The East Carolinian, October 3, 1985






(She
(Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.12
Thursday, October 3, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
18 FaKes
Circulation 12,000
Tickets Still Remain
By HAROLDJOYNER
Stiff W rim
"There are still some football
tickets left said ECU's
Associate Athletic Director for
External Affairs Dave Hart.
"With projections and figures,
we are definitely headed for a
sell-out situation for ECU's
homecoming game" this Satur-
day.
There are approximately 1,000
football tickets left, according to
Brenda Edwards, Minges Col-
iseum ticket manager. "There are
still some tickets left for the
general public, including reserved
sections and sections 1 and 2
she said. Students will not be
denied their free football ticket,
she said, "and every effort will be
made to make sure a student gets
his or her ticket
Due to the potential fill-up of
Ficklen Stadium's 35,000 seats.
Hart said measures have been
taken to ease traffic problems.
"Officials from campus safety
and the athletic department met
Wednesday at length to discuss
routing procedures he said. "A
copy of the parking map will be
placed in the local paper (The
Daily Reflector) and the public-
should make themselves aware of
the suggested routes for Satur-
day
Hart also recommended that
spectators leave one hour earlier
than usual to get to the stadium.
"It is also advisable to get to your
seat as early as possible to pre-
vent some of the congestion
before the game he said.
"We're extremely pleased with
ticket sales Hart said "Ticket
sales are consistent to what we've
projected Hart credits the
sale of tickets to the increased
visibility of the I C I football
program. "People want to see
good football teams play
During the next three days,
Han suggested that students con-
tinue to follow proper ticket pick-
up procedures. "We will sell
every ticket � to the last one
Hart said.
"This should definitely be a
great weekend he said, "a
long as i! doesn't ram. That could
throw a monkey wrench into
everybody's plans.
EARLY MORNING
JIMIHH.INs IWEMCmMi
This is the ECU Campus around 6:00 Wednesday morning. I nfortunaely, very few students have
a chance to see how tranquil and beautiful the campus can be at such an early hour. Mainly, it's
because most of us are still asleep dreading the moment when the alarm goes off that launches us on a
mad dash for an 8 o'clock class.
Diseases Remain A Problem
Duty Import
From Wire Reports
B DOUG ROBKRSON
�Miff Wnlrr
(This is Part II oj a two-part
series, fart I dealt with the in-
creasing problems and fears oj
Acquired Immune Deficiency
Smcrome, thich ran 7'ue(f(ii .
Oct 1. Part II of the series covers
other sexually transmitted
deseases, including, chamydia and
gonorrhea.)
With the death of acl n Rock
Hudson on Wednesday, public
concern over AIDS will undoub-
tablv increase. However, less
publicized sexually transmitted
diseases pose a widespresd health
risk.
"People hear so much about
AIDS, "said E I Health
Educator Marv Eiesha-Adams,
"but the other STD's. such as
herpes, chamydia and gonorrhea
haven't disappeared � they just
aren't in the public eve right
now
Herpes is an Ml) which is
feared b many because it is in-
curable. 'The disease can't be
cured at l i present time, but its
symptom? cat be treated
1 lesl a v ims said.
People are much more aware
oi herpes than they weie a few
caii ago. Bcxause n has spicad
so rapidly, more publicity has
focused on the disease. But
herpes has been around for
years she added.
Another widespread SID
which many people are un-
familiar with is chamydia. In
tact, the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services says
chamydia is the most widespread
of all STD's.
a bacterial m-
"Chlamvji,
fection and treatment is simple
with antibiotics. It's similar to
gonorrhea in that victims are
often unaware they have the
disease Elesha-Adams said.
Estimates show that approv
imately 60 to HO percent ol
women and 10 percent of men
have no symptoms of chlamydia.
As a result, infected persons may
unwittingly transmit the disease
to their se partners.
In women, chlamydia may
cause itching and burning of the
genitals, vaginal discharge, dull
pelvic pain and bleeding between
menstrual periods. Symptoms in
men include painful urination
and a watery discharge from the
penis.
