The East Carolinian, November 7, 1985






Qfoe
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.6ONo.40-�.J
1 hursda. November 7, 1985
10 Pages
Greenville, N.C.
( initiation 12.(MM)
WZMB Frequency
Change Causes Strife
The mighty Tar
I hi- ii unique look ,il ill i t,rri n "�In it Iti uIk v. In. h -pan- tin I .ir llmr 1 In (.rrni Street Bridjte -tainl- Innit- tin
(�rit-n illr lm.iiiiiinmiii a v .iti rf rmit uirk v. Inn II -Imiiiit- frequent find a ijiin t place In unwind, throw 11
1 rihee nr lake a vi .ilk
B LANCE SEARL
Staff Vntr
Differing opinions concerning
the wattage increase and frequen-
cy change of WZMB radio were
prevalent following last
Monday's ECU Media Board
meeting.
I he questions centered on
whether WZMB would remain on
frequency 91.3, increasing its
power from 282 to 3000 watts,
(thereby possible blocking out fr-
inge student stations in Chapel
Hill and Wilmington) to change
to 91.9 at 3000 watts, or to
change to 91.9 remaining at 282
watts.
Although there was hunted
discussion during the meeting,
many questions were raised after
ward.
Kan Brown, an I C L alumni
and researcher on the subject,
said afterward that "the WZMB
91.3 frequency is a valuable stu
dent asset and should not back
down to the Chapel Iiill and
ilmington stations
ccording to Brown,
"WUNC-Chapel Hill is in the
process ol finalizing a
100,000-wati satellite station.
which would also have .
tion on an 88.1 station; w
they so concerned with 91
Brown also insisted that
WMB has had a construci
permit to operate at 3000 watts
since 1983, good through 1988,
: that according to engineering
reports, 91.3 would not interfere
with the Chapel Hill or Wilm-
ington "1 hey aren't
authorized to have signals
here; WZMB has the
Kate Abbot, WZMB general
manager, said of Brown's
research, "1 agree that the
ineering reports are accurate,
we actually have a licensi
n 91.3 g
1988 . rding I
F i the presumed construc-
See WMB Pae 2.
VeteransAdministrationDoes
More Than H elp Veterans
U.S. Ships May Carry Imports

da
f(
.derail.
II. io iint tu
remeniherhe oites��'?have
made theui vvtimate trt- Kepsa rtsrifict
1 1 e 211I, echapt elev enerol M i day Waiat thew Wai i of the d been I was
e w adallwars,1
November 11 still might be called
v Day Bui World War 11
,i dream. nd dt
I Y ar. Armistice Day
i etei ans Day.
Veterans Day offers an
eleventh-hour opportunity to
w our pride and say thank you
to all oui veterans, h is a time to
remember the more than 39
million men and women who
and died from Bunker
Hill to Bastogne, from the
Mari mas to the Mekong Valley
in Vietnam. But it is also the time
to honor the more than 28 million
veterans who are alive and I
rededicate ourselves to 1 incoln's
call on Congress and the
American people "to care for
him who shall have borne the bat
tie, and for his widow and his or-
phan
This charge is the motto of the
Veterans Administration an
agency that honors veterans dai-
ly.
The VA operates the largest
medical care deli' ery system in
the nation: 172 hospitals, 228
outpatient clinics, 106 nursing
homes and 16 residences The
medical centers alone treat 1.3
million patients annually.
The VA is presently affiliated
with 101 of the nation's medical
schools for training. In return,
veterans receive high-level
te VERERANS Page 5.
W ASHING I ON. DC 11 PI)
I nited States ships will be able I �
break into the lucrative trade car-
rying Japanese cars for import in-
to this country under a new
House bill introduced b Walter
B. Jones, D-N.C.
I he Equitable Automobile
! ransportation Act ol 1985,
H.R. 3655, "is intended to
balance the support accorded bv
Japan to its maritime industry bv
requiring that an equal number
of Japanese cars imported into
the United States be transported
on U.S. and Japanese ships
ones explained.
Jones noted that not one ol the
600 vehicle carriers operating
worldwide is registered under the
U.S. Hag, while 86 percent are
owned, operated or controlled bv
Japanese interests
"More than two-thirds of these
car carriers are engaged in the
lucrative U.SJapan trade, br-
inging some 1.9 million Japanese
cars to our shores in 1984. The
$10.3 billion laid out bv
merican consume: foi tl
cars include
vet the Am mere:
marine has no access
vice. I a detei mined t( i see '
we get a fail crat k ai
continued.
I he bill requires ! ex
porters to file an annua
with the U.S. Dcpartmeni
I reasui v demonstrating that
equal numbers of ars in
into the I nited States were .a:
ned on Japanese and I S
documented vessels. The bill
nes a Japanese vessel as one
documented under thai c luntry's
laws or which has contracted
v cars to the United States.
and has at least tour Japanese
citizens among the snip's comple-
ment.
Saying tha (ill "in n ay
abandons the free trade �
which our nation has adhered"
Jones pointed out that .
transported on vessels ol
be at fee ted by
ion.
"1 aii trade -� ould fleet
� this
' pera
a: e
the prk � :
tnese o i the Amei
� � t a
effect on the
��ill be
Jones
1 Kporters found ion
be liable for a civil penalty
up to $5,000 for each day the
violation occurs.
'This hill provides obvious
to this country's
nomic well-being but will also
c our national security.
rhe military establishment has
long heralded the advantages of
m roll-off ships for
use ireas without the
sopl ide equip-
icessary to service a con-
er ship or. for that matter, a
bulk carrier Jones cone! ided.
ECU Professors Do Whole Lot More Than Just Teach
By DOLG ROBERSON
Staff Wrtltr
'Those who do � do. and
those who don't � teach So
goes the old adage. But according
to research. ECU professors do a
whole lot more than just teach.
An informal survey of ECU
faculty found that most work
from 40 to 50 hours per week in
teaching and other activities
related to their professions.
The East Carolinian survey ol
20 faculty members was promp-
ted by a Hofstra University study
on faculty workloads across the
United States. The Hofstra
survey found the average college
teacher works from 45 to 55
hours a week, about the same
amount of time as doctors and
lawyers.
Similarly, 60 percent ol the
EC U faculty surveyed said they
worked anywhere from 40 lo 50
hours per week. Approximately
40 percent said they worked from
45 to 55 hours a week.
The Hofstra study found
surveys based on faculty
responses often exaggerate the
number of hours faculty-
members actually work. Studies
that do not rely on faculty-
responses report a lower average
of 45 hours per week.
One faculty member said the
number of hours worked per
week is difficult to determine.
'Teaching is not a nine to five
job. A lot of work is done at
home. Some teachers have
research projects that require
them to work nights and
weekends also
Nearly half the ECU faculty
members surveyed said they
believe full professors have a
lighter workload than lower-
ranking professors.
The Hofstra study reported
similar trends in campuses across
the country. They found full pro-
fessors often teach fewer classes
than lower-ranking instructors.
An ECU professor who
believes there is a correlation bet-
ween rank and workload said.
"There seems to be a difference
between the workload of people
on the tenure track and those on
fixed-term appointments
He added, "I think lecturers
are treated as academic slave
laborers. They aren't paid as
much, and they teach more
(classes)
The national survey found the
number of hours a faculty
member spends at work is not
related to class size, class level or
the number of different courses
he or she must teach.
An ECU professor com
mented, "Students don't unders-
tand how much a professor has to
work. They think class time is all
that's involved in our job
All ECU faculty surveyed said
they provided office hours to
help students outside class time.
One professor added, "We're re-
quired to be accessible to
students. 1 have five office hours
scheduled per week, and I'm
available at other times as well
Nationwide, the Hofstra study
found faculty members devote 3
to 20 percent of their time to
meetings and administrative ac-
tivities.
Similar trends were found in
surveys of ECU faculty members.
Re ponses ranged from two to 10
hours spent per week in meetings
and administrative activities
Harold Yuker, who conducted
Hofstra University study,
said workload surveys could be
used bv college administrators
tor a number of purposes
Fall Graduation Exercise Planned
By MIKE EL DWICK
New txUlor
Dec. 7 will be the date for the
1986 Fall Graduation Exercise,
according to Kirk Shelley, senior
class president.
"We need an exercise in
On The
Announcements2
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Features6
SnortsH
The heights by great men
reached and kept
Here not attained bysudden
flight.
But they, while theircom pa-
nions slept.
Here toiling upwardin the
Longfellow
December because a lot of people
are out of town or out of state
and cannot attend spring com-
mencement, "Shelly said.
He added, "The fall graduates
deserve a pat on the back and
recognition for the five to seven
years of hard work they put in to
get that degree
Shelley said the idea for a fall
graduation was started by Lisa
Roberts in the fall of 1983. He
said there was no fall graduation
but a study was conducted, which
showed that schools comparable
in size to ECU had fall gradua-
tions.
The Fall Graduation Exercise
is scheduled to be in Hendrix
Theatre, and graduates are en-
couraged to invite family and
friends. However, Shelly said
there will be no march across the
stage in caps and gowns. Instead,
it is a formal party held in
recognition of the graduates'
achievements.
Shelley added that there will be
a number of speeches. Then,
after the ceremony, a reception
with light hors d'oeuvres will be
held for the graduates and guests.
Furthermore, Shelley em-
phasized that all the fall
graduates are welcome and, more
important, encouraged to attend
spring commencement.
"Students themselves are
receiving invitations for the
event Shelley said. "Since it's
not a full-scale commencement,
the EC Student Store will not be
selling pre-printed invitations
The university has tried to send
all the invitations to the local ad-
dresses. However, in some cases,
the invitations have been sent to
permanent home addresses.
Shelley stressed that students who
have not received an invitation by
Friday, and are supposed to
receive one, should check at
home. If it is not there, Shelly
said to call C.C. Rowe's office at
757-6799.
Shelley said, in order to allow
ample preparation time, students
should respond as soon as possi-
ble with the number of people
they plan to bring.
As for the possibility of a full-
scale fall commencement in the
future, Shelley said it was not
likely, "unless we double in
size
"The amount of work and
preparation that goes into com-
mencement is incredible.
Moreover, you have to gather all
the Board of Trustees, other of-
ficials and faculty. More impor-
tant, we would have to double
the graduation fee in order to
have two commencements. It
costs $40,000 plus to hold one
Fire hydrant
JIM LEUTGE N S
Th� East Carolinian
There are more than 140 fire hvdrant in the eft) af Greenville. Their unique
�hape has rauurd them to he painted as mam different rharaeter. However,
they �erve the vital purpote wiatwiatinjc the fire department in prote. tin home
and huaineaae from the threat of fire


