The East Carolinian, October 31, 1985






�Jje �u$t (EntalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.fcO No
V
I hursdav, October 31, 1985
Greenville, N.C
10 Paj�es
Circulation 12.000
Halloween Night Need
Not Be Nightmare
Bicycles
jiMLEoTGENS Tif E� Cr0imin
I his unique shot of an EC! student's rnM r eliable form of transportation will be soon vanishing.
1 hi cooler weather, which is fast approading . will quickly put an end to pedal power. Nevertheless,
there will always be those dedicated diehods who will ride through rain, sleet and snow.
Scott Dorm 9s South Wing
Disputed Between Students
Bv DOl'Ci ROBr RSON
si�ff ni�r
Students who are planning to
attend the downtown street part
on Halloween pve should take a
tew safety precautions to insure
that their celebration doesn't
become a "night oi terror
Greenville Police Chief Ted
Holmes said that his department
wants ECU students to have a en-
joyable and safe Halloween.
"We want every : have a
good time, but we also want them
to follow a tew safety precautions
as well he said.
Holmes recommended that
students who have consumed
alcholic beverages to be especially
careful when walking downtown.
"There is the potential danger
� someone being struck b a car
while walking to the down wi
area, especially if they've tx
drinkingHolmes said
He added that students i
while under the influence have
bee a problem in recent
Halloween
Holmes said thai tud
� u 1 d wear I i g h 1
clothing in order to be more
viable todrivers r those wl
plan to waik. light c t ed
clothing is essential
With the onset of colder
weather, student- should also
dress warmly, especially it the
have been drinking, he added.
As in recent years, the
downtown area will be blocked to
traffic on Halloween.
Holmes said the Downtown
Bar -V - U � out a per-
mit to close the streets bul
they hadn't, we (Greenville
P ; �: Depart ment) would
have
cc 'dii g � Creenville police
Captain Nelson Staton, bar-
ricades will be placed at the in-
tersects ns �i the I wing
stree � Reade and Con-
tanche
� Fourth and (
� Reade and 1 I
� Fiftl aJ E - I
� 42otub pa:King lot exil

Sta 20 oi
. .
�.��-� trea Ha ween
s � �
we're le ikely t ha e i r able
He led 11 e presence :
a led t o in-
late tudentsP lice and
� . dei ' get ng ell

aii tward
Holmes said there are - wo
areas of concern for students
the dowr iwn ara on
Ha iween 1 �� "We've r.ad a
problem with student try .
climb light poles. Oi course,
they're in danger of falling .
being injured he said.
� other problem in recent
downtown Halloween celel
�he number I
:ealed weapons found on persons
in the area.
"People 'ake weapons with
' a cr wd la ear we
found four or five concealed r
dguns. We dor kn why peo-
ple take wear i i ���
1 -�- a-c no one's bee
� yetHi aid.
Recei ' d wntown H ween
ns, H me ud, have
- ible-free
re have been a
Fighi � the pasi few c-ar - n
a r vai da n
B � ii � e and 5tat i
n d e d
� . le : i wall
: e n I1 i ween Eve
Stat idded . adies
. -� Pa" . � .
- ' walk alone
v IIPADa indler, a three-yeai
.aid, " 1 n.
�� � �S " 1 ecause 1 Sc
-I'd rathei . pai I -
1 rm.
�Statistics show mat s.

ms, which lias caused
'� residents to
:
-
Sc va la that 1 knew 1
.
1:

-

. sp-
e ' . tes-
tt air (
try foi
ng ii Belk said
Ka
ccord ite Dean
nee Life
im, such a m �
possible; however, it w uld re-
. ha ige in the
policies thai permit
tudei
tudeni
move will be
priority in cho
; added Fulghun
higl est retention
rate ol any other residence I i
� ECl 's campus, with an ap-
; umate 71 perceni retention
rate in is means thai oniy ap-
- 29 percent of x
freshmen and transfer
I reshman Paul Jones said tl al
: e ; lered bin :11 I
v pan � thai 2v percent "1
� i sec a change
� Scott he added.
Ka lid thai tl e change is
necessary rder to improve
ECU's ng capabilities. "It
we are t be successful as we at-
tempt to recruit the best qua
student athletes we can tor our
athletic program, this would
ible is to be more successful
"This is what motivates us to
attempt to move that particular
up into air conditioned
quarters added karr.
Vice Chancellor tor Student
Life Elmer Meyer, agreed with
Karr, saying the move would
definitely help in current
recruiting practices. "One thing
students look for is air condition-
ed dorms when applying to a
university added Mever.
Of the 135 ii idem athletes who
live Belk, Karr is requesting
- al 12" be moved into the newly
air- cordwed wing .j So I
which is inclu �ive i the 192 beds
which are available in the air c
ditioned wing.
"Basically, my reques: is to
ise 120 of 135 oi our fi tl
squad that presently occupy
Belk saju Kair. Karr selected
120 as "the magic number
because he said there would be
too many problems sun mnding
a move oi 135, bu- also said that
he thought the request of 120 to
be tnore reasonable.
"1 think as evidenced bv :he
we have athletes spread
throughout the number
dorms, ue don't feel that we have
ave a "Bear Bryant Hall' or a
place that we can isolate all the
etes said Karr, "but our
most present need is the air con-
ditioned beds
Sophomore Class President
Chris Harris said that it was time
say "no to the athletes and yes
to academics He added that he
was tired of seeing those who
�achieve academically under the
student athletes.
Karr did not think that it was
putting student athletes over
academics, but trying to improve
upon the existing athletic depart-
See SCOTT Page 1.
Teacher Shortage A Surprise
Baltimore. Vtd � PS. - Si U
education officials in Maryland
are startled a' the results ot a new
survey showing a need for v. ��
new teachers through 1987 wl
state universities and colleges said
that they expected to graduate no
more than 3,(XX) student; wl
plan to go into teaching
the same period.
"We didn't expect the teacher
shortage to develop in aim
every area as quickly as it did
said George Funaro, deputy state
commissioner for higher educa
tion.
Funar I that the current
critical areas are math, sciei
and foreign languages but the
shortage will quickly expand to
virtually every school program:
elementary education, art,
English, health, home
economics, industrial arts, music,
physical education, social
studies, v ocational-technical
education, and special education.
"We are now seeing the conse-
quences of years of school under-
funding, years of teacher abuse,
years of undervaluing teachers
and education said Beverly
Man ai d State
I �. e National E d u c a 11
ciai � predici thai
teacher shortage will grow eacl
yeai
between 900, �� i 1.6 n
�� teacl ers cc-jed as ;un
teaci ei s rei fes-
s i o i ��:
st c : ncrease
scl ol enr illments
M �si experts agree
teacher pay is a critical re
why many . mg people d
lei teacl at'ractve
cc �" ii i "Pay :ertain a
top cone � r cr
I Ma Hat-
id Futrell, pre
NE A, whicl is the
large :ational rj
wit I " rnbei
"The . area I rking
iii ns beg foi itteni
Tea -van; more say
dec making pi cess at
cal scl �; � el, m re help with
ts b parertts. and ade-
. late supplies, ratigtig fi
i d papers to curre
tt 3ks and computers ajj
I itrell.
Issues Discussed At Candidates Forum
trorn staff Reports
I he Candidates Forum, held
.esterday at noon, was plagued
bv rain and was moved from the
campus mall to Mendehall.
Despite the rain and change in
ation, between 40 and 50 peo-
ple were in attendence during the
-hour event, which featured
11 of 12 condidates running for
the Greenville City Council.
The only candidate running for
the council who declined to ap-
pear at the forum was ex-Chief of
Police Glenn Cannon.
A variety of issues were
discussed by a panel of student
representatives and the can-
didates, as well as members of the
audience. Among them were: stu-
dent voter registration, the plann-
ed switch by the city from an at-
large to a district electoral
system, a tenants' bill of rights,
which would identify the rights of
tenants renting housing, traffic
hazards faced by students cross-
ing 10th Street and parking in
residential areas around the
university.
After the forum, the student
panel, which had been selected to
question candidates, met to con-
sider the positions of the can-
didates and to endorse those
which best demonstrated a con-
cern for students' welfare. Janice
Buck, Ed Carter (a write-in can-
didate), H. W. Parker, and Lor
raine Shinn were endorsed
unanimously by all panel
members.
Innez Friedley was endorsed by
all panel members except by 1FC
President Mark Somon, who
cited what he alleged was an
"anti-Greek, anti-fraternity
bias" on the part of Friedley.
Unknown Facts About ECU Interesting
Bv IXH (, ROBERSON
Miff Wrltrf
Here are a few facts about
ECL) that most students may be
unaware of, courtesy of the ECU
Office i Institutional Research.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds9
hd i ton a Is4
Features6
Sports8
JO he seventy years young is
sometimes far more cheerful
and hopeful than to be forty
years old.
Oliver Wendell Holmes
The North Carolina General
Assembly voted to elevate East
Carolina College to university
status in 1967. ECU became a
constituent part of the University
of North Carolina in 1971 after
the state's higher education
system was restructured.
In 1984, ECU's enrollment was
13,826. Of these students, 2,110
came from Pitt County, 477 from
Lenoir County and 454 from
Cumberland County. In all,
11,395 students listed North
Carolina as their home state in
1984.
From 1974 to 1984, enrollment
increased from 11,341 to 13,826.
The number of black students in-
creased from 452 to 1,515 during
the same period.
In 1910, East Carolina
Teachers Training School had an
enrollment of 410 students. As of
fall semester 1985. East Carolina
University had a record enroll-
ment of over 14,000 students.
The buildings at ECU are a
major part of the school's
history. Graham Building was
completed in 1929, while
Flanagan was built in 1939. The
Science Complex was completed
in 1969 and Brewster Building
followed in 1970.
The oldest residence hall is Jar-
vis, which was built in 1909. Both
Flemming and Cotton were built
in the 1920's. Greene, White,
Clement, Belk and Tyler were
built in the mid- to late60s.
Both the schools of business
and nursing were established in
1960. The schools of music and
art were established in 1962. The
General College was created in
1969 and the School of
Technology in 1971. The School
of Medicine was established in
1976.
In 1978, the average Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) score of in-
state freshmen was 866. In 1984.
the combined verbal and math
scores was 826. Over 33 percent
of the incoming freshmen in 1984
ranked in the top 50 of their high
school class.
Happy Hallo aee n Tw �.� c,�
This was the scene at last year's RoxyMasquerade Ball. Most
likely, this year's Halloween scene will be q uite simular to last
year's � with lot's of costumes, drUdng , and good times.
However, to make sure the night remains fes tive one, heed a few
simple precautions, and have a happy Halowe en. See related story
on page 1.

