The East Carolinian, October 17, 1985






(Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.16
Thursday, October 17. 1985
(.reenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Faculty Satisfied With ECU
By DOK.KOKKKSON
M�ff Wrllrt
An informal survey of ECl
faculty found that most arc
satisfied with the pay and ad-
vancement opportunities in their
profession.
The East Carolinian survey of
15 ECU faculty members was
prompted b a Carnegie Founda-
tion survey on the quality of
undergraduate education. The
Carnegie survey found that 38
percent of college faculty nation-
wide say they may quit teaching
in the next five years.
In contrast, all ECl faculty
members surveyed said they were
satisfied with their profession
and would not consider leaving.
The Carnegie survey found
that one-third of college faculty
members believed abolishing
tenure would improve higher
education. Twelve out of the 15
ECU faculty members surveyed
believed tenure has no adverse ef-
fect on the quality of education.
Approximately 75 percent said
they were against abolishing
tenure.
One professor in favor of
tenure said, "a well-qualified in-
dividual who is willing to meet
university requirements has a
good opportunity for advance-
ment
� professor who thinks tenure
has an adverse effect on educa-
tion said. "Tenure has a tendency
to make some individuals relax"
and that he would prefer "a
system of long-term contracts
These contracts would be renew-
ed every five to seven years while
providing employment security,
he added.
In the national survey, 60 per-
cent believed their salaries are
either fair or poor. About 40 per-
cent said their pay is good or ex-
cellent.
The survey of ECU faculty
found that 80 percent think their
pay is as good or better then pay
across the nation.
One professor commentr
"You don't expect to get rich
teaching, but I think we are ade-
quately compensated
According to the American
Association of University Pro-
fessors, the average salaries in
1984-85 were: $39,870 for a full
professor; $29,910 for an
associate professor and $24,610
for an assistant professor.
According to information
prepared and assembled by the
ECU Office of Institutional Ad-
vancement, the average salaries
of male professors on a nine
month contract in 1985 were:
$37,071 for a full professor;
$30,603 for an associate pro-
fessor and $24,587 for an assis
tant professor.
Angelo Volpe, Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs, said ECU
"gets a lot of high-quality ap-
plicants. We're a college where
people want to come to, not
leave
The Carnegie survey results
were published in the September-
October issue of Change
magazine.
ECU Participates InTelecast ��
B EI.IABKTH PXGr
st�fr wntrt
ECU, . uction w ith 15
othei colleges and universities,
? part in the W Day
sat el � te telecoi ce on
W ednesday . oi Id 1 ood Dav,
which is now in fear,
marks thi mi I the
indmg ' : :
Agriculture Orga
United Nations in 1945.
The national committee for
Woi Day is made up of
S. Depart m e n t o t
griculture, the gency for In-
ternationa! Developmei I and a
coalition of 350 private v oiuntary
organizations.
The three-hour teleconference
originated f r o m G e o r g e
W ashingt on Univers ty in
Washington, D. . a d was
shown at The Brody Med
Sciences Building at ECl
The first hour ol the
teleconfernce was designated
panel presentai n the rela-
tionship of poverty and w
hunger, the impact on world food
security, and the problem of at-
taining long-term, sustainable
agriculture development in the
Third World.
Among those on the panel were
Peter McPherson, administrator
or' the Agency for International
Development; Barbara Hud-
dleston, chief of the loot! Securi-
ty and Information Service of the
food and Agriculture Organiza-
tion; Sena Paul S n on (D-Il);
and Mane Savane, president of
the ion of African
Women tor Research on
Development in Dakar, Sengal.
During the second hour. !(
faculty made a presentation ol
the teleconference site. Kathrvn
M. Kolassa and Marilyn F.
e, 1 I lood and nutrition
Maurice Simon, an ECl
political scientist; Frederick Day,
a geography and populations ex-
and Judith C. Rollins, dean
of the Schol of Home
� nomics, spoke at the
teleconference.
Day, who often teaches his
students on the subject of world
hunger by relating it to popula-
tion said, "1 relate population to
increase in numbers and the abili-
ty to feed those people
"The population is growing so
fast that they are not able to pro-
vide enough food for the people
in Africa said Day.
Day did not think that the
teleconference would help the
hunger situation, but that it
would help in the informing l
others, so that they would be
prepared to help deal with the
situation.
The third hour of the
teleconference was designated to
a discussion between the par-
ticipating schools with Karl
Rodabaugh of the ECU Division
of Continuing Education.
An evening program was also
held to discuss the World Food
Day theme "Hunger: Who
Should Starve The program in-
cluded a pane! discussion which
featured Day. Nina Blount of the
Greenville Tabernacle Praver.
Debbie Ryals of the Department
of Social Services, and was
moderated by Greenville Mayor
Janice Buck.
The panel discussion was
followed by a rebroadcast of the
first hour of the telecast.
"For those who work to end
hunger, this is a symoblic year
and the teleconference will be an
important opportunity to explore
global tood and hunger issues
said Patricia Young, coordinator
of the National Committee for
World food Dav.
"The teleconference provide- a
new way for the American college
community to be involved in the
search for new ideas and
answers added Young.
World Food Day marks the an-
niversary of the founding of the
Food and Agriculture Organiza-
tion of the United Nations. It was
founded in 1945. ECU par-
ticipated in the teleconference
along with 15 other universities
and colleges.
Snack Time ieuTec.r��.
Here are the range of choices students have when the go into the
Student Store between classes. More often than not. students will
choose these quick snacks. But beware, in order to maintain good
health one needs to eat good foods such as fruits, nuts, sandwiches
and milk products.
Historical Grasp
Vital In Choices
Side of Brain Determines Talent
By BETH WHICKER
NUff Unln
For some students, math is sim-
ple and English is more com-
plicated. For others artistic talent
flows while mechanical and
reasoning ability is low.
Some psychologists believe this
division of talent is due to use of
the right and left hemisphere of
the brain.
The right side of the brain con-
trols the left hand, artistic ability
and communication or verbal
skills.
"In one of my classes at the
N.C. School ol the Arts, 75 per-
cent of the students were left
handed. The class was comprised
of dancers, visual art students,
and design students. In math
class, our instructor had a dif-
ficult time trving to make us
understand the concent of math.
The best dancer in ihe entire
school was completly illiterate in
math according to a former
student at the N.C. School of the
Arts and a current ECU student,
who did not want to be named.
The left side of the brain controls
our right hand and mechanical
ability.
"Data has been collected on
the differences between sexes and
brain sides. This data shows that
males may be more lateralized to
the left side of the brain, which
could be the origin of the males'
greater mechanical ability. The
study shows that females may be
more lateralized on the right side
and might be a bit ahead verbal-
ly. Despite the findings the dif-
ferences are too small to base a
decision on according to
Robert Graham, professor of
Psychlogy.
"When presenting a card with
a focal point and a word on either
side of the focal point, everything
seen on each side will go to the in-
dividual side of the hemisphere.
You can tell exactly which
hemisphere it's going to. This
works for most people. It's from
this kind of experiment that we
think language is processed in the
left hemisphere said Graham.
Electrical potentials from both
hemispheres show different
statistics from right to left
hemispheres when different tasks
were performed. One function
most clearly lateralized is speech.
Both hemispheres can com-
prehend language, usually only
one hemisphere can speak
Graham said.
"Ambidexterity was thought
to be both sides of the brain do-
ing the same thing. It is still
found that the speech cortex is in
the left hemisphere. Of course the
right side still controls the left
hand and vice versa according
to Graham.
"Less evolved brains have no
division of labor in the
hemispheres like the human
brain. All paws try to do all the
same things. This could be
because they do not have a se-
cond motion area said
Graham.
"A monkey's brain shows divi-
sion of labor. If a monkey's se-
cond motion area is removed
See SIDE Page 3
By MIkEl IDWICK
Sr�, Mllor
A new history course that will
be offered next semester is
designed to provide the vital in-
formation that is necessary for
students to make informed and
intelligent decisions about apar-
theid and the dilemma facing the
US.
The course entitled "Problems
in Southern African History" is
offered by the History depart-
ment through the course Selected
Topics in History. Kenneth
W'ilburn, assistant professor of
history, will instruct the course.
"1 think everyone should be
very concerned with how their
country should view South
Africa said W'ilburn.
W'ilburn stated that the course
should provide the background
that is necessary for students to
understand apartheid.
"College students today are
picketing or boycotting South
African products, among other
things. This course wili give them
the background and information
they need to make knowledgable
decisions as to what they should
do as individuals W'ilburn said.
"Apartheid has evolved for
over 300 years W'ilburn added,
"in order to understand how to
end apartheid you have to
understand what it is, so you
have to do more than watch 30
minutes of nightly news
W'ilburn maintained that
students must "put the South
African problems into perspec-
tive so people can make more in-
telligent decisions about the par-
ticipation of their government
and businesses in South African
affairs
The course, according to
W'ilburn. will start with a look at
southern Africa before l85 and
the arrival of the first whites
the Cape area in southern Africa
and the problems between the
whites and the three major in-
diginouss groups of people in
Cape region of southern Africa:
the KHOI-KHOI, who were
known as the hottentots, the
SAN, who were the bushmen.
and the XHOSA. who were
known as the blacks.
Next, the course will examine
the establishment of the Zulu
ethnic group and the resulting
dispersion of the other black
groups, because they were trying
to escape the wrath of the Zulus.
W'ilburn said that the course
will look at the establishment of
the British in South Africa and
the conflict between British im-
perialism and the Boers, which
eventually resulted in the Boer
War.
Finally, the course will con-
sider apartheid and black
resistance to South Africa.
Hanging Around
JIM LEUTOENS � Tha East Carolinian
Todd Lovett and Donna Corey are enjoying a guiet moment after classes. More than likely they
are discussing where and what they will be doing for Fall Break. Fall Break begins this Friday after-
noon, and it is a hard earned break, so enjoy your vacation.
Editor Arrested For Larceny
By LORIN PASQUAL
Greenville police have arrested
a former East Carolinian features
editor and two other men on
charges of breaking and entering
and larceny in connection with
the theft of more than $10,000
worth of computer equipment
from the Wilcar Executive
Building on West 10th Street,
Greenville.
Detective John Nichols iden-
tified the men as Stephen Ashley
Sherbin, 21, a Florida native who
worked at The East Carolinian
from August to October, 1985;
Brian Keith Berryman, 19, who
lived with Sherbin at 305 E. 14th
St and Jeffrey Neil Ferris, 19, a
resident of Black Mountain,
N1Cltwho previously lived at 213
Nichols Drive, Greenville.
Police arrested Berryman Fri-
day afternoon after they brought
him to the department for ques-
tioning. They arrested Sherbin
and Ferris Monday, at which
time Sherbin and Berryman con-
fessed to the charges and made
official statements, according to
Nichols.
Berryman, who gave police at
least three different former ad-
dresses in New England, was
found with more than 100
unauthorized keys, said Nichols.
At least a dozen of those were to
ECU buildings, he added.
Although the university has
"no legal standing (in the case) at
the present time, there is a
possibility that they (the three
men) could be investigated" in
connection with recent thefts at
ECU, said Director of Campus
Security Joseph Calder.
Sherbin, an ECU sophmore
majoring in anthropology, is a
former member of the Student
Government Association at-
torney general's staff and the
College Republicans. He belongs
to the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity.
All three men appeared at U.S.
District Court in Greenville Mon-
day and were released on $1,500
bail each.
They are scheduled to appear
for probable cause hearings at the
following times: Berryman, Oct.
25, before Judge Rountree, and
Sherbin and Ferris, Nov. 1,
before Judge Hunter.





