The East Carolinian, October 29, 1985






She lEast (Earnimtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60No.18
Tuesday, October 29, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
C irculation 12,000
Mask � The Ultimate Illusion
J B HUMBERT - The EjtC�rolim�n
Art student are creating masks that they made during a recent seminar. Masks are, and have been
tons? PnJeCt Certaln em�ti0ns and fee,ln8S- But" are masks usd inead to hide ones imperfec-
Buccaneers Arive On Campus
Bv lUWNr (,()i)VS
s�f �nlr-
E I
-
� eiv ed new s
V'3
-
ly bi
ej by studei
the sc-
: publicatii
���
th Davis,
er, "We
started off at 6,000 (books) and
we have passed out at least half
We reserve lOOOfor the graduates
� we plan to mail their year-
ks Because the Buccaneer is
anced through student fees,
the only people who may receive
yearbooks now are students who
paid tuition during fall oi 1984
1985.
�ok has more photos
before Davis said, "so
there's more ol a chance that
s will get into the year-
It. '
Davis also added that ECU
students are pleased with the ear-
dition of the Buccaneer. "I
think the students really like it. It
gives them an opportunity to see
part- of campus they never knew
existed through photos. We look
for something that's new and uni-
que rather than the same thing
year after year she said. A sec-
tion on Greenville is one of the
newest features the yearbook of-
fers to students.
"Students had requested that
we incorporate some of Green-
ville into the vearbook and so we
did Davis said.
One problem the yearbook has
had is a low turnout for
undergraduate portraits. "We
tend to cater to seniors and
luat Davi �aid Thi, cai
"we didn't have a lot of graduate
participation she added.
In an effort to get a greater tur-
nout in the spring, and for next
year's book. Davis said she is
planning to schedule portrait
times at night.
Pirate Walk Funds Slashed
Bv LANCE SEARL
Suff Wrtur
along with tempers
cated yesterday when
SGA legislature voted to cut
of ECl s P;rate Walk
em by almost half of
last year's budget.
Bv a vote of 21 to 11 in favor
the proposed budge; cuts, ap-
priations given to the student
rganization were cut from
S2.985 to $1,555 over last vear.
Due to rising rates of campus
nes in recent years, Pirate
Walk has attempted to eliminate
es as rape and assault
panying females at
Sarah Coburn, Pirate
Walk spokesman, said, "With
the money they have ap-
pnated, I don't see how we
continue to be a effective as
before
The most significant cuts in-
cluded advertising, from $500 to
$125, printing, from $500 to $60,
and employee refreshments, from
$90 to nothing.
According to Coburn, "Adver-
tising is the most important
aspect of our organization. With
a $375 cut, we will reach far less
people, thus being less effective
Coburn also said that Pirate
Walk also needs money for prin-
ting booklets to be distributed to
other colleges around the nation.
Pirate Walk representatives are
scheduled to attend an Atlanta
convention, while planning their
own seminars at ECU in an effort
to expand their project to other
campuses.
ECU Public Safety Officer
Rhonda Gurley emphasized that
the number of assaults and
related crimes on campus has
dropped significantly since Pirate
Walk began.
The controversy among
legislators also centered around
why the budget was itemized in-
stead of being presented in a
lump sum. Legislative members
tried to justify their decision by
saving that Pirate Walk could
return to the SGA to get more
funds at a later date.
"We are more effective when
we pull our money from one
place Coburn said. "We'll
never get anything done if we
must go back to them (SGA) for
money everytime
Coburn also noted that the two
other student service organiza-
tions, the transit system and
refrigerator rentals receive their
own lump-sum salaries.
With many yellow-shirted
Pirate Walk members attending
the meeting and eagerly an-
ticipating the outcome,
Legislators argued for nearly 30
minutes before a final vote came.
After the vote, several Pirate
Walk volunteers, visibly upset at
the outcome, stammered out the
door.
Alcohol Awareness
Week Great Success
By BETH WHICKER
It's not often that college
students ride tricycles, but as part
of Alcohol Awareness Week,
students representing various
dorms regressed to their
childhood in order to prove the
influence of alcohol has an
adverse effect on reaction time.
Students participating were re-
quired to ride tricycles between
pylons after drinking various
amounts of beer and then waiting
15 minutes for the alcohol to take
effect.
After the initial "dry run' on
the tricycles, the race began. An
hour and four beers later, Garrett
Dorm emerged the winner.
According to Ron Speier,
associate dean director of Stu-
dent Services, "Alcohol
Awareness Week was successful
in raising people's consciousness
It was the first time we'd pa:
ticipated in anything like th
said Speier.
"Alcohol Awareness Week is
not just one week but 52 weeks a
year. Films and other programs
will be provided throughout the
year added Speier.
The stale of North Carolina
moved early in the fight against
alcohol. The Safe Roads Act was
deemed effective October 1,
1983. The act repealed the DL1
law and replaced it with the single
offense of "Driving While Im-
paired" or DWI.
Aa to a state publica-
tion, a DWI can be proven by a
blood alcohol level of .10 percent
� ng the driver
physical or mental faculties are
impaired bv alcohol, drugs or
both.
If a person is charged with a
DWI, the charge cannot be
reduced to a lesser offense.
All pet cms who are charged
with DWI o hose who refuse to
be testi their blood-alcohol
levels face an automatic 10-day
revocation of their driving
licenses.
After being convicted of DWI,
an � . go before a trial
judg a hearing to determine
the c nsequences of his or her ac-
The Safe Roads Act
estal � levels of punish-
mei xmined by the seventy
nse
The Safe Roads Act raised the
age to buy and possess beer and
e with less than 14 percent
alcohol to 19. The legal age to
buy hard liquor or fortified wine
remains 21.
L.mited-dnving privileges after
a conviction of DWI have been
reduced greatly. Limited-driving
privileges are only available
under less severe punishment
levels. In certain instances, the
person convicted of DWI will
have his or her license revoked
before obtaining limited-driving
privileges.
The limited-driving privilege
extends only to driving related to
employment, education, treat-
ment, community service,
household maintenance and
emergency health needs.
� person charged with DWI is
never held in jail any longer t!
24 hours.
Certain punishment requires
convicted persons to take an
Alcohol Drug Education class.
Failure to fake the class will result
in his or her license being revoked
for 12 months.
Drinking after driving is
dangerous and against the law. In
North Carolina, an alcohol c
centration of .10 means you are
driving while impaired.
Higher Education Act Up
For Renewal In Congress
WASHINGTON, DC (CPS)�
The current effort to renew the
landmark Higher Education Act,
which sets the outlines of federal
college policy through the next
five years, has broadened into a
spirited debate over just how in-
volved the federal government
should be in higher education.
By law, Congress must renew
the act every five years.
In the past, the renewal pro
cesses have featured routine
political arguments over whether
to start new programs and how
much money to give old ones.
This time, led by U.S. Educa-
tion Secretary William Bennett,
critics are promoting a serie
fundamental changes in the law
that, if enacted, would begin a
new era of college historv.
"The warning shots suggest
this will be a much more basic-
debate than the previous five-
year reauthorizations says
University of Minnesota educa-
tion professor Jim Hearn, who
has studied the impact of the
original 1965 Higher Education
Act on colleges.
Bennett recently announced he
would unveil his proposals for
amending the Higher Education
Act in January, but previous
comments suggest he'll try to cut
most programs.
Observers expect Bennett will
reflect the broad conservative
critique of the act surfacing just
,i.s many educators prepare to
celebrate the law's 20th anniver-
sa-
The celebrants say the law.
which effectively invented most
student financial aid programs
and fueled an era of un-
precede n American
made it po
Me ' educate much
of its middle and lower classes for
the first time in history.
The critics say the law, in fact,
made it too eas) to go to college.
let colleges make themselves too
expensive to be useful and
lowered the quality of college
educatio
It's so easy for students to get
federai aid that schools "accept
students who are unprepared or
uninterested in rigorous academic
training says Eileen Gardner I
the Heritage Foundation, a
Washington, D.C. think tank
whose education policies have
been adopted bv the Reagan Ad-
ministration in the past.
The easy monev "has promp-
ted too many colleges to abandon
substantive core (curricula) in
favor of a hodgepodge of courses
geared to the interests of those
(uninterested) students, thereby-
gutting the value of a college
education, " Gardner charges.
City Council Candidates Will Speak
By MIKE LL'DWICK
NpmIMm
The Central Campus Mall will
be the sight of the Candidate
um for City Council on
Wednesday a: noon. Rain site is
244 Mendenhall.
The Candidates Forum for Ci-
ty Counal was organized by the
Candidates Forum Committee.
SGA President David Brown
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
To many, total abstinence is
easier than perfect modera-
tion.
� St. Augustine
said, "Faculty, SGA legislators
and community residents all
worked to help realize the
students' potential as voting
citizens in Greenville
According to Brown, the pur-
pose of the Forum is to let
students know where city council
candidates stand on student
issues.
"It is because students are
residents they need to be inform-
ed said Brown. "They go out
and shop, dine, pay rent; they are
citizens of Greenville just like
anyone else. The policies that the
City Council makes affects the
students just like anyone else
he added.
Brown said 10 candidates have
already committed to par-
ticipating at the Forum. There
will be a studentfaculty panel on
hand to ask questions. Panel
members are: Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for Student Life; the
Rev. Dan Earnhardt, director of
the Methodist Student Center;
Sue Haynie, chairman of the Stu-
dent Union Forum Committee;
Mark Simon, Media Board chair-
man; and Jay Stone, managing
editor of The East Carolinian.
"We had a voter registration
drive in front of the Student Sup-
ply Store said Brown. "A
significant number of students
have registered to vote to where
they can make a significant dif-
ference in an election if they
voted.
"The City of Greenville
Brown said, "has supported this
effort and the candidates have ex-
pressed an interest in meeting the
students
Brown said that he would like
to see the City Council come up
with a comprehensive plan tor
the growth of the Greenville com-
munity � one that would allow
for the adequate growth of the
University and its student
population.
"We have some real problems
on and off campus such as stu-
dent parking. Brown said. "Both
the City and the University need
to work out a program to allow
for more off campus parking
during class hours Brown add-
ed.
Greenville City Council elec-
tions are scheduled for Nov. 5.
The city presently selects city
council members from an at large
system. However, a consultant
has been hired by the city to ex-
amine the possibilty of re-
districting precincts to ensure
that minorities are guaranteed
equal representation.
Proceed With Cau twnJ :tYt
This sign on the outskirts of Greenville fe do t warningVtsrThT
to go no further. However, had this sign bee � placed in northern
Italy around 400A.D Remans would certainlv have taken heed
The Vandals were one of the Germanic tribes which raided th,
Roman Empire and eventually caused its dem ise.
I