�"� "
t i - �� .�





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Deadline: Frida. November 1
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Hoohrr Memorial Christian Church
I Mm iples "I fins'
I I 1 I Greenville Hk�l
Special (lasses Forollege Students
hristian Education all ages
11 00 i m Worship- Opnommunion
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Survey Begins
A survey is being conducted by Marketing
Research 4622, School of Business, to better
determine your opinion of The East
Carolinian.
Surveys may be picked up at the Student
Supply Store, Croatan, Jones Dorm or
'Mendenhall Student Center.
We would appreciate your cooperation in
filling out this survey.
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Greenville Recreation & Parks
I he Greenville Recreation A I'arks Department is rei rutting '�' 10 la 14 pan
1 lime basketball coaches for fht ninler program, ppbcanls must possess some
J knowledge of basketball skills and has. the abililv and p alienee lo work with
$ vouths. Applicants must be able to coach voting people, ages 9-18, in basWethall
� fundamentals
X
Hours art from 3 p m. lo 1 p.m Mon. through In . and some night and
X weekend coaching rhe program will extend from Ih 2 lo mid-Feb saiar
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untai I Hen I
dines ai
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��MMM��M�M�4���????????????????t
We have a BOO tifiil selection
of American Greetings
Halloween Cards!
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
each of the
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
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WIN
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Toda
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dia Board
Accepting
ationsFor
i Manager
ri
arolinian
lorijt Christian Church

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munton
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 31, 1985
Outdoor Adventure Not Only Fun But Also Educational
ECT News Hurrmi
How can playing out in the
woods, climbing trees and being a
bo again be educational Is it
child's plav or pan of college and
adult learning experience?
In a way it is both � and
should be according to Bob
Vk endling, director of the 1 eisure
Systems Studies program. Out-
dooi adventure is not only
memorable fun but it affords a
varietj of educational ex-
periences, Wendling said.
"What we do in the Outdoor
dventure Program is stud our
own experiences he explained.
"The learnings about ourselves
can be used every day and most
people discover that they can do
so much more than they ever
thought and that even though we
might be afraid of something �
and all of us are � we don't have
to let our fear paralyze us
An outdoor adventure area is
being established in a wooded
area behind the Belk Allied
Health building on the I C I cam-
pus which will become the
w or ks hop-laboratory -classroom
of a new program, ROPES,
which Wendling is directing.
Plans call for the first ROPES
participants to take to the woods,
climb trees, swing on ropes,
climb fences and confront other
forest obstacles later this fall.
The program is being spon-
sored jointly by ECU and the Pitt
County Mental Health, Mental
Retardation and Substance
Abuse Center (PCMHMRSAC)
and is designed to develop per-
sonal confidence and competence
and to provide alternative pro-
grams using experiential outdoor
activities.
"Its goal is to bring individuals
into contact with the natural
world and each other in ways
which allow them to test
themselves and discover the
realities that lie within
themselves Wendling said.
"It focuses on improving skills
through an action-oriented pro-
gram. It can be used as a personal
growth experience for communi-
ty groups, in management train-
ing for business and industry, or
as a substance abuse preven-
tion treatment modality he
said.
ROPES will be open to
students and other persons refer-
red by the sponsoring agencies,
and also available to organua
tions outside the university and
PCMHMRSAC for a fee cover
ing maintenance and operating
costs.
Individuals and groups may
participate in outdoor adventure
sessions of from one day to two
and a half days.
Wendling says the program in-
cludes "a wide range of concen-
trated experiences" ranging from
working as a group to get
everyone over a 13-foot wall to a
more individual effort of climb-
ing a tree to a platform 40 feet
high, then jumping off (tied into
a safety system, of course).
"After each of these activities
and each other activity during the
day, we circle up and have the
group reflect on these experiences
and try to draw some learnings
about themselves and how they
work with a group, or how they
don't work with a group
Wendling said.
ECU-NCSU Game Will Continue
Fro� Staff Reports
Officials at N.C. State Univer-
sitv ai d ECU recently said the
annual football game between the
two schools will definitel) con-
tinue, despite the actions ot some
unruly Pirate fans at the Sept. 7
ne in Raleigh.
ECl Athletic Director Ken
Kan told United Press Interna-
tional las; week that ECU is still
under "formal contract through
1987" to piavsi
The trouble began during the
final seconds o the game, which
brought a record crowd of 58,300
to Raleigh's C arter-Finlev
Stadium, fans, from ECU and
NCSU, lost control, and tore
down a fence near the field goal.
The Vice Chancellor for Stu-
dent Affairs at NCSU, Thomas
Stafford, wrote a letter to E U's
Vice Chancellor for Student I ife
Elmei Meyer, complaining about
the conduct ot ECL tans Staf-
ford recommended that the series
of games be discontinued.
Meyer said more security was
needed at the games and he said a
recommendation has been made
to send some ECU Public Safety
Officers to next vear's game to
keep an eve on unruly fans.
The abuse of alcohol was cited
by Meyer as a contributing factor
in the rowdy conduct. However,
officers cannot legally search
fans betote entering the stadium.
ECU's SGA President David
Brown told The News and
Observer last week that he wrote
a letter of apology to NCSU ad-
ministrators for the behavior ot
"over jubilient fans
Brown told The East Caroli-
nian Monday that plans were be-
ing made to appoint faculty and
students (at large) to studv
recommendations on corrective
measures for crowd control.
oV
'
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� � �
215 E. 4th St.
Corner of 4th & Reode
752-2183
The Best Deal At The Best Club In Town.
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HAM SALAMI PEPPEHOM CAPPICOLA. TURKEY and BOLOGNA
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Hallo ween Special
50C OFF Any Lg. Sub
25C OFF Any Sm. Sub
Plus Free Chips & Tea wirh your sendw ich purchase.
Weekend Special
FRIDAY THRU SUNDAY -
Lg Roast Beef & Cheese, Choice of Potato,
Macaroni, Salad or Coleslaw, 16 oz. Tea for only
$3.39
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V�T(NAL I'MOi DA OCtSLUC
iELP FIGHT WORLD HUNGER
FROM YOUR DOORSTEP
ABORTIONS LP
TO 12th WEEK
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$193 Abortion from 13 io 18 weeks ai addi-
�lonal cost Pregnanc Test, Btrth Control, and
Problem Pregnanc Counseling For further
information call 832-0535 (Toil Free Number
1 800-532 M84) between 9AM and 5 P M.
weekdays
REUEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
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?17W��t Morton $?.
koi9h NC
Halloween Night
Costume Party With
CASH PRIZES!
Live Entertainment
THE PHANTOMS
513 Cotanche St.
for more info
Call 758-0080
i
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'A
y
V
4
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portsmeh's Lounge
presents
1
NANTUCKET
Sunday, November 3rd, 1:00 P.M
Live Outdoor Concert
also appearing