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 17, 1985 3
J
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49
o Krogenng
Congress Ready To
ForceEqual Treatment
WASHINGTON D.C. (CPS) -
Despite some negative input from
a college president last week.
Congress seems ready to pass a
lav. forcing most college pro-
grams to treat male and female
students equallv
I he bill, called the Civ il Rights
Restoration Act. would overrule
a 1984 U.S. Supreme Court deci-
sion that excused many college
departments from having to
pledge not to discriminate against
women.
Bur some administrators and
apparently some students as well
worry the measure would let the
tederal government "interfere"
in campus programs.
"It sounds like a new fear to
me sas congressional aide Kris
McManiman. "We get students
calling up from Baptist colleges
askmg if (they're) going to have
to room with a man
"We want to protect our in-
dependence Charles Macken-
zie, president of Grove City Col-
lege (Pa.), told Congress m hear-
ings last week. "The government
at some point may want to im-
pose their secular values on our
campus
The bill's sponsors say they on-
ly want to give college women a
legal tool with which to challenge
discrimination, which a court �
not the government � would
then treat.
Last week's hearings only con-
tinued a debate that began when
Congress approved Title IX of
the Higher Education Amend-
ments of 1972.
Title IX, of course, bars col-
leges that take federal money
from discriminating on the basis
of gender.
Many women's groups say Ti-
tle IX provided the legal tool to
open admissions to certain degree
programs to women, gain more
resources for female students'
cholarship programs, and even
funnel money into women's
sports teams and facilities.
Several schools � the Univer-
sity of Richmond, Hillsdale Col-
lege and Grove City College
among them � have gone to
court to escape the law .
They've argued Title IX should
not cover whole colleges, but on-
ly programs that get or use the
federal government's money.
Grove City asserted the govern-
ment simply should leave campus
programs to campus ad-
ministrators to run.
"We did not want to accept the
principle of federal jurisdiction
Mackenzie told Congress last
w eek.
It was Grove City's legal
challenge to the jurisdiction that
made it to the Supreme Court last
year. The court ruled Title IX ap-
plied only to programs that
directly got federal money, not to
all programs on a campus that
took some kind of federal aid.
The court added, however,
that campus student aid offices
would have to comply with Title
IX because they administer
federal funds.
"It's completely absurd that
women can only be protected in
specific programs and buildings
on a campus says kristin
Stelck, a lobbyist for the Na-
tional Association of University
Women.
Stelck says the ruling makes it
harder for female students to
pursue their rights.
Soon after the ruling, for ex-
ample, the civil rights office of
the Department of Education
dropped the case of a student
who officially complained she'd
been sexually, harassed in a Nor-
theastern University economics
building, Stelck says.
Side Of Brain Determines Talant
Continued From Pajje 1.
then the monkey will act as
though he has two dominant
hands. Presumably, if this were
dine with a human the results
would be the same added
Graham.
"The split brain experiment
was performed on people with
psychiatric problems. Ninety per-
cent of the experiments using
tl and left hemispheres were
done on normal people said
Graham.
"Some psychologists make a
living on the concept. People
should beware of educational
systems claiming that it will
educate a particular hemisphere.
We are just beginning to learn
about the differences. We're a
long way from applying anything
practically Graham said.
"I would guess that there are
brain differences that produce
differences in Art and
Mechanical abilities but we don't
know what they are. Certain peo-
ple are low in talent in either
area; it might not be because of
their hemispheres. Other factors
such as inheritance and past ex-
periences determine talent also A
dancer has to use all of the body.
Math is localized to the bram
added Graham.
"It's a debatable issue, we
don't have proof of the issue.
Psychometric testing does not
clearly demonstrate the theorv.
i

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East Carolina University
Alcohol Awareness Week Activities
October 23 - 29

Real Pirates Know Their Limits
Wednesday, October 23
�A.M 4:OOP.M Vlcohol Awareness Fan Tyler Hall Lobby
�'M Discussion: "Demon Run r Ration Mendenhall 244
(irog ititudcs un Drinking
K:30P.M IO:0OPM Lets Have a Party" Making Non
U oholu I innks, Rei ipes and
I ikhJ featuring Stuart Haithcotl
I asternarolina Sch�M)l ol
Bartending
Mendenhall 244
Thursday, October 24
2:00PM 4 imp M rricycleRaces lntluenc I
Alcohol on ke.K nun I ime
? H)P M y H)P M Makmgand rasti N Mcohoht
Steven Haithcotl
Mendenhall
North I awn
(irogs
1). iwntown (ireenv ille
Saturday. October 2f
1:30P.M. h'ootball 1(1 rh Carolina Ficklen Stadiu
Know vow limits, act responsiblv
Sunday. October 2"
lHI I M h- wareness Vrl
I nscml
m
Mendenhall Patio or
Hendriv theatre
1 uesdav.ktober 2V
I n�ip M ; mil' i
1 loi it ion 1 an
Scotl Hall I.ohhv
hitr Ifore tlroboJ laformatkm Contact
( ampus ikrohol and Drug Program
757-6793
. I 1 is Ki t Kl 1 . IP! ro I HI i'l HI (
I kets R ; . �
Drunken
we can
a difference.
We all are aware of the tragedy caused by drunken drivers The deaths, the accidents and the
human suffering resulting from their irresponsible behavior
Tough, enforceable drunken driving laws will help So will alcohol education and treatment
But more is necessary We each need to get involved in the campaign against drunken driving
We must ensure that we re individually contributing to the solutions and not to the problem
And that means acting responsibly, never mixing driving and heavy drinking
By knowing our limits and sticking to them
By taking the responsibility for those to whom we serve alcohol, making sure our friends
associates and guests don t exceed their limits
It also means not allowing someone to drive who has had too much to drink As the saying
goes. Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk
We can each be a part of the answer
What we do does make a difference
We Support Responsible Use Of Alcohol
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Sigma
Phi Kappa Tau
Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Phi
Tau Kappa Epsilon
And Steve Hall, Campus Representative
Miller Brewing Company
GftlJjtr

" " ��'( ���'