She iEaat (Earoltnian
Serving (he Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No. 18
Tuesday, October 29, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Mask � The Ultimate Illusion
JB HUMBERT � Th E�st Carolinian
r students are creating masks that they made during a recent seminar. Masks are, and have been
used to project certain emotions and feelings. But. are masks used instead to hide ones imperfec-
tions
Buccaneers Arive On Campus
Bv DAW NK GODWIN
s�ff Vtrltr,
rsi time recent
'�I
ipus
5
d new
arrived
. I
t be ob
by studei
Buccaneer
n the se-
publica:
Davis,
r "We
Maned off at 6,(XX) (books) and
we have passed out at least half.
We reserve lOOOfor the graduates
we plan to mail their year
ks Because the Buccaneer is
financed through student fees,
the only people who may receive
yearbooks now are students who
paid tuition during fall of ls84 or
- f 1985.
"This bo i has more photos
before Davis said.
re's more of a chance that
s will get into the year-
book
Davis also added that ECU
students are pleased with the ear-
!v edition of the Buccaneer. "1
think the students really like it. It
gives them an opportunity to see
parts of campus they never knew
existed through photos. We look
for something that's new and uni-
que rather than the same thing
year after year she said. A sec-
tion on Greenville is one of the
newest features the yearbook of-
fers to students.
"Students had requested that
we incorporate some of Green-
ville into the yearbook and so we
d:d Davis said.
One problem the yearbook has
had is a low turnout for
undergraduate portraits. "We
tend to cater to seniors and
graduate Davis said. Tl
"we didn't have a lot of graduate
participation she added.
In an effort to get a greater tur-
nout in the spring, and for next
year's book. Davis said she is
planning to schedule portrait
times at night.
Pirate Walk Funds Slashed
Bv 1 AM Y SKAR1
S��ff trlir
Debate � along with tempers
re heated yesterday when
X 1 cyislature voted to cut
fEC U's Pirate Walk
" �;� v'em by almost half of
last year's budget.
Bv a vote of 21 to 11 in favor
of the proposed budget cuts, ap-
rr:auuis given to the student
n were cut from
S2.985 to Si .555 over last year.
Due to rising rates of campus
vnmes in recent years. Pirate
W alk has attempted to eliminate
such crimes as rape and assault
by accompanying females at
night. Sarah Coburn, Pirate
Walk spokesman, said. "With
the money they have ap-
pnated, 1 don't see how we
can continue to be as effective as
before
The most significant cuts in-
cluded advertising, from $500 to
SI25, printing, from $500 to $60,
and employee refreshments, from
S90 to nothing.
According to Coburn, "Adver-
tising is the most important
aspect of our organization. With
a $375 cut, we will reach far less
people, thus being less effective "
Coburn also said that Pirate
Walk also needs money for prin-
ting booklets to be distributed to
other colleges around the nation.
Pirate Walk representatives are
scheduled to attend an Atlanta
convention, while planning their
own seminars at ECU in an effort
to expand their project to other
campuses.
ECU Public Safety Officer
Rhonda Gurley emphasized that
the number of assaults and
related crimes on campus has
dropped significantly since Pirate
W alk began.
The controversy among
legislators also centered around
why the budget was itemized in-
stead of being presented in a
lump sum. Legislative members
tried to justify their decision by-
saying that Pirate Walk could
return to the SGA to get more
funds at a later date.
"We are more effective when
we pull our money from one
place Coburn said. "We'll
never get anything done if we
must go back to them (SGA) for
money everytime
Coburn also noted that the two
other student service organiza-
tions, the transit system and
refrigerator rentals receive their
own lump-sum salaries.
With many yellow-shirted
Pirate Walk members attending
the meeting and eagerly an-
ticipating the outcome,
Legislators argued for nearly 30
minutes before a final vote came.
After the vote, several Pirate
Walk volunteers, visibly upset at
the outcome, stammered out the
door.
Alcohol Awareness
Week Great Success
By BETH WHICKER
MTWiMh
It's not often that college
students nde tricycles, but as part
of Alcohol Awareness Week,
students representing various
dorms regressed to their
childhood in order to prove the
influence of alcohol has an
adverse effect on reaction time.
Students participating were re-
quired to ride tricycles between
pylons after drinking various
amounts of beer and then waiting
15 minutes for the alcohol to take
effect.
After the initial "dry run" on
the tricycles, the race began. An
hour and four beers later. Garrett
Dorm emerged the winner.
According to Ron Speier,
associate dean director of Stu-
dent Services, "Alcohol
Awareness Week was successful
in raising people's consciousness
It was the first time we'd par-
ticipated in anything like this
said Speier.
"Alcohol Awareness Week is
not just one week but 52 week- a
year. Films and other programs
will be provided throughout the
year added Speier.
The state of North Carolina
moved early in the fight against
alcohol. The Safe Roads Act was
deemed effective October 1,
1983. The act repealed the DU1
law and replaced it with the single
offense of "Driving While Im-
paired" or DWI.
According to a state publica-
tion, a DWI can be proven by a
blood alcohol level of .10 percent
by proving the driver
physical or mental faculties are
impaired by alcohol, drugs or
both.
If a person is charged with a
DWI, the charge cannot be
reduced to a lesser offense.
All persons who are charged
with DWI or those who refuse to
be tested for their blood-alcohol
levels face an automatic 10-day
revocation of their driving
licenses.
After being convicted of DWI.
an offender must go before a trial
judge for a hearing to determine
the consequences of his or her ac-
tioi The Safe Roads Act
estal � levels of punish-
mei ; mined by the severity
� - se
The Safe Roads Act raised the
eer and
'ess than 14 percent
alcohol to 19. The legal age to
buy hard liquor or fortified wine
remains 21.
Limited-driving privileges after
a conviction of DWI have been
reduced greatly. Limited-driving
privileges are only available
under less severe punishment
levels. In certain instances, the
person convicted of DWrI will
have his or her license revoked
before obtaining limited-driving
privileges.
The limited-driving privilege
extends only to driving related to
employment, education, treat-
ment, communi'y service,
household maintenance and
emergency health needs
A person charged with DWI is
nev er held in jail any longer than
24 hours.
Certain punishment requires
convicted persons to take an
Mcohol Drug Education class.
Failure to take the class will re-
in his or ner license being revoked
for 12 months.
Drinking after driving is
dangerous and against the law In
North Carolina, an alcohol con-
centration of .10 means you are
driving while impaired.
Higher Education Act Up
For Renewal In Congress
WASHINGTON, DC (CPS)�
The current effort to renew the
landmark Higher Education Act,
which sets the outlines of federal
college policy through the next
five years, has broadened into a
spirited debate over just how in-
volved the federal government
should be in higher education.
By law, Congress must renew
the act every five years.
In the past, the renewal pro-
cesses have featured routine
political arguments over whether
to start new programs and how
much money to give old ones.
This time, led by U.S. Educa-
tion Secretary William Bennett,
critics are promoting a sene-
fundamental changes in the law
that, if enacted, would begin a
new era of college history.
"The warning shots suggest
this will be a much more basic
debate than the previous five-
year reauthorizations says
University of Minnesota educa-
tion professor Jim Hearn, who
has studied the impact of the
original 1965 Higher Education
Act on colleges.
Bennett recently announced he
would unveil his proposals for
amending the Higher Education
Act in January, but previous
comments suggest he'll try to cut
most programs.
Observers expect Bennett will
reflect the broad conservative
critique of the act surfacing just
as many educators prepare to
celebrate the law's 20th anniver-
sarj
The celebrants say the law,
which effectively invented m
student financial aid programs
and fueled an era of un-
precede American
higher educ made it po
bie foi a society to educate much
of its middle and lower classes for
the first time in history.
The critics say the law, in fact,
made it too easy to go to college,
let colleges make themselves too
expensive to be useful and
lowered the quality of college
edu.
It's so ea tudents to get
federal aid that schools 'accept
students who are unprepared or
uninterested in rigorous academic
training says Eileen Gardner of
the Heritage Foundation, a
Washington. D.C. think tank
whose education policies have
been adopted by the Reagan Ad-
ministration in the past.
The easy money "has promp-
ted too many colleges to abandon
substantive core (curricula) in
fav or of a hodgepodge of courses
geared to the interests of those
(uninterested) students, thereby-
gutting the value of a college
education, " Gardner charges.
City Council Candidates Will Speak
By MIKE LI DWICK
Nm Foliar
The Central Campus Mall will
be the sight of the Candidate
mil for City Council on
Wednesday a: noon. Rain site is
244 Mendenhall.
The Candidates Forum for Ci-
ty Council was organized by the
Candidates Forum Committee.
SGA President David Brown
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
To many, total abstinence is
easier than perfect modera-
tion.
m�mmmmmJt-Auxus(ine
said, "Faculty, SGA legislators
and community residents all
worked to help realize the
students' potential as voting
citizens in Greenville
According to Brown, the pur-
pose of the Forum is to let
students know where city council
candidates stand on student
issues.
"It is because students are
rridents they need to be inform-
ed said Brown. "They go out
and shop, dine, pay rent; they are
citizens of Greenville just like
anyone else. The policies that the
City Council makes affects the
students just like anyone else
he added.
Brown said 10 candidates have
already committed to par-
ticipating at the Forum. There
will be a studentfaculty panel on
hand to ask questions. Panel
members are: Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for Student Life; the
Rev. Dan Earnhardt, director of
the Methodist Student Center;
Sue Haynie, chairman of the Stu-
dent Union Forum Committee;
Mark Simon, Media Board chair-
man; and Jay Stone, managing
editor of The East Carolinian.
"We had a voter registration
drive in front of the Student Sup-
ply Store said Brown. "A
significant number of students
have registered to vote to where
they can make a significant dif-
ference in an election if they
voted.
"The Gty of Greenville
Brown said, "has supported this
effort and the candidates have ex-
pressed an interest in meeting the
students
Brown said that he would like
to see the City Council come up
with a comprehensive plan tor
the growth of the Greenville com-
munity � one that would allow
for the adequate growth of the
University and its student
population.
"We have some real problems
on and off campus such as stu-
dent parking, Brown said. "Both
the City and the University need
to work out a program to allow
for more off campus parking
during class hours Brown add-
ed.
Greenville City Council elec-
tions are scheduled for Nov. 5.
The city presently selects city
council members from an at large
system. However, a consultant
has been hired by the city to ex-
amine the possibilty of re-
districting precincts to ensure
that minorities are guaranteed
equal representation.
UMIHT -
E�t Caroiimtn
Proceed With Caution
This sign on the outskirts of Greenville k no t warningpasrTbv
to go no further. However, had this sign been p,ced in northern
Italy around 400A.D Remans would certainly have taken heed
The Vandals were one of the Germanic trib es which raided th
Roman Empire and eventually caused its dem is.
WtM
-





THEEAS1xkoi inks
h mm k :si, )vk�
Announcements
PPHA
Pr Po�e��ton�i Health All.ante will hold
a meeting Thurjdav Oct 31 a' 6 00 p m at
the Cultural Center Ail members
tereiteo guests are entourageo itla �
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Psi Pn, announces ts sen1
nuai Achievement week Program Si
Nov )7 at 3 00 pm ,n Mendenhaii roi
We are recognizing an mmoi si
with 3 0 or above grade point avprjjr
are a minor pf student and .
recognneo 'or you- i h o I a t k
achievements writ a iette tc I �
Ph Fr�1 Upsiion Ze'a Chapter B�
3014 Greeny Me NC 27834 containing .
name iai"Pu5 address parents
home an, .pa G P A syyiii t. -
'n the Stl . Vs' OfH cten r All eop'
re postmarKeo oetore 5 .�. n - I
OMEGA PSI PHI
� i-ga Psi Pi SpOOSOl rs I .
� weer N -grit Costume Part) 1 "�
mi ted Touch" Wefl � s
a se provided ' Mendenhal Sti
entei ano College H
!0 30 Donations are $1 00 "
e SI SO �� itumi
ceeds Wi go to our Achievement Aee�
jj( Anc'he� Herd! rP, Production
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
B st. a
�ts i - ring a e
a. e For a spirit if a different k
u$ tor fun fellowship and more tl s vs i
3a y n.ght at Intel v a- J
Fellowship We'll see y
Building auditorium at 7 00 please
by!
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
k ing i I now! i ng g
� er" Then look no tui �'� the Bap
fist S1 this nvednesda �
' :��'�� � rs at 8 (
� ot tram �
� et i � be a sma l
bring yourself oi
ind get ready for a good
Baptisl Student
�lex' to Wend s
CHESS TOURNAMENT
a " a cam pu.
. �
Com" rtin I fie 1 '
ECU full time students and is 10 be nc
Sal Nov �� �� . 10 p m on wpg.ster n
"�e Billiards ���� Me � �
' 9 Ov t. 31. For turtfH
"5" Ml I exl 23v
LAW SOCIETY
The La Society ot f CU is a semi
professional orgamialion with a history ol
acquainting interested ECU students with
aw school via practicing professionals The
soc iety is composed of students w H serious
�' attending law school � .
nted i the legal pfvyfession plea
us at ou' next meeting on Tuesday Nov s
from B 30 no pm in Rooi
t-nhail For more information
. Rli fiai � � Pond sn ms
PHI ETA SIGMA
I he't w ?�� , meeting A
0 f 30 in room 221 (Vte Please be
LAW SCHOOL
interested in going to Law School'
about the Admissions proiesc and S
summer programs by signing up fc a:k .v II
a represe"tat ve from Campbell Law School
Sgn up a' career Planning and Plaemef1t
itio � � lividua ess
.(�up' S
SIGMA IOTA EPSILON
A f will 'aye a meeting of rsday
31 a 3 IS p m n Rawi 102 ew
� � � � jed 1 - �end'
SCHOOLOF BUSINESS
. irships foi appr �
SS 000 are a. t a
� rs SI lents � se f forms from the
� H aid office oi
ting W!S Dev. S'On Si .ences B238
ince BI43 Management BU7

subn � Raw � .
studem ��,
ECU AMBASSADORS
� . .
the Multipurposi �
se l. w
CAFETERIA BLUES

