The East Carolinian, October 24, 1985






�he �ust (Earnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No. 17
I hursdav, October 24, 1985
12 Pages
Greenville, VC.
Circulation 12.004)
Male, Female Pay
Different At ECU
All Aboard!
JIMLEUTGEHS - Th� Eatt Carolinian
It has been quite a while since railroad track s made their wa onto the ECU campus, but through
the photographic magic of Jim 1 eutgens, the iron horse is back. In fact, a number of years ago a
railroad track did run on campus.
Two Student Groups Move
By DOUG ROBERSON
Staff Writer
Differences exist between male
and female faculty salaries at
ECU, but these differences are
caused by a number of factors,
said Director of Institutional
Research Robert Usserv.
"We've worked very hard to
explain the differences in average
salaries � we need to be positive
in understanding why there are
differences he said.
According to Usserv. the dif-
ferences between male and
female salaries are a
phenomena of diverse concentra-
tions lumped together to create
an average
"Some disciplines have a high
number of males. These
disciplines, such a high-
technology, recieve higher pay
because of increased demand
Usserv said.
According to information
prepared and supplied by the
ECU office of Institutional
Research, the average salaries for
male and female professors on a
nine month salary in 1984 were:
� Full professor Male �
$37,071, Female - $34,672;
� Associate Professor: Male �
$30,603, Female $29,154,
� .Assistant Professor: Male �
$24,587, Female - $23,922.
Usserv said differences bet-
ween male and female salaries
can also be explained by the
number of years the faculty
member has been employed.
"The salaries of two men who
have been employed for 15 years
are going to be greater than the
salaries of two women who have
been with the university for one
year Ifssery said.
"When you look at the sa
difference, it's explainable by
number ol years difference
added.
I sser said he emphasiz
ECl "goes great .
determining that no descrepan-
cies exist between male and
female salary structure.
"Being a center for learning,
ECU has the moral and
philosophical obliga
ing equal pa men and
women he said.
I fssery added there are alary
differences in each depa'
but "inside each discipline, n
and female ; - I (accord
ink) should receive equal pa
"Professors, male or female.
should he paid the same if the
have equal credentials and meet
the same requirement
each discipline
advancement,
"If we have a difl e in
salaries, we have
: : :
ECl
number of lawsuit
the university "V-
a lawsuit in t'r
To Impose New Restrictions Renunciation Topic of Study
groups a;
rig procedures.
papers in the
ed into trouble
many ises for publishing
deliberately provocative material,
apcl Hill
a ei I he
Obu advertis i
I Nt students
The Daily far
'� ?d, amid other quotes,
"� etzche's assertion
rJ is dead
At UNC, dissidents sought to
p the paper of student fee fun-
g.
� ave me somewhat of a jolt
al meone would cut off the
ide voice recalls Arne
Rickert, The Tar Heel's co-
edit
Rickert says the student
religious group's attempt to end
mandatory student fee funding
for the paper is ronic. They
would cut � per that has
rered them "
Notre Dame President
Bill Healv says he only wants The
Observer to open its books to the
public.
��Vve think The books should be
open Healy says. "We spend
about $100,000 of the students'
money or1. The Observer It'sonly

The Observer irritated student
government leaders when it ra -
ed its advertising rate- earlier this
fall. The student government
spend- about $10,000 a year in
advertising in the paper. Critics
wondered if the increase was
necessary.
But editoi Sarah Hamilton
refused to open the paper's books
to the politicians, reasoning it
could set a precedent for later ex-
erting editorial control over the
paper.
"I don't want them to deter-
mine editorial policy Hamilton
says.
She adds "we are already ac-
countable to the students through
the administration
Nevertheless, about 80 percent
of the students surveyed by the
student government think the
paper should open its books.
Healy also found that, of near-
by papers with ad rates com
parable to The Observers, six of
seven die not get any students
funds.
The campus judicial council,
however, last week ruled the stu-
dent senate resolutions to see The
Observer's records essentially are
toothless.
Rickert, moreover, says the
controvrsy at North Carolina has
faded away.
"I don't think student govern-
ments want to control the daily
operations of the papers says
lorn Rolnicki of the Association
Collegiate Press, a group of col-
lege newspaper advisors based at
University of Minnesota.
Rolnicki says the conflicts bet-
ween campus papers and student
groups are "not going to change
unless student governments
become more knowledgeable or
student papers become indepen-
dent.
ECU Nfws Bureau
The largest mass renunciation
of American citizenship in
history is the topic of a new book
by ECU faculty member Donald
Collins.
Collins' book, "Native
American Aliens: Disloyalty and
the Renunciation of Citizenship
by Japanese-Americans During
World War II (Greenwood
Press), is the first book devoted
exclusively to issues surrounding
the renunciation by more than
5,000 native Americans of
Japanese descent.
Nearly two decades of research
on the events that led up to the
renunciation have persuaded Col-
lins that few of the renuneiants
were actually "disloyal but
were instead reacting to the in-
fluence of mass hysteria, rough
treatment, fear and distrust.
"The internment of Japanese-
Americans
some 120.000
residents of the western states �
in 10 crowded, closely guarded
segregation camps in desert loca-
tions � has been termed
'America's worst wartime
mistake Dr. Collins notes.
Remarkably, many of the
young Japanese-American
recruits in the tamed 44 d
Regimental C ombat Team were
from the relocation camps; their
families continued to be
prisoned behind barbed
fences while the 442nd became
the most decorated .
war. During the evat
operation, Fapanese-des
citizens of all age
tions were put
Collins said, and forced to l
their homes, farms, jobs and
pets
"This evacuation was the
result of a racially based po!
which did not extend
descendants of other 'enei
people, such as the Germ i
Italians Collins said
Even before the camps w
established, long be?, i ai
began, the Japanese and
Asian ethnic groups had suffe
from widespread racism in the
west, Collins explained V
not born in the U.S. could not
become naturalized citizens.
Even native Japanese-Americi
could not hold office or become
business leaders.
"Their businesses and social
lives were segregated Collins
said.
And since 1924, no immigra-
te Japa
ted,except I
e brides " here �
deal ol
Japanese
llins
said. " I
and ma
General Jol � DeWitt, military
nmandei the
tice Departmei
caJ and state lev
shared a bast.
ei" (second general
I "Tl
belief was that the 'Japa-
blood-strain' made th i
age the Amen.
� enemy
Dr. Collins.
who be,
nia in 1943, declai i
"� .
retui a mes in
The eventual renu
their U.S. citizenship by some
evacuees came about in the
winter of 1944-45, after a well
intentioned but mistaken effort
was made to help the incarcerated
Japanese-Ame1 A sym-
pathetic official approved a ques-
See NISEI Page 6.
Alcohol Awareness Designed To Teach Responsibility
BvBKTH WHICKER
"More than 50 percent of in-
cidents on campus can be
somehow attributed to the use of
alcohol said Ron Speier,
associate dean and director of
Student Services.
"Students drink and commit
acts of vandalism or they might
break the visitation policy. Their
behavior is called to our attention
because they are disorderly or
disruptive said Speier.
Alcohol Awareness Week is
designed to teach the public how
to drink responsibly and pose
alternatives to drinking.
"Several activities have been
planned to make people aware of
responsible drinking habits he
said. "There will be a social and
demonstration of non-alcoholic
beverages and an alcohol fair,
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
The worst sin towards our
fellow creatures is not to hate
them, but to be indifferent (to
them: that's the essence of in-
humanity.
- Shaw
which gives information of the
effects of alcohol. There have
been ads in the papers supporting
Alcohol Awareness Week said
Speier.
"The theme of Alcohol
Awareness Week is centered
around 'Limit The campus
theme is 'Pirates know their
limits The purpose of Alcohol
Awareness Week is not to stop
people from drinking he said.
"The purpose is to get people
more concerned about their
behavior when they do drink
said Speier.
The most common cause of
death for those aged 18 to 23 is
alcohol-related accidents, accor-
ding to J. Nicholas Gordon,
director of Student Health Ser-
vices at Georgia Tech.
An alcoholic is defined as a
person addicted to alcohol. "Ten
percent of the population of the
United States would become
alcoholics if they drank sufficient
alcohol said Gordon.
According to the Bacchus
Guide to Successful Partying,
students do not get together to
eat and drink. Students get
together to be together. Eating
and drinking are important
because they help people have
more fun. Drinks and food
should always be matched with
the crowd.
"Martinis won't go over nearly
as well in the morning as coffee
or soft drinks. Neither would an
exceptional bottle of wine win
proper acclaim at a beach party
for 200 according to Bacchus.
The Bacchus Guide suggests
different drinks for every occa-
sion. "Cider does well in the fall,
eggnog at Christmas, chocolate
when it's cold, beer or soft drinks
after exercise or with large
groups.
"If you use alcohol in a
responsible manner, chances are
you will never experience a drink-
ing problem. Thus, alcohol will
be something to enhance your
social relationships rather than
impairing or destroying them
said Bacchus.
"The primary focus should be
directed in a manner, rather than
in the drinking itself. Those who
drink should recognize another's
rights to drink or not to drink
and avoid encouraging or rein-
forcing irresponsible behavior.
The state and campus laws
should always be observed while
drinking Bacchus said.
Gordon said that to avoid get-
ting drunk, people should set
limits on how many drinks they
are going to have and stick to
them. More important, they
should drink slowly and not gulp
drinks.
When mixing drinks, Bacchus
suggests that the alcohol be
measured and that alcohol be us-
ed carefully in connection with
other drugs.
Bacchus said that any social
gathering should offer transpor-
tation. If transportation cannot
be provided, overnight accom-
modations should be prepared in
advance.
If you let someone go too far,
you have an obligation to make
sure your hospitality does not
contribute to their undoing, ac
cording to the Bacchus Guide.
The Guide also stated that if you
lei someone drink too much and
drive, you are as big a problem as
thev are.
O ne For The Road!
JIM LCUTOIHJ - Th, Eai Carolinian
Phil Padgett, Greg Cooper, Joey Chaucer, a nd David Kauff man enjoy a beer before an ECU foot-
ball game. However, because alcohol can be attributed to 50 percent of all campus incidents Alcohol
Awareness Week is designed to teach responsible drinking habits. See related story on page 1
m 0
ftwwa





N
INI
' K I' 'HI R 24 . -
Announcements
STUOt- N S f OR
'NOMIC DEMOCRACY
HEALTH CAREERS DAY
v

. n
A' N
Dl NTS AND FACULTY
' H CAREERS DAY
' ' - A �
Nove
I will have �
- raft
N bei 4 �
" � �the site �
THE UNDER GROUND
- be a showing o� 1
� 4 at 1 30 Bring
� '�' � � � ,
RUGBY CLUB
"
Rogb

GREENVILLE
WOMEN'S CLUB
sponsor a
niversifv f
CAMPUS MINISTRY
CAMPUS MINISTRY
�-�-

s. � �
EGE DEMOCRATS
PSI CHI
LECTURE
NEEDED
Writers & Editors
For
Fall Session
The East i �
man
t4

X
ATTENTION ECU STTJ DENTS
AND PROFESSORS
reservations tor holiday travel J
ey and time
SPRING BREAK: Special student trips from $375 5
Cruises, Mexico and Caribbean packages
es for brochu res and profes ;
� avel needs X
.Q
S QUIXOTE TRAVELS.INC
? Cotanche Street
LV G'eer Hie. NC
s
tr,� 4 4.t,t,4. f.t
757 0234
t
ONSOLIOATED
"HEATRES
.Adults $2.00
530
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
field Over 3rd eek
SILVER BULLET
SHOWSDAIL I 20-3 20-5 20-7:20-9:20
R
TARTS FRIDA. "The Ve Sound Of The Century
� KRUSH GROOVE �
Starring Sheila E, The Fat Boys,
�i , Rut; D M , urtis �im and ew Edition
fARRl(,
Held (her 4th H eek ARNOL i S( HWARZENEGGER
COMMANDO
c SOM SJA1 JQ -J :ip.s -iq.? -Iti.Q K
GORDON'S
GOLF & SKI SHOP
264 By-Pass (Beside G'ville TV & Appl.ance)
Come by and see our
new winter sweaters
by - Woolrick, bod &
Obermeyer.
Men & Ladies
PootJoyQ
W ns, I adtes. Children
?7
rV JACKETS
35�
OOFF
GOLF SHOES
Super Selection MmJ O
OFF
Large selection of SKYR
turtle necks in a
I rainbow of colors.
756-1003
the largest selection of Golf A Ski equipment in
Eastern N.C. "
GRADUATE STUDENTS"
lays at S 15 at the Mi
Br mg a tfisfi to st- r
( I
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Nun i. Night V
� �� ' II Method s' ,ti
,
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOPS
BIOLOGY CLUB
� � � �
N I A
,
�I .