�I)c iEaat OlarnUman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
roM Norton, cm. !����.
I V Sl( �,wajuij
TOM LUVENDER, � �, ��,���
Anthony Martin, a
John Peterson. c�m
Shannon Short, ,w�.� vw-
Debbie Stevens. v
Bui Mn(HniJ�nWw,fr
MlKl 1 i DWICK, w�fi
R " K Mc I 'KM M
v on Coopi k
1 ORIN PASQl !
NDREU Jov Nl R,
Hi I HANI! I Johns. N
7, ! J,s
Opinion
Page 4
Hunger
Student Organization Formed
Yesterday hundreds of campuses
und the nation sponsored educa-
tional events and fundraisers
designed to help bring about an end
to world hunger. A major organizer
and sponsor of many of these
events was the National Student
C ampaign Against Hunger. The
NSCAH, which is a joint project of
Public Interest Research
ups and USA tor Africa, aims
uild a movement against hunger
will be able to sustain its ef-
- over a long period of time,
thus mobilizing students on a mass
scale to bring about an end to world
hunger.
vv
Students on the campus meal
rado state Universit)
inged to give up their evening
meal and donate the money to a
nger relief organization.
at Boston College passed a
bucket at a sold-out foot-
ball game. V the Universit) of
Moi hour credit course
been established that will deal
world tood issues. At the
Connecticut! and at
over the country
� ere held with pro-
s o hunger relief
se pan
ding fundraisers to
Vfrica; 2) sponsi
educational events complete
speakers, courtes) of the
AH, to deepen public
tnding about hunger; and 3)
projects to � hungei in
d States.
N S
making communities viable by
planning for reservoirs, irrigation
projects and education efforts
designed to increase the skill and
knowledge of local farmers. Final-
ly, ten percent goes to combatting
hunger in the United States. The
way USA for Africa spends its
money is by funding specific pro-
jects proposed by "reputable"
organizations.
According to NSCAH spokesper-
son Janet Anderson, the campaign
has already gotten responses from
1,000 campuses and: "people are
still calling and writing The cam-
paign, she adds, has alot of cam-
puses involved in making large
cardboard feet with students'
signatures on them. The feet bear
the inscription: "Students Stamp-
ing Out Hunger Ultimatelv, says
Anderson, the NSCAH plans to
send the feet to the House Select
C ommittee on Hunger.
While it is difficult to gage the
level of success that the NSCAH is
likely to meet with it is certain that,
being co-sponsored by the over 100
Public Interest Research Groups on
America's campuses and USA for
Africa, it is a force to be reckoned
with. And, at the very least, in an
age when famine and drought are
threatening to engulf more and
more of the African continent it is
encouraging to see students ex-
hibiting a humanitarian impulse.
v hile the NSC H is working in
ition with ISA tor Africa it
� discourage local studeni
nizations from donating to
anger relief groups such as
Oxfam America or World Vision.
USA tor Africa breaks its funds
wn into four categories in an at-
wage a comprhensive fight
st hunger. Thirty-five percent
s proceeds go to immediate
�t relief in the form of food
d medical care. Thirty-five per-
u goes to development aid in the
'orm of farm supplies, seed, and
fertilizer. Twenty percent goes to
long term policy planning aimed at
"Students have been among trv
strongest supporters of USA for
Africa. But we must do more than
buy the album, we must commit
ourselves to the struggle to end
iiunger. "
� Amv Carter
"The Sat tonal Student Campaign
Against Hunger is a chance to join
forces with USA for Africa in mak-
ing a brighter day for so manv less
fortunate people. Students are the
hope of the future. I hope that they
will give (heir time, talent and
energy to begin building that future
now. "
� Lionel Richie
4fiM
Anti-
I I
pus
Now You Can Do More To Fight
Hunger Than Buy The Record.
Farm Economy In Trouble Meet Schl
B GENE LOGSDON
Moth�r Jonj
I cringe every time I hear a politician
boast to an audience about how in this
great country one farmer can teed 78
people. Or about turn one hour of farm
labor produces 15 times more than it did
60 years ago, as President Reagan
himself (no friend to farmers) once
bragged at an appearance before I S
Department of Agriculture employees.
How lucky Americans are. Reagan said,
to spend only 17 percent ol their
disposable income on food � the lowesi
rate in the world.
These statistics are the worst kind of
misrepresentation because they are, in a
narrow sense, tacts. You can repeal
them with one hand on the Bible
without fear of perjury or a boll oi
lightning from above. I lie typical in-
dividual is therefore not going
understand how they are false, espe
ly when repeated, as ;he often are, with
much preening o political leathers hv
presidents and secretaries ot
agriculture.
But, in any meaningful sense, one
farmer does nol feed 78 people, or
whatever number the ag r i - f a c 1
manipulators are using now (the ratio
widens as farmers go out of business, as
2(X),(XX) of them have since Reagan first
took office.) If there is only one actual
producer of food left for everv 78 peo-
ple in the population, n is only because
there are millions of other workers
employed in providing the farmer with
money, machines, chemicals, and con-
sultation that enable the farmer to pro-
duce more.
According to L'SDA figures, about
3.5 million workers are directly involved
in agricultural production � but
another 5 million or so are involved in
agricultural manufacturing and support
services. If you add in food processing,
transportation, and retailing, you come
up with a whopping 22 million workers
employed in getting food to America's
tables.
Farm magazine will solemnly exploit
the l-per-78 agri-fact to show how effi-
cient farmers are. Then, barely a
paragraph later, in comes the 22 million
tigure to show what an important
pact agriculture has on the e
how main jobs ii supplies, how much
profit it generates. Is thei ntradic-
? Nobody notices.
One hour
more productive than it was 60 vears
ago only if you ignort nlythela
� 'he 22 million, b . �
unted others
which
rtilizers arid fuel I
chemica
itself allow � .
when oil
73
soaring.
Bui � provim
SUP we
ild ' I he wl i le idea see-
make us feel lucky on tw
" us have to engage in
�ned grueling manual labor, and
that the resi of u
our wages for food, "he 17 percent of
disposable income foal
spend, on the a- feed
themselves is. we are lowesi
centage in the world.
V d there's another pseudo-aj
the 17 percent is an average. I
spend relatively much less, the r
much more. And babies eat less than
20-year old halfbacks ccording I
number of studies, the typical middle-
class family with a couple of children
spends at leas; 25 percent of its income
tor tood. In any case, compari ns with
the rest of the world are more or less
meaningless as proof of farm efficiency,
considering rhe variations in economies,
climates, wages, subsidies, and price
controls.
Even if we do spend comparatively
less of our time working for food, a
necessity of life, is this a I which
we should be proud'1 One thing that 1"
percent figure means is that bv wav of
deficit spending, the United States has
put huge amounts of fiat money into
circulation. The resulting inflation
drives up the price of everything the
farmer buys to keep himself going. But
he can't push up his own pri
keep pace with everyone else
He's ju irmer among
bu;
� and selling to giant �
set the terms of the sale.
�-
n i toincrea
ductioj He t
: low
e
-
(w
'
l tiny and eve- . � c
P� - � .ia.e1 V
nirable about pi � �
manner that millu i
blown or wa
each year, and rivers and ground wa
� oned Would we not be m are
in the long run if we were to emp
manv more pe a kind of tarn- c
that depended more on human lab
on machines and chemicals1 Could
we not cut unemploymei .ild we
reverse the trend toward fewer lan-
slow- a trend that n. (ricaJly
led to a decline in democratic govern-
ment?
Vet the claims I i American farm i
ficiency go unchallenged, ever: by
farmers, who want to go on . �
great in the eyes of city dwellers. And
ty dwellers are evidently as insulated
from the reality of food production as
were their counterparts in ancient
Rome, who accepted free grain as p i
'heir birthright, while the farm
economy of the empire was being milk-
ed drv.
Gene Logsdon, a contributing editor
New farm and Ohio magazines, writes
a weekly newspaper column and works
his own small farm in Oh
This article was reprinted with permis
sion from Mother Jones magazim
monthly based in San Francisi
World Hunger Not Caused By Usual Suspects
B JAY STONE
rding to Richard J. Barnet,
autl � The lean Years, in 1980 462
million people in the world were starv-
- everyday. Over half of them were
children under five. Sixty-seven million
' these people lived in Africa, 301
million in the Far East. 36 million in
Latin America, 30 million in the Near
East, and 28 million of them were scat-
tered throughout what is known as the
developed world Today the picture
is much worse due primarily to popula-
tion increases.
Everyday the world produces two
pounds of grain for every man, woman
and child on earth. That is enough to
provide 3,000 calories a day for
everyone, even without the enormous
quantities of meat, fish, vegetables, and
fruits that are produced each year.
Thus, the fact that people are starving
has less to do with inadequate food pro-
duction than with the way food is
distributed.
Overpopulation is obviously a factor
in world hunger. Today, many
underdeveloped countries are still ex-
periencing a decline in death rates and a
simultaneous increase in birth rates.
Yet. Third World countries have made
progress. As of 1980 China had cut its
birth rate from 32 (per 1,000 of total
population) to 19. Sri Lanka, Singapore
and Taiwan have also made substantial
progress in cutting their birth rates.
The fact is that the population explo-
sion of our time follows a certain con-
sistent pattern. The introduction of
public health measures dramatically
reduces the death rate while the birth
rate remains constant. Then the popula-
tion begins to fall. Both parts of the
process have already taken place in
most of the developed world. East Ger-
many, Luxemborg, Austria, Belgium
and the United Kingdom all have stable
or declining populations. By the late
1970s the growth rate for Western
Europe as a whole was half what it was
at the beginning of the decade. Between
1970 and 1975 the population growth
rate in North America fell by almost
one-third.
There is, then, a relationship between
the level of prosperity of a country and
its birth rate, provided that prosperity is
distributed in a somewhat egalitarian
manner.
More and more, the worldwide food
production and distribution system is
coming under the control of a relatively
small number of multinational corpora-
tions. Five grain companies effectively
control the world traffic in wheat, corn,
barley, and soybeans. Two farm
machinery companies control 60 per-
cent of the farm machinery in the U.S.
and also have a decisive role in the
world market. A small number of grain
and chemical companies now control
the world seed market. As powerful and
important as they are, multinational
corporations are, of course, not the on-
ly factor in the world food system.
Local landowners, local governments,
peasants, and local consumers have
their own interests, prejudices, and
traditions, and these are also important
in determining who eats and who
doesn't.
Still, the industrialization of
agriculture and the priorities of cor-
porations have led to developments
which have had a dramatic impact upon
world hunger. For one thing, high
technology agriculture has led to in
creasing concentration of land, increas-
ing dependence upon imported inputs
such as seeds and fertilizers, and in-
creasing use of cash crops to maintain
the economies of underdeveloped coun-
tries. As land becomes more valuable
marginal farmers must sell and either
work as sharecroppers or go to the city.
In addition, mechanized agriculture re-
quires increased credit. Obviously,
wealthier farmers are preferred risks for
loans with which to buy imported seeds
and fertilizers. Thus the gap between
rich and poor increases within the coun-
try.
Another unfortunate result of the in-
dustrialization and corporatization of
agriculture is the rise of ash cropping.
From the mid-1950's to the mid-1960's
the principle cash crop; � coffee, tea,
bananas, cotton � grew more than
twice as fast as the rest of the
agricultural economy in
underdeveloped countries. Coffee pro-
duction in Africa has increased more
than 400 percent in the last twenty
years. Because export crops are more
profitable they crowd out the non-
commercial crops on which millions of
poor people depend for their nutritional
needs. Land that was used for growing
black beans for the poor in Brazil, has
been convened to soybeans for cattle
feed. Black beans then have to be im-
ported, and the price is prohibitive for
the poor. There are similar examples
from all over the Third World. Hence,
the high-technology � export model
distributes benefits unequally. Foreign
sales of U.S. seed and fertilizer com-
panies are highly profitable. Consumers
of tea, coffee, bananas, and strawber-
ries around the world benefit from in-
creased production, and the plantation
owners, usually foreigners, derive large
profits.
Dependence upon exporting food
makes poor countries extremely in-
secure because they depend upon a
world market that they cannot control
While production has increased
dramatically for tea, coffee, cocoa
sugar and similar commodities, prices
have fallen in real terms, and when
compared with imported agricultural in-
puts and manufactured goods.
disastrously so. Short-term price rises!
as for example in sugar and coffee, br-
ing on a strong reaction in the world
market because there are many com-
petitive sources of supply. The fluctua-
tions in agricultural exports, then, is a
direct cause of hunger in poor countries
dependent upon cash crops.
The only way to combat world
hunger on any long-term basis is to
develop a Third World agriculture that
is more labor intensive than industrializ-
ed. It should also depend less upon
chemical fertilizers than agriculture in
the developed world does because of the
world shortage of petroleum that is used
in fertilizers. In addition, the developed
world must provide food aid to combat
emergency famines in poor countries
and loans for long term development
projects that would be aimed at making
the country self-sufficient.
The economic policies of the
U.S. government should stop favoring
the interests of large agri-business cor-
porations and instead should promote a
more decentralized and democratic
agricultural industry, both within this
country and around the globe. If such
efforts were to be undertaken tommor-
row we could wipe hunger's ugly visage
from the face of our planet forever.

