The East Carolinian, November 5, 1985






�be fcaat �arnltnian
Serving the Hast Carolina campus community since IV25
Vol.60 NoH- 20
Tuesday, November 5, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pajes
( in ulation 12.0(H)
Heart Scheduled To
Appear At Minges
, B HUMBERT The Eaii Carolinian
Th e Wall
Five EC! students enjoy a break in theweat h er Monday. F en though the past few days have been
nothing but rain, and those mid-semesterHues are getting ou down. Don't despair. 1 hings are look-
ing up. Inert are only 51 days to Christrras.
Electronic Mail Causes Grief
(CPS)New1 ide elec
turning
some) intemperate
�v of
computeiobservei �sa
called
response.
V .1 re
ne to hand w rite
w nter
who don't lake a "cooling off"
per: .�i send messages the
. ibset v es
M . a New Jersey In-
' I gy professor.
" :ca lionally get .
(me u don't want It's
easy to get irritated
I pon getting an irritating note
via computer, "naturally one will
flame and send a message, 'stop
sending me this garbage1
ruroff says
ifl does not. however,
eve computers cause flaming.
'It's a lack o! people
understanding proper social
norms and writing style in order
succeed in what is a new com-
munications system he con-
tends.
"You tend to see flaming oc-
curring (nxist frequently) with in-
experienced operators Turoff
points out.
" The resolution is an organiza-
tional problem, n ot a
technological problem says
Massachusetts Institute of
technology professot Steven
1 erman. Mail system participants
need to adapt to the immediacy
the technology provides
The appropriate etiquette tor
letter writing was established over
ny ears, I erman says. And
letter writing by definition pro-
vides a cooling off period. "
letter has to be placed in an
envelope, addressed, stamped
and placed in an out basket
1 erman notes.
"It is ease to support the op-
posite view (of how computers
affect the tone of communica-
tion). People reflect more. 1 think
that is the case here at the Univer-
sity ot Michigan observes Karl
inn. a learning researcher.
B DOl (, ROBFRSON
staff �rtir
Despite overwhelming
obstacles, the ECU Major Con-
certs Committee has scheduled
HEART, a well-known rock
group, to appear in Minges Col-
iseum Thursday.
According to Student Union
President Michael Smith, book-
ing big-name groups into small
coliseums such as Minges is
becoming increasingly difficult.
"Students need to realize
bands aren't doing the college cit
cuits any more. Major groups,
like HE ART, are usually booked
at universities b private promo
lions he said.
�fler nine years as one ot the
biggest acts in rock music,
HEAR I continues to develop the
powerful vocal and guitai
dominated sound that has earned
them a lasting reputation.
HI ART'S latest album is cur-
rently on Billboard's Top 20.
And Nantucket will opei
them at the E( l performance
Chairman ot the Major Con-
certs Committee lor Eagan said
ticket pi ices tor the I C I
HI ARI conceti are low in com-
parison with those at other areas
the group has appeared.
"HEAR! tickets usually run
around $15. We can sell tickets
for Sl) because we're not trying
to make a profit he said.
Although Eagan declined to
comment on the cost ot booking
HEART at ECU, he said "We
got the cheapest date on their
tour
Since the Student Union is not
promoting the HEART concert
for profit, maximum ticket sales
are essential to ensure future con-
ceits ar ECU.
"We're trying to cover the
costs only lagan said "It we
' gel a near sell-out, this �
be the last concert we ever have "
Approximately 3,000 HEAR!
tickets have been sold so far, but
I agan said ticket sales are ex
pec ted to increase la - week
"We want studei I pick up
all the tickets That's why we're
here - tor the students It I
si udents do n
; ic '? en this is pri �bably
concert we'll ever nave
Eagan said
was fortunate to book HI R I ai
I�(. I "It was difficult to arr.i
dates between the group and the
ol, especially since Minges is
assroom facility. The AthU
Department has bent over
backwards to help
If the HE Ak I concen is a suc-
cess, the Mai n 1 mcerts C
mittee hopes to have n - ups
appear a; I C I
Tickets tor the HEAR I
cert are $10 tor students and $12
tor the 6 public. 1 kets are
availab he C entral T �
Ot fice, Men I Student
(enter and Apple Records
"We -en
at : � Stadium. fitly,
we � bility
� .
seal
ECU " I agan -a
!
tggesi
�� uld
1 c I . I
rickei � � � c HI Ak I
:ert are $1
� - the ; ib
at the i entral ; � I -e.
Mend
e Reo �
WZMB Begin s A nnual Promo
B DAWNK(,OimiN
Viff Wnlrr
Ve you listening tor those
sleigh bells That sound is the cue
for WZMB's annual Christmas in
November giveaway, scheduled
to run from Nov. 1 -30.
Mary Lou Dmgman, promo-
tions director of WZMB, came
up with the idea for the promo-
tion last year. "The response was
great and the turnout was
ierful she said of last
year's giveaway.
"The reason p's so long is 1
keep the lisienership, to keep
them listening consistently
Dmgman added. Last yeat people
: her. "All I'm doing is listen-
ing for those sleigh bells
During the month, Dii 1
estimates 'hat approxii
prizes, worth $2 50
be awarded. These include m
passes, nightclub passes and
member-hips, beach I tree
haircuts, food and clothing store
. ateS.
The station approached mer-
ints and businesses who work
tudeni an tent patrons
see
N M B
Pane
Committee Of Facutly, Students, Studies Safety On Campus
B BF1H WHICKER
si.fl Wnin
A committee comprised of
is, faculty and staff has
been appointed to assess current
safety and security practices at
he I Moreover, the group is to
make recommendations for safe-
ty improvement and strategies to
promote safety at TCI .
"v e want to look at existing
situations and see how we can im-
prove them said Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for Student Life.
1 � is : a campus-wide security
effort; the faculty, staff and
students take part in the effort.
There has been quite a bit of stu-
dent representation- � from the
liC, SGA, Pirate Walk, SRA
and the Panhellenic Council
said Ruth Kat, chairman of the
security effort.
"We've just gotten under way,
but we're anxious to get publicity
out since we know where we're
headed said Kat.
"The committee has been
needed ail along. Some ot
issues we'll be discussing are the
same things Campus Safety and
City Police are involved in said
Katz.
During the first meeting of the
committee, Joe (.aider, ECl
public safety director, gave a
brief history of the progress of
the ECU Department of Public-
Safety from 1960 to the present.
According to Calder. today's
Public Safety Department is bet-
ter equipped, better trained and
more equitably compensated.
The main problems that exist
on campus today are larceny,
vandalism and "student distur-
bances most of which are
assaults.
Calder suggested three areas
that the committee review: more
staff to keep up with cases,
quicker and accurate reporting of
incidents and increased involve-
ment by students, faculty and
staff, including watching out for
unauthorized persons and better
inventory record keeping.
"Our campus is growing;
Greenville is growing, and we
don't know the concerns that
people have. We realize some of
the work and planning that needs
to be done here on campus will
take time, but we feel it will make
a real contribution and aid in the
planning of our future said
Kat.
The committee will survey the
safety and concerns of non-
students. "Many instructors
work late and are the only people
in a particular building said
Katz.
Among the topics to be ad-
dressed are campus disciplinary
procedures, security, student
housing, visitor policies and safe-
ty of the dorms.
rhe committee will present the
needs and status of the PC I
Public Safety Office. This will in-
clude the relationship of the ECU
police and the city and state
police, the use of auxiliary police,
communications and patrol prac-
tices.
Special events, mcludim con-
certs and sporting events, also
will be discussed. "Parking is a
serious problem for those who
visit the university. Many mote
visitor spaces are needed. We also
need an information center for
visitors said Kat.
The committee was divided in-
to subcommittees who will fur-
ther investigate the objectives and
make recommendations. "The
subcommittees were designed to
do the basic work and accomplish
what can be accomplished in one
academic year said Kat.
"The goal of the campus-wide
security effort is to promote safe-
ty and reasonable security
faculty, staff and students. We're
looking at what's been going on
with other campuses as a
guideline. Everyone has been real
enthusiastic Kat -aid.
Anyone interested in making
suggestions for the campus-wide
security efforts can do so by call-
ing Katz at loyner I ibrarv.
Health Careers Day Helps All Students
B MIKFLLDWItk
Nm rdlli.r
Students who plan to enter
health-related fields have an op-
portunity to meet potential
employers during ECU's annual
Health Careers Day.
Health Careers Day will take
place from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Friday at the Nursing
Building. A second session will be
held from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Mon-
day in the Allied Health Building.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds5
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
A wise man will make more
opportunities than he finds.
� Francis Bacon
Assistant Director of Career
Planning and Placement James
Westmoreland said, "Health
Careers Day provides a place
where a hospital, or any other
type of health-related institution,
can talk to 30 to 50 students
Moreover, Westmoreland added,
"students can come and look at
30 to 50 different institutions
Westmoreland emphasized
that students who wish to attend
Health Careers Day do not have
to make reservations. They may
simply "stop by" and browze.
"It's a good way for students
to make contacts with particular
institutions Westmoreland
said.
For that reason, Westmoreland
added that underclassmen as well
as upperclassmen should attend.
It provides freshman and
sophomores a chance to make
contacts and to find out more
about their chosen professions.
Areas of employment
represented at Health Careers
Day include: nursing, physical
and occupational therapy,
medical technology, social and
correctional services, medical
record science, diatetics, music
therapy, speech language and
auditory pathology, community
health, child development and
family relations, social work, en-
vironmental health, special
education and recreational
therapy.
Although institutions are
primarily looking for health-
related majors, Westmoreland
said any major is welcome to at-
tend. He added that non-health
majors can gain valuable contacts
and insights into various institu-
tions.
Health Careers Day is spon-
sored by the ECU Career Plann-
ing and Placement Service in
cooperation with the ECU
schools of nursing and social pro-
fessions.
Disregard and DO NOT
PRINT any of this stuff. It's on
the record slugged Center.
Japan Center in July of 1980 at
NCSU. Moreover, its purpose is
to strengthen the state's academic
and economic ties with Japan.
More important, ECU will be
the home of the first branch of
the North Carolina Japan
Center.
"The North Carolina Japan
Center East is the first branch of
ihe center in the entire state
said Robert Gowen. director of
the North Carolina Japan Center
East.
The Center will officially begin
operations on Nov. 10 and
celebrate the occasion with an in-
agural reception.
The North Carolina Japan
Center East is a part of ECU and
is founded by ECU said Gowen.
JIM LEUTOENS - Th� E.H C.rot.m.n
Flying Gar berg e
Many students have seen this familiar sight on campustrash
debris floating to the ground instead of into the garbage truck.
These trucks and the men who operate than d o us students an in-
valuable service; they conviently dispose of the increminating
evidence � bad test grades.