STUDENT UNION
RECREATION COMMITTEE
sss
- ���
� �
" � ug
. v.

-
- H -
��
e hi
RESUME WORKSHOPS
. - 'ON t BUM P
AN AMERICAN CONCENTRATION CAMP rule 1
Segregation (enter, Calif. In this square inle of desert, the largesl
mass renunciation of citizenship In American histor took p.
See related stors on page I.
AUDITIONS
ATiTIC
:
IF'
QKT
HAIT
Aerobic Workshop
FALL BREAK SPECIAL
The holiday festivities ore fost opprooching
Get Your Body Ready
Sign up by Sat. Oct. 26, 1985
and get the rest of the semester for
$20.oo
- 417 Evans St. Downtown 757-1606
presents-
dmuRim octrg
DIAMONDS
ecu
PORms
c,ZZJ2� an
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
Pirate
Football
Tickets
Kroger
wilt qiwe
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
each of the
5 home gamesj
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
A
&
-
MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS!oetal5,nst
PLUS ii
DOUBLE
Black Cat
Cake
$399
California 4
Cooler
Thin Crust
Potato
Chips. .
Cherry
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Whole
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Video Movie
Rentals
No Club Fees 24 Hour Service
OVER
650
TITLES
BETA
& VMS
VHS Player
Rental
8
Ml
Seafood
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$
English
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
1600 Greenville Bivd Greenville
vtfr

ottsnl
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k
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TiMi�r
THERI
BECOMING
jf


ARMY NUR
ympxr
Take-out
weicoranc"
i
y
"Gamecc
For Lun
We're ")
TAII
V

Kiersidt ()-4tr Bar
N
Kixerside steak Bar
315 8
ill ahe





I Ml EAS1AROl IN1AN
OCTOBt R24, 1985
-twt Burnt
MP 1 uie I uke
ert, the larxeNt
WT
bait
ICT.dB
NDS
cdd $n
Health Fair
TONY RUMPLE - ECU Nni Burtau
ECU senior nursing students Lisa O'Donne 11 and Terry Strickland evaluate one of the booths made
b students during the Vibrant Health Fair at the School of Nursing. Their and other student evalua-
tions will serve as part of the total grade thai is given for the project. The fair was an out-of-class pro-
ject designed to teach teamwork and illustrated problems of nutrition encoutered bv families.
'�� A
'�'�
i
BLE "t-Kjf
OriSiOetatls In-store
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
: id rlc re t if reprv
th� u iMni.i vou w ii
: v � I the Arm Nurs
.

i (rps I :n i auueous i �n the' loh
means partial iltl
. I . � i :
reer advancement are the n
: . �! the ev epti n 1 he old bar
- vou command respect as an Armv otticer It vo . i
. - �. Aim Nurse Opportunities PO Ron "H
Or, � I tree I SOC USA-ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
(
ito
IS . .
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herry
oke
n
19
lEsi
lish
Fins
99
i K roqpr inq
�?????�
710 is Gr im Si
Ora�nvtU�. N 2734
Takeouts
w�lcotad
752-0090
'Uka-O'iU
WcicooMd
1st Annual
'Gamecock Chicken Pickin
For Lunch or TAILGATING,
We're 'frying the Gamecocks
TAILGATE SPECIALS
Your Choice of Chicken:
Cajun Style, BBQ Or icken, S. C. Fried Chicken
2 Pc. Snack Pack $1.19
4 Pc. Snack Pack $2.19
1 Whole Chicken $3.99
6 Hushpuppies dipt. S.C. ' 'chicken bog (Save 2.00)
Whole Chicken $3.19
For your "after t he game" meal, visit us
at Riverside Oyster Bar finest seafood in town
710 Nbrth Green Street
or
Riverside Steak B ar finest steaks in town
315 San tonsburg Road
OPEN AT
10 AM
Call ahead for large take-out orders, we'll have them ready.
.??????????�'
?????????
Registration Vital For Aid
(CPS) � Some students nation-
wide apparently thought they no
longer had to register for the
draft to get federal financial aid,
thanks to a widely printed
Associated Press story last week
that incorrectly reported the
government "had quietly drop-
ped the Solomon Amendment
The Solomon Amendment re-
quires men of draft age to register
for the draft before they are eligi-
ble to get aid.
Actually, the Department of
Education only implemented a
new regulation � first announc-
ed in 1984 � that said campus
student aid officers do not have
to verify that students are telling
the truth about whether or not
they have registered.
Students, however, must still
register, said the Education
Department and Selective Ser-
vice.
"Luckily The Crimson (the
student paper) made some phone
clls before running the story
says James Miller, director of the
Harvard-Radcliffe financial aid
office.
Nevertheless, "there was cer-
tainly some minor confusion"
caused when "a couple of
students" read the misleading AP
report in other papers, Miller
says.
Miller adds that the confusion
could have been greater had the
story come out when students
were applying for aid.
Some students at Boston
University also were misled by
the story, but "we were conscious
of the potential for a problem, so
we made it clear to our media
says BU Director of Financial
Assistance Byron Hartley.
Financial aid officers around
the country originally opposed
the Solomon Amendment, which
Congress approved in 1983,
precisely because of the
"verification procedures
As first passed, the law would
have made campus-aid officers
responsible for finding out if
students were telling the truth
They argued the paperwork
would be time-consuming, expen-
sive, and would transform aid of-
ficers into federal police.
"It would have been an enor-
mous burden says Dennis Mar-
tin of the National Association of
Student Financial Aid Ad-
ministrators, a Washington,
D.Cbased coalition of atd of-
ficers from around the country.
Martin said students would
have had to wait for aid money
until the Selective Service sent a
letter to campus saying they had
registered.
East Carolina University
Student Union
SPECIAL CONCERT
COMMITTEE
presents
The deep, REGGAE beat of
Awareness
Art Ensemble
Sunday Evening
October 27 7:00
AWARENESS ART ENSEMBLE
ON THE PATIO MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
&l�ty
2711 E. 10th St.
PIZZA
NOW OPEN
CALL 758-9999
HOURS: Mon-Thurs. 11 a.m. to 12 midnight Fri-Sat 11 a.m. to 2
a.m. Sun. 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.
Beginning Oct. 28, SPEEDY RE EDY'S will be open for LUNCH and
we'll be serving SUB'S from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. everyday!
Cheese
Pepperoni
Green Peppers
Black Olives
Green Olives
Mushrooms
Pineapple
FREE EXTRA
CHEESE
ITEMS
Ham
Onions
Sausage
Ground Beef
Canadian Bacon
Anchovies
Thick Crust
PRICES: 12"
CHEESE $5.00
Add. Items .95
DELUXE 8.80
RUNNER 9.75
VEGI 9.75
MARATHON 13.55
16"
$7.20
1.40
12.80
14.20
14.20
19.80
FAST, FREE DELIVERY!
CLIPCOUPON
(Limited Delivery Area) $5.00 minimum
'CLIP COUPON1CLIP COUPON
Buy any 16
1-item pizza
Get 4 FREE
Pepsi's For
$6.00
Limit one coupon
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Expires 11-30-85
Buy any small
sub
Get .500 off.
11 a.m to 4 p.m. only
Limit one coupon per sub
Expires 11-30-85
Buy any large
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Get $1.00 off
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. only
Limit one
coupon
per sub
Expires 11-30-85
'��.��





�te iEaat (Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
rOMNomON.orWMwo,
Mike Ludwick, �. e� Tom i VPN1C
Qv r- LDVENDER, otncm, 4wtM�
Scott Ccx)per. .�� g�� Anthony m�t�
� ANIHONV MARTIN, Bus.ntss Uanu,tr
JOHN Shannon. ,�,�� tduo, JnH pFTFR;nNI
, JUniNrtlfcRSON, Credit Maiui&r
LORiN Pasquai , wtev Shannon Shoot
nrr, . SHANNON SHORT. Product Manage,
DECHANI1 E JOHNSON. �� � DEBBIE STEVENS.
October 24, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Education
Students A nd Teachers Dissatisfied
Recent data published by the Na-
tional Education association show-
ing that one quarter of the nation's
18-year-olds never graduate from
high school says something about
the state of education in America
today. A recent NEA report shows
that dropout rates among
minorities and the poor are par-
ticularly high. Students in the bot-
tom third of the socioeconomic lad-
der have three to four times the
dropout rate of those from affluent
families. Black and Hispanic rates
of dropout are one and one-half to
two times higher than white
students' rates. Moreover, the in-
cidence of teenage pregnancv and
childbirth have increased.
regardless of ethnicity and
socioeconomic status. More than
one million teens become pregnant
each year.
Add to these grim statistics the
recent revelations by the Carnegie
Foundation for the" Advancement
of Teaching which show that 40
percent of university faculty
members are so dissatisfied with
their careers that they are consider-
ing leaving academe and you have a
crisis in American education. The
reasons cited for career disenchant-
ment among faculty included- 1)
Fair or poor salaries 2) Little op-
portunity for carrer advancements
3) University administrations which
are autocratic and unresponsive 4)
The quality of students.
That these two separate sets of
research findings are interrelated
should be quite evident. The crisis
in American higher education is
merely a reflection of the crises
which are permeating the fabric of
American society at large. The pro-
tracted crisis that is plaguing the
American economy due, primarily,
to international competition is par-
ticularly pertinent to a discussion of
education.
On an obvious level, the state of
the economy affects students' abili-
ty to pay for school. Yet, of even
greater significance is the fact that
economic crisis frequently results in
attacks on education in general for
the sake of expediency. Take, for
example, the recent Gramm-
Rudman budget balancing proposal
which proposes deep cuts in higher
education. The proposal threatens
to lead banks to stop making
Guarenteed Student Loans, thus
wiping out the government's largest
student aid program, according to
experts. And, even if Guaranteed
Student Loans survive, the cuts in
funding for student aid, institu-
tional aid and research could be
substantial.
It should be obvious bv now that
any society that cannabilizes its
young in such a manner is writing
the epitaph on its own future
Human capital is the stuff that
research, innovation and economic
dynamism is founded upon. More
to the point, if funding for higher
education is drastically reduced
minorities and the poor will suffer
the most. America will become a
more class polarized society and
probably less democratic 'as a
result.
The fact of the matter is that in
the present epoch the mad scramble
among some to sacrifice decency,
democracy and some of the more
noble things that our society has
aspired to in the interest of cleaving
a tighter and meaner bottom line is
undermining our position as a na-
tion rather than helping it. An en-
tire society slavishly devoted to the
pursuit of profit is a sorry thought
and an even sorrier reality. Where is
room for the pursuit 'of art or
knowledge in and of themselves?
Where is there room for the finer
and more noteworthy pursuits of a
human existence? Is' it not out of
the love of what one does that ex-
cellence burgeons? There is no
reason to question why the voung
have grown cynical and the pro-
fessors want to drop out of college.
The sensitive and the intelligent
alike see what is aborning on the
morrow. If Thoreau were alive to-
day perhaps he could set us
straight.
&5TT5R 65T SQMBBOW 0V5R HfiRg
ORGANIZE A P�RCIT AIP CONCERT
Campus Forum
Snack Bars Do Offer Healthy Fare
f
In the Thursday, October 17, 1985
edition of your paper you had a pic-
ture on the front page showing a
small selection of the items that are
carried in the Soda Shop and the
Croatan. Under the picture you had a
statement: "Here are the range of
choices students have when thev go
into the Student Store between
classes
I know that one of your goals is to
strive for accuracy and fairness of the
press. If this is true, you should send
your photographer back to take a
picture of the milk, fruit, nuts,
juices, natural foods, cereals, and
yogurt, etc. This would be a truer
representation oi the range of choices
the students have in the Soda Shop
and Croatan.
Joseph C'iark
Manager
Editor's Note: Readers ma) recall the
editorial in the September 12 issue of
The East Carolinian which dealt with
the subject of campus food. In it we
said: "To walk into any of the snack
bars or vending areas on this campus
(the Croatan and the Soda Shop, be
mg prime examples is a monumen-
tally depressing trip. Certainly, it is
not a journey thai an) person who is
even remotely concerned with good
(read: health conscious eating con-
templates with relish. " Hell, to say
that we are not contrite would be put-
ting it mildly. No, indeed, we do not
repent.
Tor one thing, while we respectful-
ly acknowledge that the version of
reality presented above is correct in a
literal sense, we believe that it is, in
fact, a less accurate portrayal of the
contents of the shelves at the Soda
Shop and the Croatan than our own.
It is true that the snack bars do
"milk, fruit, nuts, juices, natu
foods, cereals, and yogurt" sti
speaking. Yet, we arc furred to in-
quire as to what the ratio
items to the junk foods in tht
the store is. h it 50 -
30-70? We think the latter
mure representat
lure.
W. (lark if we havt
fended you we apologize That, . �
sincerity, is not our aim We just feet
that it is reasonable to believt �
healthier foods should !
student institution which. ;
has a captive audit nee H
think that all the junk show,
eliminated Just enough of it to n
room tor a larger selection oj healthx
Ods. Other � a$
Guilford college in Gret �
acted to make healthier
available to students. M h
We beseech vou
Literary Muck?
In reference to the article "
fireside Cha printed in the
September 26 issue ol "he
Carolinian:
Howdy, 'all'
It's just been one ol those days and
I'm gonna gripe about am little tl .
that pops up.
Like ECU guys grieve me to no
end. I mean they really tee me fl
know what I mean? I mean there you
are, au naturale, ready for unnatural
acts, and it's up one second and
down the next' Of course I'm miff-
ed! you think. But tr to leave him
with a little self-esteem, so vou
whisper in his ear, "Can vou just
hold me tonight0"
Herman, he rep
mate mig
V '
Ma
id � '
v Ma
Forum Rules
Tht
drop tht
tions tiuiidmg. j.
jr:
r purp. .

and signaturt I
are limited to two typew nth
double-sp � neatiy pnnu
Abortion Seen As War On The Unborn
By Michael Gardner
When trying to formulate one's views
on a controversial issue, an individual
must analyze two vital aspects: the facts
and the opinions. There is nothing more
confusing than to have an uninformed
writer espouse hisher ignorant views
on an issue. In addressing the topic of
abortion, I would like to review some
significant facts and opinions, which
may provide some understanding about
the seriousness of this issue.
We will begin our investigation of the
facts with a preview of the Federal abor-
tion laws. The January 22, 1973, U.S.
Supreme Court decision on abortion
(Roe vs. Wade) ruled that "A state is
forbidden to 'proscribe' (forbid) abor-
tion anytime prior to birth if in the opi-
nion of 'one licensed physician' an
abortion is necessary to preserve 'the
life or health' of the mother Her life
is understandable. But what did they
mean by her heaJth? By the Court's own
definition (Doe vs. Bolton), the word
"health" means: The medical
judgement may be exercised in the light
of all factors � physical, emotional,
psychological, familial, and the
woman's age � relevant to the well-
being of the patient. All these factors
may relate to health According to the
Roe vs. Wade decision, an abortion is
justified when a pregnancy would:
"Force upon a woman a distressful life
and future produce "psychological
harm will "tax mental and physical
health by child care will bring the
distress "associated with the unwanted
child will "bring a child into a family
already unable psychologically or other-
wise to care for it or will bring the
"continuing difficulties and stigma of
unwed motherhood Also, the
Supreme Court states that the legal
word for human life is "person and
that "The use of the word is such that it
has application only postnatallv (Roe
vs. Wade)
In 1983, 50 percent of the
respondents approved of the Roe vs.
Wade ruling when Gallup described it
by saying "a woman may go to a doctor
to end pregnancy at any time during the
first three months of pregnancy In
1984, the ABCWashington Post poll
found that 62 percent agreed that "A
woman should be able to get an abor-
tion if she decides she wants one Since
1975, the Gallup poll has recorded that:
approximately 55 percent of Americans
think abortion should be legal under
certain conditions, 20 to 25 percent
want it legal in every situation, and 15
to 20 percent want it illegal in all cases
(Policy Review, Spring 1985).
iNon-therapeutic abortion, one for
convenience, for absence of distress, or
for a woman's happiness, has become
the seond most common surgical pro-
cedure after circumcision. Over 1.5
million abortions are performed by doc-
tors every year in the United States
alone, meaning one abortion for every
two live births (Scientific American,
June 1981).
Since abortion has occurred so fre-
quently, population experts claim it has
become a new kind of birth control.
There is a distinct difference between
birth control, which prevents the forma-
tion of new life, and abortion, which
destroys new life after it has already
begun. For women having abortions, 75
percent are unmarried, 32 percent are
teenagers, and 20 percent are "repeat
customers (Newsweek, June 1978)
The United States has been involved
in six wars throughout history. All the
American war casualties add up to
about 1.2 million combat-related
deaths. But since abortion was legalized
in 1973, the new "war on the unborn"
has caused approximately 10 million
womb-related deaths.
How do these facts apply to reality
you may ask. Let's consider two case
histories. The first case occurred in
1975, Boston, Massachusetts: "A doc-
tor was convicted of manslaughter for
neglecting to give care to a 24-week in-
fant after a 1973 abortion. Witnesses
said he held the infant down and
smothered it. He was the first American
doctor ever convicted on charges of fail-
ing to care for an infant born during an
abortion. The conviction was overturn-
ed by the Massachusetts Supreme Court
on the grounds that improper instruc-
tions had been given to the jury
The second case occurred in 1977,
Westminister, California. "A seven
month baby girl was born alive after a
saline abortion. A nurse testified that
when the doctor got to the hospital, he
stopped her efforts to help the baby's
breathing. A fellow physician testified
that he had seen the doctor choke the in-
fant, 'I saw him put his hand on this
baby's neck and push down. He said, I
can't find the trachea! and this baby
won't stop breathing The charges
against the doctor were dismissed
With a basic understanding of the
facts, we can now review some opinions
from both sides of the abortion issue.
First, let's take a look at the pro-life
view. Dr. J.C. Willke, President of the
National Right to Life Committee
states, "There is no morally relevant
difference between feticide (abortion)
and infanticide. In each case, a living,
moving human, who is sexed, complete-
ly intact, and programmed from within,
is directly killed. And often the motive
is the same � convenience or
materialism. Each is also totally unique
from all other humans and will never
appear on the human scene again.
The objective evil is identical in both
cases. Individual guilt, however, is
another dimension of the problem. This
involves whether the person killing
believes the act is wrong. This can differ
with different people's beliefs, motiva-
tions, etc
Dr. C. Everett Koop, the U.S.
Surgeon General made the comment
that, "Protection of the life of the
mother as an excuse for an abortion is a
smoke screen. In my 36 years of
pediatric surgery, 1 have never known
of one instance where the child had to
be aborted to save the mother's life. If
toward the end of the pregnancy com-
plications arise that threaten the
mother's health, the doctor will either
induce labor or perform a Caesarean
section. His intention is to save the life
of both the mother and the baby. The
baby's life is never willfully destroyed
because the mother's life is in danger
Second, let's consider some of the
opinions of the pro-abortion advocates
Peter Singer wrote in the New York
Review of Books in 1984: "The pro-life
groups were right about one thing: the
location of the baby inside or outside
womb cannot make such a m
difference. We cannot coherentlv I
thai � � J righ, t0 kil a fctus a weeK
before birth, but as soon as the bab
born everything must be done to keep
solution, however, is not
accept the pro-hfe view that the fen.
a human being with the same m,
status as yours or mine. The solutioi
the very opposite: to abandon the idea
that all human life is 0f equal worth "
loseph Fletcher, a professor at the
I niversity of Virginia Medical Scho
supports feticide (abortion) and mfan
iic.de because fetuses and newborns are
not "persons 0nl "human lives '
Professor Fletcher "proposed a list
i-s indicators of personhood ' which
range trom minimal intelligence and
self-awareness to sense of time and
.diosyncrasy. He states that anyone with
an I.Q. below 40 is 'questionably a per-
son, below the 20 mark, not a'person
(Policy Review, Spring 1985) "
I hope that in light of the presented
tacts and opinions, every individual will
be able to come to an intelligent, moral
conclusion about the issue of abortion
In the midst of all the debate, quarrel-
ing, and propaganda on this issue, one
should stop and ask him or herself the
question, "What is God's view on abor-
tion�
"Classes are fine ma.
but I've eaten so many
frozen dinners I have
chapped lips
Less
H Hr fH WHit Kfk
Game VI
beca .
were
restrictions when a srudrn;
Notn
Da .
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Offering1,
Atmosphere
Gre
Tips
at a great v
� �
Fri Sot.
& Sun.
11 02
Sirloin