STONEWALL

TICKET GATE OPENS 12:00 NOON
ADMISSION $6.00
FOR INFORMATION CALL
Sportsmen's Lounge
Ray Oliveira
758-0058 Dan Singleton
Located behind Riverside Oyster Bar
720 North Greene Street, Greenville, North Carolina
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2H?e iEafit (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Mim I i DWICK, v- .
s on c i opt r. v,
John Shannon,
LORJN PASQl M , copy Ec
DeCHanh l Johnson, trlDmcl
"OM Norton�. �utr,
JA STON1 . Mtnafmt i
TOM LUVENDER, i Uhmtmng
Anthony Martin, �,
John Pi n rson, ����
Shannon SHORT, prodm �
DiBHii Stevens, v�
ctob� H i v
Opinion
Page 4
Endorsements
City Council Elections
Yesterday's ECU Candidate's
Forum set a good precedent for
relations between the students of
this university and the Greenville
City Council. Out of 11 candidates
running for a seat on the city coun-
cil only one declined to make an ap-
pearance � ex-police chief Glenn
Cannon. Of those who did come to
the forum onl one or two exhibited
an openly disdainful attitude
toward students and issues of im-
portance to them. As for the rest of
the candidates, they seemed in
earnest about their desire to work
with students and many lingered on
atter the conclusion of the forum to
discuss issues with members of the
audience.
All in all it would appear that a
healthy dialogue has been initiated
between the city government and
the students of this university. Our
concerns were put before people
who had probably never given some
of the issues raised much thought
prior to their meeting with the au-
dience in Mendenhall. From this
point forward perhaps the issues
raised will never be ignored.
After the forum a student panel
consisting of volunteers contacted
by SGA president David Brown met
to ponder the answers given by can-
didates to their questions as well as
those from the audience. They also
worked to come to a concensus
about which candidates had the
strongest stands on issues of special
concern to students.
The panel unanimously agreed
on supporting current Mayor
Janice Buck primarily because of
her position on the future of the
downtown area. Ms. Buck said that
she felt that since the malls had
been built on the bypass the
downtown area exists basically to
serve students. She added that she
would like to see students and the
university become involved in plan-
ning the future development and
make-up of the downtown area.
The panel was also unanimous in
endorsing current Mayor Pro-Tern
Ed Carter, who is a write-in can-
didate. Carter was endorsed
because of his strong and forceful
statements regarding putting an end
to discriminatory practices being
used against students who wish to
register to vote in Greenville. In ad-
dition, Carter voiced strong sup-
port for the change from an at-large
to a ward electoral system. The
switch to a ward system is viewed as
being desirable by many students
and Greenville residents because
under an at large system a simple
majority elects all six members of
the city council. Thus, a 51 percent
majority can theoretically block
vote to elect a council that is un-
sympathetic to the needs and
aspirations of the other 49 percent
of the populace. Under a ward
system, however, the city would be
divided up into wards or districts
and each ward would elect its own
representative to the council. Such
a system is perceived as offering
minority populations, such as the
student population, a better chance
at getting representation on the city
council. (All of the candidates 'in-
dorsed by the panel favored the
ward system.) Reverend H.W.
Parker was endorsed by the panel
because of his strong position in
favor of tenant's rights. Parker
stated that he was well aware of the
fact that some landlords in the city
maintain substandard housing and
residents are sometimes evicted
without compensation, through no
fault of their own, when such
houses are condemned. Because
over half of ECU's students live
off-campus and virtually all rent
their lodging, housing was thought
to be a matter of deep concern to
students by panel members. Lor-
raine Shinn received a unanimous
endorsement because of her posi-
tion on student voter registration,
the switch from the at-large to a
ward electoral system and, what
some saw as a willingness to work
with students on issues such as traf-
fic problems on tenth street. Inez
Fridley was endorsed by all but one
member of the student panel �
Mark Simon. Simon cited what he
felt were anti-fraternity feelings
evidenced by Ms. Fndlev for his
decision. He also cited Fridley's in-
volvement in passing noise or-
dinances and zoning restrictions
which he perceived to be targeted at
students. Yet, other students
pointed to Fridley's positions on
student voter registration, the tran-
sition to a ward electoral system,
tenants' rights and environmental
and growth issues confronting the
city as reasons tor their endorse-
ment. Students were divided over
whether to support Reverend Bill
Hadden or Milton Sutton. Hadden
has been in the city council for a
number of years and has been
associated with the campus
ministries. Though he said that he
teeK that student parking is a
university problem and not a pro-
blem for the city to deal with and he
mentioned student apathy as a
reason for students' non-
involvemem in local politics rather
than discussing problems with voter
registration Hadden still expressed
many concerns that students share.
He spoke of developing downtown
in such a manner that it might in-
clude art exhibits, craft shops,
sculpture etc. rather than simply
storefronts. Hadden was also sup-
ported because of his ties to the
campus ministry and his perceived
sympathy to students as a result of
that connection to the university.
Milton Sutton received support
from the panel because of a stated
commitment to getting students in-
volved in the council and getting
qualified people rather than
political appointees on the Green-
ville Utilities Commission. Sutton
was also supported because of his
relative youth and the fact theat he
is a former ECU student who has
recently entered the job market.
Thus it was felt he would be likely
to be sympathetic to the concerns of
students even though his relative
vagueness about what programs he
might support to get students more
involved in city government caused
some panel members concern.
All of the candidates are to be
commended for participating in the
forum. Their show of concern for
students, who are after all, part of
the larger community, is in the best
tradition of the American
democratic spirit.
The student panel, over all, did a
good job for its part and David
Brown deserves thanks for his part
in organizing the forum. The
panel's primary shortcoming was
its inexperience with doing what it
was chosen to do. Thus, members
were not as informed about the can-
didates as they might have been.
Hopefully, in years to come the
tradition that has been established
will continue and research can be
done on each candidate in advance
of the forum itself.
Perhaps, in fact, a student or stu-
dent advocate will be running the
next time a forum is held. In the
final analysis, though, the panel's
recommendations would appear to
be sound. We would encourage all
students who are registered to vote
to act on these recommendations
next Tuesday November 5.
RACIAL QUOTAS ARENTFA1R,
MINORITIES ARS JUST GOING
TO HAV� TO PO WHAT TUB
REST OF US PIP 7D 66T
A JOB
become white
ANJPMAIE,
KSSSer1
Campus Forum
Thursday November 7at 8:00 P.M.
in Minges Coliseum could very well
mark the last major concert at ECU
for a very long time. Unless student
support increases. Heart's perfor-
mance will be a show stopper as well
as a concert stopper.
I his letter is intended to shed some
light on the situation lacing the Ma-
jor Concerts Committee of the Stu-
dent Union. When planning a concert
the committee receives a list of the
act who are touring and then another
� who might be in the area. This list
is quickly dwindling. 1'op acts are just
not touring the college circuit as they
e in the past. Most are signing
with promoters who lease space in
various coliseums and stadiums 1 his
is where the big bucks are in a big
nev business.
Our facility, Minges at a little over
6,000 capacity, is modest to say the
lea 1: is used a- a classroom
athletic tacihtv, as well av an arena
tor other university events.
I herefore, we are dependent on class
edules, athletic schedules, univer-
event schedules, and the
graciousness of teachers and
to have access to the facility. Also,
with the increase in costs, most big
acts, ever, if they were to come, would
necessitate a charge of $30 � S40 a
ticket. Not quite the price most
an one would pa.
Many of you don't realize that ours
is one of the last Student Unions in
the area which puts on majors con-
certs. Most shows at Reynolds Col-
iseum, tor instance, are done by-
private promoters. They have the lux-
ury ot a large non-classroom facility.
How about Ficklen Stadium you
might ask. I say, how about some
help convincing the Athletic Depart-
ment and administration that the
field wouldn't get torn up or that peo-
ple would buy tickets and not just
watch from outside each stadium
opening; all past oceurrances. 1
guarantee, though, we are working
on it.
Your Student Union is not only br-
inging you a major concert but also a
minimal charge. When was the last
time you went to a show for $10?
That's right, last spring for the Kinks
Concert. Concerts today are $15 and
up.
Now 1 hope you realize that even if
a Bruce Springsteen or a Due Straits
were to agree to come here it
wouldn't be feasible. We'd like to
have them as much as anybody. You
know I haven't even mentioned the
lack of a major airport in the area.
Busing a major star? Not on vour
life.
In light of all this information, I'm
sure you'll agree that getting a band
of Heart's stature November 7 is a
great achievement on the part of the
major Concerts Committee.
This letter was not meant as an at-
tack or as a criticism of anyone. It
was just for information purposes.
See you at the concert!
Michael C. Smith
Student Union President
Student � City Politics
In your editorial Tuesday there
were a few mistakes that I feel need to
be cleared up. Before I begin,
however, let me make one point from
the outset: I am a conservative
pragmatist when it come to politics,
as opposed to my idealistic friend, the
editor of this paper. This is not to say
I am against students getting involved
in the electoral process. The editor
must surely remembc
1 put together the first Gubernai
Candidate's forum in the state here a:
ECU and worked with various
to help register students to v
get 'hem absentee ballots.
1 The decision to hold a
candidate's forum was never br
up m executive council. As senior
Class President I am a membei I
executive council and 1 car assui
we never discussed it there. My c
ni v.a -fiat the i . a
not asked
tornm We were I
the idea that the Presidei I �� a
hold one at tl
ore fall break hei e
we were informed I
were already asked
mat idy been laid
then a-ked would tl
J i t.
2) My persoi
candidates foru ts pi es�
is ill advised I here an
students here on campu
registered to �te in Greenville i
was .i last minute effort I i .
students to vote in thi- ele
only an insig ; hCr - ;
did so While no clear figures exis
� a many students can participai
this election, it would not be
unrealistic to ; ssume 50 1 2 �
eligible. Those that are registerei
� in this election and want to meet
the candidates have been presented
with an abundance of opportunities
to see the candidates at one of three
forums that 1 know of. It is a shame
to ask busy candidates to come to a
location where there are so tew poss;
ble vliters, when we could have co-
sponsored a torum with a community
civic group that would have given the
candidates more exposure. A Mrum
held at noon, on the mall does not
give the candidates the kind of ex-
posure they deserv .
? TCI is m no way like UNO
Chapel Hill or Appalachian State
University. In both these locations
the students were royally abused by
the towas they were located in. The
students did the logical thing, they
organized and forced their respectse
city governments to pay attention to
the needs of students. ECU, however,
does not make up a majority of the
population of its host city like those
two schools do nor could it force the
city to do what it wants via selecting
ECU candidates to the city council.
This is like NC State or UNCC
organizing to take over the Raleigh or
Charlotte city government. The city
of Greenville is responsive to the
needs of the students and has worked
well with the administration in the
past. My fear is that an attempt to
organize the students to vote in mass
would create feelings of mistrust bet-
ween the city and the University and
hurt the working relationship that
now exists.
My hope is that the students do not
feel that the city council is against
them. City government is made up of
some fantastic people, many of them
ECU Alumni and they a.e willing to
work with us. I have had the pleasure
to meet with and work with many of
them and the support they have
shown toward our university was
phenomenal. ECU is privileged to
have such a fine host city.
Kirk Shelley
Senior, Political Science
No Sexism Here
In reference to Kathy Massey's let
ter which appeared in the October 24
V . V l.)
Pirate
s .
d
I h
inju
not see � -
Itemiza
aik repri
they had n
dnJi I thinl
eds
ECl "s Pirate Walk is a I
n Id be re
scrutinized, ted
disse esentat
pie student body.
If I'm not m
to r
entail waiting on unspent money that
was appropriate
tions. 1: a disappointing tho
that Pirate Walk
organizations that don spend .
their appropriated funds jus s
could operate in .i more serving
fashion.
In mv opinion, the SGA ca
justify its actions with any excuse. l s
time the SGA wakes up and look
the values ot dn organization to the
university and ; e needs of the
student bvvi
RANDY 11l 1 1 I
Grad ychology
Editor's Note: In the interest
clarification it -ha
though Lance S nicle in the
Tuesday October 2
Carolinian dealing with i
implied thai the SGA legislature had
approved a $2.S bu .hen
cut it. This was, in fact, not the
Instead, the summer legislature had
recommended the Au.c.
The summer legislature ntiall) a
skeleton crew which runs student
government during the summer. It
does not consist of the 50 or so
representatives which are elected hv
students exery fall.
Heart May Be Last Major Concert
Mark
M� I 1 PAGI
hristm
Hv w in wm
R A T
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 31, 1985
cerr
� V alk
! of
hut.