-
s.
� . �
�.
� . i, , �
i
PRE MED
Alpha Eps.lon Delta will hold it's next
meeting on Toes Oct 11 at r 30 p m in
W Flanagan Dr Lou Anne Baldree
who is a resident physic .an af PCWH will be
the featured speaker This will be an infor
� atlve meeting and all interested students
are well:ome Retfeshments will be served
RESIDENCE LIFE
COMMITTEE
itviH tie an open meeting of the
Residence cte Committee on Thurs . Oct
30 at 4 p m it will meet in Brewster BI02
and focus on the proiected housing changes
n Si oft Han
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
There shall be a very important meeting
li ghl cl 7 at 7 00 p m m Room 221
Mendennall We win discuss me convention
ir, Raleigh this weekend and activities on
' NOV S w.th the ity elections All
� Mrlcj arid bring conven
� � � � dj I an Sandy at 75? 0711 for more in
WZMB
PARTICIPATE1' ECU Marketing
Researc" s conducting a listener survey tor
AMB Every ,1 ,ou don't listen to us we
� from you Watch for signs ami
� a questionnaire
CANDIDATES FORUM
wted to hear the
. a � andidates lor Mayor and the
" i'S Oct 29 at 7 30
� A s Bu"ding located at f rsl
and Ri � eague of Women
is sponsoring this candidates forum
as a v �� " s v �� i nore infoi n -
Kay Davis 155 "�B0
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
eel ng of the ECU Accounting
vVon Nov 4 at 4 00 p m ,n
Roon .44 Featured speakers
� � and Dr James Col
s " Preparing for the
CMA . - nembers A en
HEALTH CAREERS DAY
Do not miss the opportunity on both Fri
day November I and Monday November 11
to talk with various Health Care Agen es'
On Friday from 9 X to 12 30 40 i ospitais or
medical facilities win have representatives
,n the front hallways of the Nursing Building
On Monday from 1 30 4 30. institutions will
be in the Allied Health Building and will be
interested in sharing materials and informa
tion about their organisations Recreational
Therapy NURS SLAP PT OT. SPED and
other maiors will surely want to come to
these sessions' PSYC. SOCW SOCI and
CDFR maiors are also encouraged to come
and talk with a tew institutions who have re
quested talking to them
UNIVERSITY
ADMINISTRATIVE
AND FACULTY SENATE
Applications are now being acrepted for
students wishing to serve on University
Committees for 1985 86 school year Approx
imately 16 student positions are open Com
mittees with vacancies are Alcohol. Drug
Education Committee (li. Canvassing a,
So he i tmg on Campus (2). Residence Life I li
Status of Minorities i2i Status of Women
i 2 Student Health Services il). Residence
Status Appeals il). Continuing Education
ll). Credits (1), Curriculum (1), General
College (1), Student Scholarships
Fellowships & Financial Aid (1). Student
Recruitment 8, Retention ill Applications
are available at the following locations Of
fice of the V.ce Chancellor for Stude I
204 Wh.charo (757 6541) Mendenhall Stu
dent center information Desk SGA Office
Mendenhaii Student Center and Re
Han Directors' Offices
After November 4 the seat on It �
Will be declared vacant and a replace
ment sought Questions about un
Committees and memberships m,
n rec ted to the Office of the Vice Cra- .
for Student Life 1757 65411 Sub- I .
pin afions now'
'
P
ACROSS
�(il lightly
4 Moie soi ure
� nei
�' i aw
� ague
� �. �
1 7 Writing
AIM
2 1 (.r i ,
?2 Starting a
24 Orgrfi
hearing
26 Hauls
29 Renovatt;
31 Sign of
33 Intellect
4 Hebrew rrn
35 Ocean
37 Health resort
39 Babylc
deity
40 Encountered
42 ObSCur.

nii-
48 H
50 Riso .
of ocean
5 1 Gratu
I �ing
� e
55 Bogs dowi
58 M
61 Play .
62 Pass.i . .
64 y
� .�
66 A"
DOWN
� st
7 Su; �
��
Of
�,all
im �
pea


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� �

ll ' �
See Page 5 For Solution
Applicati
H HAHOI DJOYNKR
Expressic

aajl
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1 HI LAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 29, 1985
Applications Accepted For Committees
& A o
B HAROLD JOYNER
�Maf? Wrttir
Applications are now being ac-
cepted for students wishing to
serve on University Committees
for the 1985-86 school year, ac-
cording to Vice Chancellor for
Student Life Elmer Meyer.
"Approximately 16 student
positions are open Mever said.
"AH a student has to do is stop
by the office (Whichard 210) and
fill out an application
The committees students may
serve on include Canvassing and
Soliciting Committee, which
makes and monitors regulations
concerning selling, merchandis-
ing and distribution of posters
and handbills on the campus.
Other committees include
Committee on Status of
Minorities, Committee on Status
f Women, Student Health Ser-
vices, Residence Status Appeals,
Continuing Education, Credits
and Curriculum, General Col-
lege, Student Scholarships and
Financial Aid, and Student
Recruitment and Retention.
Applications arc available at
Mendenhall Student Center In-
formation Desk, Student
Government Association's of-
fice, and the Residence Hall
Director's offices, he said.
"The University greatly ap-
preciates the efforts of those
students who have served in the
past and we hope that students
will continue their interest and
participation Meyer said.
Students who served on Com-
mittees last year and wish to con-
tinue to serve must notify
Meyer's office by Nov. 4. The
telephone number is 757-6541.
After the Nov. 4 deadline, the
scat on the Committee will be
declared vacant and a replace-
ment will be sought, he said.
"Students should submit their
applications now Meyer said,
"and have the chance to par-
ticipate in University activities
Night Club
Carolina East Centrp
Off Highway II
Hear Plrft Theatre
Phone 756 6401
Expressions Receives ACP A ward
B MIKF11 nWKK
Srwi r dlior
The Associated Collegiate
Press has awarded the 1985 Ex-
pressions with a First Class
rating, with two Marks of
Distinction.
General Manager of Expres-
sions Jeff Canad said a First
Class rating is just short of an
All-Amencan rating of which on-
ly 10 in the nation are awarded.
The ACP is the organization that
critics college publications.
Expressions received Marks of
Distinction in the broad
categories of Concepts and
Photography and Art.
The ACP said "the (Expres-
sions) staff obviously had a well-
defined purpose, which was ob-
viously achieved The ACP
stated that the "attractive and in-
novative format" in Expressions
earned the second Mark of
Distinction. Other catagories are:
graphic design and typographic,
layout and format, and content
wrliing and editing.
Overall, the ACP said the Ex-
pressions was a "very impressive
initial effort with a new format.
You (the Expressions staff)
should feel a real sense of self-
actualization for your achieve-
ment coupled with excitement for
the potential
"I was very pleased with Ex-
pressions initial effort. I'm even
more excited about our next
publication. During the summer,
we overcame many obstacles, but
we had an excellent staff who
pulled together to achieve an ex-
cellent publication said
Canady.
The Expressions next publica-
tion will be in late November, he
said.
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25t Wine and Draft all Night Long!
Friday Night
WAM BAM END OF THE WEEK JAM
Doors Open at 8:00 p.m.
Wear Purple and Gold and get in
for JUST $1.00
$1.00 Tall Boys � 50c Wine & Oraft
$2.50 Pitchers
ALL NITE LONG
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
Beau's a Private Club for Members & Guests am arc p
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Need
roommate for Spring '86 to
nt at Wilson Acres
Re ' 43. Phone number
ROOM FOR RENT
ind 1 � Aithin 4
impus Good
F58 1S43
iv d v Ginness or
FEMALE ROOMMATE
eded l
� '�'an
ire 2
i udes
6 8676 after
PER HUNORED PAID For
etters fi Send
.elope
v n d rtc rj i
$6
elf ao
SPORTSMEN'S LOUN GE
Presents
NANTUCKET
Sunday, Nov. 3rd l:00p.m .
LIVE OUTDOOR COrCE R T
also appearing
STONEWALL
Ticket Gate Opens 12:QDNo on
Admission $6.00
For More Information CaI75 8 -0058
Located Behind RiversideCVst er Bar
720 N. Greene Street Gville
All ABC Permits
l1���X�reK3�S3�53fc3�
and �:
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Tuesday, Octcbe r 29 � 8:30 till 2:00
LADIESON LY TILL 10:00
Admission $1.00 $2.00 for 18 yrs
1st: $100, Dinner for 2 at New Deli, SlOCert i ficate � Marshes
2nd: $50, Dinner for 2 at Chinatown Egress, 55 Certificate - Tapscotl $
3rd: $25, 1 Month's Membership at Gold iy m . Dinner at Time-Out J
Sponsors:
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Beginning Oct. 28, SPEEDY RE EDY'S will be open for
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PRICES: 12"
CHEESE$5.00
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4 ways to pick up a date
while entering the
General Foods International
Coffees Sweepstakes.
1. Go to the U.B.E. this
week.
2. Sample Sugar Free Suisse
Mochaand spill a drop on your
prospective date's sneakers.
3. Borrow their lucky pen to fill
out the "Week In Switzerland" entry
form below.
4. Pick up your free posterand
ask their advice on where to hang it!
n

Deposit this form in the entry box at the college bookstore. And thenkeep your fingers crossed.
OaaMatMn
rgSft " ' C" Mn h �"y b" " S1" "W �� �"�(tadaaas kalal. ataatsi tatuatt to atari
SSS � Mifcru.� �rr�.B� u, . c ,�"UT Ireaaawlaaea to rtaat Tart .nil 6 pro
��� ����� ���� �� Mdtrti u 3" i 5" caid �� otter as you like to partictpaliaaoeatftons
UWjOrtl dat, to SUGAfl FRcf SUISSJ MOCHA c o M��t Op, to restore ���, ataPaatt aa .1.
Jfl11 "�'��� �H "�rt� ���� �� Po�lm�,�rt tt� emptayaa, aa. tkttf Iwaam at aHmftmh
Carpat aftaa. n alHtaln mtuMwm. afawats
(
i
tttttMS.
Suisse Mocla
GcneraI Food" Inmrnaiion! Coffees
J5"Jfl ���� taMoaatit �t ���t�ea Kim aa .xdependrnt gusamo aM Maria Kaaa
' � �"�� w� tlaat tfrawtaj �ttt 1111 glace an la�naa�r
t ta. 1W9 7 vVaaaart wan ba
� artal aa aatarfaa' Mit al annom) an atttrmut by numoar mi
jaaiaa. PWia awtl aa datmatt ailhin U ay at notitiuhan a vmn taaa a
I � taaajac ta lartadaft Wtaaari are retprMtiWa tor all taut He MOOUt Waaaara
.� aaaaaajH " laamwHia at praM NJHSIZ
U�a�rtia� RnH(1, raaatrip�cltant�, twotoiUiTs " aiaats ta Fatanaataat.laaa�ar
lajlM
Xmoc.
FREE
Great Poster
prat at aM W Niatai ttefe aaf Mcaa
etmaaataamttltowaaaataatttritanaatM
1 hranka4 prta, w aaat a) arawMc Far a hat at
antataaroai anaia la "SUGAfl FUR MSK
' Saarea CarpaiMaaa. �o Sai Ua CnaaMra.
1st SOOStuderts
to Sample
Suisse Mocha
U.B.E
516 S. COTANCHF.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
v
HaH
f





