The East Carolinian, October 15, 1985






She
(ftarnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No. 15
Tuesday, October 15, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Thornburg Visits ECU,
Speaks To Group
Hatch Out!
JIM LEUTGENS - The E��t c�roln
With the unseasonably warm weather still with us, man students stick to one of the more
economical forms of transportation available � pedal power. Nevertheless, bicyclists need to watch
out for motorists and pedestrians and visa versa.
Graduate Numbers Low
(CPS) � Colleges are exag
gerating the number of athletes
they actually graduate, the
Government Accounting Office
(GAO) says.
Some campus sports sup-
porters fret the GAO rq I ma)
resuscitate congressional efl
to force colleges to pa closet ai
tention to how well student
athletes are doing in class
The GAO said an American
College Testing (ACT) Progi
stud) of how main athletes
graduate simply compared
graduation rates of athletes and
non-athletes, but didn't break
out how manv athletes were on
scholarship, says the GAO's
i arolyn Boyce
Another stud, this one b Ad-
vanced Technology, Inc and
trumpeted b the National (
legiate Athletic Ass - iation
(NCAA) as pr h : . eges work
hard to educate athletes,
statistical!) compared "apples to
oranges Bovce sas
�s a result, they didn't answer
questions posed last year b) Rep.
James Howard (D-N.J.), who
wants to stop alumni from deduc-
ting from their income taxes
mone) donated to colleges that
fail lo educate their athletes.
"Should we allow money to be
deductible for advancing educa-
n when athletes don't
graduate?" asks Scott Imus, an
aide to Howard.
Howard wants to end deduc-
tions for donations to schools
that don't graduate at least three-
quarters o their scholarship
athle'es within five years 1 tar
ting school.
Imus says Howard figures that
ilarships are supported in
varying degrees by tax deductible
dollars, but are used to enhance
schools' teams with little regard
I graduating the athletes.
Boyce also notes the A 1
stud. r � was commissioned
b) the C A A to help refute
charges colleges exploit athletes.
did not break down the data by
institution.
The schools with good gradua-
tion records for their athletes
may have very small or nonexis-
tant programs, she adds.
�s a result, the study says little
about how effective athletic
scholarships are in promoting
education.
Only 23 percent of the schools
surveyed actually responded to
the AC'T's qut .lions. Researchers
relied mostly on athletic direc-
tors' estimates of how many
athletes in their programs
graduate each year.
"1 can't defend the 23 percent
rate says Jim Maxey, who did
the AC'T's research.
Maxey added that, although
the sample was not represen-
tative, more than 80 percent ot
the respondents were from "ma-
jor athletic schools
Nc A officials did not return
calls concerning the GAO report.
Bv DOUG ROBFRSON
Staff Wiilrr
North Carolina Attorney
General Lacy H. Thornburg told
a group of ECU students and
faculty on Tuesday that honesty
and fair dealings are essential
qualities in a successful business
Thornburg delivered the in-
augural address for the Beta
Gamma Sigma Distinguished
Lecturer Series. Beta Gamma
Sigma is the National Scholastic-
Honor Society in the field of
business and is sponsored by the
ECU School of Business.
In a prepared speech, Thorn-
burg said, "A good businessman
has the duty not to take advan-
tage of another's weaknesses, be
it a business or an individual
He added that laws which pro-
tect consumers have a moralistic
basis, "Laws against unfair and
deceptive business practices are
the equivalent of the Golden Rule
- do unto others as you would
have them do unto you
Thornburg said the state At-
torney General's office is
dedicated to serving the people of
North Carolina.
"Some of the attorney generals
in other states view their roles
solely as representing the agencies
ot state government. Some solely
represent the people. I believe in
balancing the interests of the
government and of those who are
governed he said.
Thornburg added that the
public's interest is foremost when
conflicts of interest occur bet-
ween the people and government.
Manv potential businessmen
are concerned with the "anti-
business" image ot consumer
protection laws and agencies,
Thornburg said.
"Manv business-oriented peo-
ple often view consumer proii
tion as anti-business, but i
simply is not the case he said.
The function ot 'he consumer
protection division in the A'
lorney General's office protects
businesses as well as consurm
"The Consumer Protection
Division protects North Carolina
consumer from unfaii
deceptive trade practice
division also protects businesses
from dishonesty and unethical
competition he said.
Thornburg gave some recom-
mendations to future
businessmen regarding con umer
protection. "Most consumers are
understanding when problems
arise. Consumers are
understanding when their com-
plaints are treated as if �
didn't matter
He added, "It's important I
business people to attempt to
quicklv .orrect at - imer
problems. Most om-
plam to other consun
the) complain to the companv.
That's bad buMnc
In a questu n and answ
, Thornburg said that
See Bl SINESS Pa�e 5
Facility Misuses Discussed
Bv LANCE SEARLE
suff Wrtl�f
The Media Board held a .on
troversial hearing Monday con-
cerning the use o appropriations
and facilities tor The Pirate
Pigskin Preview.
Former East Carolinian sports
editors Randy Mews and Rick
McC'ormac were dismissed from
their positions, banned from
other media positions at ECU for
one academic year and required
to replace any funds not already
paid to The East Carolinian.
The controversy began when
Mews and McCormac allegedly
attempted to publish a multi-page
review of ECU's upcoming foot-
ball games. In the process, they
used The East Carolinian
facilities to print the paper.
When E I media officials
learned of the publication, ques-
tions rose as to whether Mews
and McCormac were attempting
to make illegal profits from The
East Carolinian.
Evidence against the sports
editors were similarities in the let-
ter types in both The Pirate
Pigskin Preview and The 1
Carolinian.
Media Board Chairman Mark
Simon said after the meeting that
although the infractions were
"white collar, victimless crimes,
the students are the ones who are
hurt everv time appropriations
are misused.
"This is the third
something
happened he :
policies ol 1(1 med
reviewed and more widel) -
by media workers
be
time
Rape Can Be Prevented, Not Committed By Strangers
McC ormav. said in respo
that they had "no intern
making a profit. All we wantex
I ' was to promote ECU football
We worked night and day on
paper and we ended up losing
money on it
McCormac was also unhappy
about what led up to Monday's
closed session. "1 don't realh
preciate how the whole thing wa-
handled. It was blown totall)
of proportion. I d feel
have dov.c anything wrong
B BFTH WHICKER
Sl�ff SrUrr
Most rapes are committed by
an acquaintance rather than by a
complete stranger, said detective
Karla Fuller of the Greenville
Police Department.
Since January 1st, five rapes
have been reported to the Green-
ville Police Department, accor-
ding to Fuller. "Of the five rapes
that have occured since January,
two were ex-boyfriend e-
girlfriend situations, one was
raped by a person the victim
knew, the other two rapes were
committed by strangers to the
victim said Fuller.
Twenty rapes have been
reported to the Real Crisis In-
tervention Center, according to
Mary Smith, director of the
center. "We have more reported
rapes because many victims do
not want to involve the police for
fear of embarrassment or their
own fear of the rapist's retalia-
tion. Fear of retaliation is the
most common fear. Manv victims
do not report the rape because
they feel they ma) have enticed it;
this is especiall) true with date
rape or acquaintance rape said
Smith.
Date rape or acquaintance rape
is defined as another person forc-
ing sexual encounters without the
consent of the other person in-
volved in the act. "This year,
several acquaintance-type rapes
occured, but no victims wanted
to prosecute. Date rapes and ac-
quaintance rapes are a major pro-
blem on university campuses.
These types of rapes are the most
unreported of all rapes. Victims
do not think that anyone will
believe that they were raped ac-
cording to Cpl. Rhonda Gurley
of the ECU Public Safety Depart-
ment.
"If a female says no to a male
once he continues advancing and
eventually forces sex on her, he
can be charged with rape. Many
males do not know when to stop
making advances and believe that
when a female savs no that she
really means yes. Rape can be a
hard area in which to prove a
crime; therefore, many rapes go
unreported to the authorities.
Many victims call the Real Crisis
Center to overcome the traumatic
experience added Smith.
"We don't get calls for all
rapes that occur. The evidence is
not our first priority but the vic-
tim is. We cannot overlook the
importance of evidence if it is
overlooked at the beginning. It
could be serious in the outcome
of the situation said Fuller.
"Rape is not an act of lust, but
an act of violence. Sex is a
method of dehumanizing of the
female. Sex is used as a weapon,
but it is not the reason women are
raped said Fuller.
"There are many situations in
which rape could have been
prevented. Each person can pre-
vent themselves from being a vic-
tim. Preventing rape involves
common sense. You have to
realize that there are people who
can hurt you. A rape victim is
watched for vulnerability and
isolation. Females should change
their schedules as much as possi-
ble. If you do the same things
every day at the same time you
could find yourself an easy
target said Smith.
"Taking lighted areas when
walking at night, walking with
others and having your keys
ready before getting into your car
at night can reduce the chance of
rape said Fuller.
"In college, students tend to go
out with students they hardly
know. For example, students
meet other students in bars and at
parties and naturally assume
these people are okay and agree
to a date. It is very risky to date
someone they've only met brief-
ly. For the first few dates they
should arrange to meet their date.
By meeting their date they can
escape if they feel intimidated or
Counseling is available for
rape victims. "It is important to
accept what has happened, and
go on with life. Counseling is
available at the Student Health
Services, and the Real Crisis In-
tervention Center added
Gurley.
"I would recommend that
students take advantage of the
Pirate Walk or walk with other
students. If there is no one to
walk with one should call the
Campus Police; they will assist
the lady in traveling safely to her
destination said Guriev
Sexual Revolution Has Come To An End
AMES, IA (CPS) � The sexual
revolution seems to have ended
on campuses, some experts say.
Iowa State psychology pro-
fessor Meg Gerrard's most recent
survey of college sex habits found
far fewer "sexually-active"
women on campus than there
On Theinside
Announcements2
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
See the happy moron,
He doesn't give a damn,
I wish 1 were a moron,
My God! Perhaps I am!
� Anonymous
were just a few years ago.
"My research clearly indicates
that there is less sex on campus
than five years ago she reports.
While other observers are
reluctant to endorse Gerrard's
conclusion, they do sense a
change in students' sexual prac-
tices.
"I don't know if it is
statistically reliable to say there
has been a drop" in sex, says
Clive Davis, a Syracuse Universi-
ty psychology professor who
monitors sex research.
"At most, I would say there
might be a leveling off Davis
concludes.
Gerrard bases her conclusion
on ongoing surveys of college
women since 1973.
In her first survey, Gerrard
found that about 34 percent of
the University of Texas-Austin
female students she asked were
"sexually active having sex at
least once a month.
In 1978-79, Gerrard expanded
her research to also include
University of Kansas women, and
found that 51 percent of the
women at both schools were sex-
ually active.
"The late seventies were
definitely the height of the sexual
revolution she observed.
Now Gerrard has released the
results of her latest survey, taken
during the 1983-84 school year at
Texas, Kansas and Iowa State,
and found sexual activity seems
to have declined.
Some 37 percent of the women
responding said they had sex at
least once a month.
Gerrard attributes the decrease
in sex to the generally more con-
servative attitudes of students
these days.
"They will wait until they are
in a relatively committed rela-
tionship until they jump into
bed Gerrard adds.
She speculates that fear of sex-
ually transmitted diseases also is
contributing to the downswing in
campus sex, and that women may
be more assertive in saying "no,
that they are not ready yet
But Davis contends there are
not enough recent conclusive
studies to determine if in fact
there has been a decrease of sex
on campuses nationwide.
This One Was For Yau&SStZU.
Imagine that you are walking with some friends and one offers
you a Bud. But as you reach for it it slips from vour hand and falls
to the ground - where life's cruel wheels crush it into nothingness
Don't fret; there's another in the cooler � life's the same way �
there's always another chance.





(KT H1 k 15, lsK
PRE MED
Announcem
IFC
W I 2 Club Meetmq
Von
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
B v� lull MfitiDfr and Pro�pet
' ' '��'���� ' ' I oiiegiatc A aoamy of
1 � � I ' ' p s s hpoulrd tor Nov 1 3 fo
W " N N (. We will be staying at
� Mall Blue Ruiue Assembly The
s presently set at $20 but pending and
Ac paid to Wargaret Sihiiiet m the
at Main Otte Heservat.ons are
� � St fifty sign ups and there is
� ' � , meeting tor all who are going
Oct 28 at 7 p m
REGISTRATION FOR
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
INTRAMURAL FACILITY
SCHEDULE
B
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE
PSI CH
BACKGAMMON TOURNAMENT
I Campus Ba. kgammon Tournament
be heid until 3pm Ocf 15
B �� Tou-nament starts at
� ' �1 on aii "i 66! I
ACCOUNTING MAJORS
' � available tor
- n rs wiffi Ouke ower
' " � eternal Revenue Service
�' l 'r more information
� '�'��'��"�� tg ipportunities i onta t
operative Fdu(ation ottae ,n Rawi
BANKING
� � sten
m Wednesday Ocf )6 at
on amb Ms Lisa
" � ' Wachav.a Bank � . ,� op
' � ' � ' �e its the oankmg in
� � .
COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
FRESH -SOPH
St,n interested in being on the Honor
Board we have one more slot open Come to
the SGA office ,n Mendenhali and put in your
application by 5 p m Wednesday Screen
irSS will be Wednesday mght at 7 � and an
applicants must attend
LSSSMEETING
The ne�t LSSS meeting will be on Wed C ,
'6 at 7 p m ,n the Multipurpose Rm Goes'
Speaker w,i; be Mrs Mairlyn Steele She will
provide interesting information on food and
Nutrition Everyone please attend We
should have lots of tun
PPHA
Matthew Whitted assistant director of
MED (Medical Education Development Pro
Arami at UNC Chapel Hill, will be on Cam
pus Wed Oct UiUpm ,n room 221 in the
Mendenhali Student Center All pre med.
pre dent pre vet pre opfometry and pre
ood.atry ma.ors as wen as other interested
guests art ent iuraged 'o attend MED s a
summer program tor those interest
medual career
ECU COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
Our net meeting j on Thur Oc'
Brewster BB 204d at 7 p m Let s have tv.
Represents,yes from all Honor So, iet
Campus
.
. v
�, �� .
' . �
MOCK BAKE SALE
� a �, ectingat the
esdav � lie � �
� "casr donate

oo
-i
CLIFF'S
PRESBYTERIANMETHODIST
FELLOWSHIP
���??
Come t� the Methodist Studententer It
Wednesday mght at 5 JO p m and ever,
Wednesday n-ghttor a del.nous an ,�
eat homecooKeo meal w 'h a short progran
�ra,ds I he meal s�2 at the door Jlso
it you sign up in advan, e Sim e this Wednej
aay ,s World Food Day th,s week we will see
a sfiort t,im about world unger Can
'M 2030 tor reservations Sponsored by
Presb,ter,an and Methodist Campus
Ministries
NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH ASSOCIATION
Will be going camping the weekend of Nov
2 AH those want.ng to go should call 752 8777
lor more information
ECU POLITICAL SCIENCE
We're look.ng u� � � good people w.tr a
aednaton to studying todays issues In
terested in finding out w) nJ,a r,apcM�
tomorrow trom today S perts' The
"�e challenge ,om the E CIII
ety There are already new pro
e ts under way bu' we need )u F,nd Out
what's new al ui ��� ��� -Thursday
� ' Brewster c wing 'OOm 105 ,��
US and ge' the yyhole s'or. Or
do you have what � 'anes'
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
� ' ��� eting
for interested pledges on Oc t 17 7 p
Mtmdenr.a i room 243 .an ma Sigma I
5 a Na' ty promoting ser
Iship ano equfl � the com
mun.t, F ir mot . . , . .
BLOOD PRESSURE
SCREENING
' ' �� �.If V .IT .

trom noor- �� .
s reenmg Wi oe ne.d at v.
School 0t Nuri,ng Lobb,
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Cues' speaker tonight Tues I �
be Sylvania Wilkerson former
Off i er and green ber
Mmorit, Aftairs Director lot
Republican Par �
tant �e
-oom 221 Mendenhali Stuck
Sand, Hat I, a- 757 0711 lot
fion
SCHOOL OF BUSINF 5
SCHOLARSHIPS

-
-
-


LOOK GOOD
When Your Friends
See You Back at School
�� ����?
GORDON'S
GOLF & SKI SHOP
264 By-Pass (Beside G'v.lle TV & Appliance)
Men & Ladies
Wens, Ladies, Children
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
i
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(Past R. . � 4pj ,
GOLF SHOES
Super Selection Mm W O
OFF
Sportsfi JACKETS
J Flounder
J Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
Large selection of SKYR
turtle necks in o
rainbow of colors.
, -NEWLY REMODELED -
A(,
756-1003
Come by and see our
new winter sweaters
by - Woolrick, Izod &
Obermeyer.
'We've got the largest selection oj GolJ A Ski � quipment in
� astern c . "
30-60 off
All Eveo;s Frames wDurchase of Rx Lenses
Ray Ban Sunglasses. . . 30 off
LARGE
Select Group of Frames
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27
95
BIFOCALS "rr.4695
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$25
r Is
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20
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Senior Citizen
Discount
Sale ends N
1 Discount P�r Ey�gla�s
CfAR
VE plicians

J
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Open Moo -f 'i I A.M M i
HiraT-0��oantoQ Oioari
Night Club
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Piitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
USE
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25C Wine and Draft all Night Long!
Friday Night
WAM BAM END OF THE WEEK JAM
Doors Open at 8:00p.m.
Wear Purple and Gold and get in
for JUST $1.00
$1.00 Tall Boys � 50c Wine & Draft
$2.50 Pitchers
ALL NITE LONG
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
All ABC Permits
Kroqer
fc Ocr 19 198
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
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HHOopa





I HI- FASTAROI INIAN
OCTOBER 15, 198'
NtSS

I0K GOOD
iten Your Fnends
e You Back at School
3 off
;es
O U 70 off
il, mm
1
ETED
es
'25
:r�8ia�s
I �
ansi
J
I
-t2 ' Jfcr
iONSIoetails In store
terry
ke .
99
Shrimp
Basket
$
-L.
$P
yers
gurt.
49
'nCO-
.
Blood Pressure Vital
For Good Health
Science Teaching Focus Of Project
HI New Burrtu
1 ea tiers from five school
districts in eastern North
Carolina are participating in a
pilot project designed to improve
science teaching in the middle
school grades.
Methods of teacher training
and materials must be devised to
HEALTH'
COLUM
The Health Column answers
student's questions and concerns
about health related problems.
Anyone who has a question they
would like answered, or a con-
cern thev would like to have
clarified, send your question or
concern to the Healtholumn.
The hastarolinian. Publica-
tions Building. 1(1 .
WHA1 is HIGH BLOOD
PR! SSI RE?
High blood pressure is a warn-
ing that your heart is working
harder than normal to pump
blood and extra fluid through
your body. More important,
when high blood pressure is not
treated it can lead to serious
damage to blood vessels that food
the heart, the brain and the
kidnev. Statistically, uncontroll-
ed high blood pressure is the ma
jor cause ol heart attacks, strokes
and kidney disease.
WHAT IS A NORMAI BLOOD
PRESSURE?
There is no blood pressure
reading that is norm
everyone. Age, sex and overall
health determine whal your nor-
mal blood pressure is Some
medications ma increase your
blood pressure such as an-
tihistamines and oral contracep-
tive agei 1 ireover, your
blood press
different times day
and your blood pressu e is lowest
when you resi Physical
or emotional stress can also raise
your blood pressure.
WHO GETS HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE?
Anyone can net high blood
pi ess tire More older than
younger people have high blood
pressure; nevertheless, some peo-
ple get it when they are much
younger and more men than
women get high blood pressure.
Mso, black Americans are more
likely to have high blood
pressure, and to have a more
serious form than white
Americans. Interestingly, people
who are born and raised in
1 astern North Carolina also seem
to have a higher incidence of high
blood pressure than people who
live in other parts of the country.
If anyone in your family has high
blood pressure or has had
strokes, heart attacks or kidney
disease, you are more likely to get
high blood pressure.
HOW CAN I FIND Oil IF I
H Wl HIGH HI OOD
PRESSl RI '
Get your blood pressure check
ed periodically bv your family
physician oi at the Student
Health Center. lso, blood
pressure checks will be done bv
sophomore nursing students on
several davs in October. 1 ook
them in from of Mendenhall, the
st ude rit Supply Store, the
Croatan, and the School of Nuts
ing 1 obby.
Club Travels To D. C.
Bv KI.IABKTH PAGE
Sl.ff Wrttrr
The ECU Veterans Club is
planning to sponsor a trip that
would include a visit to the Viet-
nam Memorial in Washington,
DC. said Veterans Club Presi-
dent Jim Reid. who is a senior
majoring in English.
'The Vietnam Veterans
Memorial is one of the most mov-
ing memorials said Reid, "I
think that everyone should have
the opportunity to see it
According to Hector Campos,
who is the committee chairman
tor organizing the trip, "the trip
to the Vietnam Memorial will
give an opportunity for those
who have never seen the
memorial to see it
The Veterans Club is not new
to I CI . according to Reid, "the
club was popular during the 60s,
but events such as the Vietnam
War decreased the interest in the
organization. We're trying to
reestablish interest in the club
added Reid.
The Veterans Club is not only
limited to veterans on the cam-
pus, but other interested parties
as well, Reid said.
"The purpose of the Veteran's
Club is to promote the American
way of life, encourage leadership
and promote interbranch
fellowship among the veterans o
the United States Armed Services
and other interested partes he
said.
"Many people have
misconceptions of what a veteran
is like and we just want to clear
up those misconceptions added
Reid.
Plans are underway to make
the trip to the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial an annual trip, accor-
ding to Campos. "We're seeking
funds from SCiA for the trip,
which is only tentative at this
time said Campos. "The trip
will be open first to club
members, then if space permits,
non-members can go said
( ampos.
"There is a certain amount of
deep respect shown for the Viet-
nam Veterans Memorial said
Reid. "There are no children run-
ning and playing, there is only a
deep respect shown by the
children and their parents add-
ed Reid.
M1K
FALL BREAK COUPONS
WGOODYEAm
TIRE
I IN EASTf
CENTER
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Greenville
729 Dickmson Ave
Phone 752 4417
� Official N.C. Inspection Station
� We Employ . Technicians
� All nrw fcowgkt rt MrtMr OOODYIAR DM CINTI or. mmM
Fill
� Wa rorat. all Uxm�o nm f Kit
� W� GmohihI� all Mrric -� pmiimm In writing
� W� imnId Nuftmiul Account
Greenville
West End Shopping Center
Phone 756-9371
GftDSS
OCTOBER
1985
&
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overcome "a significant pro-
blem" confronting educators in
North Carolina because of a cur-
riculum change ordered by the
State Board of Education, accor-
ding to Floyd E. Mattheis, direc-
tor of the Science and Math
Center at ECU.
The curriculum change deleted
the life science and earth science
courses in grades seven and eight
and replaced these courses with
two years of integrated science.
With the integrated science cur-
riculum, "teachers will have to
teach different topics than they
have before Mattheis said. The
integrated science courses "take a
topic and teach all aspects of that
topic, as related to the different
sciences Mattheis said.
As a result, there is a need "for
a broader base" in teaching
science, he said
The pilot program, called
Foundational Approaches in
Science Teaching (FAST) "is a
well-tested and proven solution
Mattheis said.
Thirteen teachers from school
districts in Martin, Gates, Nca
Hanover, Bertie and Washing
counties participated in a two-
week workshop at the E I
Science and Math center and will
participate in another scheduled
for next summer.
The FAST program is
laboratory-oriented and the
workshop participants were in-
structed in methods of teaching
and materials, said Mattheis.
' CONTACT LENSES ;
i
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DAILY WEAR
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deludes c y s ��� ies ire krt and ' -up
tnei I
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Dr Peter W hqiiis
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?reerivii!e - . I
3ree le. NC - �
t

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Greenville, N.C.
757-0327
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Si?e East (Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, mmf nrj
Jay Stone, w��ilni tj��,
Tom Luvender. a�a
Anthony Martin, ���, v
John Peterson, , ���,�
Shannon Short. p, vana(t
Debbie Stevens, w
V�rn Editor
MlM I I DWK K
Rick Mccormac
S I OOPI K. Co-Sporu Edilc
I OK IN PASQl Al . FttMMfiiK
ANDRI VV JoVM K. Coo, td�or
lK'iu!i i Johnson.
October 15. Is�8
Direc
Bill Mitchell
� mutation Kljnuger
Opinion
Page 4
Sports Talk
Academics Neglected In Sports
Recent revelations concerning
zademic standards among college
athletes are an embarassment to
sity. East Carolina rank-
e bottom of the heap
seven other L'NC system
in graduating college
on scholarship. From 1978
only 19 percent of the
tes who came here on scholar-
?ceived a diploma.
stud) also showed that at
ercent of freshmen foot-
d basketball players had
(d SAT math-and-verbal
700. A score of 400 is
score possible and on-
10 percent of the 1984
class al this university
' m the test, in ad-
d an average of
� freshmen basket-
exceptions to stan-
ions policies during the
NSC � '84.
'his means, obvious-
es are being brought
for the purpose of
ts. Many will ask,
ere is anything truly
ibout that. After all, they
these are folks who
idmitted into school
he didn't have an op-
� sports. College
which help them
ce, therefore, are ac-
g them a favor by at least
shot at college, expos-
hen the limelight and the
' being recruited by
scouts. Such pro-
might be argued, also
tes for their prowess by
hem with special tutors
portswear, exclusive din-
?s and, at some schools,
under the table and other
lefits.
Ri
sing to see college
Tampered and privileg-
ing to see reality.
I the matter is that college
exploited on most cam-
the recognition and
that they bring into the
ol and the town. Athletics eat
tudy time and coaches all too
push the idea that academics
I take a back seat to sports
lubs, which help raise
for university athletics, fre-
quently become intent upon con-
Hing the programs thev support
ind this too can have an adverse
n both coaches and
letes.
The fact that professors and
tutors at ECU report that thev have
taught athletes who were illiterate
should convince anyone that
athletes are not benefitting from a
program which, in many respects
treats them like marines or even cat-
tle. Some of the members who
make up the various sports teams
on our campus have been encourag-
ed or allowed to neglect academics
in favor of sports from junior high
school until their arrival here, at the
hallowed halls of ivy - or kudzu as
the case may be. In anv event, it is
time that ECU corrected the in-
justice that is being done to our
sportsmen and women.
The issue is not whether or not
these people should be in college.
To make such a decision is like try-
ing to decide which famine victims
will receive food packages that are
in scarce supply. We believe that
every American should have the op-
portunity to attend college in return
for community service, a tour of
duty in the peace corps or
something of a similar nature. The
citizens of many West European
countries have their educations paid
for by the government and,
ironically, many of these same
countries are outperforming us
economically. Public education
should be more generously funded
in America, for as Robert Reich
and other economists have per-
suasively argued, it is human
capital which creates economic
growth. For a country not to invest
in its human resources is for it to
mortgage its future.
The university should begin help-
ing to repair trie damage that has
been wrought over the years by the
way the higher education and
athletic systems in this country in-
teract. It should enlarge tutoring
programs which presently assist
students who need help and such
services should be provided to
academically troubled athletes even
after they stop playing sports.
Moreover, the tutors provided
should be academic tutors and not
those selected by the athletic
department. They should be
responsible for targetting problem
students for special assistance.
Yet, athletes themselves must
bear some responsibility in all of
this too. They must get their
priorities straight and face the fact
that few of them will play profes-
sional sports. Those who know that
they will not should stop deluding
themselves and consider why they
are here.
AAAfl&uiiK
Contras Being Coached
CIA Plays In Nicarag
ByJOYHACKELAnd
DANIEL SIEGEL
In Th�i� Timei
Later this month, the White House
will again ask legislators on Capitol Hill
to unleash the CIA against Nicaragua.
As Congress debates whether to renew
the "Boland Amendment a congres-
sional ban on CIA involvement with the
contras, it would be wise to recall how
the Reagan administration has i
sistentl) tied to Congress and
American people about its intention to
topple the Sandinista governmei
The activities of Marine Lt.
Oliver North of the National Set .
( ouncil presents an insidious exa
Without the knowledge or con i
ngress, North has been bus) dire.
ting contra tactical operations, acting as
a liaison for contra fundraising drives
and orchestrating the contra lobb)
efforts on Capitol Hill
Why did Reagan officials fii
necessary to conceal North's role and
"hide" the contra war within the Na-
tional Security Council The Boland
Amendment prohibits the1A. the
Defense Department and all other in-
telligence agencies from supplying the
contras with advice, military materiel.
personnel or training. Vet North's ac-
tivities clearly support the contra cause
and defy congressional stipulations.
Equally troublesome are the recent
confessions of Edgar Chamorro a
former director of the FDN, the largest
contra group and a leader hand-picked
by the CIA. According to Chamorro.
the covert war has targeted not only the
Sandinistas but members of the I S
Congress. "The CIA men didn't have
much respect for Congress recalls
Chamorro. "They said we could
change how representatives voted as
long as we knew how to 'sell' our case
and place them in a position of looking
soft on Communism. Thev suggested
members whom we should'lobbv and
gave us the names of big shots we
should contact in their home districts
The CIA is explicitly prohibited from
such lobbying efforts by the president's
own executive order.
Moreover, the administration has
misled Congress regarding the make-up
:es. Earlier this year
1 anghorne Motley, former Assistant
Secretary ol State for Inter-American
A" ;ed before Congress that
the freedom fighters are peasants
farmers, shopkeepers and vendors
en leaders are without exception n
PPOsed S moa However a
-ued last spring bv a bipari
gressioi tucus specializing
lic found that 46 of the 48
� � the Nicaraguan Democratic
� rce are former National Guardsmen
' � late d ctator, nastasi M
rhe administration even liedal
ginal justification for supporting the
contra army. i� congressional
mony, official argued that the
as e.essarv to interdici
arn s n�w I ' m the Sandinistas to
Salvador an insurgents While
I ndersecretary of Defense Fred Ikle
testified that the Salvadorans obtained
"th . percentage of (their) muni-
tions from Nicaragua only months
earlier a classified cable from the I S
embassv in San Salvador admitted that
"the insurgents may have obtained
most of their newly acquired firearms
through capture from the Salvadoran
military "
These deceptions underscore a larger
pattern of deceit and Ulegalitv bv White
House policymakers. A report entitled
"In Contempt Of Congress" released
earlier this year by Sens. Tom Harkin
(D-IA) and John Kerry (D-MA) details
a systematic record of deception. The
report, prepared by the Institute for
Policy Studies, reveals 77 instances in
which the Congress has been deceived
or misled by Reagan officials concern-
ing their activities in Central America.
The report also cites 15 possible viola-
tions of domestic and international law
by the administration.
In public, the U.S. allegedly supports
the efforts
ombia, Panama,
Mexico - to forge a
ment. Vet a secret back
prepare :
Security Counc
the administrati
ked
� feu ;
ck(ing)
c Reagan adn
pended
dil
paign to r

ed without .
Mananil.
presidei
Nicaragua!
Secretar) I -
Juiv, flatly re;eed the
talks v.
York
Reagan admii
rule
bilateral pt-dc
Nicaragua
When promises
negotiated settlements
window dressings for sec .
murder manuals and esca
militarism. Congress and the pub
robbed of their voice to debate a
fluence the conduct fl reign afl
Congress must once again draw I
line against President Re
war in Central America bv pi
the CIA from reopening its b
tricks against the government ol
Nicaragua.
Joy Hackel and Daniel Siegel
research associates at the Institute
Policy Studies, Washington, D.C Th
articles have appeared in the
Washington Post, the Los Angeles
Times, the St. Louts Post-Dispatch c
the Des foines Register
This article was pnnted with per?-
from In These Times, a bi-wet
in Chicat
Money Corrupts College Athletes
World Food Day
By DARRYL BROWN
V ednesday October 16 ECU will
imong 150 colleges and univer-
sities taking part in the World Food
teleconference. The
teleconference,which will deal with
Id hunger, is being sponsored
by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, the Agency for Inter-
national Development and a coali-
tion of 350 private voluntary
organizations making up a national
committee.
The three hour teleconference
can be seen locally, beginning at 12
noon, at the Brody Medical
Sciences Building. It will feature a
panel of four speakers: Peter
McPhersonn, administrator of the
Agency for International Develop-
ment; Barbara Huddleston, chief of
the Food, Security and Information
Service of the Food and Agriculture
Organization; Senator Paul Simon
(D � II); and Marie Savane, presi-
dent of the Association of African
Women for Research on Develop-
ment in Dakar, Senegal.
The panel presentations will
locus on 'he relationship between
poverty and hunger, the impact of
environmental degradation on
world food security, and the pro-
blems of attaining long-term, sus-
tainable agricultural development
in the Third World.
A study of such areas and inter-
relationships is crucial in the pre-
sent age as famine in Ethiopia is
spreading into other parts of Africa
and threatens to become a long-
term, intractable problem.
Not only because of
humanitarian concerns, but also
because of geopolitical concerns the
United States should take the lead
in combatting world hunger and
educating the public on its causes
and consequences. We encourage
all interested students to attend this
teleconference.
WASHINGTON - The very title of the
man makes it more shocking. He was a
Trustee. As in Trust. One was suppos-
ed to be able to trust him, but more than
that, certain duties and responsibilities
were entrusted to him, because he was
worthy and honorable. It turns out he
was just a dealer under the table, using
his power and money to get what he
wanted � illegally.
And so the saga of Dick Lowe,
former college football lineman, current
Texas millionaire oilman, and now,
former trustee of Texas Christian
University. It has been revealed over
the past two weeks that Lowe con-
tributed to an illegal fund to pay foot-
ball players at his alma mater. The deal
went on for years, and brought to a
screeching halt the career of TCU All-
America running back Kenneth Davis
and six other players suspended for tak-
ing payments from Lowe & Co. Not the
least casualty of this drama is Davis
shot at the Heisman trophy: he was
considered a top contender, having led
the nation last year in average yards-
per-carry.
Listen to Davis' comments after be-
ing suspended. "I took the money
because I needed it he said. "In a cer-
tain sense I never gave it a thought. It
never crossed my mind if it was wrong,
or if I deserved it Think about that.
This is coming from a player on a team
in the Southwest Conference, a league
that has had more than its share of
recruiting violations, including player
payoffs, that resulted in NCAA
reprimands and probations. Nearby
Southern Methodist University is pro-
bably the worst of the lot. And it never
crossed Davis' mind that getting paid
for playing college ball was wrong?
Whose fault is that? If this guy is at
all telling it straight, where did the
system go awry that is supposed to in-
culcate people with some idea of what is
right and what is unacceptable? Dick
Lowe did not start the faltering of that
system, but he certainly contributed to
it, and, in the case of the TCU players,
sped up its demise.
So what we have here is a violation
not only of NCAA rules, but of the
trust and responsibility we put in
university officials and representatives.
For the record, TCU coach Jim Wacker
apparently had no knowledge of the
payoffs, but his assistant coach or
coaches allegedly did, along with
former TCU coach F.A. Dry who
allegedly helped set up the scam and, of
course, ex-Trustee Lowe and his
cohorts. These are the real instructors
in the moral education of Kenneth
Davis and myriad other college players.
So the problem lies mostly with the
money men and the coaches who
cooperate with them. They are the ones
teaching players, in the mid heir
higher education, that wrong pays more
than right. And it is the greed and pride
of such money men, who have idle
thousands or millions ol dollars lying
around, which somehow dictate:
is more important to channel that cash
illegally so their alma mater will have a
winning season and they can get box
seats to a bowl game, than to direct that
money to any of a number of better
causes, including other needs of their
college. To such types not only the
NCAA should sanction, and not onlv
the press publicize, but the universities
should humiliate by saying, far from br-
inging pnde and glory to our school
you shame us. and you contribute to the
corruption of our students. We would
rather not have you around. But that
won't happen, because those monev
men are needed by schools, which
ahvays need more funds to carry out
their noble work, and thev can get it
from nowhere else but these guvs But
if Hamlet were around todav, he would
tell It like it is: There is something rot-
ten in the state of college athletics, and
it is in the likes of these rich scoundrels.
m�rlc.n Con $yndic�tt (c) IW
ArsoA
Emory Fi
World Ne
sOnl's
��lv�ry Co
I
i
I
i
CHISATOID �XPft�iS
Western Sizzlin
Call
57 1973 Dinner
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1
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re interested in
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AAkvAL ft
iragua
� in

.
�'
� t ieei are
inelei
!ipurch and
er
e Athletes
re
:de
idle
a -e a
i
hat
� better
� f their
res not only the
and not only
EC, but the universities
aying, far from br-
Je and glory to our school,
fou shame us, and you contribute to the
rruption of our students. We would
ther not have you around. But that
m't happen, because those money
;n are needed by schools, which
tlways need more funds to carry out
heir noble work, and they can get it
m nowhere else but these guys. But
If Hamlet were around today, he would
lell it like it is: There is something rot-
ten in the state of college athletics, and
t is in the likes of these rich scoundrels.
km�rtc�n Coii�9� Syndic' (c !�5
Arsonists Terrorize Fraternity Members
R. ��u (tft) - Three recent reports of widespread sex
't fires within a week at ual abuse and misbehavior by
orado campuses may be fraternitv members across the
14 work oi arsonists angered by country.
Emory Files Suit
VV ire Reports
Nan.
s Emory, the wife of
ECU football coach Ed
seeking a court-
separation, claiming that
� is physically abused and
f morv
f-
Emory hied a complaint
int) Districl Court that
' ad blocked her ac-
rennessee residence
fused to support her.
mplaini filed by Mrs,
� ibed Emory as a man
personalities. On one
ling to the complaint,
Id he charming and
However, he has a ter-
and he becomes
violent both physically and ver-
bally when he loses control of
himself, according to the com-
plaint.
Mrs. Emory stated in the com-
plaint that she was afraid of h
and she accused him of threats
and violent treatment, which con-
sisted of a black eye, scratches
and bruises, on several occasions
being thrown against the wall,
and being slapped in the face
In the complaint, Mrs. Emory
claimed that she had $85,000 in
cash. However, Emory used the
money as if it were his personal
money.
"It's clear we have a group in
tent on destroying fraternities in
general Boulder Assistant Eire
Chief Cliff Harvey said Sept. 24,
the day of a fire at the Chi Psi
house at the Universtiy of Col-
orado.
The tire caused
$60,000-580,000 in damage to the
house. No one was hurt.
Someone, Harvey said, is "trv
ing to kill fraternity members
In the six days before Chi Psi
went up in flames, fires erupted
at two fraternity houses at the
University of Denver, some thirty
miles away.
On Sept. 18, the day of the first
fire at Denver, a Boulder
newspaper reprinted an article
from Ms. magazine in which the
author characterized fraternities
as "refuges" tor sexist attitudes
that spawn gang rapes and other
forms of sexual misconduct.
Since the fire, several Colorado
fraternity members reported
receiving anonymous calls from a
male who asked whether they had
heard about the Denver fires and
warned. "You're next
Several fraternities also have
received cards saying "Offense
noted" from someone purporting
to represent a "Committee to
Protect the Status of Women
Fire officials are taking the
threats seriously.
"I have a feeling (the
perpetrator) is not a professional
arsonist Denver lire Depart-
ment Lt. Larry Varnej says.
Adds tire investigator Harvey:
"Maybe someone's trying to get
even with fraternities
If the fires were set by people
motivated by the Ms. magazine
article, or a Phil Donahue show
aired Sept. 13 thai explored
criticisms ol sexual misconduct at
fraternities, it would represent an
alarming escalation of anti-
fraternity activity.
I ast school year, women's
groups organized anti-fraternity
protests and marches at Brown
University and the University oi
World News Stories In Brief
Bl 1 GRAD1

Yugoslavia of-
:ed to for-
ihe United
for the extradition
Mohammed Abbas, who the
masterminded the
� e chille Lauro
1 arlier, the U.S.
i protest to Italy for
leave Rome on
1 . N.J. - Some of the
� o were aboard the
!av! week - in-
family of slam
� Klinghoffer - ay
file civil suites for
However, Attorney Jay
vitv the target
unity's suit.
� man
' the kidnap-
So iet Embassy
a radio station
iptives would
ion bomb-
Joke's On Us
Food Dmlivry Co
Delivers For
ed if it is not closed by today.
Four Soviet Embassy officials
were abducted Sept. 30 and one
was killed two days later.
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - The
1985 Nobel Prize for Medicine
was awarded Monday to Univer-
sity of Texas researchers Michael
S. Brown and Joseph L. Golds-
tein for their work in the regula-
tion of cholesterol metabolism.
Goldstein is chairman of the
Department of Molecular
Genetics at the university and
Brown is a professor in the same
department.
LONDON - British officials
Monday cancelled a meeting with
two Palestine Liberation
Organization officials because
the PLO visitors refused to
recognize Israel's right to exist. A
meeting was held with the Jorda-
nian representatives of what was
to be a joint meeting with Britain,
which is seeking progress in the
Middle last peace process
WARSAW, Poland - Poland's
communist government Monday
reported its first parliamentary
elections since martial law, a vic-
tory for stability. But Solidarity
founder Lech Walesa said that
the turnout was much lower than
the government said it was. I"he
government reported a 75 percent
turnout but Walesa said it was
probably only about 50 percent.
JOHANNESBl RG, South
Africa - Security forces said that
noting blacks near Cor: 1 lizabeth
killed a white soldier Monday 1
was the first soldier to die on duty
since military units were sent into
black townships a year ago. The
government said that Johan
Schoekan was patrolling near
Port Elizabeth when hundreds
black rioters stoned and stabbed
him.
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CHISATOUW �XPA�SS
Western Sizzlin
Call
757-1973 Dinner
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University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenvile, NC
758-4927
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inventory control and purchasing, personnel
administration and systems analysis.
V
With the important responsibilities, comes an
outstanding benefits package: 30 days' paid
vacation earned each sear, medical and dental care, f �
low-cost life insurance and tax-tree allowances.
The requirements are simple: you must have a BS or BA,
meet all requirements, pass aptitude and physical
examinations, qualify for security clearance and be a U.S.
citizen.
It you're interested in this kind of responsibility, call the Naval
Management Programs Office:
1-800-662-7231
Get Responsibility Fast.
Florida.
There were fires caused by ar-
son within the past year at In-
diana University and University
of Illinois fraternities. But in-
vestigators don't believe the in-
cidents involved anti-fraternity
sentiments.
"The whole campus is in a
panic says Alex Payne of CU's
Sigma Nu house.
Business Honor Society
Starts Lecture Series
Continued From Page 1.
torney General's office works
with local law enforcement agen-
cies in improving public rela-
tions.
'We do not encourage
overbearing, excessive law en-
forcement tactics. We emphasize
the need for local law enforce-
ment agencies to work with the
public he added.
Thornburg said that the At-
atf�PtMeM
torney General's office was
primarily responsible for drafting
North Carolina's new Anti-
Obscenity Law.
"The law was thoroughly
researched. We feel the obscenity
law is in compliance with both
the federal and state constitu-
tions. We think the law can and
should be enforced Thornburg
said.
m
��
Lets Tailgate With West Area
Residence Council
Residents of Clement, White, Greene, Fletcher, Garrett)!
Oc ober 26 11:00 til 1:00 at the Allied Health Area
Tickets being sold by House Councils
$2.00
"Must Have Ticket To Receive Food"
Each person may bring 1 paying guest - with SRA card. Catering
by Abrams - (B-B-Cue, Chicken, Slaw, Potatoes, Rolls,
Hushpuppies, Iced Tea)
��
i
t
Upcoming Events
for
Student Union
Films Committee:
"La Traviata"
"Jules and Jim"
and
"Small Change"
"Dune"
Recreation Committee:
Wed. Oct. 16
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Wed. Oct. 23
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat.
Oct. 25 & 26
7 and 9 p.m.
All Campus Backgammon Tournament Tues. Oct. 15 at 4 p.m
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
Women's All Campus Billiards Tournament Thurs. Oct. 24 at 6 p.m.
- Student Center Billiards Room
Visual Arts Committee:
"Recent American Works on Paper"
Smithsonian Art Exhibit
Travel Committee:
New York Trip
Hawaii Trip
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON EITHER TRIP, PLEASE CALL
757-661T, ext. 266.
Thurs. Oct. 24
Mendenhall Student Gallery
Nov. 24-Dec 1
Dec. 31-Jan. 7, 1985
S
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
New Attraction:
Have you heard about
THE
UNDERGROUND?
Bring your lunch and a
friend Tuesday, Oct. 15 at
1:30 p.m. to the Ground
Level of Mendenhall (old
Coffeehouse) to find out
what everybody else will
be talking about!

.
i





THF EASTCAROIINIAN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 8, 1985 Page ft
'Jagged Edge'
Courts Thrills
STEVE SHKRBIN and
l.ORIN PASQUAL
triOrn MHon
It opens with a macabre
stabbing at a deserted beach
house. There are two female vic-
tims. One is the maid. The other
is Page Forrester, a newspaper
heiress, found naked with her
hands and feet tied to the ends of
the bed. She has been mutilated,
and the word "BITCH" has been
written in blood above the head-
board.
The cause of death is obvious.
Page Forrester and her maid were
stabbed repeatedly with a hunting
knife - the kind with a serrated,
jagged edge.
The only suspect seems to be
Page's husband. Jack Forrester,
who discovered the bodies and
phoned the police. He claims to
have been hit from behind as he
arrived at the beach house and
found the bodies after he regain-
ed consciousness. Jack now
stands to gain his wife's entire
holdings
This new release by Columbia
Pictures titled Jagged Edge is the
kind of gripping psychological
mystery-thriller that has not been
seen on the screen since the davs
of Alfred Hitchcock.
District Attorney Tom Krasny,
played by Peter Coyote, is quick
to gather a case against Forrester,
but there are many questions
Krasny's motives. He may be try-
ing to ride the publicity of the
case into a Senate seat.
Glenn Close stars as Teddy
Barnes, a mother and attorney
who must come to grips with the
immorality she abandoned by-
leaving er corporate nest to de-
fend Forrester. She also says she
will only defend the man who is
accused of a terrible crime if she
is convinced of his innocence.
With the help of a weathered,
old private investigator, Sam
Ransom (Robert Loggia), Barnes
finds holes in Krasny's case. She
also Finds something she didn't
expect: emotional involvement
with her client.
The tension between Krasny
and his former assistant, Barnes,
loads the film with suspense,
swiftly moving it through the in-
vestigation and making it come to
a boil at the trial.
Jagged Edge is directed bv
Doonesbur
w
'
I

I
X
I i
Gh. O- �� � �� Teddy B.n,�. �ho ukes �riousl ���,�,�, Jack
KlCharn MarnnanH ihr r,at�H i- -� . �u K hi
Richard Marquand, who created
such memorable films as The Eye
of the eedie and Return of the
Jedi.
According to Marquand. all
his Films explore "the surfaces of
reality Jedi, "seemed to be
partly a myth about who you
really arewhether you have a
tendency toward the da4 k side of
The Sound Of Music
Classical String Quartet Shines
WARRKN BAKKR
Miff Wrllrf
7:59 p.m.
for The East
Carolinian wain patiently for so-
paces outside ECL's
ndrix 1 heat re. five minutes go
and suddenly applause erupts
from the theater. Menaenhall
Manager Rudy Alexander an-
nounces that the quartet is ready
lay, and everyone should now
take their seats. Doors to the
concert close as the reviewer
stands outside Hendrix. His wait
beams. A minute later, she ar-
rivesjust a little late.
"It's started 1 said as 1 gave
her a ticket.
"Sorry she said sym-
pathetically with a smile. "Let's
go in
"That'd be rude 1
countered. "We have to wait
outside until they finish their first
movement of Schubert. Artists
hate interruptions
"How long is the movement?"
"Urn
"1 thought you knew a little bit
about classical music?"
"Urn
A small crowd gathers in the
foyer, their faces staring through
the little windows of the theater
doors. As the music seeps
through the wood, sweeping
melodies add anticipation. Soon.
the first movement ends, and the
foyer crowd rushes silentl into
nearby seats. The second move-
ment begins, andante, and the
reporter and his friend relax in
their cushioned chairs. Two more
movements follow, and in bet-
ween each segment, people rustle
in their seats as coughs and snif-
fles add character to the almost-
silent break.
I was struck immediately bv
the involvement of the musicians
with their music. Their shiny
black shoes moved up and down
as the music swelled and swayed.
The first piece, by Schubert, Str-
ing Quartet in a minor. Op. 29,
was easy-going but predictable,
with the themes anxiously-
repeating themselves. I turned to
her to see her reaction.
Her eyes were fixed to the
stage. No expression.
After the finale of Schubert's
piece, the musicians stood up,
bowed and went behind the stage.
Once again, the crowd eased out
their coughs and engaged in
whispers. My friend turned to me
and said:
"I'll have to leave in a little
while. Band practice, you
know
As I nodded my head, the
quartet returned to the lighted
stage and began to play Hans
Werner Henze's String Quartet
No 5.
Violins, played to a different
rhythm, dominate the air. Strings
are plucked and sometimes
strummed. L ncharacteristic is the
word for a different melody that
keeps the audience of Hendrix
guessing.
Throughout the music, you can
tell the attention to detail is well-
rehearsed,and played with emo-
tion. The reporter enjoys the
departure from the traditional
Schubert. His friend shares a dif-
ferent opinion. She moves
carefully out of her seat and
through the doors as the second
movement ends. L'nphased, the
reporter leans back in his chair
and refocuses his attention on the
quartet. The music starts and
continues to play until
Intermission.
As I walked into the lobby, a
familiar face attached to a
familiar frame came up to me
hurriedly. She wasn't my date.
"Do you have a cigarette she
said anxiously. She obviously
didn't know me very well. No
smokes here.
LMttvilte MH�f
Ptwf fcv OavM Taibctt
"I thought the person you
came in with had a pack of
Dorals I said.
"He left early she said. "He
doesn't like Schubert too much
"I'm sorry
"It's really a shame since that
second piece was so different and
interesting
"That's very true I com-
mented. "The artists truly get in-
volved with the music they play. I
really enjoyed that aspect
"Me, too. But we need cigaret-
tes
Before I could agree, she was
already making her way-
downstairs.
A reporter and friend smoke
cigarettes quickly as intermission
draws to a close. A warning is
given, and tobacco is ground
regrettably into a nearby ashtrav
They rush down the aisle and
locate seats near the front of the
stage. Soon, the Concord Quartet
moves into the refreshing sounds
of Beethoven, a sound not as dif-
ferent as Henze but more varied
than Schubert. Time goes bv, and
the last note is played. The au
dience applauds gratefully for a
fine evening of classical enter-
tainment. The reporter smiles for
a moment and then exits with the
homeward bound crowd.
ECU Draws
Famed Ballet
On your toes, ballet lovers!
The Louisville Ballet will ap-
pear at ECU under the sponsor-
ship of the Department of
University Unions Theatre Arts
Committee. The performance
will be at 8:15 p.m. Friday at
ECU's McGinnis Theatre.
Distinguished as the only
regional company with which
Mikhail Baryshnikov has per-
formed, the Louisville Ballet has
evolved over the last 33 years.
Founded as a civic ballet in
1952, the nationally acclaimed
troupe was recently designated as
the State Ballet of Kentucky.
Tickets to the Louisville
Ballet's performance are
available at the ECU Central
Ticket Office, from 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. daily. Ticket prices are
$5.00 for ECU students and their
guests, $7.00 for youth (high
school age and younger) and
$10.00 for ECU facultv and staff
and the public. All tickets will
cost $10.00 if purchased at the
door on the night of the perfor-
mance.
For more information, call the
Central Ticket Office at
757-6611, extension 266.
deceit and manipulation or to be
a true hero, to tell the truth, to
appreciate love and be loyal he
said.
Jagged Edge is a con-
JaKKed KuKe
these themes,
tinuation ol
said.
"To say, an
the film he
re would
quipped
" he
spoil
Man - O - S
"Installation" (above), by Debra Fanelli. is among the works in ex-
hibits by three prominent artists displayed in Gray Art Gallery
through November 4.
Walkin' The!
FAKE ID. NICK) ft
d , i05� IS i
MYI
Zg -r - Scii � .v
l�5 - CAM r�
" VV X
Tooth
-?�& "Uutitled a mixed-media work by
Fontaine Dunn. Paintings by New York artist Jeff Way, who wiH
�nU 7hTH�n '� 7:3� Pm- ��"nkins Auditorium, �
appear that day. A reception follows Ways lecture.
Gray Art Gallery hours are 10-5 Monday-Saturday and 8-5 on
W�lned.y. The gallery will do Saturday� J.y for �
HI5 5
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p.m. at Jenkins Auditorium, will
lows Wav's lecture.
�S Monda-Saturda and 8-5 on
Hose Saturda-Tuesda for Fall
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DATE: Wednesday October 16
Thursday October 17
TIME: 9:00-4:00
UHERFF JONES
PLACE: Student Store
tradition of excellence
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1 HI I ASF i AK( l INI AN
Sports
lohiK ivx�
Page 8
.
Booster Clubs
Influence Recruits
rheir influence ,
: than Jus,
B RICK McCORMAC
"Nporti Kdllor
A 47-yard field goal in the
pouring rain allowed
Southwestern Louisiana to take a
16-14 victory over ECU, spoiling
a second-half comeback attempt
by the Pirates on Saturday.
Patrick Broussard, who hit all
three of his field-goal attempts in
the afternoon, split the uprights
with 5:32 to play in the contest to
put the Cajuns on top for good.
LSI opened up a 13-0 lead in
the opening half of plav before
the Pirate offense came alive in
the second half.
� The Ragin' Cajuns received the
n opening kickoff in the second
3 halt, hut a fired-up Pirate
; defense forced them to kick after
a clipping penalty.
After the USL punt, the Pirate
offense took over with excellent
field position at the Cajun 46.
nthony Simpson began the
drive with a five yard run up the
middle. Three straight carries h
loin Baker netted 35 yards, and
the Pirates had first-and-goaJ
from the LSI six-yard line.
Simpson picked up three yards
first down, and scored from
the three on second down, with
10:42 remaining in the third
Period. Jeff Heath's conversion
attempt was good, and ECU pull-
ed Ioct, 13-7.
1 aier in the fourth period.
frov ersv
An Inside Look
By
Scott Cooper
i
ea-
Christian Univers I
; � ' -ai Kenneth Da
o give up his senior seat
� a poss;Mc bid �
Hc forachan
s
Davis was suspended from the
rCl team by head coach Jim
Wacker. Wacker suspended
and six othei
found that they
t ng " im j
m booster
In yesterday's :ssUe of Sports
Illustrated (Oci 14). Davis said
rCU boosters offered him
'� clothes, ng bonuses,
and a monthly salarv for
ch lie didn't have to work - a
tl package that Davis
�-mated at S38.O0O.0O.
Davis, who comes from a fami-
12 children, would not be
'he least bit reluctant to take such
an offer, honestly � who won
He didn't even consider that tak-
ing the payments was wrong!
The TCU program is just the
latest example of illegal indict-
ments brought against univer-
through booster organiza-
utheastern Conference
�ol's Georgia and Florida as
as the SMI Mustangs of the
Southwest Conference, are cur-
rently under NCAA probation
for violations dealing with "il-
legal booster involvement in
recruiting according to an arti-
cle in the Chronicle of Higher
Education, Oct. 9, 1985.
It seems to me that the problem
begins here - with the boosters.
A big question now arises Where
should the NCAA draw the line
also ih(
� a
wouldn't

d rules
-
A A
irhten
USL had a chance to put the
game away after a questionable
call gave them possession of the
ball at the ECU 25.
USL punter Terry Falgout's
punt hit an ECU player, accor-
ding to the officials, setting the
Cajuns up deep in Pirate ter-
ritory.
The ECU defense stiffened
however, forcing a LSI fumble
Senior linebacker Robert
Washington nailed LSI quarter-
back Thomas King as he was at-
tempting to pitch the ball on the
option. Fssrav Taliaferro
recovered, and the Pirates tool
over at the ECU 11.
From there, the Pirates march-
ed 89yards in 10 plays, taking the
lead on their longest scoring drive
of the season.
The crucial plav on the Pirate
drive came on third-and-nine
from the E( I 25 Ron Jones hit
tight end Scott I ewis f)r 34 yards
to keep the drive alive
Later in the drive, Jones con-
nected on a short pa-s to senior
fullback Bobby (lair, who did
the rest of the work on his own,
for a 34-yard touchdown recep-
tion. The plav as the longest
scoring plav for ECl this seas
excluding Jeff Heath field goals.
Heath connected on the point-
after-touchdown attempt, to put
EC U ahead 14-13 wil
maining in the final p.
Downs
On LSL's second play from
scrimmage, quarterback King.
connected on a 20-yard pass to
t arl Issac to move the ball to
midfield. from there, Dwane
Williams carried the ball five
times for 26 yards down to the
Ragin' Cajun 26.
After the Pirate defense held,
Broussard came on for what pro-
ved to be the game-winning field
goal, giving LSI a 16-14 advan-
tage with 3:23 remaining.
ECU's Reggie McKinney
returned the kickoff to the ECU
M After three rushing plays and
an illegal procedure penalty net-
ted eight yards, the Pirates'faced
fourth-and-two at their own 4)
Simpson crashed through the left
side of the line foi four yards to
continue the drive.
After an illegal procedure
penalty moved ECU back to their
own 39, I C I went to the air.
iones passed deep to a open
William Carver, who slipped and
fell on the wet field and the pass
fell incomplete. On the next piav
from scrimmage, Jones again
passed deep to Carver, who drop-
ped the pass mside the LSI 30.
On third-and-15, Baker netted
11 yards on a sweep moving the
ball out to the EC I 39 After a
timeout, on fourth-and-four, the
Pirates went with the sprint draw
to Bakei He was stopped tor no
exhausting
drive.
From ti.cre, LSI was able
run the clock out, and hand the
Pirates their fourth consecutive
loss
ECU coach Art Baker wsn
disappointed that his team
although he felt they played well
enough to win in the second I
"You just don't count
dropping passes or falling d
when they're open Baker
"We really did all the things we
needed to, to win in the
half.
Baker felt a key to the game
was the Pirates' performance in
the opening half of p
"I thought they (LSI , ere
well prepared, and we were
They took advantage of their
portunities in the first half
we did not he contin .
"Simply, Southwestern
siana outplayed us at the lini
scrimmage in the first halt. In
second half, we might hav
a little better than they did
e bright sp t I
was the running
tailback Tony Bake
47 yards
Iff will have an open da
next weel
�nna in two w .
� ei Stadium, bet
Women Netters Cap Season With Win
B DAVIDMcGINNESS record al the No . . m '
V
Coi
c rators
Can
the
Georgia pr
-t schoo
"We tho
and a I
( an said.
sters
le, ai d urged
.1 (oi
that
'VV .
!OOd
� I feels
��, nut wouiu tat
n boostnjwyolyc
Swimmers
Those (boosters')
ru ai e � able to sign it, or fail
- I sign it. either intentionally or
inadvertently, are not allowed
participate in recruiting
( arr also believes that the issue
is a moral one. With national at-
tention focusing on the subject, a
lack of tolerance for the violators
is apparent, ac arr.
"The atmosphere is going to be
cleaned up, and everybody needs
to understand that and make it a
moral commitment
The so-called "commitment of
compliance" is a good idea and
should lessen the involvement
that boosters' have in college
tball recruiting. However, to
eliminate such an influence
would take time as well as an in-
Bv DAVID McC;iFSS
M.ff Wrurr
I he E I women's tennis team
capped off an excellent fall
season last Thursday with a
devastating win over Christopher
Newport.
Lady Pirates were
lefeated at the end of singles
not even losing one set to
their Christopher Newport op-
ponents.
Ann Manderfield disposed of
Newport's Carrie Jones 6-2, 6-0
in the No. 1 match.
I isa Eichhok handled the
move from three to two singles
well, obliterating Sharon Guv
6-0.6-1.
I isa Eichholz maintained the
I Cl sweep with a 6-1, 6-3 vic-
tory over Pam Owens in the No.
3 match.
Susan Montjoy put away No. 4
Newport player Musiol 6-0, 6-4.
Holly Murray crushed her No.
: opponent Renaud 6-0, 6-0, as
did Maria Swaim over Newport's
Allison Garren in the No. 6
match.
Doubles play was rained out
and will not be made up as ECU
had already won the match.
The Pirate women had several
outstanding performances this
season, ai! of which contributed
to their 7-2 fall season record.
Holly Murray remained
undefeated at No. 6 singles
throughout the fall season with a
record of 9-0.
Becky Clements was 8-2 at the
No. 2 singles spot, and Lisa
Eichholz had a 10-2 record at No
4.
In doubles competition, Ann
Manderfield and Lisa Eichholz
lost only once � against Peace
College, compiling a strong 10-1
record at the No. 1 doubles ,
Perhaps the highlight
season or the women was -
first-place finish ai the i a
Intercollegiate foul
September ai Mereditl (
"I was very pleased
w omens' performance I
season said Pat SI
man. "We have some really g
depth this ear. which is
something we have lacked
before
� place
rhe Pil ' ice -tlan-
C ollege today
' P-n Minges Vai
Courts
Ih:s wil ' dual match
� 25
Richm

le;
The men will be at a decided
disadvantage in this tourney due
�hat they will be p
without the servi � their
1 player, Dave Shell. Lhis
hurt the Pirates in two wavs
st. they will not be able to
play their best man at the No. I
spot
Second, they will be unal
receive seeding I e:
gles players. This is du
that everyone below S
will
records they 1
issed this season in their i
mal pos
seedings ai the i
mond.
In addition to Shell's absence
up for doubles play will
change. This may : m add
ed crease in the ECl doubles
ter.
Hopefully the team will be
completely healthy by the star-
the spring '86 seas �n, for wl
the fall is reallv a warmup.
Strong Buc Golf Team
Fares Well In Tournev
B riM CHANDLER he nl,w�, Ml Au UV
Ann Manderfield
The men's team travelled to
UNCWilmington for the 1985
UNC-W Fall Invitational Tennis
Tournament last Fri. and Sat.
However play in the tournev was
rained out after only two rounds
of singles play. This left ECU tied
with UNC-W and Campbell for
riM CHANDLER
The Pirate Goll team com-
peted in then second match of the
year this past weekend. Thev
played in the John Ryan Invita-
tional in Durham, N.C. The
Pirates placed 11th out of the
26-team total of 594 players.
North Carolina won the event,
followed by North Carolina State
and Duke University in third.
Individual scores for the
Pirates were Mike Bradley with a
69-74 for a 143 total that tied him
for 9th in the individual competi-
tion. Paul Steelman had a 77-78
tor a 153 total. Tony Jarrett shot
a 4 in the first round which
counted on the first day total but
had an 82 on Saturday that put
him out of ECU's top four
finishers.
Team leader Mike Bradley said
that he was pleased about the wav
he played "My 69 on theTirs:
put me in a good position
stated Bradley. He added that'a
triple bogey on the seventh hole
during the second round hurt him
ar as finishing higher. He a
said that he felt the Bucs placed
good as a team.
Bradley believed that the one
thing which was suprising him,
was that the golf team is shooting
much better scores than in the
past However, they just aren't
placing any higher.
"I know that when someone
reads that we finished 11th or
12th in a tournament that they
think we are playing mediocre
golf, but actually we are a much
improved team stated Bradlev.
He also stated that by the team
being able to play with Wake
Forest (which is ranked in the top
By DAVID McGINNESS
Miff Wrllfr
The ECU swim team warmed
up for their fall dual-meet season
last Thursay with their annual
pentathlon . The event is design-
ed to get the team mentally ready
for actual competition.
The team competes on an in-
dividual basis in five events. Each
swimmer swims an event every 20
minutes, which usually leads to
better times in the first two or
three events. However, according
to head coach Rick Kobe, the
event helps the swimmers, in that
it's like a real meet situation.
"The pentathlon isn't really-
done for time head coach Kobe
said. "But it gives the swimmers
a feeling for swimming with a
clock
Stratton Smith was the top
finisher in the first event. Smith
finished the 200-yard individual
medley with a time of 2:04.42.
Bruce Brockschmidt was second
with a 2:05.98 and Patrick Bren-
nan third with a 2:06.30 time.
The 100-yard butterfly follow
ed and was taken by Kevin
Hidalgo in 55.80 seconds. Smith
topped Broekschmidt's 57 :h
with a 56.94 to grab second place.
Brockschmidt struck back in
the 100-yard backstoke, with a
winning time of 58.10 seconds.
Smith placed second again with a
59.37, beating teammate Andv
Cook's 1:01.47.
Ronald Fleming took first in
the 100-yard breaststroke by
morethan two seconds with a
1:02.72. Brennan nudged out Lee
Hicks by eight-tenths-of-a-
second with a 1:04.98 time.
In the 100-freestyle event,
Keith Kaut was first with a 49.40
followed by Brockscmidt's se-
cond place time of 51.05. David
Kileen took third with a 51.66 se-
cond time.
Here are the men's overall
P�int standings.
1. Bruce Brockschmidt-1888
2. Stratton Smith-1603
3. Patrick Brennan-1451
4. Ronald Fleminng-1330
�KW1 lwl mdl ne was pleased ahout he waj GOLFERS p jo
SSHf� In Annual Pentathlon
1 K, � IS-eiin Naut- 1.84 Lorj Ijvineston finisher! rh.rH ir, "VIV'vp hi,I crr�� o,s.sH mcci Alfk�u .�
Keith Kaut-1284
Ronald Fleming came closest
to setting an ECU pentathlon
record with his time of 01:02.72
in the breaststroke, missing by-
only :22 seconds.
Caycee Poust led the women's
competition by more than 500
points, placing first in two events
and third in another.
In the 200-individual medley,
Poust was first with a time of
02:21.05. Brenda Horton was un-
contested for second with a
02:21.49, and Susie Wentink
took third with a 02:24.30.
Jenni Pierson was first in the
100-yard butterfly with a time of
one-minute and four-seconds
flat. Susan Augustus edged out
Poust by .03 seconds with a
01.04.87 for second place.
Poust set an ECU pentathlon
record in the 100 backstroke with
a 01:04.25 time. Brenda Horton
was second with a 01:04.36,
which also broke the old record
by .04 seconds.
Lori Livingston finished third in
the event with a time of 01:05.14.
Susie Wentink's 01:12.50 time
broke the old pentathlon record
by half a second in the 100-yard
breaststroke. Wentink led the
field by almost three seconds.
Patricia Grand placed second
with a 01:16.30 and Jennie
Halstead's 01:17.35 earned her
third.
In the 100-yard freestyle, Pier-
son was first with 57.85 time.
Scotia Miller turned in a 58.65
time for second place, while
Poust grabbed third with a
0:59.40 time.
The top five scorers
women's division
1. Caycee Poust-2782
2. Brenda Horton-2248
3. Susie Wentink-2041
4. Patricia Grand-1868
5. Jenni Pierson-1830
The team is just starting to get
into competitive shape for the up-
coming season, according to
coach Kobe.
"We've had some good
swims said Kobe. "But we are
still in our training period now
The team will have its annual
Purple-Gold intersquad meet on
Oct. 24. In this event, the team
will be split into two (hopefully,
according to coach) equal squads
that will compete in a mock-dual
meet. Although talent cannot be
divided exactly down the middle
Kobe tries to make the teams
even as possible.
The Pirate swimmers will open
their campaign when thev host
Furman University in Minges
Natatorium on No 2.
Volleyball Team Wins
Bv JANFT MMPsn
in the
were.
By JANET SIMPSON
si.ff Writer
With momentum on their side
from their recent win over
Methodist College, the Lady
Pirate volleyball team made it
two-in-a-row Wednesday night
when they defeated Atlantic
Christian College.
It took the Lady Bucs four
games, but they finally put a
tough ACC squad away.
The Lady Pirates won the first
two games 15-12, 15-10, but came
up a little short in the third 5-15,
and captured the match by winn-
ing the fourth game 15-5.
The results of Saturday's
match against UNC-Wilmington
however, weren't as pleasing as
their past two matches had been
The Lady Bucs lost to UNC-W
m three tight games, 12-15
10-15, 13-15.
The win on Wednesday and the
loss on Saturday brings their
overall record to 4-9.
The next opponent for the
Lady Pirates is N.C. Wesleyan
tonight in Rocky Mount at 700
P-m They have already defeated
Wesleyan once, so let's hope the
Lady Bucs will be successful
again. U1
FOR SALE
NEED TYPING
-

FORSALE





FORSALE

PROFESSION -
VICE


. HEV, 1 D D L E




1 SELL AVON
FOR1
Buy, Sell
Thro
Class
Call 75
To
Deai
ili be taken over the p
ads muvt he pre-paid.

Wednesday 1
One show nig!
Doors
open at
For Show
Information
Call 758 3943
Kt 264 Bypass NE
pri��lt dab AD A
$ 1.00 OffWiA
Wednesday, O
��
.1





ns Bucs
able to
and the
secutive
u a
ad halt.
'
.inct rush
ies.
With Win
nave
absence,
play vj
u
:bles
be
c Golf Team
1 In Tourney
�� He I that a
iole
him
He a
yed
one
him,
' ting
ai m the
isl aren't
meone
i lth or
.at they
e playing mediocre
wc are a much
im stated Bradley.
by the team
th Wake
.inked in the top
iee'
; team
se? GOLFERS, Pae 10
ntathlon
tgh talent cannot be
; exactly down the middle,
ses to make the teams as
even as possible.
The Pirate swimmers will open
their campaign when they host
urman University in Minges
N'atatonum on Nov. 2.
II Team Wins
The results of Saturday's
match against UNC-Wilmington;
however, weren't as pleasing as
their past two matches had been.
The Lady Bucs lost to UNC-W
in three tight games, 12-15,
10-15, 13-15.
The win on Wednesday and the
loss on Saturday brings their
overall record to 4-9.
The next opponent for the
Lady Pirates is N.C. Wesleyan.
tonight in Rocky Mount at 7:00
p.m. They have already defeated
Wesleyan once, so let's hope the
Lady Bucs will be successful
again.
ide
ue it
antic
tour
put a
k first
It came
5-15,
winn-
t
SALE
FOR SALE. Commodore VIC 20
puter with all hookups and some
tras including: 6 game tapes,
assette storage recorder player,
' k modem with terminal pro
n cassette,Programer's Aid,
nory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals $200 Call An
. ai '57 63M or 752 7346
NEED TYPING: Letters Resume's,
'i papers etc Call Karen at
?52 0498
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Skylark
�n and tan 4 door Air condition
p S Am Fm Stereo Tilt Wheel
Great shape. $3,500 or $500 down and
r payments of $148 a month
� � � offer Call 758 2174 between
Spm Ask for Tony.
FOR SALE: 19 Peugot ten speed
Great condition Call 752 1642.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience, quality work,
IBM Selectnc typewriter. Lanie
ve 758 5301
THE MIDDLEMAN: Apartment
ng roommate referral service
Small tee - putting you in touch
a th people Let us help you find the
apartment or roommate you're look
nq for. Call 830 1069
I SELL AVON: Call Sheila 752 7279.
FOR SALE: Three Nursing
niforn i hal $60. Two burner
rove $1 N �� kitchen table with 4
rs $50 Call 752 9200 or 756 4270
FOR SALE: Sanyo MBC 550 IBM
compatible computer, 256K, 2000K
and 800K disk drives, serial, parallel
ports, lotus video board, hi res
monitor, lots of software, Epson
printer, over $2000 invested, $140C
with printer, $1100 without Price
neg Call Philip at 752 5979
STUDENTS DON'T MISS YOUR
CHANCE: To buy your official
"Hoser Hat" Call for more informa
tion now at 757 3262
WORD PROCESSING: contact
Becky Latham - 752 5998 (8 a.m. 5
p.m.) 17 yrs. experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
fers.
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU Students. S
and F Professional Computer Co
(Back of Franklin's) 757 0472.
FOR SALE: 1967 Mustang
cellent condition. Call 756 5541
Ex
FOR SALE: 5 pc leather luggaqe.
Never been used. $250 Call 752 1726
DAPPER DAN'S VINTAGE
CLOTHING: (1920 1960). Jewelry
and Collectables are now available
at Poorman's Flea Market on Hwy
264 between Washington and Green
ville open Sundays from 10 6 See
Danny
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICEWORD PROCESSING: The
Dataworks specializes in Student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resumes, and more All work
is computer checked agamst 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (Call for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after
6 15 p m.
PERSONALS
Buy, Sell And Trade
Through
iEaat (Eutalxmun
Classifieds
Call 757-6366
Today!
Deadlines
Turn in ads to The Fast Caroli-
b 12:00 noon one business
daj before publication. No ads
will be taken over the phone. All
ads must be pre-paid.
Classified Ad
Rates
as
V II s
less
Students
Non-students
Each additional w
All boldface type.
Boxed border(lpt.
ord
)
- S2.00
3.00
05
1.00
.1.00
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 15, 1985
LOST: Tl 58 C Calculator Reward
offered Call after 6 p m 756 5285
ATTENTION: Early Childhood
Education Club Members please br
ing a small bag of Halloween Candy
to our Oct. 29 meeting We will be
making up treat bags for the
hospitalized children.
BRIAN: Congrats Happy 20th to the
best Big Brother a Lil Sis could
have Turn it out in Raleigh for me 4
ever friends, Dawn.
CONGRATULATIONS BILL
DAWSON: There's a helluva job in
front of you You know where we
need to go. You know what to do Do
what it takes. Chafe some ass if you
need to iust get us there! The
Bros
CATHY ENGLISH: To DC on Fri
day, we wild girls will be; To
celebrate your B Day and break the
7 month creed Love your BMFer
roomates, Christy and Mary.
SIG EPS: Thanks for a great social.
It was a blast! The sisters and
pledges of Delta Zeta
LAMBDA CHI'S: The party was
Fantastic, full of fun and games
Team 1 get out of town Team 2
rules Love the Sigmas PS The
wemie roast was great, it must have
been B.Ls generic ketchup
AOTT: Thanks to the BE pledge
class for a super sister party Are
you ready for the "Big I "�
PKT 2nd FLOOR AND 3rd FLOOR:
There's someone new to listen to and
he knows what he's doing It's time
to get off your butt while you still
have some brain cells left.
SPE GOLDEN HEARTS: Don't
forget about the brothers' HH
Wednesday night at Pantana's!
WANTED
NEED MONEY? NEED A JOB?:
Come work for us Hard workers can
earn $5 � $6 an hour Must be 18 yrs
old Need a car with Insurance and
valid Driver's License. Apply at
Speedy Reedy's, 2711 E 10th St
Greenville, NC 27834
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Christian
roommate needed to share 2
bedroom duplex $135 includes
utilities. 1 "i bath. Call 756 8676 after
5 30
RIDE NEEDED: Looking for a ride
to New Jersey for Fall Break. Can
leave at l p m. Oct. 18th. Will pay for
part of the gas Call 752 0796, ask for
Dan
ROOMMATE WANTED: Share
bedroom apt. in Wilson Acres. Call
758 7244 ask for Jamie
ROOMMATE WANTED: Share 2
bedroom townhouse $145 a month
and Vi utilities Call before 5 p m
753 3582 after 5 pm 758 6065
Brookwood Dr Riverbluff
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non
smoker, male to share two bedroom
apt $147 50 a month, Vautilities
752 0461 Auailable now
M0 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home Send
self addressed, stampec envelope
for informationapplication
Associates, Box 95 B, Rosele, NJ
07203
NEED SPENDING MONEY: Need
extra cash for Christmas? Have a
little spare time? Like earning
money the easy way? Like to find
out more about it? Call Julie at
658 5308
DEAR SIGMAS: The Brothers and
Associate Members of Lambda Ch
Alpha would like to thank the Ladies
of Sigma Sigma Sigma for a kille
field day We hope you have
recovered from the sandspurs and
your bruises have healed. Can
harldy wait until our next encounter
It was the Daddy. Sincerely, The
Lambda's
GOOD LUCK PETER PAN: We're
thinking of ou Tracy Love, The
Sigmas
HELP WANTED: Sales clerk, no ex
perience necessary Saturday work
required Good personality, neat ap
pearence, dependability a must
Convienent hours. Call 1 946 9551.
HELP WANTED. Part time sales
clerk stock person. No experience
necessary Flexible hours Neat ap
pearence and dependability re
quired Call 1 946 9551.
WANTED: Chest of drawers. If have
one to sell call 758 7481 after 5 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Non smoker to share 2 bedroom
trailer $175 a month includes
utilities, cable and basic phone 4
miles from campus
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
(Ditclple ofhriut)
1111 Greenville Bivd 756-227S
1 s � f
ll
.