fact, nor theuse.
iature hud
r $2,9
.iure is essentiailv u
runs student
luring the summer. It
' the 50 or so
are elected bv
ts evt
Marketing Survey Conducted For Paper
b lipagf
Sl�ff Wtllr
1I students and faculty have
ad the opportunity this week to
oss their opinions of The
t arolinian in a survey con-
ted by .i marketing research
( he idea tot it is long overdue,
ording to I om 1 uvender,
toi of advertising for The
�'oilman. "WeThe East
inian) haven't had any
rketing research done since
�bably 1981 said I uvender,
' what I was looking for is
facts and figures on our
readers
Haw a Altuner, who teaches
marketing research at ECU,
agreed to conduct the survey with
the help of the students in her
marketing research class.
I.uvender said that the survey
is being held Oct. 28 through
Nov. 1 with approximately 1,2(X)
questionaires being circulated
throughout the campus.
'Through this survey we hope
to find out facts and figures
about our readers said
I uvender. "Being director of
advertising, I hope that I'll be
looking at a way to give our
salesman some good ammuni-
tion added Luvender.
The survey covers subjects
which relate to advertising and
other areas such as reader in-
terest, luvender said that he
hopes to compile all the facts and
figures and end up with an adver-
tising brochure after the survey is
complete.
Advertising is not Luvender's
only goal. He also would like to
determine how The East Caroli-
nian is perceived on campus. He
would like to see what is the im-
age of The East Carolinian.
According to Luvender, the
survey also is geared to identity
which areas of The East Caroli-
nain are in need of improvement.
"Dr. Altuner's marketing Lias-
is doing all the work said
I.uvender, "all 1 did was come up
with the idea for the survey
Scott Dorm Controversy Rages
Christmas Toys More Violent
Continued From Page 1
ment. He also said that it would
help in competing with other
universities on equal 'levels.
"They are out there and
related with football-related ac-
tivities for a period of about
fourteen to sixteen hours when
classes are not in session said
Karr, "they only have about
eight hours to get rested up and
recharged for the next day Karr
also referred to the heat which
the football players had to endure
while practicing as a major factor
in the need for air conditioned
housing of student athletes.
Derrick Reaves, a sophomore
majoring in Music Education and
also a member of the ECU Mar
ching Pirates, said, "We (The
Marching Pirates) come to school
a whole week early, and pra
throughout the whole day, with a
two hour break for lunch during
the hottest part of the day. W .
out and recruit new members '
but we aren't requesting special
housing just for us added
Reaves
The proposal is expected to be
heard by the Residence
Committee, however, a date has
vet to be set.
Bv B� 111 WHK KER
is Santa Claus stocking
c abbage Paul: Dolls.
di Stai Wars dolls and
bby the Hear
lean Huryn, associate pro-
� Sociology saysIt's
symbol. The
j are scarce
sell well 1 a s!
"1 tl � bage Patch
uiai because ol its uni-
has be �me a fad
Chat les ilson, a
I' I atrician.
dolls arc not beautiful.
� are popular because of
� ed crazeadded
e contenders accor-
i I nited Pi ess story are a
f G.l Joe dolls and a
doll -� the toy industry's
e movie industry.
v e are seeing the children, ol
� grew up with Viet-
Rambo dolls
� ietnam has
i in out
� � i r y i
el lection
. 'heir
see their
parents watch Rambo rvies
which takes care of the things not
done in Vietnam. The children
then want Rambo dolls Huryn
said.
According to Wilson, children
use means of play to familiarize
themselves with fear. "These
children watch movies like 'Ram-
bo' and want to act it out com
mented Wilson.
"There is no question that
shows on TV. trigger violence in
children. Pediatricians are very
concerned with the amount of
violence on IV lie said.
"Children have a hard time
seperating fact from fantasy.
Children see things on television
and then try them out for
themselves Wilson said.
"Basically the toys have chang-
ed but the function is still the
same said ilson.
According to UPI this
Christmas will show more
warlike characters than
Christmases before.
The toys this Christmas aren't
likely to be cuddly reports UPI.
The need for cuddly dolls has
already been taken care of by the
inventors of Cabby Bear, a doll
based on the stuffed animal nam-
ed for Teddy Roosevelt who in
real life carried a big stick.
According to UPI the creators
of He-Man and other Masters o'
the Universe Dolls is sponsering a
"Create- A-Character" contest
open to children 12 years old or
younger. The question is what
types of dolls will be suggested
among the expected half a million
entries. The UPI reports they are
not likelv to be cuddlv.
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T�H FAST( AROt INIAN
Entertainment
CM nm
10 Years After The Riot, All Is Calm