miMWn-T
HI AM M�)l INIAN
0( lOBhK 24 1S�85
Less Than 40 Percent In U.S. Smoke
v
ire!
Rules
ii in
orn
and
will
i o n.
irrel-
kbor-
: m ihiumi mmmmmmmm
B BKTlt UHK'khK
less than 40 percent ol this
country's population is smoking
garettes, according to the
Vmerican Cancel Society.
Moreover, the number o peo
pie who have quit smoking is ris-
ing steadil) From 1978 to 1984,
the ranks o formei smokers in-
tsed from 31.5 million to
more than 35 million.
ccordingly, ECU Student
Health Services are ottering a
smoking cessation clinic for those
who wish to stop smoking. "The
cessation program is designed to
help people unlearn their habit of
smoking, as smoking is a learned
behavior said Mary Elesha
Adams, health educator of Stu-
dent Health Services.
The American Cancer Society
reports that lung cancer is the
number one cause of cancer
deaths among men. But in the
last 30 years, there has been an
increase of more than 300 percent
in women's lung-cancer death
rates. This year, lung cancer is ex-
pected to surpass breast cancer as
the number one cancer killer
among women.
"One thing that we see a lot
more o' is women who smoke.
More women smoke than men; it
may be because they are now in
high stress occupations said
Elesh-Adams. "More nurses
smoke than doctors Some
studies claim that nurses smoke
more than any other profession
she said "Within the North
Carolina Nursing Association,
ihev have resolved to encourage
members not to smoke. Similar
groups are also doing this and en-
couraging their members not to
smoke It's hard in Eastern North
( arolina to be arm tobacco ad-
ded Hesha Adams.
According to the American
lung Society, most people find
quitting the smoking habit "cold
turkey" works better than a
gradual tapering
Smokers ol low tar and
nicotine cigarettes find it easier to
quit altogether than do the high
tar and nicotine smokers,
reported the American Cancer
Sock.
"Most people stop smoking
Game ViolenceProblem For Colleges
because of health reasons. The
biggest reasons are lung cancer,
cardiac problems, emphysema
and chronic bronchitis said
Elesha-Adams.
"Many people who smoke quit
because it is expensive. Some
smokers begin an exercise pro-
gram while smoking and realize
they aren't getting any of the
benefits of aerobic exercise ad-
ded Elesha-Adams.
"Many people are reluctant to
quit smoking but try to quit
because someone else wants them
to quit. Perhaps their boyfriend
doesn't like it or maybe their
smoking, but sometimes it woi
The most successful reason
quit comes from the smoke:
himself said Elesha-Adams
According to a report by the
American Cancer Society, p
nant women who smoke have a
higher rate of miscarna.
stillbirths, premature births and
complications of pregnar.
More of their babies die s
after birth than the newborn
non-smoking mothers.
"Many women stop smo
because they are planning
becoming pregnant. There is a
greater risk to pregnant smokers
RALEIGH, "� (CPS) �
isiting III. ewcomer to
.nonce among the
tive universities oi
( arolina, was whipping
. state
tavoc broke
v � � owdy fans storm-
e fence and spilled
the field. Fig
' people were
na-
. - once
Z restrictive
were uppoved to
the
' Missouri-
.s ere
ess as the
Ma
. -tur-
ned to
w atring of
Wisconsin, for example,
recently made bodv passing � in
which a student is passed over the
heads of fans down toward the
field � a criminal offense.
Campus police sav the)
charge people who indulge
bodv passing with fourth-de
sexual assault.
West Virginia I nivers
police, who last year had to stvp
a home game with Perm State
because so main fans �
fighting and throwing paper cup-
onto the field, signed a "(
tract" with the student gov
ment in September to ens.
hcav ior in the stands.
Under the contract, the .
sitv will move student sea .
less desirable part of Moun
taineer field if police
evidence of "bad behavior
Student government
Florida and Miami worked
together to try to tame student
misbehavior during sports
meetings between the two hitter
rivals.
But the rivalries exist and often
idow rules when the games
Can
creased
m -
With
I lie
beet1.
state'
Duke
; between North
a State and E I lias in-
over the vears iles
. little admiration,
idds. "they (ECU) have
building their pro-
until it now rivals the
tiei athletic powers;
I Nl Chapel Hill, North
ilina S i I Wake lores
( r encourage
ss, observers sav.
Blow, an frustrate
and bore fans.
"1 . veaken-
the kame"
when the score gets lopsided, says
Carl W i 11 i clinical
psy hologist � i a consultant
e UM pi
"WTk . margin of
exceeded" the pto-
bab, '� dmess in-
creases, VA
And � e alcohol at
�eats past
i a-rest an
ave . a game �
has helped, can be p
v oked ibtle as the
family doesn't like it. It's not than to non-pregnant smoker
always the best reason to quit added Elesha-Adams.
Vintage Film Shorts
Enjoy the Three-Stooges' Charlie
Chaplin, the Little Rascal's,and many,
many more every Thursday afternoon!
It all starts at 1:30pm, downstairs on
the lower floor of Mendenhall Student
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gathering pace
tsi
i
idds
Raleig iice.
�eat, a
:Med
in
; more
restrictions when a student suc-
- � . � images from
at aftet he
a Notre
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HE 1 AM c Roi INIAN
"i fOHl R24, 1985
Criticism Not Stopping SDI Researchers
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS)
Increasingly widespread campus
criticism of President Reagan's
Star Wars program is not having
any noticeable impact on
campus-based research tor the in-
itiative, Defense officials sa.
About 3,000 higher-education
researchers submitted grant pro-
poals to the department's
Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI)
during the fiscal year that ended
Sept JO, the Pentagon reports.
Some 58 grants totaling $14
million were awarded, and in no
case did any researcher offered a
grant decline, SDI public infor-
mation officer Mary Pershak
says.
Pershak says SDI officials have
had no difficulty finding univer-
sity researchers to do the work
they are seeking from the higher
education community.
However, physics professors
on many campuses have been cir-
culating a petition nationwide to
thwart SDI college research.
"It (the petition drive) hasn't
affected us one bit Pershak
says. "The proposals keep rolling
in
SDI is the Defense Department
agency charged with implemen-
ting President Reagan's plan to
put lasers and other high-tech
weapons into space to shoot
down nuclear warheads heading
for the United States.
Critics, who charge Stars Wars
is an unworkable and dangerous
escalation of the arms race, have
collected more than 1,500
signatures from professors and
graduate students pledging not to
seek or accept SDI funds.
University of Illinois physics
professor Michael Weissman,
who helped organize the petition
drive during the summer, says
university researchers are respon-
ding to SDI the way one would
expect.
"If I had $3 billion to throw
away, I could find researchers to
do whatever 1 wanted them to
Weissman says.
Weissman simply hopes the
petition drive will have "small
impact" on campus SDI research
by encouraging those who have
qualms about Stars Wars to delay
seeking SDI funds.
"We've already heard from a
number of people who are sitting
on the fence Weissman says
"If they thought Star Wars
was unstoppable, they'd give up
and take the money
Last week, for example, 28 oi
the 47 members of the Ohio State
physics department signed the
petition. The signers pledge no;
to take any Star Wars reseo
money.
Nisei Renunciation Subject Of Book
Continued From Page 1.
nnaire intended to separate
yal" evacuees from the
"disloyal as the first phase of a
plan to relocate the loyal citizens
"normal American com-
munities" and isolate those
believed to be hard-core Japanese
sympathizers in one camp.
Collins believes the clumsily
Jed questionnaire registered a
�1 negative feelings and
is rather than disloyalty;
rntment of unjust treatment.
.amp conditions and being
v. as disloyal by their own
ernment resulted.
"Disloyal respondents were to
Deis al rule Lake Segrega-
enter in northern Califor-
me Japanese-Americans
claimed to be disloyal so
e could get back to California,
their homes had been, or
could stay there he
"Ironically, some of the renun-
ciants had been in the U. S. Army
during World War I; others had
volunteered to fight Japan right
after the attack on Pearl Harbor
but had been rejected because of
their ancestry
During a two-month period, a
total of 5.589 Americans of
Japanese descent � far many-
more than expected � formally-
rejected their U.S. citizenship.
This was one out of every 14
Japanese-descended citizens in
the nation.
However, within a few weeks,
most of the renunciants "came to
their senses Collins said, and
wanted their citizenship back.
'The Justice Department
wouldn't give it back and made
plans to deport them all to Japan
as soon as the war was over
Collins' book discusses the
historical, cultural and
sociological factors that led to the
mass renunciation and traces the
post-renunciation developments.
Most lawyers, even the American
Civil Liberties Union, were un-
willing to undertake court pro-
ceedings on behalf of the newly
created "aliens Largely
because of the efforts of one at-
torney in San Francisco, who
championed their cause, nearly
ail were ultimately able to reclaim
their former status during a legal
struggle, which continued for 23
years after the war.
Collins, an associate professor
in the ECU Department of
Library and Information Studies,
says his interest in the plight of
the Nisei during World War II
goes back to his college days at
the University of Georgia, when
he began research into "one of
the darker sides of American
history" for an undergraduate
term paper.
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Spring Break
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i
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amiifi
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Opposite
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KRAVETZ
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inl
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"YA
.
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in
life
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ticall)
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Re
The hastaroiina I niversitj mJ
concert on November 'th. at 8 Hp.
students; 12 dollars for the puhlic al
Ticket Office or fr f
Louisian
B C APP I r
v�ff � rtirr
The University Union Theatre
Arts Committee opened
season with the Louisville Ballet
on October 1 1985. The dance
company, the only regional
troupe with which Mikhail
Barvshniko has performed, gave
an admirable performance to a
sell-out crowd, despite lighting
difficulties.
To begin the performance, the
repertory did a number entitled
"Allegro Brillante Set to the
music of Tchaikovsky, the ma-
jestic dancers moved smoothly
across the stage. There were,
however, a few shaky moments in
I
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I he hastarolma Iniversity Student Union Major Concerts Committee will present HF.ART in
concert on November 7th, at 8:00p.m. in Minges Coliseum. Tickets are priced at ten dollars for ECU
students; 12 dollars for the public and at the door. Tickets nut be purchased from the ECU Central
Office or from Apple Records in downtown Greenville.
1 i c k e t
Louisiana Ballet
California because thealitmia
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Disi . schedule
R Madder a Disne)
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�vill contain tour sound
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depart men complete
post-production facilities and
studios for live television broad-
Disne als( � hopes to ddd a
stud attraction in 198
ruction o the stud:
complete
ing rapidly as
� film production state
len - � "This studio.
which will not just be used bv
Disney, will be one more tea
for producers to make their
movies in the South The South,
ever, already has a good
track record in the movie
business.
Steven Spielberg's The Color
Purple, filmed in North Carolina
this summer, Ron Howard's I
coon, shot in Florida, and The
River, starring Sissv Spacek and
le in Iennesee, are among the
films giving southeastern states
their high profile in the movie in-
dustry Sixty-two feature films,
television movies and music
videos were filmed in the south in
1984, pumping $447 million into
the economies of four southern
states.
Southern movie-making of-
ficials agree the millions of
dollars the industry brings in are
often to poverty-plagued areas.
"It is a fortuitous time to bring in
jobs when textile plants are
down said Bill Arnold of the
North Carolina fill
Som ' those skilled w
end up working in the film in-
dustry Other jobs are created as
producers hire local talent,
technicians, carpenters and pro-
duction assistai
More jobs a ated in
North Carolina at "ew movie
studios thai ' � .tied
or will open by next m: rhese
new studios are Earl Owensb)
.
( a: film . � Zale
Magder's stud . .eyville
Reidsville's World Corn-
mum Center.
"Rig1 now N -a is
the only state outside of Calil
ma with, more than one studio ol
significance said Arnold
The importance ol increased
film production in The South
lends an even larger responsibility
to the job of a film-office direc-
tor, these directors said. Perhaps
the new film studios that are be-
ing established in The South can
lessen 'he unemployment pro-
blems faced bv many southern
states
By JOHN SHANNON
With the long-awaited release
of her latest I P, Kate Bush
cemented her reputation a
of the most consistently in-
teresting practitioners of popular
music today.
Hounds of love continues the
artistic direction established
Sever bin Ever (1980) and The
Dreaming (1982), with extensive
use if � he FairlightMI
keyboard and daring juxtaposi-
tions ol acoustic and electronic
sound, but surpasses the previous
albums in emotional range and
probablv in commercial
tial.
Kate Bush is on the ! ve
edge � ntemporarv music in
use of the Fairlight. This in-
strument, which first appeared in
the late 1970s, was one of the first
to provide digital sampling, a
process by which virtually any
sound can be translated
digital information and then be
reproduced by keyboard, at any
pitch, with any desned modifica-
tions.
This gy makes
sometimes difficult to tell wh
sounds are natural and which are
the Fairligl instance, the
strings on "Under Ice" would be
almost indistinguishable trom
string instruments w
the liner notes. On "M
Stands a dis-
quieting trib ' therl d, a
sound simila e natural h
whistles Dream
sheep" into a warbl- ��'
ing sound, eerily beautiful but
unmistakably elect
of the drum tracks sound e
nic but were played bv real
drummers.
s any Kate Bus would
expect, the � ding featun
this album is Kate's voice.
Whether she is screaming with
angst, as she does more than
once, or singing about sheep
("their breath is warm, and they
smell like sleep '), this ery non-
electronic voici Vie heard to
be believed
Kate Bush's work has been
relatively little-known in this
country (she is English), but it
seems likely that the more pop-
ngs here may end that
circumstance. "Running Up That
Hill" has already been released as
a single; the title track and "The
Big Sky" seem likely candidates
for follow-ups.
With these new songs, which
would not seem out o' place on
MTV or. for that matter,
American Top 40, we may
assume that Kale Bush's career
will take a leap in the U.S. In her
own words, "if you're going,
jump, 'coz we're leaving with the
Big Sky
Joe Walsh Prizes
Valid Musicianship
Performs Copland
Bv APP ll-
si.rr Arn�
8
� nJuJaLJLaLAJB M M MMJLiLMbJd
ie University Union Theatre
( ommittee opened its
season with the Louisville Ballet
her 17, 1985. The dance
npany, the only regional
,pe with which Mikhail
Baryshnikov has performed, gave
an admirable performance to a
sell-out crowd, despite lighting
difficulties.
Io begin the performance, the
repertory did a number entitled
Ulegi Bnllante Set to the
music of Tchaikovsky, the ma-
jestic dancers moved smoothly
�ss the stage. There were,
however, a few shaky moments in
the routine. Staccato pointe
movements were not finely tun-
ed; the dancers were not syn-
chronized at various points in the
number. This tended to over-
shadow the superb duet of Diane
Dowr.es and Dale Brannon.
Performed to music by Aaron
( opland. the second series of
dances narrated the life of Bills
the Kid. Choreographed by
Eugene I.oring, the dancers mov
ed into expressive patterns
throughout the contemporary
ballet.
The ballet did an excellent job
of dramatizing the violent life of
Billy the Kid, who was portrayed
by Clark Reid. Alias, played by
Keith Kimmel, appeared in
several episodes symbolizing the
men Billy shot with no feelings ol
remorse or guilt. The close of the
number brought Billy's death by
Pat Garrett, who was once Billy's
friend and then became a sheriff
The opening episode was
repeated, showing life in the west
was once again free from the
reign of terror evoked bv Billv the
Kid.
The number included comic
relief, seen through the Dance
Hall Girls (Rebecca Adderton,
Jeannine Murrell, and Kay.
Nickens), and the Cowboy in Red
(Kenneth Braso). These
characters presented all of the
aspects of America's wild fron-
tier. The performers provided the
audience with an immensely
entertaining tale.
The final number, "The Judy
Dancers was by far the most
enjoyable of the three. The
music, original scores by Judy
Garland, was arranged by Steve
Crews and performed by Sound-
chaser, a Jazz Quintet. Although
the number broke away from the
traditional ballet expected, it was
a sportive work of entertainment.
Dressed in the flapper-style
costumes of the 1920s, the
dancers did well in their tribute to
Please see JUDY, page 8
Joe Walsh is playing guitar with a
concentrated look on his fa e as an in-
terviewer walks into his New York
hotel room Looking up. he says, I'm
going from here to a studio My old
friend Steve Winwood is in town He has
a song he'd like me to play guitar on.
"That's an honor and a privilege
Usually he plays all the guitar parts
"I'm trying to figure out the key and
see what I'm going to do, so I don't look
like a dummy. Usually my initial thing
that 1 start hunumng after 1 listen to
something a couple of times is the one
to go with
"I hope I can do Stevt a . �: job
He's a valid musician, as opposed to
some other idiots out there making
record.s We won't get into that "
He does get into it a little but. at 37.
he's somewhat philosophical If Bv
(ieorge didn't look like that I don't think
he would have gotten anywhere I can
put on a dress and lipstick and wear
orange hair I try not to meet people
I'm not impressed with When I do.
they're usually wonderful people and I
say. Darn it. 1 wish I hadn't met him
He's a great guy I can't not like him
any more
Walsh, who joined the Eagles in ear-
ly 1976 when Bernie Leader left, has a
new album out. The Confessor on
Full Moon, a subsidiary of Warner
Brothers The first singles were "The
Confessor" and "Good Stan Down " In
August and September he and the band
on the record toured with Foreigner
Of the Eagles, founded in 1971. Walsh
JOE WALSH
says. "Don Henley and Glenn Fre
were the writing brain trust of the
Fagles They were brilliant together
They could write words that were real-
ly neat and meaningful and bearing on
"I was writing some then I had a
song or two on aft the albums BasVcal
ty my job was to bring in little bits and
piece in the guitar I joined Iff,?