A






i iu i m i m) i.XN Nmi slBl K 1985
Announcements
PHI BETA SIGMA
CANNED FOOD DRIVE

I

FORENSIC SOCIETY
i
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� � �


PI SIGMA ALPHA
NAACP
THE UNDERGROUND
� � . . i a �
h a' 1 30 m the Underground
ECUCOUNCILOF
HONOR SOCIETIES
'�'��'��� 1, N .
A- � � . .
STUDENT UNION
RECREATION COMMITTEE
me B

GRE

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Box 966 R I
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ACT
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
'���. be a

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THE UNDERGROUND
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HONOR BOARD

.�. � �
TIE DYE SALE
ii �
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WZMB Power Increase,
Frequency Change Uncertain
( untinued From Pane 1
the
ild be ex
RC'l
VZMH
permn ai J000 waits, we
have applied bui have noi reciev
ed it
I he cost to change from 282
to 3000 watts will cost bbot
tinued, "but the cost of
inging frequencj v ill be I
minimal
cording to Media Board curi
membei and SGA legislative
speaker Kirk Shelley, "the p Bi
lion of the Media Board is thai WMB.
W MB
CATHOLIC NEWMAN CENTER
EC?
HEALTH CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
LSAT

� -
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION

Check
Out
The
Read The Comics
Every Week In The
East Carolinian
�The first meeting of the nt � msed ter i
National O
-
which dealt with
Rights Vmendn
S is scheduled foi I u �
i

s
? d 1
Hoohcr Memorial Christian Church
111 s � t i� s .t h ri s i
Hvd - .


It V
Special Classes Forallege Students
hristian Education a ag's
0 a m Worship- Open Communion
-4 44444444 �
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Campus Voice
Today 's Question
What do you see resulting from the uprmmg summit meeting
between President Ronald Reagan and Stwt leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev'
i
i
Kearney
fs
Hunter
Kearney 'There will probably be
better communication between
Reagan and Gorbachav, but I
don't think either side is going to
give too much said Steve
Kearney, an ECU junior major-
ing in therapeutic recreation. "I
think there's going to be a better
feeling for each other's views, but
it's still iKK going to solve any of
their problems. There may be
some of the small problems solv
ed, but Reagan is not going to
give on the Star Wars, and that's
one of the main issues
Hunter" I lie Summit is good for
relations, but not for actual arms
control said Durwood Hunter,
an ECU senior majoring in
music. "The Summit won't stop
military build-up because it has
been going on for years and
yearsI don't think the Summit
is going to accomplish anything
but improve relations between
Gorbachav and Reagan
Hughes don't thing anything is
going to come out of the Summit
because the Soviet Union isn't
willing to compromise said
ECU junior Theresa Hughes.
"The last Summit didn't ac-
complish anything, and I don't
epect this one to be a surpriseI
think the Soviet Union will be our
(the l.Ss) enemy for a
lifetime
Deck" There ma be a positive ef-
fect, but Reagan may not get the
effect he wants said Cassandra
Deck, an ECU senior majoring in
criminal justice.
� y
Hughes
Deck
STUDENT STORES
' tComputer Orientation
Seminar

IBM and Apple Compiler
Products Demonstrated
Company Representative s
Available For Assistance
And Information.
Date: Thursday, November 14,1985
Watch For Additional Infor nation In The
November 12 Issue of The Eat Carolinian
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina University
Wright Buildng
Bedbugs Still A Problem
By BKIII WH( KFK
Staff Wnlrr
'v d seases such as lice,
bedbugs, and scabies are more
prevalent and are routinely
ed said Mary Elesha-
dams, idem edu( atoi of ECU
' Health Services.
"Many students realh seem
assed when treated
Never, there is no need for
m to be : � ed Skin
diseases arei 'i i ece ai ih se
ly tted Ha ing a skin
i that you are
dirt 1 lesl a Kda � said.
Scl tfl tionary ays here
ises oi skin diseases,
and parasitic
to bactei
. � reactions
of v xic substances,
- it to sul e taken in-
� ed external-
ly, and new growths. Some skin
sases are ol an unkn
cause. I M' � s are part ol a
s si - sease that may or ma
Sc added there is a tei
ite skin condil
a � i el non-
iory, whereas der-
tus is the term used to
designate inflammation oi the
skin, whether due to infection, ir-
� other causes.
Pruritu . which means severe
g, is present in a verv large
: � ; i ol all dermatoses and
aln ost all cases of dermatitis,
after defines Pruritus as a
iptom not a disease, often
caused pv emotional stress.
I he person infested with lice
has itching ol the area involved.
Ihis is caused bv lice biting the
victim to obtain blood, which lice
use as food. I he skin aiea will
redden, and usually the bites
be seen; moreover, the lice and
their eggs are also visible on
skin.
1 ice found in the pubic area
are aboui the same size as head
lice. However, the can occa-
� be found in I . pi's
and on the eyebrows as well.
Schaffei said.
"Occasionally, a person in-
tested with pubic lice will scratch
� pubic area and then scratch
: eyebrows, rhis is one way in
which the lice spread said
Elesha-Adams.
I ice are easily acquired in city
living. Many children get lice
from their
lassmates oi
on
crowded buses, said Elesha-
Adams. Pubic lice can also be ac-
quired from toilet seats, accor-
ding to Schaffei
Bedbugs hide in bed frames
and mattresses and can also be
acquired on crowded city buses.
Bedbugs usually bite at night,
and the victim awakens wit:
ching bites. However, bedbugs
can be spoted under light.
According to Schaffer, bed-
bugs are destroyed bv the same
drugs that kill lice. Certain lice-
control insecticides kill lice and
bedbugs that cling to upholsters,
blankets, bedding, clothing and
other places. Killing lice in all
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locations helps prevent reintesta
tion.
Scabies, a contagious skin
disease caused b) a mite and
characterised h intense itching,
is usually found in people wl
live in unsanitary surrounding
The female mite burrows under
the skm, leaving a dark trail tl al
causes the skm to itch. -nd doc-
tors can usually diagnose the pro-
Mem b tins trail.
The mite can often he foun I
the delicate areas of the sk
such as the inner surfaces ol the
torearm and thighs, under the
breasts and between the fingers.
Ireatment ol scabies consists
ol cleansing the skm with .arm
soapy water, using a brush
followed by an application of
preparations designed especially
t ill scabies.
�n important problem in
treating patients with insect in-
festations is reinfestation. In
crowded living condit ions,
everyone must be treated to avoid
reoccurrences, Schaffei stated
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i