B Maine hitman
Halloween is the 10th an
' the Greenville run or
vears Uk(� today, eight
ients and wx Greenville
i rs were hurt, and 56
m �, arresh d in the riot,
ii downtown
����� I his stoi examines
rmath, and
' the no;
� 's frame oi mind in
understanding
Integration na vtill
il issue, as apparent with
which stated thai
arrested were white.
the except ion oi one black
x mem teel-
ell. America
from Watergate
le del
n Vietnam. ;
me was
ene was set tor
31, 1975, about 500
a i ve.
� e Police I
Cai as
e sever, as
However, at approx-
. hiefDispat-
He tacted Can-
ine :i wd was
(a cond i
ji descrih any
� e rep �rts) I hirty-six e?
cers were called ii assist
: fficers.
nd otl
� �
the si
ars. S . .
led. i
- a ni
.
the streets
Ml happen
: thev
" ie a ere be
A Restless Crowd Is A Ticking Bomb
?
lice said
( am

Peppe! Fog machine
claims '
'�'
d nt owners, including a
WITN-T ter, said
never heard such an order. No

f c mas hine t sea
eai gas ni
� �� declared the desti
t. such as a patrol
� ' v ndi a being mashed
before use ol the I
Vv police officers and
11 students were hurt, mosth
bv hurled objects, such as pieces
' - �� s, and the trampling ol a
panic-stricken croud. One was
even injured when she was struck
in the face b a teai gas cannister.
Fifty-six people were arrested
e Daih Reflector reported
-
Alt 1
studen i i
M
M;
a p u bl
suffered $3,700 damage mostly
broken show w
The EO Si
A s social
I was
and as pi,i into a bus The stu-
'�
Ut il . ;
lay ��� j �
asking police what was g
alter being gassed A police
"crabbed me bv the collar and
slapped me once oi twice a,
the ace and said 'get
here
I he S iA riot investig i
soon released its recommei
The SGA called I
student-police seminars, 2;
1 L student body to hav
officio non-voting represent
on the Greenville City
5)all charges ol failure to disj �
and inciting a riot be dropped
against students arrested in t
the indident, 4) the ret;
Pol
5) a I . An
I v' arolina alum;
ontv � the Green
�' sided -
i and ��
�erreacted a
ts had been treati
:e and
reenville residei
ftei ,i �
i �.
k voluntary d: i �

Hagerty verbally aj
S iA I
s �' �� ' tact
.
water a- a forceful mea
� i rowd .
nly in disini .
' under upem-
�! ly, Greenville
ed -uch excite-
tow
exists h ce jep .
mem ECU. apt. Neh
Staton of the Greenville Police
Department savs there are several
reasons for the better relat.
A Tribute To Tribute Bands
W !U iM rtw r as i ajotti
It Really Was This Big!
ATTIC OCT31 ATiTII
BEAUX
Tonight the Beaux Arts Ma
will take p:ace, for the 1 lth
time, at the Attic in Greenville.
Susie Saxon and the Anglos, a
Richmond, Va. band, backed
up by the School of Art's own
Deco Bros will provide music
for the masquerade.
The Beaux Arts Ball has
become an ECU Halloween
tradition. In its early years,
back in the latter seventies, the
ball was mainly an art school
party. But the event became
more popular yearly, and
students began to look forward
to it who were not in the School
of Art
Now the Beaux Arts Ball has
become a fund-raiser for the
Visual Arts Forum, the group
responsible for bringing out-of-
town artists to lecture and
display work here.
Doors will open at 9 p.m. at
the Attic. Tickets are still
available for $3.00 in the School
of Art main office and at Apple
Records. Tickets will be $9.00 at
the door. 18 year olds will be
admitted, with picture I.D as
long as they wear no facial
make-up.
B CLA DKANHAKD1
Maff w rfttcff
When you think ol areas that
are trendsetters in the musical
world, several come to mind, in-
cluding New York City, the San
Francisco Bav area. I iverpool,
and Eastern North Carolina.
Eastern North Carolina0
That's right. This part of the
country has been in the forefront
of a new, nationwide craze.
"Tribute bands bands which
dr. musical salutes to more-
popular groups, have been steadi-
ly gaining in national prominence
and popularity over the last few
years, and the Greenv die area has
been a leader in bringing these
bands into the public eve.
Nationally, the trend towards
tribute bands can be traced back
to the wild success of the group
Beatlemania and the Elvis imper-
sonators. Also, with the renewed
popularity of such solo stars and
supergroup offshoots as Robert
Plant. John Fogcrty, Don
Henley, and the Firm, there has
been a resurgence of public in-
terest in the music these stars us-
ed to play in bands like Led Zep-
pelin and Creedance Clearwater
Revival.
Haines said thai the per-
formers were committed to giving
a quality show. They resent being
called "clone acts" because they
add their own styles and their
own love for the music while
maintaining the image of the
original band.
Most acts try to mimic the per-
sonality of their predecessors as
closely as possible. They use the
same kind of equipment as the
original band, and in many cases
the dress like the originals. The
White, a Led Zeppelin revue,
went so far as to purchase and
use an obsure sound-effects in-
strument called a theremin,
which was originally used exten-
sively by Jimmy Page, the lead
guitar player of Led Zeppelin.
Clear Light at one time had a li-
quid light show that rivaled that
of their mentors, Pink Floyd.
An attestment to the amazing
reality that these bands portray in
:ir aci
singe: tor the Back
Hakin I his risinj
endorsed b memb Jut.
Moi : is n's fami - a
leading coi
Morrison in tl
c oming film biogi i
Each bai
toire of songs froi
thev salute, and ows usu
differ from appearai ap
pearance. Don come expe
straight studio vei
cases either. Most bai ds
recreate the live performa
the original bands many times,
and this means playing extended
versions of the so.
on the albums.
1 ocally, the Attic has been the
leader in booking tribute bands.
Three years ago the ttic brou
" 11 u t e i
Do Green-
and since then these hands
gained so much popu
" e club has been featuring
� ilar basis.
nother reason sited bv
Haines for the emergence ol these
ds is that for years
ive been di
dleys ol great tunes from
supergroups like the Beatles, and
se medleys have been one
the most popular parts of the
rribute bands take that
one step further, doing perfor-
ces in costume dnd assuming,
sometimes, the identity and per-
ce os;0. v't the band they
are saluting.
Don't get the wrong idea,
though. These bands are not
simply sopy or cove bands, fhev
usually composed of out:
ding musicians, and in n
cases, thev play a set of m
that is not from the group the
their tribute to just to esta1-
themselves as performers.
The growing national popu
�v of these groups can be seen in
tendance figures for their
concerts One group. The White,
has played to crowds of more
than 20,000 tans, while others,
including Revival and the Back
Doors, have played all across the
country to sellout dnd standing-
room-only crowds in both
theatres and clubs.
� ��
Tribute bands are the closest
one can get to the real thing
day. and the students get to "ex-
perience what it was like to see
the real band, live
The White - a Led Zeppelin mouie oanu endorsed by Robert Planf- wil appear
in concert at the Attic on Saturday, Nov. 9. The show will start at 10:00 p.m.
Doonesbur


k
x
SI


I Happy
I
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NEED CASH?
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Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N Grene
$.
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OD
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' THIS OFFEP
l I" ?faA 11