"The disease can cause perna-
ment physical damage in males
and females if untreated Elesh-
Adams said.
According to an ABC News
report. 10 percent of all college
students may be infected with
chamydia. The disease is present
at ECU and is "in line with na-
tional trends Elish-Adams
said.
The need for students to com-
municate with their sex partners
See DISEASES p. 3
Telef und Is Big Success
Money Pours In
WASHINGTON. DC (C PS)
� Colleges are abdicating their
mandate to teach students civic
responsibility, therby fueling stu-
dent's self-interest, the author of
the latest report critiquing the
higher education system savs.
In a wide-ranging review of
colleges and universities, Frank
Newman, president of the Educa-
tion Commission of the States,
calls on college administrators to
rededicate themselves to making
sure their institutions graduate
civic-minded students.
College officials, Newman
conteds, are well aware of
surveys indicating that students
today are disinterested in their
surroundings and focused almost
exclusively on their ability to get
a job after graduation.
But most of them, he writes,
believe there is nothing they can
do about it.
"This is a abdication of
responsibility Newman
declares, calling ther resurgence
oi civic education "a siable
task'Tacing educators.
"The college experiece should
develop within each student a
sense of country and community
service, and a desire to help
' TT� '
By DOUG ROBERSON
M�ff Wrllrr
ECU's National Telefund raid-
ed a record $15,000 in alumni
contributions Tuesday night, said
Annual Giving Director Cindy
Kittrell.
"This has been a record setting
week. On Monday night we rais-
ed over SI3,000. That broke the
old record of $8,900. We had no
idea we'd set a new record the
very next night Kittrell said.
The ECU National Telefund
uses students to call alumni
throughout North Carolina and
the United States. Through an-
nual fund contributions, alumni
can make an investment in the
future of ECU and the people it
serves. The Telefund, now in its
second week, has been "extreme-
ly" successful. "Last year we
raised $82,000 in a little over four
weeks. This year we've already
received $50,000 in pledges in on-
ly five nights she said.
One reason for the success the
telefund is experiencing, she said,
'elates to the $100,000 Dowdy
OnThe Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds13
Editorials4
Features9
Sportsu
The youth of America is their
oldest tradition. It has been going
on now for three hundred years.
� Wilde
Challenge. "All new and increas-
ed gifts will be matched dollar for
dollar, up to $100,000. This has
been a real incentive for others to
give Kittrell said.
Student enthusiasm is another
reason for the Telefund's success.
"Our student callers have been
great. Some students have so
much fun that they invite their
friends to help out she added.
All campus organizations have
been invited to help with this
year's Telefund, Kittrell said.
"The resident halls and other
campus organizatins have been
very helpful. Everyone is con-
tributing and it's become a
campus-wide event she said.
Students who help with the
Telefund receive gifts and prizes
in return for their services. Free
dinners and movie passes are
among the prizes donated by area
businesses.
"There's competition between
individuals and groups to see who
can raise the most money. The
student who has raised the most
will recieve $100 at the end of the
Telefund Kittrell said.
Free long distance telephone
calls and meals are another bonus
for students to help, she added.
Kittrell added that gifts to
ECU may qualify donors for
membership in the University
Advocates Program. Formerly
the Order of Wright Circle, the
Advocates Program is a means of
giving special recognition to
friends and benefactors whose
generosity goes beyond the norm.
J.B. HIMBART rWliM CaroltaMa
MOUNTIAN CLIMBING
Two ECU students are skillfully trying to scale the side of the
Jenkins Art Building. Although the Art building may not be a Mt
Everest, the challenges are still the same. The idea is to see how
high one can climb, which is the same spirit that abounds on this
campus � to see how high one can go � how far one can succeed.
others Newman says.
"This must not be a welcome
byproduct of a college education,
but a central urgent and con-
scious purpose
Toward that end, Newman
