The East Carolinian, October 8, 1985






She
(Earnltntan
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since IV25
Vol.60 No.13
Tuesday, October 8, 1985
Greenville, NX.
10 Pages
imitation 12,000
P
5 H�r 1
Sfe?-
SGA Decides By-Laws
Ambigi
J B HUMBERT - Th� East Carolinian
Legislative Process At Work
The SGA decided .Vfonda night that a number of the b-laws. which were approved last year, were
"ambigious and unclear and therefore, the SGA legislators decided to delete the b-laws from the
constitution. For all the details see the related story on page 1.
Med School Numbers Drop
Bv HAROLD OYNKR
staff Wrlln
legislative by laws passed last
summer by the current SGA 1 k
ecutive Council came under
discussion Monday night by
legislators, who decided to
away with certain rules termed .is
"ambigious and unclear
Examined by the Rules and
Judiciary Committee, Chairman
Dwayne Wiseman told the
legislators that the bill came out
of the committee unfavorably
Discussion was then opened up
and the general consensus was
that the rules, which appeal
under appropriations guidelines
in the Consitition were am-
bigious, and should not be ap
proved.
SGA President Daid Brown
said the bv laws were approved
b last vear's SGA. and the ex-
ecutive council was onl) responsi-
ble for signing the bill. Brown
and SGA Vice President Chris
Tomasic voiced their support for
the bill, which hunts conditions
ampus groups can ask for fun-
ding.
The Executive Council consists
Brown, romasic, Treasurer
I'niv Braswell and class officers.
� point oi information was
made b Vice Chancellor llmer
Mover, who said the guidelines
t approved last year by the
Appropriations Committee,
when groups were , "luestmg
ding.
The rules stated that campus
groups should seek a alternative
method I � raising revenue,
rather than asking for SGA
money; stop duplication of a
groups' activities; prohibit the
use oi student fees irrelevant to
the educational or service value
to the campus; and prohibiting
the use of SGA money to buy-
awards or plaques for committee
members.
Legislators argued that the
rules were ambigious, and
therefore were not necessary
"clutter up" the existing con-
stitution.
In other SGA action,
legislators approved a recommen-
dation that would reassess a bill
siamg that student's wages of
the Marching Pirates not be the
responsbility ol the SGA, who
usually appropriates money I
ntenance of the band. The
athletic department funds
� sportation c ts for the band.
RDI Utilizes Area Resources
(CPS) � The nearlv decade-long
increase in medical school enroll-
ment may be coming to an end,
the latest enrollment figures sug-
gest .
The country's 12" medical
schools graduated 1 ft. 3 1 8
students las! year, a slight decline
from the 16,343 students who
graduated at the end of the
1983-84 school year.
The figures, compiled by the
ssociation oi American Medical
leges (AAMC) and released
last week, show medical school
enrollment has declined only
twice during the past decade.
But substantial increases
followed each small decline.
Overall, enrollment has in-
percent since
creased bv about
1976-77.
The growth has prompted
some med school officials to
warn there may be too many doc
tors in the near future
In March, officials in the
federal Department of Health
and Human Services warned
medical schools mav have to limit
enrollments to avoid creating an
oversupply of doctors
The officials predicted that,
even if med school enrollments
keep falling through the res: oi
the eighties, there will be al
51,800 more physicians than
needed by the end of the century.
Medical school officials,
however, have been reluctant to
limn enrollments, arguing many
rural areas will need doctors even
if there's a glut of physicians in
other areas.
The AAMC enrollment figures
show that about 3,(XX) of last
vear's medical school graduates
plan to practice in small cities.
The figures also show the
average student graduated from
med school about $30,000 in debt
as a result of relying on student
loans, 13 percent more in-
debtedness than 1984 grads had.
I ast yeai. 11 medical �c I ools
graduated more than 200
students each. The University of
Illinois has the biggest class of
new doctors, 308.
B DOl (, ROHKRMIN
S�ff U -ilrr
I CU's Regional Develoj
Institute helps Eastern North
Carolina better utilize the
herein resources ol the area,
Communit) Development I)
tor Dick Brocket!
"Eastern North C arolina
lot going for it. The purpose of
RDI is to take the advantage
our area and put them to work
economically and aesthetically
Brocket! said.
Among us man) services, Rl)
helps rural areas and small towns
recognize their problems .
develop methods to solve
:r a so nan)
towns and rural counties that
don't have access to professional
help. We provide a service bv
tenng our expertise to help
them �
V t, RDI is w rkii g
several
benefit haste
( a:
feasal
Ea N
ess pai � '
:
Su k wou ntaii
businesses that upplv
ds, such as haii be u i .
area he added.
RDI also pr
assistance I
an
. -
provement projects.
"We conducted a survey of
local m is to
detei � needs More im-
portant) , we trie-
strengths oi the areas and
local merchants max-
imize these strengths Brockett
communit) RDI
recentl) completed was the
developmei i ttion
?m � � Pitt t ount) The
tern w redu
n provided by
. county agencies,
ices.
The s)stem i mplemei
in luly, 1985 Its purpose is I
Lximum usage from
the county's existing vehicles by
reducing the duplication of
routes he said.
RDI Director Janice H.
Faulkner said the institute is also
working on ways to help North
litia tobac ers.
ECU Research Scientist Develops New Food For Eels
B SI SAN ASKEW
H I Sf�i hmi
What do you feed eels0 Why,
eel chow , of course. And Margie
Lee Gallagher, an ECU research
scientist, is trying to develop the
perfect eel chow.
Because of increasing interest
in commercial eel farming,
Gallagher is working to develop
an eel chow that will provide op-
timum nutrition requirements
and be inexpensive enough to be
commercially feasible.
When her research began, the
squirmy snake-like fish from the
Sargasso Sea were being fed
dough diets, which is the
Japanese method of feeding eels.
Now, Gallagher has the creatures
on dry diets, mostly hpids and
proteins, made up right in the
aquaculture lab at ECU. The eel
diets are purified, so the resear-
chers know exactly what's in
them.
The supply of research eels is
kept in five- and 50-gallon plastic-
tanks purchased from a pickle
company, which allow a controll-
ed environment. "We try to con-
trol the waterflow, temperature,
light cycles - everything - so the
only thing that's making a dif-
ference is the diet we're feeding
them said Gallagher.
Gallagher is an assistant pro-
fessor in food, nutrition ar.d in-
stitutional management in the
School of Home Economics and
a research scientist for ECU's In-
stitute for Coastal and Marine
Resources (ICMR).
With the eels, she is testing to
see how temperature affects the
way they react to their diets, how
it effects the growth rate, if there
is some metabolic difference in
slow-growing versus fast-growing
eels but, mainly, to learn how to
produce a low-cost eel chow.
There is no reproduction of
eels in captivity. Thus growth is
important to the entrepreneur
who wishes to bring a crop of
captured immature eels to a pro-
per size for the cooking pot.
That is, of course, if eel becomes
a popular culinary item in
America as it already is in Japan
and Europe.
The eels being used in ECU
research are caught in early spr-
ing when millions swim up the
rivers and coastal streams from
the Atlantic Ocean. Eels
reproduce in ihe Sargasso Sea, a
shallow, grassy-bottomed por-
tion of the ocean in the Bermuda
Triangle.
"Apparently when eels get
within a certain distance of fresh
water, thev can sense the fresh
water, orient themselves toward
it and begin metamorphosis
(changing physically) she said.
Both American eels (Anguilla
Rostrata) and European eels
(Anguilla Anguilla) are being us-
ed. Gallagher said that by the
time the eels make it to fresh
water where they are caught, they
are already two to three years old
but only about one inch long and
any weight above a pound. The
bigger the better, of course.
Currently there are no eel
farms in North Carolina. Accor-
ding to Gallagher, it is very dif-
ficult for commercial eel farmers
to start a business because they
don't have enough information
on the subject.
"My job is to provide technical
information to the Marine Ad-
visory Service, who will serve as
extension agents to educate and
serve people who are trying to
commercially produce eels
Gallagher said. "We hope we're
doing that
The N.C. Sea Grant Program
has been studying eel farming
since 1973, and ECU has been
doing eel research since 1980.
There is a lot of international in-
terest in commercial eel produc-
tion because the European eel
market is so large.
The research is a cooperative
project with Dr. Gad Dcgani, an
Israeli scientist, made possible
through a S60.700 grant from Bi-
national Agricultural Research
Development Fund (BARD), a
joint USIsrael funding agency
Dr. Degani is interested in the
development of aquaculture in
his country. Israel is trying to im-
prove its economy and balance of
trade. Eels are in great demand
in Europe and have a high market
value. In 1983 alone, the Euro-
pean Common Market imported
$93 million worth of eels. Israel
is looking to commercial eel pro-
duction as a means of becoming
economically self-sustaining.
D ivas at ECU for six
months in 1983 to work with
Gallagher on the aquaculture lab,
their first project. ' as! summer.
she went to Israel to study
aquaculture facilities. Once thev
were familiar with one another's
facilities, they decided to apply
tor the BARD grant.
Some of the research will be
done in aquaculture facilities in
Israel, but more of the work will
be done in ECl 's lab, assisted bv
graduate studei
Governor Martin Decrees Handicapped Week
By MIKE LlDWK k
CavNawMaaW
Governor James Martin has
proclaimed Oct. 6-12 as "Employ
the Handicapped Week" in
North Carolina. This is the 41st
year this nationally recognized
week has been observed. This
special week serves to highlight
the contribution of disabled in-
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds3
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
A man cannot be too careful
in his choice of enemies.
� Wilde
dividuals to the labor force and
to encourage their increased
employment. It is also a time to
commend employers for their ef-
forts in hiring handicapped per-
sons.
"Everyone should have the op-
portunity to achieve employment
at the highest levels of which they
are capable and this opportunity
should not be abridged by reason
of physical or mental
disabilities said Governor Mar-
tin.
"Disabled people aspire to
equality in the work force as well
as self-direction and self-
determination in their lifestyle.
Employers, both public and
private, can and do readily testify
to the credentials and value of
these disabled employees con-
tinued Martin.
Martin said that committees
across the state have been formed
partnerships among the disabled,
non-disabled, and employers and
employees to assure that disabled
persons may share in the life of
our society.
However, Martin stated,
"Despite past and present efforts
of employers to hire people with
disabilities, the unemployment
level of disabled citizens con-
tinues to be unnecessarily high
Martin added that because of this
high unemployment, "It is ap-
propritae for the state of North
Carolina to concentrate on these
problems, and to encourage more
businesses to actively seek han-
dicapped workers
Vocational Rehabilitation and
Services for the Blind are state
agencies serving people who have
physical or mental disabilities
and want to become gainfully
employed. Those eligible for ser-
vices may receive assistance with
physical and mental restoration,
training, job modifications, job
development and other related
services which will help them
enter the work force as produc-
tive, taxpaying citizens.
Vocational Rehabilitation, Ser-
vices for the Blind, and Employ-
ment Security Commission coor-
dinate efforts to help employers
and the public become aware of
the capabilities of disabled peo-
ple. This year, these agencies are
planning an employer seminar on
Oct. 11 at 8:00am in the Willis
Building. Employers can obtain
information about these agen-
cies and how they can benefit
from employing them.
J � NUMHRT-
T�� Eati Carolinian
Clowning
An ECU student clowns around for the crowd at the 1985
Homecoming Parade. The parade was a success with very few no-
shows and all the bands except one participating. And cventhough
the Pirates lost to Miami, the Pirates did put up a stiff fight
Nonetheless, most students enjoyed their Homecoming weekend






COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
� � ' - r the CR's Tues
H 8 p m ,n room 221 O
� ' v " '� tntre Contact v. I
1 " 51 t tformaflon
WEYERHAUSER INTERN
PROGRAM
k about summer' Com
rs wilti � 3 0 GPA should
" - � . e, intern
' ' i' MO per month Con
� � �� 113 Rawl Bog
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
ADMINISTRATION
'���'�' �� II onai
' with a 3 should contact 'he
� ' �oom 313
B posit,ons
Announcements
ECU LAW SOCIETY
CAREER FOCUS
ant want 1
With yoi '� � � eer FotuS
WZMB � �
CO OP STUDENTS
� Raw 307
� u' e�pef . n �� "
SCHOOLOFTHE ARTS
� Fane be visiting

Friaav October l! a' ' 30
enkms F tie Am
'����� ��. ;�?� . -��
' � � �
SCHOOLOF ART
SCHOLARSHIPS
' i


� tw � H
' 500 a

� . �
The ECU Law Society mUl hold a meeting
'or an members and others interested In
Lav. School The meeting w.M be m Room 221
Mendenhall on Thursday October 17 from
308 p m Dr Stevens ECU Attorney win
be guest speaker For more information call
7M 3155
PETER PAN
Usher and see Peter Pan fly tree Peter
Pan win be presented Oct 9 12 ana you must
'0n up ahead of show time to usher Sign op
sheets are located on the buMentm boards In
Wessick Theatre Art Center
INTERESTED IN
REVELATIONS
Jo.n us m our in depth study of trie Book of
Revelations at 5 15 at 242 Mendenhall
Thursday October 10 The king Youth
Fellowship Bible Study welcomes all those
interested For more information contact
Jack at 752 1081 or kevm at 758 5130
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Mliance will
meet Thurs Oct 10af� 30p m ,n room 221 in
Venoenhaii Student Centei Our guest
speaker will be Ms Etiel Mason Director of
volunteer Service a' Pitt County Memorial
Hospital She win talk about volunteering at
the hospital Ail members and guests are en
c our aged to attend
MINORITY STUDENT
ORGANIZATION
The Minority Student Organuation of East
Carolina University Formerly known as
SOULS will hold an organizational
meeting on Tuesday October 8. at 6 p m in
Room 221 Mendenhall Student Center All
minority students are urged to attend this
meeting if you are interested but unable to
attend call William Robinson at 758 9624 or
Keenan Ward at 758 8488 anyday after 9pm
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
A Pre OT mixer will be held Monday Oct
14 from 7 8 30 p m in Mendenhall Multl pur
Pose Room There will be a speaker
displays, slide presentations, academic in-
formation and refreshments
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma P, will hold its next business
meeting on Wednesday October 9 at 5 30
pm ,n Biology 102 Remember to bring your
dues Also don t forget the follow up pledge
meeting a' 5 p m
ATTENTION
if you have achieved a 3 3 or better GPA
and have completed 33 94 hours you are cor
dially invited to attend the Smoker of Phi
Sigma PI National Coed Honor Fraternity
it will be held on Tuesday Oct 8 at 7 30 p m
m Biology 103 Oress neatly (skirt for ladles
shirt and tie for gents) and come enjoy sorre
refreshments and learn how to become a
part of our great brotherhood
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
We invite all students to join us every Sun
day at 6 p m at Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church on Elm Street We have activltatlon
followed by a free home cooked delicious
meal If you need a ride or directions call
'5A lliSA or 75 2058
BINGOICE CREAM
The Student Union Recreation Committee
is sponsoring a bingoice cream party on
Oct 8 at 7 p m in the multi purpose room at
Mendenhall Student Center AM ECU
Students. Faculty, Staff, their dependents
and guests are welcome Admission 25 cents
ano 8 different Bingo games will be played
tor pres Eat delicious ice cream and have
NATIONALTEACHER
EXAMINATIONS
The National Teacher Examinations
Specialty Area Examj will be offe-e a'
East Carolina University on Saturday '� -
� Application oienks are to be completed
and mailed to tne Educational Testing Ser
vice Box 911 R Princeton NJ 0854:
rive by Oct 7 Applications ma� tie ot � �
from the Testing Center Room 105 Speigh'
Building. ECU
SGA
Students you can register to 'j!e � "
County this fall Please taxe tn,s oppo' �
to use your voice in government t
register at the student store on Thursday
Friday and Monday Monday Oct
latest you can register so pleas '�� " �
opportunity thank you
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda acting
Wed Oct 9 at 3 p m In �a U. Ed � .
from the Chamber of Com met � �
speaker Deadline for dues has be�- .�.
ed so there is still time to loin
EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION CLUB
pi ese ting a - � B
Pleave Dr mg a si- - bag
-
ECU MARAUDERS
V' �y, -��� g 4
dowi �
Centai
- -
luestions �
ALLEID HEALTH
rest
����.�
-
Classifi
SAI.LK
FOR SAlE
extra'
TNE
The Best Deal At The Best Club In Town.
Student Special Mt3c1S
CLASS
Hillel Sponsors
Introduction to
Judaism Class
Taught by Rabbi
Bonnie Koppel
TuesOct 15th
4:00-5:00
BrewsterC 206
S25
per month
NEED TYPING
NG SERVICES F
PROFESSION
FOP
-
Our Full Facility Co-Ed Club Features
The Best In Weight Training & Instruction
NTvCSCNTV
Aerobics
Two Weight Rooms
f ccam Room
Sauna
Whirlpool
Call Lynn or Dave
For Free Visit!
Today
Social Events
Lockers
Private Dressing Rooms
Showers
Professional Personal
instruction
The
FOR SALE
FOR SA

York Olympic Weights
(Including Bench , SqUa
Dynacam Machines
Exer-Bikes
Therapeutic Massage
Nutrition Instruction
t Ma
SPA
Southpark Shopping Center
756-7991
SOCCER
Soccer Coac
For Pitt Co
AfteriK
If Intei
752-2954 i
xi
12 OFF
All Frames
In Stock
�� ! '� ENSES
rde�
N f good wirt thei
SOFT
CONTACTS
59.00
pair
COUPON EXPIRES
985
K7-�
ve; OCT I '985
SI NGL ASSKsTool)Trw"Th7oo7ov
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
Pirate
Football
Tickets
f&s
J
lUJ&
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
each of the'
5 home game
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
CONTA
$105,001
$ 145.00
'k �tMui our 20n Senior Ctttm� f �" ��T�ngt an ee exam for ou on
R�if thr uinr da
The
Phone
756-4204
OPTICAL PALACE
03 Greenville Bl. Aco-MomPmPL N,� To EXA rTU
in
J-

Saturday,
October 12, lf�s")
Planter's
Snacks
V
opn
�Y�CA
. VI
$
Pepsi
Cola.
Hoagie
Rolls

NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N Gre�ne
$
Ham
Salad
SAVE
UP TO
yhmcAan Jtuau
Video Movie
Rentals
No Club Fees 24 Hour Service
$ 1 .00 Off With Coupon
Wednesday October 9,1985
A V
"iNTii
VHS Player
Rental
Aqua Fresh
Toothpaste
$-09
Potato
Chips
NO NONSENSE
FASHION COLORS
FASTF
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
c600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
4tftf&'
S I
FREE EX
2711 E. 10th St.
$2.0
offanyI
2 Item
16"PIZ.
COUPON





OHOOO
KM!
RS
lures
uci i on
SI
109
oagie
lolls
EE!
NO NONSENSE
ASHION COLORS
5j99
4
Classifieds
IMF FAS IAROLIMAN
PERSONALS
SALE
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC 20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorder player.
iOystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette Programers A,d
memory expansion cartridge ana
reference manuals $200 Call An
tnony at 757 6366 or 752 7346
NEED TYPING: Letters Resume's,
Term papers etc Call Karen at
752 0498
TYPING SERVICES: Familiarwith
all formats, proofreading & spelling
corrections included Low rates
'57 0398 after 5pm
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Ana
wora processing Term papers.
reports resumes letters etc
Reasonable rates Call Teresa at
758 4509 work or 355 6794 after 6
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Skylark
Green and tan 4 aoor Air condition
ing P s. Am Fm Stereo Tilt Wheel.
Great shape S3 500 or $500 aown and
take over payments of $148 a month
or best offer Call 758 2174 between
9am 5pm Ask for Tony
FOR SALE: 19 Peugot ten speed
bike Great condition Call 752 1642
FOR SALE; 2 Smith Corona
typewriters, like new $30 each Caii
756 4514 206 Berkshire Rd Green
vile, NC 27834
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience quality work,
IBM Selectnc typewriter Lanie
Shive 758 5301
THE MIDDLEMAN: Apartment
listing roommate referral service
Small fee putting you in touch
with people Let us help you find the
apartment or roommate you're look
mg for Call 830 1069
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience m typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and adaresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU Students. S
and F Professional Computer Co.
(Back of Franklin's) 757 0472
PUPPIES FOR SALE: AKC
Chocolate Labrador Retriever Pup
pies These pups are "magnums"
Weight 3lbs at 2 weeks old
Wormed and ready 10 19 85 $200
Chris Smith 793 9205
TYPING NEEDED: If you have let
ters. reports, papers, etc that need
to be typed. Call 756 8934
FOR SALE: 77 Catsun 280Z Green
EC AM FM cassette $3800 neg.
752 4379 ask for Mike Bunton
FOR SALE: Panasonic Stereo
Equipment. Best offer Call Pete
756 1183
I SELL AVON: Call Sheila 752 7279
LOST: Gray Persian cat wearing
white flea collar Lost in Eastbrook
area If found please call 757 2687
Sentimental attachement. Reward
offered.
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulates Miss
Christine Roman for her crowning
as the 1985 ECU Homecoming
Queen You make us all proud. Love
The Brothers, Pledges and Little
Sisters
LISA G I resolved a lot this
weekend Don't be a stranger, give
me a call sometime. I Love You
F.D.L.
PETE BOO: I am so excited about
our intimate dinner party for two
The night is going to be filled with
love, laughter, bubbles, and me and
you. Jackie Boo
DELTA ZETA: Thank you for mak
ing us feel so welcome We love you
all and look forward to becoming
your sisters Beta Nu Pledge Class
STUDENT REVUES: Formerly the
Freshman Register will be
distributed beginning the week of
Oct. 7 If you or your parents pur
chased one, come by the Buccaneer
office 2nd floor Publication Bldg
between 9 am and 5 p.m and pick it
up. You MUST have your ID card
NEW SORORITY: Our second
meeting will be Thursday at 7 30
p m. in Room 221 Mendenhall The
first meeting was a great success
New girls are welcome
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
CLUB MEMBERS: Please bring a
small bag of Halloween Candy to our
Oct 29 meeting We will be making
up treat bags for the hospitalized
NIBS: As they say in showbiz break
a leg We're such good friends
SIG EPS: This past weekend was
TOOMUCHFUN! Thank God it only
happens once a year The Little
Sisters
DELTA ZETA'S: Looking forward
to a good time on Friday night be
ready to throw down The Sig Eps
SIG EPS: To all those wild and
crazy people who survived Sig Ep
homecoming What a time1 Mark,
you done good! Thanks to all who
made it a success
HOME SLICE: Saturday was fun,
thanks Sorry you got so burned out
I guess it could have been funner
Chafe!
OCTOBER 8, IV85 3
are 2
Can
ROOMMATE WANTED
bedroom Apt m Wilson Acres
758 7244 Ask for Jamie
WANTED
SOCCER COACHES
Soccer Coaches Are Needed
For Pitt Community Schools
Afternoon Hours
If Interested, Call
752-2954 Ask for Carol Barwick





CONTACT LENSES
$105.00
$ 145.00
i ��
EXTENDED WEAR
kit and 1 -up 1
thAr d � it �
OPIOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
OD
PA
���� ��
:� Anne
- � . e Bivd
7r�e
. 934
� � :



i

$
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
r$
?
RIDE NEEDED FOR FALL
BREAK: TO NORTHERN
FLORIDA Jacksonville or
Tallahassee Will help pay for gav
Call 758 4682
ROOMMATE WANTED To are 2
bedroom apt S142 50 jtilities
Call 752 4270, ask for Ken
HELP WANTED: Sales clerk, no ex
perience necessary Saturda work
required Good personality, neat ap
pearence, dependability a must
Convienent hours Call 1 944 9551
ELP WANTED Part time sales
clerkstock person No exp-f �
necessary Flexible hours Neat ap
pearence and dependab' ty
au"d Call 1 946 9551
� � � � � �
&AOII
Present
Draft Night
Tues Oct. 8,1985 9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m.
Admission $1.50 $1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
& Sigma Tau Gamma
Present
Draft Nite
Wed Oct. 9, 1985 9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m.
Admission $1.50 $1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
RECORDS
We Buy
Used Albums �r
Tapes
Chicken � , Biscuit
OPENINGOCT. 9
cSJJOr-
PIZZA
FASTFREE DELIVERY!
FREE EXTRACHEESEON EVERY PIZZA
2711 E. 10th St.
COUPON
758-9999
$2.00
OFF ANY
2 Item
16" PIZZA
COUPON
$1.00
OFF ANY
12" PIZZA
i
COUPON
fjf sit PH N KINGS
fjiVER BUUEI
H I
Nl A K I
1 V
A
EVEN!
DINO DE LAURENT IIS PRESENTS
STEPHEN KINGS SILVER BULLET GARYBUSEY EVERETT McGILL COREY HAIM
MUSIC BY JAYCHATTAWAY BASED ON THE NOVELE TTE CYCLE OF THE WEREWOLF BY
STEPHEN KING SCREENPLAY BY STEPHEN KING PRODUCEC)BY MARTHA SCHUMACHER
R ut� D,Re c JtO BY DANIEL ATTIA A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
Starts Friday, October 11 at a theater near you.
f
fV; A
-
I





$te iEaHt (Earnlmtan
Servms I he fast Carolina campus t
ommumtv since 1925
row Norton. g� . ��.
Stone,
Mike 11 pwick.
RickMccormac . TI lUNI),R � �
SCOTTCOOPEB Anthony Martin. .
STEPHEN SHERBIN HN PETERSON, c ��
ANDREW JOYNER SHANNON SHOR! mMmmm
ncr,u , I)l�H" Stevens,
DeChanh l Johnson Rii ,
B'ii MlK HELL. C,rcu,a,mnMm
anjxer
Ocioher 8, 9gj
Opinion
TSAV START VOLUNTARY
pRoeTEsnAJAa
AREAS OF SPORTS
BASEBALL
FoorBAa-
BASK6TBAU,
HOCKEtfSOCCgB
WZMB
Radio Wants More Wattage
WZMB, the campus radio slation, in answerinc ih m
before the Media Board. The Media Manas
board, which oversees the opera
tion of all campus media and con-
trols funding has given a tentative
go-ahead on the application. It has
a lowed WZMB to forward the ap-
plication for raising its power from
the
will
Kate
WZMB
SRA
Hv "JJ xmh v
Page 4
M �
be
General
has said that
282 watts to 3000 and tor changing
its frequency from 91.5 to 91 9 to
the Federal Communications Com-
mission.
The reason for a frequency
change is that WZMB is currently
interfering with area r 0f
WUNC. The reason for tl er
increase is, of course, thai WZMB
wants to reach more people and ex-
pand its broadcast area.
And there lies the rub. For. there
are those within the administration
and on campus at lame who believe
that if WZMB grows ii will violate
its original mandate. They sav tl
an increase in power will result
the student run radio
becoming overly controlled ill-
time professional Thus they
claim, students will he deprived of a
learning laboratory expert
they will be introduced. ins
a rigid bureaucracy thai w
innovation and experime
The added expense of a power in-
crease is also a reason given by
some for being hesitant about gran-
ting the radio station a power in
crease.
Vet, in our opinion, none of
these arguments really holds up
under scrutiny. Even if the radio
station is forced to hire some pro-
suuion 41 woul5X,hf2e1war8fn ��& SEW &3"2
ocated here. Greenville residents
cosi oi a power increase
approximately S25.0OO.
While WZMB has primarily con-
cerned itself with getting its applica-
tion approved up until this point
and. hence has neglected to devise a
scheme tor raising the necessary
tunds, it is obvious that $25,000 is
not an astronomical sum. It should
noi stand m the way of a power in-
crease tor the station. It is not dif-
u" to see, then, that neither the
tear oi a loss of artistic freedom for
idents nor money are serious con-
cerns in deciding the fate of
WZMB. There are, after all, other
campus stations that have increased
their wattage similarly.
Rather, for us, the pertinent
arguments have to do with whether
or not the school and students, as a
whole, would benefit from such a
move.
It appears to us that on both
counts the answer isyes bor
one thing, the radio station would
provide a valuable link between the
campus and the surrounding com-
munity. As the whole concept
behind the Research Triangle Park
shows, communities acquire much
of their vitality from the services of-
tered by universities. Phis is true
both in an economic sense and a
cultural sense. Greenville and Pitt
County residents partake of our
plays, films, concerts, lectures, etc.
because they enjoy the vibrant at-
losphere of an educational institu-
We Make Money The Old Fashioned Way
Marcos Milks Manila Dry
By PETER CAREY, KATHERINE
ELLISON and LEWIS M. SIM()
Filipinos and who insisted on anonymi-
ty. But ,1 the Philippine government
reall dld anything about this they'd be
indicting all their own officials Diey're
the biggest offenders
As the Philippines sink deeper into JH 0l PPosition, ex-
povcrty, fore.gr debt and political h !lgn Phases compound
unrest, many of their most prominent alolTw,?trCgimetha( �d
citizens arc systematically draining vast ill 7 CXpCnS� 0f mil,ion '
amounts of wealth from their nation and � v u rep�r!s v orruPt'on ;
hiding it overseas anon and �fe ated betvveen W
These political and business leaders �' $�L l&Tgef inc�me-distribution
have poured their personal fortunes into 8 Vet? � fur,her
investments in the United Stares ,n k Accordin8to a slud' release
eluding condominiums, luxury homes pL?�0�51 al
office bmldings. businesses, and banks' ,h I I ' POOresl N' -nc:
malifornia and New York " nouseholds which had receiv.
At the center of the controversv are m J"1" �- IO!al income " u
22.5 percent in 1979. The richest lOpei
Presideni Marcos and his ,fe. imelda
l ike man) Filipinos who have invested
overseas, thev use holding corporations
oi busmess associates to handle their ' h PCrCi
transactions. The comnlev svsIf' ' ,1' in ihe same Period
� vv, naiuic uieir
transactions. The complex system makes
�cult to identify the real owners
and to identify the relationships between
business involved in the investments
But Pablo Figueroa, a former
ent of the population, on the
hand, increased their share of tota
come to 41.7 percen ercen
n t n i c �- i �: i
Capita! High-has ly made mat-
ters worse. According to Verne Dickev
an economist at the State Department!
some Phihppmes factories have laid
kers or closed because there were
business partner of Mrs Marcos 'chare orkers or c,osed because there wei
ed in a lawsuit filed in March 1984 that k8" currenc reserves with which to
Mrs. Marcos -does business TieS r "nd spare r
York State systematically and con- �L A(mbas,sador Srehen B�s�
tinuously" and that her activit.es includ 11 u American concern over
ed "extensne real-estate purchasing im vi p.rob,em aI a news conference in
Manila ,n August 1984. citing a lea, .
station they would be few
number and they would enable
students to have greater freedom
rather than cutting back on the
freedom that they enjoy at present.
We have, professional printers who
print the East Carolinian, the
Rebel, Expressions and the Buc-
caneer and a professional lawyer
who assists Student Government.
All of these professionals seem to
facilitate the increase of students'
freedoms rather than circumscrib-
ing them. Though we acknowledge
the potential for conflict between
students and a professional
employee payed by the university,
we merely point out that the addi-
tion of a professional staff member
does not necessarily have to result
m a loss of creative freedom for
students.
proving, developing and managing '
Figueroa also said that Mrs. Marcos us-
ed agents and nominees to keep her per-
sonal involvement in the transactions
hidden.
Filipino economist's estimate
residents had removed more than $10
billion in recent years. Bosworth sa
Now it even half oi that would return
to the Philippines for private unest-
mem it ui
want us here.
It is clear to us that students
working with the radio station can
only benefit from being exposed to
a wider, more diverse audience and
an experience that more closely ap-
proximates the one that thev will
have on the job should they choose
to enter the broadcasting field after
they leave this university. The new
communications major that has
recently been established at ECU
only makes the need for this more
apparent.
In conclusion, then, WZMB is
the only station of its kind in this
area and students and community
alike would benefit if it extended it's
reach.
Capital flight from the Philippines Ph'hppmes for private invest
surged shortly after the assassination of TcZceZl ' nsidera di!
opposition leader Bemgno S. Aquino Jr c? r .
in 1983, according to a special study last uar Flhfmo �flci including the
year by the Northern California In e �s denied that thev owned anv
faith Committee on Corpo ate Re pon v U"itCd Sta!e- But
sibility, in San Francisco The snidv" StatCment added tha: the
found. -Out of fear of�PoHttl and n"S? � " f �W �V��
economic turbulence, over a billion 1' T Su�'on as the aquisinons
dollars left the Philippines" in three , � nobody can question the
months after the Aqu.no afsass nation � "J1 � h PWtfa
. CS. real estate agents relate instances Pon e Se andT m JUdn
in wh,ch their Filipino clients have plop- th " W? haVe 0Wned
ped shopping bags stuffed w.th cash on FnrL v ff"? Pmes and
their desks, no questions asked to be us acknowledged currently owning
ed for investment in property one condominium there.
"It is illegal and everv once in awhile m holdings are of such a
there'll be fines and confisca ions sad uT.Z �f d�llars' ,d
the San Francisco lawyer who represents PhZpfnJTaid V? " T �f '
rnnippines and 1 d agree that it was
qu:
pines M
stable a
One Filipii
I
Mai
A torn :
a:
an � He
�he Sa:
TCCt a,C medica ' a:
i l niversit Medicale:
Ea . Mav )
edthed
n Francisco's e
k ! t"C,S U
dR- agreed i
perties. He
�: the �
few years not onij i
his wife s name. -
ment building
domimums and a San raJ
restaurant called the Old Cla

a
about pub

ted he
mg illegal Uthouj
money out
also has brought monev back
said has he illegally traded currei
Pa U.S. taxes
r) of AJ Ca
� 'AJ Capone was never convk
' anything but tax evasion "
1 S r estate investments b 5 .
cos inner circle are merely i
the iceberg according to a set
ecutive with one of the larg
the Philippines
"You're not seeing the securit .
s bank vaults he said in an im
view in Manila. "The important thing
it s unlikely that any of this money v
return to the Philippines �
is complete and we have stability Wl
their patron saint (Marcos) goes, n
ofjthemi will go overseas to sta
them already hold green card, rh
not bought L s real esi
as a financial investment, it's for their
retirement when thev can no gc. stay
e Philippines
( t. - �� "� �� me rnnippines
ts Co-op Best Bet For Universities
� Bv DARRVI qdhua
By DARRYL BROWN
John Curry never stops singing the
praises of cooperative education. Not
John Curry the skater, John Curry the
executive vice president of Northeastern
University, the one in charge of the best
college cooperative education program
in the country.
Curry was in Washington last week to
convince a House subcommittee not to
squeeze out funds for co-op programs
when they tighten the budget belt on
higher education. That would do the
federal budget, as well as the individual
student's budget, more harm than good,
not to mention what it would cost
students in lost practical education and
in job training which is so highly regard-
ed today.
The federal government currently pro-
vides a little money to help colleges set
up cooperative education programs that
permit students to intern at myriad cor-
porations, small businesses and in other
occupations in which they will probably
work one day. There could not be a bet-
ter idea, says Curry, from anyone's
point of view. And the institution from
which he graduated and for which he
now works has built its entire curriculum
and idea of higher education around it.
Last year, more than 200,000 students
at more than 900 U.S. colleges worked
in co-op programs, usuallv working a
term on the job between traditional
terms as a full-time student.
But this system of self-reliance has a
couple ot other advantages Curry does
not tout. These are potential effects
that, administered correctly, could make
' ndUCatior,al traditionalist from me
to Wilham Bennett happy.
Picture, for example, 'the land scat-
tered with colleges set up like Nor-
theastern on a five-year program in-
stead of four, but with a required (yes
at Northeastern co-op jobs are required)
two to four semesters of full-time co-op
work alternated between semesters of
study. Co-op becomes part of the cur-
riculum, giving students the practical
training and experience they want and
need for that goal so many cite as their
reason for attending college: to get a bet
ter job.
But, with the pragmatic, even
technical, end of college taken care of on
the job, university officials can redesian
their curricula toward an original and
better end. They can offer an academic
experience that teaches not primarily
vocational skills, but foremost critical
tanking. expository writing
plating reasoning and judgemeni
skills. In other words, all the essential
benefits of a traditional, general edi
tion. one grounded in history, govern-
ment, language, philosophy and science
not marketing, management or technical
training. Those last three have a place
DU� a secondary one in the
undergraduate years The upshot of col-
ege curricula focused on the latter in-
stead ot the former was judged last week
bv the Carnegie Foundation report- un-
creanve graduates with little sense of
"vie responsibility, uninterested ,n
challenging ideas, lacking innovation
and perhaps not capable of comprehen-
nal fSyr"heIlc thinkng needed to
understand, and thus be effective in,
todav,ntCrnal,0nal natUrC �f the uorld"
Jfti0 tCnCh thCm SUCh Skllls a"d
abilities In college, with only a basic
'�7 K8rrundmug m the national
talents of balance sheets and personnel
manage Then leave those for
on ,h I ac� beSt taugnt and learned:
co opCjb- Startmg' hf'all- �� a
Wounds
HEALTH CJ




cern






dog day
afternoon
"O COVfB
SUBS i.
OS
ocatec at
One
Leadi
Now!
I hi
imn
pplv you must h
BA. pass aptitudt
securit) clearance I
H � make an appo
Placemen! Offii
Get

j





I
a Dry
was
of
Manila.
He
bay area
s at
Yabut
. I'm
. orned
' S
j he
, he
acted
Mar-
�: ex-
the

Jniversities
'rad,
not primarily
-emost critical
writing,
. md judgement
ill the essential
general eduea-
'unded in history, govern-
.age.
:ience,
echnical
ive a place,
- in the
The upshot of col-
n the latter in-
former was judged last week
�undation report: un-
graduates ndth little sense of
uninterested in
ilienging ideas, lacking innovation
nd perhaps not capable of comprehen-
synthetic thinking needed to
I rstand, and thus be effective in,
� international nature of the world"
)Jay
n short, teach them such skills and
es in college, with only a basic
om grounding in the vocational
nts of balance sheets and personnel
Management. Then leave those for
jtere they are best taught and learned:
I the job Starting, hopefully, with a
job.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER I. 19t3
5
SRA Discusses New Plans
B JESSISTAMELY
I he Student Residence
Association discussed plans for
ip to a regional conference in
gia and also discussed possi-
wcial events for the year
Monday night
rhirty-two people from the
SRA will leave Nov. l to travel to
S uth Atlantic Affiliate of Col-
and University Residence
Halls at Georgia Tech. Students
from South Carolina to Loui-
i and all along the east coast
be attending the conference
November 1-3.
The sra also discussed the
ate conferenceof the NCARH,
' 1 ast Carolina will be
Education Majors May
Teach Out Of Field
hosting this year. Approimately
250 people will be attending the
conference of the North Carolina
Association of Residence Halls.
A date has not been set for the
conference, but it will be held in
February or March. SRA Presi-
dent, Mike Kleinert says, "Stu-
dent involvement will be greatly-
appreciated. Anybody can help
Besides conferences, energy
conservation was also discussed,
so the SRA is sponsoring an
energy contest. A winner is
selected each month, and first
prize is 100 points. The residence
halls do not have to participate in
the contest, but they can use these
points for competition in the Best
Residence Hall Contest. The
residence halls will receive money
for prizes in the Residence Hall
Contest.
At the meeting College Hill
and Central Campus reported on
upcomig events. College Hill is
planning a trip to Kitty Hawk
Hill for hang glidig and is show-
ing the movie In Cold Blood for
Alcohol Awareness Week. Cen-
tral Campus will be sponsoring
Fall on the Mall this weekend.
There will be games, a cookout,
and a horror movie. For Alcohol
Awareness Week, Central Cam-
pus is getting a bartender to show
students how to make virgin
drinks. He will be in Mendenhall
on October 23.
The SRA also talked about the
possibility of having a spring
banquet at the Sheraton, a semi-
formal, and a pig pickin' for the
last home game.
The SRA's constitution states
that the SRA shall provide self-
government which is concerned
with all aspects of campus
residential life. Kleinert says,
"The SRA is the unifying force
of all fifteen residence halls
Each residence hall has a
governing body known as the
House Council. The HC is advis-
ed by the Residence Hall Direc-
tor.
The SRA is designed for the
students, and Kleinert said that
he will listen to complaints or
compliments from anyone.
Wounds Need Prompt Attention
HEALTH
coivn
The Healtholumn answers
student's questions and concerns
about health related problems.
Anyone who has a question they
would like answered, or a con-
cern the would like to have
clarified, send your question or
concern to the Health (Olumn,
The East Carolinian, Publica-
tions Huildinii, It I .
vYHAl SHOUI 1) 1 DO IF
I MYS1 I i
I
All accidental injuries have the
potential for getting infected.
Therefore, immediately after cut-
ting yourself you should wash the
wound with water and an antisep-
tic such as hydrogen peroxide,
which bubbles and helps to clean
the wound. Cuts and other
wounds caused by bites (human
or animal) or by dirty or rust)
materials should be seen by a
doctor. A tetanus toxoid injec-
tion might be needed, and always
watch for signs of infection such
as redness, drainage from
wound, odor, and swelling.
WHAT TYPES OF WOUNDS
CAN OCCURS
An incised wound is caused by
a sharp cutting object such as a
knife, glass, or razor blade, and
the wound gapes because several
layers are cut. A laceration is
similar to an incised wound ex-
cept that it has jagged, rough
edges. A laceration may be caus-
ed by animal bites, wire, or
machinery. More important,
both these wounds usually bleed
easily and need pressure applied
to stop the bleeding.
Puncture wounds are caused
by sharp, pointed, narrow ob-
jects such as nails, pins, bullets,
or splinters of wood. Any punc-
ture wound should be allowed to
bleed and should be watched for
signs of infection. A stab wound
is caused by a sharp, pointed,
cutting instrument like a knife.
Remember: all stab wounds re-
quire prompt medical attention
because they are deep.
A contusion is a wound that
breaks the skin and bruises the
surrounding tissues, and swelling
occurs because blood leaks into
the tissue. Apply an ice pack to
the area immediately and elevate
the injured part to reduce swell-
ing.
WASHINGTON (CPS) - Many
college students planning to
become primary or secondary
school teachers can expect to
spend all or part of their time
teaching classes they are not cer-
tified for, according to a new
study.
The study, produced by the
American Federation of Teachers
(AFT) and the Council for Basic
Education (CBE), estimates some
200,000 teachers are teaching at
least one class a day thy are not
properly trained to teach.
"It is not an exaggeration to
infer that what some educators
call 'out-of-Field' teaching is out
of control says CBE director
Graham Down.
"It's not a pretty picture. The
implications for morale, profes-
sionalism, pedagogy, subject
knowledge and student learning
are dire, to say the least
The study, released Sept. 24, is
based on a state-by-state survey
of misassigned teachers.
But because many states do not
track misassignments, a precise
accounting of the problem is not
possible.
Although most states prohibit
misassignments, few have reliable
ways of preventing them, the
report concludes.
Moreover, some 15 states per-
mit misassignments on a limited
basis, the survey found, while six
don't restrict the practice.
The report's authors reject the
widely-held assumption that
misassignments invariably occur
because of shortages of qualified
teachers in certain disciplines.
In fact, they say, many English
and humanities classes are taught
by teachers certified in other
fields, even though there is no
shortage of English and
humanities instructors.
The authors call on state
lawmakers to tighten policies
against misassignments, but they
blame teachers temselves for
some of the problem.
Some teachers, the report says,
do not understand the subjects
they are certified to teach, and
are therefore reluctant to
challenge misassignments.
There is one feature of the pro-
blem that will help reformers, ac-
cording to the report:
October
The yER ANDA
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUBS & SUDS
FUNKY FIESTA
'�� :
BUCCANEER
BASH
DOG DAY
AFTERNOON
NO COVIB
SUBS &
SUDS
' �
ALOHA
WEEKEND

�� 'OvvCS'iC'

Ma ' z �
- -
wBb i
FUNKY
IESTA
BUCCANEER
BASH
" � � j
. � .
. -
.
Ptl WI
ALOHA
WEEKEND
Och
6 P rri 2
Oct. 7-12
Atlantic Avenue
I
Oct. 14-19
I Top Secret
Oct. 21-26
Spice
Oct. 28-Nov. 2
Point Of View
Located at the Ramada inn � 301 Creenvllle Blvd � 756-2792
fcmfc.K � � m m m m KiiKmJfc.Jfc, Jfc �.
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Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone beginners "in between"
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BEGINNER QR ADVANCED- Cost s about the
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Price includes jet round trip to SevNe from
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L e witti a Spanish family attend classes
four hours a day 'Our days a wee tou'
months Eami6nrs of cred't'equivalent to 4
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yea' time Span Your Span, sh studies win be
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iHimnnmmn

f-j3aea�Er- ar: :aaa�cr
j LOOKATWHATS
J AROUND THE CORNER
COURTESY OF
YOUR STUDENT UNION
One Of The Nation's
Leading Employers Is
Now Interviewing
On Campus.
One of the largest employers in the U.S. is accepting applications
and scheduling appointments
for interviews. The Depart-
ment of the Nav) is
offering management
opportunities in
electronics, engineering,
nuclear propulsion,
systems analysis and
other vital fields.
rr,
� �
These positions provide strong
technical and general management
training, rapid professional growth and
immediate executive responsibility.
a .
K - -

iS.
-
I s
4L
To apply, you must he no more than 34 years old. have a BS or
BA, pass aptitude and physical examinations, and qualifv for
security clearance. U.S. citizenship is required.
To make an appointment tor an interview, sign up at your Career
Placement Office, or call:
SPAf i FOR RECRUITERS NAMI ADDRESS AND PHONi M 1B1 K
Get Responsibility Fast.
Films:
"Red beard'
"Witness"
Recreation:
Bingo Ice Cream Party
Wed Oct. 9
Fri. & Sat Oct. 4 & 5
Tues Oct. 8
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
Visual Arts Committee:
"Recent American Works on Paper"
Smithsonian Art Exhibit
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery
Special Conceits Committee:
The Spongetones
Through Oct. 19
Travel Committee:
Thanksgiving Trip to New York
Christmas Trip to Hawaii
Sun Oct. 6
2:00-5:00 p.m.
Nov. 27-Dec. 1
Dec. 31-Jan. 7
REACHNG OUT TO SERVE YTXI
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 757-6611 Ext. 266
.??�??????
b .i
i f'





TMI- FAST � AROI INIAN
Entertainment
'XIOBFR 8, IV85 Page
VN AMKI)
WANTED
Arnold: Pumping Fame, Not Iron
SCHWARZENEGGER'S BACK
rnold VrmareneKKfr portrays Col. John Mutriv in his now film.
( oinmando"
Crocodile Blood: Moral Issue
N-W-IVII 1 I
11 PI i
Mill in
: i Eve glades is simply
approach as
the I s '
"Is a � 'the
e rnot horren-
. are committed the
New York said in
t erview.
'N body in the i Second
Vs orld) war would have done this
i atrocious beha � r It sud-
denly occurred to me that this
was not human behavior at all.
rlist 1 extended it
e Blood (Arbor
H use, 422 pp $17.95) begins
��� � � the rape I a . oung
Seminole in the 'glades bv five
e youths. She is then im-
pregnated by a crocodile and her
pring of subhumans are call-
ed "Bay hamas " They randomly
limit the most wle crimes on
their own people, on Indians,
blacks and the p.iple who run
Gull Glade, a fictional develop-
ment in Florida.
"Crocodile blood differs from
human blood and deserves no
human rights. Evil is not man.
is a mi
said.
Mandel, wh
to-be contr
e
e and tei
"W hat 1 wanted
gel people arguing al
why nothing is e
blame the juri
which is run bv
apes. I he cops arc ha
They are tied up and tl
a closet. They ca I I
"I'm a libertarian. 1
the hardening of tl
against atrocious crime i
liberal people are ted up �
Criminals just don't deserve
rights that civil liber
them. These people arc
blow up the AC I I which
gravely needed. B
Nais and every kind
thing, they never give a damn
about the victim "
Mandel says he gets disgusted
when he reads people
tificating" about not takinj
human life for any reason.
Mandel said this is not to
negate the constitutional right
that a person is innocent until
proven guilty.

M i aid.
' ' V ho cares il I
ed,
I ad
iimg
rb
e
into it.
case
N a York.
' them in
11 want
they want
ei "goes in-
absorb the
V e read
newspaper and
. it
i gical that sooner
atei people will spell out in no
rtaii term I hat they cannot
tak any more. They will
literally unbearable and
they will rebel. 1 think this is a
stani tl u ner or later
: es too much w hen
a ridiculous point,
?pie will put a stop to it.
"Up to a point 1 believe in giv-
ing every individual the benefit of
doubt. But there is no longer
any doubt. Get rid of them.
Who wants to rehabilitate them0
You kill somebody, you get kill-
What could be simpler?"
This country has been long in
need of unification. This thing
may eventually go into something
like it's us against them
I
' rr
1uViV. r
ii
I he ECU Marching Pirates performed before the largest attending crowd ever.
Estimated attendance: 34.500 fans.
By JAY & ELLIOTT KRAVKTZ
lalrrBXIoaal Pkolo Snri
A mold Schwarzenegger stars
�'� as Colonel John Matrix in
his latest film, "Commando
Schwarzenegger has become a na-
tional and international star to be
reckoned with. Schwarzenegger
looks upon "Commando" as an
important step in his acting
career, because the character of
Matrix is a man with more than
one dimension.
"In the beginning of this film I
play a loving, gentle and
understanding father to my
daughter Jenny (A1 y s s a
Milano) he explained in a re-
cent interview. "I educate her
and protect her; it's 180 degrees
from the life I used to lead. Then
she's kidnapped and I have to im-
mediately snap back into the per-
sonality many associate with 'The
Terminator' and the 'Conan'
films.
"1 become a fighting machine
that will not stop until my objec-
tive is completed he continued
"But between that loving father
and the 'machine 1 have to -
with this character Cindy (Rae
Dawn Chong), who is always giv-
ing me a dirty look or a funny
line in response to w hatev ei I say.
The relationship with Cindy
works as a comic relief, arid it
adds another dimensii the
ter ' ! Matrix
His most recent film, "The
lerminator received great
critical acclaim as well as tremen-
dous success at the box office,
becoming t�
weeks
number one film in the country
"It was just a much more
powerful character he explain-
ed of "The Terminator "I lik-
ed the idea of being the aggressor
in the film rather than the
hunted. The guy that goes after
the hero, goes after the girl.
Keeps pursuing, keeps coming,
keeps going, boom, boom,
boom.
"And I could visualize very
clearly the wav n should iook, the
wav the robot should act, the way
he should handle the weapons,
the way he should be programm-
ed he continued. "It's that
kind of a role that I thought I
should play. Everybody told me 1
was crazy. They said when you
plav a villian once then that's it,
it's bad for your career and all
those sorts of things
Previous starring roles have in-
cluded the national and interna-
tional blockbusters "( onan the
Barbarian which grossed over
one hundred million dollars
worldwide, and its sequel, "Con-
an the Destroyer the interna-
tional box office of which may
surpass the first.
"1 was hungrier u-r success
than anyone I knew he recall-
ed "1 - . al, visualize it very
irly, and create the drive, the
hunger, tor turning it into reality.
1 here's a kind of joy in that kind
of ambition, in having a 'vision in
' ' u. With that kind o
discipline isn't difficult,
itive, or grim.
"You love doing what �
have to do�gi � the gym,
working hard on the set Even
;s part of reaching
your goal and it usually is- you
can accept that, too
Other films include lead roles
in "Pumping Iron "Stay
Hungry" and "The Jayne
Mansfield Storv " Aide from his
popularity as an a
Schwarzenegger is also a best
selling author and successful en-
trepeneur As an author, he has
written four best selling b
fitness and bodybuilding, the
sport from which he retired ten
years ago at the unparalleled
height of the field, having won
five Mr. Universe titles and e -
Mr Olympias, a competition
limited to former Mr Universe
winners that is the m
prestigious in that sport.
Acting was an enormous
change for me Schwarzenegger
said. "A challenge. In ;
competition, I'd had to tear
discipline myself against my ei
tions. Lows or higl
the wrong times, can new
influence how you pe
Well, of course, in acting.
actly the opposite You have
be sensitive to yourself and
se you're working m il
in bodybuilding, you're n
autonomous. You know yourself
what it is you want
t're m the dire.
The thr his phenomenal
h e is now directed toward
acting career, as he performs w
the same energ nce made
him bodybuilding a
record-holder
"To achieve si�� in life
he said, "you must be commit-
ted totally committed
whatever you are doing
Hollywood Fades Out
HOI I YWOOD (I PI) There
was once a Hollywood film col-
ony. Movie stars lived and
played in a close-knit circle c
prised of other stars, directors
and studio moguls, but it no
longer exists.
Pickfair, the stately home
Mary Pickford and her husband.
Douglas Fairbanks, was the
spiritual heart of Hollywood
where the elite par tied. Mahbu
was a weekend watering hole tor
movieland royalty.
The peccadillos and scandals
ol the kings and queens o the
screen were chronicled in minute
detail. Every star knew every
other star.
In the past two decades and
more, Hollywood stars have scat-
tered geographically, socially and
psychologically. Many stars no
longer live in Bel Air, Beverly
Hills and Holmby Hills - or even
in California.
Like their English counter-
parts, they have been absorbed
into their own "civilian" social
circles, most of which exlude - by
design or circumstance - other
show business figures.
Of course, scores of stars mix
at major industry functions,
charity fund raisers and awards
programs. But most are not ac-
quainted with other stars unless
they happen to work together in a
movie.
Robert Redford, for instance,
doesn't know Sylvester Stallone.
Certainly, Meryl Streep and Sally
Field don't have lunch together.
A typical example of current
social patterns is Mary Steen-
burgen, who has starred in nine
movies in the past eight years, in-
cluding her new six-part
miniseries, "Tender Is The
Night" for Showtime - The
Movie Channel.
A native of Newport, Ark .
Steenburgen has starred in
"Cross Creek "Melvin and
Howard" - for which she won a
best supporting actress Oscar -
"Goin' South" and "A Midsum-
mer Night's Sex Comedy
At 32, Steenburgen is married
to English actor Malcolm
McDowell, whom she met when
thev co-starred in "Time After
Time
The McDowells live quietly in
the Ojai Valley, some 70 miles
northwest of Hollywood, in a
rambling house on several acres
that includes a dozen chickens
they inherited from the previous
owners. They are the parents of
Lilv. 4. and Charlie, 2.
"We lead a very uneventful life
that includes few parties Steen-
burgen said during a rare trip to
Beverly Hills. metimes I .
two or three months with
coming to 1 os ngeles
"During my husv nine vears I
eve; � two vears ave
children, and no matter where
I go on location, Malcolm and
the children go with me. I Hew to
New York earlier this year for
tour days - the longest time I've
been separated from them. I sup-
make in getting all dressed up to
ne here to the Beverly Hills
hotel in a limousine It's a major
cleaning house, being
a mother and doing the grocery
ipping. I could never think of
myself as a movie star. An a
,ress, ves.
"I've worked with some of the
best actors - Malcolm, Wood)
Allen, Jack Nicholson, Paul Le
Matt, Dudley Moore, Jason
Robards and Rip Torn, to name a
(f
4
Representing Pi kappa Phi fraternity. ChristineoroW became"
ECU's 1985 Homecoming Pirate.
pose it was good for all of us, but
1 worried
In "Tender Is The Night"
Steenburgen is seen in antique
gowns worth a fortune. In her
new Disney film, "One Magic
Christmas she plays a waitress
wearing a tacky orange uniform.
"It was quite a switch and
rather nice after months of wear-
ing expensive wardrobe she
said. "Also it was closer to the
life I lead.
"It was fun being a mess after
srven months of looking
beautiful with a perfect coif and
faultless makeup.
"It reminds me of the change I
few. But we rarely if ever meet
socially.
"Malcolm and I have our
children and don't think about
mixing with actors or celebrities.
It's not our style. We reallv don't
belong to any social group
"I drive the children to a little
school near home, just like the
other mothers do and we chat,
but even that isn't anything dif-
ferent from what other women in
the area do.
"It may sound silly, but I'm as
impressed as anyone when I see a
major star. I've worked with
some big stars, but I meet very
few otherwise
!ooiH sbur
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!HI I AM � AKOl 1N1AN
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4
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iomecoming Pirate
Mai
I en and d k al
. with actors or celebrities
' style We reaily d
a � .p
' drive the children a ttle
near home, just like the
thei mothers do and we chat,
he hut even that isn't anything dif-
'he t'erent from what other women in
the area do.
'It may sound silly, but I'm as
impressed as anyone hcn 1 see a
and major star. I've worked with
Mme big stars, but I meet very
tnge I few otherwise

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IHJ EAS1 t AR() INIAN
Sports
(X lOBt-KX. 1985 PageX
Big Plays Kill Bucs
4T"
By RICK Met ORMAC
Art Baker's young ECU foot-
ball team again had a nationally-
recognized opponent on the
ropes, but could not finish Miami
off, falling 27-15.
The Pirates proved to be a
resilient bunch, coming back to
take a 15-14 lead in the third
quarter, after giving up two easy
touchdowns in the opening
period.
Disaster struck early for the
Pirates on ECU's third offensive
play of the game. Ron Jones went
back to pass on the Pirate 15
when he was stripped of the ball
by defensive tackle Darrin
McMurray. Jones' arm was cock-
ed, and McMurray grabbed the
ball out of his hand and trotted in
to make the score 7-0 in the Hur-
'Canes Down Pirates
� r
ricanes' favor
The Pirates answered back im-
mediately, as they moved the ball
down the field, for the first of
three Jeff Heath field goals. ECU
marched down to the Miami 19
before a holding penalty killed
the drive. Heath came on to con-
nect from 41 yards out to make
the score 7-3 in Miami's favor.
The Hurricanes, however,
wasted no time in increasing their
lead. Starting from their own
nine, Miami faced a third and
seven after a running play and a
pass gained little. Vinny
Testaverde hit Alonzo Highsmith
on a screen pass. After a couple
of missed tackles, Highsmith
rambled 88-yards for the score, a
Miami record for the longest pass
play from scrimmage. Greg Cox
connected on his second extra
Men
Point, giving Miami a 14-3 lead
with 5:13 remaining in the open-
ing period.
After ECU was forced to punt,
the Pirate defense came up with
one of many big plays on the
afternoon. The Hurricanes were
on the verge of blowing the
Pirates out as they drove to the
ECU two yard line. Senior
linebacker Robert Washington
saved the day for the Pirates with
an interception in the end zone
that killed the Miami scoring
threat.
ECU again marched the ball
down the field on the Hurricanes.
With the aid of a personal foul
penaltv against the Hurricanes,
and the running of fullback Boh
by Clair, the Pirates were able to
get to the Miami 20 before the
drive died. Heath again came on
to convert, this time on a
37-yarder and the Pirates now
trailed by a score of 14-6 with
10:06 remaining in the half.
On Miami's second offensive
play, senior cornerback Keith
Ford intercepted Testaverde
the ECU 26.
The Pirate offense, once again
aided by a personal foul penalty
against Miami, used a balanced
offensive attack to move the ball
to the Miami 1 1.
From there, fullback Anthonv
Simpson got f ' n 1
touchdown as he r am bled
through a gapn . in the mid-
dle of the line for an !i-vard
touchdown run. ECU elected
go for two on the rivers;
however. Jones' pass was -
See EASY, Pajje 9
Th 6j C�
AI. ei J B HUMBERT , n, fe�, cj.ronu
Anthorn Simpson (31 powers for some of his Kame-hivh 72 varrK
against a tough Miami defense.
Gamecock Student
Ticket Information
,
The ECl vs South Carolina
game on October 26th is .s SE1
OUT. NO general public tickets
remain at this time.
Due
to
excessive d
for tickets for the South Caro
game, the Athletic Department
revising the ECL Studeni P
Up Schedule.
Below is the Revised Si
Pick-Up Schedule. In oi
8lve ECl ample
tun p ck up their allotted
number ol tickets, the Athletic
Ticket Office will conduct STU
DI NT GROUP PICK-UP D
on 1on� Oct. 14. Individual' S
dent Pick-Up Davx will he rues
October 15th; Wed Oct. 16; and
Thurv, Oct. P.
Thurv. Oct. 17, will he the
FINAJ da that students can
Pick up tickets foi 'he South
le.
II students - n picked up
e end of
� kets will he
' sale ' General
i x , Oct. 21.
The onh way General Public
saie South arolina tickets
ild reoc( �r, is if the E t
dents Do or pick up their
allotted tickets � ai came or if
I niversit of South Carolina
tickets to
1 C I Athletic Ticket Office.
If eithei those re-
mair - kets would be placed
on sale for the General Public on
Mon Oct. 21
B DAVID McGINNESS
staff �r)i�f
The ECU men's tennis team
emerged with a 6-2 win over
Campbell University a week ago.
The No. 1 doubles match was
called due to rain and was not
rescheduled later as the Campbell
team could not have won.
In the No. 1 match, freshman
John Taylor lost to Campbell's
Arturo lharguen 6-3, 6-3. No. 2
player Dan Lamont came back
from a tiebreaker loss in the first
set to win his match 6-7, 6-1.6-1.
C.reg Loyd defeated Campbell
opponent Jon Gaskins in straight
sets 6-3, 6-4. Paul Haggar top-
ped Clay Maynor 6-4. 7-5 in the
men's No. 4 match. Jon Melhorn
downed Reggie Hester in (he No.
5 match with a consistent 6-3,
6-3. No. 6 John Anthony took
.are of Campbell netter Chris
Carr 6-4, 6-4.
In the two doubles matches
that were completed before the
ram, the Pirates were undefeated.
Pat Campanaro and John An-
thonv easily defeated Jon
Gaskins and Cla Maynor 6-2,
6-3 while Greg Loyd and Dan La-
mont had even less trouble with
Chris Carr and Reggie Hester,
crushing them 6-0. 6-2.
Women Netters Victorious
The women netters had their
match Thursday with Atlantic
Christian College postponed by
rain, needing only one more
match to lock in a win.
N 1 Ann Manderfield had
lost her first set and was down 3-1
in the second set to her AC"C op-
ponent, Sonali Muskerjee.
Beekv Clements played an ex-
Coach Pat Sherman directs her squad during a practice session
cellent match against Susan
Macwell in the No 2 ma
defeating Macwell 6-1. 6-0. "i
as very impressed with Bed
play said coach Pat Sher:
"This is the same girl that she
to in a tiebreaker at the I a
Inv 'rational
-n: Ziemei wa I
tpone her match against
ACC's No, 3 Wendy Sm
Ziemer was d. se.
cond set aftei . he first
tiebreaker.
Lisa Eicl er
No 4 opponent Kim :
6-0
either, allowing AC (. -
Mattock
6-2, -
player.
Hollj V
-U Tern P
6 match.
When rain forced the match's
nement, the E
were up 4
singles matches unfini
match will be completed toda
ACC.
In upcoming match play, the
men will face Pfeiffer College
tomorrow and the womei
up against Meredith Thursdav.
B S(()T7 COOPKR
ECU set three records despite a
27-15 defeat to the Miami Hur-
ricanes; total points, intercep-
tions and attendance marks were
broken or tied in the Pirate
homecoming.
Senior placekicker Jeff
Heath's 46-yard field goal in die
third quarter not only gave the
Pirates a 15-14 lead but gave
Heath ECl 's all-time scoring
lead. Heath's third field goal
(nine points) gave him 224 career
points, surpassing former runn-
� f
Despite Hurricane Loss
ester f'rnmnW c �.� .u. i-� l
ing back Carlester Grumpier s
old mark of 222 points.
"I am delighted to have him
break the record ECU coach
Art Baker said. "He is a worthy
young man and worked very hard
for it
The 6-0. 190 pound Virginia
Beach, V'a native connected on
field goals of 41 and 37 yards
earlier in the game. However, his
46-yarder brought all the 34,511
fans to their feet.
The Pirates' big-play man
responded once again, as Kevin
Walker stole three errant passes
from Miami quarterback Vinnie
Testaverde. Walker's three thefts
contests for the Bucs have been
large in attendence, an average oi
33.299.
After a disappointing loss to
Temple a week ago, many fans
doubted the capabilities of
quarterback Ron Jones. Specula-
tion was an ongoing occurance
prior to ECU's homecoming
game. But with all the commo-
tion and controversy hung over
the shoulders of sophomore
quarterback Ron Jones, his 10-20
passing performance was highly
admirable, according ECU coach
Art Baker.
"A lot of us have tests and I
am extremely proud of the wav
Ron responded Baker said. "I
hung in there and had a chance
for the victory
Defensively, ECU could only
manage one quarterback sack
and coach Baker felt that the
Pirates were lacking in their abil-
ty to pressure the quarterback.
"They're the best passing team
we've faced all year Baker said.
"We had about 20 different blitz-
ing situations and we only
managed one quarterback sack.
"They had four eas
touchdowns Baker added.
"I'm not trying to take anything
away from Miami, they could
easily be a Top-10 team if they
keep playing like they are.
They're a very skilled team
Coach Baker felt that the Buc
offense moved the ball well, but
didn't take full advantage of their
scoring opportunities. Be-
thought the Pirates plaved pretty
good for three quarters, bu:
to settle tor field goals on three
occassions
"When we needed it most, we
couldn't seem to come through
Baker commented. "We couldn't
get it done in the fourth quarter.
Too many times we're getting the
ball into scoring territory and
coming away with a field goal.
We've got to get hungrier
With the loss, the Pirates had a
homecoming victor) streak snap-
ped. ECL is now 14-1 m their
15 homecoming appearances.
ECL' will be on the road next
week when they travel to
Lafayette, La to battle the
Rapin' Cajuns of Southwestern
Louisiana.
Lady Pirate Spikers
Overcome Methodist
Hi usn smiKnv
Got The Record!
ollnian
Jeff Heatb (3) nails this 46 yarder as Tony Smith (13) holds Heath
passed Carlester Cnimpler with his 224th career point, to become
the ECU all-time scoring leader.
Jeff Heath
tied an ECU single-game record.
It was also an encore for Walker,
as he picked off three passes in
the Bucs 24-11 win over Temple
on Oct. 15, 1983.
The 5-11, 185 pound senior
cornerback leads the nation in in-
terceptions per game with a 1.6
average. Walker is also just two
intercepts away from the school's
single-season record of 10.
There were only 489 empty
seats in Ficklen Stadium on
Saturday afternoon. This was the
largest attendance for a Pirate
home crowd. The past two home
Kevin Walker
have great respect for the manner
in which Ron Jones reacted to the
adversity
"He is the best quarterback we
have in camp Baker continued.
"But we will continue to work
with Brad Walsh
Along with the play of Jones,
the ECU running game was also a
power as they rolled up 210
yards. Hurricane head coach
Jimmy Johnson praised the Buc
offense.
"They executed really well on
offense and just took it to us
Johnson said. "Their players
By JANET SIMPSON
Staff Wrtl�r
It took five games, but the
Lady Pirates finally overcame
Methodist College to pick up
their third win of the season.
"We needed the win after com-
ing off a tough week Coach
Imogene Turner said.
Turner also feels consistency is
a big problem for her team.
"We're not playing consistent
volleyball. When we become
more consistent we'll be a better
team
The Lady Pirates lost the first
(15-6) and fourth (15-3) matches
but won the second (15-10) and
third (15-10). bringing about a
fifth tie-breaking match which
the Lady Bucs were victorious in
(15-9).
"We handled their power well
the season against Methodist "
Turner said. "She had some
power spikes, power blocks, and
was serving well
Another bright spot for the
Lady Bucs is the return of Alvson
Barnes, who was hurt earlier in
'he season. "We're looking for-
ward to Alvson coming back "
Turner informed, "It should be
limited action against Atlantic
Chmtian College but hopefully
lull tilt against University of
North Carolina at Wilmington "
Some color was even added to
the game when 17 students from
acros, the way started doing their
own version of the wave
Coach Turner is still disap-
pointed because the team is not
getting more student support
She would very much so like for
iTTT t0 C�me �ut an cheer
ECU 7,
Bv DAVII, MiUNMss
S�f �
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I HI-fc AST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBFR8. 1985
Pirates
ictorious

itch's
E CI w i
the
e Loss



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irate Spikers
e Methodist

)) and
&oout a
which
ious in
iwer well
imp very
k
nendous
Pirates,
game of
Mel
said.
and
serving we
Another brighl � the
1 adv Bucs is the return of Ah-
� nurt earlier
the reason "We're looking
i Alys ing bat �
Turner inform uld be
ted action against Vila:
ristian College but hope!
full tilt against University
n Carolina at Wilmington '
Sme color was even added to
the game when 17 students ft
across the way started doing their
own version of the wave.
Coach Turner is still disap-
pointed because the team is
getting more student support
She would very much so like for
everyone to come out and cheer
the Lady Pirate volleyball team
on.
The Lady Bucs' next match is
at home against Atlantic Chris-
dan College on October 9, at 7:00
in Minges.
ECU To Hold Tennis Classic
By DAVID McGINNFsS
On Nov. 1 3, ECU will sponsor
! ust nnual Fast Carolina
.ersit Iennis Classic The
lament is sanctioned bv the
V ST A, and UST A and in-
les Men's and Women's open
s. doubles and mixed plus
's and women's 15 and over
s and doubles.
I he tournament will be held at
Minges 1 ennis Courts and the
Birch Iennis Center and is
ected by ECl 1 ennis coach
Sherman and assistant coach
ei t I ong
entry fees are $12.00 per
for singles play and
10 pei person for all doubles
petition. Play is limited to
events; a singles, a doubles
and a mixed doubles.
Entry fees must accompany the
entry in order to be included in
the draw. Checks should be
made payable to ECU Athletic
Dept. - Tennis Team and should
be mailed to: Dr. Pat Sherman,
Minges Coliseum, Greenville, NC
27834. Entry forms may be ob-
tained at Minges Coliseum or at
the River Birch Tennis Center off
Arlington Blvd. in Greenville.
All entries must be received by 5
p.m. on Monday, Oct. 21, 1985.
USTA membership is required.
A photocopy of current USTA
membership card or renewal
receipt check, or an application
receipt not more than 90 days
old, must be attached to your en-
try blank. Otherwise players
must present such proof at the
tournament before their first
match, or purchase an enrollment
at that time.
The draw will be posted at
Minges Coliseum on Tues Oct.
29, on the bulletin board outside
office 200. Players outside of
Pitt County will be notified by
mail of their first round match
playing time.
All matches will be played on
the courts at Minges Coliseum.
In case of rain delay or a large
draw, the courts at River Birch
Tennis Center will be utilized.
Night play will be used only it
necessary.
Players will oe seeded on the
basis on information possessed
by the tournament committee at
the time of the draw. Please send
current rankings and latest good
wins for seeding consideration.
USTA rules and Code of Con-
duct will govern all play. Mat-
ches will be two out of three sets,
no-ad scoring. The 12 point
tiebreaker will be used at six-all in
all sets. Players must report to
the designated playing site 30
minutes befre their first schedul
ed match. A 10-minute warm up
and the 15 minute default rule
will be strictly enforced.
Awards will be presented to all
winners and finalists in each divi-
sion, and there will be a picnic
supper on Friday evening.
All interested players are en-
couraged to participate in the
tournament. Spectators are also
welcome, so come on out Nov. 1
and watch some of Eastern North
Carolina's best tennis talent.
Easy Miami Touchdowns Doom Bucs
Continued from Pajje 8
and the score stood at
2 5:31 remaining in the first
I got on the scoreboard
h eight minutes elapsed in
nd half, when Heath con-
4 ards out to put
Pirates ahead 15-14. The
ia Beach, Va . native set
1 Ct scoring record
kick, and the Ficklen
I crowd was smell-
ivas not to he as
red two more scor-
in the third period to
utcome. 1 he First was
� ker Michael
ftei ECl was unable to move
ball, "estaverde again con-
a scoring strike.
ked up with the
l Brian Blades, who got
oik- 1 i I defender
il ed 77-j . the
ip 27-15
fina margin of ictory.
was
liability to score
.hei the) had to
. als.
"We got into scoring position
and came out with field goals
rather than touchdowns ECU
coach Art Baker said. "Obvious-
ly, had we scored the
touchdowns, it would have been
a different game. The key was
our failure to score touchdowns,
though I'm delighted for Jeft
Heath
Although the Pirate offense
was unable to put the ball in the
end one enough for the victory.
there were some encouraging
signs
The much maligned Ron Jones
completed 10 of 20 passes, and
according to the coaching staff,
17 of the balls he threw were cat-
chable.
The running game also was
productive as the Bucs riddled a
Miami-Florida defense that was
giving up only 43 rushing yards a
game. With fullback Simpson
and tailback Tony Baker leading
the way with "2 and 67 yards
respectively, ECU gained 210
rushing yards.
The Pirates now stand at 2-3.
and will travel to Southwest
Louisiana to take on the Ragin'
Cajuns, who are 2-4. According
to Coach Baker, this is going to
be an important game for both
clubs.
"Our players still have their
spirits high the coach said.
"We are very much aware of the
fact that we've lost three in a
row.
"We are both in the same boat.
Southwest Louisiana needs a win
and we need one too. We need a
great week of preparation tor us
to be successful Baker con-
tinued. "They don't call them the
Ragin' Cajuns for nothing
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10
THE EAST CAROUN1AN
OCTOBER 8. 1S8
B JKANNETTE ROTH
The Department of IRS 3-on-3
basketball season has arrived
with top flight action nightly on
the courts of Memorial Gym.
Sneaker Sam has scouted the
talent and has come up with the
following top picks in the respec-
tive divisions:
Men
1. The Fellows
2. Akadinmk Skaters
3. White Boss
4. lakers
5. Get Fresh Crew
Women
1. Enforcers
2. Lmstead Jockettcs
3. Slay Mamas
In recent action, THE PAINT
Co. fell to THE TERPS, 20-13 as
Phil Hamilton led all scoring for
THE TERPS with 10. Teammate
Jeff Konecke topped in six of his
own for the victor v.
The STL BISTERS look
strong after defeating THE
CRONES and the SIGMA Nl
KNIGHTS 20-16. A balanced at-
tack led by Ed Fowler, John
Galonski and Danny I ynch holds
the key to their success
On the ladies side of the court,
THE ENFORCERS continue to
dominate the nets as they slipped
by the THRU 1 IRS and
LMSTEAD JOCKETTES. In the
first contest, Slyra Tart led the
way for THE ENFORCERS
while Dwana McNeel) pumped in
10 points for THE THRU L ERS.
Against THE JOCKETTES, a
balanced attack at the hand of
Jill Contarina, Laura Conway
and Kim Turmpseed pushed this
year's No. 1 ranked squad on top
once again.
Intramural Flag football i
drawing to a close with several
teams in both the men's and
women's divisions still
undefeated The ladies for
ALPHA PHI are dominating the
sororitv sisters as the) continue
to win without giving up a point
to any of their previous contests
Pure Gold
Dancers
The Pure Gold Dancers will
return for an encore performance
in 198586. The upcoming
basketball season will mark the
second year of existence for the
group which performs at selected
men's basketball games
Last year, the dancers were
well received not only by the
basketball crowds, but the com-
munity at large. Towards the end
of last year's basketball season,
the Pure Gold Dancers were ask-
ed to perform at various com-
munity functions. Recent calls
have been made to the Athletic
Department to inquire about the
dancers' availability for special
appearances this year.
The Pure Gold Dancers are for
East Carolina University students
only. It should also be noted that
previous dance experience is not
required. If you are interested in
becoming a Pure Gold Dancer,
you must attend an organiza-
tional meeting on Thurs. Oct. 17,
in Minges Coliseum, Room 144
at 8 p.m. At this meeting, a
tryout date and time will be an-
nounced.
ECU Marketing Intern John
Akhoff stressed that previous
dance experience is not required
to be a member.
"Formal dance experience is
not required Althoff said.
Win $1,000!
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is
THE ENFORCERS and FLEM-
ING also boast undefeated
seasons. The all-campus cham-
pionship should be quite a match
up in the women's league.
In the men's division, BOMBS-
QUAD recently beat the
undefeated OREOS 28-6. They
continue to top the gridiron
charts and look almost
unbeatable this year. THE LAKE
BOYS and MCGARRETT FIVE-
O continue to cruise through
their divisions while the brothers
from PI KAPPA Al PHA lead
the fraternity league in wins.
Flag football all-campus cham-
pions in the women's, men's and
co-rec leagues are eligible to com-
pete in the National Collegiate
Flag Football Tournament held
in New Orleans, LA. The tourna-
ment will take place over
Christmas Break. For more
details, contact Kevin Williams.
Today through October 10, be
sure to register for the intramural
punt, pass, and kick competition.
Registration will be held in room
204 Memorial Gym. Divisions
Hoops
have been set up for your in-
dividual technique and
characteristics so be sure to be a
part of the fun. The competion
will take place Thur Oct. 10.
It's here
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Serv ices
favorite special event � Almost
Anything Goes. Wednesday, is
the day for fun. Competition will
take place at the bottom of Col
lege Hill beginning at 3 p.m. It
you don't participate be there to
spectate.
Intramural flag football playoff action will soon he starting up.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 8, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.430
Location of Original
University Archives

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