I HI EAS1 CARDI INIAN
NOVIVftR S, YH5
Announcements
ECUGOSPEL CHOIR
I Hf t i l) c.iispvi i hoir H having a tan con
i"1 Nov�mi 10 ivus at 00 pm it will
be hricl m Hendr u theatre T he adm.svon n
tree
CAN FOOD DRIVE
Saturday Nov i� I9�s In the Cultural
Center from 10 00 pm 2 00 am iO all night
I-fee with ianned good Canned goods will
till Thanksgiving Baskets tor the needv AH
proi eds go to the Sukie C ell Anemia Foon
dat.on G O V A B
PHI BETA SIGMA
vvi- the brothers o Nu i rtapret would
��� ' pt� d to all young men to attend our
�i � �� I " Nov 13 l�8s 100pm
v i � rjpnl Union Wixm :�4
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
1 he different kind O spirit IS here arid 't .s
i � .i ��� growing! Find out what its an
I Inter arsity c hi istian
arsriip this Wednesday night a? ' p m
I i Bi Id rtg See you thee1
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Ufa Lambda will hold a meeting
a. inesday Mov 6 n Raw io: Please bi ng
, n � torn A.i' showcases
ROOMMATE PROBLEMS?
A'i' irou having p t ems with you' i.xim
�'� � � PI � ii has developed lite
reel ai w tel ii:u a'i. yout
la ����.� �� nmati ook lot postei s
' ' . ' . on hi'ip
w I if . lot fhe pr Itxt roommate
� v new roornn ate
HRM
� les yoi � ittend a ; � esentai on g -
I Daniels � � mi -�;� cialisl
A �Cl - � say 'ius &. 1 'us! � .
lerested understand ng the roll � Person
' �' ed lo attend Wi
:� eel g Tuesday Nov S at 3 30
����� I $60i - t� paid ai
ECU RUGBY
. - s on ,ino'hur
"�' - . i I . ' � k c A riKc t orest
M Hlii weekend
n1 � � � , SI lie Collegiate
h Ruggers?
MEDT INTENDED MAJORS
ege students intending lo
V i " - hnology shouc � the
Departmenta O a' 157 eosi e�' . �
-�� appointment tor pre registrar
" ml II be applying tor entrance
ItM u'otessionai phase beg-nninv,
August 198 will be given a packet ot
mate' ais 'egaraing application procedures
'�'i "i � ��� 'or pre registration
PI KAPPA PHI
' -i P kappa Ph Lil" Sister pieaoes are
� ipOv Hour WednsJay Nov 6 a
�� �� - 00 p m Everyone is
VISUAL ARTS
COMMITTEE
The't ���
4 30 p m ,r roor�
3ent Center Ar v
� �eno
uesdar No S a'
He Vencenra Stu
rested is welcome
PSI CHI
There win be a meeting on Tuesday Nov 5
at 5 30 m the Ps; Ch, Library All members
are urged to attend'
ARMY R.O.T.C.
On Sat . Nov 9 ECU Army R O T C will
be sponsoring the 2nd annual Rent A Cadet
c adets will be rented trom 8 00 to 4 00 to do
�ai i and housework The cost will be $15 00
t.� I 2 day or 4 hrs and $25 00 a whole day
or 8 hrs I or more mtor mation or to Rent A
Cadet contact ECU Army ROTC at
?5 6967 6974 (8 51 Won Sat
4 H CLUB
The EC Collegiate 4 H Club will meet
Ihurs Nov J at 6 30 p m in Mendenhali
All c urrent members and interested persons
Are encouraged to attend
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance will
meet Ihurs Nov J at 6 00 p m in the
cultural Center We will have two guest
speakers Ms Gwendelyn Lee from the
Center tor Student Opportunities who will
talk about reading and writing practices and
Mr Edward Wallace from the Howard
University Sc hooi ot Pharmai y who will talk
about Pharmacy School This will be os
great merest so all members and interested
guests are encouraged to attend
LAW SOCIETY
the Law Society of ECU is a sem,
professional organization with a history of
acquainting interested ECU students with
c aw Sc hool via prac fiong professionals The
Soc lety is composed ot students with serious
� ntent.ons ol attending Law School II you
are interested in the legal profession please
iOin us at our meeting on Tues Nov 5 room
221 Mendenhali trom 8 30 9 30 p m For
more information, contact Richard Pond at
'58 315
ATTENTION
NURSING MAJORS
The National Student Nurses Association
Foundation announces its 198 schoiarsh p
program Students currently enrolled in nur
smg or pre nurvng programs in state
approved schools ot nursing are eligible tor
ai sh.ps ranging trom $1 000 to $2,500
Scholarships are tor undergraduate educ a
tion only See M May Room 247 School of
Nursing tor further information
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Slide Presentation by faculty members
and students (2 OO 4 00 Brewster B 205'
Presentations will be on research activities
and eype'iences in Latin America Film.
A 'less t0 War on the Situation in
s aragua ' 30 8 30 Brewster D101
Through Our Own E yes a side and sound
show on situation in Nicaragua. 8 30 9 30
Brewster D 101 All on Tuesday Nov 5
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
� Roie of North Carolina in interna
tional Bus ness Mr Gordon Mc Roberts
Drector of international Marketing. NC
Dept Of Commerce will discuss the current
s tual on at North Carolina businesses inter
nationally and the role North Carolina hopes
to go in the future He will also consider new
programs promoting NC business interests
overseas Nov � 2 00 p m Brewster D 103
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Latin American Music Historical and
Regional Panorama a music presentation
.xi Nov 7. 7 30 9 30 Mendenhali 24
AIR BAND CONTEST
Rock the nite away at the 3rd annual Air
Band Contest Contest to be held at the Elbe
Room Nov 24 at 9 00 p m Contest spon
sored by the Leisure System Sfud.es Socie
an proft goes to the 1984 Sprng Barvquet Ah
nterested participants call 7M 8594 now
$100 00 f5t pr.je plus more
GAMMA BETA PHI
induction ceremonies for all new members
w ii be held Nov 5 at 7 30 ,n room 244
Mendenhali Don t lorget mat all newly m
ducted members are invited to attend the
general business meeting on Nov 7 at 7 00 m
'he Mendenhali Multi Purpose room
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
(Diac I pics o� ChrUI)
1111 Greenville Blvd 756-2275
Y
In essentials 'Uni.1
In nun essentials 'Diadem
In all things J-ovt
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (all ages)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion

i!
i!

ii


ii
l!

i!
i
.
UNITED SAVINGS ASSOCIATES
USA
IT'S WAITING
FOR YOU!
A very special little candis waiting for you. It will mean
keeping $$$ in your podce t! Local businesses are offer-
ing terrific discounts toECU students. The card is free
to you. Pick up yours a the following locations:
Mendenhali Student! e nter, Student Supply Store
Croat an. Allied He altb & Residence Halls
Sponsored By: ECU3udent Government Association
PRE REGISTRATION ISSUE
The East Carolinian Pre registration issui-
will be issued Wed . Nov 6 Look lor it at all
East Carolinian distribution points Early
registration will be Nov 14 27
SIGN LANGUAGE
The next meeting will be on Nov 12 from
5 00 to 4 30 in me I ibrary B 04 Please pa
dues by this time
SILENT DINNER
he Sign Language Club will have a Silent
Dinner on Nov S at S 00 The dinner will be
held at the New Deli All interested persons
are invited to attend Questions' 758 452
TABLE TENNIS
T he Men s All Campus Table Tennis Tour
nament sponsored by the Student Union
Recreation Committee is postponed Irom
Thurs Nov 7 to Thurs . Nov 14 at 6 00 p m
All entrants must register at the Billiards
Center m Mendenhali by Tuesday Nov 12
EPSILON PI TAU
The Beta Mo chapter of E psiion Pi Tau
will meet Wed Nov 13. at Qumi v s Family
Steakhouse at 7 00 p m The speaker will be
Dr James W Batten of the ECU School ol
Education and the topic will be Recent
Trends m Space Tec hnoloqy All members
faculty and alumni members of this 1NP!
honorary fraternity are invited to attend
ECU SURFING
Trwrre will be a meeting Wed n.ght at 8 00
m rm 221 MendenhaM (original date was
Thurs) Topics wMl mi fude the contest neat
Sun in Wilmington and the Thanksgiving
tnp to F ta A v.deo at the IVBS Katm Surfing
contest will be shown Men Ami women ana
any new members are wekome
ECU VETERANS CLUB
There will be a meeting ot the ECU
Veteran s Club on Wed . Nov 6. at 7 30pmm
Rm 212 Mendenhali All veterans
dependents, and active duty or reserve
military are encouraged to attend Stop by
and see wha were planning
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Do you want publicity .n the East (. a
n'an' We need your help if you think 1
a newsworthy subiect to be covered till out
an article information form at the Las'
Carolinian office T s form does not
guarantee coverage but it could help your
hances
ECONOMIC SOCIETY
The Economic Sooety win be �� I
Wed night at 8 00 m Brewster B '01 �
terested persons are .nv�ed To arter
you there'
THE UNDERGROUND
We re oft and runmngi There will be an
open meeting Mon No ll at 3 30 Anyone in
terested is weir ome to i ome Call Joel Mer
ntt at 75 9311 tor details
NOW
The Greenville Chapter of the National
Organization ol Women will have a dinner
meeting on Wed . Nov 6 at 6 30 m the ban
auet area ol That Place on 5th (formerly the
Olde Towne inn! 118 E 5th St A short
animated film will be shown "Women s
Voices the Gender Gap Movie" featuring
the (haraiter Sylvia by Nicole Hollander
We will have a brain storrmngplanning ses
sion to determine priorities lor our chapter
duririq the neirt several months Newcomers
wek ome it you have any questions please
i all f ran Parrott at 825 0186
SIERRACLUB
Todd Miller Director ot the N C Coastal
F ederatmn will be the featured speaker a'
the Nov II Sierra Club meeting Mr MiHer
is one ol the lounding members ol the
Coastal Federation and will discuss I urrent
issues rif l iiastrti ecology The Sierra Club
meets a' trie Firs- Presbyterian Churrh a
14th and Elm St in Greenville Non
members are welc ome to attend
AFROTC SLIDE SHOW
A slide show will be presented Nov 5
roe at 7 30 The slide show will contain
general information about AFROTC and
v areers in the u S Air Force The presenta
tion will be given on the second floor ol
Wnght Annev me�t to the Student Store)
COPING WITH STRESS
A tree rmm lass uttered by trie un
seling Cent, r I �.
' ��' � iress Mane P"s � ire
Changes Manage irour Response 10 stressful
.earr. to Reiai improve Se't
Confidence Plan lo attend all tour me-
Nov H 13 18.20 from 3 4 pm ,n 305 A
� � No advan. .� reg, itration is ret;
Call 0� ' . "e Counseling Center for fur
" er information 307 A- gh.1 Anne�
�s- MM
THE UNDERGROUND
� ' A a snow . � Charlie
' � �'� Gold Rush 'oo�, a'
1 30 and Superman as wen Br,nc; .
a meeting nfii Monody at 3 3C
be oblong
The Health Column answers
student 'j questions and concerns
about health related problems.
Anyone who has a question they
would like answered, or a con-
cern they would like to have
clarified, send your question or
concern to the Health Column,
The East Carolinian, Publica-
tions Building, ECU.
DIF-
BIRTH
CON-
to any
WHAT IS THE
FERENCE BETWEEN
CONTROL AND
TRACEPTION?
Birth control refers
method of decreasing the popula
tion and includes abortion. Con
traception means using an ar-
tificial method to prevent the
sperm from fertilizing an egg or
to prevent the egg from implan-
ting on the wall of the uterus.
WHAT TYPES OF CON
TRACEPTIVE METHODS
ARE AVAILABLE AT THE
ST I DENT HEALTH CENTER.
AND HOW EFFECTIVE ARE
THEY?
Contraceptive methods
available at the Student Health
Center include oral contraceptive
agents (birth control pills
OCA's), the diaphragm, and con
doms. An appointment must be
made by women who wan! to oh
tain OC As or the diapru,
while condoms may be bought
from the pharmacist or a nurse a'
any time.
Contraception effectively
rates are determined b rescar �
studies, and it is important
remember that the effectiveness
of a method is only as good as the
person who uses it. For example
OCA's are not going lo be 99
percent effective if the user take
them incorrectly.
The effectiveness of �
diaphragm is usually around 92
to 96 percent, although it ma-
slightly higher or lower. on
doms are usually estimated to be
70 to 80 percent effective;
however, the use ot contraceptive
vaginal foams and suppositories
may increase the effectiveness of
the condom to 90 to 95 percent
ARE OTHER TYPES Or
C O N T R A C E P T I V E S
AVAILABLE?
The contraceptive sponge is the
newest type of contraceptive
device available. It ranges in ef-
fectiveness from 86 to 92 percent
and can be purchased without a
prescription at a drug or la
grocery store.
30e60OFF
Alt Eyeglass Frames wpurchaseof Rx Lenses
Ray Ban Sunglasses30 Off
LARGE
Select Group of Framw
Por Men, Women and Children
wSlngle
Vision Lenses
Rx � or � 4.00 Power
27�
Sale Ends Nov. 1, lttS
l Discount Per Eyeglea
CALL US FOR AN
EYE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
Of YOUR CHOICE
Mu�f eVeaant Ad At T.ma Of eu
31S Parkview Comrno.u
Acroaa From Doctori l�ar
Phone ?H 144a
Own Ma pr �Mtli M Pm
20
Senior Citizen
Discount
BIFOCALS
25 Flat Top
46
95
pucians
�Hcinr Kimtay Oitaantina Optaoar
J
Gover
'
ECU
Bv J1M 1 ! nvi K
M
kid F
'he N-
Basketball
dreenvilk' F
1 he (.rtrnviil- K ,
7 timt bucket-tic
knowledge of ba -
voulhv Applicant rr
J fundamenikis
J Hours ar
weekend COBckieg 1
J ot S.l 46 how
5 ppiK-suon� �iii b, accept
5 -52-413 exl lt,l
This Month's Spec
We 50
All Designs
by ECU Stuae
For more alt:
758-41
0�igNzJ
Shrii
All You C
$5
Served with frenc
hushpuppies
Expires





