan enthusiasm is
there, as is the new technology of
stadium construction with
transluscent domes, retractable
domes and evaporative coolr.g
a form of outdoor air condition-
ing.
New Orleans' pitch was linked
to the Louisiana Superdome,
New Jersey's to a projected First-
year attendance of 2.6 million,
Nashville's to its claim as a major
tourist center and the home of a
highly successful minor-league
team and the Tanipa-St.
Petersburg bid to the region's
growth potential and climate.
The 26 club-owners meet a
month from now in San Diego,
where they will evaluate the com-
mittee's report. Ed Durso,
baseball's executive vice presi-
dent, secretary-treasurer and
general counsel, reiterated that
the committee "will not be mak-
ing any announcements or com-
mitments" and that their sole
purpose was to gather informa-
tion.
"We neither encouraged nor
discouraged anyone Durso
said, shooting down comments
by Rich.
"We came here as the dark
horse and we're going out as the
eye-opener Rich said. "We
tried to bite our lip, but we're en-
couraged
"I'm pleased they feel that
way Durso said. "It probably
just reflects the fact that they
were happy to have an opportuni-
ty to address the committee. 1 can
assure you there was nothing
stated by the committee to them
in any way which would say
they're to be particularly en-
couraged
New Orleans offered the
Superdome as a neutral site for
the World Series. "There was no
reaction on their (the
committee's) part Mayor
Ernest Morial said.
The stadium, home of the Na-
tional Football League's New
Orleans Saints, also housed the
New Orleans Pelicans, a Class
AAA American Association team
that arrived from Tulsa, Okla in
time for the 1977 season and left
for Springfield, Mo before the
1978 season. "Poor attendance
was a major factor in the team's
move said a spokesman for the
team, now located in Louisville,
Ky.
"There is a different appeal
with major-league baseball than
there is with minor-league
baseball Morial said.
The expansion franchise in its
region "would draw, from year
one, 2.6 million people Jon
Hanson, chairman of the New
Jersey Sports and Exposition
Authority said.
"We are willing to enter into
an agreement of a baseball fran-
chise that, for the first five years
of operation, we would have two
million dollars paid admissions
per year, and if it were less than
that, we would have to make the
payments to back it up Hanson
said.
The exposition authority owns
the Meadlowlands complex,
home of the Giants and Jets of
the NFL plus pro basketball's
Nets and pro hockey's Devils.
Hanson said a baseball stadium
would not be a part of the com-
plex but would be built elsewhere
in northern New Jersey.
The ECU Rugby club gave a
valiant effort this weekend, but
came up short against UNC-
Greensboro. finishing No. 2 in
the state for the second year in a
row.
UNC-G started out quickly
with an early try. However, they
were unsuccessful with the extra-
point attempt and led 4-0. The
Spartans scored again off a line-
out. "Their second row member
grabbed the ball and scored from
about five meters out said rug-
ger president Bill Zimmerman.
The extra point was good and
UNC-G suddenly had a 10-0 lead.
The score remained this way until
the half.
Although the Pirates went
i scoreless in the opening half,
"they did put together good plays
where they broke down
Greensboro's team, but couldn't
score Zimmerman said. One
example was Alan Blankenship's
interception in the first half. He
picked off a pass and scrambled
bout 45 meters before being
tackled, stopping a Pirate drive.
The second half went scoreless
for the first 15 minutes. Then
ECU freshman rugger Steve
Kinne scored on a 10-meter
overlap. Mike Brown added the
extra point and ECU trailed 6-10.
With five minutes left to play,
UNC-G tacked on another try on
a 30-meter run off the wing. With
the conversion, UNC-G went on
to win 16-6.
"The match was pretty even,
the score didn't indicate how the
match really was Zimmerman
said. "It was a tough-fought
match in front of a big crowd.
"The experience this year will
help us carry on the tradition next
year Zimmerman added.
Zimmerman and the ECU
rugby team would like to thank
their two December graduates �
Alan Blankenship and Kevin
Mussier for their time and effort
throughout the years.
Also, the rugby team would
like to invite all interested
students to attend a team meeting
on Nov. 14 in room 205 of the
library. The team will be discuss-
ing plans for the Spring Break
Tour to the Bahamas.
Despite a great Pirate effort, the ECU njby team fell short in their
quest for the state title against a powerfti UN C-G team.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 12, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.440
Location of Original
University Archives

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