Orbach
u
fI Srm H
V I
M
-
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Rep Wa.
pei
Mar" ' a
Marii t
-

pu"
to dev
sta
Pres
thre
b occ
N
Top
rela
develop
toui
coas
CKkken A IImmIH

Tailgate With
Tin�� Ovtt
Open 24 Hours'
$
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Green.
$
4





I HI I AM i KOt 1N1AN
OCTOBER 17, 1983
Io Fight
Record.
-
�. �



ns


'irn




I
�ini-

tiated en i art � farm
g milk-
tcs
rks
�� ,
iolhu
Anti-Nuclear Group Plans March
Md 1 I s, CA (CPS) -
Hoping to revive the fires of cam-
pus anti-nuclear activism, disar-
mament proponents are combing
colleges this month to sign up
students for an "unprecedented"
month cross-country march.
I cadets of PROPEACE (Peo-
Reaching Out for Peace) hope
act 5,000 people � over
�x1 oi them college students �
arch from I os Angeles to
Washington, D.C. next year, a
$,235 mile journey beginning in
March and climaxed by a
ighl vigil bv one million
n November.
Members oi Congress have
il er clear that nothing
to dramatically affect
arms race until there is,
allv, a citizen uprising ex-
PROPEACE founder
M ner, a veteran of Viet -
ai pi (tests and a longtime
� tate hallo! referen-
To pull off the "uprising
Mixner hopes to raise $18 to $20
million, which would make it the
most expensive, prolonged pro-
test in memory.
PROPEACE will also have to
find some way to awaken the dor-
mant campus anti-nuclear move-
ment.
"Organized anti-nuclear forces
on campus are not there now, but
there is a great deal of receptivity
to the issue reports Marshall
Mayer, who is organizing PRO-
PEACE's current four-week na-
tional 125-camus recruiting drive.
Because few students can
devote nine months to walking
across country, Mayer has
organized a panel of professors
to aid the students in getting
course credit for the adventure.
March organizers expect
students will make up between 33
and 40 percent of the par-
ticipants.
Mayer thinks the sheer
magnitude of the sacrifice PRO-
PEACE is seeking will revive in-
terest in the arms race.
"People go to college to build
a future, and college students are
increasingly realizing they won't
have a future unless nuclear arms
are dismantled
Efforts to build a sustained
anti-nuclear weaponry campus
movement peaked with the "con-
vocation" and "Ground Zero"
teach-ins and rallies of 1983 and
1984. Organizers readily confess
it was mostly a faculty � not a
student � movement.
But even faculty groups faded
away in the months after the spr-
ing, 1984 network television
broadcast of "The Day After a
film about the effects of nuclear
war.
So Sanford Gottlieb, director
of United Campuses to Prevent
Nuclear War (the largest campus-
based anti-nuclear group), says
PROPEACE will make history if
it meets its numerical and fun-
draising goals.
"If you add the budgets of all
the anti-nuclear groups, campus
and off-campus, during the peak
year of the anti-nuclear move-
ment (1984), you're not going to
get even close to $18 million
Gottlieb says.
"What they're doing is unlike
anything that's ever been done
before on any issue Gottlieb
adds. "There's nothing to com-
pare it to
Gottlieb, a student organier
since the early 1960's, is
"awestruck and envious" ol
PROPEACE's resources, though
he isn't sure it's the best way the
movement can spend $18 to $20
million.
"I can't imagine that the effect
of the march on anyone but the
marchers is going to be worth
that amount of money he says
PROPEACE, which has raised
about $1.6 million so far, ad-
vocates worldwide disarmament,
but spokesman Peter Kleiner saj
the group endorses unilateral
disarmament as a step in that
direction. Gottlieb's group op-
poses unilateral disarmament.
Gottlieb, among others, has
found any kind ol disarmament
issue shoved aside by student in-
terest in Central America and
South Africa.
Mayer, however, expects PRO
PEA( 1 will benefit from the in-
terest. "They have raised the
whole level of political awareness
millions of students
The size and drama of the el-
tort also will attract attention.
"This is basicall) going to be a
moving city Maver savs. "All
that goes on in a city will he going
on in this march
PROPEACE organizers are
trying to keep the march en-
vironmentally sound. Meals,
laundry supplies, showers and
medical equipment foi marchers
will be transported by 75 electric
cars. Hot water will be heated by
portable solar heat'
Marchers won't clear anv plant
life when they pitch their 2,500
tents. A conservation corps will
clean up after marchers leave
their campsites
Organizers figure it will take
tour million meals (all stressing
whole foods), two million
showers and 40,000 pairs of shoes
to get to Washington. They'll
supply vitamins designed to
facilitate long periods of exercise.
The U.S. Student Association,
student coalitions in four states
and more than 200 student
. ctnment leaders already have
jorsed PROPEACE.
Groups at six universities �
Harvard, USC, Colorado,
( alifornia-Irvinc, Massachusetts
and Cal State-Northridge � have
pledged to raise $15,000 each
toward purchase of large
cafeteria tents.
A series of campus walk-a-
thons, aimed at raising money, is
scheduled for November 3.
Trouble Med School Celebrates Anniversary
Suspects
ai d when
icultural in-
red goods,
i term price rises,
ind coffee, br-
in the world
many com-
ippl) I he fluctua-
iral export, then, is a
poor countries
ombat world
term basis is to
A rid agriculture that
'erosive than industrializ-
depend less upon
;ers than agriculture in
he de -id does because of the
age of petroleum that is used
isers In addition, the developed
id must provide food aid to combat
emergency famines in poor countries
ans for long term development
- that would be aimed at making
the countrv self-sufficient.
The economic policies of the
. vernment should stop favoring
the interests of large agri-business cor-
porations and instead should promote a
more decentralized and democratic
agricultural industry, both within this
ntry and around the globe. If such
efforts were to be undertaken tommor-
row we could wipe hunger's ugly visage
from the face of our planet forever.
t Nt-�s Bureau
public open house will kick
I week long celebration Oct.
20-25 as the East Carolina
yersity School of Medicine
observes its 10th anniversary.
e event commemorates the
North Carolina General
Assembly's decision to establish a
r medical school at ECU
in the summer of 1975. The
: operated a one-year
a education � gram from
ng of 1975.
� the public, the highlight of
a eek will b open house
- mda, Oci 20, ieaturing
: the Brody
Med al p Building and
Radiation I tocology
1; will be the public's first
unit) to tour the radiation
ter, a beautiful and functional
ns state-of-the-art
"We hope that everyone in the
community will be able to join us
as we commemorate our first 10
years of service to eastern North
Carolina said Dr. William
Laupus, ECU vice chancellor and
dean of the medical school.
"The occasion provides us
with an opportunity not only to
show our friends how much we
have grown over the last 10 years,
but also to thank them for the
faithful support they have given
us from the beginning
Members of the medical school
faculty, staff and student bod)
will be on hand to direct open
house visitors through
laboratories and educational and
clinical areas. Guests will have
the opportunity to receive a free
computerized health risk ap-
praisal in the lobby of the Brodv
Building, where a special photo
exhibit will feature rare snapshots
from the early days of the School
of Medicine. Refreshments will
be served.
The open house will initiate a
series of events planned for
medical school faculty, staff and
students during anniversary
week Among the events planned
are the dedication of a park area
adjacent to the school, an open
house for ECU main campus
employees and students, a cake-
baking contest and book collec-
tion drive to benefit the Ronald
McDonald House, and a continu-
ing medical education program to
provide area physicians with an
overview of new approaches in
the treatment of cancer with
radiation therapy.
The first public discussion of a
medical school at what was then
East Carolina College began in
1964. After a protracted public
debate, ECU was authorized to
establish a one-year medical
education program in 1972.
The UNC Board of Governors
gave its approval for a four-year
school at ECU in late 1974, and
the state legislature authorized
and appropriated funds for the
expansion and construction of
the school the following summer.
Dr. Laupus joined the school
as dean in 1975, the same vear the
school fashioned a mod filia-
tion agreement with Pitt Count)
Memorial Hospital. The school
enrolled its first 28 students m the
tour-year program in 1977. Since
then, entering classes have grown
to include 68 students.
The school now has 271 can-
didates for the MD and 124
physicians in the po . : iate
education program.
�.
AJi i Mf A.
� - S�S�S�sC.SeSCC.
105 Airport Road
Greenville, N.C.
757-0327
Shrimp
All You Can Eat
$5.
99
Served with french fries, cole slaw and
hushpuppies
Offer GooJ Thursday, Oct. 17
i
???????????????
Orbach Chairs Conference
V News Bureau
:
ECl cultural an-
, ��; will direct the North
� iovernor's Conference
States Ocean Policy,
Oct Nov. 1. in Raleigh.
Michael K. Orbach of the ECU
He
'merit ol Si
o I o k v
An-
ai : I c �: mics will
serve as chairman for the con-
which will feature ad-
Go James Martin,
Wake: B. Jones (D-NC)
� cean polic) ex-
across the country.
Martin will open the conference
with remarks on Wednesday and
Jones, chairman of the congres-
al committee on Merchant
Marine and Fisheries, is schedul-
ed to deliver the keynote address
at a banquet on Thursday.
Orbach said the goal of the
conference is to educate
policymakers and the general
public about important ocean
policy issues facing the state and
levelop a coordinated coastal
e perspective on those issues.
Presentation will be divided in-
nree panels and will be given
.ean policy experts from
North Carolina and other states.
Topics will include state-federal
relations on ocean policy, ocean
fisheries, offshore petroleum
development, and leisure and
tourism development in the
coastal zone.
The conference is the result of
a report published by the N.C.
Marine Science Council which
evaluated ocean policy issues
relating to the state. Earlier this
year Martin directed appropriate
state agencies to implement nine
recommendations made in the
report.
Orbach directed production of
the report which was developed
by the Ocean Policy Committee
of the Marine Science Council.
Others on the committee are
Belinda Buescher, Wilmington;
B.J. Copeland. UNC Sea Grant
C ollege Program; Mary Johrde,
Edenton; Jay I angfelder. N.C.
State University; William H.
Oueen, ECU; William A. Raney,
Jr Wilmington and Rep. Peggv
Stamev, Raleigh.
The conference is sponsored by
the N.C. Marine Science Council
and the N.C. Department of Ad-
ministration.
YOUR
DRINKING
ECU Pirates
vs.
USC Gamecocks
BBQ Chicken
at
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: � � � mea :� " 1 ;� " �
I budd I Budwesi
' � � � � net I al
: � � .�.���� : '
i � .
��� � � neant I be e .�
idull t . : ���:��
' MODERATION i
iid be used whenever : � -
Makl , � : - : : : ! �
thinking � .
: I judgmenl . � f thej
�.� they need � "
think for then n t let th
bel " � ���� " � �� �
ild ta � isti
MODERATION KEY RING
; -
, Aak 1 fiuMa !
We Support Responsible Use Of Alcohol
Alpha Sigma Phi
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Sigma Phi
Lambda Chi Alpha
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Sigma Phi Epsilon
Sigma Tau Gamma
Zeta Beta Tau