I HI i ASTAROl 1NIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1985
dent Health
ntraceptivc
control pills �
agm, and con-
. must be
want to ob-
v dtapragm,
,� he bought
urseat
vencss
esearch
ant to
iveness
� .is the
tample,
be w m
ci takes
� the
i id s2
maj be
m Con-
lobe
ive;
aceptivc
.Ties
� percent.
H oi IU K rYPES OF
0 N T R A M' 1 1 r
rs in ef-
, en:
.� a
base o' Rx Lenses
es30Off
20
Senior Ctttien
Discount
BIFOCALS
es
46
95
t
ptictans
S MK 1� D1 In OpIfcWir
UBLE
4CTURIRS
�IHPONSlDetails In-st
ore
22
L Potato 41
Chips -U
� A
tato
tips . .
99
-

Coca
Cola
Seat
e
ream .
499

Go Krogering
i
Government Eradicates Errors In Loans
Washington, DC (C PS) �
rhe Education Department's at-
tempts to reduce the number of
mistakes m Guaranteed Student
I oan (GSI I awards aren't mak-
ing much headway, authors ol a
recent!) released federal audit
sa
General Accounting Office
(GAO) auditors sa the error rate
in the GSI program is probabl)
about as high toda as during the
1982-83 school year, when about
13 percent of GSI funds went to
students who didn't qualify for as
much loan money as they receiv-
ed.
Ai the time, the shocked
Reagan Administration vowed to
stop giving out too much money
in the program, installing dn
elaborate now checking pro-
cedure
But the new procedure isn't
working, the GAO said in its
repoiI
rhe GAO found the procedure
has saved about $22 million but
has cosi abou v i
rhe process
rors, m
making awards to about
of the students receiving GSL
loans, the auditors said.
The delays, in turn, forced
thousands of students to borrow
funds from other sources or
reduce class loads, the auditors
said.
Some congressmen say the
stubbornly high error rate � and
increasing concern over what is
widely viewed as the high rate at
which college graduates default
on their federally-guaranteed
loans � make it hard to push
bills to raise loan limits through
Congress.
In their report, dated Sept. 27,
the GAO auditors say the govern-
ment could cut the error rate
faster by training campus finan-
cial aid officers better.
In response to the study,
Education Department officials
maintain they already have been
implementing many of the
i i)'s suggestions.
The CiAO's auditors said the
department still hasn't done
enough.
rhe audit was performed at the
request of Sen. Paul Simon,
D-Illinois, who asked the GAO to
study the department's efforts to
validate the accuracy of GSL
awards made by college officials.
Education Department of-
ficials were at the time reviewing
about two-thirds of all GSL
awards.
They found that, during the
1982-83 year, about 61 percent of
all GSL awards were incorrect by
$2 or more, 40 percent were off
by at least $100.
The 61 percent error rate is a
decline from 71 percent in
1980-81, but, according to one
department official, it is still
"substantial
All told, students improperly
were receiving about S319 million
in loans, about 13 percent of the
total loan funds available.
"It is amazing to me we have a
$300 million-plus error when we
are sitting around trying to figure
out where we are going to get
more money for the program
Rep. Thomas Coleman,
R Missouri, said in June when
the preliminary results of the
GAO audit were released.
GAO auditors said department
officials are skilled at identifying
errors, but not at determining
what causes them.
They noted the department of-
fers voluntary workshops to train
college financial aid officers. But
those workshops are not
specifically targeted to correct
high error rates.
The department has not tried
to evaluate the problems at in-
stitutions with high error rates.
either, the auditors said.
The GAO audit comes a' a
time when many students, unable
to secure grants or scholarships,
are more reliant on federally-
guaranteed loans.
Group Defen ds Test Takers
SAN FRANCISCO (CPS) � A
new organization plans to defend
the rights of millions of
Amencaas who take standardiz-
ed exams annually.
"We will be a clearinghouse
for students, parents, schools,
legislators and civil rights groups
who seek an independent source
of information on standa iied
tests. People have always ques-
tioned the tests in the dark says
John Weiss, executive director of
the National Center for Fair and
Open resting, creators of the
FairTcst project.
"Every year the educational
and career opportunities � and
self perceptions � of over 10
million .Americans are forever
altered by standardized exams.
Most of these standardized
multiple-choice tests are cultural-
ly biased and poorly designed
Weiss notes.
The Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT), perhaps the best known
and most � idely administered
standardized test, has come
under heavy scrutiny in the past
10 years, with allegations that the
exam is biased on social-
economic lines.
FairTest wants to expand such
scrutiny to all standardized tests
under the "Truth-in-Testing"
program, which allows test-
takers an opportunity to review
copies of their scored exams and
challenge inaccurate answers or
poorly written questions, Weiss
sav S
FairTest also will seek to ex-
tend the "Golden Rule" pro-
cedure to employment exams re-
quired in more than 80 occupa-
tions, and for admission to more
than 3,000 colleges and profes-
sional schools and graduation
from high schools in 30 states,
Weiss said.
Currently, "Golden Rule
which requires replacing
disciminatory questions with less
biased items of equal difficult v. is
required only in a few state
employment exams.
FairTest will coordinate the ef-
forts of about 700 researchers in-
dependent of test-designing firms
who frequently have been critical
of fairness of standardized tests.
ECU Be gins North Carolina Japan Center
operations Monday and will
celebrate the occasion with an in-
augural reception.
The North Carolina Japan
lei Easi is a part of ECU and
is funded by ECU, said Cow en.
Even though the Center at
ECU i- affiliated with the state
organization, it has its own goals
and activities.
"One of our goals is to en-
courage grants designed to link
Japanese and American cultures.
Another goal is to strengthen
Japanese language and culture
studies at the college level said
Gowen.
In that regard, Gowen said,
"We want to develop a program
here at ECU in Japanese
studies
Gowen added that another
goal of the North Carolina Japan
Center East is to develop pro-
grams and materials for teaching
Basketball Coaches
Greenville Recreation & P arks
the GncavtHc Recreation A Parks Department (.recruiting for 10 to 14 part
time basketbaJI coaches fur the winter program pptuanls must possess some
knowledge of basketball iktftl and have the abilit and patience to work with
souths ppiicanls must be able to coach �ung P�e � �K 18. in basketball
fundamentals.
Hours are from 3 p.m. to ' p.m Mon through t-n. and some night and
weekend coaching the program will extend from Ifcc. 2 to mid-reb. !salar rale
B MIKE 1 I TUMI K
. �� tdiiw
North Carolina -
few bu
�b)
VsCat olinaI a pan
Center.
C i o v e: sHunt
established i(arolina
r in July1980 ai
NCS1 "� �
to sti'
.
M. it Iwill be
the home ol
h e n1 t all

" ! he Nortl aiJapan
.
the -e entireMate.
said RobertGowen, director of
'he Nor-1 Carolina JaparCenter
1 as!
will officially begin
Japan studies in the public-
schools.
To achieve this goal, Gowen
said there will be a heavy educa-
tion slant to the Center at ECU.
"We will have workshops and
materials for teachers he said.
"The education slant is designed
to bring Japanese awareness into
the classroom.
"We want to p r o m o t e
understanding for the Japanese
and Japanese understanding ol
us he added.
A common goal of both the
North Carolina Japan Center
East at ECU and the North
Carolina Japan Center at NCSl
is to stimulate awareness of the
increasing interdependence bet-
ween the U.S. and Japan in
economic relations.
According to published
documents, Japan is an impor-
tant part of North Carolina's
economy.
Take the amount of trade bet-
ween Japan and North Carolina,
for instance. In 1983, the Japan
Tobacco and Salt Public Cor-
poration bought $183 million of
North Carolina leaf tobacco.
Moreover, tobacco bound for
Japan is a major item shipped
through North Carolina State
ports.
Japan not only purchases
tobacco but also soybeans, elec-
trical machinery and apparel in
North Carolina.
investment and growth are
other examples of Japan's
economic importance to N
Carolina, according to North
Carolina Japan Center
documents.
Forty Japanese companies,
half of which are in manufactur-
ing, now operate in North
Carolina. A regional example is
Takeda Chemical Industries,
which is building a factory in
Wilmington.
e A o
Nightclub
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway It
Near Pliti Theatre
Phone 756 6401
X of $3.46 hour.
J Applications M be accepted from No
52-4137, ext. 262
to V�. 20. Contact Ben James at

i
i


.

-

"p

X
i
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
� Compreherrtve Eye Examinations
� Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Hear, Contacts for Astigmatism
� Glasses
� Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
� Convenient to Campus
612 E. 10th Street 758-6600
L
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25c Wine and Draft all Night Long!
Friday Night
WAM BAM END OF THE WEEK JAM
Doors Open at 8:00 p.m.
Wear Purple and Gold and get in
for JUST $1.00
$1.00 Tall Boys � 50C Wine & Draft
$2.50 Pitchers
ALL NITE LONG
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
Beau's a Private Club for Members & GuestsAll ABC P
All ABC Permits
This Month's Speda
W�50(Limited Supply)
All Designs are created
by ECU Students & Alumni.
For more information call:
758-4176
(Across from campus secur i ty)
t�W�MIMM
&AOTT
Present
Wxf2.AL6
AVAILABLE AT:
Marsh's Surf & Sea
206 E. 5th St.
DRAFTNITE
Tuesday November 5, 198 5 Admission $1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All
Nite
9:00-1:00 A.M.
& ECU Rugby Team
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, November 6, 1985
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
H
?