I )(MMI( s
Mil
I in

i v.
� �
Robert Plant - will appear
will start at 10:00 p.m.
'

0'
-0i
a�
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V
�Writers Needed
hi(ict 757-6366
ckJ

ATTIC
FREE VCR
1 Happy Halloween, ECU!
THUR
Suzy Saxon &
The Anglos
� ����
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WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
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ARMY BAND.
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i





I Ml M l K() INIAN
Sports
(K IOHI K
'�
V
& 1 m
K
Pirate Netters Close Season
tf
a�
��� I UTGENS The Ea�1 Carolinian
John rayior pounds another service ace in action earlier this ear.
Pirate Volleyballers
Take Two Games
B JANE! MMPSON
an nr'
Tu
e i
��
- �
' 12


"ata�
15-2.
;
ference cham-
� ��� ��� tea
ugl eek ahead.
; exi week -a
dlenge a ink
rurner said.
playing with
B DAVID McGINNESS
The ECU men's tennis team
finished seventh out of eight
teams in the Colonial Athletic
Conference Tournament last
weekend.
The tournament was won by
Navy, followed by Richmond,
William &. Mary, James
Madison, George Mason, UNC-
Wilmington, and American U.
In the first flight, John Taylor
lost to Harvey of W&M 3-6, 6-7.
I aylor then lost to Jones of Navy
6-10.
In the second flight, Shendeil
of JMU defeated ECU's Dan La-
mont 6-0, 6-1.astro of Rich-
mond then defeated lamont
10-5.
Third flight player Greg I oyd
came hack from a 2-6. 3-6 loss to
Haskin of Richmond to beat Me
nian ol GMU 10-4. Loyd lost in
the finals of the consolation
round to Bell of JMU 10-4.
In the fourth flight. Navy's
Chandler defeated ECU'S Paul
Haggar 6-2. 6-1. Haggar came
back to beat a tough L'NC-W op-
en; Furbay 10-2. Haggar lost
to Richmond's Slobin 10-4 on
Saturday.
ECl John Melhorn won the
opening round of the fifth flight,
but was forced to retiu in the se-
cond match, trailing W&M's
i -6, 6-1, 4-2. Melhorn was
suffering from heat exhaustion
and muscle cramps when he
retired from the match.
However, Melhorn's win in the
first round provided the trailing
ECU team with some badly need-
ed points.
Murphy of Richmond defeated
ECU's John Anthony 6-4, 6-0 in
the opening round of the sixth
flight. Anthony then lost to
Dillario of GMU 10-8.
In first-round doubles play,
Melhorn and Taylor were forced
to default their first-flight match
They then lost to Day and Young
of GMU 10-7 and to Gratz and
Robbins 10-9.
In No. 2 doubles flight, An-
thony and Campanero lost to
Carpenter and Sileo of GMU
10 2
In the third flight, Loyd and
Lamont defeated Biumenfield
and Hedges of American 10-4,
but then lost to Jackson and
Villarel of GMU in the finals ol
the consolation round, 10-5.
According to ECU assistant
coach Robert Long, several ol
the ECU players played well in
the tournament. Prior to suffer-
ing from the heat, Melhorn
played very well and could
possibly have won his flight, ac-
cording to coach Long. Taylor
played at his highest level this
season.
"John played really well this
weekend said coach long. "He
moved well and scouted his op-
ponents' strengths and
weaknesses. He made every
count and got to more balls in ad-
dition to cutting down on unforc-
ed errors
1 ong thought that the toun
ment had some positive effects
for the team as well.
"It gave them the opportunity
to see some very good tennis
Long explained. "They also g
ed valuable experienci
Experience may well be
to success for this young
tour of whose top-sn players are
freshmen. Coach Pat Sherma
looking forward to the ofl
to give her a chance to w ri
individual players' weakness
"The players need to develop
their placement, depth an
sistency said Sherman.
just aren't used to the level of
competition they are facing
collegiate plav. "hey
build their mechanical si
well a.s their mental ones
These skills include
tensr.e weapons of their sei
and return of serve
when to play de'
manuever their opp
when to attac? him In ad
the players need to develi :
not in their repei
. slices a
serves.
Mental c
point is alsi
the collegiate level P
know what they war
win a. :

Sherman belies i
of play
:e the seas � .
� ers are g lining i ind e
pcrience with eacl
winter break a a
Tennis
Classic
FRIDA
i
1 RID
r i n N-
-
AI
1 H
PI -N I D A
i sn m
. K i ' W 1 !
I raci Gall is
� on
. iall,
ire.
-
ta
: o drawing
r N
� crsity . 1 he 1 adv
iced in the
,v
as L'NC-
Golden Eagles Host
Struggling Pirates
M a i
V In
Di
ne:
at;
she
i ,
w rl
n un men
Coa think
all.
� - � V A
lei stated.
vin if we get
; i i � time to prac
� e we play
1 ady Pirates do have a
�� v ' - ip Friday
t, No .1. they face v ake
� ' esi I ni ei sity. here at 7:00
I NC-Wilmington is next on
the Lady Bucs agenda. I"he
match is also here, Nov.2, at
11:00 a.m. Sunday, Nov.3 finds
the Lady Pirates in the William
and Marv University against
VPI. Wake forest and host team