�te East (Karnlhtfan
Serving the tost Carolina campus community since 1925
row Norton, cwmitaw,
J Si ONE Hmmamgfmo,
MlW L l DWICK, ����
Scon Cooper
John Shannon �
l own Pasqi i
DeChanii i Johnson, �
Tom Luvender. 0
Anthony Martin, b, h
John Peterson. �,
Shannon Short, mm ����,
Debbie Stevens. ��,
irsnDtfjeH42&uiA4uM�iMrarf
ls8'
Opinion
Page 4
Forum
Voters Meet Candidates
Debate in the SGA legislature
yesterday evening grew heated and
emotionally charged over the issue
ol the candidate's forum which is
being scheduled tor tomorrow at
noon on the campus mall. The can-
didate's forum, which will consist
of ten candidates for the Greenville
City Council answering questions
from a primarily student panel as
well as from the audience, was
organized in an effort to get
students more involved in Green-
ville municipal politics. The forum
was the brainchild of SGA presi-
dent David Brown, thougl i is be-
ing organized with the assistance of
a committee of volunteei
Speaker of the House. Kirk
Shelley came out in opposition to
having the legislature fund the
cnadidate's forum because, he said,
the SGA executive council had
acted without getting the
legislature's approval for the
forum. (The executive council con-
ts of the president, vice-
president, treasurer and class
presidents for tl Heals
alleged that, were the candidates
forum to attract . dance
and result in poor voter turnout
amon8 edicted
oppon the forum
by some
propo
would voi
SGA -
outcome might
ding leni
.ause the c
realize that
stitme
ich
ine
inef-
an
damage the stan-
1 community
cit council would
ients do not con-
and organized
ity council
would no longer fear the possibility
of an organized student backlash in
retaliation for legislation which
hurts students. Another point
which was brought to light during
debate was that students might ac-
tually antagonize the city council by
organizing politically. Presumably
this would result in some sort of
reprisal against the student com-
munity.
In answer to the charge that the
executive council had acted without
consulting the legislature David
Brown said that he had, in fact,
solicited support' from the
legislature and had received
assistance from individual
legislators in organizing the forum
project. In responding to criticisms
and doubts about the forum SGA
V ice-President Chris Tomasic
asserted that the Candidate's forum
on the mall would be likely to pique
student interest in the city council
elections, thereby increasing voter
turn-out.
It is the opinion of this
newspaper that sponsoring the can-
didate's forum is precisely the sort
ot thing that a student government
should be doing. Since many deci-
sions made by the city council af-
fect students it only 'makes sense
that they would become involved in
electing its members. More to the
point, the idea that organizing
politically might somehow work
against students does not ring true
to us. To begin with, there is no
evidence that the city council has
voted in the interest of students
because of fear of an organized stu-
dent offensive in the past. It has
always been known that students
are a disinterested and apathetic lot
when it comes to municipal elec-
tions.
Moreover, if the city attempted
;o pass legislation which hurt
students in the future would it not
be better to be politically involved
rather than uninvolved? We think
so. Democracv requires par-
ticipants. In Chapel Hill and Boone
students routinely endorse and elect
members to the city council. Thus,
it is clear that it is possible for
students to be a viable political enti-
ty in their communities and to still
live harmoniouslv with area
residents.
It is a pity that factional strife
and political struggles within the
legislature have prevented that
body from working in the best in-
terest of the students here at ECU
up until now. David Brown, Kirk
Shelley and their two respective
camps have been at war since the
legislature's first session. We only
hope that their differences can be
resolved in the best interest of all in
the coming weeks.
H6 SA& HE; WONT P5BATE STAR WARS BUT HE'S MUM
TO PfSCUSS RETURN OF U M AW EMPIRE MM 0ACK.
Gramm-Rudman-Hollings
New Deficit Reduction Bill Unfair
B Ml( HAHKINSLEY
Th� Nio Rtpublic
The "Gramm-Rudman-Hollings'
Deficit-O-Matic Sure-Fire Government
Diet" has swept Washington with ts
promise of a balanced budget h isNl
President Reagan and both houses of
Congress have now agreed in principle
to slice $36 billion a year off the deficit-
bv across-the-board cuts if all else fails-
until all the unsightly tat is gone in just
five years.
As a diet, this is akin to locking
refrigerator and hiding the key where
only you can find it. since these same
gluttons are free to repeal the plan
anytime they want.
In all the praise of this bill, you won't
find a single specific reference to any
government program, benefit or activity
that will be foregone as a result. You'd
think it was all a matter of giving up
that extra dollop of whipped cream.
For that reason, a little math is in order.
The Congressional Budget Office
estimates that the federal deficit in fiscal
1990, under current spending plans, will
be about $120 billion. That's op-
timistic. It assumes five years withoul a
recession, and it ignores the extra spen-
ding that Congress has already approv-
ed.
But it's morning in America, so let's
be optimistic.
Under our diet timetable, the deficit
is supposed to be down to $36 billion in
1990. To meet that goal, we've got to
cut $84 billion. Total projected 1990
spending is $1.2 trillion, but about $250
billion of that is Social Security, which
is exempt. Another 1200 I
are other entitlements, wl ere cuts
!imi:cd ' �: increases
Vbout $10
muted military-procurement contrat
Arid $180 billion
on the del
� �ne thing and a , we
ii die; in 1990 b ,
10 percent to 15 per.
eve � else in the . nent.
defense, welfare. : rks,
rnei tgs, everything.
died "fair, a
board" approach .
political, fiscal and moral nonsense Is
Phil Gramm going to approve a 15 per-
cent cut in maintenance of our nuc
arsenal? Jn Secret Service protection
president? In the Centers foi
ase Control? fat chance
Returning to me diet metaphor.
lose weight by cut! .
equal proportions I ;e cream, beer,
broccoli, and diet soda And where is
the fairness in cutting equally I
price supports foi tanners (who have an
average net worth ol $791 �� and
school lunches tor poor children?
What would Messrs. Gramm, Rud-
man and Hollings cut? What would
President Reagan cut? They won't sav
But the biggest unfairness of the
G-R-H diet is the exemption for Social
Security and partial exemption for other
middle-class entitlements.
What the above math actually shows
is that the budget can't reallv be balanc-

benel .
' � �


a whei
-
are any numbei f a
.
anj iverty Theeasiesi
be
I
equity quesi
E
Gra
crowm .
ed fi
m tarn .
saser, but it throw
out ot whack, since I
surplus is projected
billion to the budge-
Without it, we will have
25 percent from ev
in order to meet the time
Keagan Speech Antagonizes Right People
The President's speech to the United hlnri R,H,n .� u ,o � JL
The President's speech to the United
Nations was a joy. It antagonized both
the Soviet Union and American liberals,
a sure sign that on October 24 God was
in his heaven, and all was right with the
world.
ON THE RIGHT
Win JAM F. BUCKLEY JR.
Here is the point to keep one's eyes
on. It is that our strategic posture vis-a-
vis the Soviet Union has for a genera-
tion been defensive. We have always, or
almost always, left it to them to deter-
mine the theater of combat. Obviously,
when that happens, the enemy will
choose favorable terrain. During the
past period, the Soviet Union has posed
as the suitor for an arms agreement that
will leave the world safer from war.
What never comes up is why there
should be any danger of war in the first
place.
But the Western specialty, dating
back to the 1948 crisis in Berlin, has
been the countersalient. The Soviets
block Berlin, so what do we do? Block
Vladivostok? No, we airlift to Berlin.
The Soviets threaten Lebanon, so we
land troops in Lebanon. The Soviets
mastermind (there is a historical ques-
tion here) the invasion of South Korea,
we land troops in South Korea. They
move nuclear missiles into Cuba, we
chase them out of Cuba. They invade
Vietnam, we defend Vietnam. They at-
tempt to colonize Grenada, we liberate
Grenada.
The theme of Mr. Reagan's talk can
then be defined as: What is it that's go-
ing on in the world that gives rTselo in-
ternational tensions? As I say, it isn't
the existence of a huge inventory of
nuclear weapons; weapons aren't in-
herently frightening, it is the will to use
them as weapons that frightens. The
President pointed to four areas of the
world in which there is a great deal of
tension � indeed, in which people are
killing each other. Because of what
Moscow has done, in Nicaragua.
Because of what Moscow has done in
Ethiopia. Because of what Moscow has
done, in Angola. Subtract Soviet sup-
port of these revolutionary govern-
ments, and suddenly a great stillness
would come. That is the kind of stillness
that accomplishes true rapprochement.
Sure, there was in the speech an ele-
ment of national pride. Mr. Reagan
referred to the United States as a coun-
try that occupies no land abroad except
- a lovely metaphor � "beneath the
graves where our heroes rest But that
isn't bombast, and although some of
the editorial writers cringe at any ex-
pression of pride in the record of
America, it is fairer to say that the dif-
ference between our record of conduct
abroad since World War II and that of
the Soviet Union is rather too infre-
quently remarked, then so frequently
remarked as to slide into chauvinism.
We have every reason to call to the at-
tention of the world, as Mr. Reagan
did, that we have given $300 billion of
aid to the world's needy: a figure 10
times as much as the request we have
outstanding for research into a space
shield.
And why not recall, as Reagan did,
what Premier Kosygin said in 1967
when he suggested a moratorium on
ABM technology? Kosygin said, "I
believe that defensive systems, which
prevent attack, are not the cause of the
arms race, but constitute a factor
preventing the death of people. Maybe
an anti-missile system is more expensive
than an offensive system, but it is
designed not to kill people but to
preserve human lives The e York
Times editorial writer sniffed at quoting
an "18-year-old statement Well, the
Bill of Rights is older than that.
They didn't interrupt Mr. Reagan,
not once, to applaud him this time
around. Last year, he was applauded
every time he mentioned the need for
arms control. It is a key to how things
work in the United Nations that when
you inquire as to why you need arms
control, there is silence. There is ap-
plause only when you deal with the ob-
vious threats posed by international ten-
sion. By analogy, they would applaud a
speech about stopping AIDS, but not a
speech about stopping dirty-needle use
or aberrant sexual habits.
Mr. Reagan may surprise the skeptics
in Geneva. He has certainly not ap-
proached it in the spirit of someone who
is willing, in exchange for ephemeral
trades in arms reduction, to give up
the important things. And these imp
tant things are those that distinguish life
in the West from life behind the Iron
C urtain.
�Campus Forum
Oxam Asks For Help
On November 21, the Thursday
before Thanksgiving, there will be a
nationwide collection of money to
support Oxfam in its work of
famine relief. In previous vears the
students and staff of ECU have con-
tributed to this effort and helped
feed hungry people and promote
agricultural development in
Ethiopia, Kampuchea, Bangladesh
and Nicaragua.
Oxfam asks that we fast on
November 21 and contribute the
money saved, but to organize the
campaign on campus this year
volunteers are needed. If you are
willing to lend a hand to organize a
campus group or a campaign at
your church or fraternity, call me at
757 � 126.
David Ames, M.D.
Greenville Resident
Pirates Unite!
ECU fans � in regard to last
Saturday's ECU vs. South Carolina
football game � 1 was embarassed'
However, most of the embarass-
ment did not come from what hap-
pened on the field or the humiliating
score. The embarassment came
from a crowd less than one-third the
size of ECU's first home sell-out
crowd, that completely out-cheered,
out-yelled, and out-classed us. How
does ECU expect to gam a home-
field advantage with a stadium full
of silent fans? How can the
cheerleaders lead a cheer 12 feet
below ihe stadium wall with no
"PA?" Does ECU even have a
worthwhile cheer? Why doesn't the
band get more involved-1 Why
doesn't ECU1 have something as ob-
noxious as USC's cannon? And
when will Ficklen stadium ever have
a P.A. system that can be
understood?
Todd Patton
Senior, Business
orum Rules
The tasi Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing ail points of view. Mad or
drop them hv our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the
trance ofjeyner Ltbran
en-
Students
jjjj Applicaf
�' Being Ace
Transit
Apply In Ri
Mendenha
Cen