I Ml fcAST Kol IM
iu lOHIK 24. 1985
The Family Nastymouth
v�
?
:
Slur t
S' totterfovti -f,H(�.
kowe. .1 cop cT
Whaf i yoof
� Garland
Celebrated
Continued from page 6
Judy Garland. The abstract
ballet, on the brink oi jazz, av
upbeat; the emotions of the 1V4k
were easily touched. Dancing
the tunes ol "Stormv leather
�(iei Happy and "The Mai.
that ()! Away Diane Dowries
again gave an impressive per'
�uisville Ballet gave a
commendable performance in all
e numbers There were times
en the routines were less than
dazzling, but overall the per I
mance was pleasing it you miss
ed the Louisville Ballet, you n
an evening I oul
entertainment
ECU Pirates
vs.
USC Gamecocks
BBQ Chicken
at
1 (inflff
Record
KARI
1 PARKER
14 in dows
i taste for
appreciated.
inker would
he fir1'
Rush is
akes a while
Rush
e crea
lie aress
ase, a
The
goal. A conceptual goal has been
created throughout the yearv
from the early, natural, mystic
songs such as "By-tor and the
Snow Dog" and "Xanadu" to
mechanized. Futuristic ideas like
"Subdivisions" and "Distant
Early Warning
Being thetr latest in a pro-
gressive series. Power indow
can now be tasted. 1: is the type
of album one can't mbibe in one
swallow. You must sip, smell and
taste it before a judgment
develops.
Although the synthesizer is fre-
quently used. Lee's bass, almost
nonexistent on Grace Inder
Pressure, reemerges, quieting any
critics. The band seems to write
belter music with Lee playing
bass.
Peart exceptional, thought-
provoking lyrics are u n-
characteristicall) blended with
1 ee's overdubbed vocals on "Big
Money the album's first single,
which is critical of today's
business world, very much like
"The Spirit of Radio an earlier
song.
Overall, Power Windows com-
bines elements of the 1982 and
1984 LP's Signals and Grace
inder Pressure, respectively, to
form their best album since early
1981. This is B" Rush material
Thanks again to Apple Records
of Greenville for their help.
Chicken
Pickin'
830-IS.Vl
October 26
JOIN THE
BEST PARTY INTOWN!
ECU
CO I LEGE DEM OCR A TS
Meet even Th ursda at 7 p.m.
Mendenhall, Room 212
hw more information
(all 758-4530
(
��4-0-���t.t-vit.mf.t

B3S5S1
3r recohos sJkJ We Buy Used Albums it Tapes "Best Prices Paid" 112 E. 5th St. 758 4298

$7.00 (tax included) WHO! E Bucket (8 pieces)
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$

PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
� Cleaning done by the doctor
� Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert C argill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenviit, NC
758-4927
r
���,
���������,
MllMlFiSI
A MESSAGE
TO THE MOST
IMPORTANT PERSON
WE KNOW
THE BEER DRINKER.
64 Bypass Northcj
Greenville. North Carolina
THURSDAY OCTOBER 24th
25� DRAFT ALL NITE
Ladies Admitted For $1.00
GREEK ORGANIZATION
With Largest Turn Out Gets
$50.00
TICKET - Best In Top 40
Cail58-5570 for a FREE RIDE to
on the c'
At Anheuser-Busch, brewing is an art
No one takes more time or goes to
more effort or expense than we do in
brewing the most popular family of
beers in the world.
We take great pride in this
distinction, yet this distinction carries
with it certain responsibilities
Beer is a beverage to be enjoyed
by adults socially�with family and
friends at home in your clubs,
restaurants and at special events It is
also the beverage of moderation, and
good judgment should be used when
you drink.
Thankfully, the vast majority o
those who consume beer do so in
moderation Nevertheless, any!I
less than responsible consumptior
alcoholic beverages is detrimental
the individual and society We at
Anheuser-Busch certainly are
concerned about you. our valued
customer Accordingly, we are
dedicated to the support of resear
education, and treatment program
aimed at combatting alcoholism ar
alcohol abuse
-
We Support Responsible Use Of Alcohol
�August A Busch III
Chairman of the Board
and President
Alpha Sigma Phi
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Sigma Phi
Lambda Chi Alpha
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Sigma Tau Gamma
Zeta Beta Tau
s VI X















wwww
Chick
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Private Club All ABC Permits
i





Man
iane i tow
rssivc
vHl
irates
nee
ocks
�?
� Wkg
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M530
26
es