I II d
ming week, accordii g
and Marv nginia
onwealth on Nov. 5 and
A A 1 ournament round ml
!
tdv Bucs schedule.
w a!
N games the Lady
ave an overall record of
b sco rr cooper
Spord diii.r
2-5 1(1 football squad
will -rave! to Hattiesburg, Miss
:Iasl a � the 5-2 University ol
itl ei i Mississippi Eagles.
1 he 1 agles, coming off a 14-
win over Memphis State two
weeks ago, will host the P rates
heir homecoming game.
n Mississippi currently
owns a ' . � game wini
streak, tf school's 5-2
record is then best start since the
; seas
The Eagles' offense is similar
thai ol the Pirates. ECU
defensive line coach Rex
Sponhaltz praises the SMI team.
" rhey're a trap-opt ion team
Sponhaltz said. " I heir offense is
built around the run, and their
running game makes their pass.
ing game effective
Junior quarterback Andrew
Anderson, who earned the star-
ting spot after taking over for the
inconsistent pl of Robert
Ducks worth, spearheads a
talented back field, last vear's
leading rasher with 572 yards,
Vincent Alexander, will be team-
ed with fullback Ralph Brown.
Brown averaged 4.9 yards per
carry in '84. The Bus will have
their hands full in stopping the
powerful SMU running attack.
according to Coacl S i i
"We have to be ; ned with
their trap Spoi haltz
"Vincent, he ha- g mds
they lik � run
backfield. They do a nun
� things with Vincent.
�"Brown is an excellent block-
back Sponhaltz added.
"He's quick, he's g
I tie sti i ng
The Eagle line returns
starters from a yeai ago and is
anchored by 6-6, 265-pound
tackle Benny Draughn. Seniors
Chris Haag and Ken Bentlev were
starters from last year's
lineup.
Perhaps the strength of the
1 agle squad lies in the tight-end
position. Senior Robert Stallings
and Sophomore Carlos Powell
handle the chores there. ECU
coaches stress a major concern
w ith the ends
"The strongest part of their of-
fense may be the tight ends
Sponhaltz said. "Thev present a
real challenge. They block as well
as any of the tackles"
A veteran secondary heads a
very aggressive Southern Miss,
defense. Junior free safety Tim
Smith heads the defense. Smith
led the secondary in tackles (105)
and interceptions (3). Senior cor-
nerbacks James Harris and BoBo
h v.
Cooper provide the experieno
a relatively young defensive
"Thev have a brutal sec
dary offensive line coach. P
Anderson said. " T hey will c
up and attack you, they're very
aggressive. I hey 'II go out I
Nee PIKAII Pai�t s�
Baker Nears Record; Despite Pirate Losses
B DAVID McGINNESS
VttUint Sporli f-diior
With a ie-s-than-average per
:e against the Gamecocks
Saturday, senior tailback
I ony Baker moved into the No. 3
on I 's all rime rushing
Baker began the season at the
N and now trails
C rumpler and
when you're hurt and can't
play
Hard work and motivation are
things that Baker is known for,
according to the ECU coaching
staff.
Sutton bv 365 and 159
To over'ake
Baker needs to
average 92 yards per game tor the
remainder ol the season.
o most football players.
� ids of this sort and the
prestige that accompany them are
sought-after goals. But Baker
does not see it quite that way
" times the record enters my
mind Baker stated. "But our
real goal is to win football games,
and if we're not doing that, then
rds aren't really important
One of Baker's personal goals
is to stay healthy so that he can
contribute to the team. "I think
that one reason I'm unhurt is the
hard work 1 put in with the team
this summer Baker feels that
staying healthy is one key to be
ing motivated.
"You can't be too motivated
Ton Baker
"Tony's great attitude and
athletic talent make him one of
our most valuable players said
offensive coordinator Don
Murry. "He gives it all he's got,
motivating with his leadership
and performance and consistent-
ly giving 100 percent
Baker will no longer be with
the Pirates after this season, due
to graduation. ECU will have
some big shoes to fill, to replace
the High Point native. "Any time
you have someone with his
physical abilities and dedication
it's a great loss when he
graduates said Murry.
Although Baker may be quiet
off the field, his performance on
it speaks for itself. Baker is proud
of his role and takes it seriously,
but doesn't try to motivate others
verbally. "I just go out and work
hard each day he explained. "I
try to be an example setter
Apparently Baker's attitude
extends back to his high-school
days. While at T. Wingate An-
drews High School in High
Point, N.C he starred in track
as well as football. A member of
the 1982 North Carolina Shrine
Bowl team, Baker was all-state in
his senior year, netting over 1,600
total yards and his high school's
rushing record.
In addition, Baker was No. 2 in
the state his junior season in both
the mile and 880 relay and No. 4
in the 440 relay. He also set the
school record in the long jump.
As befitted one of his talents
and achievements. Baker was
highly recruited coming out of
high school. What made him
choose to play for, and get an
education at ECl ?
"ECU showed the most in-
terest in me as a person he ex-
plained. "I think that they really
had my interests at heart
But now Baker, and the rest of
the 2-5 Pirates must attempt to
pull together and win against
some of the best talent in the na-
tion.
"The toughest part of being
his success to himself though.
With him in the backfield are V
thony Simpson and Bobby Clair.
"Thev do a lot for our
offense Baker said
"Sometimes in third-down situa-
tions they (the opposition) will
expect us to pass, and instead we
just give the ball to Anthony and
he takes it up the middle
Baker has respect for the
talents of senior fullback Clair as
well. "Bobby is a reallv great
athlete added Baker. "He can
catch the ball verv well "
'He gives it all he 9s got his leadership
and performance and consistently giv-
ing 100 percent
�Don Murrv
2-5 is the mental aspect Baker
stated. "We know we should
have won most or all of the
games we have lost this season,
we just need to eliminate our
mistakes and execute. We just
need to stop beating ourselves
and go out there believing we can
win
Baker does not attribute all of
But no one man car. w in
ball games by himself. It takes
the coordinated effort of the en-
tire team. Baker feels that self
motivation is one key to being a
successful football player.
"I think my biggest motivator
is myself stated Baker. "A
player can't always rely on so
meone else to motivate him,
beca .
always be
motivate I
anywhere. We g
a
team thai cj
everyone else We d
reputai
For ma
highligl � their college
would be the 0r
their best game, b
differently.
"1 u ay that mv
especially in the dorm suite.
what 1 will remember most about
being a; ECU Baker said. "I
would rather be known
remembered as a good person,
than as a football player
But what about life after col-
lege? What are Baker's goals'1
"1 guess a professional (foot-
ball) career is probable every .
iegiate plaver's dream he said
"But I'm just going to wait, and
take it as it comes "
Baker, and the rest of the
Pirates will face what mav be the
greatest challenge of their careers
as they enter the final leg of the
1985 season. Win or lose, Tony
Baker's name will he etched in
the Pirate
Classifi
NEED T YP
Terr
752
SALE
PROFESSION HG SER
VICE
WORD PROCESSlNi
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FOR SALE

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FOR SALf
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FOR Si I
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VINTAGE CLOTI
� '
� I
CHRIS'
ISLAND
-
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narr.es ai
res-
-
Br- �
COMPUTERIZED
VICE WORD PROCESSING
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aoc
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rates
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i B V
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OFF
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Carolina East Mall
756 6078
OPi N MiN SAI
tprrt n-l
The
HOMEMADE PI
Sunday Nght Dinner M
,47 You Can Eat Lasagm
Ladks
Free Canal





Classifieds
reason
SAl.K.
need typing ��� s Resume's
. ipet � - ' Cal Kai en a
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
v ICE : � . � � �'� work
- �
RD processing contad
,1 m S
typing
J750