(Bile lEaat (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
MlM I l DW1CK, vo� �du,
Sean Cooper, �,�� .�
John Shannon, fmm e
1 OkIN PASQI M . . p� Eduo,
Iom Norton, CMmMm
JAY STONE, Munatima tdiior
Tom Luvender, dwi � ��,
Anthony Mar i in bu�� ����,
John Pi iirson, , wJ1Jef.
Shannon Shori . �� im w
DE' v, Johnson .
Di hmii Stevens, .
No fin her
108
Opinion
Page 4
Benefit Concert
This Sunday from one until ten
o'clock p.m. there will be a benefit
concert for Mike Hatner, a former
writer for this newspaper, at T.Ws
Nightlife. Mike was recently in-
jured in a swimming accident that
left him paralyzed from his chest
down. Though he has a good deal
of mobility in his arms, at present
he has none in his lower body.
Unfortunately for Mike his acci-
dent occurred at a time in his life
when he was attending graduate
school here at ECU and was,
erefore, unable to afford health
insurance. Right now, in fact, his
ispital expenses arc enormous and
a substantial part of them will not
be covered bv Medicaid. So the up-
coming benefit concert was
organized with the aim of helping
Mike to meet his medical expenses.
Vide from being a student and a
trt-time journalist, Mike is also a
isician who has played in such
bands as Iommv Ci. & Company
.1 the Rutabaga Brothers and the
Lemon Sisters. Thus, it comes as no
p ise that many of his friends
are musicians have donated
time, energy and talent to
nizethe upcoming benefit. I he
Phantoms, the Amateurs and the
Rutabaga tiro hers and the
Elections
e results of the recent elections
he Greenville City Council are
itructive. The winners were: Ed
Carter, Janice Buck, the Reverend
Bill Madden. Lorraine Shinn, Inez
and Nancy Jenkins. All but
. I these candidates was endors-
jtudent panel which attemp-
select candidates based upon
stand on such issues as:
! voter registration prac-
thin the city, the switch
m an at-large to a ward electoral
tern and tenants' rights. Thus the
� council can be said to be
iwhat sympathetic to the in-
students. Did students
.in influence on the outcome
the election? It is hard to say. In
truth our impact on the election was
Thanks Hamer!
Lightnin' Wells Blues Basnd are on
ly a few of the bands that will pla.
In fact, many people have given
something o' themselves to make
the benefit at T.Ws happen. Ihe
deserve the respec of everyone who
cherishes what is good, kind and
caring in people. But. they do not
want a pat on the back or a chorus
of hurrahs. For them, then con-
tribution is the hare minimum thai
they can do for Mike Hamer. I ha!
is because Mike is such an extraoi
dinary person himself. His life has
been filled with exemlary deeds oi
sacrifice on behalf of others and.
yet, he has never sought recognition
or praise for the things he has done.
It seems lo me. then, that this Sun-
day's benefit represents a po
sort of justice. Even it fate does no!
discriminate in who it rewards
who it punishes. Even it lite is blind
and siupid and unable to discern
what is just and what is
Human beings can. We .an
recognize the good and the compas-
sionate in one another and respect it
and pav homage to it. So maybe
this Sundav all of us can pav Mike
back for some of the truly great and
beautiful things he has d
throughout his life.
Lack Of Diplomacy
Tutu Hurts Anti-Apartheid Cause
P W Botha, which thank
, 1 would hire the South
V cai set o pur up huge hid-
purses around the world tor the
Bishop Tutu to
:id. I here was a
� months
st rated
expense i �!
Africa, ti reaten-
de continued, to
family to the
Bui ever since
apparent
an apogee or
.
1 dav morn-
I nited
Sal� �
States, a well as
ind West Ger-
"raci'
ON I HI RIGHT
probably slight. Yet the fact that we
did get involved was certain!) a
healthy development. We suc-
cessfully defined and raised the
issues that were important to us
Now. at least, our public officials
know what some of our concerns
are. In years to come we could
dramatically increase our involve-
ment with a more concerted effort
aimed at registering new voters and
getting out the vote. Over 400
students were registered in one
voter registration drive alone last
fall and a siable portion of tit
ECU student population consists oi
native Greenville residents. vVe
have begun something that all ol us
should resove to see continue.
Bj M F. BUCKLEY
ryone who opposes economic
gains South Anica is a
Man Paton is a racist. And
ol Cry, the Beloved
ry" a racist, then we should all
� � tcist, and conscript another
-cribe racial animosity. What
I ter with Bishop Tutu?
Hi-hue irgument is embarrassing-
1 simpleminded: "Certainly the sup-
this racist policy (South
' � ica s i i- racist he savs.
Whai is wrong with that generality?
1) Id maintain diplomatic relations
vsitii a countrv and to trade with tl
country is not necessarily to endorse I
domestic policies of that country V
whom does the United States trade'
With almost every country (there are a
few exceptions, historical anomalies like
Cuba, North Korea. Vietnam), i-
Bishop Tutu's iron generality help
then it could as easily be said ab
President Reagan that because I
with Iron Curtain countries, he is p
communist
2) 1 here are men oi unimj
racial toleration il have cited
Paton) who oppose the imposition
sanctions. Are we to call
Buthelezi oi the Zulus a racist beca
pposes sanctions
But Bishop Tutu, he now reveals,
been harboring suspicions I
long while. "I'm supposed now as a
Nobel laureate to -peak responsible a
all that sort of thing, and 1 tried
1 just think we're seeing close' ra
coming into the open It is highly
unlikely (that Mr Reagan) would have
the same indifference if the casual!
had been white Bishop rutu's
reference here is to 700 people k:
during last year's violence in south.
Africa. Tutu forgets that only a few
weeks ago, he was bemoaning
violence being inflicted on blacks by
blacks, on Indians by blacks, on blacks
by "coloreds such as Indians and
Arabics.
But of course Tutu's point, though.
morally arresting, is historica
groundless. Six million (white) Jews
were killed b Hitler in a supreme a
pinnacle genocide; and yet the war the
West finally fought against Hitler was
not animated to save the Jews The
death sentence imposed bv Stalin on
white kulaks came to 10 million. The
deaths imposed bv Mao during the
Great Leap Forward came to 2" million
(Were we anti-yellow for declining to in-
tervene?), and the per capita deaths in

u r y N


.

'
'

-

v-




Mi k

-
ible spots
S

Mi k,
E11

'
'

pet n
If 1
disi
momeni
Union, oj
Menj
I
bio:
the indignities
ety
Bishop rutu
case bv discrediting the reasoi
Black Leaders Not Out Of Touch With Blacks
B MICHAEL KINSLE1
Th New Republic
� black leaders out oi touch with
black people? poll appearing in
Public Opinion Magazine, a publication
the American Enterprise Institute,
i answer the question with a
. fii tive "yes
� ducted by Linda Lichter, co-
;ctor of the (enter for Media and
Public Affairs, the survey claims there
vast differences between black peo-
ple and black leaders on major issues.
I ichter savs, for example, that 59 per-
ii I nited States black leaders
favor disinvestment in South Africa,
'4 percent of all American blacks
ontinued investment.
tors of "The Wall Street Journal"
were impressed. In a Sept. 30 lead
editorial, they welcomed the "long-
overdue criticism" of black leaders and
hoped it would "provide an opening for
a new breed of black leaders less given
to liberal posturing Others too,
mav cite Lichter as an authority on the
"out oi touch" question. This is unfor-
tunate because the Lichter poll is shod-
dy, disingenuous and slightly ugly.
( uisider how Lichter came to the
conclusion that three-quarters of
American blacks support continued in-
vestment in South Africa. She opens
with a tasteful summary of the con-
troversy: "Recently, there has been a
great deal of discussion about racial
discrimination in South Africa This
frames the issue in the objective tradi-
tion of Ronald Reagan; South Africans
recently discovered a racial problem in
their midst � jus) as we did main
moons ago.
Lichter then summarizes the case foi
sanctions; "Some people say thai
American corporations should not be
allowed to invest money there and that
corporations already having in-
vestments there should be forced to sell
them By contrast, Lichter's anti-
sanctions summary is pure Reaganite
applesauce: "Other people sav that
American corporations should be allow
cd to remain in South Africa so that
they may use their influence to help pro-
mote equality for black people After
ignoring the aims of one alternative and
describing the aims of the other in the
most cheerful manner, Lichter then
genuflects to the altar of fairness:
"Which of these two positions comes
closer to your own?"
What if Lichter were to frame the
question in a slightly different but
equally biased way? Something like:
"Recently the South African govern
ment reaffirmed its commitment ot
white supremacy. Some people sav the
American government should actively
prevent U.S. firms from profiting from
the situation, so as to promote equalitv
for black people. Other people say the
U.S. should condone the U.S. business
operations under apartheid. Which of
these two positions is closer to your
own?" I am certain Lichter would be
astounded by the results.
At the end of the survey, Lichter
stumbles from sloppiness into racism.
Her penultimate question is, "Do you
think it is appropriate for leaders of
k groups in tfie United States to
role in U.S. foreign policy?" It is
unlikely that 1 ichter will ever ask the
white public the same question about
"leaders of white groups" and "leaders
fewish groups Only someone who
believes the legitimacy of whites or Jews
making I .S. foreign policy is pro-
blematic would ask such a question �
someone like Louis Farrakhan.
Think about the uncomfortable
ironies here. Suppose a rising black
leader took seriously the conventional
wisdom that biack leaders are "out of
touch Suppose he then hired Lichter
to find out what his followers believed.
Suppose I ichter asked a random sample
ot black people, "Do you think it is ap-
propriate or inappropriate for leaders
of Jewish groups in the United States to
play a role in U.S. foreign policy?" Say
1" percent of blacks surveyed said "in-
appropriate" (the same percent of
blacks who said a foreign policy role for
black leaders was inappropriate). Im-
agine the black leader published the fin-
dings in the publication of a respected
Washington, DC, think tank.
It takes no imagination to conjure up
the fierce denunciations of the black
leader, of I ichter, of the poll, and of
the magazine that would follow. Yet
Lichter asks the same question in the
pay of white people, and she receives
hearty applause from the country's
largest circulation daily newspaper.
Contradictions of the "out of touch"
theory hardly stop here. Those who at-
tack black leaders for being "out of
touch" are often first to complain when
any black leader attracts a following.
What is frightening about Farrakhan is
not how "out of touch" he is. but how
"in touch" he is. What disturbed many
about Jesse Jackson's 1984 campaign
was not how superficially it was sup-
ported, but how passionatelv.
One conclusion to be drawn is that
the "out of touch" charge is really a
polite way to say blacks are out ot
touch. But to phrase it this way suggests
it is white people, not black leaders,
whom blacks are out of touch with.
And this raises two unpleasant
possibilities: Either white people share
significant responsibility for the situa-
tion, or they don't � and black
Americans deserve their isolation.
In any case, the solution for these
out-of-touch black people is said to be
up-and-coming conservative black
leaders. It may be. But these leaders are
distinguished as much as for their abili-
ty to get "in touch" with whites as for
their ability to reach blacks. This is en-
couraging, but the difference between
the black and white vote in the 1984
election should make clear that being in
touch with white and with blacks are
two very different things.
Finally, black politicos who, accor-
ding to Lichter-Journal criteria, should
be most in touch with black people are
so out of touch as to be ludicrous.
Take William Keyes, black
Republican and former White House
aide now earning $390,000 per year
working for the South African govern-
ment. His job is to explain to Americans
how the regime promotes "equality for
black people If, a- 1 chtei :1a
cent of Mack- �
1 S. investment ii Si n VI
purpose, Keves should ei
port among blacks H,
Reagan and with coi ttives V
Keve- demo
with blacks bv winning am publu
higher than dog
decade? Don't bet your Krugei
ho is out of touch w
Black leaders are more oui
with white leaders than they a
black people. And white leader-
more out of touch with black pe
than thev imagine. The grow
popularity of farrakhan testifies
that.
Meanwhile, some white leader-
beginning to suspect that majoi bl �
leaders may be closet Farrakha
Nathan Perlmutter. national dr
the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'nth. wonders whv Jewish lea
have to sav -please, pretty please" to
coax anti-Farrakhan statements out I
black politicians.
One small way to bridge this racial
chasm would be for white leaders of the
American Enterprise Institute to
disown 1 ichter as quickly, publicly and
unequivocally as they would if she had
asked about the appropriateness ol
Jewish leaders playing a role in foreign
Policy. Black leaders should disown
Farrakhan as quickly, publicly and une-
quivocally as they would if he were
preaching hatred of black people No
"pretty pleases" from anvone
College
Veterans
c ont
XT
Thurs
Long Live
The
BEATLES
; p
JttU
SAT
The hite
Tn
Test you