wants to:
� Make more student aid con-
tingent on community service.
Newman calls for community ser-
vice programs modeled after
ROTC, in which students receive
financial help from the military
in return for service work.
� Expand work � study funds
and programs. Universities
should set aside at leat 20 per-
cent of their work�study funds
for public service projects both
on and off campus
� Reduce federal funds
available for loans. The savings
should be transferred to
work�study programs. "Work-
ing one's way through college is a
cherished American concept that
conflicts head on with 'Go now,
pay later Newman writes.
�Create a national civilian
service program 'modeled after
the GI bill. In return for com-
munity work, students would
receive tuition credits.
Newman's report, prepared for
the Carnegie Institute for the Ad-
vancement of Teaching and
released Sept. 16. is the latest in a
series of reports calling to reform
higher education.
A simular series of reports on
primary and secondary education
during the past few years preced-
ed a rash of reforms in elemen-
tarv and high schools.
The new report, "Higher
Education and the American
Resurgence originally was to be
a study of the role of the federal
government in higher educ
The final version, howe s
broad review of almost every
facet of higher education, in-
cluding research, access and fun-
ding.
Newman white paper
the agenda for a vigorous
debate about the federal -
ment's relationship" to higher
education. Came.
President Ernest Boyer proclaim-
ed.
New man, a former pres
of the Universiiv of Rhode I
� which, despite a verv good
academic image, enjoys a "party
school" reputation � decries the
materilalsm of today's college
students, and what he says is their
lack of initiative and interest in
civic responsibilites
"Students too frequently sit
passively in class, take
courses, are discouraged :
risky or interdisciplinary research
projects, and from challenging
ideas presented to them
Newman writes.
"Students must be willing
recognize that learning is more
than preparation for a career,
more than sitting in a class, and
more than piling up credits need-
ed for graduation
Newman, however, savs in-
stitutions deserve as much of the
blame for this as students.
Surveys used to show that college
seniors have a much higher sense
of social responsibility than
freshmen.
Homecoming Planned,
'Alive In 85'Is Theme
By MIKE Ll'DWICK
l o-Smi i dlu.r
"Alive in 85- Building A
Future Thru Involvement" is this
year's Homecoming theme, said
Jane Whitfield, chairperson of
the Halftime Division of the Stu-
dent Homecoming Committee.
Co-Chairperson of the Steering
Committee and Assistant to the
Vice-Chancellor for Institutional
Advancement Don Leggett com-
mented, "We are trying to show
the spirit and involvement bet-
ween the students and alumni.
We're trying to show the ex-
uberance and spirit you would
like to see on a university cam-
pus Leggett added, "We are
expecting the biggest crowd ever
on campus for a Homecoming; as
far as what I can tell from the
ticket office
According to Whitfield, the
Homecoming Committee has
planned a busy weekend. Whit-
field said that the weekend will
begin Friday evening with a pep
rally. "It will start at the bottom
of the Hill with the ECU Mar-
ching Pirates and, this year, an
added special feature � The
Budweiser Clydesdale Horses
Whitfield said. "We are hoping
that the Clydesdales will attract
people from the community so
that they too can be involved
she added.
The 1985 Homecoming Parade
will start this Saturday at 10 a.m.
said Whitfield. "Bands from all
across Eastern North Carolina
will participate. Also, twelve of
the fifteen dorrhs'are entered in
our competition � this is the
largest number of any previous
yearshe said.
"Approximately 70 units are in
the parade, but there are a lot of
fire engines in our parade.
However, this has become a
tradition Whitfield said.
Whitfield said that the tradi-
tion began years ago when
Homecoming coincided with a
fire parade and ever since fire
departments have always been in-
vited to the parade.
Whitfield added that the fire
engines help out those groups
who cannot afford to build a
float Those groups get to ride
the trucks and then we decorate
the fire trucks with balloons and
streamers said Whitfield.
See HOMECOMING p. 2
�:� � . � -