r SALI �' ' � - fan
����'� Call
- �
i BEDROOM APTS Four bit -
�180.
ALE
- Tn Fin
� 620
USE IN UNIVERSITY AREA
. v
� � en, d
- � � �
v � �
itcentra
154
NTAGE CLOTHING
. � � � . �
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5 30
TYPING: All typing services pro
vded by professional woman with
IBM Correcting Selectri
typewriter Familiar with all styles
Call Debbie at 756 6333
PERSONALS
LOST: Tl 58 C Calculator Reward
ottered call after 6 p.m 756 5285
LOST White male, appro
510" by 1" thick is missing Alias
SigEpSam" if you have mforma
tion relating to the kidnapping I
Sam please - all the Sig Ep Hoi
757 0487
NANTUCKET will be appearn
�� e Sportsman Lounge Sunday Nov
3 Gate opens at 12 00 noon lo
behind Riverside Oyster Bar
more info call 758 0058 it's going to
, one hell of a live outdoor
LOST: T155M scientific calculator
A �� the initials CWF lion the t
Lost n Flanagan building 3rd floor
Oct. 24 Reward Please
752 2321
ECU STUDENTS ' ' � " � �
, . an Ir nk 100 Keg: " l �' 1500
ns Give it a ' '�
son-1 � � s at th Sign � ' i
. � � . � . Party � �'� '
DELTA ZETA: The Pi Kapp party
was a scare, with the cocktail crew
we partied there! The Chapel Hill
men are on their way, so be ready to
throw down on Friday! Then when
Saturday rolls around, grab a date
and FORMAL down!
r E WARD. A reward will be given to
anyone whocan provide information
leading to the arrest and conviction
ot the person(s) responsiole for the
�� efl and damages to the Delta Zeta
Soronty house on the night of Sept
25
KENT, WILL, TOMMY, DEREK,
ART The DZ formal is drawing
hope you're as psyched as we
here I ar River is where it all
who knows when the party
' See a Saturday Suzanne,
Manjake Sonya Dana and Alyce
HEY COON MAN: Happy 20th Bir
tl lay Georgie Get ready tor a fiesta
ekend of snapper and grog Be
ii e of an intoxicating kidnapping
BD & JN
PHI KAPPA TAU BROTHERS &
PLEDGES: Don't be scared to
throw down with your lil' sisters on
Halloween n.te1 ! Be at the house at 8
Thursday nite Bring yourself and
your mask .��� II provide the buzz1
Love You- . ttle Sisters
PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGE CLASS
Announces the winner of the new
rth Cruiser Bicycle Contratula
H F McLaurm Thanks
� � our support Pi Kapp
I
SPRING BREAK CRUISE: 6 days 5
mghts Mexican islands Ship goes to
port 3 times Tips and gratuities in
eluded! $445 Limited number of
tickets available CALL NOW'
752 3178 or 758 0074
NEW SORORTIY: Thanks for a
great meeting Tuesday night Our
next meeting will be at 6 Sunday in
room 221
STUDENTS: Add new color to your
wardrobe and household furnishings
by supporting ETA Sigma Gamma's
Yard Sale, Saturday Nov 2 at 110
Heritage St Greenville From 6
am 1 p.m
WANTED
rHE EAST CARPI 1N1AN
MODELS NEEDED Experience
and Sales ability required Must be
tree to travel Wednesday andor
Thursday evenings Fantastic f man
cial opportunity for the right gins
443 6471
TELEMARKETING POSITION
AVAILABLE. With nation's lar
retail company Salary bonuses
Permanent part time Afternoon
and evening hours available Call
355 7108 for appointment
S60 PER HUNDRED PAID
remailmg letters from home Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
for information � a; 'on
Associates, Box 95 B. NJ
07203
CM rOBl R y
FEMALE ROOMMATE �
rent ($325 ai
,1 or Lisa
FREE TRIP ro F1
Daytona for Spi
� Rep ca '
LAMBDA CHI'S
. � . � . � �
' ' ' '
BASKETBALL OFFICI AI
Anone
-
-
� -
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Im
mediately to share 4 bedroom house,
close to campus and Overton's Call
758 5953
SALES AND MANAGEMENT: Be
part of the growing Clayton
organization Sales and manage
ment training positions now open in
NC's hottest manufacturing market
Tell us about your background and
why you want to share the success of
our dynamic company AH replies
confidential Write Bob Clouse, 1823
301 South, Wilson, NC 27893
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Chr.stian
roommate needed to share 2
bedroom duplex SI 35 includes
utilities 1 a bath Call 756 8676 after
5 30
Pirate Football Versus Eagles
Continued from pajze H
year, and are expected to fill the
middle for the Eagles. Another
sophomore, Eric Reed, will sec-
some playing time as well
The 50 defense ol SMI I
good size up front Senior nose
guard Tracy Oakle (6-1, 2r0
pound) led the Eagles in sacks
with five last year. His fSK tackles
were also tops for the SMI. club.
Oakley will team with fellow
(seniors dreg Dampeer, Fred
Baskin. Kip Smith and freshman
Re B - i ire
placekicking dune
til 18 ol
point tries, wl
2 field .
SMI
� irtl
record ol 2 -1
shov
Pit :
ha �
Eagles and wi
hra M, .
CHRIS Ol
� � �
'
HRISTMAS ON HILTON HEAD
CONGRATULATIONS
pi iml
. . � � . n ai
ECU FOOTBALL TEAM: I'm still
� Let's try to
� �� , md look
arc) You quys can put your I
� . � � your legs or you car
i tf and play some real toot
� and have pride in
The Fan
LOST gold cross pendant
�" hi losl Oct
. �� : � : nti a � Reward
� t 794 4378
Magcz ne
'OCESSING
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GOLF & SKI SHOP
264 By Pass (Beside G
"V & Appliance)
.i�j
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30 OH
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SHAG BAGS Reg
$35.00
Now$29.95
The Minority Affairs Publication of East Carolina Univers
has openings for the following position:
Advertising Representatives
O Off
Many Golf Club Sets OnSpecial
Thru Nov. 2nd
Complete Wilson Jr. Clubs ubs)
Reg $150.00 Now $99.95
rApplications will be available at Expressions Office or the
Media Board Secretary, 2nd floor, Publications Bidg.
I HMC
' it Hen per � stn
Framed
e Losses
Process & Print
131 2$ per print
NowS4.73
( arolina East Mall
756 6078
- )PI N MON SA1
- I M I'M
affordable fashion eyewear 8. contact lenses
The Plaza Greenville. NX 756-9771
would like to thank the
following businesses for their support of
CHRISTMAS IN
NOVEMBER
fcaptm ii n �
:
ship
giv-
1urr
Bakei
be the
ireers
enter
Win ot
ed in
The Treehouse Restaurant
is havin g all you can eat
HOMEMADE PIZZA, PASTA, and SALAD BAR SPECIAL
Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday
Nights for
$3.50
Enjoy Our 50 Item Salad Bar
Sunday Ng ht Dinner Special BAR SPECIALS
-1 YOU Can Eat Lasagne $3.1 5 Sunday $2.50 Pitchers
Monday S2.50 Pitchers w Monday Night Football
sot wine TUESDAY LADIES NIGHT
Live Entertainment w Bruce Frye
$2.50 Pitchers
WEDNESDAY
Wine Coolers � $1.99 per Pitcher
THURSDAY
85c Canned Beer and Steamed Oysters 20C each
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Steamed Oysters 20c each
Daily Luncheon Specials
Contact for Priva te Parties and Gatherings
ITcH
&
The Attic
SubStotion II
Pizza Hut
The Tree House
Chico's
Buccaneer
TW's Nitelife
Fabricate Too
Hearrs Delight
Chinatown Express
Apple Records
ECU Playhouse
Grog's
Sunshine Video, Inc.
Subway
The Plaza Record Bar
Pepsi Cola
Franklin's
Movies
Marsh's Surf & Sea
For Heads Only
Jarman Stables
Suzie's Pizzeria
Wrong Way Corrigan's
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10
I Ml EASTC KOl IMW
IK lOBl R W, 1985
Norto GAM!n Mai TOM NORTON
ECl -Southern MissSouthei i Miss. b 3
Honda- iihm itFlorida
Bostonolll'tnn. StatePenn. State
Michigan-IllinoisMichigan
Kansas-OklahomaOklahoma
I.SI -Mississippi1 SI
Stanford-WashingtonW ashing!on
I M -Man landMaryland
a y-Notre DoomNotre Dame
Miami-Ha. StaleMiami
S rai'iise-Pittshurghsvj acuse
It'as levh-lexaI e x a s
KICK Met OR MACJOHN PETERSON
Southern Miss. b 5
ECt bv 7Auburn
ubui nPenn. State
Penn. State 1 ihuinMichigan ()Wlarwmi:
in tains Slim
SIEGFRIED SHEWS
Southern Miss, by 10
Auburn
Penn. State
Michigan
Oklahoma
LSU
Washington
Maryland
Noire Dame
Fla. State
Pittsburgh
Texas
BILL DAWSON
Oklahoma
1 SI
Wasl
Ma
itre Dame
M iami
.
I SU
ashington
Maryland
Notre Dame
Miami
Sracuse
fexas
Southern Miss.
Auburn
Penn. State
Michigan
Oklahoma
1 si
Washington
Maryland
Notre Dame
Miami
Pittsburgh
lexas Tech
bv 3
SCOTT COOPER
ECU by 1
Auburn
Penn. State
Michigan
Oklahoma
LSU
Washington
Maryland
Notre Dame
Fla. State
Pittsburgh
Texas
TOD I) PATTON
Southern Miss, by
Florida
Penn. State
Michigan
Oklahoma
LSU
Washington
Maryland
Notre Dame
Miami
Pittsburgh
Texas
�'D.J WATTS
Southern Miss, by 5
Florida
Penn. State
Michigan
Oklahoma
LSU
Washington
UNC
Navy
Miami
Pittsburgh
Texas
Lady Bucs
Hold
Scrimmage
si NDINGS
IOM NORTON
SIEGFRIED SHEWS
SCOT1 COOPER
"D.J WAITS
RICK McCORMAC
JOHN PETERSON
BII I DAWSON
IODD PAITON
LAST WEEK
7-4
7-4
9-2
7-4
8-3
7-4
8-3
7-4
OVERALL
67-27
66-28
65-29
64-30
64-30
62-32
60-34
59-35
Entertain
Pirates
quad
No
:udent'
:00 p.n)
sKe
:
Si day
Minges
X
X
X

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Pi � 3 es
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 31, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.436
Location of Original
University Archives
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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