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MARA
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ante
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hy doesn't the
Why
mething as ob-
.annon? And
� ien stadium ever have
be
r, Business
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nian w letters
wm Mad or
(ice n fte Publica-
. I . ling, m r en-
vner Librarx
I HI hAST AROl 1N1AN
X luBl K 2V 1983
Students Excavate 18th Century Ship
�ff Report
tte students
History and
Research Program
ktown, Va. ex
ains of an 18th
merchant ship.
� he ship is not vet
kcver, diaries and
time of the
suggest that
several ships
e British Ar-
p transports,
ntentionally
General Corn-
to prevent a
Lssault on the
tnd to prevent
Hi cd Forces
G e o r g e
. ' hei, nine
Re
liionarv era
. . .IV
2 u e 11 e o f
Lakewood, Co. and Billy Ray
Morris of Wilmington, N.C. are
assisting underwater ar-
cheologists from the State of
Virginia in the underwater ex-
cavation as part of their research
semester. The wreck is more than
50 percent intact and is the most
complete of all the wrecks found
in the Yorktown area.
Although detailed plans ol
British warships still exist, verv
little is known about the con-
struction details of 18th century
merchant ships, like the one be-
ing studied. The excavation also
provides an excellent opportunity
study 18th century life aboard
ships.
The wooden, two-masted ship
is 75 feet long and 25 feet wide
and rests on an average of 20 feet
underwater. It was found in 1978
during a side-scan sonar and
magnetometer survey.
The program in Maritime
History and I n d e r w a t e r
Research is one of two such pro
grams in the country which
specialize in underwater ar-
cheology. The program at E l is
in its fifth year and presently 10
students are enrolled. Students
must complete 45 hours of course
work as well as a research
semester. Hie program has done
underwater research and survey
work at Bath, N.C; Edenton,
N.C; Swansboro, N.C; Cape
Hatteras, N.C; Washington,
N.C; Columbus, Ga Erie, Pa
and Bermuda.
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HEALTH
in
lumn answers
id concerns
a problems.
. question they
or a con-
tikt to have
question or
. tholumn,
man. Public a-
CK1
i
-
ction
disease is the number one cause
of death in the U.S. and in North
Carolina.
HOW WOULD I KNOW IF I
WAS HAVING A HEART Al
I A OK
Signs of a heart attack include
sudden, severe, crushing chest
pain, and pain that travels into
the left and sometimes the right
arm, shoulder and neck
Sometimes the person feels as ii
he has indigestion with ab-
dominal pain. He often is
restless, may become short of
breath and feels clammy. The
pulse is usually rapid, the blood
pressure falls and the person may
collapse.
SOMETIMES 1 FEEI AS IF M
HEART IS SKIPPING BEATS
WHAT DOES THAT
ME N?
Heart "flutters pounding
kipping a beat mav be a normal
i r the heart or ma
I nderwater archeologists at excavation site.
�Practice sensible drinking I
habits and care in taking over
Stress and anxiety, the use of
nicotine, alcohol and caffeine
may contribute to irregular heart
beats ' Id always see a
ph u have any symp
ton heart.
WHA1 R1 SOME ol IH1
miNGS 1AN DO IO AVOID
HAVING A HEAR! ATTACK '
�v garettes Sn .
the single mosi im preven
table ness and early
dea
the-counter drugs � if you drink,
don't drive � follow your doc-
orders when taking any
n edication.
�la! sensibly. C ontrol your in-
a k e o 1 salt, sugar and
cholesterol.
�Learn to handle stress.
Distinguish between things that
are worth worrying about and
ie that are less important.
tf
s
�sti-
s
lit I
�r
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OK PREGNANCY
S r, from 13 to 18 weeks a! addi-
� Pregnancy Te5t, Birth Control, and
Problem Pregr.anc Counseling For further
information call 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
584) between S A M and 5 P M
lays
RELftCH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
0GANiZATXK3
917 WMf MatvonS.
it. k '

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� Effective th
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Football
Tickets
� �
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Applications Now jjjj
Being Accepted For S
Transit Manager-
8
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Mendenhall Student
Center
Kroger
will give
away 2
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tickets for .
each of the ' V
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
DOUBLE tAfGSCOUPONS
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Un FAST AROl INIAN
Entertainment
)t)
K lOHl-k 29, IS8
f ai' Carolinian
ECX7 Gospel Choir H ins!
-Ha, Mr. Mister Let Down
MVFXKKKK
and
hRl
v
shiny,
round
;lcome
-Ha's
get her
them were so great ��
couldn't tell the difl
ween the two It seems the
are trying to carry the song; i
the simp!) aren't good en
to d
1 ake awa the
songs are virtua
! ere's a metronome beat
six finter synthesizer d
strumemally, the ba
show much in -
I he aren'i
new, ju

.
ween sion I
essei
What Was That You Said?
lakes aim in a battle to the death against the snarling werewolf which has crashed into his
h -iephen Kind's Silver Bullet.
King's Bullet Flies Safely
ByGINASANDl
based on
. s novelette "C y-
Werewolf was film-
on and at North
l In Corporation's
i in Wilmington,
iii standard
meets-werewolf movie.
gh it is lacking in
se. as always. King uses
� what will happen as
frighten viewers.
. Iraws people into the story
as mere spectators and oi
hints at what is to happen but
makes them wait anxiously for
the known to occur.
Silver Bullet is set in Tarker's
Mills, a small, southern town
that is turned upside down b a
string of savage, unexplained
murders. Marty (Corey Haim),
a young 10-year-old who is con
fined to his hot-rod wheelchair
(The Silver Bullet) figures out
the murderer is a werewolf. Not
knowing what to do with what
he knows, he shares it with his
sister Jane and his uncle Red.
The story carries these three
� ening and
sudden . ion.
There is little to he said about
ye; werewolf movie.
are
its spe� i these are
tew an Although
some involve
blood- -h-npping
scenes, these and other special
werewolf's
tran k to a man,
were the rnghlij I the film,
upared to
Christineand The Shining, King
has given Silver Bullet his own
stvle.
HEART Rocks MingesNov. 7
I he Easl arolina University
� Concerts Committee will
the campus one of the
ountry's leading touring bands
when Capitol recording artists
HI ART come to Greenville. The
ert is scheduled for Thurs-
day, November 7 at 8:00 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
Since their inception in 1976,
HEART has sold over fifteen
million albums worldwide. Their
string of hits, which include such
classic rockers as "Crazy On
You "Magic Man and "Bar
racuda" have made HEART one
of American's best-loved bands
Led by Ann Wilson, one of
rock's most valued vocalists.
HEART features the guitar and
keyboards of Nancy Wilson,
guitarist Howard Leese, bassist
Mark Andes and drummer Den-
ny Car masse.
Tickets for the concert are
available from the East Carolina
Universnv Central Ticket Office
and are priced at10.00 for ECU
students and $12.00 for the
public and at the door. In addi-
tion to the Central Ticket Office,
public tickets are also available
from Apple Records in
downtown Cireenville and School
Kids Records in Raleigh. For ad-
ditional information contact the
Central Ticket Office, Monday-
Friday, from 11:00 a.m6:00
p.m. Call (919) 757-6611-
ECU Gospel Choir Places
Second In State Competition
ByLORIN PASQl'AI.
( opt Milor
iiospel literally means "good
news With its message of
brotherhood, faith, promise
and assurance, gospel music can
make you weep with joy.lap
your hands. Even jump out of
your seat. But most of all.
gospel music does something
that most other music can't -
make you feel good right down
tit your soul.
Carolina Gospelfes! '85
organizers
More than 500 people
gathered at the Raleigh
Memorial Auditorium Saturday
night to watch Carolina
Gospelfesi '85, a unique ex
travaganza featuring music,
competition, comraderie, and,
� -ourse. soulful singing by the
state's finest gospel choirs.
Throughout the lavish three-
hour show, women clutching
babies writhed and danced in
aisles. Men and couples
clapped feverishly and chanted
praise to the Lord. Even j
children, with parents in tow,
seemed to revel in the festive at-
mosphere, and everyone, in-
cluding the host, was pretty ex
cited.
The highlight of the evening
was not only the awe-inspiring
melodies or the glamour and
glit of the Hollywood-style
bash, however. It was the
tremendous performance of the
1 ast Carolina University Gospel
Choir.
The 93-member E( I troupe,
which recently won the semi-
finals, competed with six other
choirs and placed second in
Saturday's final competitii
That means they now rank a-
the state's second finest gospel
ir, according to Gospelf
dards.
Not only did they win a
noteworthy award and a token
tor their hard work, but the)
walked aw-av with honor and a
new VCR, complete with a
monitor and accompanying
camera.
Other winners received more
than 110,000 worth ot prizes,
including $300, a PA s item,
sound mixers, amplifiers and
speakers. Among them was
( hris (ray and The
ntet District h
placed first, winning
ding session with
Records, pressed re
free distribution.
In addition, WRA1 Iv.
Raleigh, imed c
ai, is scheduled
.
: 30-minute spei i
the sh
All participant
received pnes and were jud.
. technique
terpretation of the music
tone, including quality ai
tensity, coordinatioi
mpaniment, appeat
showmanship.
They ai ared th
with such notable spe i .
as Reverend 1 �. .
pel musician and mini �
Washing
J in Christ in New 'i i -
e v a n g
( a
.
a Gi Vward.
On Hallo weenMany Years Ago
Orson Frightened The Nation
Bv MAITHKW .(,I.I Is
�x�ff �nm
Mosi people, s me ay. ve
g scared at leas: oi
s, and hearing or se -
something scary on Hallowed
certainly no exception. In I93i
young actorwriter director
decided to come up witn
something special for Halloween
to fulfill just such a need W
happened was that his
scared the nation so much, main
actually believed that there was
an invasion from another planet,
all thanks to the imagination of
one man�"Citizen Kane"
himself, Orson Welles.
Welles, who recentlv died of
heart failure at age 70, was a i
known for many different p
jects. Many remember him as the
director, writer ' and star oi
Citizen Kane, his 1941 film
classic, for which he won the at
claim of many in the film world.
Others remember him simply as
that huge, bearded gentleman
knwon for selling no wine
"before its time
Nevertheless, Welles was
known and respected by his peers
as a top figure in films. Welles
developed his artistic talents e i
U, learning to act, read
Shakespeare, and play music bv
the age of 16, when he began ac-
ting overseas.
In 1937. Welles and another
writer actor decided to join
forces and form a company ot ac-
tors. The company they formed
became known as the Mercury
Theater of the Air, and was sign-
n bv -he Columbia Bi
casting s stem now bet
wn asHS) to do a sene
one-hour radio dramas. Current-
an updated version of the
Mercury "heater still performs
all across the a antry, under
guidance of Welles' former part-
ner, John Houseman, the man we
all know as "Professor
Kingsfield his role from the
1974 film and the current pd W
series The Paper Chase, a
his brokerage firm commer-
cials I "Smith-Barney makes
ney the old-fashioned w
they earnnn it).
But in October, 1938, the series
was facing certain cancellation in
a very competitive radio worid.
much as TV" shows face the same
fate today. In a bold move,
Welles had just come up with a
good idea�he had done an im-
provised story from a science fic-
tion novel by H.G. Wells, but set
up to fit more recent times Net-
work officials regarded the show
as being so realistic, Welles wa-
told that the show would need to
mention that this was only a
radio showbut no one, not even
Welles, knew how out of hand
things would get
On October 30. 1938, the Mer-
cury Radio Theater signed on
with their Halloween production,
expecting only their loyal au-
dience. The story itself was inno-
cent enougha broadcast of a big
band music show, interrupted bv
a news bulletin of a huge, flaming
object spewing from the surface
of the planet Mars, then return-