�tj� iEast (Karnltman
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, g�� vmin
Jay Stone, ����!��. -
MlM LUDW1CK vwj�j TOM LUVENDER, o��ciwo�rfwjiji�i
Scon Cooper, Anihons. Martin, Busmen MaMf
John Shannon, � � John Peterson, i -i m,�
1 orin Pasqi i Shannon Shoki . production war
DiOtwill Johnson. , DEBBIE STEVENS, Swrnao
Novembei V l"
Opinion
Page 4
Peace March
Trek Across Country
rhis past Sunday over 2(X) col-
leges across the nation participated
n fund raiser walk-a-thons in
preparation for "The Great Peace
March" scheduled for March 1,
1986. The March 1 event is being
sponsored and organized by an out-
fit called PRO-Peace which aims to
build an international citizen's
vement to end the arms race.
The march will involve 5,000
ople who "will leave schools,
nics, jobs and families to walk
m 1 OS Angeles to Washington,
D.C They will walk 15 miles a
i for 255 days. It will be, what
CBS News has called, "the largest
civilian undertaking in history
1 asting nine months, the march will
require extensive planning and sup-
rt facilities. There will, for exam-
ple, be six mobile kitchens to serve
$,825,000 meals. Six colleges have
pledged $15,000 each to pay for the
3,200 square feet of tents that will
serve as mess halls. Solar heated
-bowers will be set up for the mar-
chers and a conservation corps will
scour each site for trash once the
arch moves on.
Though it sounds grandiose, the
arch is being planned in painstak-
ing detail. Over 70 professionals in
media, finance, organizing and
gistics have put aside careers to
make it happen. Among them is
David Mixner, the Executive Direc-
tor PRO-Peace, who was
ecently involved in Gary Hart's bid
�r the presidency. In the process oi
iing the march Mixner has
jonvinced celebrities such as Paul
Newman, Richard Dreyfuss, Jack
Lemmon and Jodi Foster to do
numerous benefits and fundraisers.
In addition, the U.S. Student
Association has endorsed the march
as have 200 student leaders and five
state student coalitions.
Because at ieast one-third of the
marchers are expected to be college
students. PRO-Peace is undertak-
ing a widespread recruitment cam-
paign on campuses to find five
ousand people committed to mar-
ching. Teams with banners and
ins will appear on college cam-
uses, ads will be placed in college
newspapers and radio and televi-
sion features will air. Students will
be prompted with the message:
"Don't just take history. Make
history
Though the march is being
undertaken in order to bring about
an end to the arms race many of
those who are involved in anti-war
groups such as the War Resister's
League and Mobilization for Sur-
vival are offering only token sup-
port. Their reason is that PRO-
Peace is endorsing no specific plan
for bringing about an end to the
arms race. It does not officially
support the nuclear freeze pro-
posal, a comprehensive test ban
treat) or any other specific ap-
proach to ending the arms race.
"The Great Peace March" merely
represents a generalized plea for
peace. Hence, it is feared by some
that, at worst, the march will drain
needed resources from other peace
groups and, at best, it will do
nothing to educate the citizenry
and. therefore, nothing to change
the status quo. Yet, march
organizers point oul that since the
march will take place in an election
year it will be bound to place the
arms race on the agenda lor discus-
sion in several campaigns around
the country. Moreover, they argue,
a large outpouring of concern from
citizens might be just what is need-
ed to break open the petrified
universe ot discourse that has
engulfed the arms race debate and
kept si stagnant for so long.
Certainly, without addressing the
concerns of the average American
vis-a-vis the I'SSR and its inten-
tions neither PRO-Peace nor any
other organization can hope to
make much progress toward ending
the arms race. Yet, at a time in
histor when the arms race is pro-
ceeding at a more and more ac-
celerated rate with each passing
year it seems imperative that people
around the world join in expressing
their desire for peace. For if we can
all agree upon our common desire
for peace, perhaps we can begin to
agree upon a path that will lead us
out of our current predicament.
HOW ihS GR��KS M660T7AT5P
P6AC6 WITH TROP
HOW TH6 R0MANJS N&SCTIAT5P
R6UGI0US FR66PCW1
HOW OUSTER NSQ0TIAT5P
(HCHAN RIGHTS
HOW RSASANJ UEQOTIAWP
ARMS REDUCTION
Campus Forum
Students Urged To Vote
Students;
During the ECU Candidates
Forum held on October 30 the ma-
jority of the City Council candidates
asked for student input regarding the
development oi hast Carolina
University within the Greenville com-
munity. Mayor Janice Buck asked the
student audience to "tell us what you
want" concerning the redevelopment
of the downtown district.
With a student population ot ap-
proximately 14.iKK). fas! Carolina
needs to acknowledge the great role
and responsibility it has in Greenville.
We cannot be a community to
ourselves. Today. November 5,
Greenville is electing six City Council
persons from a field of twelve, ai I
the Mayor. Those candidates who are
sensitive to the growing needs ol 1 asi
(. arolina University and the orde:i
structured growth ot Greenville need
our support. It you are concerned
about off-campus . � g, or mg,
housing, police security, the
redevelopme I I trie downtown
� ict and park and recreational a-
tivities then demonstrate your con-
cerns to both City Officials and the
Kdmini .nation by voting
lay.
Rcg.ered student voters should
check thesr voter registration ard or
call the Pitt County Board ot Elec-
tions to determine your vol
precinct. Thank you
David Brown
President, SGA
Inez Defended
How can Inez Fridley, a candidate
for City Council, be against greeks or
students when she is actively involved
with both? She is a member ot Sigma
Sigma Sigma sorority and i
ol E astarolina studei
Inez is presently set ving as (
Hill Areaoordinal of �
She was Preside! the 1 ar K
Neighborhood Ass I er
ed on the Chapter for the St a
V imen ommittee. Inez ! as
served on various university commit-
tees tor student interests
She not only take pa mic
affairs of East Ca i
supports her -
a minee foi 1982 Sij
the year, and she serves as a
membei ur Alumnae d
Board.
If anyi
eeks, si i i exi
Dorm Life
more resea
� h Li
-
Kan ina Hohbv
Senior. 1 .L
And the members ol Sigma Sinma
t S ' Hy
I in � s ote: La � � �
editoric
a student panei
asked questions
Greenville I �'�
la � in i �
�1 j was
i .

Fridley I
thusiastt i ndorsea
because of her position on sm
of vital concern to students as.
tailment of discriminator) practices
against students a ing to
register to vote, the transition from
an atlare to a ward system I
tion in Greenville and the rights
tenants. This newspaper agrees with
the opinion of the panel in-so-far as
Ms. fndlev is cancer. .
I
� i
g of S
Hall. 1 iddu
-

Scott Ha H

.
ised
ratl
. Scoti !
. Sc
tie dot
i

trricula
deprived. Scott Haii has a
vement, inclu I
:i a
H
ide
� Scot t
ben K J
Sc ott Hall H
Forum Rules
The Eastarolinic
expressing all points ' view Vfa
drop them by our office in the Pul
nuns Building, acros from the en-
trant ' h yner I ;rar
For purposes oj verificai
ters must include the namt �� o
classification, address, phone nu
and signature of the author
B DILIPHIRO
In These Times
Once the current elation about "hi-
jacking the hijackers" has subsided in
.ountry. Americans will realize, to
their consternation, that the United
States has been fully integrated into the
vicious cycle of terror and counter-
terror endemic to the Mideast for
several decades. For the time being,
President Reagan has reason to feel
euphoric. Having raged for some years
against international terrorism, he at
got his chance to engage in what
Secretai � ol State George Schultz called
gitimate retaliation Had Egypt
led to end the Achille Lauro crisis on
October 9. Reagan had the Delta
niter-terrorist force assembled in
Sicily to storm the Italian cruiser the
following night.
His record until then had been
dismal. In April, 1983, Reagan promis-
ed to avenge the blowing up of the U.S.
embassy in Beirut, only to realize that
this was easier said than done. Six mon-
ths later, he threatened to avenge the
deaths of 241 American marines killed
by a suicide bomber in the Lebanese
capital, but nothing happened. And
then, nothing came of his threat to
punish the assassins of a Nav diver
during the June hijacking of a TWA
airliner. In contrast, the interception of
the Egyptian Boeing 737 carrying the
Italian liner's four hijackers showed
unusual political decisiveness and
deviousness by the White House, coupl-
ed with flawless performances by-
American military and intelligence
agencies
The White House pressured Egyptian
President Hosiii Mubarak to intercede
to secure the release of 507 hostages and
succeeded. Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ism at Abdul-Maguid worked closely
with the American ambassador in Cairo
to resolve the crisis. When he signed a
written agreement with the Italian am-
bassador in Cairo slating that Rome
would deliver the hijackers directly to
the Palestinian Liberation Organization
(PLO), the American ambassador was
present. Trie verbal understanding that
the Italian response was conditional on
no hostage having been harmed was not
incorporated into the agreement.
Having obtained the hostages'
release, the White House concentrated
on catching the hijackers, particularly
after they had been discovered to have
killed American Leon Klinghoffer. It ig-
nored the statements by President
Mubarak and his foreign minister that
the hijackers had been sent to Tunisia,
relying instead on information obtained
from its own sources. These sources
were, by all indications, CIA
agents. Given the dominance that the
U.S. enjoys in almost all walks of Egyp-
tian life, the CIA has access to many of
the country's highest officials.
It never occurred to the Egyptian
leaders that the U.S their protector
and ally, would be perfidious enough to
act independently, and even against
them, to secure its objective. Quite in-
nocently, instead of putting the hi-
jackers guarded by Egyptian security
and diplomatic officials on a scheduled
flight to Tunisia, they opted for a
specific aircraft. They compounded
their vulnerability by using Al Maza air-
port, a military base near Cairo, which
is also used by U.S. military personnel.
The moment the Americans knew
that the Egypt Air Boeing was airborne,
they had their AWACS based in Egypt's
western desert track it. The NATO base
near Heraklion, Crete, plotted the Boe-
ing on its screen, and Reagan pressured
the Tunisian president to withdraw his
landing permission to the Egyptian air-
craft. Having lost the landing right in
Tunisia, the Egyptian pilot turned his
jet back to Cairo. It was then that his
plane was intercepted by the U.S. F 14s.
the Tomcats. Since Seetarv of Defense
Caspar Weinberger has refused to
divulge the Tomcats' rules of engage-
ment, one must give credence to
statements made by some Navy person-
nel of USS Saratoga that the U.S.
fighter aircraft had orders to shoot
down the Egyptian plane if it refused to
obey orders. This ties in with the state-
ment by Muhammad Abul Abbas, who
was aboard the Egyptian jet, that the
U.S. fighters had fired warning shots
and missiles.
In short, Reagan got his way, but at
the expense of inflicting damaging
humiliation on the president of a
Mideast country closely tied to the U.S
Mubarak was obliged to publicly de-
nounce the American behavior as "an
act of piracy How was he to explain
to his fellow citizens that an Egyptian
aircraft was intercepted and fired at by
the fighter planes of the U.S Egypt's
superpower "ally" � at whose behest
he had intervened to resolve the hostage
crisis? As it was, only 10 days earlier,
Mubarak had been shocked to hear
Reagan personally endorse the Israeli
air strike against the PLO headquarters
near Tunis, an act of state terrorism
that violated Tunisian sovereignty and
caused 72 deaths, and which was (with
the U.S. abstaining) unanimously con-
demned by tne UN Security Council.
Reagan's subsequent qualification of
his stance made little difference to
Mubarak, or to any other pro-U.S.
Arab leader.
While American might was galvaniz-
ed to intercept a plane of its own Arab
ally in the Mediterranean, where was
the same military-intelligence machine
on September 30 � October 1. when
eight Israeli jets flew 1,500 miles over
the Mediterranean, bombed the PLO
headquarters near Tunis and returned
to base safely? To accomplish their mis-
sion, these fighter-bombers had to have
the support of slow-moving KA-6
tanker jets and Hawk-eye surveillance
planes, thus forming a squadron of at
least 16 aircraft moving at different
speeds.
Washington claims all this went un-
seen by its military infrastructure in the
Mediterranean;� that is, neither the
radars on the vessels of the U.S. Sixth
Fleet nor the ground-based radar
screens on Mount Troudos in Cyprus or
near Heraklion in Crete or at Domiso in
Sicily noticed this Israeli formation,
which was in the air foi about eight
hours. Dt Pentagon appears to be
ing. The decision to turn a blind eye
the Israeli air activity on such a scak
the Mediterranean could only have hi
taken at the highest level. In
words, top Reagan Administration
ficials had advance knowledge of
Israeli action and went along with it.
To convince the Americans.
Israelis argued that onlv alter Prime
Minister Peres had shown himself, bv a
dramatic deed, to be tough on the ter-
rorists � no matter where thev were
would he be in a position to inn
serious talks with King Hussein. PLO
officials maintain that there is
agreement between Israel and the I s
to see Arafat dead and the PI O
destroyed. This would smooth the wav
for direct negotiations between Israel
and Jordan, which has all along been
Peres' goal, and which has been
Reagan's blessing.
Feelings are running high
in Egypt against the hijacking of their
plane by the U.S. and the Tunis bomb
ing by the Israelis. Mubarak would be
loath to see the result of his painstaking
efforts to draw Arafat into the
moderate Arab camp washed aav
Any stiff sentences on the Arab hi-
jackers by the Italian court would in-
flame sentiment in Egypt and elsewhere
in the Arab world.
Above all, there is always the chance
that some Mideast group will seize
Italian and omencan hostages and
offer to trade them for the hijackers.
This is not just a possibility, but a pro-
bability.
Handling Of Hijacking Angers Arab Allies
SAIJh
SE
� HEAD
DDOCK S
ESER �
JISE
J s- � r J O N
PERSONALS
GIRLS OF DELTA
WANTF.l)
ROOMMATE NEEDED