NC STUDENT
LEGISLATURE
Announcements
� -

'cd so
� " ' � � . .
-

-
STUDENTS
11
ALPHA PHI
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
FORENSIC SOCIETY

�s call
St ev S'roupp at rsj 1974
GAMMA BETA PHI
� " � ����� are
� nma Beta Ph, Honors
ei 5 to �e held
rues, oct 1
ECU MARAUDERS
Oct at th)
all Student
� eclul
� ' " Marauder qua aons

"ouia be a.rected to cpt
'� � - 6974
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
" � test part. n tow
BtS M
Harry -
. lerj
Party � .
' � � � � �� .� . ,t 752 $41
ECU SURF TEAM
rty' tl
, ,
� as &
�s be show 1 �i ti
' � �
���
� - �
SAM

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iKmWfci frW fain.
2 Piecf Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscl
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Mashea Potatoes w Gravy 1
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I : �
$1.89
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Art Majors
Commercial or Otnervvise
Experience the field of commercial art
and GET PAID for it The East Carolinian
has one opening for an advertising
layoutpasteup artist.
Experience preferred. If you are in-
terested, stop by 2nd floor Publications
Bldg. Mon-Fri 8-5.
" Eastarolinian is an equal opportunity employer
M F V H
' rj
�turrari ETFirTula
IN PRECISELY ONE MINUTE
-mg tne Ferran Formula Collection Quart
Cimtng in high style
Water resistant Swiss made Exquisitely detailed
Clockwise Sport calendar $425 Chrono-
graph $575 Marine calenddr. $395
The Ferrari Collection, for men and women
�� .WV. - M4Ht,t Vis (HI HI. N t MH ns
jBarnes Jjg
And Diamond Gallery
H.U 10 � M. - S ,�.d S.r,d�,
GREENVILLE SSB KINSION 4 JACKSONVILLE
urged to attend
AOTT
A'tn All Greeks Tne AOT T Assassination
yame will be start,ng soon Watch for detans
and get psy hed'
ECU COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
Our IS Tl it 7 ii
enrta � . if Center All honor
' ' � ' ' raged to sent: -A
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
SOPHOMORES

s on materials Irom the OT Ott.ce iOt Bem
ano register to take the ��
ammat.on a' 'he ECU l(
Bldg Deadi.ne for apphcaton ��
Nov I Quest,ons' Can 757 6W1
� ba � � OT
SIERRA CLUB
Jerr , . .

� '� A !e the lea- ai
� � 'mg of 'he S.erra Cli
; �' ' � ss the plai
development 0f R,ver Par. ��
on Pr -�����.� a
door science curriculum pr,
eastern NC I
at 8 p m a' the First Presbyl
-�� �
� ������.� . .�
198;
STUDENT UNION
tudent Union s SDlnsormg a'
,rnamenl
Regis' �-�.
at 5 p m and Ti �, . tl it p m at
lenhall An pnt, ,
?ee of J. � � . . . �)
eo to ls� H1 and Ji
BIOLOGY CLUB

gomg on if. . �
��'ernoor, so it you w I infs a'
Super a .
VETERAN'S CLUB
Our seco'
heid Thurs Oct 3 at 7 30 i
Hous- lownstairt ��� � . feM �
the topus on the agenda
Da a � , � . s a pos ble efei i
Awareness Oa and'he deveiou- � I � �� �
A � � a
pose Bas � .
� ' " ou an op
-
�' �
'� � � � ano reset
- '

MAKING A MAJOR
DECISION GROUP
n program ,s designed to an
tg n academ c maior ,n a smaii group
format Each participant wm
� luei aid from the group leader if
�'�! Group parfir,pants Mrr r,oyv
'tiese related to ma,ors and career areas at
ano "arrow fhe.r options through a
systematic career decision mak,ng pro ess
The Maior Decision Group will meet Oct u,
'6 21 ?3 from 3 4pm 308 Aright -
Although advance registration ,s not re
quired, we would appreciate advance
' ' ation of .merest to insure that we riave
adequate materials on hand Please conta. '
'he Counseling Center In 307 A- ,
'57 6661 for further information or t
know you plan to attend
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A three part workshop ottered to s'uoents
a' NO COST Dr 'he Counseling Cent
' 'J ana 3i A: three sessions wm oe con
ducted from 34 pm n 306 Wright Anne�
'� ���' 0 wll focus on help
ng members distinguish between
�! set � ve aggressive, and n
behaviors Part
press themselves directly and opt . .
respond to interpersonal s tuatlons r a man
�" IrVt � � "rr compromise
no offends others Please
Counseling Center for registraor
COFFEEHOUSE
.
PHI ALPHA THETA
� �
faua as s house �
' � -
s arc rtq �
mandato mee' . �
Homecoming
Confinued From p.
Dun hall
Home. ming 1
presented, and the
float, band, and
tions will be announced.
Whitfield.
(Jn Sunday, the Student I
will present the Spongi
cording to Whitfield, tl
Spongetones will p. .
p.m. to 5 p.m.
Prescri
hv"Himm( Krk
Diseases
'intinued From p i
HOMECOMING
WEEKEND SPECIALS
A Complete Meai On A Bun'
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, N.C.
752-2183
COUPONS VALID FOR DINE-IN ORDERS ON
LY
; -y THIS COUPON mil INTRODUCE
A' W TO OUR WIDE VARIETY Of
" JMOmCHtS T GREAT PRICES
4 L
FREE
z SOFT DRINK
W ti A- . Whole
Sandwich Purchase
� �
Enpiras Oct 8, 1985
$1.00 OFF
La- (
SUPER SUB
E�pir� Oct 8 1985
FREE
YOUR CHOICE OF
' �" - 'ColeS r
� �� � .v
W,rh Any Half Sub
with this coup
Expires Oct 8 1985
FREE
HALF SUB
-� '
WholeS il
-
EnptrwOct 8 1985
IeT
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
Pirate
Football eachohe
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
Tickets
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
7
PLUS
Nacho
Bugles
DOUBLE m$3
MANUFACTURERS .O:?
COUPONSfo ,�
fc HA ��
J
KHI.lt S
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
Becks
Beer. ,
East Ca
Special
HOM
FEA TURIN
Ji"
Gallo
Gewurtztraminer
J
Surf
Detergent
FHE SPO
Sunday
October 6, 2:00
HOMECl
ECUS
Coca
Cola
Orange
Juice
Cluua
J
Video Movie
Rentals
No Club Fees 24 Hour Service
OVER hc JiPl i k C
650
TITLES
BETA
& VHS .
VHS Player
Rental
$28
Luncheon
Meats . . .
Deli
Chip Dips
BUY ONE LB
GET ONE LB
Five Color
16 oz. Plastic Cup
Filled With Your
Favorite Softdrink
v French
Onion
Fried
Chicken
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
,600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
.�
Offer Good
Available at Sodl
STl
Owned and Opel
i