v
hii
in mo-
Whichis98
spita
Whic h is portable
and privds
You're right.
You gel -I Plus!





lHf -SI AKOI -N
NOVIMBER 1985
' 3 " c
K6 A
rri
u A ii i
� L I w" f �i
Colleges Protest CIA Hiring
l l's - number ot schools
' protested the presence ot
entral Intelligence Agency
ruiters and money on their
campuses in the lasi two weeks,
and some observers think the
anti-CIA activity is a spillovei
from the anti-apartheid move
meni
In October, students at
ona State. Minnesota and
Harvard demonstrated against
( I recruiting efforts on then
campuses
Harvard students also pro
tested that a professor used CIA
funds to sponsor an international
lirs conference on the cam-
pus
rhe protesters say their actions
are an outgrowth of the anti-
movement, which.
aft( oi languishing, began
building dramatically on scores
� lampuses last April.
' n ei e is no doubt that the
ith frica issue has transform-
ed the political scene on
American campuses says Har-
vard student act i ist Damon
Silvers.
"It's helped foster a general
climate of activism on a number
of issues asserts Joshua
Nessen, student coordinator for
the American Committee on
Africa, which helped organize the
Oct. 11 National Day of Protest
against South Africa's apartheid
s si em.
But others aren't convinced.
"I'm not sure you can say that
there is an increase in protests It
may be premature to say that
CIA spokeswoman Patti Volz
say s
Campus protests oi the CIA
and its operations are hardly
new. During the past year, Yale.
Tufts, Colorado, Michigan.
Iowa. Oregon and Brown
students, among many others,
hae mounted demonstrations
against the agency, frequently
leading to arrests.
ctivists beliese the October
protests, however, are different.
Nessen says students are mak-
ing a connection between the CIA
and American policy in Central
America, South Africa and
Angola. "CIA involvement and
U.S. policy are designed to en-
trench U.S. corporate interests
lie contends.
For example. Cray Hale, a
leader of the anti-CIA protest at
Arizona State, says the CIA is
training police officers in South
Africa.
"There is more concern about
the CIA the more one looks into
the South African oi Central
American issue observes
Elizabeth Burpee ot the South
Africa Awareness organization at
the University of Colorado.
Additionally, "Reagan for the
first time has given the CIA legal
power to operate in the United
States Hale sas, referring to
Reagan's decision to allow
limited CIA domestic operations
Hale believes last year's
discovery of the CIA manual in-
structing the contras - the U.S
backed group trying to overthrow
the Nicaraguan government on
how to conduct terrorist acts also
turned student opinion against
the agency.
"The news of the CIA manual
last year alarmed people he
recalls.
But Nessen thinks the South
Africa issue is responsible for
sensitizing people to CIA policies
because apartheid "is less cloud
ed by Cold War obfuscation"
than, for example. U.S. policy in
Nicaragua, which the Reagan ad-
ministration says is an ally of the
Sov iet I fnion.
Whatever the reasons tor the
recent protests, CIA
spokeswoman Volz savs student
interest in working for the agency
"has never been higher. Protests
have not deterred our recruit
merit
Writers Needed
on tact 757-6366
I he I utarohniun
Publications Hldg . t
� ruhitiiumns Mldit ' i
illlllllllllltlltlltlllllllttlilllHllllllllllllllllHllltltllHIiiiffiXiffHffiiltiliiimiTiiwM&iiiMMwr
f
Cause Veterans Administration DoesResearch
he proposed
Si
h Blacks
: sup-
Mth
Will
� uch"

tnds.
whom?
� 'ouch
with
iers are
� people
Browing
i Iers are
ajor black
f arrakhans
lirectoi oi
f B'nai
v Jewish leaders
to
out Of

bridge this racial
white leaders of the
erprise Institute to
I ichter as quickly, publicly and
unequi - would if she had
appropriateness of
Jew tying a role in foreign
9a � leaders should disown
rakhan as quickly, publicly and une-
quivocally as they would if he were
ing hatred of black people. No
pleases" from anvone.
( untinued From Page 1
care from one-thud ot
at ion's residents and
stafi who are involved
the VA
In fforts io treat the na-
et srans, the has not
ped at just providing ex
It has strived
� ' d new cures and methods ol
ugh Ms research
gran In the past. has
done pioneering work on drug
rapy foi tuberculosis
illness, kidney and liver
the cardiac
-make . �� 1 scanner.
ignized as a world
search and
� it prosthetic
v si II 'he research ei
M
h in
erve cells from
Jev annuals onto adult
by A
neuroscientisl ierald Bernstein.
His work has led to the discovery
plant onto the
-lie will grow to
till I irv in a spinal cord,
-v nerve cell fibers will then
5 means that in the
future, doctors may be able to
repair injured spinal cords in
humans and reverse the tragedy
of paraplegia
W hen Byron Marsolais'
paralyzed laboratory participants
walk and actually climb and
descend stairs � at the
Cleveland. Ohio. VA Medical
Center, it is difficult to imagine
they are paralyzed, many from
the nb cage down. More than 14
years I careful research has led
to the successful implantation of
electrodes within patients' legs to
enable them to walk with
computer-directed elect r
stimulation.
The VA is also involved in such
researcl as training capuchin
monkeys to assist the disabled, a
robotic arm, omni-directional
w h eelch air s and aids for
diminished vision. V A
psychiatrists and physiologists
are continuing to develop techni-
que for the treatment oi
schizophrenia, alcoholism and
the long-term psychic effects oi
war
The VA is a world leader in ex-
ploring the whole subject of care
for the aged and is deeply involv-
ed in research for Alzheimer's
XTiTIC
Thurs.
Long Live
The
BEATLES
I 2 Price Adrn.ision w HEART
U&ii
FRI
PKM
SAT.
The White � LedZepplin
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Test yourself.
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Which is .i simple one-step test?
Whit h has a dramatic color change
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Winch is 98 accurate, as accurate
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Which is portable tor convenience
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disease.
In addition to medical benefits,
there are nearlv 1 million veterans
receiving disability compensation
or pension payments from the
VA. Almost 1.3 million widows
and other survivors of veterans
are being paid death compensa-
tion or death pension benefits.
through the VA, some 8.3
million veterans attended college
under the GI thl! and 9.9 million
received technical, farm and
other training the VA has also
assisted in the education ol more
than 500,000 sons, daughters,
widows or wives of veterans
whose deaths or permanent and
il disabilities were service
connected.
I o add to all this, the
operates the following: a41-yeai
loan guarantee program.
which has benefited about 11
million veterans and their
dependents; one of the largest life
insurance programs in the world,
and 109 national cemeteries ii
states and Puerto Rico.
But the VA storv cannot be
told in such abstract figures.
Because each veteran, ea
dependent and each survivor
served is a separate storv. Despite
its size, the nature of the VA's
mission requires personal service
its success depends on indivi I
ability and willingness.
over 240,000 VA employees
work ever day to honor
veterans. Ihev are joined bv
78,000 -olunteers -
over I 1 million hours to the VA's
mission.
I hese people have used
skills, talents and experience
help veterans. Ihev know
warm, personal satisfaction oi
giving their hearts and hands
Veterans Da
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TMF FASTC AROI INIAN
Entertainment
Dooneshurx
NO 1 MHI K 8
Southeast Seven 8
New Show At Gray
Southeast Seven X, an exhibi-
tion of works produced b
southeastern artists, opens Mod
day at Gray Gallery, located in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Center at
ECU.
The seven exhibiting artists
were selected from a competition
that attracted 1,100 applicants.
The following are exhibitors
and recipients of the 1984-85 at
tisl fellowships: Scott Duce ol
Macon, da painting; Stephen
H. Fox ol Richmond, Va pain-
ting; John 1. Hall ol Hurdle
Nl i 11 s, NX pi raphy;
Robert M. Hausev ol Baton
Rouge. ! ,i . painting; '�
Iverson ol Richmond, V
work; Leonard ko
Kensington, ld pa
Thomas 1 Suoma i
alnui (irove, (
I he annual com;
resulting exhibition, i
eighth yeai
the Southeaste nentei I i I
temporary : � (SEO V
Winston-Salem,
hibition opened - .
rhrou
fellowship pr EC
tempts to idei
contem
'�ring a growing