im FST AROI IMAN
Entertainment
Reporters Are
Strange Breed
B lOl (, ROBFRSON
'thei daj. I wa waiting
�' ie call at The East
nian when a fellow
asked, "Whai arc ya'
Wa ting 1 replied.
V aiting foi who?" he asked.
� bod eor body I
M' I waited, but no one
� n ked on several stories
ther people. None of
P e -a ere in, so J efi
Bui no one called.
8 I his is how much of a
si s time is spent. The
:iiage of the fast-living,
argeh
: Mosl ol a reporter's time is
waiting en iew s or
tor people to return
- a 1 i s Although a
fe can be hectic at
d portion of his life is
to jusi plain waiting.
friends, it's time
up a few of the other
s the public has
8 D Ma Rather,
Harbara
s �' Mosl jour-
that's all.
t Ins,
irked in a
���� Unless of
belongs to his
x � ber 2 - Jour-
rous and ex-
c lans and
' ever) da).
Number 2 - Journalists
have the unique opportunit) ol
meeting main interesting people.
Most of these people are every
day folks just like you and me.
You won't find main reporters
sitting down to 'chew the fat'
with Ron and Nancy.
Misconception Numbei ; Joui
nalism is a profession filled with
intrigue and suspense In
vestigative reporters gel into
some prett) dangerous situations.
FACT Number 3 Mosl jour
nalists don't get the opportunit)
to investigate many potentiall)
dangerous stories. Reporting is
relative!) sate, unless you con-
sider slamming your finger in a
filing cabinet drawei while look
ing for a case folder hazardous
While attempting to gel an inter-
view. I did manage to find mysell
standing between a group ol ami
apartheid protesters and some
angr) looking he, k lets.
However, the situation wat
nearh as dangerous as it dp-
peared at the time . irnalists
are not Mike Wallace
Misconception Number 4 - Jour-
nalists die loo pUsh. I he 're
always trying to find trouble
where their real!) isn'
Reporters stick th
where the) don't belong
FACT Number 4 Reporters
must ask main people .
in order to obtaii
detailed information
perform a 'watchdog'
insuring tl at the pub:
ol illegalities and
Watergates doi com
everyda) nd journalists
ot the reasons u h)
Misconception Number c
sts are too liberal I
alwas putting down the . .
and the president.
FACT Number 5 � As
fessions, Democrats and
(x roBi h
I'r '
Singer Ray Charles
Helps Handicapped
Jour nalism.This ts how much of a
journalist's time is spent. The
Public image of the fast-living,
JIML60TCENS Th. t�U C�rol.A.n
hard-drinking journalist is iargeh
false
Rt-T blica he found in
n .i president's
pop
nalists is low it you �
Reagan, y i
-
Cd I )r.
ke Reag
love negative
publicit) al iim. Makes
nd hold on to
friends, some o us
journalisi n voted foi Pi
dent Reagan.
Hopetully. some of the
miscon
en clea
course, I've been a i
onh a few months,
' mces
x 'lends, ;
u see i
tssed like a bum.
I) didn'i have anything
wear
(Doug Roberson is a sei
� minoring
nalism.)
Record Review Roundup
JAY & KM IOTT kRAYF 1
Rayharles showed up
While House resent
President Reagan's bl
new public service ad Na
rial Organizati
tv.
"There are 35 million pe
with disabilities in
day Charles told us du . i
interview on the White H
lawn. "Do you know v
warn fe?"
Charles sa
need what mosl p
'A
g
said " ;
want. We w
the disabled, tying
CSS
"We wa
everythi . R .
it now I wa

Bu ��: al
pur
ped
"I �

sax. I got it ii

! acclaimed as a mu . s
ise inspiring
jazz, bines, pop, soul and even
platinum albums.
Award
Playboy' la an Hall
f Fa
Hall of Fai
. �
Mil was mad-
-
. -pel mu
ii �
. believe


-
i
He
-
I
w as
Mu
ick
-
B
Please see i , pav,e 7
Loverboy And Hooters Rock
M.PARKER & I SKAR1
ECL students have long been
deprived of recentlv released
album info; the Couch Potatoes
shall attempt to inform you now
and in the weeks to come of up-
coming music. We appreciate
Apple Records' suppl) of albums
this week. So put on your ear-
phones
KISS � Asylum
Another monotonous,
repetitious, predictable album
right off the pop heavy metal
assembly line. Nearly every song
follows the verse-chorus-verse-
solo-chorus-etc. format of con-
tinuous, non-stop, harmonic-
upon-harmonic vocals. "Tears
are Fallin the album's video
single release, will probably lure
hard-core Kiss fans into another
disc for their 20-album collec-
tion. Although their new guitarisr
ws some talent, especial!)
"Radar for I ove" and "Love's a
Deadlv Weapon he doesn't
get a very good chance to show
his stuff. We give it a C
written bv Bryan d 1
r:cdw, nfora . V1TV
video. Overall,
( anada's veteran �
provemenl ovei
therefore me . a B
THE HOOTERS
ight
er
l "U
I OVERBOY
Minute of It
Lovin' Every
Hooters new alb
suprise pick hit this week B .
their first major-label
Senous Sight hits home
isic. The mandolin
such soi g
We Danced" .
"u ildrenGo In the
m, the Hooters' urn-
could win then a
.ketiess
RT M and U2. A B is our grade
lovin' Every Minute of It's
main difference is Paul Dean's
razor-sharp guitar riffs, tastefully
mixed keyboard effects and new
signs of originality. The title
song, in case it hasn't been
engraved in your mind, will be
soon. Well done "Dangerous
Boone To Hudson:
'Get The Disease Out
Billy The Kid Struts His Stuff
The Louisville Ballet will appear at McOiius Theatre Thursday at
8 p.m. Tickets to the performance arc 5.00 for ECU students
and guest, 7.00 for youth (high school and under), and 10 00 for
ECU faculty, staff, and the public.
NEW YORK (UPI) The
wife of singer Pat Boone con-
ducted an evangelical prayer ser-
vice at Rock Hudson's bedside
shortly after his death, chanting
"get the disease out of the body"
as the coroner waited to take the
body away, People magazine
reported.
In its Oct. 21 issue, released
Sunday, People said Shirley
Boone, who was called by one of
Husdon's nurses to the actor's
bedside about 20 minutes after
his death Oct. 2 from AIDS,
grasped his legs and spoke in
tongues during the half-hour
evangelical service.
Clutching a Bible, Mrs. Boone
chanted "get the disease out of
the body over the corpse as the
coroner waited downstairs in
Hudson's Beverly Hills home, the
magazine said.
The magazine said Hudson,
who was raised as a Roman
Catholic, made his confession to
a priest in the weeks before-he
died of acquired immune defi-
ciency syndrome at the age of 59
and received Communion. The
priest also administered the last
rites.
The night before Hudson's
death, a Pentecostal prayer group
of which the Boones and two of
Hudson's four nurses are
members came to pray for the ac-
tor's recovery as he lay as un-
conscious in his bed.
"After a while when we were
all standing around his bed, he
raised up off his pillow and smil-
ed at us said Boone. "It was a
real turnaround. Because of this
sign of rejuvenation, one of the
nurses, with (friend) Tom Clark's
help, laid out some nice clothes
for Rock to wear the next day
The following morning
Husdon awoke early and was
dressed by the nurse. But Clark,
concerned that it was too soon
for the actor to be getting up, un-
dressed him and put him back to
bed, People said.
Hudson died a half hour later,
the magazine said.
Using handmade masks, bold colors J MUMr "TBc,ro'4m,n
costumes, New York artist left Wav n PF�PS and c,ab�rate
mime, dance, music and drama at GravnS ,edta,unil� show of
ra 'cry Wednesday.
v - s.
v
3
X
K

S
u
X

�L
Ray Charles
Is Not Blind
To Handicap:
� ontinued from page 6
Here the teenage musioa; .
instrument
after "ah
him and his tea
Lawrence Garret! Gra
Still in his tee:
be stopped by
Charles lei
a dance band in J I
toured with the group 1
Florida ani Georgia and �
union card bv lying about
"It was just a case of one da 1
heard somebody say to me, 'F
you sound just like Nat Cole
he recalled. "And I s
Thanks I thought that wa
great compliment but then
name Ray Charles wa
tioned
myself. 'Well, fi
lose or draw, when I
whatever ui) I'n
they re goinj
me the way sound nr.
"Seeing
life he said. "People
never be bitter about anyl
They should go out into the
id and learn to keep I .
for themselves. The match tl
burns you also burns me. 1 do
need to see to plav or sing the wav
I do. That comes from w
Eastc
S
SPECI
CO
Thed.
�S
Sund
Octobl
ON THE PA- 0
i





harles
apped
I HI EAS1 Ak1 IMAN
OCT( �MI K : IVS�
oc�
"
f HUMBERT T"� 6�� Carolinian
and elaborate
d a unique show of
Ulerj Wednesday
The Family Nastymouth
fHfrfr
Festival Planned
H ' J

V
x
A,
� � i �wy�T " �� � � ' �
m a k � o-
W. r g canV j f ?o move n
TarRiverFest, sponsored by
the Pitt-Greenville Chamber of
Commerce, promises both fun
and competition for all ages
The festival begins at 9 a.m.
Saturday at the Town Com-
monsDowntown area in Green-
ville.
For the fun part, many craft-
spersons and artists will display
and sell their goods at the
festival.
John Smith, chairman for the
canoe and raft races, is finalizing
the plans for the races and en-
courages people who are in-
terested in entering the race to
send in their registration forms or
call the Chamber of Commerce.
a.m. from the North arohna
Wildlite Access Area and ill end
at the Town Commons. Award
will be presented in all tl
classifications.
In addition, a 1UK run bey
at 8:45 a.m leaving the River
side Oyster Bar and ending at the
Town Commons. A two-mile
"fun" run will start at 9 a.m. af
the Town Commons, taking par
ticipants through the downtowi
district and ending at the Town
Commons. Gift certificates and
prizes will be awarded to the win
ners of the events, sponsored b
Overtoil's Sports Center.
For more information, call
752-4101.
The canoe race will begin at 10
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
Dist ifls of hn�t
1 1 1 1 (revnville Blvd 756 2275
mmm
h
Y
He H V rtim Kmqht
Special Classes Lor College Students
945 a.m. Christian Education (all ag�s X
11 00 am Worship- Open Communion
Grecrt
�. a h "riC�
Rav Charles
Is Not Blind
To Handicaps
Continued from page 6
Here the teenage musician got the
instruments he craved, but only
after "a lot of perscvercncc" by
him and his teacher. Mrs.
Lawrence Garrett Grant.
Still in his teens and refusing to
be stopped b his handicap,
Charles left St. Augustine to join
a dance band in Jacksonville. He
toured with the group throughout
Florida and Georgia and got his
union card by lying about his age.
"It was just a case of one day I
heard somebody say to me, 'Ray,
you sound just like Nat Cole
he recalled. "And I said,
'Thanks I thought that was a
great compliment but then the
name Ray Charles was not men-
tioned at all So I said to
myself, 'Well, from now on, win.
lose or draw, when 1 record,
whatever company I'm with,
they're going to have to accept
me the way I sound myself
"Seeing or not seeing life is still
life he said. "People should
never be bitter about anything.
They should go out into the
world and learn to keep fighting
for themselves. The match that
burns you also burns me. 1 don't
need to see to play or sing the way
I do. That comes from within
ELLIE'S
Ladies Fashions & Men's Wear
Grand Opening
Bargains
Ladies Cotton Sweaters From $8.99
Jeans $17.95 to $23.95
Men's Lacoste Shirts $15.99
Men's Suede Jackets $21.99
And More
-e 10 percen
2008 E. 10th St.
Across From I
Highway Patrol
Present ECU ID and receive 10 percent off! f
Mon-Wed
8oz.
Sirloin
Huh Salad Bar
And Drink
s4 cieat ftltice t& e&tf
STUAK HOUSE
tl
THEATRES
'Adults S2 oo
5.30 I ANYTIME
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BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Held Over 2nd Week
SILVER BULLET
SHOWS DAIL Y 1:20-3:20-5:20-7:20-9:20
J 4 V� FOSDA IN Held Over 4th Week
AGNES OF GOD �,�
SHOWS 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
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Held Over 3rd Week ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER
COMMANDO
5 SHO W'S DA IL Y 1:10-3:10-5:10- 7:10- 9:10
TALK
RATE
East Carolina University
Student Union
SPECIAL CONCERT
COMMITTEE
presents
The deep, REGGAE beat of
Sunday Evening
A
t
October 27 7:00
AWARENESS ART ENSEMBLE
ON THE PATIO AAENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
FOR
E R N A T
S)t i r MW.I
MA RTANTRI
BILLY BRAGG , ;f E S A RIOT WITH SPY VS SPY
Bringing po' I
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enjoy lusic Bragg brings � lefight to all
listen
4.99 CASSETTE OR LP
ALEX CHILTOM F EUDALIST TARTS
In the 60 s he put The Box Tops on top with The Lettei In the 70
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two decades of rock s best and brightest Chilton s back onr
than ever
4.99 CASSETTE OR LP
JOMATHAN RKHMAM ROCKIN AND ROMANCE
On his eighth and most rea release. Rid hnuestopn
compelling yet simple songs full ol hy. I
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of Jonathan Richman and The Modern Lov
5.99 CASSETTE OR LP
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5.99 CASSETTE OR LP
��
Record Bar
THROUGH OCT 30 AT CAROLINA EAST MALL & THE PLAZA
VTS4