oming
I r k
ft- ?n
fu� s�. E
PONS!
ergent
-49
Orange
s
Juice
109 q
v. i
$i�
I HI f AS! i AkJl !M-N
CM K'Hf R3 '�'
Prescription Drugs Can Cause Addiction
H Hh 111 miu M K
t�ff Wrllrr
Prescription drugs are tak
v da to help us furu
we feel ill l ater, man ot
rvd ourselves addicted
'hose same prescription drugs
"Any drug can be addictive;
addiction can be eil
?'sical oi psychology
S ybody whi obtain a
Ption can be addi ted V I
diction is not limited to an ace
I
( �i
i
Si
be addicting, a drug must
duce a psychological craving,
a physical craving and a
:e Narcotics produce the
blatant addiction. Ann
i! drugs produce more oi a
iil than a physical addiction.
- psychological addiction is hard
�. you just have to go
by w hai - ou are told b the pa
aid lames Mathis,hail
the Department oi
i! Medicine
Diseases Still Widespread
( ontinued F rorn p. 1
sk
�case D
-
to Elesha-Ada
a
"Mi .
East Carolina Student Union's
Special Concerts Committee
presents
HOMECOMING FINALE
FEATURING THE SPONGETONES
Sunday
October 6, 2:00-5:00
O
ra,nsitr MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
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HOMECOMING SPECIAL
ECU SOUVENIR CUP