E L S NEEDED
TELEMARKETING POS
oLABLE
urs ava
BASKETBALL OFFICIM
e Greer. reati
� i Deoartmen'
Basketball leagues, shouia coot
Ext 262 I
furthei nformation
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
semester 3 bedroom apt
� $325) ana V utilities C
ena or Lisa at 355 7196
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To shar
oedroom apt 31 2 blocks from cai
pus Can Doug at 758-4211
UNIVERSITY UNIONS:
Department ot University Unions!
rm students, with experience s
g bussing tables, for tl
Madrigal Dinners, Dec 4 7 Mj
lead to spnng employment,
appt call 757 6611 ext 213 ask
Jon Curtis anytime Mon Fr
8 30 5 00 P rn
ROOMMATE NEEDED: $98 mc
- 13 utilities. 4 blocks from camj
m good neighborhod Call Tom Ail
S8 1893 day or 752 0101 evening
FEMALE ROOMMATE Chn
roommate needed to sna'
bedroom duplex $135 indut
S6 8676 ai
5 30
I
I





: h
Hies
� �
11
i)
Group Starts New Program
Vaff ' Nirr K�-p"rN
. . .1 I'M I" I I !
�'I Its !� d
eek Sunda M. w
i A A
M

, I .1
al commi
'M
ind at ta


added
md ('
��- � M)14,
WZMB 1
( ontinued Horn Ha 1

I
� - .
� V s

AD
I HI
M WIIH
IVAItriMHlM
�MI
N G
NOW IN PROGRESS
III
UBLE
COUPONS
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
LOWEST PRICES
IN GREENVILLE
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED FEATURE
GROCERY PRICE IN TOWN
I
QUAKER REG (8 OZ
Instant Grits
Spaghetti
, I T ION
NACHO BRAVO
(7 OZ I
Tortilla
Chips
JACK s m OZ
TOP NOTCH
Vanilla
Wafers
a
OFFICIALS
FLAV-O-RICH
GAL
Ice Cream
PLAIN (6 CT
Lender's
Bagels
�8 OZ CTN
Flav-O-Rich
Yogurt
(12 CT � 10 OZ i
Ann Page
Waffles
BUY TWO GET ONE FREE
i5 CT CAN)
Hungry Jack
Biscuits
KEEBLER (8 OZ
CHtDDAR � NACHO�TOASTED & HEARTY
Krunch Twist
BUY TWO �GET ONE FREE
CHEESE�SAUSAGE�PEPPERONI
Fresh Pizza
&VA ftBi.1 s
DIXIE CRYSTALS
PLAIN SELF-RISING
BUTTER�REGULAR
. f�
'�
EOEO T
ks
l
UNIONS The
ence ser
' ' " '
IK. 4 ' May
i � � f �r
. - . v � F i
impus
. - m Aiipn
� enmqs
Pure Cane Sugar Red Band Flour
Crisco Shortening
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE.
MEDIUM (46 CT.) SMALL (66 CT.)
LARGE (32 CT.)
Luv's Diapers
Tomato Soup
LIMIT ONE WITH AOOITWNAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
DUKES
Mayonnaise
10.75 oz.
&
32 oz.
1
LIMIT ONE WITH AOOmOHAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
LIMIT SIX WITH ADOmONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
LIMIT ONE WITH ADOTTtONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
�ALI roommate Chr.st.an
. d to share 2
$135 includes
ifter
703 Greenville Blvd Greenville, NC
7





Dooiushur
THF EASTl AROI INIAN
Entertainment
NOVFMBtK 6, IV85 � ae 6
Maynard Blasts Off And Blows It Out
By WARREN BAKER
Canadian Trumpet Master Maynard Ferguson
Art Event Rescheduled
�X
"Connections and Detours a
collaboration between three EC I
faculty members, will be
presented at 2 p.m. Saturday on
the lawn in front oi the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center on the ECU
campus
Eight dancers under the dire,
lion of Theatre Arts assistant
Patricia L. Weeks will dance on
and around a sculpture built by
Dr. Edward Levine, dean oi
ECU's art school, to music pro-
vided by composer Otto Henry,
associate professor with the
School of Music.
The dancers, all students who
have volunteered their time, will
perform wearing street clothes
"because I'm approaching them
as people, not as abstract
dancers says WeeksThey're
people that are exploring the
sculpture
The piece begins with the
dancers 'discovering' the
sculture. "It's like they've never
seen it before Weeks says.
"Then things start happening.
The sculpture affects one of the
dancers, then it affects the rest of
the dancers
"In one way the sculpture affects
the dancers is that they can
become a part of the sculpture
and not be seen by the pursuer
Weeks adds. "The sculpture is a
friend
"I view it kind of as a fantasy
she says. "They're attracted to
this entity, the sculpture. They go
througl
never experienced
end of the p
v
:and
tei 1 i
was mak-
aloiiki a
look at it m amazt
"he idea I
came ab.ui; last
asked Weeks peal
he was tea
lustrate the points sh
ing, Weeks brouj
group of dancers. "We did an
improvisational demonstration in
Gray Gallery involving a piece ol
sculpture that lev me had con-
structed Weeks said. "The
demonstration was very suc-
cessful. 1 thought to myself, 'I his
is really fun; this is neat explo-
space in this wav "
Once the decision was made to
work together. Lev me began ;
structing a sculpture using wood.
plaster, and gravel. "Throughout
the construction she (Weeks)
visited and made suggestions and
asked questions Levine said
"It was very much ot a give and
take experience, which I like a
lot
Seeing his work being put to
use is a new experience for
Levine. "Basically I build pieces
in the studio, then dismantle
them so I can show them
Levine says. "Myself and so-
meone who's working with me
are the only people who ever see
them, so it's really nice to have
the opportunity to have
somebody really get to know a
piece and interact with it
.��.� S ptembc
ide lenli
weeks
earsals itl tl
�vas in
e, W eeks bej ai working v�
music. 1 he result.
is "mainly synthesize! and c
tronic music sounds me' -s
immediate api m the
dancers.
"This is going to make it so
much easier said Jennifer
Gillikin of Hamlet. "1 love it
exclaimed Jessica raylo ot
Smith tie Id.
Weeks plans to give tie au-
dience an opportunity to explore
the sculpture and o some im-
provisation following the perfor-
mance. She's also considering
having the dancers run through
the 15-minute routine again to
give members of the audience a
chance to view the performance
from another location. "I've
tried to make it accesible to them
wherever they're sitting Weeks
says.
Ernest Miller, a senior dance
major from Lexington, savs be-
ing totally surrounded by the au-
dience is a unique experience.
"Things are happening on the
other Side, but you don't know
w hat they are
The Nov. 9 performance is free
and open to the public. The piece
�.1- � it hed . � I be
2. but �
weathei necessitated a reschedul-
ing oi he eve:
Other dancers who will he per
K Warlick ot
V � Lisa 'ee
i la, arolyn 1
1 asdale, Pa . Ralph Bass oi
te, arid Rachel
Chai Vt.
ei ot
Question: Who could possibly
not enjoy this man's music?
Answer: Anyone who failed to
stop by TW's last night.
Somehow, when someone tries
to find words to describe music,
the feeling and the excitement
tend to get losi in translation. A
silvery silky saxophone solo. A
be-bop-a-dop bass line. An even-
handed drum roil
Yes, there's something missing
there.
All Of those good 1jectives
that you thought impressed your
English teacher could
possibly come close to describing
the enthusiasm and genius ol a
white-haired trumpet player fi
Canada.
When Maynard Ferguson took
his dominant position under
lights, you knew, as the crowd
knew, that $8.50 wd- a small sum
to pay for a show that was well
worth more.
The opening number
presso hit the audience hard
with a tough back beat and a
rhythm section that sould
possibly raise the dead. No
could keep still.
Atter that, the aud
wondered, how could Maynard
keep the pace throughout the
night'1 Following a well-deserved
recognition oi his band members
(each member a recei . tduati
trom college), the bass playei
launched into a funk
ins guitar with the band pick .
up the slack bv adding pol
diversity to the rhythm.
Heads moved trom side
side. Mouths stood agape will
the wonder ol it all Ihe wonder
ol Mr. Fergus
tduates I he bass player "s
fingers moved with a blaing
furv, probably enough heat to
generate a small fire.
The latin-oriented "
mpagne" I wed up
funk) bass-oriented
Park ' Guitarist Michael Higgins
�bed the spotlight with a
mind-boggling display
fingers.
I odd Carlin, the keyboardist,
soloed on the I i '
adding a touch ol fun, a pir
pleasure and at lea ' a ga
unpredictability Ferguson
tioned that the song wa� cut
in the rehearsing stage
The Canadian k �ei a!
( arlin and asked, "Wl ai �
?' The grin
stretched the
in
face
stage
During the evening, 1 erg
constantly . �ked a
spotlight with each ol
members, shaking
hand at the end ol eacl
the audience's eves.
�aere having
N the fu
the audience, litera
(n the next
audience, the
.
Despite
odiness, "Beautiful Hea
earnest
Maynard a
evening wa
k unding
1 ei gus
a well .
"Bebop Buffet a tril
rts to the big I
petites de:
the ear.
a ��� - ext
Wh
�urned, ol
broke k and
�� . . F eri
� .
B
v
g su
Ma
Park S. V
Jude
'Rocky " And just m
th t was safe i atel
"B
tha
If 1
e