)





I HI- I ASI (. k(M INIAN
Sports
(X tOBf R 7, IV85
Page�
Mascot Crucial Role

Ihese mascots came from all oer the Ration to train at the "Mascot's University
and will be competing for top honors in February, (an ou find ECU's Pirate?
in Nashville, Tenn
Lady Spikers Pull Out Win
B JANET SIMPSON
Miff nlrr
rhe Lady Pirate volleyball
lean; picked up their fourth win
in their last five matches Tuesday
night.
lor the second time this
season, the Lady Bucs have come
oui victorious in matches with
N.C W esleyan College
( oach Imogene Turner was
p with the win. "We've now
ur out of the last five
ich Turner said. "We're also
nninj to show some c
lence overall
oach Turner feels tl
- their concentration still
seems to he a slight problem I
: ad Pirates
"We came out strong and won
� first, then we lost the second
�� won the third Turner said.
"Then after we lost rhe fourth.
we came back and won the match
with the fifth
The Bucs came out I
. winning 15 I
dropped the second 7 !
back to win the third 15 1
ped again in the fourth 12-15, but
did take the match in I
: final ga 5-2.
Traci Smith and Vickie (iolden
both had good game- I
Lad) Pirates Donna Davis also
played well, according i
Turner
"Donna lead ff sen . foi us
the first game and scored 12
e
ime
consecutive points before giving
up serve Turner explained.
'Main of the 12 were aces too
c oach Turner really believes in
her team and stands behind them.
ey're really can be awesome
when they are playing well
1 he I ady Bucs next match is
tonight, when they host St. An-
drews c ollege. (oach Turner
y wants a vicory on the
Pirates home court.
"I really want St. Andrews,
who is coming up here on Thurs-
day night
The match starts at 7 pm in
Minges C oliseum. Ian support is
very, important to a ball team so
please come out and cheer the
I ad Pirates on.
By JEFF WEBB
�irtbuun, Writer
The hometeam is behind with
minutes to go, third down and
long yardage for the winning
score. Time is called.
But the nail-gnawers in the
home stands get a few minutes
relief from Ulcerville when out
on the field comes the quickly
recognized symbol of the team's
nickname (or mascot), exhorting
the huddled team with exag-
gerated movements and gestures
of various expressions of
anguish.
A few moments of distraction
allows the fans' heartbeats to
return at least a little closer to
normal and they finish out the
game.
The ungainly cartoon character
tripped a psychological lever in
the fans' heads just as 'happy
time' was announced. And, for a
few moments, the magic of im-
agination took them away from
the cares of the day.
Mascots, the light and special
attraction, and specifically
cheerleading, are a relatively re-
cent phenomena that has quickly
and popularly spread through the
college sports world and now
raches down to high-school
levels.
Mascots from 250 colleges and
universities were trained this past
summer by the "Mascots Univer-
sity" of the Universal
Cheerleaders Association.
UCA, whose headquarters are
in Memphis, Tenn will sponsor
the National College Mascot
Championship, part of the
American School Spirit Awards,
in February. The annual I
College Cheerleading Champion
ship and the National Collegiate
Dance Team Championship will
be held at San Diego's Sea World
in January
"It all started with the Boston
College mascot said Jeff Davis,
the former mascot of University
of Southern Mississippi's Golden
Eagles. "But mascoting has
become a very sophisticated and
highly trained avocation
Davis pushed mascots through
10-hour-a-day paces during four
day training camps at Memphis
State, Virginig Tech and the
University of Utah.
Pam Davis, cheerleading coach
at ECU, believes the mascot is big
part of the cheerleading team and
that the Pirate squad had an e
cellent year as well.
"He (the mascot) plays a big,
big role. He's an intregal part ol
the program Davij com-
mented. "He sets the irftige for
the team
Davis has the right to be hap-
py, as he Pirate squad finished in
the finals ol two categories at
nationwide competitii
"It was a good show .
us Davis said. "We were
two teams that won the n
improved award "
The Bucs also finished ii
finals oi the fight
overall cheer fina
petition.
f he American S
Awards will recognize the I���
college and unh
next Februa
wide competition thai -
in November dmii
the Universal heei
sociation of Mem-
the mascot compel
pansion ol the compai
cheerleading contest M
250 mascots spent a
10-hour days Ii
their character
University, I he vie
toons, '
and learned to wall
animals they depict. i
show motion through par i
"These mas
creasingly important i
ing students and alum
terested in theii
universities
IA president.
I he I t will
d College heerle
San Dieg i .
Ruggers Slip Past Marines
ACC Downs Pirate Netters
B DAVIDMeGINNESS
Viaistaoi Sports -dH.?
ECU men's tennis
' tfeated Tuesday 6-3 bv
v � hristian College, losing
their top-four singles and top-two
nbles matches.
Freshman John Taylor lost to
VCC's Jaqadis Gowda 6-1 in the
sel .oul 6 in the second.
In the No 2 match, veteran
Dan Lamont lost to John Maltas
also in straight sets, 6-4, 6-1.
Mark I pple of ACC beat No. 3
reg Loyd 6-4, 6-3.
ECU's No. 4, Paul Haggar
tared no better against opponent
Krull, losing 6-3, 6-3.
hn Melhorn strengthened I
rad good singles record,
ing verv Ludwig 6-2, 6-1.
John Anthony proved he can
perform well at the No, 6 spot.
topping Danny Adcock 6-1, 6-1.
In doubles play the story was
same, the men lost in the up-
per matches and won solidly in
the lower ones.
Melhorn and Taylor fell to
Gowda and Maltas 6-3, 6-4 in the
No. 1 match
ACC's Epple and Krull took
olNimatch,
defeai onv( am
panero 6-4. 6-3.
In ihebirdh, 1am ont
and IoydpreventecI anvc
sweepol 1he dmbles wit
6-0 domination ol Adcock
I 1 udwig.
With then final dual .match
completed, the mens1 record now
stands at 4-6. On Oct. 25 thev will
'ravel to Richmond for the Col-
onial Athletic Conference Cham-
pionships.
John Taylor and the men netters gear up for the championships.
B SCOTT COOPER
And
DA VID MeGINNESS
The ECU Rughv Club extend-
ed it's winning record to 3-1 bv
edging out the U.S. Marines ol
the Cherrv Pom! Air Station
16-14.
The marines drew firs! blood
by scoring a try on a loose-ball
play, but were unable to convert
the extra-pom; kick.
The Pirates quickly regrouped,
scoring the next 12 pom's ol the
half. Rob Carroll, team advisor
and 13-year rugby veteran,
scored a try on a 10-meter run
Mike Brown added the extra
point, giving the Bucs a 6-4 ad-
vantage.
Five minutes later, the Pirates
scored off a Wayne Parnsh punt.
ECU's Doug Eckley caught the
punt and downed it in the try-
zone. Brown was once again suc-
cessful on the conversion at-
tempt, stretching the Pirate lead
to 12-4.
Cherry Point retaliated with a
long run off an overlap on the
wing, cutting the ECU lead to
12-10 at the half.
In the second half. Bob robin
made a valuable play, giving the
Pirates the insurance goal thev
would need for the win. Tobin
grabbed the ball from the back of
the scrum and made a 20-meter
dash to the goal line. Brown fail-
ed on his third extra-point at-
tempt, leaving the Bucs with a
16-10 lead.
The Marines made a last-ditch
effort, but fell short when they
missed the extra point.
Team veteran Bill Zimmerman
was impressed with the Pirates
performance and praised
Cherry Point squad
"Thev like to hit hard, but we
do too Zimmerman said "We
outplayed them technique wise,
even though thev had a
strong and big scrum
While most ol the ECl student
body will be home recupera
during the fall break, the P.
ruggers will be in
fWashington) D.C. area :
fall-breal
I he Bucs w
iversitv
1 will l
�ci 22
"We plan i
me At wa
ichool
JBl
Mike Brown (above) boots a free kick in the Bucs win over Cberrt
Pointwh.le the ruggers (below) psyche th,mU for ,his wekend
UNC Board Reviews A dmissions Policies
By SCOTT COOPER
And
DAVID MeGINNESS
sorti ration
A special committee of the
University of North Carolina
Board of Governors studying
academics and athletics in the
university system has found
evidence of low SAT scores, poor
graduation rates and many excep-
tions to admissions standards.
However, the board recommend-
ed Thursday that no new system-
wide policies should be imposed.
In a report to the board, the
committee recommended that
chancellors who head 15 UNC
campuses seek reforms in
eligibility for college sports,
recruiting of high school athletes
and season lengths. The reforms
would be accomplished through
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association and individual-
athletic conferences.
The committee found that
chancellors have adequate con-
trol over athletics and over
booster clubs, which were
described as well-audited and
clearly accountable.
At the same time, the commit-
tee's report said UNC campuses
had "serious problems associated
with our (athletic) programs
and some of these have the
potential to lead to gross abuses
that could seriously impair in-
stitutional integrity unless the
problems are faced and firmly
dealt with
The committee recommended
that chancellors would be re-
quired to prepare annual reports
for the UNC Board of Governors
on student athletes. The reports
would show athletes' SAT scores,
the number of student athletes
admitted in exception to admis-
sions policies and athletes'
academic progress during college,
among other information.
"We felt the chancellors are
the responsible party (for
athletics) at the campuses and we
didn't change that Poole said.
William C. Friday, president
of the UNC system, said the com-
mittee did not need to set more
detailed requirements. "It's the
attitude and purposefulness
that's conveyed by the document
that will command our
attention he said. "They don't
have to spell out every phase of
it. The committee believes the
chancellors support what they're
doing, and e pects them to follow
through
The committee decided not to
recommend any separate eligibili-
ty standards for freshman
athletes at UNC schools, but to
wait and see if a new NCAA
eligibility rule will be left intact at
the group's convention in
January. The committee said it
would come back into session to
review the NCAA's actions, and
might choose to act independent-
ly.
The committee's report offered
the first comprehensive look at
the UNC-system athletics pro-
grams and their relations to
academics. Among its findings:
The average SAT scores of
football and basketball players
were considerably lower than the
average for all freshmen at each
school. At East Carolina Univer-
sity, 63 percent of the players had
combined math-and-verbal
scores below 700. Only about 10
percent of the 1984 freshman
class at ECU had scored below
700 on the test, the report in-
dicated.
"Excessive" numbers of
athletes were admitted as excep-
tions to admissions policies at
most UNC campuses. ECU and
N.C. State University each ad-
mitted an average of three-out-
of-four freshman basketball
recruits as exceptions during the
four years from 1980-84. UNC-
CH admitted an average of two-
out-of-four freshman basketball
players as exceptions.
Pam Penland, ECU assistant
athletic director for academic
counceling feels mat the universi-
ty has done a great deal to im-
prove the problem.
"We have instituted a com-
prehensive tutorial program to
help the athletes Penland said
"The coaching staff here at ECU
is very concerned about the
(players') academics. There has
been a concentrated effort in the
coaching staff.
"There is a program to check
on the progress of athletes in the
classrooms Penland added.
"Now there is an effort to get
people graduated. There is a very
positive attitude
Graduation rates of athletes,
particularly at the larger schools,
are low. At NCSU, only 23 per-
cent of students who entered with
athletic grants-in-aid from 1978
to 1981 received their degrees. At
ECU, it was only 19 percent, and
at UNC-CH it was 18 percent.
This may lead us to the ques-
tion of whether oi not college
coaches have an interest in the
academic success of th
athletes.
ieir
The number of courses and
semester credit hours that
athletes take generally was below
the loads taken by other full-time
students, particularly for football
and basketball plavers at ECl
NCSU and UNC-CH.
Booster clubs are also a poten-
tial concern "Influential and
over zealous boosters intent on
controlling the programs they
support can cause serious pro-
blems for the autonomy of an in-
stitution the report said. "Re-
cent cases reported in the na-
tional press are illustrative, and
no university or college, in-
cluding none in the UNC-system
is immune from such an in-
fluence
WIT
for s;