nal Endow
southeast Seven
SEO . then
Hii tei Mu �eum
aiII remain at
Dec 14.
i � u ;
through Satur
Aero smith Regroups
B Max Parker
"Night" By Robert Hausey
painting is one of man, thai .ill be shown in Gra, Gallery as par, of Southeast Seven H a ne�
exhibit opening Nu. 11. ' " "tw
�i�ff Wntn
Aerosmith is back! And
without a second to spare.
In this age ol deteri
heavy rock. Done with Mirrors,
the group's long-awaited seventh
studio album, is a gods
old Aerosmith tans after dogs
like Night in the Ruts and Ri -
and a Hard Place. It's great to
hear Joe Perr and the iriginal
band back together again and in
their true form.
The allure i I album
right with the cover concept.
which min i
on the albun
through ui:
"Lei the Music Do
I P, is
the mood ���
gs H u d
.
� �
terest t
blen
Steve


la
' the
Hoot ten,
'hic unds
- PA speal
ui this live
" aw energy and
me thr� .
� music
� a wild h
time.
in the
ise Mak i
Larry Linville To Appear
ry Lim

ies v�4�S�f, will be .
in a special prese
" lay.
� show, sp.
dem I nion forumommit-

ii 1 (I .
1 a � 1 in ule's involvement in
iced back
n a Christmas pageani
duri
W
par m develope
il drama following his
with the Royal Academy
ttic Arts in l ond
'l ured the United States
ears, performing many



Ins high school days.
.is was his first comedv
-
i i' a as t fi
�� 222
� M
the television
� v� I S� I)e ;

is, dramatic act
nedic role, Linville was
. alter seven years, has gamed
nation foi the ability
move smo
: and to do well in bo
Since �-l�S�, l arry I
ville has appeared in such televi-
luctions as R- �
� tin, Barnaby Jot
Gra
�' � CBS
�'� " - the
M he Veek
starring
Si hool
H received
th the
ada for his
1hou-
and " I w ice
�Vo Park
presentati n, 1 inville
backj ound in the
class and his overnight success
�medic actoi He will also
show, for the First time, an un-cut
ed!) never-betore-
d episode ol MA�SH. I his
is originally made and
v- ��� ai
sonnel overseas. Needless to say,
it was a hit there, and will I
another aspect ol the e
presentation bv 1 arry 1 i
that you will not want to miss.
By (LAV DKANHAKDI
M�ff Wnlrr
Picture this You 're .
your lunch in Mendenhall, again,
slowly digesting your third Pirate
Burger in as many daw You hear
sound around you, as usual,
there is something different
about them. They sound like
yes, they are sounds oj
laughter. Looking up, you
longer see the snack bar counter.
Instead, there is a television, and
ur long-time friends, everyone
m the I it tie Rascals to Charlie
Chaplin, are all there. Instead oj
the usual barrage of intercom
numbers and the loud dm of
students, you hear chuckles bet-
ween the indignent i ies of Moe,
Larry, andurl. Suddenly you
realize things are not the same
You've entered another dimen-
sion oj sight and sound. There's a
signpost up ahead, beckoning
you to enter thethethe.
Underground.
formerly known as the Cof-
feehouse, the Underground has
been renamed, revitalized, and
reopened to entertain the
students of ECU. The location is
the same, downstairs in
Mendenhall just past the soda
machines, but the atmosphere
and entertainment are new, fresh,
and exciting.
The changing of the name
from the Coffeehouse to the
Underground came, says Joel
Mel airman ol the Student
Union committee that runs the
Underground, "from an effort to
bring the coffeehouse idea into
the y, " The committee wanted
to provide "more of an upbeat
image of a place tor people to go
tor entertainment he said.
One ol thje objectives of the
new Underground is to provide a
different, more relaxing at-
mosphere for students to eat in.
ccording to Merrill, new lunch-
tune teat tires have been added to
provide a more pleasant environ-
ment than the usual crowded,
noisy scene at the snack bar.
Instead of facing the commo-
tion of the snack bar, students
can, on Tuesdays and Thursdavs
beginning at 1:30, bring their
lunch to the Underground, eat,
relax with friends, and enjoy
some entertainment. On
Tuesdays, the Underground
shows Rockworid videos that run
the gamut of the musical spec-
trum. On Thursdavs. short film
classics, including films bv
Charlie Chaplin and the Three
oges, are shown.
The Underground is not open
only for lunch, though. Ultimate-
ly Merritt sees it serving as an
alternative to the downtown
nightclubs. The first step in that
direction will be taken Nov. 14.
On that night from 8 to 10
p.m the Underground will of-
ficially present its first live per-
formance, by the local rock and
reggae band The Amateurs.
Mock tails, non -alcholic
cocktails, will be available for
tree, but there is a Si admission
fee to help offset the event's cost.
It's Jamaican night, so come
readv for good times and the reg-
gae sounds of Ihe Amateurs.
In the long run. Merritt hopes
that the Underground will
become a viable alternative for
students who don't want lo oi
cannot (because of the corning
21-year-old drinking age) go
dow ntown to Cireenville
nightclubs, future plans include
hav ing nightclub-type acts weekly
instead of monthly.
The shows on Tuesdays and
Thursdays at lunch are free, as
are most Underground events.
rickets foi this program are
available from the Central luket
Office, Mendenhall Student
Center. Monday-Friday, 11:00
a.m. 6:00 p.m telephone
757-6611, ext. 266. Hckel prices
arc S2.00 for ECU students and
guest. $4.00 tor E I faculty and
staff, and $6.00 tor the public
and at the door. Group rates are
also available; for more informa-
tion, call the Central ITickei Of-
fice at the number above.
round!
For the coming schedule of
movies, videos and special
events, look for the fliers posted
around campus and on the new
Student Union bulletin board
outside Mendenhall.































Finally the shock of discovery
has worn off, but you realize that
everyone else has left. You are W � V n
sitting aone, relaxed. You stand llfTVlUe SIS trQtlK HlirtlS
slowly, throw your backpack ??�����
over your shoulder, and trudge
off to your next class and the real
world. As you leave, you swear
you hear the sounds of fading
laughter in the empty room
behind you. You know you 'II be
back, trapped forever bythe
Underground.
Auditions Set
For Moliere Comedy
Bands Unite For Hamer
By I.ysa Hieber
"�iff Writer
At T.Ws Nitelifeon Sunday 1
to 10 p.m Greenville and
Triangle area musicians will per-
form a benefit concert for Mike
Hamer. a Greenville musician
and teacher who was paralyzed in
a diving accident August 25th.
The benefit ball will feature six
bands. The Boomers and Phan-
toms play high-energy rock V
roll and rhythm and blues, while
Light Wells and the Rocking
Horses and The lemon Sisters
and Rutabaga Brothers play
traditional rhythm and blues, sw-
mg and rockabilly. Tommy G.
and Co. features Tommy
Gillespie's hard-edge lyricism, set
in a modem rock mode, and The
Amatuers play Shep's (Bill
Shepard) original reggae songs
and popular rock tunes.
Tickets for the benefit ball are
$7 and can be purchased at Apple
Records and Pirate's Chest in
Greenville or at the door. Draw-
ings will be held during the day;
all ticket holders are eligible for
prizes.
Since Hamer does not have
medical insurance, donations are
gladly accepted and can be sent
to: The Mike Hamer Relief Fund,
P.O. Box 232, Greenville, N.C.
27834
GREENVI 1 I Acting audi-
tions tor Mohere's classic com-
edy "The learned ladies" will
be held November 14 and 15 in
the Messick I heatre Arts C enter
at the corner of Fifth and Eastern
streets on the ECl campus in
Greenville. The auditions will
begin each evening a: 7 30 p.m.
in room 206.
"The Learned Ladies" is a
barbed comedy that takes aim a!
pretentious learning, fake poetry
and false language. Some con
sider it Moliere's wit at its best
"The Learned Ladies" has 13
roles to be cast by Director Edgai
Loessin: eight men's and five
women's. Those planning to
audition Tiould be capable of
performing characters 18 to 2 or
30 to 40 years old.
According to I oessin, "We are
king tor people who have a
-I sense of comedy, who like
earned) or think they
would Actors should come
prepared to read a scene of their
'torn the plav. Scripts are
tilable for reading in the ECU
loynei library Reserve Reading
Room.
'The 1 earned I adies" will be
1 s I Plav house's third major
production of the season. Perfor-
mances are scheduled for
lebruary 12-15, in ECU's
McGinnis Theatre. ECU
students, faculty, staff and local
residents are all invited to audi-
tion.
For more information, call
757-6390 in Greenville.
:

N Vstwid
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All VVeekh Winne
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For Two To The
s
Must


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Gray
ups






Frank Burns:
.�����������
sons Set
Here Comedy
'A !� are
- h like
:omi
ne of their
Scripts are
:ading in the E( I
. Re e e Heading
I adies" iil be
tse's third major
the season Pertor-
heduled for
12-15, in ECU'S
Theatre. E I
. staff and local
ffe all insited to audi-
more information, call
Greenville.
Doonesburv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU



V
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73
Vleanwhjle.
I pstairs
' N-
M
c
n NEEDED
f Writers & Editors
For
1 Fall Session
Apply: The East Carolinian
END
Of The
Week Party
������
Free Admission Friday
Nov. 8, 3:30 'til 7:30
RAFFLE for $50!
AH Weekly Winners Are
Eligible For Grand Prize Drawing: Expense Paid Trip
For Two To The
BAHAMAS!
Spring Break
1986
iHI f AS IAkoi 1MS NOVEMBER 7, 1985
V �5 9U ����:
V yji �: �
i ANYThlHO
� � f -
X M
i
Mike Hammer mus cia ���� � r. and man of peace was
recently para ,z. I nr Donat.ons may be sent
to. v . Hamn PO Box 232. Greenville. NC 27834.
I
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I HI I AS1 KO! INIAN
National Power
A uburn Hosts Bucs
Sports
NOVEMBER 7, 1985 Page �
H X ()l I COOPLR
ECl will he making anothei
homecoming slop when the
travel to Jordan Hare Stadium to
battle uburn University in front
ot an expected crowd of 75,000
I hi rigers, coached by former
I i I mentoi Pal Dye, are ranked
No 13 in the P Pol! and No. 14
in the I PI
1 ed h the country's top
Heisn an candidate and leading
rushei (1,450 auK. 181.2 pei
game) Ho Jackson, uburn
isesses the nation's best
rusl ffense Their $68 9
yards pei game ae:ace is top
miry ! he I igers also rank
� s nse. Auburn is
v 6, i balking up 462.1 yards
pe: i
D the powerful offense
lomecoming crowd. c
Pal Dye does not take the Pirates
ligh
1 don't look forward to p
ing las Carolina, I've kept up
will through the seats
Dye said. "I'm impressed �
ECl 's speed and their ah
get to ic ball. We're g
evei ything we can to get read I
this weekend
i (. I r, oac: r Baker is qu
oach Dye. I fie two
have faced each other in the
rn Confernce when Dye
was al ECl and Baker was al
' lan and 1 he t itadel.
"We (the EC I coaching si
hav respeci
D e, . ach Baker said
" - the best team �
and probably
ed team
Sp � talent, ul
a 1 foi i t se! I j
touted tai bad
. � Pa
then biggest problem is that they
van play with two footballs.
ee is underrated and is a
big contributor to Jackson's Sue-
s'ess Spoil halt added.
"Washington is an underrated
passer. He doesn't throw a lot,
hut when he does, he's
e
I he rig fr ml line is ex-
perienced with three seniors and
one junior comprise the starting
unit. Anchored by left tackle
Stee l line averages
6-3, 262 pounds. "Up trout
they're not too big, but they're
extremely quick, strong and very
ed Sp mhaltz said
known foi the big
play n sophomore
�a . and s
able to the
. z has a
� �� th big
"It's a

w e e �
I) e'
n
y, A up
:ked
e in
4 4
VA
�r tullb;
1 Vgei ses a scoi
S
Auburn

.hi v � 5 said rhe
i , a talent in Bi
Fullv - . 's backup)
lior
1 lallman and
I Robinson
"Ha � and
� � nsive line
. : � said. I
md the
fa it ably
even
ick Ron
: � i
Berke
-

iw are hi
W
� . ha e been
fensively
cern.
.
See HXKl.K. Page H�
nzt
mj W
It's Possible
ECU Volleyball Team Has Busy Week
B JANLT SIMPSON
-ff Wnur
last Tuesday night brought the
curtain down on what had been a
very busy week for the ECU I ad
Pirate volleyball team.
live matches in five davs was
what the lady Bucs faced, "he
ladies were at home against Wake
Foresi University, UNC-
Wilmington and Virgina Com-
monwealth, along with a trip to
the William & Mary Invitational.
On No. 1, the Deamon
Deacons came to Minges Col-
esium. Despite a tremendous ef-
' which kept things close, the
1 ady Pirates only managed to
wm one game of the tour-game
match, losing to Wake Foresi
17-19, 14-16. 15 13, 7-15.
Sarurday morning (Nov. 2)
proved no easier for the 1 ady
Bucs. The I NC-Wilmington
1 dd Seahawks swept the 11 am
match 6-15, 9-15, 2-15.
The William & Marry Invita-
tional provided the Lady Bucs
only win ol the five games they
played. ECU picked up a win
over Virginia lech, but failed to
evercome host school William A.
Mary
Virginia forced the Lady Bucs
into a five-game match, but fell
to ECU 14-16, 15-6, 7-15, 15-13,
14-16. William V Mary
dominated the I adv Bucs, 15-3,
15-3, 15-6.
1 adv Bucs ended their
tegular seson schedule Tuesday
night at home with a loss to
Virginia Commonwealth. VCU
took the match in three games,
15 12, 16 14. 15-8
The final action for the Lady
Bucs this season will be their trip
� i 1 airfield, 'a. tor the Colonial
Vthletic Association conference
tournament on Nov. 8-9. ECU
ires the same bracket with
William & Mary and UNC-W.
I racy Gall, sidelined by an in-
jury, will be questionable for the
trnament. Her status will be
determined by a doctor today.
Gall has been participating in
some o the team's light drills but
has not scrimmaged.
Coach Imogene Turne-
that her Pirates stand a g
chance of winning the
men "I have confidence that we
can the tournament Turner
said "We just have to have the
:nce in ourselves that we
can win
"On the basis ol our matches
with irginia Tech on Sunday
and VCU Tuesday nigh: we are
just beginning to peak Turner
explained.
As the Lady Pirates prepare
:heir conference tournament,
their season record stands al
10-16.
Season Outlook
Lady Bucs Seek Success In 1985
Senior guard Sylvia Bragg, a two-time all-conference performer,
should contribute to the Lady Bucs' success in '85.
By MM CHANDLER
staff V�nin
The W5 36 I ady Pirate
basketball team begins its season
on Nov 22 in the Tennessee Tech
Tournament. This year's squad
could be one o the best, accor-
ding to coach Manwanng.
The women hope to bring
home their third consecutive con-
ference title in the Colonial
Athletic Association (formerly
the ECAC-South).
The women w:M be lead by
three seniors, all ol whom played
very well for the Lady Bucs last
season.
Senior 5-9 guard Sylvia 3ragg
averaged 11.8 points and 5.6 re-
bounds per game. Bragg is a two-
time all-conference performer.
Another returning senior is 5-7
guard Loraine Foster. Foster
finished second in team scoring
with a 12.9average and also chip-
ped in 87 assists.
The third returning senior is
Lisa Squirewell. Squirewell led
the team in rebounding with 7.8
per game while scoring an
average of 10.9 points per game.
She is also a two-time all-
conference selection.
The Lady Pirates also return
two sophmores who played key
roles in the success of last year's
team. 6-0 forward Monique
Pompili, an all-conference
player, averaged 7.4 points and
6.4 rebounds per game. The other
sophomore is 6-0 center Alma
Bethea, who averaged 5.5 points
and 3.6 rebounds per game in a
back-up role.
Delphine Mabry, a 5-5 guard is
returning to the Lady Pirate team
after sitting out last year. Mabry
led the team in scoring during the
1983-84 season.
5-5 guard Theresa Durkin and
5-7 guard Shelly Ridgway should
lend depth to the Lady Pirate
squad.
5-9 forward Chris O'Conner
and 5-9 guard Jody Rodriguez
were sidelined by injuries last
year, but appear ready to go this
season.
The I ady Bucs had an outstan-
ding recruiting year in lw�s
Among the incoming freshmen is
I innette Tucker, a highly touted
6-1 forward from Boston Ma.
i :her additions to the Lady
Pirate roster are Gretta O'Neal
and Rose Miller, two 6-2 centers
from South Carolina. In addi-
tion, 5-10 forward Cathy This
and 5-8 guard Pam Williams.
"The key to the season will be
our ability to work together as a
unit against teams with national
reputations (which) we face
said head coach Emily Manwar-
ing. "I think we will be the team ranking and a trip to the tourna-
picked to repeat as conference ment
champions and there will be The ladies will have ;her
many conference teams putting chance to catch the eyes of the
"The key to the season will be our
ability to work together as a unit
against teams with national reputa-
�Emily Manwanng
pressure on us. Strong player
leadership will be a very impor-
tant ingredient in accomplishing
our goals of an NCAA top-20
nation, while playing teams such
as Tennessee Tech, Tennessee
and Georgia very early in their
schedule.
1985-86 ECU Basketball Schedule
Date
Nov. 22-23
Nov.24
Dec 6
Dec.7
Dec. 13
Dec. 14
Dec.16
Dec. 17
Dec.19
Dec. 30
Dec.31
Jan.4
Jan.10-11
Jan.13
Jan.18
Jan.20
Jan.25
Jan.27
Feb.l
Feb.8
Feb.10
Feb.15
Feb.22
Feb. 24
Feb.28-Mar. 1
O pponent
Tennessee Tech Tournament
University of Tennessee
Francis Marion College
UNC-Charolotte
Radford University
North Carolina Central University-
University of Florida
University of South Florida
University of Miami
Old Dominion University
Indiana State University
University of Richmond
Lady Pirate Classic
WilliamAMary
UNC-Wilmington
American University
George Mason University-
James Madison University
American University
University of Richmond
William & Mary
UNC-Wilmington
George Mason University
James Madison University
CAA Tournament
Location
Cookville.TN
Knoxville, TN
Fayetteville.NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville,NC
Greenville, NC
Gainesville, FL
Tampa, FL
Coral Gables. FL
Norfolk, VA
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Washington, DC
Fairfax, VA
Harrisburg, VA
Grecnville,NC
Richmond, VA
Williamsburg, VA
Wilmington, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Wilmington, NC
l I
NEED �
PROFESS
VICE
IBV
1 & 3 BE :

VINTAGE

FOR S-
SPRING
LAGNAI
Tournament
LA( ;
hall I ��
prizes
tropl
receive
Tht
. N
mat'
meni
752
758 9255
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
Complete A j
756-3023 24 hn,
310 Gro





N 1

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ZLOT HING
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LAGNAF
Tournament
i Invitational f lag "�?-
S60 00 PER HUNDRED PAID for
r ernailmg letters from home! Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
tor information application
Associates Box 95 B. Roselle. NJ
0 3
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
' services including
reports term papers dissertations,
theses resume's and more All work
is computer ked against 50,000
onic die tionary Rates
��� as SI 7 5 per page, in
.ill for spe '
V �' K a1 757 3440 a1
6 I �
WORD PROCESSING We
pei � � tyj ng resumes, theses,
hnical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and add nto merged
rs labels, envelopes or rolodex
is Our prices are extremely
ible and we alway s �ffi r a 15
ECU stud �
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING I
���� � 5 30
FOR SALE: 1975 rAG ' nly
� i ' -md tires Ex
I Call
r46 �
FOR SALE �
Sail
B Brand neA All for
� � '83
COMPUTER FOR SALE IBM PC
- - 16 - rive Color
� �
f St � ' ' ��
BM Wril ' � '
a tor Prinl
Word Pi for
: : � 500
MARY KAY COSMETICS FOR
SALE: Call 756 3659 or 756 9783 for a
complimentary facial appointment
Re orders delivered or mailed
PUPPIES FOR SALE: AKC
Chocolate Labrador Retriever Pup
pies These pups are "magnums
Weight 3' i lbs at 2 weeks old
Wormed and ready 10 IV K5 S?00
Chris Smith 793 9205
PERSONALS
phi tau: The Beta Psi pledgee I ass
of Phi Kappa Tau will be having a
happy hour at Tl � on Monday
Nov 11 at 9 p m 52 50 piti hers and
SO cent draft Come party with the
best!
phi TAU: Champagne ni tood
and brew Saturday's spe ial for the
Phi Tau crew Early morrum:
group will come to have a day of par
tying tun Loud will be I
and yell as tl
fh day
as all the brofl a shot1
ATTENTION GREEKS: Thur
Nov 7th after the Heart
re will be an ALL GREt
at the Sig Tau house inside tl
Greek iersies n
sion. No exceptions Mus pi .
BYOB!
AOTT: Thanks for a great I
must do it agam sometime soon
you at the party after the Hi � ' Con

ma
SIGMA TAU GAMMA LITTLE
SISTERS. You lid a � ' lerf
, � � � . Ha v. � Party, �

so lets keep it going 1 � �
of Sigma Tau G
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
' �:
� ll 3
Baker
Comments
Continued From Page x
Bakei
led. "We're trying
be sure
ads up.
W e' 11 i ry t o fi i
ide
' ' w
.
TWIGGY AND MAZE Ni

�' � crip, God know ' �'�
. . -
ts bite God Knows I a th
-�� . ' '
Aha i � � � �'
WOO HOO! AOTT'S AND SIG
TAU'S: That Holidome thang was
the cheese1 We gots to par tay so
mo! HOY! those Sigma Nu guys
MIKE C. Happy 21st Birthda1'
Thank for being my best friend
Saturday awaits ou with antic ipa
tion WSGF Troy
PI KAPPS: Get ready for Road Trip
this Friday to Wotford College
Charlotte to party with the Pi Kapps
there at their 1st Annual Toga Party
Then get ready for Sig Ep Volleyball
on Sat and Lambda Chi field day on
Sun
PI KAPPA PHI Thanks D(
Zeta'S for a great social last wi
We had a jammm' time Hope to do
it again soon! Love, The Pi Kapps
YO! YOU DZ THANGS! Now
led 'o the house shakm' and s
glass breakm WOOO1 Wi
done yet! BOOM! the Sigma Nus
ALPHA XI DELTA: bisters and
pledges of Alpha X i get ready for the
stranger par, T he Ramada Party
room is the sight to meet our
ht. I e at
8 45, your "mystery date" will ar
rive Laughter happiness fun and
� r will be abundant for a
hear Get psy hed Alpha x � s1
ECU FOOTBALL TEAM
� ember the firs �
. par i do We were 2 0 and
mg Penn State We should I
ow number
� '� � ntr and .���� should l
ten them What happened to our
confidence' Thi
bla, � . � .v plays
'� can stop the big pia , .�-� am 11 do
�'�- ��� ���rent
. Don't be cautious Just go out
anc: ; � � I worry
� , in't d
than las-
' wrong, iusi go oi play
hard Good Luck, and remen- I
. .�� me 100 percent and don't . .
up You must have respect for
ourselves first, before people wili
best The Fan
ECU BIKE CLUB Good luck tl
weekend Let's terrorize F �
e with the Pack ou knov.
� � re to chi � � u on I

I Mr EAS1 AKOI INI
AOTT: The roadtnp was great
( Thanks, Sam!) The iacuzi was the
best1 Sisters, get psyched to cutout!
Love, The Beta Zetas
SNUMEN: Say "HOY NOW, you
ZBT thangs That Halloween than
was tooooo chill! Let's make that
party a early thang1 BANZAI!
those Sigma Nu guys
NEW SORORITY: This weeks
meeting will be Sunday at 6 m room
221 Don't forget about dinner after
wards
AS
NOVEMBER 7, 1985
WANTED
TELEMARKETING POSITION
AVAILABLE: With nation's largest
retail company Salar bonuses
Permanent part time Afternoon
and evening hours available Call
355 7108 for appointment
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS
,one interested in becoming an
official m the Greenville Recreation
and Parks Department Adult
Basketball leagues, should contact
Ben James at 752 4137. Ext 262, for
further mforn ation
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed tor
Spring semester 3 bedroom ap'
rent ($325) and i utilities Call
Elena or Lisa at 355 7196
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Department of University Unions is
hiring students, with experience
bussing tables, for the
Madngai Dinners, Dec 4 7 May
lead to spring employment For
appt call 757 6611 ext 213 ask for
Jon Curtis antime Mon Fri ,
. 5 00 p ��
ROOMMATE NEEDED To share 2
oedroom apt 3 1 '7 blocks from cam
pus Call Doug at 758 42H
ROOMMATE NEEDED $98monf
utilities 4 blocks from campus
m good neighborhod Call Tom Allen
at 758 1893 day or 752 0101 evenings
ROOMMATE WANTED To sha
bedroom apt at Eastbroof I
more mfo call Ken at 752 4270
FEMALE ROl AMATE WANTED
For apartment n Wlson Aces
Spring Semester Please caw
mediately 752 0158
ROOMMATE NEEDED
mediately to share 4 bedroom house.
close to campus and Overton's Call
758 5953
LOST Lady's Citizen Gold
Lost around Speight Buildmg
778 6704 (756 0903)
LOST: Unusual gold cross pen
Jerusalem Cross), 3" hi . lost 10 25
campus or downtown REWARD
752 7908 (or collect 794 4378
REWARD: Lost 35 mm camera lost
downtown Thurs night (Halloweei
about 2 30 or 3 a m Will pay to ge' 1
k! NO QUESTIONS ASKED
ill Jeff Mitchell at 752 3475
BABYSITTER NEEDED: RN S� '
:ng weeKeno babysitter evenings
References needed Please respong
to P O Box 4205, Greenv �
27834
FEMALE ROOMMATE
roommate needed to shar.
bedroom duplex S135 includes
utilities 1 . ' '56 8676 �
S TO
204 East Fifth St 75&-1427 OpenMon-Sat 10 am-9pm
Albums and Cassettes on SALE for $6.99!
Latest Releases By.
In 1985
�.son will be our
gether as a unit
h national reputa-
Kmil Manwaring
Come on out
and enjoy
the fun, it's
free
well
there.
and
he