:
w

Maxx Warrior Releases EP
B MAX PARKER
and
LANCESEARL
Miff Vr1ln
Area bands trying to make it
the :op are ever attempting to
impress record companies into
recording then original
material. Since main a band's
fate is determined by the single
stroke of a pen, it is important
that these bands receive fair and
objective publicity when they
reach the point oi moving
toward bigger and better goals.
This exposure is important,
because if these bands make a
dent in the music business,
other hard-working performers
in the area may also be
recognized.
With the above in mind, we
may now consider Maxx War-
rior's new four-song EP. Those
who have never seen Maxx War-
rior live, or haven't seen them
for a while, should listen to this
album. Lor a first release, we
believe Maxx has an intensity
and song-writing ability that
other bands have taken several
albums to reach. The songs
have a strong beat and are mix-
ed surprisingly well for an initial
attempt.
This album tastefully aba
dons the boring vocal cover-up
scheme of 'harmonic-upon-
harmonic' singing, which so
many 'kiddie' metal bands fall
into. Carl Snare effectively car-
ries the lyrics by
ing room foi
� be heard.
'Burning I) n i
Hell the last song
tener that Maxx isi
expe: iment, a quality lacV
many bands.
The fact thai tl
number one heavy-metal imp
in I ondon shows how 'W �
Mania' lias p'Cdd. we d
K look forward to a full-leng
major-label release from
band. Metal listeners should
take note ol Maxx W a ow
and in the future. Once
many thanks are due Apple
Records tor their help.
Record Industry Bows Down To Censors

By LORIN PASQl AI
The recording industry Friday
agreed to place warning labels or
print lyrics on album covers to
aid parents who want to know if
their children are buying songs
with explicit references to sex or
violence.
The inscription will read "Ex-
plicit Lyrics - Parental
Advisory The record com-
panies will decide what con-
stitutes explicit; and there are no
guidelines.
Those singers whose contracts
give them control over the design
of the album cover are free to ig-
nore the understanding. In addi-
tion, record companies may skip
the special advisory if they print
the exact words of the lyrics on
the album covers.
According to Jay Dillon,
manager of Apple Records in
Greenville, the new ruling pro-
bably won't have any adverse ef-
fects on local record sales or
mm
bands' popularity. What's more,
he believes the stickers will do lit-
tle more than create controversy.
"Most artists do have control
over the art design oi their album
co' .ts and the way the albums
are made up he said.
Some bands may even welcome
the advisories, especially since the
warning labels can spur heated
debate and draw attention to
groups that otherwise may go un-
noticed, he added.
Take members of the heavy
metal group W.A.S.P who
garnered national attention by
making explicit references to sex
and violence in their songs. Like
a few other current rock artists,
they openly endorse the warning-
label ruling and have already
begun placing advisory notices on
their albums.
Moreover, singer "Frank Zap-
pa has been using his own brand
of warning stickers for years
Dillon said. On the inside sleeve
of his 1984 album Tiger - Fish, as
on previous albums, he takes a
tongue-in-cheek jab at rock V
roll censorship bv stating the
following: "WARNING -
Gl ARANTEE- This album con-
tains material which a truly free
society would neither fear nor
supress. In some socially retarded
areas, religious fanatics and
ultra-conservative political
organizations violate your First
Amendment rights by attempting
to censor rock 'n' roll albums.
He feel this is Unconstitutional
and un-American. As an alter-
native to these government-
supported programs (designed to
keep you docile and ignorant)
Barking Pumpkin (Zappa's
record label) is pleased to provide
stimulating digital, audio enter-
tainment for those of you who
have outgrown the ordinary
The language and concepts con-
tained herein are
GUARANTEED NOT TO
CAUSE ETERNAL TORMENT
IN THE PLACE WHERE THE
GUY WITH THE HORNS AND
POINTED STICK CONDUCTS
HIS BUSINESS
i
Y�?
-�rfjay k.

m
-
� �r
4
Maintaining Order
ROB POOL ECV Rm I if
Every Fall, little piles of leaves begin to appe a r here and there. To the ECU student, the mere sight
of them is a comforting reminder of the constant cycle that is nature. This year, students might be
reminded that leaves don't fall into piles naturally �- they are raked!

11
Man-O-Stick
Tooth
Overkill
f
gf
WalkiiT The
1





Out
S1SCS �Lx
�MPRf
-
!hrMl student, the mere sight
ire. This vear, students might be
all the are raked!
i ooiHshiir
! HI I AMAKOI IMAN
VAF-MBhR 5, mi
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
�J

m
� Ml Ml4
WUMf�,
"�r.i
w: nm
-IJi
'�� v . �����
� �. mmu �
a j �� . 9RAt �
V�
A
t r
M �
� � �
1 , ,
� �
- �

� i-
. 10RP
S
1
r-
u

II
0 - � s
Man-O-Stick Bv jarrell &johnson
Tooth
By BROOKS
h


Overkill
:3E$3i)
- 1 can tW A'
��v
L
By PAUL F RI EDRICH
1
VN

II
v
s. K 7 h

Ali !
Ju
M 8
1 :
Ptt wZnfc '&$
��
-iW

sum
Y
V '

Walkin' The Plank
By A. GUY
ft $�k o �. p :��� �
10 �As . ��-
fkts.PtNi wS sK A.io '
MAV�i Ht i 0-Slt(s LI
M&igt (Jl piPN 0� �'?
CuiAK5 lil. iNVtt UKf
5fcA0 Ht 1"0 Vg�Ri ' 1
Hft fHt COLD, MiCK
fAMlK Tut W�6v.HU.HMl.O
Two friends
raised under
one root
Bryon saw the
future coming
Mark never knew
what hit him.









K
STARTS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 8TH
AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
��� 1 j. i5HiK5K4ixiKi;i'5Ki)4HaKiKS
REBEL '86
PROSE AND POETRY
Contest
9





� Open to current ECU students
� Kntn date Nov. 7
� Bring entries by Rebel Office from 9 to 5
2nd floor Publications Bldg.
� Please include name, address, phone number
?PRIZES:
1st, $100; 2nd, $75; 3rd, $50
ART COMPETITION
� Open to current ECU students
� 2-D work must be ready to ha ng, framed or matted and acetated
� 3-D work must be self-supporting
� A completed entry form must accompany each piece
� A $1.00 entry fee per piece (limit of 3 pieces per artist)
ENTRY DATE
Nov. 6, 9-5 p.m. Bring entries
to the Rebel Office, 2nd floor
Publications Bldg.
� Winners will be on display in the Art and Camera Gallery Sov.
9-15, with a reception on Sov. 9 from 7-9 p.m. in the Gallery.
� PRIZES: Best in Show, $125 if
� First place per category, $25 if

Ceramics
Design
Drawing
Illustration
CA TEGORIES:
Mixed Media
Painting
Photography
Printmaking
Sculpture





I HI- l-ASI C AKOI INIAN
Basketball Team
A waits New Season
Sports
V I MHJ K
By SCOIT COOPER
sport, r dior
A young ECU basketball learn
awaits its 1985-86 season, and
fourth-year head coach Charlie
Harrison is optimistic about the
campaign
"We have upperclassmen who
have played and been through a
season Harrsion said. "They
have experienced winning and
losing at the big-time college
level
The Pirates, who suffered
through a 21 season, finished at
the bottom o' the ECAC-South
Conference a yeai ago. However,
the ECAC South, as o' June 6,
1985. is now known as the Col-
onial Athletic Association
With only two seniors occupy-
ing the 14-man roster. EC I is
basically a young team. With
tour freshman recruits and
junior-college transfer Marchell
Henry, coach Harrison believes
their impact was fell immediate
1-
"All five can make a contribu-
tion Harrison said.
"Although, we're still at a stage
where we haven't been defin
roles. We just don know right
now.
7 think we can have a
good team. "
�Charlie Harrison
"I have been verv pleased with
our freshman class Harrsion
continued. "They (the freshman)
have pushed our older guys They
will have some playing time
depends on how they develop
The Pirates are basically a
small team, with the excepti
of 6-10 junior center 1 eon Bass
junior Peter Dam
However, the problem of ECU's
inabilitv ' score on the inside is
still apparent. accordii
Harrison.
'The key is the same as it was
going inti last year � what kind
o piav we get from oui inside
people Harrison said. "We
can't continue to get killed on the
inside like we have the past two
seasons arid hope to be suc-
cessful. I plan to do whatever it
takes to nuke our inside game
more effective
ECU had a tough time lasi
year, being outrebounded bv
more than seven per game by
conference foes. Bass, who miss
ed some games earlv due to a leg
injury, led the Bucs with 5.0
boards per game, while guard
Curt Vanderhorst was second
with a 4.3 average
"Size and rebounding are not
synonomous. You can't teach
sie Harrison remarked. "We
have to let our instinctive ways
take over. 1 think we can have a
good team
sie Harrison remarked. "We
have to let out instinctive ways
take over. 1 think we can have a
.ood team
With the addition of Henry
(6-5, 215 co-captain), freshman
-1 Clark (6 -5, 220) and Manuel
(ones (6-5, 200) along with
returnees William Grady (6-2.
185), Jack lumbiii 6 9, 200) and
Derrick Battle �6 6. 190), ECU
may look to be tough at the foi
waid spot in '85-86
Grady, who was the team's se-
cond leading scorei (Is" ;
last year, broke the school's
sophomore scoring record with
his 440 points. However, Grady's
biggest task was that ot a defen
sive role. He was usually assigned
to the opponents' best scorer.
Grady used his spe

and
quickness to overcome ins height
disadvantage.
� blight spot for the Pirate
squad has to be in the backcouri
spearheaded by returning starters
Va tderhoi S1 and Herb Do
Vanderhorst, who lead 1 . I
scoring (10 ppg), will provide
the senior leadership as well as
excellent perimetei shootinj
the squad. Dixon, wh I the
starting spot midway through the
season, averaged 13.5 ppg
6.2 assists pei game in ECl 's
12 games the 'v campaigi
"He (Dixon) has mu
confidence in his jumpshoi I
did as a freshman Harrison
"For us to be successful,
is got I -
ffe : n ore
loining andei I 1 Dp
he backcoui I will be sei
v iti Hardy (5 9, 170),
Keith Sledge (6 V 190) I
Jet t Kelly (5-9, 160) and J
Williams (6-3, 170)
Hardy,
f
e team's c� cap
Sledge pi i ided �
rebi md i
ai
Lady Pirates Hold
Team Scrimmage
Bv IIMCHAVDI IK
Ihe I ady Pirate Ba �
team held their s
Gold intrasquad scri
the season this pa
Mmges COhsemi!
I he Purple squad w as
ot Alma Bethea, Sylvia Bi
I arraine Foster, and !
Griei. Delphine Ma
Pompili, and I isa 5
Gold unit
tesa Durkin, atl
Rose Millet, Chi
and Greta O N
Ridgeway. lody k z, Li
netteTuckei
rhe twi
I w i i t e i
Those periods w
five-minute p
rosters wer
Head milv Ma
I
.
Cords!
Despite Leon Bass' (left plea for the ball, Scott Hardy (lOi fires this
jumpshot in some action last year. Ihe Pirates will see action a week
from today when the hosi the Irish National I earn in Minxes
Auditorium.
said that she was
pleased; witl
pei formana