cws b:
ures fi Mars, equipped
with giant � e machines
powerful heat ravs, spreading
from the farmlai New
Jersey to New York C ity itself.
The story continued on, featur-
i Welles . . as the ;
met Richard Pier-
son � firs to win
arrival and the menacing
er oi the M es.
Unfortunately, most people
: tuned in during the midd.
the pr i
think the "inva
real. Bv the time it was finally
.need that this was only a
radio drama, the network shifted
into total panic' Traffic jams
were reported in several East
coast cities, massive were
reported a over the country, and
doens of incidents occured that
left some people arrested and
ers injured, but no one killed.
Bv the station break, 'he CBS
telephone switcht
lied with calls-and the
telephone messages continued at
a heavy pace foi the next couple
ol day -
The program today seems quite
ridiculous, but there are enough
people who find it fascinating
that it has become a Halloween
orite on many radio stations.
In fact, the show is also available
for home play-and some of those
have listened to it today
think the show is capable enough
being real, thus showing true
genius on Welles' part.
1
The Chairmen of the Board
played to a hyped crowd Saturday mtf The Chairmen of the
Board members, from left: Ken Knox, General Norman C
Johnson and Danny Woods keep the sound of t he South alive Also
appearing with the Chairmen were the Eacutives.
I
f

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Man-O
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a
For Gre
t o
�& Rain site
& 244 Mendenhall
j Sponsored
? SCA
!y 4 Pubtk er
��t$C. JJJLJrL
,1





too
nesbur
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
IHfchASIAROLIN1AN
OCTOBER 2S�, Ht5
� �- i i
aces
on
go
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Board
I ruirrnen of the
neral Norman.
If he south alive AUo
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Man-O-StkcR

The Pirate Walk Staff
BY JARRELL & JOHNSON -N

4 Je 're He re For You
Sunday-Thursday 6 p.m12 a.m.
37 -6616
a
tMV��VVVMaKVv'
!
BY BROOKS
t ��
rr 11
.
- Rain site
& 2 Mendenhall
" Sponsored by:
-
i i�
f?CTUr?Nlt)H feOs rne TA0Oul
60'5� 60T R�5i�i, fffiies
PKUG5 An. JACJC MUSIC- AP SOfrCONro-
J05TlitT�)s-Oieif!
STUDENTS!
You Are Invited To
M��7 THE
CANDIDATES
For Greenville City Council
On The Mall
Upcoming Events
Courtesy of Your Student Union
Films Committee:
"Nosferatu The Vampire" Wed Oct.30
"The Killing Fields" ThurSat Oct. 31, Nov. 1&2
"Motel Hell" Specialftil1o ween Late Show 7:00&9:30p.m.
Fri. Sat Nov. 1&2
Midnight
Recreation Comnittee:
All Campus Chess Sat, Nov.2 1230pm.
Men's All Campus Table Tamis Thur Nov. 7 6:00p.m.
Men's Billiards TuesNov. 19 6.00p.m.
SIGN UP NOW
Travel Committee:
New York Trip
Thanksgiving � Wednesday, N. 2 7 till Sunday, Dec. 1, 1985
Hawaiian Trip
Dec. 31, 1985 till Jan. 7, 1986
Call 757-6611 ext. 266 for inforrafion on how to sign up.
Major Concerts Cb mmittee:
Heart Thursday, November 7
Minges Coliseum 8:00 p.m.
Tickets on sale now at the Central T icket Office at Mendenhall
Iiiv.ivi.i3 imi saic nun at uivr vv-uucu
The Underground
Rock World Videos Tuesdays at 1:30
Movie Shorts Thursdays at 1:30
(Including 3 Stooges and many more I)
Ground Floor, Mendenhall
WEDNESDA Y 1030 � 12 Noon
i Pubtk Service Announcement Provided By The tost C aroilman
RfACHMG OUT TO SERVE YOU
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 757-6611 Ext. 266
;Q$l�V4QVVVVQVVQQQVQQVVQ&
1
j





I HI l-ASlAKOl INIAN
Sports
X.T()BF:R29. I9�i
;
J�
Purple- Go Id Swim Meet Held
i �
s
There va some fierce competition in the inte rsquad meet.
Pirate Golfers Win
UNC-W Tournament
By TIM CHANDLER
surf W rn�
The Pirate golf team had a very
ible turnout this past
weekend. By winning the UNC-
gton 1 nal, the Buc
won theii first match
placed
d ol 6
vlantic ci ege
14, and UNC-Charlotte
524
.� was individually
e Pirates w
� nkel who had round
i 146 total. Chris Riles
. Bucs -
' "� a 15 tal. Th
Fonj Ja re witl 77-801 r a 157
total and John Chapman 83-77
160. Mike Bradley, finished
the Pirate scores with 87-74
a 161 t
Coach Don Sweeting said that
he was ver pleased with the
tea: � mance Sweeting
also said he felt that the gi
ing ei well. "I
keep looking for b . md bet
ter tl . said Sweel .
is Winkel, whose 146
i third am .
al golfi i
le team was real entl
about get - their firs: wii
Nee GOLFERS, Page 10
By DAVID Mc(ilNNKSS
The Pirate swim teams held
their annual Purple-Gold inters-
quad meet on Thurs. Oct. 25.
The meet saw some good perfor-
mances by freshmen David
Killeen and Susie Wentink as well
as veterans Bruce Brockschmidt,
Keith Kaut, Scotia Miller and
Patrick Brennan
In the women's 50-yard
freestyle, Angela Winstead took
first with a time of 26.0! seconds.
Jenni Pierson was second with a
26.94 and Jane Wilson third with
a 28.37.
Jenni Pierson squeaked bv
Angela Winstead in the 100-yard
freestyle to take first with a 57.93
time. Winstead was virtually
alone in second place, almost
tour seconds ahead of Jane
Wilson's 1:02.63 third-place
time.
Veteran Scotia Miller grabbed
first in the200-vard freestyle with
a 2:02.77. aycee Poust's 2:03.08
was good enough for a solid se-
cond place finish while Jennie
Halstead was third with a time of
2:06.91.
Scotia Miller had another first
in the 500-yard freestyle with a
5:29.62. Brenda Norton was se
cond with a 5:35.68 while Jill
Gorenflo took third with a
5:43.64.
Jill Gorenflo was the winner in
the 1000-yard freestyle with a
11 40 55, while Nancy 1 udwig's
! i 4 5 ;arned net second
pla.
F isie Wentink .
: e in
with a time
la Horton was
2:20.56 and Ellen McPherson
took third place.
In the 400-medley relay, the
team of Lori Livingston, Wen-
tink, Susan Augustus and Jane
Wilson edged out Horton,
Patricia Grand, Poust and
Angela Winstead by a three-
second gap.
The 400-freestyle relay was
closer yet. Jenni Pierson, Liv-
ingston, Doreen Jaworski and
Miller slipped by Poust, Grand,
Gorenflo and Winstead, 3:52.97
to 3:53.70.
Susie Wentink got her 3rd first-
place finish in the 200-breast
stroke with a 2:37.07. Jennie
Halstead took second with a
2:39.98.
Poust got a first place in the
200 backstroke with a 2.5 second
win over Livingstone's 2:21.22.
laworski was far behind the win-
ning pace, putting in a time of
2:35.84.
The men's competition saw
outstanding performances by
veterans Bruce Brockschmidt and
Patrick Brennan as well as
freshman David Killeen.
Veteran Keith Kaut landed first
in the 50-yard freestyle with a
time of 22 1 seconds. Ronald
Fleming was a very close second
with a 22.81 and Lee Hick's 24.72
earned him third.
Kaut was first again in the 100
freestyle, with a time of 50.16
seconds. Ronald Fleming again
slipped into second place, beating
Jeff Brown's 50.73 by 14
nds.
Freshman David Killeen took
in the 200 freestyle, edging
out senior And) Cook by .59
seconds with his 1:48.62 time.
Josh Jones was third with a
1:51.16 time.
Killeen and Cook were again
first and second in the 500
freestyle, with times o 4:V
and 4:58.88 respectively. Richard
Wells was way back in third
a 5:17.41.
Patrick Brennan had a sir rig
swim in the 1000 frees:
finishing with a 10:07.56. Strat-
ton Smith took second wii
10:21.67.
Senior Bruce Brockschn
dominated the 200 butterfly
a 1:59.14 time, over 10 sec
ahead of second-place finisher
David Robacewski's 2:09 IV Al
Smith turned in a third-plae I
of 2:12.67.
In the medley relay, the te
of Hidalgo, Smith, Wells
Kaut slipped past Brockschmidt.
Hicks, Hawkins and Brown
times were 3:48.10 and 3:4
respectively.
The 400-freestyle relay came
right down to the wire, as
Hidalgo, Jones, Smith and
nudged past Brown, Haw
Fleming and Killeen, 3:23 -
3:23.95.
Bruce Brockschmidt turned in
an "outstanding" time of 2:0
in the 200 backstroke to g
another first-place finish. Stal
Smith was more than half a p
length back with a 2:10 "c
second-place time.
In another good performance,
Patrick Brennan led the wa
the 200 breaststroke with
2:17.31 Hicks took second witl
a 2:20.09 and Robaczew
2:22.11 placed him in third.
The object of the purple .
meet is to give the swimmei
feeling for swimming in comp
tion with a clock. The full teai
divided -nlv as ;
make each eveni
1 ' � � :
judgi ' it the p
sprr
was se.