S3ESS5I3 1
(lr RECORDS "Okc 1 We Buy Used Alburns & Tapes "Best Prices Paid" 112 E. 5th St. 758 4298


V I
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fan If.
Jane A �
a � e
x �
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Usst t'S
fA.Si
Apple Record's
COMPACT DISC
( heck Out Our Selection ml P r ices I
GO PIRATES
OTmWW
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2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscuit
1 Mashed Potatoes wGravy
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Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd 756 6434 ?
edule
264 Bypass Northeast
Greenville. North Carolina
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And You Could Be A
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� I
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 7, 1985
Intramural Sponsors Aerobics Fitness Classes
ByJEANNETTEROTH
SUflWrttcr
The department of Intramural-
Recreational Services physical
fitness program will once again
be holding drop-in classes. At .75
cents per session, you can par-
ticipate in aerobic and advanced
toning classes. Advanced toning
classes will be held Monday and
Wednesday at 6:30 pm in room
108 Memorial Gym abd Tuesday
and Thursday at 6:30 in room 112
Memorial Gym. Aerobic fitness
classes will be held Friday at 5:15
pm, Saturday at 11 am and 1 pm
and Sunday at 4 pm in room 108
Memorial Gym.
Intramural soccer is kicking
along with some rule changes and
classifications. During this
season, the time for the men's
soccer shoot-out has been
shortened from 10 to six seconds.
Also players may not kick above
the waist, particularly if another
player is nearby. This is con-
sidered dangerous play.
Co-rec flag football action has
been challenging the minds of in-
tramual odds-makers with upset
victories. Two-time all-campus
champions, Third Regiment got.
off to a rather shaky start,
pushing them further down in the
top-five lineup. This year's top-
ranked team is The Spoilers. Led
by Kevin Jarman, they gave up
only one touchdown in their first
three games. Jarman alone has
scored seven TD's to keep The
Spoilers undefeated.
At the No. 2 spot are the Royal
Invaders. Candy Horton and
Kurt Sibayan provide the one-
two punch for this season's se-
cond choice. Third Regiment
falls in the third spot, followed
by Chaos and Campus Crusade.
Be sure to sign up for the first
annual IRS-East Carolina Turkey
Trot. The newest intramural
event four-man relay race across
the 1985 Cross Campus Run
course. Each team member will
run a two-mile segment of the
race. This is a point system event,
so be sure to get your strongest
team together. Eleven divisions
have been set up to accommodate
all students, faculty and staff.
First-place winners will receive a
20-pound turkey while second-
place winners take home pum-
pkin pies. The registration
deadline is at the team captain's
meeting Mon Nov. 18 at 7:30
pm in the balcony of Memorial
Gym.
Intramural bowling is rolling
along in Mendenhall Student
Center. Sigma Phi Epsilon A'
leads the men's league, followed
by previous all-campus cham-
pions Powerhouse. In the ladies
lane, the Powerhouse Women
top the polls. Alpha Delta Pi
places second followed by the Sig
Ep Goldenhearts.
Be sure to tune in each Tuesday
and Thursday at 2:30 and 5:30
for the Inramurals Tennis Shoe
Talkshow. In coopcration with
the campus radio station WZMB,
91.3 FM, The Tennis Shoe Talk
Show presents highlights, inter-
views and updates of the latest in-
tramural action.
Norton Moves Up
In Standings
GAME
ECU-Auburn
Clemson-UNC
So. Carolina-Fla. State
UVaNCSU
Miami-Maryland
Alabama-l.Sl
Illinois-Iowa
Florida-Georgia
Duke-Wake Forest
S. Cal-California
Army-Air Force
Syracuse-Navy
SCOTT COOPER
Auburn by 1
UNC
Fla. State
Virginia
Miami
LSU
Iowa
Florida
Duke
Southern Cal
Air Force
Navy
TOM NORTON SIEGFRIED SHEWS
Auburn by 1
UNC
Fla. State
UVa.
Miami
LSU
Iowa
Florida
Duke
S. Cal
Air Force
Navy
"D.J WATTS
Auburn by 51
Clemson
Fla. State
UVa.
Maryland
LSU
Iowa
Florida
Wake Forest
S. Cal
Army
Syracuse
Auburn by 35
Clemson
UVa.
Maryland
Alabama
Iowa
FLorida
Wake Forest
S. Cal
Air Force
Navy
RICK McCORMAC
IRS HOURS
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F7a.m8a.m.
M-F12 Noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F3:30 p.m6:30 p.m.
Sat.1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun.1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th9a.m8 p.m.
Friday9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat.11 a.m5 p.m.
Sun.1 p.m5 p.m.
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member ot the Army Nurse
Grps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement arc the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer It you Ye
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton. NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
HERFF JONES
Anburn by 1
Clemson
Fla. State
UVa.
Miami
Alabama
Iowa
Florida
Duke
S. Cal
Air Force
Navy
JOHN PETERSON TODD PATTON
BILL DAWSON
Auburn by 10Auburn by 15Auburn by 9
ClemsonClemsonClemson
Fla. StateFla. StateFla. State
UVa.UVa.UVa
MarylandMarylandMiami
LSULSULSU
IowaIowaIowa
FloridaFloridaFlorida
Wake ForestWake ForestDuke
S. Cal.S. CalCalifornia
Air ForceAir ForceAir Force
NavyNavyNavy
STANDINGS
LAST WEEK
TOM NORTON11-0
SIEGFRIED SHEWS8-3
SCOTT COOPER7-4
"D.J WATTS8-3
RICK McCORMAC8-3
JOHN PETERSON10-1
TODD PATTON10-1
BILL DAWSON8-3
OVERALL
78-27
74-31
72-33
72-33
72-33
72-33
69-36
68-34
ECU Opponents
Tops In Nation
mmmm
By
SPORTS INFORMATION
Auburn, although suffering a
14-10 defeat at the hands of
Florida last week, will again be
ranked among the nation's Top
20 teams when this week's polls
are released Tuesday. It will
mark the second time this season
ECU will play a team ranked in
the Top 20 on game day the
Pirates dropped a 17-10 decision
to Penn State back on Sept. 21
when the Nittany Lions were No.
9 in the country.
Four opponents on ECU's
1985 schedule were ranked in last
week's AP Top 20 poll Penn
State at No. 3, Auburn at No. 6,
Miami-Florida at No. 11 and
LSU at No. 16. In last week's
UPI Top 20 Penn State was No.
2, Auburn was No. 5, Miami-
Florida was No. 12 and LSU was
No. 15.
This Saturday in Jordan-Hare
Stadium will not only be
Homecoming for 75,000-plus
Auburn fans, but it also will be a
I homecoming of sorts for Tiger
Head Coach Pat Dye. Dye spent
I six seasons as head football coach
at East Carolina and ranks No. 2
on ECU's coaching list for winn-
ing percentages. From 1974-79
Dye's teams amassed a 48-18-1
record for an impressive .727
winning percentage, made one
bowl apapearance (Independence
in 1978( and captured one
Southern Conference champion-
ship in 1976. Dye left Greenville,
NC, and ECU following the 1979
season for the University of
Wyoming, where he coached for
one season before moving on to
Auburn.
The Dye Years at ECU:
1974 - 7-4 (tied for third in
Southern Conference)
1975 - 8-3 (second place finish in
Southern Conference)
1976 - 9-2 (claimed school's last
Southern Conference champion-
ship)
1977 - 8-3 (ECU's first season as
a major indepent)
1978 - 9-335-13 victory over
Louisiana Tech in Independence
Bowl)
1979 - 7-3-1
IIP
f h h l -11
I
TA
1 I
Lowest Prices Ever Special:
Only $10 Deposit
DATE: Wednesday November 13
Thursday November 14 �
TIME: 9:00-4:00
�. as, e j e UHERFF JONES
PLACE: Student Store 9
a tradition of excellence





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THERE ARE TWO SiD
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Lowest Prices Ever Speci
Only $10 Deposit
��� ML,
DATE: Wednesday November 1
Thursday November 14
TIME: 9:00-4:00
H HERFF JONBS
PLACE: Student Store if





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Title
The East Carolinian, November 7, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.439
Location of Original
University Archives
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57755
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
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