� .
ecuted with m
time. I hat
backed up by
pie team's
During lha
team
field and we
the free-thro a
�s sista
said that sh(
. M
Golden Eagles Swamp ECU 27-0
Pirates will
� get her a s lid
"We w ill pla
a- we can d:
mented. "We � ' up
depends on the personnel
"()u i strengtl
around out quickness and our
abiluv to rut Harrison added.
W e're mm
b(
king
(the basket), we're not big. but
we have skill with the ball. I think
we are one o the quicker teams
in the league and if we can take
advantage ol that, it will he a
plus
The Pirates will firs! see action
a week from today when I
' the Irish National I
No. 12m Mingesoliseui
rest of the 1(1 schedule is as
follows.
See BASKETBAL1 . Pa�e 9
Bv M )I IOOPrK
SporU 1 lUun
mecommg
�d at 17,000 was on
den 1 agles
M ippi downed
.
S � Mississippi, now 6-2,
� pla
1I
til jason,
except on.
"1 Aas .ii e ol those nij

T Make: said.
"O it ion and out
football
,i
Despil 27-0 score, ECl
( n ilden Eagles until
twi �.�HA tei scores blew
the game open. Ihe Pirates could
not capitalize on several Southern
Miss turnovers, as the Buc
defense could only contain the
1 s offense foi ng.
rhe Eagles started quickly.
With the help ol an ECU
rouj he-passer penalty.
1 SM drove to the Pirate 1 l-yard
before the defense stiffened.
ke Banks' 27-yard fieldgoal
e USM an early 3-0 lead
The Pirates got their first
takeaway when USM's Vincent
exandei was stripped
ball 1 C I seemed to be in
ness on then own 4,
1 1:06 remaining in the half.
However, the Bucs faded to
capitalize on the I agle miscue.
Ihe 'big-play' pirate defense
respond V tl
V a
leveled USM
drew Andei
tow nfie
ei rani pas; hat
linebacket Bubba V
stt EAGLES, Pac 10
Bobby C lair (301 finds a common mudpudde as he cuts behind a Pirate
Fagles of Southern Mississippi.
JIM LEUTSENS - TM � Ml Cr�in.a�
blocker in ECl 's loss to the Golden
Pirate Swimmers Drown Furman In Opener
By DAVID McGINNESS
akUll SporU f dMor
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams began their dual-
meet season with big wins over
Furman University last Saturday.
Among the standouts for the
Buc men were Bruce
Brockschrrudt and Keith Kaut
with three victories, while David
Killeen and Kevin Hidalgo had
two firsts.
Pirate swim coach Rick Kobe
was ecstatic with the mens' per-
formance against Furman.
"The guys went into the meet
as slight underdogs and ended up
dominating the meet, winning
nine of eleven events Kobe
said. "This is one of the nicest
wins we've had since I've been
here at ECU
Both teams are coming ofl an
'8485 season that was one ol
their best ever, making the earlv
win that much more satisfying.
"It's great to win both the
men's and women's first meet
said Kobe. "Usually one of the
teams is stionger and you have
split victories in your dual meets.
This year both our teams are
strong, it could be our best
season ever
The women's win was even
more spectacular, in that it came
against a Furman team that was
ranked No. 5 in the nation last
year.
The Pirate swimmers will host N.C. State Nov
"I his is the greatest victory in
ECl 's history. Our girls were
severe underdogs in this meet
Kobe said. "We knew we'd have
a chance to beat them if we could
be mentally tough, but this is a
team that sent five girls to the
( Y- nationals last year
One surprising aspect of the
womens' victory was that the)
won only three of eleven events.
This statistic is somewhat deceiv-
ing though. Although the Fur-
man women won eight events,
they were unable to sweep the
No. 1 and 2 slots in any of their
wins. This meant that instead of
getting eight or nine points per
event, they could only get five.
The ECU women however,
1-2'd their opposition in two of
the three events they won, rack-
ing up valuable points.
Another important factor in
the womens' victory was the per-
formance of Sherry Campbell in
the one and three-meter diving
events. Campbell won both, scor-
ing 16 points to Furman's two
and in the process qualified for
the NCAA regionals.
Among the outstanding swims
by the women, Susie Wentink
broke the ECU varsity record in
the 200-yard breastroke by over
two seconds. Scotia Miller won
the 200 freestyle, Caycee Poust
took the 200 IM and 200 butterfly
and Brenda Horton snagged a
win in the 200 backstroke.
The Pirate tankers will see ac-
tion next on Nov. 18 when they
host the N.C. State Wolf pack.
ECl has iK-ver beaten the peren-
nial ACC powerhouse in its
40-year history, a streak the 1985
Bucs will be looking to end.
Men's Meet
400 medley: East Carolina (Bruce
Brockschmidt, Lee Hicks, Kevin
Hidalgo, Keith Kaut) 3:39.27.
1000 free: Stratton Smith (EC)
10:03.75; Paul Johnson (F)
10:16.87; Andv Cook (EC)
10:17.53.
200 free: David Killeen (PC
1:47.12; John Reddon (F)
1:49.63; Mark Kothel (F) 1:50.5.
50 free: Keith Kaut (EC) 22.48;
Jeff Brown (EC) 23.56; Steve
Renyolds (F) 23.76.
200 IM. Bruce Brockschmidt
(EC) 1:58.95; Kevin Howard (F)
2.05.09; David Robaczewski
(EC) 2:06.30.
1-meter diving: (Furman took
first, but name and points
unavailable); Luke Durkin (EC)
246.5; Greg Stevens (EC) 180.0.
200 fly: Kevin Hidalgo (EC)
2:00.29; Paul Johnson (F)
2:01.64; Eric Hawkins (EC)
2:10.68.
100 free: Keith Kaut (EC)
48.21; Mark Kothel (F) 49.81;
Ronald Fleming (EC) 50.93.
200 back: Bruce Brockschmidt
ilc 2:00.68; Si
(EC) 2:07.92; hris Berg (1 I
2:31.12
500 free: David Killeen (EC)
4:51.90; Paul Johnson (1
5:00.76; Andv ook I
5:01.56.
3-meter diving: (Fui i a
first, but names and
unavailable); Luke Durkin (1
238.5; Greg Stevens (EC) 203
200 breast: Steve Renyolds (F)
2:16.32; lee Hicks 2:16
Kevin Howard (F) 2:17 95
400-freestyle relay Fun
(Kothel, Rembert. Stewart, Red-
din) 3:19.32.
Women's Meet
400-medley relay: Furman
(Christine Hortvell, Leslie
Dupree, Paula Boehme, P
Winters) 4:10.53.
1000 free: Kirn Pagkal (F)
10:51.22; Scotia Miller (EC)
10:53.02; Jill Gorenflo (EC)
11:45.35.
200 free: Scotia Miller (E I
2:02.81; Jenny Pierson it c
2:03.29; Paige Winters (I)
2:03.78.
50 free: Angela Myers (1 )
24.77; Angela Winstead (EC)
25.97; Ellen McPherson (EC)
27.32.
200 IM: Leslie Dupree (F)
2:14.92; Caycee Poust (EC)
2:16.5; Susie Wentink (EC)
2:22.48.
1-meter diving: Sherri Camp-

(E s � i .
ame ai
e�.
Paula Boehme
Vugustus
! 26; . :
2 5.71.
Myei
53.4M EC) 57.52;
ngela Wmstead (1 3.43
200 back: Bi rnda Horton (EC I
2:15.5 Ion I ivingston (EC)
2:17.16; Christine Hartell (F)
2:19.47.
500 tree Kin Pagkal tl
5 21.80; 5 Miller tl (
5:26.26; Jill Gorenflo (1 (
59.
netet diving: Sheri Campbell
(EC) 2: 5; Denise Pofl (EC)
223 3; (Furman took thud, but
name and points unavailable).
200 breast Susie Wentink (EC)
2 3 ! 96; Leslie Dupree (1
2:32.40; Jan ingold (F) 2:38.03
400-free relay: Furman (Angel
Mvers, Christine Hartzell, Kim
Pagkal. Paige Winters) V.44.94.
J meter diving: Sheri Campbell
(EC) 22 5; Denise Poff (EC)
223.3; (Furman took third, but
name and points unavailable).
200 breast; Susie Wentink (EC)
2 3 1.96; Leslie Dupree (F)
2 52.40; Jan Ingold (F) 2:38.03.
400 free relay: burrnan (Angel
Mvers, Christine Hartzell, Kim
Pagkal, Paige Winters) 3:44.94.
Baske
De
la 4

Mai
w
ECl womtn
Services, and p
Lagnaf
Holds
Football
Tourney
D
lags i
hall I


I
V e.
s s; -
1$






i MM K ' '�'
d
I P
ener
Basketball Schedule
v am pi
Duke
t di nboro State
Iong wood ollege
Wn I hi op i ollege
al Kentuck) 11
sMl . K ky, B ucknell)
al Sienaollege
i S . .i.i t
MI Rl
N
alan
R l( HMOND
W II 1 IAM&MAR
V MINCiK N
GHORGl MASON
I AMI S MADISON
al W1 1 RICAN
a I N
�. Wa ke I
RI( HM )N1)
WI1.I I 1 & MAR1!
IV MIN HON
t a
1 ORGt MAS N
: Mi SMAD1SI )N
CAA 1
C A A 1
I oration
Greenville,
I urham,
(. ireenv tile,
(ireenville,
i ii eenille.
(
(
N
N(
N
Ruggers Crush Wake
.i. foui ne
Iournev
I exincton, K N
I oudonv tile,
(ireenville,
t ireen ille,
I ayetteville,
Richmond,
illiamsburg,
W ilmington,
I niversit Patk.
(rreen ille,
(ireenville,
Washington, I
V: � I
inston Salem,
( ireenv ille,
c ireenville,
ireenv
(, �reen ille
I ai
Ha

N
N
(
V
V
VA
N
PA
N
l
) (
MD
N
N(
N
(
N(


i BA

It I kugtn I earn trami
V ake Forest 24 4 last Saturda
Winston-Salem, giving them .i
shot a! the Northarolina v
title, and an oppurtunitv to
in the regional championship;
Atlanta, (ia
I he Pirates scored the first
nine points ol thi
opening 10 minim
test. David Schumachet
pen alt plav in from ! 2 r: etei
catching the 1 eai on? oft qu
and scoring the try Mike Hi
converted the extra-poini a
to make the si ore I
ECU kept the hall i V ik
.Mmma
one of the several aerobi fitness classes Hired bv the Intramural-Recreational
ng some enjoyment for onlookers as well.
Lagnaf
Holds
Football
Tournev
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th & Dickinson Ave.
WE BUXGOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
y. All Transactions Confidential V8-
V H
752-0322
; 9:00 sn-o00 pM flow.7Nll.