I'HI i ASIAKOI IMAN
CX IOHI K 24. IV85
SALE
ED TYPING
-
'ROTFsSIONAl TYPING SER
HE MIDDLEMAN

SELL AVON
TUDENTS DON 1 ISS YOUR
NANCE
fD PROCESSING
SALE
FD
OR SALE
DISCOUNTS Present ECU ID
-torc purchase and receive dts
�1 on ail beauty supnhes Sally's
Beauty Company Carolina East
Convience Center
1 & 3 BEDROOM APTS; Four blocKs
�i ECU Call 746 3284 or 524 3180
THE GOLD CONNECTION
lutiful 14 K i fahan made
elry better than domestic at
whole sale prices Large inventory
in tor Christmas Group showings
orities, etc possible. Call
s.1 '643 for details, or leave
WORD PROCESSING We offer ex
ence in typing resumes, theses
Finical documents, and term
ers 'At-manage and merge your
names and addresses into mergec
rs iabels envelopes or rolodex
Is Our pnees are extremely
able and we always offer a 15
ount to ECU Students S
and F Professional Computer Co
(Back of Franklin's) 757 0472.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE WORD PROCESSING The
specializes m Student
services including
reports term papers, dissertions.
es, resumes, and more All work
� ed against 50,000
�lectronic dictionary Rates
�. as Si 75 per page, in
paper Call tor specific
. �� - at 757 3440 after
FOR SALE Get ahead on buying
if special gift for that special per
The � I disable Chair Co
s now. takmq
t the ultimate in
-ore Call 752 2110
TYPING Pi otessionai, experienced
, ! per page includes
grammatical and
S Call 757 0398
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Eiec
typev ' R easonaoie rates
in e at 355 ?;33 after 5 30
typewriter Familiar with all styles
Call Debbie at 7S6 6333.
PERSONALS
LOST: Tl 58 C Calculator Reward
offered call after 6 p.m 756 5285
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Would like
to welcome everyone back from fall
break be ready to party with the Chi
Omegas Friday night!
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS: Be
prepared for one helluva Halloween
jcial Wednesday night and don't
orget to bring your scary self!
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS
Welcome back! Don't forget about
Beau's Friday night and the meeting
Sunday night! Elections will be held
so please attend
HEY N.N I guess we'll have
another enjoyable afternoon in front
of the set watching HBO! (smile)
S.C D
DINK: Happy 4th month anniver
sary l love you very much Your
Princess
TO THE BLOND HEADED GEEK
CALLED "HAPPY FLAG You
know who you are You know you're
on an ego trip You know you're ter
nble If you're one of the best at
ECU, it's time to abolish Intramural
Football Why not wait for a penalty
before you throw a flag
REMEMBER: MYRTLE BEACH
DAYS with Rick, Vern & Vern
Punkms key not fitting (at Joyner),
losing a patch of hair at the game,
study breaks at Heart's Delight We
love you! Emma and Melissa
C: Ballet was OK but it can't com
pare with Dancing In The Dark
While the night's still young Let's
keep it that way Rocco
TRl SIGS: Get ready to throw down
tonight The goldent beverage will
be flowing and games will be played
Don't forget the surprise at 12
Everyone dress up and party The
Phi Taus
100 KEGS: That's right, 100 kegs
through 12 taps at the Sigma Tau
Gamma Halloween Party on Oct 31
Robin Thompson and Skip Castro
providing the music. For more info
call 757 0127
ECU MEN: The Tri Sigmas will be
m front of the bookstore today and
tomorrow to sign up any men in
terested in participating in the Male
Amateur Strip Contest at the Elbe
Room on Tuesday Oct 29th Cash
prizes will be awarded
ECU FOOTBALL: It is the start of a
new season You had a week off anc
you should be ready to kill. Soutr-
Carolina will be coming in here
strutting their stuff, and we better
make them limp on the way out USC
fans are the most obnoxious fans anc
l want them to eat their words
There will be 12,000 of those suckers
and I want them to walk out with
their heads down. I know you guys
are better than them and you have tc
believe that You are a very good
football team when you want to be
Come into the game confident You
should know right now that we are
going to win Like I've said all year.
OP SALEtyping All typing services pro a woman with S e I e c t r i c
ABORTIONS IP ro !2thWEEK OFPREGNANCY
L
S 8 weeks ai addi � lest. Birth t ontrol. and i ounsehng For further 832-053! Free Number � . � � jv4i between A M and 5 P M
HiilZ das s RILIKiH WOMiN-S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS 917 WMt Morton S� RoUigh. NC

PET
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DONNA EDWARDS
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is
available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 7S4-9222
give me 100 percent and I'll be pro
ud If everybody gets up for this
game we won't lose I don't want to
lose to a team named the 'Cocks
The Fan
NEW SORORITY: Tonights
meeting will be at 8 m Room 221
Mendenhall New girls are welcome
Please dress nicely
FACULTY : Do you need your leaves
raked at a reasonable price? Help a
kid through college Free estimates
758 0341 ask for Brett
LOST: Black kitten wearing white
flea collar, near Greenville Athletic
Club Reward offered if found call
355 2871
BUCCANEER: Yearbooks will be
distributed TODAY, Fn , and Mon
m front of the Student Supply Store
You must have enrolled at ECU for
the 1984 Fall semester or before m
order to receive a book Please pre
sent your ID card when getting your
book
( ont d on Page 12
30-60OFF
All Eyeglass Frames wpurcha of Rx Lenses
Ray Ban Sunglasses30 Off
20
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1 Discount Per Eyeglas
CALL US FOR AN
EVE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
OF VOUR CHOICE
Must Prs�nt Ad At Timed Purchase
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Phone 752 1444
OMoMon Frl � AM til 5 � PM
puctans
6��r)�r Kirklcy Dispensing Optun
ECU BIOLOGY
CLUB MEMBERS
And Prospective Members
Don V Miss
The Collegiate A cademy
Of Science's
Fall Trip
To Black Mountain, N.C.
Accomodations: Weathrford Hall
Blue Ridge Assemby Fri Nov. 1 thru Sun
Now 3
Cost: $15 � Includes 2 days lodging, tours
and 2 meals. Must be paid at time of sign-up.
Reservationslimited to first 50 sign-ups
?Payment may be submitted to Mrs. Margaret
Schiller, secretary, biology main office.
Mandatory Meeting for all who are going �
Monday, Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. in Biology Sorth
Room 102.
OST
ERSOM
I majority o
in e beer do so
eless, anyth
consumptior
detrimental
iety. We at
�mainly are
our valued
. � we are
jpport of resear
. reatment program
inq alcoholism ar
August A Buxch III
Chairman of the Board
and President


??















??





HOME COOKED FOOD
I
Call ' 'Jokes On Us' for delivery of
tailgate food - fried chicken, etc.
Chicken Box

2 pieces and bread
$1.50
Daily Specials ip2 2u
Semester Meal Plan: 100 plates for $250
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faki Outs 752-0276
OPES 7 DA YS A H EEK 11 A M-8 PM
1 ��
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Spread collar shirts
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Thursday, October 31
a special
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-ilk ties
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HW). 70 F.
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were $15.00
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were $25.00
Don V be left out!
Get Pantanasized!
Private Club for Vtm bcrs and Invited Guests Only.
! �





A
I Ml EAS1 I AKOI INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 24, 19 Page 10
Bucs To End Losing Streak
By SCOTT COOPER
tgmmwmm
With the Pirates and
Gamecocks taking the weekend
off last week, ECU will be trying
to end a four-game losing streak
when they host South Carolina
on Saturday.
The Gamecocks, who were
10-2 and ranked as high as No. 2
last year, have been slipped a bit
in '85 with their 3-3 record.
However, the Gamecocks' 28-7
homecoming win over Duke on
Oct. 12 snapped a three-game
skid.
ECU coach Art Baker believes
this weekend's game may be
determined by how much con-
fidence the Gamecocks have
coming off a win, compared to
that of the Pirates � after their
loss at Southwestern Louisiana.
"A key to the game may be
how much confidence that win
(over Duke) gave them and how
our loss has affected us Baker
said. "But I'm glad to be playing
'Cocks Invade Ficklen
For the Pirates to be successful. they will have to stop the potent
Gamecock offense spearheaded b senior qua rterback Mike Hold.
Pirate-Gamecock Chicken
Pickin' '85 This Weekend
at home with the big crowd.
The South Carolina offense,
ranked No. 7 in scoring and No.
9 in total offense a year ago,
returns their starting backfield.
The three seniors include quarter-
back Mike Hold and runn-
ingbacks Thomas Dendy and
Kent Hagood. USC Offensive
Coordinator Frank Sadler feels
confident about his troops,
despite youth on the line.
"We have a good situation in
the backfield with both talent and
depth Sadler said. "If we get
some experience for our young
line, we'll have a good offensive
team
Coach Baker believes that in
order for the Bucs to be suc-
cessful, they will have to go after
USC's quarterback.
"Hold, he wears number seven
and mimics Theismann (Joe, of
the Redskins) � he likes to get
out of the pocket Baker said.
"We're going to have to pressure
him. We can't let him have time
to throw
This weekend promises to be a
big event for ECl too;ball tans
as the Pirates vs. the Camecocks
Chicken Pickin' '85 rakes place.
We all know how harbeque
chicken and football g . her.
and this weekend should offer a
fine combination of b.
Sunny's Char-Broiled Chicken
will be donating one dollar to the
Pirate Club for everv bucket of
chicken void. The money will
help in the funding scholar-
ship athletes.
There will be special souvenir
buckets given to all those who
purchase chicken from Sunny's.
Also, there are a limited number
( fiicken Pickin' T-shirts to be
given away with each order of
barbeque chicken, while supplies
The T-shirts are com-
pliments of Pepsi-c ola Bottling
Co. Inc.
With the Gamecocks bringing
a large crowd, this weekend's
game promises to be one of the
biggest � in terms of attendance.
"It's going to be one of the
greatest athletic events ever in
North Carolina ECU Athletic
Marketing Assistant Lee
Workman said. "There will pro-
babh be more people nere than
ever before.
"The visiting team is going to
bring more people than any
� visiting) team has ever brought
betore. as far as we know
Workman added. "They will be
out there in full force
Workman also hopes students
will show their pride and spirit by
wearing purple and gold. "We
need to have everyone dressed up
and to be a part and support the
Pirate Club Workman said.
"We're really hoping for a big
day
With such a large crowd
ecpected. Workman urges all
sudents, faculty and game-goers
to get to Ficklen Stadium earlier.
Tickets
Available
There is still a number of
tickets left for the ECU-South
Carolina game, set for Oct. 26 in
Ficklen Stadium. They are
available for student pickup at
the Minges Ticket Office.
The tickets are available after
the University of South Carolina
returned a portion of its allot-
ment, and some still remain from
last week's allotment targeted for
ECU students.
Tickets are available with a stu-
dent ID and activity card and will
be sold until the supply is
echausted. This is your LAST
chance.
The Gamecock defense, also
known as the "fire ants is
known for .ts swarming and
gang-tackling capabilities, led by
the sole senior, defensive end
Tony Guyton. Carl Hill, who
earned fresr " an all-American
honors last year with 135 tackles,
anchors a strong linebacking
core. All-South Independent's
strong safety Joe Brooks leads a
strong veteran secondary unit.
Coach Baker compares USC's
defense to that of the stingy Owl
defense of Temple.
"Their defense is like Temple.
They're very intimidating and
vocal Baker said. "They get to
the ball very quickly and are very
aggressive. They have a sound
defense
Despite the Pirates 2-4 record
and a difficult schedule ahead,
coach Baker is pleased with the
positive attitudes of his players.
"I'm really pleased with the
players' attitudes Baker said.
"The guys go out and practice
hard. We don't have bad days
The Pirates vs. the Gamecocks
clicken
pick
"Our open schedule (last
weekend) couldn't have corne at a
better time Baker added "i
an ideal time � in the middle of
the season. It was a related week.
we gave the plaver's some time
off
For the Pirates to be su
cessful, they will have to plav
possession football on
and will need a big game from the
Buc defense, according
Baker.
"We have got to be more .
sistent on offense Bake
"In order to win, we musl
trol the football and get poii
our drives � hope!
touchdowns.
"Our defense can't all
big run Baker continued '
worried about our ability l
their option game
One can look tor one I
largest crowds in I1
ECU hos' a powerful Gamec �
team in Ficklen Stadium on
Saturday afternoon.
Ultimate
Tournament
By DAVID McGlNNESS
�nil syoru Mllof
Oct. 26, 1985
Ficklen Stadium
I WAS THERE!
E$M,lFfers Take Second Place In Tournament
B PAU2A98 arch-rival UNC-W. A strong The con.�. � h,in in ii on , �.
By DAVID COLB
( ormposdl! Wrllrr
The ECL Surf Team took se-
cond place last Sunday in a con-
test with LNC-Chapel Hill and
arch-rival UNC-W. A strong
team from Wilmington took top
honors with 44 points, followed
by ECU at 34 and Chapel Hill
with 23 points.
The contest was held in ideal
conditions at North Carolina's
famous Cape Hatteras
lighthouse. Well-formed 2- to
4-foot waves rolled in all day and
sunny 80-degree weather made it
hard to believe it was October
and not July.
Scoring in surfing competitions
is determined by five judges who
score each surfer's best-three
waves in a timed heat. Each heat
is made up of six surfers, and
team's receive points according
to what place their members
finish. The top three surfers in
each heat advance to the semi-
finals and later to the Finals if
they do well.
Each fall, the ECU team holds
its tryouts at Cape Hatteras, and
this year it produced the best 12
surfers ever at ECU. Despite this,
the Pirates could still not match
the efforts of the Seahawks from
Wilmington. Top performances
for ECU came from Johnny-
Ghee, Cliff Scott, John McCann,
Todd Parker and Bobby
Steinberg, who all advanced from
their heats into the semi-finals.
Steinberg's surfing was in top
form as he advanced all the way
to the finals taking fifth overall.
The Pirates are looking foward
to their next contest which is on
Nov. 10 in Wilmington, where
they will meet four other teams
including UNC-W again. ECU
hopes to avenge their loss from
last weekend in that contest. The
ECU team will get its real test
Thanksgiving, however, as they
travel to Florida. There, they will
compete against the best college
teams on the east coast.
ECU Club of the Year will hold
its next meeting Thursday, Nov
7 at 8:00 in
room
.1
Mendenhall. A video tape of the
1985 California Katin Contest
will be shown, and any new
members are welcome to attend.
For more information, contact
David Colby (758-2392) or Gor-
don Van Sant (758-6088).
Hatteras Team Challange Results
1st UNC- Wilmington 44 pts.
2nd ECU-Team A 34 pts.
3rd UNC-Chapel Hill 23 pts.
4th ECU-Team B 21 pts.
Current ECU Surf Team
Rankings
1. Bobby Steinberg
2. Johnny Ghee
3. Paul Chaucer
4. Cliff Scott
5. Dan Hardy
6. John McCann
7. Todd Parker
8. David Dees
9. Gordon Van Sant
10. David Colby
11. Johnson Hagood
12. Blair Riddick
The ECU frisbee club,
Irates. will hold its sixth annual
fall tournament, the Natural
Light Lltimax, this Saturday and
Sunday
The first match of the Lltimax
will start at 10 a.m. Saturda
the bottom of College Hill. Play
will continue all dav long Satur-
day and Sunday
The championship match will
be held at 3 p.m. Sunday.
Trophies will be awarded for
first, second and third place
finishers.
The eight-team draw will in-
clude Irate rivals UN
Wilmington, N.C. State and Ap-
palachian State as well as Duke.
Virginia, USC and "The DeaJ
Spiders"(a team of ex-lra:v
players).
On Saturday night, the Irates
will be showing videos at the
tic of Irate games aga
Raleigh's Mr Pouce and UN
Wilmington at The Attic.
The tournament is s -ed
by Natural Light, The Attic, Sub
Station and the IRS. Ail sj
tators are welcome to come out
and see some of the area's best
ultimate talent in one of North
Carolina's biggest tourname-
Lady Pirate
Scrimmage
The Lady Pirate Basketball
team will have their annual Lady
Pirate Purple-Gold mtra-squad
basketball game Saturdav.
following the ECU-South
Carolina football game.
The Lady Bucs. who are two-
time defending conference cham-
pions, will begin action im-
mediately following the game
Probable game time is 4 pm in
Minges Coliseum.
Head Coach Emily Manwaring
urges all interested students to at-
tend the game. There is no cost
and everyone is welcomed It
should be a great time for all. so
come on and check out the Ladv
Pirates.
Volleyball Team Edged
By St. Andrews'Spikers
The surf team operates out of
the ECU Surfing Club which is
open to all beach-lovers, both
male and female. Last year's
By JANET SIMPSON
9Uff Wr.r
The ECU Lady Pirate
volleyball team ran into a buzz-
saw last Thursday night when
they faced off against St. An-
drews College.
It was a very hard-fought
match with the Lady Bucs com-
ing up short, one game to three.
St Andrews claimed the fist two
games 15-4 and 15-11, ECU the
third 15-12, and St. Andrews the
fourth 17-15.
Coach Imogene Turner felt
that St. Andrews' team was really
fired up and ready to play. "They
came over here with loaded bar-
rels Turner said, "They were
really fired up
Losing the first two games of
the match proved devastating to
the Lady Pirates. They made a
valiant comeback effort in the se-
cond game and even won the
third, but did not quite have
enough left to pull off the vic-
tory.
"We just waited too long to
sjart playing explained Turner.
"It's pretty hard to come back
after you get down (by) two
games
Although the Lady Bucs failed
to claim a victory, the "wave"
continued to roll in Minges Col-
esium as the Pirate faithful show-
ed their support.
The Lady Bucs next match is
on Fri. Oct. 25th in Wilson when
they play Atlantic Christian Col-
lege.