N E E O T Y P
FOR SA
PROFESSl
� HE

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FOR SA
STUDES
'HANCE
OR
.VORD PROCF
rOR SALE
V
9
Roieig � �
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Prepare Your Cc
NEW & USED
R�tr�ad Tlrti
17.00 a Up '
SERVICE
CiA'J
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impute i �, i
Brake Sa
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Coggms
756-5
320 W





THE EAST C AROLINIAN
OCTOBER 17, 1985
al Role
.
Marines
-
We a.m
fret kick in (ht Bucs in overherry
lo psvchf themsehes for this weekend
licies
intere
the
leek
the
Ided
i es.
per-
with
is At
I, and
In'
Iques-
The number
ester redi; hours
at hir � : � generally was be
the iken ther full-time
lents, particularly for football
and basketball plavers at ECU,
N SI and UN( H
Booster clubs are also a poten
concern. "Influential and
over zealous boosters intent
controlling the programs
support can cause serious p
biems for the autonomy of an in-
stitution the report sajd. "Re-
cent cases reported in the na-
tional press are illustrative, and
no university or college, in-
cluding none in the UNC-system,
is immune from such an in-
fluence
SALE
FOR SALE. Commodore VIC 20
utet with all hookups and some
s including 6 game tapes.
"tie storage recorder player,
� fick modem with terminal pro
issette Programer's Aid,
'ory expansion cartridge and
ence manuals $200 Call An
it 757 6366 or 752 ?346
NEED TYPING: Letters Resume's,
m papers etc Call Karen at
FOR SALE: 1982 Suick SkylarK
4 door Air condition
P S Am Fm Stereo. Tilt Wheel.
ape $3,500 or $500 down ana
� ��� over payments of $148 a month
Offer Call 758 2174 between
ipm. Ask for Tony
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience, quality work,
B V- Selectric typewriter Lanie
� e 758 5301
THE MIDDLEMAN: Apartment
ig roommate referral service
all fee - putting you in touch
. " people Let us help you find the
� partment or roommate you're look
. for. Call 830 1069
1 SELL AVON Ca : Sheila 752 7279.
FOR SALE: Sanyo MBC 550 IBM
catiDle computer 256K. 2000K
and 800K disk drives seal. parallel
oorts, lotus video board, hi res
monitor, lots of software, Epson
over $2000 invested $1400
printer $1100 without. Price
� PI .a' 752 5979
STUDENTS DON'T MISS YOUR
CHANCE: To buy your official
Call foi ore informa
"OR SALE Nun
Durner
kitchen table with 4
�- 200 or 756 4270
.VORD PROCESSING: contact
: 5998 i8an: 5
�perience in typing
scien' � reports,
� ts Dusmess and form let
rOR SALE: One year old Cockatiel
age included $50 or best offer Call
19
VORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
)enencei typing resumes, theses,
echnical documents, and term
apers. We manage and merge your
tames and addresses into merged
etters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
:ards. Our prices are extremely
esonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU Students. S
�nd F Professional Computer Co.
Back of Franklin's) 757 0472
"OR SALE: 1967 Mustang Ex
ellent condition Call 756 5541
OR SALE. 5 pc leather luggage
-Jever been used $250 Call 752 1726.
TAPPER DAN'S VINTAGE
CLOTHING. (1920 1960), Jewelry
and Coliectables are now available
at Poorman's Flea Market on Hwy
264 between Washington and Green
ville open Sundays from 10 6. See
Danny
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICEWORD PROCESSING: The
Dataworks specializes in Student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resumes, and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in
eluding paper (Call tor specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after
6:15 p.m.
FOR SALE: Love seat, sofa, chair,
coffeetable. 757 1691.
LOFT FOR SALE: Fits on (Aycock)
dorm bed $40. Call 752 3265
FOR SALE: Get ahead on buying
that special gift for that special per
son. The ECU Collapsable Chair Co
ilNDT 4092 4093) is now taking
orders for the sale of the ultimate in
sitting pleasure. Call 752 2110
TYPING: Professional, experienced
IBM Typing $1 per page Includes
proofreading, grammatical and
spelling corrections Call 757 0398
after 5 15t m
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 530
TYPING: All typing services pro
vided by professional woman with
iBM Correcting Selectric
typewriter Familiar with all styles
Call Debbie at 756 6333
PERSONALS
LOST: Ti 58 C Calculator Reward
offered call after 6 p m 756 5285
FOUND: Computer program disk
Found Oct. 10 (Thursday) near
steamplant To claim call 752 4635
and identify disk brand.
ijuo HEWARD: For any mtorma
fion leading to the return of a stereo
stolen on the night of Sept 28 Op
tomca 5 pc set all in black Call
758 6921
Shop Nightly tii v�The Plena
Sturdy Cotton Duck
Flip Chairs
rue 49.99
Htgt �� . � �:
covered with heavy
jji' cotton duck in assorted
colors Great for dor" s
vacation homes,
recreation rooms and more
galleria
l?a:eigh�Durham�Greensboro�Wilson�Greenville�Wilmington�Fayefteville
- -roocoooccoycoc XIOCOCCCC&CCCO&Cr-
Prepare Your Car
NEW & USED
R�lr�ad Tlr�
$7.00 UP
SEBVIC
For Fall Break!
Complex 5 Pom
Brake Safety
� Check
:rJouf"o"
OIL- ,oC
4-CynieT
CAR SV�.HATe $29.95

For l dilhty, fci&he
Alignment
Ail size
tires
available.
3fflClfil NORTH CAROLINA SIAU INSPlCflON STATif N
Wf SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
StFGoodrieh
SbTIRE CENTER
SATURDAY
� MAM. 1:00 PM.
OPEMMON FRI
INtMiXPM

"Consider us your cars'
Home Away From Home " o3V
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Blvd
ofKocowPP�JJ0000100
TOMMY FORE : Have a super twen
tieth birthday! Love, K
JOY: please have patience Burgun
dy will chase away your blue and
your dreams will be fulfilled It only
takes time. I love you. JR
McGARRET
DJ!
5-0: If you only had
COLLEEN: The time has come to
give a clue, sometime this week, I'll
talk to you. SSA
ODELL: I lied, I did and I do feel
bad. I did not forget your birthday or
neither our friendship. No apologies
or excuses are needed between
friends, but my conscience feels bet
ter. Love Ya Little Paula
L.A.G.N.A.F If you win this next
one what do you say we all GNAF
and celebrate! Good luck guys! Jar
vis is behind you! Love,
A.R.B N.A.F
A.R.B.r A.F C. Abbott, D. Fisher,
C. Horton, K. Lipuma, N. Nickel, J
and J James Remember it was a
team effort and a good one! There's
always next year! Get off ladies! B
McShea, you were a great coach.
Thanks for all your help!
CINDY: Happy 21st birthday Hope
you have a great day Love. Kevin
IRWYWSM
FITZHUGH: Get your own Cabbage
Patch Doll Susan
CONGRATULATIONS: To our new
Gammettes! Sherry Jone, Veronica
McKinney, Francine Allen, Wanda
Battle and Stephanie Perry
Welcome to the Sigma Family!
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority
100 KEGS: Through twelve taps, will
be on hand at the Sigma Tau Gam
ma Halloween party. Music will be
supplied by Robm Thompson and
Skip Castro So come to the biggest
party on Oct 31
ECU FOOTBALL TEAM: Take ad
vantage of no game this weekend
Think about the first 6 games ana
see what has gone right and wrong
When thinking about what went
wrong, try to correct it. I've been
telling my family about how good we
are and how good we can be They're
coming for the South Carolina game,
so prove to them that you are a gooa
team use this week to rest and heal
your injuries Have a good Fall
Break and get psyched for USC The
Fan
BUCCANEER UPDATE: The 1985
Buccaneer yearbooks will arrive on
campus Oct 23rd or 24th Books will
De distributed in front of the Student
Supply Store. You must present your
ID. card ;n order to get your book
responsible for marketing, pro
moting, and delivering USA TO
DAY For more into call Mike
Rosenthal at 1 800 532 0062.
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money. Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida. Call
Bill Ryan at 1 800 282 6221
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
work at this campus. Good Income.
For more information and applica
tion write to Allen Lowrance,
Director, 251 Glenwood Drive,
Mooresville, N.C. 28115.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Christian
roommate needed to share 2
bedroom duplex. $135 includes
utilities 1 ' 2 bath. Call 756 8676 after
5.30
RIDE NEEDED: Looking for a ride
to New Jersey for Fall Break. Can
leave at 1 p.m. Oct. 18th. Will pay for
part of the gas Call 752 0796, ask for
Dan.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Non
smoker, male to share two bedroom
apt $147 50 a month, 'utilities.
752 0461. Auailable now.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203
NEED SPENDING MONEY: Need
extra cash for Christmas? Have a
little spare time? Like earning
money the easy way? Like to find
out more about it? Call Julie at
638 5308.
AMBASSADORS. Great Weekend!
Too bad some couldn't go next time
Be proud, we made it with mos
quitos, without civilization and over
THE WALL Love y'all, Aggressive
and Enthusiastic.
JAMES GRIFFIN: Your day will
come my friend Sincerely, Your
Brothers.
PAT O'NEILL: You outsmarted
me this time. Get ya next spring
M.K L.
Buy, Sell And Trade
Through
EaHt Carolinian
Classifieds
Call 757-6366
Today!
Deadlines
Turn in ads to The Fast Caroli-
nian by 12:00 noon one business
day before publication. No ads
will be taken over the phone. All
ads must be pre-paid.
Classified Ads
less
Rates
Students
Moi . Icnts
Each additional word,
All boldface type
Boxed border(lpt.)
- s: �
3.00
05
.1.00
! 00
UHliiliiimifnmmitiiiiiii.
WANTED
i
Read The Comics
Every Week In The
East Carolinian
lll�lllllXTTCXlXTXTTXia.llJLX-t-gJULaLXt:
USA TODAY: The nation's
newspaper, is looking for a hard
working campus rep
EXERCISE INSTRUCTOR NEEDED -
Self-motivated, enthusiastic individual'
Call Theresa at "5h-5te

Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th & Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
AU Transactions Confidential .
BUY�SALE�TRADE JP?
752-0322
:00 pat Moijii.
Thursday, Oct. 17th
25 DRAFT
All Nite
LADIES
ADMITTED FREE
DON'T DRIVE CALL
758-5570 for a
FREE RiDE!
TOP 40 by POWER PLAY
Private Club - All ABC Permit!
Friday Oct. 18th
LADIES NITE OUT
XANADU
Formerly Ultimate Fantasy
50� WINE ALL NITE
Doors Open � 6:30
LADIES ONLY
Doors Open to Public at 9:30 for the
TOP 40 of
TIGHTROPE
CO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
The hardest thing about break
ing into professional
music is- well, break-
ing into profession
music. So it you're
looking for an oppor-
tunity to turn your
musical talent into
.i full-time perform-
ing career, take a
good look at the
Army.
It's not
all parades
and John Philip
Sous,). Army
hands rock,
waltz and boogi
.is well as march,
and they perform
before concert au-
diences as well
as spectators.
With an average
of 40 performances a month, there's
also the opportunity for travel -
not only across Amenca. but possibly
abroad.
Most important, you can
expect a first-rate pro-
fessional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
usicians. The Army
has educational
programs that
can help you
pay for off-
duty instruc-
tion, and if
you qual-
ify even
help you
repay
your
federally-insured
student loans.
If you can sight -
read music, performing in the Amm
could be your big break Write
Chief, Armv Bands Office, Fort
Benjamin Harrison, IN 46216 5005
Or call toll tree ! 800-USA-ARM
ARMY BAND.
BEALLYOUCANBE.





10
1HI I AM i AKOI IN1AN
OCIOHhk 17, 1J
GAME
Tennessee- Alabama
uhurn-(,a lech
( lemson-Duke
Michigan-lmu
Miami-Oklahoma
UNC-N.C. Slate
Penn Stale-Syracuse
SMI -Houston
William & Mar-Iemple
Texas- Arkansas
West aBoston College
Illinois-Mich. State
rODD PAT ION
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
1 O U A
Oklahoma
N.C. State
Penn State
I emple
Arkansas
West Va.
Mich. State
Cooper Moves Up In Standings
SIEGFRIED MEWS tou uadtau nnrwiTTcnur
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Michigan
Oklahoma
UNC
Penn State
SMI
Temple
Arkansas
West Va.
Mich. State
BII I DAW SON
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Michigan
Miami
N.C. State
Penn St;
SMI
Temple
Ark
Boston c ollege
Illinois
TOM NORTON
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Michigan
Miami
UNC
Penn State
SMU
Temple
Texas
West Va.
Mich. State
THE WATTS LINE
Alabama
Ga. Tech
Clemson
Michigan
Oklahoma
UNC
Penn State
SMU
Temple
Arkansas
Boston College
Illinois
SCOTT COOPER
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Michigan
Oklahoma
UNC
Penn State
SMU
Temple
Arkansas
Boston College
Illinois
RICK McCORMAC
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Michigan
Miami
UNC
Penn State
SMU
Temple
Arkansas
West Va.
JOHN PETERSON
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Iowa
Miami
N.C. State
Penn State
Temple
SMU
Arkansas
Boston College
llinois
STANDINGS
SIEGFRIED MEWS
TOM NORTON
THE WATTS LINK
SCOTT COOPER
RICK McCORMAC
JOHN PETERSON
TODD PATTON
BILL DAWSON
l AM WEEK
9-3
9-3
9-3
11-1
7.5
9-3
9-3
10-2
OVERALL
52-19
51-20
50-21
49-22
48-23
46-25
45-26
45-26
IRS Physical Fitness Program Coming
B JEANNETTE ROTH
stiff Wr1lr
I h e Depart m e n t o f
Intramural-Recreational Sen ices
Physical Fitness Program is gear-
ing up for second session aerobic
fitness registration From Oct.
23-25 second session registral
wi
be
h.�
room
:o4
Memorial Gym. The classes begin
Oct. 28 and will end Dec. 6. fhe
cost is $8.00 for students and
$15.00 for facult) stafl spouse.
All campus putt-put: g
finals will be held tonight at
Greenville's Putt-Putt Golf
Course on Highwa) 33. With the
reason's end. individual low
scores have been tabulated with
following outcomes. Jen Tafi
and Rick Klein have tied for the
lowest match, by shooting a 61.
Donna San Marco shot the lowesl
ie in the ladies division with
an 80. The
lowest overall average are Jeft
Ian and Donna SanMarco who
shot a 63 and 80 respectively.
It's time for last Carolina's
alley cats to come out of hiding
dud register for team bowling,
Oct. 16-24. learn Captain's must
�nd the Team Captain's
meeting on ct. 24 at 5 pm in the
Mendenhall Bowling Center.
Registration for Volleyball
begins this week. A learn Cap-
tain's meeting will be held Oct. 24
Brewster C-103. If you
extra mone for those
family� : stmas gifts, attend the
volleyball official's clinic Oct. 23.
The Intramural Sports Program
will tram you through a number
oi rules and positioning clinics.
The clinic will be held at 9 pm in
Memorial Gym room 102.
Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
ECU students to tonight's
women's soccer and men's rugby-
club social to be held at Sub Sta-
tion II at 8 pm. If you are in-
terested in being a member of any
sport club offered, contact Pat
( o in room 204 Memorial Gvm.
flag Football finals are tonight
on the intramural fields adjacent
to Ficklen Stadium. Be sure to get
'�nt and cheer on your favorite
gridiron greats. Congratulations
to tins year's divisional finalists.
iood Luck!
V������SCN�sCS�sCsC�S�sCN
I THE
DINNER
PLACE
4 p.m10 p.m.
Jters with the Sport Club program invites all
Show us your student I.D.
and Get An Extra 10 Discount:
Pure Gold Tryouts

The Pure Gold Dancers will be
conducting tryouts for the up-
coming sea ' ere will be an
organizational meeting !ODA
in Minges Coliseum in Room 144
8 pm.
Gamecock
Tickets
Sold Out
The IX I vs. South Carolina
game on Oct. 26 is officially a
sellout, athletic department of-
als announced a week ago. No
general public tickets remain at
this time.
The only way general public
ale of South Carolina tickets will
take place is if the ECU students
do not pick up their allotted
tickets or if the University of
South Carolina returns some of
its allotment to the ECU Athletic
Ticket Office.
If either occurs, the remaining
tickets will be placed on sale for
the general public on Monday,
Oct. 21.
Due to the excessive demand
for tickets for the South Carolina
game, the Athletic Department is
revising the ECU student pickup
schedule. In order to give
students ample opportunity to
pick up their allotted tickets, TO-
DAY is the last day.
TODAY is the FINAL day that
students can pick up tickets for
the ECU vs. South Carolina
game. If students have not picked
up their allotted tickets at the end
of the final day, remaining
tickets, which will be on the press
box side of Ficklen Stadium, will
be placed on sale to the general
public beginning Monday, Oct.
21.
Those interested in placing
their names on a waiting list in
the event seats become available
from the University of South
Carolina or from unclaimed stu-
dent tickets, send your name, ad-
dress and telephone number to
the ECU Athletic Ticket Office at
Minges Coliseum. Names will be
recorded as they are received and
you will be contacted regarding
ticket availability.
Vnyone interested MUST at-
d the meeting. For further in-
formation contact the Athletic
Marketing Department a:
757-6491. All students are asked
attend.


Mon. & Tues. Night
Fried Shrimp � All You an I at $4 50
Wed. Night
Scallops & Soft Shell Crabs Combo $4.50
7- Thurs. Night
Cubbies Cheese Steak $2.50
) Fri. Night
Cabbies Shrimp Burger $1.50
Dailx Special
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00
Hamburger & French Fries Sl.(K)
corner oj ma I vans St.
Hours: 10:30 a m. to 2:30 a.n
" Day 5 a H eek
Phone 752-6497
TUBE!
Revco Bagged Candy
A.ss Pted FIslv i
Get it for less everyday
2S100
vi

STYLING IRON
Royal Salon Curling Iron $f QQ
Assorted styles � MB
Get it for less everyday lib ea.
Filler Paper
100 count
Get it for less everyday
89
t
IVOIsO
Ivory
ShampooConditioner
15 n. oz
Get it for less everyday
$189
1
DATE: Wednesday October 16
Thursday October 17
TIME: 9:00-4:00
PLACE Student Store Sf s tradit,on �fe'��ence
DISCOUNT DRUG
�(Only ECU Student D s Qualify For 10 Discount,
Does Not App,y ,o Alcohol Tobacco Products F�m Products. Magaz.nes 0. Sot, DnnKs
GREENVILLE
South Park Shopping Center
115 E. Red Banks Rd. � 756-9502
Open Mon-Sat 9-9 � Sun 1-6
i
-






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Title
The East Carolinian, October 17, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.433
Location of Original
University Archives

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