I
but not ecstati
per formance. "W

'he season said
- �
they will
need
ire i
c tram i
work. Instead tting
50,000 yai �
the
i .
This Satur I
mpett
� as the �
i
�;

I
peak �
Pirate Basketball Scrimmage Successful
B SCO! I COOPI-K
rhe 1 ad Pirate basketball
annual
Purple (ioid scrii
w eekend.
ECU Head Man-
. believes ���. a
.men; is
needed
Their. i nd
discipline level juite
there M. . said. "It
takes time. Even 'he returnees
get some things, u also gives
us a chance new
people
However, the one thing that
Coach Man waring isn't shot
is talent. Some players who
displayed their impressive form
were two-time all-conference for-
ward 1 isa Squirewel! and
sophomore center Alma Bethea.
Two-time all-conference guard
Sylvia Bragg was as equally im-
pressive, as was Delphine Mabry,
who returns for her junior year
after sitting out las; season.
"We think that the talent is
re Man waring said. "They
need to use their common
sense and make better decisions
passes
'They weren't precise Man-
warn.g added. "They didn't
eecute well eithc
rhe I ady Bucs ran their transi-
. offense. "To get the ball up
the court" is how coach Manwar-
ing explains her face-paced of-
-o She feels that the scrim-
&e helped the team.
"It was helpful in that it was a
game-type situation Manwar-
said. "We've got three weeks
get ready for our opener
The Pirates played intense
basketball, using, their man-to-
man defense throughout the con-
test. However, Manwanng and
the coaching staff of assistant
Lillian Barnes and graduate assis-
tant Anita Anderson feel that
some defensive improvements
need to be made.
"We need to put more pressure
on the ball Manwaring stated.
"The pressure was not intense
enough. When we say 'put a hand
in their face we expect it t(
there
The Lady Pirates are the two-
time defending conference cham-
9

the running for a
trophy m their '85-86 campaign
Will the Lady Pirates maintain their eh ampin nship form this year.
Gamecocks Maul Pirates Despite Sellout
By SCOTT COOPER
Sporig tMior
Despite the first-ever sellout in
a Stadium history (since its
expansion in 1978), ECU drop-
"embarrassing" loss to
' arolina, 52-10.
"It's a tremendous disappoint-
ment to myself and the players as
ach Baker said. "We
f things going for us,
tbe firs' full house. It makes
us doubly embarrassed � to have
the crowd and to lose in the man-
ner that we did
g with the sellout
(35,047), there was another
Pa for the Pirate record
Senior tailback Tony
Baker moved into the No. 3 spot
on Lv L"s all-time career rushing
list. Baker replaced Butch Ccrtson
(1967-69) and needs just 365
yards to be the Pirate's all-time
leading ground gainer.
Although the Gamecocks
dominated the statistics, the
Pirates were close throughout the
opening half. In the first half,
USC netted 185 yards in total of-
fense to that of 172 for ECU.
However, USC rolled for 355
total yards as ECU managed just
91 in the second half.
Once again, it was big plays
that spelled doom for ECU.
Crucial penalties cost the Pirates,
according to tailback Baker.
"We beat ourselves the
senior tailback said. "We helped
them beat us. We made some
mistakes that hurt us. You can't
do that against a tough ball
club
The Pirates started the game
with their defense, which gave up
two first downs, but stiffened as
Scott Hagler missed a 43-yard
fieldgoal. The Bucs took over
and drove down field, via the run-
ning game and a USC in-
terference call. Ron Jones then
connected with tight end Scott
Lewis for a gain of 34 yards.
However, Lewis fumbled on the
play as USC strong safety Joe
Brooks recovered on the
Gamecock 22.
USC was unable to move the
ball and ECU took over on their
own 37, with 6:53 left in the first
period. The Bucs, who
methodically moved the ball
downfield behind the running of
fullback Anthony Simpson,
tailback Baker and quarterback
Jones, came up short on a fourth-
and-two from the USC 11. The
Pirate's decision not to kick the
fieldgoal, ended the first period
in a scoreless tie.
In the second quarter, both
teams struggled offensively.
After Jeff Heath missed a
42-yard fieldgoal, the Gamecocks
responded with a 10-play,
74-yard drive that put USC up
7-0 with just under three minutes
left until halftime.
Bobby Clair's 47-yard kickoff
return aroused the full-house
crowd and gave ECU good field
position �on the Gamecock 48.
After a Baker first down. Heath
connected on a 51-yard fieldgoal,
cutting the USC lead to 7-3 with
1:23 remaining in the half.
The Gamecocks came back,
thanks to a Mike Hold pass and
two personal-foul penalties. The
pass play covered 43 yards, plus a
15-yard penalty and a half-the-
distance to the goal line penalty.
Suddenly, USC had a first down
on the Buc 11-yard line with
under a minute remaining.
Walter Bryant (94) and Robert Washington (58) sack Mike Hold (7).
Ravnard Brown scored on fourth
down, giving the Gamecock
14-3 advantage at intermission.
The 80-yard, six-play drive
took USC just 1:12. Coach Baker
felt that the big (penalty) plav
hurt the Pirates.
"That one play took all the
stinger out of us Baker said
"They were foolish penalties and
were very uncharacteristic of the
players who made them. We
can't afford to do those types oi
things
The second half, a strong point
of the Pirate defense during the
course of the year, saw ECU gne
up 38 points. Coach Baker feels
the Pirates lost their concentra-
tion and poise.
"We didn't play with the inten-
sity we had in the first two
quarters Baker said. "1 don't
think the score indicates how our
defense played, especially in the
first half.
"We didn't do anything dit
fcrently at the half Baker con
tinued. "We simply just lost our
poise
After the Gamecocks scored on
a Hold keeper from 10-yards out,
ECU had a crucial turnover deep
in their own territory. However,
the Buc defense stiffened for the
moment, relinquishing a Hagler
34-yard fiddgoal. This gave USC
a 24-3 lead with 3:47 left in the
third period.
The Pirates got their sole
touchdown behind the arm
quarterback Jones Starting the
drive on their own 46, ECU'S
Jones found Mike Gainey down
the sideline for a 43 yard gain.
Alter three plays the third period
ended, leasing the Bucs with a
fourth-and-five from the l
Jones bootleg pass to
lewis was on target, endn .
successful 54-yard five-play
dtive.
1 he Gamecocks retaliated im-
mediately Sterling Sharpe's
70 yard TU catch erupted n
from the vocal USC crowd.
Another Pirate miscue led to yet
another Gamecock score.
USC freshman running back
Greg Welch then finished the
scoring with touchdown runs of
15 and 55 yards. I he two ID's
were the first and second of
Welch's career
Despite the high offensive per-
for mance by the Gamecocks,
their defense lived up to its "fire
ant" name. Senior tailback Tony
Baker felt dismay at the loss, but
feels the Pirates will come back
"The game plans didn't go like
we wanted Baker said. "We
fell flat in the second half. We're
going to have to pull together and
do the best we can. We'll bounce
back
ECU travels to Hattiesburg,
Miss next week to battle the 5-2
Eagles of the University of
Southern Mississippi.
Lagnaj
By JEAN Mm ROTH
MafTWrtu,
The Intramural ' .
dynasty has ended
top-ranked team
took their hopes and a
winning streak
campus champioi
to come out a ster
Jarvis LAGNAJ
determined,
knockout pu
Bombsquad 21 2
boasting a 32
tried to defeat I
point
just seconds lei
attempt failed and 1.
away w
Golfers
Take
Tourney
( ontinued from paw
such ,i
comes � EC1
that I . .
since he was
up a clut H
was glad �
Bradley . :�
score �. tl e
knew we �
said V.
Chris Rile
cond for the !
was satisfied w I
consider Hi
tions. "Pla1- .
made it very �
the first da
also s
Bucs;
in the ma:
The F
match
Tha'
v national wl
Nov. 11-12
We Buy
Used Albums it
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
1U E. 5th St. b8 1298
The Me
Is Now
Applic
General
The East
For Spri
A pi
Second FI i
Deadlln
�???????
Wednesday
Admission!
101
A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 29. MS
-
er Held
gj
� �
- paigr.
vear.
ellout
v
ienior tailback Ton)
h may at the loss, but
Is the Pirates will come ba
like
wanted Baker said. "We
flat in the second half. We're
ig to have to pull together and
he best we can. We'll bounce
back "
ECU travels to Hattiesburg,
Miss next week to battle the 3 2
hagles of the University of
I pi
Lagnaf Wins IRS Title
By J KANNETTE ROTH
The Intramural flag football
dynasty has ended. The men's
top-ranked team, Bombsquad,
took their hopes and a 28-game
winning streak into the all-
campus championship game only
to come out a step behind.
Jarvis I.AGNAF, fired up and
determined, provided the
knockout punch as the held oft
Bombsquad 21-20. Bombsquad,
boasting a 32-1 three-year record,
tried to defeat Jarvis with a two
point conversion after score, with
just seconds left in the game. The
attempt failed and Jarvis walked
with the all-campus ictoi y
Golfers
Take
Toumey
Continued from page 9
uch a long time. Winkel. who
comes to ECU from Iowa, said
that he had been playing golf
since he was old enough to pick
up a club. He also said that he
was glad to see teammate Mike
Bradley come back with a good
score on the second day "We
knew we would need his score
said Winkel.
Chris Riley, who finished se-
cond for the Pirates, said that he
was satisfied with the scores �
considering the playing condi-
tions. "Playing near the beach
made it very windy, especially on
the firs; day stated Riley. He
also stated that he felt that the
Bucs put forth a good team effort
in the match.
The Piiates have one more
match left on their fall schedule.
Thai match is the Wolfpack In-
vitational which will be held on
�. 11-12 in Wake Forest, V
Bombsquad struck first in the
opening minutes of the contest.
Jarvis retaliated to take the lead
on a four-play drive climaxing
with a touchdown pass from Don
'Walter Lewis' Terry to Doug
Mount. In the conversion, Terry,
also known as 'Slick Don con-
nected with Kenny Farmer for the
score. In their next possession,
Bombsquad came up with
nothing and was forced to put
LAGNAPs offense back on the
Field. The dynamic LAGNAF
duo struck again on a 35-yard
touchdown pass from Terry to
Farmer. This gave LAGNAF a
14-6 advantage at the half.
The second half meant more of
the same for LAGNAF as they
held down the Bombsquad of-
fense. How fitting that
LAGNAFs final score was cap-
tured by the defense on a Terry
interception. Terry pitched the
ball to teammate Kenny Farmer
for the 75-yard touchdown play.
With four minutes remaining,
LAGNAF lead Bombsquad 21-6.
Bombsquad was forced to put
their passing offense into play
and responded with a scoring
pass from Willie Ehling to Garry
Bishop with 2:45 left to play.
Richard 'Iceman' Frazier caught
the two-point conversion as
Bombsquad cut the lead to 21-14.
With 1:05 remaining, Ehling
struck again connecting with
Frazier on a Five-yard touchdown
pass. Fading to make the two-
point conversion, Bombsquad
watched the seconds tick away
and their number one ranking
fall.
Three-year standout and
former IRS Player-of the-Year,
Kevin Williams, was disap-
pointed with the loss, but praised
the LAGNAF squad.
"We just couldn't get it going
in the first half Williams said.
"But I've got to give them credit,
they really played well
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
is holding registration for raquet-
ball singles and one-on-one
basketball Oct. 28-31. Play
begins Mon. Nov. 4. Co-rec
basketball registration ends today
in room 204 Memorial Gym.
Team captain's meetings for
these three events will be held
Oct. 31. For more information,
come by room 204 Memorial
Gym.
SigmaTau Gamma
& BUDWEISER PRESENT
THE 6 ANNUAL ALL CAMPUS
Halloween Party
FEATURING
Sfafc CaA&lO & loMiH 'J&Ortt'flAtot
Limited Ticket Sales
$5 advance
$7 at the door
THUR. OCT. 31
9pm -lam
RECORDS
We Buy
Used Albums &
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St. b8 4298
ECU BIOLOGY
CLUB MEMBERS
And Prosp ective
Members
Don't Miss The Collegiate
Academy of Science's Rill Trip To
Black Mountain, N.C.
Accomodations: Weatherford Hall
Blue Ridge Assembly Friday, Noverrber 1 thru Sunday,
November 3
Cost: $15.00 � Includes 2 days lodging tou rs and 2 meals.
Must be paid at time of sign-up.
Reservations: Limited to first 50 sign-ups.
Pament: May be submitted to Ms. M argaret Schiller,
secretary, Biology Main Office.
12 TAPS
$ Bring your ID
508 w 5th ST. for info, call 757- 012:
Greenville N.C.
Partial proceeds go to
Boys Club of Pitt County
i. S ST.
The Media Board
Is Now Accepting
Applications For
General Man ager
of
The East Carolinian
For Spring Semester
Apply at Media BoardOffice
Second Floor Publications B uilding
Deadline: Friday, Novonber 1