Pros
Southarolina PC I
SX State lemvin
Duke-Maryland
Virxinia-Wake Forest
Georgia Jeh- lennesw
LSf -Notre Dame
West Virinia-Penn State
Honda State-l (
( ahforma-l CLA
Arizona State-Wash Mate
Michigan Mate-Purdue
Piltsburuh-Nav
JOHN Pr IKKSON
Mai

Ruggers
While n
"vet.
rugby
Wa
was
to be '
club's
The P
hosted I
on the .
mo:
Th
har
i
I
spurred
EC
mat.
tnd "( U
plat A .
down-
On Sunda

Vernon i
their way
double
which phacJ .
fans.
After the mat.
Ml Vernon College
i
were re,
Pira
:
come
On Monday,
break fron
to tour the D c
RATE
UPRIGHT CIT1XENS OPE
.
voice the frustrations and hori
Then message of freedom,
intense rhythms and screan I
the Citizens an album to reel
8Y0
mrrwt ��'� iiMiiU'iM
R
THROUGH
I





Ficklen
(last
me at a
tdded It's
idle of
aced week.
e :ime
;av
the
con-
said,
con-
ts on
ully
ime
on
Ultimate
Tournament
B 1) ll)U"(,INNh
1

Sal aral
ax
a H Pla . Jatur-
; '
.draw wU in-I N �

11 be show .
Ira(

.ll
best V
Lady Pirate
Scrimmage
aquad
; South
.
are two-
e cham-
im-
- the game.
� � 4 pm in
.
ome
Manwaring
all inter- at-
re is no cost
eer �� med. It
d be a great time for all, so
on and eci it -he Lady
Team Edged
drews'Spik ers
the match proved devastating to
the Lady Pirates They made a
rate valiant comeback effort in the se-
i cond game and even won the
'hen third, but did not quite have
An- enough left to pull off the vic-
tory,
ught "We just waited too long to
om- start playing explained Turner,
three. "It's pretty hard to come back
two after you get down (by) two
the games
f the Although the Lady Bucs failed
to claim a victory, the "wave"
felt continued to roll in Minges Col-
rcally esium as the Pirate faithful show-
fThey ed their support,
bar- The Lady Bucs next match is
were on Fri. Oct. 25th in Wilson when
they play Atlantic Christian Col-
kes of lege.

OCTOBER 24, 198 5
11
Pro siPick
GAMEM fwrV TOM NORTON
Nouth Carolina-EC IECU b 3
N.C. Stale-ClemsonClemson
luke-Mary landMaryland
irjiinia-W ake ForestVirginia
Georgia Tech-Tennessee(ieorgia Tech
I S -Notre DameNotre Dame
West Yirginia-Penn SlatePenn State
Honda State-l NCFlorida State
California-l Cl.AUCLA
Arizona State-Wash StateWash. State
Michigan State-PurduePurdue
Pittsburgh-NavPittsburgh
JOHN PETERSONBILL DAWSON
ECI b UECU by 3
ClemsonClemson
MarylandMaryland
VirginiaVirginia
1 ennesseeGeorgia
USuse
Pen StatePenn State
Florida StateFlorida
UCI AUCLA
Arizona StateWash. State
PurdueMichigan State
PittsburghNavy
Winners
RANDOLPH MEWS
South Carolina by 14
Clemson
Maryland
Wake Forest
Georgia Tech
Notre Dame
Penn State
Florida State
UCLA
Wash. State
Purdue
Pittsburgh
TODD PATTON
ECU by 6
Clemson
Maryland
Virginia
Tennessee
Notre Dame
Penn State
Florida State
UCLA
Wash. State
Purdue
Pittsburgh
For W'eek Of' A ction
RICK McCORMACSCOTT COOPERThe WATTS LINE
ECU by 7ECU by 4ECU by 3
ClemsonClemsonClemson
MarylandMarylandMaryland
VirginiaVirginiaWake Forest
TennesseeTennesseeTennessee
Notre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
Penn StatePenn StatePenn State
Florida StateFlorida StateUNC
UCLAUCLAUCLA
Wash. StateArizona StateWash. State
PurduePurdueMichigan State
PittsburghNavyNavy
STANDINGS
TOM NORTON
RANDOLPH MEWS
RICK McCORMAC
SCOTT COOPER
THE WATTS 11NE
JOHN PETERSON
BILL DAWSON
TODD PATTON
LAST WEEK
9-3
7-5
9-3
6-6
9-3
7-5
7-5
OVERALL
60-23
59-24
57-26
56-27
56-27
55-23
52-31
52-31
Ruggers Tour Washington Over Break
While most ECU tudents
�egged out' over fall break, the
rugby club was touring the
Washington DC. area. The tour
as considered by team members
to be the most enjoyable in the
club's 10-year histor.
The Pirate Ruggers were
hosted by three of the top teams
on the Fast Coast: American I
Georgetown U and U. of Rich-
mond.
The weekend began with a
hard-fought match against the
Hoyas of Georgetown. ECU split
Joubleheader with the Hovas,
-�purred on by support from the
ECU Chi Omegas. After the
the team was escorted
around "One the wildest
places in Washington. D.C
ntown Georgetown.
(n Sunday the ruggers faced a
strong American U. team at Mt.
Vernon College. The Bucs fought
'heir way to another split
doubleheader in the pouring rain,
which phazed neither players nor
fans.
After the match, the women of
Mt. Vernon College hosted a
social for the players. "They
were really great hosts said
Pirate rugger Daid Sgroi.
'They'll be talking about the
- :rom ECU for years to
On Monday the ruggers took a
break from competition in order
:our the D.C. sights. They also
snapped some informal team pic-
tures in front of the White House
and the Capitol.
Tuesday, the Bucs squared off
against Richmond in a torrential
downpour. "The field was six in-
ches deep in mud � perfect
rugby weather rugby player
Bill Zimmerman said.
Only one match was played
against Richmond, the Pirates
losing in the face of some rather
The Media Bo ard
Is Now Accepting
Applications For
General Man ager
of
The East Carolinian
For Spring Semester
Apply at Media BoardOffice
Second Floor Publications B uilding
Deadline: Friday. Novonber 1
ROCK TALK
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FOR
E R N
A T I V E
RKETED BY IMPORTANT RECORDS
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The thinking person s hardcore band combines the blistering raw
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5.99 CASSETTE OR LP
D. O. A. LET 5 WRECK THE PARTY
FromNi ' 'tie border, tins Vancouver hardcore troupe blasts into
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5.49 CASSETTE OR LP
MISSION Of BURMA THE HORRIBLE TRUTH ABOUT BURMA
Recorded live during their farewell tour, this is the final testament of a
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and essential It captures Mission Of Burma and the underground
new music scene at their peak
5.99 CASSETTE OR LP
UPRIGHTOnZENS OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS. BRAINS TO THINK
& A MOUTH TO SPEAK
Hailing from West Germany, this provocative group uses music to
voice the frustrations and horror of growing up in a war-torn country.
Their message of freedom, disarmament and peace, set against
intense rhythms and screaming guitars, makes the latest release from
the Citizens an album to reckon with.
5.49 CASSETTE OR LP
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Record Bar
THROUGH OCT 30 AT CAROLINA EAST MALL 4 THE PLAZA
SUBS
questionable calls, according to�
ECU players.
The team considered the tour a
success not only because of the
playing experience and the vic-j
tones, but because of the overall
good experience that club
members had during the trip.
"We met a lot of really great( C�J?FFK D-IC
people and we felt that the whole ; 11J llnn
trip was a really positive ex-SALAD
perience for everyone involved
said Zimmerman. "Rugby is
more than just a game, it's a
fellowship between both our
team members and every team we �
play Zimmerman said. "I have
gotten only positive things out of
the four years I have played this
great sport with this club
The rugby club would like to
thank everyone who made the
trip such a success, including the
parents of Steve Kinne and John
Duval.
MARATHON
RESTAURANT
I

Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979'
SANDWICHES
PIZZA
Ca
I us � � � Fast Delivery
758-0326 or 752-3753
560 Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 278 34
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I

II
All things
in moderation
especially
alcohol.
That s good advice
We re learning that moderation is the key to a sate and healthy
life We are each becoming more concerned with nutrition, exer-
cise and overa physical fitness That s why we re watching our
salt intake, for example
We know that there are certain safety lines and we don t cross
them Because excess means abuse and abuse means prob-
lems
The majority of people who drink alcohol do so responsibly
because they do so in moderation
They know how to enjoy alcohol beverages and gam the
social, personal and health benefits that come with responsible
drinking
They know the responsibility they take on when they drink
alcohol beverages or serve these beverages to others a
responsibility for safety, health and proper conduct
And they know the best way to practice that responsibility is
through moderation
By knowing their limits, and sticking to them
By neither accepting, nor offering one-for-the-road
By neither condoning nor contributing to irresponsible behavior
And by exhibiting at all times, a responsible attitude about
alcohol.
They know the special responsibility that comes with the deci-
sion to drink alcohol. . moderation
That s the only way to drink . responsibly.
We Support Responsible Use Of Alcohol
)QfeT(
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Sigma
Phi Kappa Tau
Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Phi
Tau Kappa Epsilon
And Steve Hall, Campus Representative
Miller Brewing Company
�I





12
im I AST I AROl 1NIAN
OCTOBER 24. 1985
IRS Finals Completed
PERSONAL
JELLYFISH: Thanks for
loss and have a happy 30th
and "the Sheik"
the $50
MO.S.
By JF.ANNETTE ROTH
StaT Writer
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
putt-putt, flag football, co-rec
softbal! and 3-on-3 basketball
finals have been decided.
Sigma Phi Epsilon 'A' cap-
tured the men's team putt-putt
championship along side the
Umstead Jockettes, who won the
women's crown. Divisional win-
ners are as follows:
Mens independent-Rude Boys
Women's independent-
Goldenhearts A
Fraternity 'ASigma Phi Epsilon
Fraternity 'BKappa Sigma 'B'
Sorority-Sigma Sigma Sigma
Men's residence hall-P.Ws
Women's residence hall-Umstead
Jockettes
In 3-on-3 basketball action,
number-one ranked 'Fellows'
captured the men's all-campus
crown. The final game pitted The
Fellows against Akadinnik
Skalors w ho held the number-two
spot throughout the year. In
somewhat of a one-sided contest,
The Fellows were forced to come
from behind to capture the title.
Final score: The Fellows 20,
Akadinnid Skalors 16.
Co-recreational softball finals
will be played this week. After
defeating Good, Bad And Ugly
7-3 in the semi-finals. The Fried
City Gang has advanced into the
finals to play the Dodge City
Hustlers. The Hustlers downed
Strike Force 18-10 to earn their
place in the championship game.
The ladies all-campus flag
football champion has been!
crowned and the No. 1 ranked
Enforcers are wearing the gold.
With outstanding play from1
Allison Carreras, Jill Contarine,
Kim Turnispeed, Sandra Bush1
ai d Val Finley. The Enforcers,
could do no-wrong against the'
-Vpha Phi's. The sorority gals!
held the Enforcers to onlv one'
touchdown in the first half but
fell to the Enforcers one-two
punch, (Allison Carreras to Jill
Contarino) in the second to come
up short 20-0.
The men's flag football cham-
pionship will be decided this
week. The contest pits the
season's No. 1 ranked team,
Bombsquad, against Jarvis
LAGNAF. Bombsquad defeated
Tau Kappa Epsilon in the semi-
finals 18-6. Touchdowns from
Garry Bishop, Kevin Williams
and Danny Price put the mark in
the Bombsquad's win column.
Jarvis LAGNAF stunned
residence-hall champs Garrett
Giants to earn their chance at
Bombsquad.
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
special event of the year has con-
cluded with some exciting
highlights. Almost Anything
Goes was once again a huge suc-
cess as 25 teams took part in this
year's extravaganza. Six wacky
events highlighted the days ac-
tivities: Dirty Dozen, Wacky
.Relay, Dip and Dive, Dancing is
Divine, Budweiser Ail-American
and the Deg Rolls On. Coming
out on top of this year's com-
petitors were the Umstead Ter-
minators Z-Squad. Close behind
the Z-Squad was the Word,
followed by Dingle Berries and
the No Names.
Julian Anderson, of The
Word, commented his success in
the Dancing is Divine event.
(Competitors are given a time
period in which 2 team members
slow dance to the latest moody
tunes while teammates blow and
pack balloons in between the
dancing duo.) His squad came
out on top in this event and
Julian had this to say about the
secrets of his teams strategy, "I
was blowing' and she (fellow
teammate) was packin Well,
Julian the secrets out, here's hop-
ing the word gets out in next
year's Almost Anything Goes.
Registration for the following
intramural sports will be held
next week Oct. 28-31: raquetball
singles and 1-on-l basketball.
Co-rec basketball registration
will be held Oct. 28-29, room 204
Memorial Gym.
Tomorrow is the last day to
sign up for Aerobic classes this
second session. Register in room
204 Memorial Gym.
WANTED
USA TODAY: The nation's
newspaper, is looking for a hard
working campus rep. You will be
responsible for marketing, pro
moting, and delivering USA TO
DAY. For more info , call Mike
Rosenthal at 1 800 532 0062
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money. Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida. Call
Bill Ryan at 1 800 282 6221.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
work at this campus. Good Income
For more information and applica
tion write to: Allen Lowrance,
Director, 251 Glenwood Drive,
Mooresville, N.C. 28115.
HELP WANTED: Part time
telephone sales position available
5 9 p.m. Tues Fri. 10 2 on Sat
Guarenteed hourly pay � bonuses
and incentive. Must have strong,
clear voice, enthusiasm and profes
sional attitude. Pleasant working
conditions Apply in person 1 9 p.m
Tues Thurs , 9 30 5 30 p m Fn
and Sot Olin Mills Studio, West End
Shopping Center, Memorial Dr
Greenville, NC 27834
ROOMMATE NEEDED: im
mediately to share 4 bedroom house,
close to campus and Overton's Call
758 5953
SALES AND MANAGEMENT. Be
part of the growing Clayton
organization Sales and manage
ment training positions now open in
NC's hottest manufacturing market
Tell us about your background and
why you want to share the success of
our dynamic company AM replies
confidential. Write Bob Clouse, 1823
301 South, Wilson, NC 27893
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Christian
roommate needed to share 2
bedroom duplex $135 includes
utilities 1 i 2 bath Call 756 8676 after
5 30
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non
smoker, male to share two bedroom
apt SU7 50 a month, futilities
752 0461 Auailable now
M0 PER HUNDRED PAID For
remailing letters from home Senc
self addressed, stamped erwelop-
for informationapplication
Associates. Box 95 B, Roseiie
07203
�Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
Lg. Drink $2.89
at Greenville Stores Only
Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd 756 6434
2905 E 5th St 752 5184
The Yamaha
tradition
RZ350
$2499
2-stroke. liquid-cooled
347cc Torque Induction
twin
Yamaha Power Valve
System delivers higher
horsepower and
stronger torque
scopic
front fork and Mono-
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Breakeriess Capacitor
Discharge Ignition
Racy, sprinter styling
designed after Grand
Pi - 'oad racers
STANS'S CYCLE CENTER
801 Dickinson Ave
Tel 752-0592 W
Greenv.lle, N C 27834
Are
Kcl
item
ent
$100 Discount
With Ad!
YAMAHA
Built for the fun of it.
Appl
Sports department
needs writers im-
mediately. Come by
and fill out an applica-
tion.
ications Now
Being Accepted For
Transit Manager
Apply In Room 228
Mendenhall Student
Center
umkm
iuiinuiummmijini
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone beginners "in between
students, and advanced Put some excitement into your college career"
BEGINNERQR ADVANCED - Cost arv-�
same as a semester in a U S college S3 18
Pnce includes ,et round Inp to S�
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Fast Carolina University
Alcohol Awareness Week Activities
October 23 - 29
Real Pirates Know Their Limits
Wednesday October 23
9.00A.M 4 OOP M
7 OOP 1
8 J0P 1 10:00 P M
Alcohol Awareness Fair
Discussion; "Demon Rum or Ration
Grog" Attitudes on Drinking
"Lets Have a Party" Making Non
Alcoholic Drinks. Recipes and
Pood featuring Stuart Haithcott
Eastern Carolina School of
Bartending
Ihursdav. October 24
2 OOP M 4 OOP M Tricycle Races: Influence of
Alcohol on Reaction Time
Making and Tasting Non Alcoholic
Drinks featuring Steven Haithcott
Tyler Hall Lobby
Mendenhall 244
Mendenhall 244
30P M 9 �P M
Saturday. October 26
1:30 P.M.
Sunday. October 27
Football - ECU vs. South Carolina
Know your limits, act responsibK
Mendenhall
North I awn
Grogs
Downtown(ireenillc
Ficklen Stadium
Brain Food
7:00 P.MConcert: "The Awareness Art Ensemble"Mender Hendrnlhall Patio or Theatre
Tuesday,October 29
1 OOP M4:00PMAlcohol Information FairScott Hill Lobrn
for More Alcohol Information Contact Campus Alcohol and Drug Program 757-6793
ALL EVENTS ARE EREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
TicketsRequired
r

i
i
i
i

i

i
i
TOPPING!
�b
�1N ON
�1
I
Order any I
delicious 1 - item
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 24, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.434
Location of Original
University Archives

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