Speoais Good Thru Sept 30h
2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscuit
1 Mashed Potatoes w Gravyv
$1.89 X
:
? a? Greenville Stores Only
60C vV Greenville Blvfl ?S6 6434 o
"905 E 5th St 752 5184 "t
1
We Buy
Used Albums H
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St. 758-4298
FREE EYEGLASS
FRAMES
WIIH INK PI RCHASK OK PRhSCWPI ION LENSES
r
i
Joke's On Uss
Food �llv�rv Co
I
Deliver For S
( h��is�- trnm nur Ure selection of fa.in frames
j 03 ToOU OFF
I ALL FRAMES IN STOCK
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order for discount
Not Good S ith Other Advertised S pecials
( Ol PON EXPIRES NOV.39, 1985
SOFT !
j CONTACTS j
vJOjJwIiik s-
w � � �� � � � � � � J S
� W ean Arrange An Fe hxarn For VouOn Ihe Same l)a
� Ask About Our Senior
( itiens 20�n Discount
�ar M. Harris
I icensed Optician
"70M.ren�illf Bld
A i rOM rum
1 he Plav
vrs
The
OPTICAL
PALACE
OPEN �:30 M to 6 PM MONDAY 1HH1 FRIDAY � PHONr 7V-42(M
I ward th ei 1 ' 11 � ga
.Phillip Ritchey picked off a ;
!?from a W ake Fore .1 ba ?
scrambled 4 meters 1
HBrown added
S ali�
ill i� e i i6 4 Bu y tggei i '
1� - unning fot the state cl
t� � . N'l n Satut 1 ' � � the tate title lea Da
lit, EC1Schum � Pira .quad.
� S 1 am reaJl) excited. 1 �
: .Schui
ECI
: I'
�e �
'j al �
The Sports
Department
would like to
thank all of those
who helped make
it possible. We'll
be looking for-
ward to it again.
Thanks.
Phillip Kiuh. ha- the ball as DumiI Schumacher (left) and I)aid
N Hi i l2 look 11n m a tMm aainsihern Point Runbvlub.
ABORTIONS LP
fh ftHNhIO 12th WEEK
nOFPREGNANCY
11S Aboi from 13 18 weeks �: �ddj-
r w �. �' H'cgnncv Test. Bir.h C'oniroi. and
VA.Pre �. Counsebni Foj further
jaP1. � I � . � � r et .Nui.ioer
MflB0O-532-53I4) between 9 AM uwl ' P M
"2weekdays IliDftH wOMll-n MtALTM OAOANtlAtlOMS
? 17 W�t tAmrgom V
ECU Has Heart
I
Major Concerts Committee: u
HEART Thursday Nov. 7 I
g "i p.m. at Minges Coliseum
Films Committee:
(jHOSTBI sters
Thurs Fri & Sat.
Nov. 7, 8, &9at 7:00
9:00 p.m.
Forum Committee:
LARRY LINVILLE � "Frank Burn" from MASH nill lecture
and present an uncut version of MASH. Monda, Nov. 11 at 8
p.m. HENDRIX THEATRE, rickets ma be obtained at Mendenhall
Student Center Ticket Office.
Recreation Committee:
Men's All Campus labk' Tennis
Thursday, Nov. 7 at 6 p.m. Mendenh; S udent Center
Men's Billiards
Tuesday, Nov. 1 al fs p.m
Turkey Shoot In Bowling
Thursday, Nov. 21 at " p.m.
Student Centei Bowlineentei
The Underground
Rock World Videos Tuesdays at 1:30
Movie Shorts Thursdays at 1:30
(Including 3 Stooges and manynvrt .
Ground Floor, Mendenhall
i �
a
ualluring place
RtACHNO OUT TO SWVE YtXJ
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 757611 Ext. 266
i





10
I Ml 1 sl t. KOl IM
NOVEMBER S, is�s
Intramural
ByJEANNETTEROTH
The Department oi
Intramural Recreational Services
has something new to offei
faculty staff and students oi
ECU. Fa the first time ever,
Tues. Nov. 19 from 3-5 pm, In-
tramurals in cooperation with
ECU Dining Services, will spon-
sor a Turkey Trot.
The event is a pan of the
intramural-poini system con
sisting o' a four men-women
relay team running the 1985 four-
mile Cross Campus Run route. 11
divisions have been set up to ac-
commodate all members of the
University community;
tacuity staff men and women,
co-ed facultystaff, fraternity A
and B, sorority, men's and
women's residence hall, men's
and women's independent and
co-recreational.
First-place winners will receive
a Thanksgiving treat � a
20-pound turkey. Second-place
winners can bring home the
dessert pumpkin pie. The
registration deadline is Mon
Nov. IS at the 7:30 pm team cap-
tain's meeting held in the balcony
of Memorial Gym.
Intramural team bowling has
struck the lane o' Mendenhall
Student Center. I his year's
'Alley Cats' are more powerful
than ever. In opening games,
fraternity topplers, Sigma Phi
Epsilon looked extremly tough as
they rolled a high 1315. In the
ladies lanes, Tootsie Rollers'
have the high game with an as-
tounding 1154
IndivdualK, Mark Royster is
going for the intramural record.
In his debut match, Mark poured
in 191 points tor his squad.
I he top-five picks have been
chosen, and here's how the pin
busters look for 1985:
Women
1. Powerhouse Women
2. Alpha Delia Pi
3. Sigma Phi Epsilon
Goldenhearts
4. Sole Rollers
5. Delta eta
Men
1. Sigma Phi Epsilon 'V
2. Powerhouse Men
Turkey Trot
Cheerleading Competition
The Fast Carolina University
varsitv cheerleading squad is one
oi more than 150 college and
university teams scheduled to
particpate in the Ford College
Cheerleading Championship for
1985.
Now in its fourth year, the an-
nual competition showcases the
mosl outstanding squads in the
United States based on en-
thusiasm, timing, rhythm,
athletic ability and overall effect
of performance on spectators.
Finals will be held at Seaworld in
San Diego, c alif in January.
This yeai the competition will
include Division I and II schools
in audition to Division I col-
leges. Winners will be chosen in
each category as squads vie foi
national recognition as well as an
all-expense-paid trip to San
Diego from the lord Motor
Eagles
Successful
Continued from pae 8
The drive stalled, however, and
Jeff Heath's 4! yard fieldgoal ai
tempt was wide left.
Southern Mi.s didn't take long
to answer, fter a Pirate 15-ya
penalty and a I SM pass comple-
tion, Randolph Brown dashed 43
yards for theSCOre. This
USM a 10iiCi il� alf.
A dowi ;�.
half got underwa�
team comn
ly. USM'sS:
Ron J(1 v 47.
Howeveis.rn Miss
drive� � as
Was hi n jed USM's
Andersoitillnble. ai
Carta recovered (n th� Pirate
42.
At tins point
ed possessionsandkepi the ball
in the middleof�
where the trationseemed to be
the worst.
USM finallyb go-
ing and marclas fai as the
Pirate nine, beforesettling tor a
Banks 26-van1 fieldgoal. fhe
Eagles had a 13-0 advantage with
seconds remainingin the third
period.
The Pirate offense could not
get on track. Ihev were struggl-
ing with each possession, accor-
ding to coach Baker.
"The offense was trying to
hard and began to get tense
Baker said. "They were hurting
themselves.
"When the defense knows you
can't pass the ball, they will key
on the run Baker added.
"Since the Penn State game, our
offense has steadilv declined
After another Tim Wolter
punt, USM mounted a seven
play, 66-yard drive to take a com-
manding 20-0 lead.
A Keith Ford interception gave
ECU the ball on the USM 39.
However, it was too little too late
for Pirates, as they were unable
to make anything of the tur-
nover. The Eagles managed to
tack on one more touchdown on
a Shelton Gandv 52-yard run,
leaving the final score, 27-0.
Despite the USM scoring ef-
fort, coach Baker was pleased
with his defensive unit.
"The defense played well
despite the three big plavs
Baker said. "David Plum may
have had his best game ot the
year. Vinson Smith also played
very well. Washington and
Waters played well also, they
combined on 11 tackes
The injury bug has also hit the
Pirates. Deep snapper Stuart
Ward injured a leg. Offensive
tackle Greg Thomas and defen-
sive tackle Joe Grinage missed
the USM game. Paul Hoggard is
also questionable for the Auburn
game next week.
"We are going to try to im-
prove and get some sort of of-
fense going Baker said. "I'm
not going to wave the white
flag.
c ompany. Each squad will sub-
mit an unedited videotape oi a
cheer, sideline chant and fight
song for judging. "We'll be
scrutinizing these tapes for
cheerleading skills and techniques
as well as crowd appeal said
Jeff Webb, president of Univer-
sal Cheerleaders Association, the
sanctioning body for the il-
lustrious event. "Cheerleading
on the college level requires
superior gymnastic skills, tremen-
dous stamina and real com-
munication with the crowd.
Dial's what our judges will be
looking for
"We at Ford are proud to
return as sponsor for this annual
event said Ross Roberts,
general marketing manager of the
Ford Division. "We're pleased to
be associated with such fine
young men and women and we
strongly believe that our colleges
will continue to provide the
future strength of this country
The final competition will be
broadcast over the Entertainment
and Sports Programming Net-
work (ESPN), according to the
soft-spoken Webb. I ast year
NBC telecast the finals from
Hawaii during a prime-time
special.
UCA, now in its l ith yeai
operation, held more than 120
clinics and camps in 28 states for
over 45.(MX) high school and col
lege cheerleaders this summer.
Here i to Bar-
bara and Gael:
The mothers of
two great young
sons � what else
can we say.
Don't laugh.
Mazeltov.
3. Phi Kappa Tau 'A'
4 Army ROTC B"
Intramural team volleyball has
hit the courts of Minges Col-
iseum r lie men's division is up
foi grabs as last year's champs,
I bird Regiment have gone into
early retirement. Three squads
are undefeated in the men's in-
dependent division: Lucky Seven,
rhe Victims and Phi Kappa Tau
'( ' Oddsmakers like the spiking
powers oi the lucky Seven and
look tor them to capture this
year's title.
In the women's league, last
year's all-campus stars the
Destitutes are back under a new
alias. Volleyball fans mav
remember the powers of co-rec's
Good, Bad and Ugly. Well, the
gals have got a team of their own
and a No. 1 ranking to go along
with it.
Here's how this year's spiker
are ranked:
Men
1. Lucky Seven
2. 307 Spikes
3. Sigma Phi Epsilon 'A'
4. C.H.U.D.
5. Phi Kappa Tau A'
Women
1. Good, Bad and Ugly
2. The Unknowns
3. Sigma Phi Epsii
Goldenhearts
4. The Gumby's
5 Hawaiian Noises
g�W�W��MHW3W3WX3�S3
CONTACT LENSES
y!05.00 DAILY WEAR
$ 145.00
EXTENDED WEAR
�� :�' s &t ses core �I and fotfow-ig I
Studor � -r discounts qdCv
OPTOMCTWC
�YECAR�C�N7�R
Dr Peter w hqiIis
,�-�� � �'
Pa
Ihe Tipton Annex
228 Greem ��
Greenville NC 27834
� -So-94
I



1 - 'DC �4 J
ECU Student Union
MAJOR CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
presents
Nov. 7. 1985
p-� 8:00 p.m.
flmges (Joliseum
Tickets A vailable at
ECU Central Ticket Office &
Apple Records Downtown Greenville
$10 Students
$12 General Public & At The Door
f





39993c0598f3aace595334ee1554d03c 00057753.0001.tif
2b5a93a63790b59c83a2e9dce03eb5c1 00057753.0002.tif
562c1f309caf55cc2083d627ae09729a 00057753.0003.tif
93047c72b90f7df5ee16a89ed3996b76 00057753.0004.tif
db4c624e7e302f6565b98d479936ff2d 00057753.0005.tif
fcb836b3ae33fb7feee8ff8e9ad7a2b7 00057753.0006.tif
121d7bc819f746bdfdf648d9972dbe8e 00057753.0007.tif
fe7f22d7c390ee878c1117e6671390ff 00057753.0008.tif
a2a2506840c96d32285234d1289fc6bc 00057753.0009.tif
e7331ffb8920a104507b382c48fdd8c5 00057753.0010.tif





Title
The East Carolinian, November 5, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.437
Location of Original
University Archives
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy