The East Carolinian, October 10, 1985






�hc
(Eawltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.14
Thursday, October 10, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 12,000
U.S. Enemy To Seajackers
By DOVii ROBERSON
Surf Writer
American citizens are the
target of terrorist activities in the
Middle East because Arab
radicals view the United States as
their enemy, said Mohammed
Ahrari, assistant professor,
political science.
The Palestinians who seajack-
ed an Italian cruise liner on Tues-
day view the U.S. as the primary
suporter of Israel, Ahrari said.
"It's a simplistic view - they see
the U.S. as an "enemy of the
Arabs" because we support Israel
with "billions of dollars in
military equipment he said.
"That's why the seajackers say
they have killed two American
hostages. The terrorists believe
they can force the U.S. to in-
fluence Israeli policy he added.
Ahrari said U.S. Middle East
policy is one reason for the in-
crease in terrorist activities in the
region. "From the moment the
U.S. decided to support the
Gemayel government of
Lebanon, we became a partisan
member of the Middle East he
said.
Israel's use of U.Ssupplied
technology in the recent bombing
raid of the PLO headquarters in
Tunisia has added to tensions in
the region.
"Israel violated treaties in us-
ing U.S. technology and military
equipment in bombing raids on
Lebanon and Tunisia. The Arabs
sec this as another sign of U.S.
support for Israel Ahrari said.
He emphasized the need for the
Reagan Administration to
develop a policy that will stabilize
the Middle East. "Since the at-
tacks on Marines in Beirut, the
U.S. has really had no Middle
East policy. Between the time we
pulled out of Lebanon and the hi-
jacking of the (TWA) jet in
Rome, the U.S. has done little to
stabilize the region he added.
Ahrari said the U.S. has the
potential of being a "major
stabilizing force" in the Middle
East. "The Reagan Administra-
tion needs to start the peace pro-
cess between Israel, Palestine and
Jordan. Once the peace process is
begun, the radicals will be
defeated. The U.S. is actually
playing into the terrorists' hands
by not moving into the
negotiating process he said.
Tuesday's seajacking is an at-
tempt to frustrate any attempts at
a peaceful solution to the Middle
East situation, according to
Ahrari. "Sucessfully dealing with
a specific event is a short-term
solution. The ultimate solution to
the Mid East problems will re-
quire a long range plan he add-
ed.
Ahrari said he was skeptical of
unconfirmed reports that two
American hostages have been
killed. "There has been com-
munication from the seajackers -
this is encouraging. I don't think
any of the hostages have been
killed
Military attempts to rescue the
hostages are possible, said
Ahrari. "Israel and Italy have a
history of rescuing hostages.
They both have precedents of
armed action against terrorists
VT.
Scholarship Money Unused
Lines Into Brewster? ZlL,
Some mornings between classes one would think that a traffic
cop is needed to direct the flow of students that jams the entrance
to Brewster. More important, isn't it ironic that one would have to
wait in line to get into class, nevertheless, isn't that the life of a col-
lege student � waiting � be it in lines or for grades.
By BETH WHICKER
M�ff Wrlirr
Between 1975 and 1982, the
percentage o! black enrollment in
colleges dropped to 28 percent
from 31.5 percent, according to a
study by the American Associa-
tion of Colleges and Universities.
Some analysts have attributed t1 e
drop in student enrollment to a
lack of monetary support.
Every year scholarship services
say that thousands of their
dollars go unused, while many
students do not get the scholar-
ships they need.
So, where do students look for
financial assistance? "There are a
number of scholarship services a
Campuses' Crackdown On Drinking
PEORIA (CPS) - Police of-
ficers "have come to the door on
a. noise complaint, and have just
walked in, and started carding
people complains Mike For-
man, Interfraternity Council
president at Bradley University.
"They don't have the right to do
that without a warrant
They may in fact have the
right, and colleges across the
country are using it more to keep
a much closer eye on students this
fall as the nationwide crackdown
on student drinking begins its se-
cond year.
Some critics fret the
crackdown, however, may scuttle
campus "responsible drinking"
programs, forcing many students
off campus � and into their cars
� to drink in less-controllable,
more dangerous situations.
And while observers can't
agree if tougher regulations and
stricter enforcement actually are
changing student drinking habits,
campuses' switch to more ag-
gressive anti-drmking tactics this
fall is beyond question.
-At Indiana University, the
dean of students makes surprise
visits to campus parties to find
underaged drinkers and enforce a
new campus keg policy.
� Yale now effectively prohibits
alcohol at many campus events,
and issues students "drinking
cards" to help enforce the new
rules.
� Local police broke up tradi-
tional school-opening street par-
ties at West Virginia and Western
Michigan, arresting some 42
students the first week of classes
at West Virginia.
� Pittsburgh police have warned
student groups they will drop into
University of Pittsburgh parties
unannounced to enforce new
drinking age laws.
� University Of Florida ad-
ministrators made a point of
holding a public hearing into
alleged violations of their new
dry rush rules the verv first week
of school.
Bradley officials had two
students arrested for violating
drinking rules during their first
week of classes, too.
Boston University, Southern
Cal, Berkeley, Penn State, San
Diego State, Kentucky and
Arizona, among scores of other
campuses, have adopted stricter
rules for student drinking this
fall.
At Smith College, for example,
underaged drinkers no longer can
get legal help from the college.
Students can't have liquor in
dorms at South Dakota state
schools any more, while Penn
State restricts the kinds of parties
that can have kegs.
Administrators say they are
responding to new minimum
drinking ages and to the difficul-
ty of buying liability insurance
without proving they're trying to
enforce the rules.
No one is sure how much the
crackdown is changing student
drinking.
"The keg is still the major
focus of a party, but there is a
trend toward more responsible
use of alcohol on our campus
notes Harold Reynolds, director
of student affairs at Cal-
Berkeley.
"There are some disgruntled
views about the ban on alcohol,
but we are living with it" says
George Kuntz, president of the
Interfraternity and Sorority
Council at Boston University.
"In the past, 10 people would
work on the homecoming com-
mittee. We had 35 this year.
There is a definite increase in par-
ticipation in school events. It has
worked phenomenally well
Kuntz says of the new alcohol
regulations.
At Yale, "there will be fewer
large parties predicts Mark
Watts, of Yale's Joint Council of
Social Chairmen.
student can subscribe to. The stu-
dent fills out a personal data
sheet and sends it to the service
with $15 to $25. The service then
sends a computer printout telling
the student that he or she is eligi-
ble for Federal Aid. We(Finan-
cial Aid Dept.)can tell the student
that information for free said
Ray Edwards, director of Student
Financial Aid.
Approximately 80 percent of
ECU's black student population
and 51 percent of ECU's white
student population received some
type of financial aid last year ac-
cording to Edwards. "One woula
have to believe that more minori-
ty students receive financial aid
because their incomes are lower
Also, most minority students
receive a greater amount of
financial assistance said Ed-
wards.
"We suggest that students beat
the bushes to find scholarships.
We are very happy to assist
students. Therefore, you should
start at home looking for a
scholarship. It's all a matter of
digging, investigation, and using
your resources Edwards said.
"We have scholarship infor-
mation in the office that's ex-
haustive in terms of aid.
However, there are a lot of civic
organizations, church organiza-
tions, local and private organiza-
tions that offer scholarships in a
community he added.
"Many companies have educa-
tional assistance for employees
and their dependents. Here at the
financial aid office, we have
ordered information that list
loans and scholarships for
minorities and women. We have
a detailed listing, but it's hard to
keep track of every scholarship
offered he stated.
According to the Reagan ad-
ministration, all of the Federal
aid is accounted for. "By all
means the need exceeds the
availability. We've never had an
over-abundance of federal funds.
Here at ECU we are still making
awards in the Federal program
for the current year said Ed-
wards.
The smartest student does not
necessarily always get the
scholarships. Many scholarships
are based on field of study,
leadership, ethnic race, or ex-
tracurricular activities.
Many young men are
discovered in high school and
recruited to play sports for a
school with a scholarship. Until
recently, women were left behind
when athletic scholarships were
handed out. However, Title IX
legislation has determined that
federal funds be used equally for
men and women's sports.
Morever, students can also
earn money for expenses as a
form of financial aid.
Cooperative Education is a pro-
gram that enables the student to
gain experience in their specific
field while earning money to pay
college expenses.
See CO-OP Page 3.
Dedication, Coordination Make Successful Homecoming
Bv lANfFlsFARI Pirate cheerleaders fane � i . . O
B LANCE SEARI
Suff VtrUtt
Hard work, dedication, coor-
dination, cooperation and a little
bit of luck is usually the formula
for a successful homecoming
weekend.
With such groups as the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee, the Homecoming Student
Committee, the Marching
Pirates, Greek fraternities and
sororities, and campus dor-
mitories using these elements,
Pirate Homecoming 1985 was a
tremendous success.
Many individuals in charge of
these organizations had pertinent
roles in this year's success. They
include. Barbara Winrey, parade
coordinator; and Betsy Peters,
Don Leggett, Jane Whit field and
Rudy Alexander of the
homecoming committees, to
name a very few.
The weekend, slugged 'Alive in
'85: Building Futures Thru In-
volvement began on Friday with
OnThelnslde
Announcements2
Classifieds5
Editorials4
Features6
Sports7
' Tis sweeter to bleed for an age at
thy shrine
Than to sleep but a moment in
chains.
� Thomas Moore
Pirate cheerleaders, fans and
others celebrating at its annual
Homecoming pep rally. Featured
were the beautiful Clydesdale
horses through which much ex-
citement and anticipation was
generated for Saturday's ac-
tivities.
Saturday began at 10 a.m. with
the Homecoming Parade featur-
ing marching bands, floats, fire
engines, clowns, horses and
beautiful young sponsors riding
in an assortment of expensive
cars; competition was also in
abundance.
The band competition, judged
by Kerr Strang, Joe Rosemund,
and Mike Fussell, saw Goldsboro
High School winning,
Greenville's own J.H. Rose High
School taking runner-up, with
Bertie High School placing third.
The float, dorm and house
competitions, judged by Cindy
Pleasants, Richard Loving and
Mary Ann Pettington, were at-
tempts to exhibit this year's
theme thru decoration.
The float competition, which
had many entries, was won by
Dean's Advisory Council; their
float consisted of purple and gold
blocks emphasizing the need for
participation for the future.
Runner-ups will be chosen later.
The dorm competition, based
on the best-decorated dormitory,
was won by Jarvis, followed by
Clement and White.
The house competition was
won by the Student Methodist
Center, who had the best theme
decorated house. Delta Zeta was
runner-up while Chi Omega
rounded out the top three.
The football game, featuring
the national power Miami Hur-
ricanes, was next on Saturday's
agenda. Bands, balloons,
pageantry and most of all excite-
ment were the main ingredients
of the afternoon.
Although the Pirates lost 27-15
on a few big plays by the 'Canes,
individuals such as Jeff Heath,
Kevin Walker, and you, the fan,
made even bigger plays: Heath
became ECU's all-time leading
scorer, Walker intercepted three
passes to approach an ECU
record and solidify his national
lead in that category, and Ficklen
Stadium had its largest crowd
ever.
Halftime witnessed the Mar-
ching Pirates put on their usual
impressive performance with the
moment of truth soon to follow
� the crowning of Ms.
Homecoming Pirate.
Christine Roman, representing
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity, took top
honors as she received the crown.
Paige Luther of Alpha Delta Pi
and Martha Hudson of the Tri
Sigs took first and second
runners-up, respectively.
Saturday evening wa.� also a
festive time, on and off campus.
Parties were abundant �
celebrating the successful day;
they took place in dorms, frater-
nities, sororities, houses near and
far from campus and in Green-
ville's downtown establishments.
Rafters and Elbo frequently saw
lines extend around the corner.
Sunday afternoon capped off
Homecoming '85 weekend with
plenty of musical entertainment.
The Spongetones filled the cam-
pus mall air with such favorites as
Little Richard, The Beatles, and
Crosby, Stills and Nash.
Homecoming Parade
J � NUMIIRT - TIM IIUCHWI
The Pirate takes a ride in a vintage Austin Healey 3000i. The Pirate In his classy ride along with
other bands, floats, fire engines, and clowns joined together in the Homecoming Parade to make it
one of the most festive and successful In years.
1
I





IHL- bAST (ARni INIAN
FALL ON THE MALL
Announcements
PPHA

� 'cs you to an evening
' ' 'he Van a'lpm
udc jarnes a cooKout ana the
��ee will be
"COCh'j Oial V tor
ECU MEN S BASKETBALL
�' I DdSnefDaii team ,s
nale s'u.ipnt in
� fl � � hostesses tor
"Pus Quahfica
� ��-� � athletes
' � ;ooo Knowledge
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" l 'Lire anc most . m
! Ml . pet sona � wfk
M B H aoout
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" " ' � �' � m sei
SCHOOL OF NURSING
-
B &e ot�eng the
� ' - -ses .n Spr
"�' 'egu.a' second
s- scheduled every spr.ng
terested n oeg.nn.ng
�-s Nurs.ng 200 in
" Assessment , 3 Nurs
' '�� � �� H 3 ana Nut
M� rsing o Well
itentt em a 'orm
- - � � Nov 1
SILENTDINNER
� - -� ub w Moid its 1 rsl
5 at 3 X " � D "nfi
in ac a mee' ig
�'��es'eo persons
- esl 'St 52t
Pre Professional Meaith Alliance will
meet tonight at 6 30 p m ,n room 221 in
Mendenhall Student Center Our guest
speaker will be Ms Etiel Mason Director ot
Volunteer Service at Pitt County Memorial
Hospitai She will talk about volunteering at
the hospital All members and interested
floests are encouraged to attend
Refreshments will be served
ECU AMBASSADOR'S
Don t forget our General Meeting on Oct
16 at 5 15 in Mendenhalls Multipurpose Rm
See you there
PI SIGMA ALPHA
We are having a cooKout oyster roast at
Mike s house this Sunday at 6 p m All
members are invited to attend Just bring a
couple of bucks donation and your beverage
Be prepared to kick oft your shoes sit back
and relax For directions or more nto check
the Pol So bulletin board or call Tina at
�"52 3022
EPSILON PI TAU
EPT will hold its monthly meeting a' the
Western steer on 10th Street today at 5 p m
The purpose of this meeting is induction ot
officers Dr Molt will be the guest speaker
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold a meet.ng
tor all members and anyone nteresfed in
iaw School We will nee n Room 221
Mendenhall on Thursday Oct 17 from 6 30 8
P ECU Attorney Dr Stevens w III be our
gues speaker For more information call
?S8 3155 NOte N C Attorney Genera! Lac.
hornburg will be speaking n jenn.ns
Aud'torium Mon Oct 14 at 2 p rn
Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
AU Transactions Confidential V8 e
BUY�SALE�TRADE j&C?
9 75241322 V
Hoars: 9r00
:00pm.Mo�Si(
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries $
Lg Drink $2.89 $
?
?
ocations ?
600 W Greenville Blvd 756 6434$
2905 E 5th St 752 5184
??????????
ABORTIONS IP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
SN5 Abortion from 13 to 18 weck a: aJd;
uonal cosi Pregnant) Test. Birth Controi, and
Problem Pregr.anc Counseling For further
information call 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
1-800-532-53) between 9 AM and 5 P M
weekdays
RELUOH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
tl7WOTtMor9o�$.
tolalgli NC
s

s


L
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
Disciple of Christ
1 1 1 1 Grernville Blvd 756-2275

I
� '
In non-essentials 9i�oi
In all thing
akM 9.45 am. Christian Education (ail ages
H Vann Knight 11 00 am Worship-Open Communion
����������
CAREER EXPLORATION GROUP
Assist participants who are undecided about ca-
reer goals or life plans to initiate exploration of al-
ternatives and decision making. Includes aware-
ness of how ones interests and values relate to a
eer, career testing and decision making skills
necessary for making career choices.
Begins October 15
Tuesdays, 7-9 P.M. for 3 weeks
Cost - $40.00
-a L Helms. MA
'ogical Associate
Call To Register
756-8014
;�-���5���i�cso
u
THE
DINNER
PLACE
4 p.m10 p.m.
In Mon. & Tues. Night
Fried Shrimp � All You Can Eat $4.50
Wed. Night
Scallops & Soft Shell Crabs Combo $4.50
) Thurs. Night
Cubbies Cheese Steak $2.50
Fri. Night
Cubbies Shrimp Burger $1.50
Daily Special
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00
5 Hamburger & French Fries $1.00
I
Corner of 5th and Evans St.
Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 a m
7 Days a Week
Phone: 752-6497
NEED A MASSAGE?
On Tues Oct IS irom 6 30 10 p m the
priysial Therapy Club m spot-
massage cllnl Come to 1st floor Beik
BidgiAiiied Health and get a
professional 10 minute massage tor only
REDUCEDCALORIE FOODS
Examination of taiorie content of Home
prepared and commercially processed food
products Study of new products used to pro
doce reduced a � foods Evaluation ot
selected texts whi h nave been moo �
reduce calories
For information write Dr Eugena M
Zallen RD Department of Food Nu1' �
and institution Managempn' School of
MomeEconom cs. East �
Greenv,iie Norn i . . �
?57 6917
PHIALPHATHETA
Ph. Alpha Tret will have a
cookout meeting tor members ana prospe
� embers "ursaar O I -� jo at
Dr Papaias s house
� I
Bttei I because off
BETAKAPPAALPHA
Beta Kappa Alpha the tanking finance
committee will hold a meeting todar On ' 10
at 3pm mRawlRrn 101 AU interested per
ions are invited
PHI BETA SIGMA
Puttmg on the M,ts Oct is at 7 pm Men
��Theatre ECUstudenfs Scents Non
ECU studer � $
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
Classes tor second block begm Monday
Oct U (Sections 31 41 6 and 47) an
day Ocl is (Sections 12 30 4S 48 4� and
AMA
rOu doing tor (all Break' Make
Plans to do your resume Parney �
from the career planning ano placement
-esumes I
day Oct io a' 3 30 in 103 C fWws'e'
Members jna ques' a.
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
An eacelient opportur- ty r, sis for
students nrrrs'M n personnel
managements w.tr a manufac tur ng fa
in New Bern Students should be untort and
fave a minimum of a 2 8 &PA Fc n
� � tooperat � f � -�
"aw
STATE GOVERNMENT
A variety of positions a'e available for
students interested in career . �� me staff
government Opportunities are ava. able for
business, graphics . .
scence. and computer science n
more information contact Cooperative
Education. 313 Raw! Bunding
GAMMA BETA PHI
� net U with a 30 &pa or be"e are
nv ted to ,om the Gamma Beta i
'erested students p.ease -
one of the oriental,on sessions to be
Tues Oct 8 or Thurs Oct 10 at 7 t
Biology 102
ECHO
ISA Ad
I lABr !H '(,Y
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l- -af li . � .ft.
INDT
Itingd
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The Best Deal At The Best Club In Town.
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Our Full Facility Co-Ed Club Features
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Two Weight Rooms
Steam Room
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Social I vents
I ockers
Private Dressing Rooms
Showers
Professional Personal
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The
York Olympic Weights
(Including Bench & Squal Ma
Dynacam Machines
Exer-Bikes
Therapeutic Massage
Nutrition Instruct!
Co-op Pre
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CONSOLIDATED
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Adult:
Call Lynn or Dave
For Free Visit!
Today
SPA
Southpark Shopping Center
756-7991
75� 3307 � Grt.nv.llt S
SILVER
AGNES (
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
Pirate
Football
Tickets
each of the
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
3
LIBERTY II
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Jeno's
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89
Saturday,
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ISA Admitted To Central Campus
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 10, 1985
b ki.izabkthpc;k
M.ff Writer
The recent admittance of the
International House to Central
ampus Area Residence Council
may prove to be an incentive to
incite new members to the Inter-
national Student Association, ac-
cord;ng to ISA President Naresh
Tolani.
Tolani is a Bombay, India
native, but has lived in other
places such as England and
Africa, which he now considers
home.
Tolani, who is also a pre-med
major, said, "the main purpose
of the ISA is to facilitate cultral
exchange with American
students
"The main goal of the ISA is
not only to promote this cultural
exchange, but to aiso make those
foreign students feel at ease in a
new and different country said
Tolam.
The move which placed the In-
ternational House as part of Cen-
tral Campus just may be that in-
Co-op Program Helps
Students With Money
Continued From Page I.
'The Co-op program is
seperate and apart from financial
aid according to William Bar-
coordinalor of the
Cooperative Education Program.
"We work with the students
and try to find them work related
to their major. Work periods de-
pend on the employer. If you get
involved early in the Co-op pro-
gram, perhaps when you are a
sophmore, then you have a better
chance to get a job when you
graduate said Barrett.
"Six hundred FCC students
worked in the Co-op program
last year. Our students made
close to a million dollars. Most
students make $5 plus an hour,
although it does vary. S'udents
make good money. Many
students pretty well support
themselves during the year.
centive to promote this cultural
exhange.
Kamrul Islam, an ISA member
who lives in the International
House, hopes the move makes
students more aware of the ISA,
which would hopefully recruit
new members. Islam is a
Bangladesh native and a graduate
student in Sociology.
To Tolani's disappointment
there are not many American
students involved with the ISA.
"We have an International Din-
ner every year, which is a success
most of the time, but it does show
American interest in the ISA If
American students can support
this one event, then the ISA
should be successful, added
Tolani.
To make the cultural exchange
more effective, Tolani not only
holds ISA meetings, but also
makes it more effective through
debates between certain faculty,
guest lecturers, exchanges with
other universities, or have
students from other universities
visit ECU.
"We (ISA) need to inform the
American students about our
governments back home and our
problems as we see them, and not
as the Western press puts it
said Tolani.
According to Tolani, the Inter-
national House acts as a source
of information. "The fact is
said Tolani, "that we are maybe
seven different nationalities stay-
ing under one roof
f
!
!i
000oooo00mt00OOf0O0O0Oom000000000600O00000O0ooo00 ����������,
Oct. 10
Happy Birthday
Anthony
Well, Anthony, here it is.
Have a fantastic day, and
thanks for all your help. Now
will you tell us how old you
are.
� Scoop
OCT. 11
Happy Birthday
Andrew
You 've finally reached the
big two-two and it's calling
your name Be careful and
don't do too many Russian
tricks.
� The fearless trio
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�t?e iEaat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
roM Norton. GrwMtaMiw
J av Stone, wjw�,n�
MlKE LUDWICK, T()M LUVEND�R �.�
RICK Mc ORMA( , . ANTHOW Martin
Scott Ccxwr .y John P u RSON
STEPHEN SHI RBIN. ,�,� ShasNuS Shqrt ;
ANDREW JOYNER.O, DEBBIE STEVENS. ��
DECHANILE JOHNSON. , BILL MITCHELL �
Stt&frVOCAl
October 10. :J�
Opinion
Page 4
Protest
NAA CP Calls For Divestment
Events in South Africa have con-
tinued to make headlines in
America as everyday more people
are killed (primarily blacks). In
response to events in that country,
organized opposition to the policies
of the Botha government have in-
creasingly been taking the form of
divestment resolutions and
economic boycotts. The State
University of New York (SI NY)
system voted just two weekv ago to
divest itself of SI 1.5 million worth
of its holdings in South Africa and
Columbia University voted to com-
pletely divest two days ago. It is the
first Ivy League school to do so.
All of the divestment activity is
apparently having an impact too as,
according to a recent issue of
Business Week magazine. Apple
Computer has just decided to cease
operations in South Africa and
South African businesses have
opened secret negotiations with
black opposition leaders citing the
anti-apartheid movement in the
U.S. as a major reason for their ac-
tion. More to the point, the Botha
government has been making more
reform overtures toward blackv
These overtures, which have includ- '
ed the integration of some theaters
and the possibility of the inclusion
of some blacks on the advisorv
President's Council (though blacks
will still be denied the right to vote),
are token gestures to be sure. Yet,
they are an indication of how po-
tent the anti-apartheid movement
has become.
The Greenville chapter of the
NAACP is organizing a demonstra-
tion against apartheid slated for
this Saturday at 10:00 A.M The
demonstration, which will begin at
York Memorial Zion Church on the
corner of Third and Tyson streets.
aims to focus the attention of
Greenville residents on the apar-
theid system and the continuing
racial violence in South Africa.
This demonstration, following as it
does on the heels of the recent
demonstration organized on this
campus by the Alpha Phi Alpha
tratermty, marks an escalation in
anti-apartheid activity in our com-
munity. Moreover, the NAACP is
exphcitely endorsing divestment as
a strategy for combating apartheid.
This last measure can be taken as
evidence that an evolutionarv leap
has occured in the thinking of anti-
apartheid activists, for. the
demonstration which was held on
campus two weeks ago did not ad-
nv strategy for combating
Rather it was simply
to increase public
about the apartheid
-Campus Forum
J
Classifiec
SALl
FOR S-


-




NEED '
PROFf



FOR Si





FOR SX.

Restaurant Critics Shish kabobbed
apartheid,
designed
awareness
system.
Though.
educational outreach
was a necessary first step and must
be continued, we believe it is now
time to move swiftly toward strong
decisive action. That is why we erf-
dorse the actions of the local
NAACP and call upon the student
body ol ECU to join them in their
call tor justice in South Africa and
an end to the apartheid svstem.
some (companies j
acknowledge privately that the
groundswelt of university
demonstrations, city council resolu-
tions and Congressional concern is
taking a toll. Some say they wonder
if it is reasonable to maintain a
South African presence that might
venerate less than one percent of
global profits but ten percent of
global headaches.
"Experts attribute the com-
panies' doubts to three principle
factors.
"One is the mounting campaign
against corporate involvement in
South Africa, which affects com-
panies' images, takes up company
time and raises the possibility of
consumer boycotts. "
The New York Times
My name is Harr I eist. 1 am the
area supervisor for Western Steer
Family Steakhouse. I worked tor
Spartan food Systems for six ears,
in the Har dee's Hamburger
restaurants as well as QuincvV j
would like to clarify the errors in the
article written by Stephen Sherbm
and Brian Berry man in the September
19th edition of your paper.
The article states Quincy's "ap-
pears to be just another steakhouse
and that is exactly what it is,
another steakhouse. All the be
fast food steak houses have
background music, plants, friendly,
fasl efficient service, a choice of more
items thai include "chicken, chili,
shrimp, and soup" that is "tastefully
prepared, promptly served and
guarenteed" to satisfy, and a salad
bar with "plenty of choices for the
pick vegetable isseui "
1 am really offended b the
tour paragraphs in your article.
especially the statement on qualitv
With the exception o Pepsi, bread,
and milk, everything Western Veer"
buys comes from KRAFT, whose
name over the ears has become
synonymous with quality. None of
our competitors can make this claim.
Your paper thought so last ear when
it echoed the same sentiment by
writing that Western Steer had the
best salad bar in Greenville. 1 also feel
that we at Western Steer offer the
same services mentioned in the arti-
cle.
Quincy's was not established in the
early 60's. It was started in 1971 in
Greenville, South Carolina, by Alvin
McCall, and was called Western
Family Steakhouse. The name was
changed to Quincv's in !9-4 The
eight existing units were purchased by
Spartan Food Systems in 19"
Spartan Food Systems was found-
ed by Jerome J. Richarson and
Charles Bradshaw (not Terry Brad-
shaw, former quarterback e Pit
tsburgh Steelers). Terrv Bradshaw
advertises for Red Man Chewing
bacco and tries to record cou
musie, but has no: quite made
' the board I I
W rld Corporation. Char B
tw was a quarterback a: Wofford
ge in Spartanburg
( arolii a. and i; currently Chairman
of the Board of Trans-W �
poratii
o entire article was verv slanted
and did an injustice
VV e
ulle I
icked objectivity ai
researchc
these areas drc funda
'�'� e u - a mil
Harry 1 eisi
Area Supervisor. Western Steer
WZMB Frequency Change
Having read the .us: two ar: .
WZMB, 1 can't help but be amused.
You mentioned the fear of manipula-
tion by bureaucracy as not beii
serious threat o student-owned
WZMB. Awaken my naive ones, so-
meone hasn't beer, going to class
WZMB applied for a 3,000
power increase years ago � a request
the Feds approved. So why are you
applying for one again'1 WUNC was
neither engineered nor licensed to
broadcast in the Greenville area when
WZMB was engineered and licensed,
so why are you giving them our sta-
tion at your expense The wav 1
remember it, you had to have a
�e Di Re
1.5 frequency in
area.
W ' WZMB
.� �
nager, engineer, de .
Jeeter -
freq
g
i 100,001
(
W I N(
wi V
are already severa i a. There
isn't anything else in the world �
WZMB; just like there's nothing like
Radio Free � tpe , � . h ,iNi,
here. When I
getting
son g from you I g
P.S State
ECt Alumi
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all poit M fQ
u
tions Build, tne en.
trance of Joyner I
Anti-Abortion Men Seen As Hypocrites
By Katha Pollit
M tha Juries
Every few years a progressive man
takes it upon himself to set the women's
movement straight � from a progressive
point of view, of course.
The latest male pundit to show women
the true path is Nat Hentoff, for decades
the grand old civil libertarian of Village
Voice and other left-liberal publications.
Hentoff has decided that the fetus is a
"kid having an abortion is "killing
and women who terminate their
pregnancies are ushering in a Brave New
World of euthanasia for the retarded,
the old, the terminally ill. Why, he asks!
do women have abortions? It's not just
"because they're poor or 15 years old or
victims of rape, as that old softy New
York Governor Mario Cuomo would
have it. No, Hentoff complains, "For
some, it is just plain inconvenient, at a
particular time in their lives, to have a
baby. In terms of their careers or the
state of their marriages. For others
the choice is abortion because the kid
down there is going to be retarded. Or
the kid has some other defect. And since
everyone wants a perfect baby � it's
guarenteed in the Constitution, isn't it?
� the kid is done away with
Although Hentoff believes abortions
should remain legal, because women will
have them anyway, he wants everyone to
understand that women who choose not
to bear unwanted children � unless they
are young or very poor � are frivolous
and shallow and bad.
I don't want to dwell on the logical in-
consistencies of Hentoff's position �
why, for example, if abortion is only a
convenience, he thinks enormous
numbers of women will seek them even
under unsafe, illegal conditions. Or its
fancy footwork � that the fertilized
egg, embryo, and fetus are, in fact,
"kids" is exactly what prochoicers do
not concede. Or its red herrings � abor-
tion as sex selection is shocking, as he
protests, but is it more shocking than sex
selection per se?
But what really bothers me about
Hentoff's position is its hypocrisy. I
don't have this problem with the
bishop's statement on abortion. The
bishops make no women pregnant. The
bishops, all of them presumably
celibate, believe that sex is supposed to
"transmit life in their curious phrase,
and that it ought to be engaged in only
by those willing to become parents. They
lay out a hard line, and one that
overlooks the considerable amount of
sex that is involuntary for women, but it
is straight and clear and asks nothing of
others that they do not ask of
themselves.
Noncelibate men are another story. It
outrages me, as a woman, that any man
who has a sex life, married or unmar-
ried, can talk about abortion as though
every year a million and a half unwanted
fetuses were placed "down there" by
God himself, and as though the fact that
they are unwanted has nothing to do
with men. Hentoff argues that his
maleness ought not to debar him from
opposing abortion since a lot of women
do so, too, and on an abstract level he's
correct. But 1 have yet to hear an an-
tiabortion woman speak so contemp-
tuously of women's real-life cir-
cumstances, or call an unwanted child
an "inconvenience Forgetting your
umbrella is an inconvenience. Having a
baby � even if she gives it up for adop-
tion � is a major event in a woman's
life, and deserves, one would think,
some respect.
Rather than fulminate against
women, about whose lives he seems to
know little, would it not be more seemly
for Hentoff to direct his moral fervor
toward his brothers? After all, once a
woman is pregnant she's not going to
listen to The Village Voice. But there are
a lot of men out there in Hentoff's boat
� men who have sex, one presumes, but
are "worried" and "concerned" and
"upset" by abortion, and these, I would
argue, are Hentoff's natural audience.
He might address them along these lines:
Men! Abortion is a terrible thing, and
it behooves us to ensure that there are as
few as possible. Therefore, I propose
that we never sleep with a woman unless
we are prepared to marry her if she
becomes pregnant. That means no more
extramarital affairs, no more sleeping
with our students, no more one-night
stands. Should the marriage fail, let's
vow to cheerfully continue to support
every child we father until that child is
21 � we have a bad record there, what
with three-fourths of divorced dads
reneging on court-ordered child support,
and we'h just have to shape up. Let's
always split child care 50-50 with our
wives � according to my research, some
women actually have abortions in order
to pursue their careers. Some of us will
have to scale down our professional
aspirations, but, after all, that's what we
want women with unwanted pregnancies
to do.
means vasectomies for you guys who
can't live with the conditions I've outlin-
ed above, and, for the rest of us � con-
doms! They're messy, they diminish
pleasure, but so what? How can we
blame women for having "convenience
abortions" if we won't put up with a lit-
tle inconvenience to prevent unwanted
pregnancy? In fact, since condoms have
been known to break, let's wear two at a
time!
None of this stuff will amount to
anything, though, if we don't change
our attitudes about sex as well. Face it,
men: we give women mixed message-
So from now on, let's never call a
woman frigid if she won't sleep with us
without commitment, or promiscuous if
she takes a diaphragm with her when she
goes out for a date. As for men who
sleep around. Let's think of them not as
stallions bursting with vitality but as hit-
and-run artists so irre ble thev
don't even know how many fetuses thev
scatter about. I'll save my report on the
men's antirape-and-anti-incest cam-
paign tor next week, but fellas. 50 p
pie does not a demonstration mal
Now know what you're think: �
V h not just go back to the old wav .
let women have their abortions in peace
in return for letting us off the hook
about birth control and commitment
and child care and all that0 Well, that
would be convenient. But it would be
wrong.
This. I would suggest, is the only
honorable line for an antiabortion man
to take. Nat Hentoff, are you listening?
Reprinted with permit � m Mother
Jones magazine, a monthly based in San
Francisco.
� �tA�' r�r.W� m -l
WHAT HISTORIC
BEST WILL OCCUR
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TMFFASTt AROI INIAN
Entertainment
Our Turn!
B ROSE HERRING
rfmrnr r a I ale
M en are a strange lot. lor
��?. centuries, males have con-
stantly tried to categorize women
into cliche ridden groups - just
for the sake of caressing their
masculine egos.
Times have changed. The very
same group o narrow-minded
males have managed to inadver
tantly.by every fault of their
own. place themselves into
similar stereotypical molds (not
similar to fungus),
lime now to turn the tables.
How about those macho men?
They're not hard to miss with
their little fannies swinging back
; forth like the pendulum of a
grandfather clock. Sometimes
socks are worn in the strangest
places, a feeble effort to bulge
where need be.
Brains have been sacrificed for
twn. 1 ook at some of the lines
e use:
' Ha ven � I met o u
somewhere before?"
"Let me show you my
weights
"Weren't you in mv driver's ed
class?"
"Let me show you my muscles,
woman they'll say.
Sure, big boy. Hurt me. hurt
me.
And how about those self-
centered ones with 'God, I'm
d' tat toed on their forehead?
They drive around in their
parent's gucci-mobile expecting
women to toss their feminine
bodies on the car's windshield.
They wear their frat and izod
shirts and expect you to idolize
them for what they're worth.
They talk about 'their' lifetheir'
major, and how horny 'they' are.
Takes two to tango, huh
fellah?
Then there are the ones that
fall in love on the first date. How
irritating.
"I can see it in your eyes he
says as he stares down your
blouse. "It's not often I can find
someone as special as you, and
I've only known you for 30
seconds
Sure, I'm special, but why
should 1 believe that you're so
keenly perceptive.
These are the kinds of saps
who tick off your roommates
with a deluge of phone calls, and
if you're lucky, he'll fall in love
with one of your roommates.
End problem.
The lovesick men remind me oi
static cling; so unnecessary. Thev
come over to your place and
refuse to leave. Even as you drop
subtle hints such as "I've got that
big trig test coming up in the next
few weeks. Time to studvand
"You know, 1 killed my last
boyfriend in that very seat you're
sitting in these people refuse to
go home-as if they're waiting tor
something.
Have you ever dated a wimp?
No fun here.
Movies are usually the itinerary
of the evening simply because the
guy cannot talk intelligentlv for
two hours. After the movie, he'll
take you to go watch his family,
bowl at the local lanes.
Wimps try to make you feel
guilty for not 'understanding'
who they are. If that's the case,
encourage him to seek profes-
sional help, and then, and only
then, he should be allowed to
stop by again.
Wimps are usually easv to spot
since they usually wear plaid
pants and have Alan Alda posters
in their rooms.
Philosophical tvpes are an in-
Pagc6
Peter Pan Prevails
In Second Season
By STEPHEN SHERBIN
And
CAPPY IVEY
Tracy Clark, shown at right, stars as SSSSwver wLfteST
Krow up in the East Carolina Playhouse production of Peter Pan.
teresting, yet dull, breed. Their
lines drL- more original than
others, but the purpose ol then
lines is still the same.
few examples to watch out
for:
"It you played your cards
right. I could be had
and
"Sex is like deathbut since 1
don't want to die just yet
Uh-huh. The philosophical
ones are slippery devils. They'll
quote Shakespeare. Dante and
Hustler, all in the same breath.
lso, watch out for the bores.
These yawn-provokers plan their
evenings around Trivial Pursuit
and gin rummy. Their definition
ol fun is a visit to the paper mill.
"Gee they say. "Isn't this
fascinating. I gel all excited just
thinking about it
And they expect you to share
the excitement.
With the advent o the '80s,
you'd think the double standard
had vanished. Not true. No one
should tolerate a man who thinks
'a girl in every port' is the
American way. If a women has
several boyfriends, she's sailed a
slut. It a man has sev
girlfriends, tie's called a -
Isn't it amazing how 'slu
'stud' have difl .
tions'
"sometimes, it's jus) a ihai
that some men fall into these
categories. Ol coui
are versatile at Iraw
traits from two or more
aforementioned i . L�an
feel awkward dating a guy w
has too many personalities.
There are solutions ese
The East Carolina University
Playhouse has opened its
season with the musical comedy
production of Peter Pan. It is a
delightfully humorous version
from the novel by Sir James Bar-
rie and is directed by Edgar R.
Loessin. Choreography and
musical staging is directed by
Mavis Ray.
Peter Pan is more than a
children's fairytale. It is the
heart-warming story of a journey
to the land of dreams and of a lit
tie bov refusing to grow up and
lose the carefree freedom of
youth.
As Wendy Darling. MaryKate
Cunningham convincingly
depicts the emotions of a young
girl in love with the foolhardy
Peter Pan.
Vandy Behr portrays the
problems. One is to have him
take you to a nice restaurant and
order the most expensive meal
possible. Then, after dinner, ask
him to take you homeyour
home � not his.
Many other solutions can be
found, but whv elaborate.
Women are versatile, and that's
only warning men should get.
Don't fall for lines likeDo
you sunn often - I thought I saw
a mermaid that looks just like
. "
cky men o the world
beware; we're not as mgnorant as
you may think. So when you guys
pick up that tab at the bar or
restaraunt, think again - you may
have forced yourself into a
stereotypical corner.
Get a grip, gentlemen. W e
know whai you're up I
Bathroom Philosophers:
dastardly Captain Hook. His ex-
pressions and gestures lend an
even more humorous effect to the
pirate captain.
Tracy Clark, as Peter Pan,
gives a respectable performance
but is unfortunately forced to the
sidelines by the commanding per-
formances of Cunningham and
Behr.
Mavis Ray has done a fine job
on the choreography and musical
staging of the Indians and
pirates.
Veteran actress Sandy Bullock
plays Tiger Lily, leader of the In-
dians and new-found ally of
Peter Pan's.
Robert Ruffin and Anne
Coatney are Mr. and Mrs. Darl-
ing. Coatney gives a commen-
dable rendering of the lullaby
"Tender Shepherd
The remaining two Darling
children, John and Michael, are
well portrayed by Jack Edward
Burnish and Anthony Distefano.
Special use is made of lighting
and visual effect. Tinker Bell is
actually a $10,000 laser from
New York.
The effects of flying are pro-
duced by the same company
responsible for the Broadway
version and involve the use of
harnesses and a crane.
This production is a
thoroughly enjoyable visit to
Never-Never Land for youths of
all ages. Peter Pan will show
nightly through October 12th and
begins at 8:15 p.m. A special
matinee performance is schedul-
ed at 2:15 p.m. on Saturday, Oc-
tober 12th.
Following productions will in-
clude "The Three Sisters "The
Learned Ladies" and "Fifth of
July Tickets for all productions
are available at the McGinms
Theatre Ticket Office.
i
I
r t
Ra
After an embarrassing 41
defense will havt
By STEPHEN SHERBIN
And
CAPPY IVEY
Wizards Of Wit IRS Cr
The Concord String Quartet will perform in Hendrix Theater
Thursday at 8:00 p.m. to open the Chamber Festival season.
Quartet To Entertain
MARY BETH DO WD
Suff Wr1lf
The Concord String Quartet,
recognized as one of the na-
tion's finest string ensembles, will
be performing tonight at East
Carolina University.
The members of the Concord
String Quartet, formed in 1971,
are Andrew Jennings and Mark
Sokol, violins; Norman Fisher,
cellist; and John Kochanowski,
viola.
The group, received its first big
break when it was named winner
of the 1971 Walter W. Naumburg
Chamber Music Award. The
group has achieved nothing but
success since then, performing
many premieres by such com-
posers as George Rechberg, Hans
Werner Henze, Borodin and
Hayden.
In a telephone interview last
week, Andrew Jennings said they
will "be performing a middle
piece by Hans Henze at East
Carolina. He's a German com-
poser who is very well known in
Europe but not too popular in
America
Jennings said the group "prac-
tices five - six hours a day seven
days a week, besides their
residency at Dartmouth
College
Jennings said the quartet is
also scheduled to perform in Ger-
many and Holland in January
and Febuary of 1986.
Tickets are still available for
their 8 p.m. performance tonight
in Hendrix Theatre. It looks to be
an enjoyable experience.
It was an ordinary afternoon. She
was finished with classes and
could soon go home, hut still had
one last slop to make. As she
walked into the room, she was
relieved to have the remaining
patron pass her on the way out.
She entered the second to last
cubicle on the right, not wanting
to he conspicuous. She prepared
herself for what was to
come mentally. She withdrew
her ballpoint and bettan, a
dubious artist at work.
Minutes ticked by.
The masterpiece would soon be
complete.
Rembrandt. Picasso, Monet -
thev had not hint; on her. "My
work comes from the soul, " she
mused.
Hmmm. How to begin?
Education takes on a variety of
guises. Parents, teachers, sibl-
ings, even friends provide the
guidelines to behavior that are -
and are not - acceptable. But a
well-rounded education goes
beyond known acquaintances,
extending to the realm of those
one has never met.
Fortunately, there exists an
i arena of intellectual expression
that fills the void left by close
. associates - the bathroom wall.
Each semester the battle rages
between the Administration and
the would-be philosopher, artist
and comic for possession of The
Stall. Even racists and nym-
phomaniacs can have their say on
this most unbridled and
anonymous slate of expression.
But what do they have to say?
What is their message?
(Here goes nothing!)
Staying on top of the latest
jokes is a must for today's college
student. But occasionally
"Freedom of Speech" can turn
out some comments that may
make one question that right:
(Joyner Library, Ground Floor) -
Please flush twice, it's a long way
to Jone's cafe.
(Joyner Library, Ground Floor) -
What's a diaphragm? A tram-
poline for sperm.
How about the music
sion? Free advertising knows no
bounds, and everyone can have
'equal time' on the wall:
(Joyner I ibrarj
Billy Idol Lives'
Third Floor)
worthwhile, or not:
'� lanagan, First floor)
fusciom say, 'Wherever
there you are '
- Con-
VOU HO,
(Garrett
Floor) -
Dormatory, Second
THE JOHN HIM A7 I.HAM)
Appearing in Greenville
Dec. 25th
Singing:
Anything ForJody
Mr. President
God Made Me Do It
Criminally Insane
Brady's Brain
(Joyner Library, Third Floor) -
Jimmi Hendrix, the Wild Man of
Pop Music!
Let one never forget that pillar
of social conscious, the
Philosopher. Everyone has
something to sav. whether it's
(Brewster D, First Moor) -
There's nothing more you can
leave behind.
(Garrett Dormatory, Second
Floor) - If time is a waste of life,
and life is a waste of time, then
net wasted and have the time of
vour life!
Ah! And what about the Poet,
symbol oi romance, he who can
put our deepest emotions into
verse For instance:
(Joyner Library, Second Floor) -
Jack and Jill went up the hill
To smoke a little leaf
Jack not fried - unzipped his fly
And Jill veiled H here's the
Beef �'
(Joyner Library. First Floor) -
Here I sit all broken-hearted
Came to ECU and became
retarded
Politics seems to be a hot topic
of debate here. Even current
issues can be found adorning the
cubicles:
(Brewster C, First Floor) - Sup-
port Russia, Vole Democratic.
(Croatan) - Support South
Africa, Stop Communism on the
Dark Continent.
Of course some people never
tit into the categories correctly.
They are always somewhat dif-
ferent. One author must have
either been very humanistic or
afraid of pissing-off someone.
He simply wrote:
Long Live Earth
Creativity is the mark of one
bound for success. And good
grafitti only comes from a
creative mind. So take advice
ttom a successful person and
read the nearest bathroom wall -
fc can be a wonderful wav to
waste an afternoon!
Bv 11 W! I IF RO
Wl
-
I
D e
Can

-
and a
In
title
Golfers Pla
B JIM . H MI fK
the

the Ma
?H Th� f 8 ' ?2 HitS bringS the,r brand of n�" "� P�P o the New Drf v
night. This trio is progressing in leaps and bounds. First � Don K 1?ls
sharp cawette of brand-new song, like "Pressure Dome tun"wtoSllJft by
band has earned auite - n.m, f�r �� .nw. "�� Window, and "Numbers Th�
band has earned quite a name for Itself all over the eastern :Ttf,T'JV? - i'?w "L �
Focus and "Just One of the Guys and they .PPW quitey7o I2ltti3
original pop.
Mark Arcilesi. had the second besl
i





1 Prevails
TJft V
ason
i His ex
end an
:he
:
the
pet -
and
dud
I
&
.
Be
Wit

:
:
'
�p to the New Dell this Friday
jn-produced single followed by a
indow and "Numbers The
" with Number 1 nils like "Sharp
make their mark in the world of
llll I S1 l Ki U INI N
Sports
Pirates Seek Revenge
Ragin' Cajun Offense
After an embarrassing 42-24 loss to Southwestern 1 ouisiana in Lafayette,
defense will hue their hands full stopping the Cajun offensie attack.
La a ear ago, the ECU
B RICK MeCORMAC
AND
SCOTT COOPER
sorli Mllon
The 2-3 Pirates will be looking
to spoil the Ragin' Cajun
homecoming this Saturday when
ECU travels to Lafayette, La in
hopes of ending a three-game
skid.
After opening the season with
wins against N.C. State and
Southwest Texas State, the
Pirates have had tough luck the
past three weeks.
Southwestern Louisiana is in
the same boat as the Pirates.
After losing their first three
games in '85, the Cajuns have
won two of their last three, and
are currently 2-4.
Interestingly enough, LSI ,
under sixth-year head coach Sam
Robertson, has won four of their
last five games in each of the past
two seasons If you include the
'82 season, the Cajuns are 11-3-1
(.767 winning percentage) in their
final five weeks during the past
three campaigns.
"The last three seasons have
been fast finishes for us I SI
coach Robertson explained.
"This team needs to get better in
all areas of the game. It's hard to
evaluate how we'll finish � we're
waiting and hoping.
"The most important thing is
that we need to be able to come
together like a family Robert-
son added. "We've had some
problems and we've plaved some
tough teams. We need to stick
together
ECU ot tensive coordinator
Don Murrv. who was an assistant
at LSI in 1SS3. sees a younga
jun defense that is led by some
experienced veterans.
"Steve Spinella and Chris
Jacobs lead the defense Murry
said. "They're both seniors and
have been the leading tackiers for
three years.
"They're strong characters.
They run well, hit hard � they're
a cog in the defense Murry con-
tinued. "The defense will res-
pond if they stay behind these
two
The USL secondary is another
strong pat of the defense, retur-
ning three strarters from last
year. Senior free safety Clarence
Glenn and junior cornerback
Elton Slater head the experienced
defensive backfield. The
Thomas Jackson
weakness ls the youth in the front
line, which has hurt the unit's ef-
fectiveness, according to Murrv
"Their defense went from one
of the best, to one that people
have done well against Murry
said. "Their young kids up front
are getting better each week. 1 an-
ticipate them reaching a point of
maturitv.
"Their defense is tough, hard-
hitting and swarms the ball
Murry added. "We just need to
IRS Cross Campus Fun Run Results
Bv If I I Y KOI H
W
the
In the
group, (
� ' si in
B lack
1 )ee i
- i
I
M � Mail
anks won the
�' 2 : 14
; ; respective!). Robert
Moi � first in
' even; wit1
23:54 v. liam W hue
:v won the alumni
ler 40 group while Rill
laled out the run with
a time of 30:01 for the alumni
" 40 division.
The Department o f
ramural-RecreationaJ services
would like to thank all 77 fitness
buffs foi their participation in
tins year's most successful cross-
campus run.
On October 14-16 Intramural
soccer registration begins. A
mandatorv team captains
meeting will be held on Wednes-
day, Oct. 16 in Brewster C-103 at
7 p.m. It no captain is present for
your team, participation will not
be allowed in the all-campus
tournament.
Intramural team putt-putt
playoffs begin October 14 at
Greenville's Putt-Putt Golf
course on highway 33. Two put-
ters have tried for this season's
lowest round ot play. Jeff I aft
and Rick Klein must he the Ar-
nold Palmers of ECU as both
Golfers Place Twelfth In Tourney
Bv MM CHAND1 LR
.
� end
Ma
Sweeting, who is in his
golf coach,
it he was pleased with, his
team's performance.
1 he golfers placed 12th out ot
21 team field. The team total
the Pirates was 602 strokes.
Mark Arcilesi, had the second best score for the Pirate golf team.
Human won the event with a
team total of 577, followed by
Clemson at 578. Coastal Carolina
College finished third at 590.
The individual leader for the
Pirates was junior Mike Bradley,
who finished with a two-day total
of 145. That was good enough
for an eighth place finish amoung
the individual scores. Mark Ar-
cilesi was next highest for the
Pirates with a 149 total, followed
freshman Micheal Nadeau
with 153 and Chris Riley with a
155 total. Mike Bradley stated
that he was pleased to get off to a
good start this year. He said that
his goal was to finish in the top
ten and feels that with consistent
play this year, he may be able to
make the NCAA tournament.
Bradley and junior Mark Ar-
cilesi each had high regard for the
freshmen on the team. Arcilesi
said that all they need is time.
"They are hitting the ball very
well now he said.
The Pirates will be in action
again this weekend at the John
Ryan Invitational Tournament
which will be played at the Duke
University Golf Course in
Durham. Arcilesi commented
that the competition will be
tougher in Durham this weekend,
but feels that the Pirates are
capable of playing with the best.
The two remaining Buc con-
tests will be at the UNC-
W'ilmington Fall Invitational
Tournament Oct. 25-27 and the
Wolfpack Collegiate Interna-
tional on Nov. 11-12.
IRS Pult-Putt Action
shot low rounds of 61.
Be sure to be a part of this
week's punt, pass and kick event.
Today is the big day for all the
booters of ECL to show their
talents and try for this year's
championship.
Get your favorite alley cats
together and warm up those
hooks. Team bowling registra-
tion begins Wed Oct. 16. If last
year's championship teams are
still aiound, this year's competi-
tion will be tougher than ever.
Even if your favorite shot is a
gutter ball, register and be a part
of the Intramural fun.
The Department of
Intramural-Recreation Services
hopes that you keep abreast of all
the departments programs
through its bi-monthly publica-
tion: Tennis Shoe Tidbits. The
next edition will be out Oct. 15
and should be seen at your
favorite dormitory lobby. Who
knows? You may be this month's
Intramural Player or Employee
of the month.
Lady Pirate Netters
Demolish Meredith
By DAVID McGINNESS
SttffWfttM
The ECU women's tennis
team, led by Ann Manderfield,
crushed Meredith College Tues
9-0.
In the No. 1 match, Ann
Manderfield took care of Teresa
Duffy 6-4, 6-3.
Becky Clements controlled her
Meredith opponent Barb Bulla
6-3, 6-3.
Amy Ziemer, ECU's No. 3
player, gave up only three games
in her 6-1, 6-2 thrashing of
Elizabeth Hornthal.
No. 4 Lisa Eichholz topped
Meredith's Adriene Gore 6-4,
6-3.
Susan Montjoy came on strong
in the second set of her No. 5
match, beating Amy Messick 6-4,
6-1.
Holly Murray stomped
Meredith's No. 6 player Loria
Cochran 6-2, 6-1 to close out the
ECU sweep in the singles play.
In doubles, the Lady Pirates
failed to dominate their Me.edith
opponents, going to three sets in
two of their matches. However,
they held on to complete the ECU
sweep over Meredith.
In the No. 1 match Eichholz
and Manderfield dropped their
second set but came on strong in
the third, winning 7-5, 5-7, 6-2.
Myers and Swain were forced
to a tie breaker in their first set,
and nearly so in the second but
won both to take the match 7-6,
7-5.
Clements and Montjoy won
their first set against Cochran
and Gore easily, but dropped the
second. But in the deciding set
the Lady Pirates came back to
finish 6-2, 4-6, 6-2.
The women were on the road at
Atlantic Christian College yester-
day to finish a match there that
had been postponed by rain.
Today they will face
Christopher Newport at home on
the Minges Colesium courts at
3:00 p.m. for their final match of
the fall season. With a win today,
the women will finish their fall
season with a strong 7-2 record.
Good luck ladies.
go in there and play well We
have to keep their defense off
balance
On offense, the Cajuns are
predominantly an option team
They throw a lot of play-action
passes and sprint-outs, which
could trouble the Pirate defense,
according to Rex Sponhaltz.
"Anytime you play against a
team that throws a lot of sprint-
outs, your secondary has to be
ready defensive line coach
Sponhaltz said. "W'e need to con-
tain their quarterback and we
also need to shut down their in-
side running game
The quarterback situation is
unsettled, as last week's starter
Clint Campbell was injured in
USL's loss to Southern Mississip-
pi. If he is unable to play,
freshman Thomas King will
direct the Ragin' Cajun attack.
The USL ground attack is lead
by senior fullback Thomas
Jackson, who needs only 120
yards to be the school's all-time
leading rusher. Opening the holes
for Jackson is a small but quick
offensive line. The receivers and
return men also pose a concern to
the Buc coaching staff.
"Their front people aren't big
but they make up for that with
foot speed and agility
Sponhaltz said. "Pierre Perkins
(wide reciever) has the kind of
speed that concerns us. They are
great believers in the comeback,
and that speed can hurt you
quick. We will have to be
prepared to play 60 minutes of
football
To be successful, the Pirates
will have to be consistent on
defense while being more ex-
plosive on offense.
"W'e have to decide what we're
doing wrong and work to correct
those misfakes head coach Art
Baker said. "W'e simply aren't
consistent enough on offense. We
need someone to become a big
play man for us.
"I feel very strongly, if we
keep working at them, some of
these good things are going to
start happening to us Baker
continued. "Our players still
have their spirits high and we're
very much aware of the fact that
we have lost three in a row "
ECU Ticket
Distribution
Explained
The ECL vs. South Carolina
game on Oct. 26 is officially a
sellout, athletic department of-
ficials announced Tuesday. No
general public tickets remain at
this time.
The only way general public
sale of South Carolina tickets will
take place is if the ECL students
do not pick up their allotted
tickets or if the Lniversity of
South Carolina returns some of
its allotment to the ECL Athletic
Ticket Office.
If either occurs, the remaining
tickets will be placed on sale for
the general public on Mondav,
Oct. 21.
Due to the excessive demand
for tickets for the South Carolina
game, the Athletic Department is
revising the ECU student pickup
schedule. In order to give
students ample opportunity to
pick up their allotted tickets, the
Athletic Ticket Office will con-
duct Student Group Pickup Day
Monday, Oct. 14. Individual stu-
dent pickup days will be Tues
Oct. 15, Wed Oct. 16 and
Thurs Oct. 17.
Thursday, Oct. 17 will be the
FINAL day that students can
pick up tickets for the ECL vs.
South Carolina game. If students
have not picked up their allotted
tickets at the end of the final day,
remaining tickets, which will be
on the press box side of Ficklen
Stadium, will be placed on sale to
the general public beginning
Monday, Oct. 21.
Those interested in placing
their names on a waiting list in
the event seats become available
from the University of South
Carolir or from unclaimed stu-
dent tickets, send your name, ad-
dress and telephone number to
the ECU Athletic Ticket Office at
Minges Coliseum. Names will be
recorded as they are received and
you will be contacted regarding
ticket availability.
1





8
I HI t AM CAROl IN1AN
CX rOBER8. 198

Mews Leads Pick The Winners Battle
CAME
FCl -Southwestern Louisiana
Aiabama-Penn State
Florida State-Auburn
Arkansas-Texas Tech
V irginia-Clemson
Duke-South Carolina
Tennessee-Florida
Indiana-Ohio State
Wake Forest-LNC
N.C. State-Pittsburgh
Texas-Oklahoma
Michigan-Michigan State
RICK McCORMAC SCOTT COOPE
SIEGFRIED MEWS TOM NORTON
ECU by 3
Alabama
Auburn
Arkansas
Virginia
Southarolina
Florida
Ohio State
INC
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
ECU by 17
Penn State
Florida State
Arkansas
Clemson
South Carolina
Tennessee
Ohio State
UNC
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
THE WATTS LINE
ECU by 17
Penn State
Florida State
Arkansas
Virginia
South Carolina
Florida
Ohio State
UNC
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
K
ECU h "
Alabama
Florida Slate
Arkansas
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee
Ohio State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
STANDINGS
SIEGFRIED MEWS
TOM NORTON
THE WATTS LINE
RICK McCORMAC
SCOTT COOPER
JOHN PETERSON
TODD PATTON
BILL DAWSON
ECU by 8
Penn State
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
South Carolina
Florida
Ohio State
UNC
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
LAST WEEK () FRAIL
9-3
9-3
9-3
8-4
7-5
7.5
7-5
JOHN PETERSON
ECU by 14
Alabama
Auburn
Arkansas
Virginia
South Carolina
Florida
Ohio State
UNC
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
TODD PATTON
ECU by 6
Penn State
Auburn
Arkansas
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee
Ohio State
UNC
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
DAWSON
ECU by 13
Penn State
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
South Carolina
Florida
Ohio State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Oklahoma
Michigan
43-16
4217
4118
4118
38-21
37-JL 4b.
36-23
35-24
CUP COUPON
Yes, There Is A Place
To Eat Between ECL & New Bern
LEAH'S GRILL
Located on N.C. Hwy. 43 South
17 Miles From Greenville
2 Sausage & Egg
Sandwiches
for $1.00
Offer Lxpires 10 31 85
. oon" �'u ! - i. w
( all: I syl Mephrn
Suite 202. 4109 a
Raleigh. N Hum
(919) 856-4012allolletl
AIM HIGH
AIR FORCE
AFTER COLLEGE:
AIR FORCE
EXPERIENCE
Graduating soon? If you're under 29 1 2 make .
move as an Kir Force Otficei Moeu
with AIR FOR 1 1 MM KllI You
� � k in wur ihosen field I peiit
allenge n opp , �-
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� �
' I �rce Rlm inter
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimuiiiiimuimnmBgBBBHBB
Presents
Our
Special

n
END
OF THE
WEEK PARTY
FREE ADMISSION FRIDAY
Oct. 11, 3:30 til 7:30
RAFFLE
FOR
$50!
��������
All Weekly Winners Are
Eligible For Grand Prize Drawing: Expense Paid Trip For Two
To The
i
i
Must Be Present To Win
All Cans 850
ALL DAY
BAHAMAS!
Spring Break
1986
iiiiiiim
�������?���������?�
UlUlimmmnnimi�.�M
mmr
�Tirimnii�,
'h
I �
-
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i





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Title
The East Carolinian, October 10, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.431
Location of Original
University Archives
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57747
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
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