!l

�i

ii
n
i

�.

'

s
�.

ii
i
�.

�.


s
s

T
In essentials, linilci
In non-essentials, Jxttdcm
"n ail thmqs. J-ovt
Kev
H V'ir.n Knight
Special Classes For College Students
945 a.m. Christian Education (all ages)
11.00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks ai addi-
tional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth Control, and
Problem Pregnanc Counseling. For further
information call 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
1 800-532 5184) between 9 A.M. and 5 P M
weekdays
RELIKSH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917WwtMor9o�S�.
RoWgfc, NC
AFTER COLLEGE:
AIR FORCE
EXPERIENCE
iraduating �ion ' ll you're undei !N ! 2 ike youi
oe as an x force Ot'ficei Move up fast
with AIR FORCI riXPERIFNCl You'll do important
rk in youi chosen field I xperiencea
challenge v ;�;� �� special
i ii intry and
uuirsell, talk w n h an
v Force Recruiter
toda.
' Specials Good Thru Sept 30th
a Greenville Stores Only
2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscuit
1 Mashed Potatoes wGravy
SI.89
o
4
Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd 756 6434
"905 E 5th St 752 5184
-i
Call: I Sgl Stephen While
Suite 202. 4109 Wake I crest Road
Raleigh. 2"6r
(919) 856-4012 Call Colled
AIM HIGH
AIR FORCE
00 a.m. UNTIL
103 EAST BROOKRD
758-7570
Located Beside King & Queen
Hair Designs
Complete Hair Care For
Men & Women
Specializing in Cutting
Manicures & Eyebrow Waxing
We Use Nexus Products
One Free Visit to the Tanning Booth
With This Ad and A Haircut
We are excited to announce our new nail line
w
lAllS;
FRENCH NAIL PRODUCTS
&EEE
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, October 15, 1985 9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
10C DRAFT ALL NITE
Wednesday, October 16, 1985
9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
IOC DRAFT ALL NITE
DRAFT
$1 .00 Off With Coupon
WednesdayOctober 16
NITE






10
1 Ml LAST Kol INKS
(K UiHt-k 1
H JEANNETTE KOI'H
Miff W .Hn
iks 3 on 3 basketball
playoffs begin this week in
Memoi ial Gym.
women's division looks
up as thre� teams hold
-11 2 records, Io even up the
rHRILLER defeated the
i ranked I NFORCERS
Dwanna McNeel) led the
rHRII 1 1 Ks with eight baskets
� eas scores.
- and Sechiquita
ig offen-
mances
� I MRU 1 1 Ks, each con
the
i M�Rv 1 RS, Sylvia d all
I MSI I 1)
Kl IHn a 2-2
op three
division, tour
dfeated records.
ked FEL1 OWS,
SS HO, AKADINNIK
d K P P A
d 4-0 records
DIN NIK sK i I Rs recent �
? victor) over
�AS1 . ipsei
e 1 KE BOl S,
mil
baskets
the
n en' � indi idual
Pa . Vh rthu
'Nl S wed in 15
PAIN1 CO On
� � i '
Golfers
Successful
In Tourney
ontinued from pae nine
tated
ECU Ticket
Distribution
Explained
ECl - ith Cai
' " ally a
lepartment of-
inc -�; a week ago. No
tickets remain at
� �� general public
ina tickets will
plac ' the ECU students
P ck up
heir allotted
University of
� ns some of
he ECU Athletic
ther occurs, the remaining
a ill be placed on sale for
: iblic on Monday,
Du the excessive demand
� foi the South Carolina
� e thletic Department is
the 1 C L student pickup
1" order to give
ample opportunity to
� up their allotted tickets, the
eti ricket Office will con-
idenl Group Pickup Day
Monday, Oct. 14. Individual stu-
dent pickup days will be Tu.es
15, Wed Oct. 16 and
. ().t. r
I hursday, Oct. 1 7 will be the
1 INAL da that students can
pick up tickets for the ECU vs.
itharolina game. It students
have not picked up their allotted
tickets at the end of the final day,
remaining tickets, which will be
on the press box side of Picklen
Stadium, will be placed on sale to
the general public beginning
Monday, Oct. 21.
Those interested in placing
their names on a waiting list in
the event seats become available
from the University of South
Carolina or from unclaimed stu-
dent tickets, send your name, ad-
dress and telephone number to
the ECU Athletic Ticket Office at
Minges Coliseum. Names will be
recorded as they are received and
you will be contacted regarding
ticket availabilitv.
key for the top-ranked
THRU I ERS.
Intramural flag football
playoff action is here marking the
beginning of this seasons all
campus championship play. In
the women's division, perhaps
the biggest upset of the year fell
upon top-ranked Fl EM1NG
DORM at the hands of ARB
NAF. ARBNAF put the clamps
on Fleming's quarterback Renee
Grant holding the squad to eight
total points with help from Jen-
nifer James, ARBNAF defeated
Fleming 16-8.
Tonight, a showdown in the
sorority division will take place
between Alpha Phi and Delta
eta. Both squads were vic-
torious in first-round playoff ac-
tion as ALPHA PHI defeated
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 6-0
while DEI IA ETA over-
powered AI PHA DELTA PI
26-6
Previously unheard of, DO
WRONGS look ery impressive
in the men's residence hall league
walking awav with their first
playoff win in a trouncing over
the A-Team 36-6. Maurice
Thorbs and Maurice Steward
lead the way for the Do-Wrongs
who will no doubt be in the mid-
dle of the championship pack.
Number five ranked 'Y' tern and
LAGNAF have also notched
playoff win number one bv
defeating GUESS WHO 35-0 and
a win by forfeit respectively.
No.l ranked BOMBSQUAD
struggled against a very tough
B.C. EXPRESS 14-6 while se-
cond ranked I AKI BOYS
tffs Begin
destroyed the UN
TOUCHABLES 39 x McGAR
HI IT FIVE-O,
SHAKEMASTERS and BERN
CITY BREAKERS also came out
on top in first round play. NM
last upset the S I I MP-
IUMPERS 24 iv in the men's
division And in another contest,
the NAVIGATORS, enroute to a
match up with BOMBSQUAD,
defeated the BREWSK1 BOYS
41 6 Kevin Jarmon ol the
NA IGA rORS single handedly
added in points to the
NAVIGA rORS victoi
I he Depart ment
Intramural-Recreational Services
Informal Recreational facilities,
including Minges and Memorial
pools, weigh! rooms, equipment
rooms and gymnasiums will close
at 5:00 p.m on Friday Oct. 18
foi Fall Break I tie facilities will
resume normal operational hours
on Wednesday Oct 23
The Department
Intramural-Recreational Services
wishes you a sate and happ
Break.
mfflttU
gfrHg ITEMS YQU
WALLTOWALL
SUPER COUPON
BELOW
DUNCAN HINES
Cake Mix
703GRE
BSSBBBstr-
SAVE ?
41c

18V2 oz.
Pk9-
48
c
LIMIT TWO WITH COUPON BELOW AND ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
KRAFT REAL
Mayonnajse
0
SAVE
jar
99
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
KRAFT
Grape Jelly
ASSORTED
Pork Chops
o iko - mm m mm
W 8 lbs. or
save j more
61C - ft
23 Ends
3 Centers
lb.
CALIFORNIA SEEDLESS
White Grapes
SAVE
40c
,r
r
lb.
100 PURE
Ground Chuck
t SAVE "t
. 51'
c
S
3 lbs. or
more
lb.
Ground
Fresh
Daily
U.S.DA CHOICE BONELESS
Rib Eye Steak
� m -�
3
V �
lb.
098
SAVE
50
ARMOUR
jr 32 oz.
jar
Corned Beef Hash
MAZOLA 30 OFF LABEL
Corn Oil
LOCAL PACKETS
Equal Sweetener
GOLDEN CRYSTAL
Instant Coffee
JIF CREAMY � CRUNCHY � 30- OFF LABEL
SAVE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
KRAFT PARKAY
Margarine Qtrs.
SAVE U
59co"
2
11b.
pkgs.
99
0
WAREHOUSE PRICES
U.S.DA. CHOICE BEEF
Cubed Steak
4'
US.D.A
CHOICE
16
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
ALTEST
8 oz
VwH
Sour Cream
BUTTER ME NOT
A&P Biscuits
CHEESE FOOD SLICES
Ched-0-Bit
IN QUARTERS
Shedds Spread
CRISP N TASTY
5 OZ
cans
12 oz
pg
1 lb
pkgs
lb.
98
General Merchandise Specials
FINE
Porcelain China
Peanut
Butter
AAP NON DAIRY
Coffee Creamer
30
28 oz
22 oz
6 qt
pfcg
SAVE ON
Orange Tang
FCPJ) super coupon'
DUNCAN HINES
I
t
Jeno's
Pizza
SAVE
10
EXCLUSIVELY AT A&P
THIS WEEK:
CUP
SOMEROALE CRINKLE CUT
Frozen Potatoes
PACKERS LABEL FROZEN
Sliced Strawberries 3
ALL FLAVORS
BONUS COUPON
WITH EVERY
3.00 PURCHASE
! $
. ut Cake Mix
I
I
ll
LMWT TWO WITH AM AOOrDONAL 10 00
0 MOftf PVftCHAtt QOOO THRU SAT OCT 19
612
� PaUl f �VE
jMasson ' , �
I REGULAR jm
!Busch f�
I Beer

3ltr
bti
ctn o1
12
12 oz
cans
5"
1.00 OFF
; Fine Porcelain China J
Completer Piece
I 11 � 11
each weekly
place setting
piece only
79
c
DELI SPECIALS
SLICED
3
99
Boiled Ham
89
FRESH BAKED
FRENCH BREAD
14-OZ
LOAF
1
49'
r





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a29a1d1437c54d71cff6b5c67e15bf00 00057748.0010.tif





Title
The East Carolinian, October 15, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.432
Location of Original
University Archives

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