'


ending a

.
i � -
1


?he
�vn run
I he two I D's

. the Gamecocks,
�.ed up to its "fire
The Best Deal At The Best Club In Town.
Special
1
JHEMfM Ax Student Spt
Re $25
0 co�ua� pee
per month
Our Full Facility Co-Ed Club Features
The Best In Weight Training & Instruction
Aerobics
I wo Weight Rooms
Steam Room
Sauna
Whirlpool
Social Events
Lockers
Private Dressing Rooms
Showers
Professional Personal
Instruction
York Olympic Weights
(Including Bench & Squat Machines)
Dynacam Machines
Exer-Bikes
Therapeutic Massage
Nutrition Instruction
Call Lynn or Dave
For Free Visit!
Today
SPA
Southpark Shopping Center
756-7991
1
& Sigma Nu
Present
Draft Nite
Wednesday, October 30, 1985 9:00-2:00 a.m.
Admission1.50G u ys 1.00 Ladies
IOC DRAFT
NATIONAL
UNITED SAVINGS ASSOCIATES
U$A
f I 4f ,U � - ,
SEE BACK FOR SAVINGS
ALL NITE
IT'S WAITING
FOR YOU!
A very special little card is waiting for you. It will mean
keeping $$$ in your pocket! Local businesses are offer-
ing terrific discounts toECU students. The card is free
to you. Pick up yours at t he following locations:
MendenhaU StudentCe nter, Student Supply Store
Croatan, Allied He alth & Residence HaUs
Sponsored By: ECUStu d ent Government Association
h
�-





10
I Ml I ASI c KOl tNlAN
SALE
NEEDTYPING I
rerm papers et
'52 0498
PROFESSIONAL
VICE � � �
-tters Resume s
Call Karen at
Shi
TYPING
quality
ewriter
SER
work.
Lame
OCTOBER 29. I98i
MICHAEL LIDDY: We hope you
had a Happy 22nd Birthday! Love
Anne and Shannon at the East
Carolinian.
ALPHA XI DELTA: Tonites the
night to put on a disguise And party
awhile with the Lambda Chi's, Bub
bly and Brew will provide the cheer
The fun begins when darkness draws
near, Prepare yourself for an
outrageous time We'll end it here,
for we're out of rhyme
PHI TAU: Last mght was a chafe
but we know what we need to do.
Remember pictures on Sunday bet
ween 5 00 and 1000. Get ready for
next Sun 11 9 It will be awesome
HAPPY HOUR: Wednesday mght at
Cubbie's from 9 2 Come out and 0in
the Chi O's for a fun pre Halloween
bash!
WENDY S: Had a great Fall Break
lust bummin' around Love that
empty house! Love YLS 1
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS:
Anyone interested in becoming an
official in the Greenville Recreation
and Parks Department Adult
Basketball leagues, should contact
Ben James at 752 4137, ext 262, for
further information.
COLLEEN: I'm not all that strange,
and our talk made me glow, but I
will not come between you and your
bo' SSA
SKI AUSTRIA this Christmas Call
752 7402 for further details You can
afford it!
A SPECIAL THANKS to all the
Brothers and Little Sisters of Sigma
Tau Gamma for making us feel so
welcome. We're proud to be a part of
you The New Little Sisters
PHI TAU: It was great bringing in
the New Day with you all Love, the
Sigmas
NEW SORORITY This week's
meeting will be Tuesday at 7 00 in
Room 221. Please remember your
dues
MALE STRIPPERS: The ECU All
Campus Male Strip Off sponsored by
Tri Sig, will be held tonight at the
ELBO! All interested in signing up
who haven't be at the Elbo at 8 30
First prize is $100, second prize is
$50, and third prize is one month's
membership at Gold's Gym! So men
if you have got it show it If you
don't have if flaunt it it's funny I!
WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED: lm
mediately to share 4 bedroom house,
close to campus and Overton's Call
758 5953
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earni.ig money Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida Call
Bill Ryan at 1 800 282 6221
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
work at this campus Good income
For more information and apphca
tion write to: Men Lowrance,
.Director, 251 Glenwood Drive,
Mooresville, N C 28115
HELP WANTED: Part time
telephone sales position available
5 9 pm Tues Fn 10 2 on Sat
Guarenteed hourly pay � bonuses
and incentive Must have strong,
clear voice, enthusiasm and profes
sional attitude Pleasant working
conditions Apply in person 19pm
Tues Thurs 9 30 5 30 p m Fri
and Sat Olin Mills Studio, West End
Shopping Center, Memorial Dr
Greenville, NC 27834
SALES AND MANAGEMENT Be
part of the growing Clayl
organization Sales and manage
ment training positions now opt-
NC's hottest manufacturing markel
Tell us about your background ana
why you want to share the succ
our dynamic company AM ref
confidential Write Bob'Clouse
301 South, Wilson, NC 27893
MODELS NEEDED Exper .
and Sales ability required V
free to travel Wednesday ai
Thursday evenings Fantas'
cial opportumt for the right g �
443 6471
ROOMMATE WANTED T
bedroom apt at EdStbrc -
more info ca K ei a' 75V 4
ROOMMATE NEEDED
smoker, male to snare two be li
apt $14 50 a month
752 0461 Aua ' ow
5301
WORD PROCESSING: contact
. 5996 .8 am 5
itperience in typing
entif reports
ma" ess ana form let
ters
FOR SALE: 1975 Rabbit, green 2
door $600 Evenmgs and weekends
'56 216J
FOR SALE 1975 Honda C . - S750.
Set of 4 te mags with 4 con
tmental tires, $150 Call 758
FOR SALE: Motorcycle Yamaha
250 streetbike. bes' offer Call
��92 ask �
DISCOUNTS Present ECU ID
before e and receve dis
count on an beau'v supplies Sally's
Beauty Company Carolina East
'er
2 & 3 BEDROOM APTS Four blocks
from ECU. Can "46 3284 or 524 3180
FOR SALE: 5 10 Becker Tri Fin
surfboard Gooc cone $90 756 2620
HOUSE IN UNIVERSITY AREA:
Traai'�'
F replace'
. � tl e r, Magtag � � as
itral
VINTAGECLOTHING
� ittl
'
OpenTues ��" ' '
Consignments coi
FORSALE C ��� rbec
ess and 'eater5aera Is
uaeo $350Fr
Zaim at 75-
WORD PROCESSING � offer ex
penence i mes meses,
technics nenl ana te
papers ve manage and merge your
names and andresses into merged
. � opes or roiodex
cards C es are extremely
reso .� � �. ��� � i 15
perc ' ECU Students 5
F Prof 'er Co
(Back of Fra J472
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE WORD PROCESSING
� - � :�� n Student
document services including
repots term papers d ssertions,
: more All work
jmpufer checked against 50,000
wore: electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
p ipei Can for specific
rates Ca v � -� at 757 3440 after
6 1 P rn
TYPING: Professional, experienced
iBrv " � rig SI per page, includes
proofrea , grammatical and
spelling corrections Can 757 0398
after 5 15 p.m
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Jan.ee at 355 7233 after 5 30
TYPING ft tp,ng services pro
v;ded by professional woman with
IBM Correcting Selectnc
Vpewr.ter Familiar with all styles
Call Debbie at 756 6333
PERSONALS
LOST "M?C Calculator Reward
offered call after 6 p m 756 5285
LOST: White male, approximately
510" by 1" thick is missing. Alias
"Sig Ep Sam" If ou have mforma
tion relating to the kidnapping of
Sam, please call the Sig Ep House,
757 0487
CONGRATULATIONS: Dana Troutt
for winning the AOII Assassination
Game Thanks to al! Greeks for par
tcipating Look tor the spring
game!
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS: Be
prepared for the Halloween Party.
Don't forget to bring your scary seif!
CONGRATULATIONS DONNA
PRATT: For being elected the
Sigma Phi Epsilon Sweetheart for
1985 86 Love, The Little Sisters
NANTUCKET will be appearing at
the Sportsman Lounge Sunday, Nov
3 Gate opens at 12 00 noon Located
behind Riverside Oyster Bar For
more info call 758 0058 it's going to
be one hell of a live outdoor
concert
KAPPA SIGS: Congratulations to
Mark Berandson for winning the All
Campus intramural Tennis Cham
pionship, and to Rob Strauss for be
mg Runner Up An all Kappa Sig
final the creme of the crop rises to
the top. Stick with it Alpha Omegas
The time has come. Bon Voyage,
Beth, if you mess with the Boot
Bros you will get the Boot.
zv?�M�&
T&&&& �
.iMP ��� �
MGINOTO
c�VE?OUgSgL
Pft SUPER COUPON
WHITE CLOUD
"�fiSBB
Bath Tissue
0
40c
78
4ro
pkg.
CRISCO
REGULAR � BUTTER
Shortening
SAVE
40c
-i
i yf
can
188
ASSORTED
Pork Chops
S SAVE
71c
lb.
USD A CHOICE
BONELESS
Chuck Roast

I SAVE
. 91c
NEW CROP
FLORIDA
Pork
Spare Ribs
-138
lb.
148
Chuck
Steak
� I68 �
Tangelos or Oranges
SAVE
10c-
100�o PURE
Ground Chuck
i ij? 3 lbs. or
V 3I J more
v i
lb.
138
WAREHOUSE PRICES
DEVILED HAM
Underwood Spread
C
SAVE
30c
j 412 oz
can
SPAM
Luncheon Meat
BETTY LROCK.tR SUPER MOtST
Cake Mix
8ETTv CROCKER CREAMV DEtu�E
Frosting
QUAKER 35 OFf LABEL!
Quick Grits
KRAFT DINNER
Macaroni &
Cheese
SK'NNER
Thin Spaghetti
A�P 'RAP OMAI
Spaghetti Sauce
�������� PjP SUPER COUPON
J WHITE CLOUD
I
I
SAVE
10c
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FROZEN
Totino's Pizza
89c
Ffi!
Fryer
Leg Qtrs.
WAREHOUSE PRICES
US.DA CHOICE
BONELESS
Aftc Beef Stew
s
10 oz.
SAVE ,
31c,
APP, E Pt AL.M B. Lll BERR
Banquet Pie
A4P FROZ( S
Orange Juice
ANN PAGE
Handi Whip
py
REGULAR
A&P Pie Shells
MORTON
Pot
P�q
o�gs
-U9prii
99ca
79cj
69crjj
��
lb.
98
General Merchandise Specials
Fine
Porcelain China
J SAVE
30 �
Pies
.s
Bath Tissue
78�
LIMIT ONE WiTM AN ADOITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE
PURCHASE GOOD THRU SAT NOV i AT A&P "663
�.
Cottage Cheese
HUNGRY JACK BUTTfRM K
Pillsbury Biscuits
ALL VARIETIES
r3UI
Masson "�r
REGULAR � LIGHT
Coors
Beer
EXCLUSIVELY AT A4P
Royale Aurum Genuine Gold Bands or
Crown Platino Genuine Platinum Bands
M.00 OFF
Fine Porcelain China
Completer Piece
.rxm.
each weekly place
setting piece only
79�
,
3 lit
Bit
5"
WIT EVERT 3 00
PURCHASE
DELI SPECIALS
��.
J SA'fc -1 Clr ol
2
SLICED TO ORDER
Boiled
Ham
FRESH BAKED
1
89
59 French
Bread
f
La�
48'
I
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 29, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.435
Location of Original
University Archives
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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