giffiiiLfira
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i
Five Color
16 oz. Plastic Cup
Filled With Your
Favorite Softdrink
?
?
i
?
?
?
?
75 C
(combined Reg,
Retail $1.08
Offer Good Through Saturday, Oct. 5th
Available at Soda Shop - Wright Bldg. & Croatan
STUDENT STORES
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
,???�??�??????�?�??�????��???????��????????????????????
"People become addicted
because ol the strong Feeling ol
need tor the drug I lie pain ot ex
istence makes the user feel the
are getting something from the
drug I he drug cares for the
user's emotional needs as well as
Ins physical ailments said
Smith.
"Addiction to prescription
drugs are a bigger problem than
street drug1 said Smith. "In the
70s street drugs were popular;
now there is a better support
tem and students are wiser.
When we see 10 percent per year
ol the population ol students, we
see only a small part and it's hard
to make a generalization as to the
number of students who are ad
dieted to prescription drugs
cording to ill Ball, dire
ECUounselingentet.
1 he del ion process in-
.es decreasing dosage or
substituting the prescription drug
;s stranger one, according
a study conducted b Phyllis
md Merla Zellerba
lo begin ridding yoursell
tie druki.
aid tmd out
withdrawal symptoms ol the drug
and what the means are to ease
withdrawal
physician can .
youi reason for stopping the
usage of the drug. Some doctors
may urge you to take the drug
because ol its needed effects,
despite the addiction You may
feel the need I another
physician in any major medical
decision
According to the studv done by
Sailer and Zellerbach, a
decrease the dosage, activities
should be planned to divert your
attention. During this time, you
should keep friends close by
case the withdraw .
severe. It the dependency on
the drug is not major, a p!
may help you break away fi
the habit bv prescribing low
dosage, "no refill" dr .
Accurate and dailv revord-
dosage should be kept. Sv
toms su mnia and ner-
vousness mav be tell.
11 the problem is sev . .
:�
to treat the addictioi
You may need med
supervision. Some types ol
medical insurance will cover
hospitals and private clinics
designed to treat those addicted
prescription drugs, said the
study
It is important to tollow sound
advice to kick the dependt-
habit. Always check with a physi
cian before beginning the pro-
cess.
Saiter and Zellerbach said tl
when the dependency is kicked
I the withdrawal symptom
have subsided, you may need
behavior-modification therap -
jp support to reduce your
need tor th- medication.
The worst medical treatment is
.over one drug's treatment
with another. To preven
dependency, always learn the
primary use of a drug before tak
ing it, said Saiter and Zellerh:
More important, according to
Saiter and Zellerbach, be alert
and take no medications unless
you feel you absolutely need the
chemical to maintain your men-
tal, emotional, and physical well-
being.
W'
You can be sure any choice from our
wide selection of natural food
products is a quality item that has
been carefully chosen because it
meets our standards of freshness
and purity. We believe food should
be whole. That it remains as close
to its natural state as possible to
ensure all the valuable nutrients
are intact.
dow
eart
NATURAL FOODS GROCERY ,
o

SPECIAL
Rest of Semester
- Weights (3 months) $45.00
- Aerobics $25.00
- Weights &
Aerobics (monthly) $25.00
GTYM
FITNESS COMPLEX
i-ocatea on the Evans Street Mail
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�iic EaHt (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, ommt sianager
JAY STONE, Managing tdnor
Harold Joynlr, . Edor Tom Luvender, d�, , mm,
Mike Ludwick, c � &�� Anthony Martin, ��� vm��
Rick Mccormac oim�, John Peterson, o�iita
Scott Cooper, . ���, tdllo, Shannon Short, p ��
Stephen Sherbin. mm &��. Debbie Stevens. bcmr,
Andrew Joyner. cm DeChanile Johnson. ���
October 3. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Discrimination
Cfty Discourages Registration
That Pitt County has begun to
discriminate against students yet
again in its voter registration prac-
tices has left many in the campus
community baffled. For, last year
at this time, the city was warned
against employing the use of special
questionnaires designed to deter-
mine the residency of students. This
warning emanated from the State
Board of Elections in a special
memo it sent out to all Elections
Boards. The memo, dated
September 18, 1984, reads in part:
"The United States Supreme
Court has held unconstitutional the
use of special questionnaires to
determine student residency.
United States v. Texas, 445 F.
Supp. 1245 (S.D. Tex. 1978) aff'd
sub nom Symm . United States,
439 U.S. 1105 (1979)
It adds:
"All county boards shall inform
all registrars, judges and registra-
tion commissioners that students
may not be denied permission to
register where they attend school
solely on the grounds that they are
living in a dormitory or are
students, provided they are other-
wise qualified
It was this memo which promp-
ted the Pitt County Board of Elec-
tions to cease using special ques-
tionnaires designed to discourage
students from registering to vote.
The memo itself was the result of
the threat of legal action against the
state which was to be initiated on
behalf of students by the National
Student Campaign for Voter
Registration. The NSCVR, a pro-
ject of the Public Interest Research
Groups, was working in coopera-
tion with a group of ECU students.
We can only speculate as to why
the city has resumed the practice of
discriminating against students.
Yet, it seems likely that, since this
fall, elections will be held for city
council, it is feared that students
might become a decisive factor in
local elections and, hence, in city
government. We are compelled to
ask rhetorically: "What is wrong
with that? At Appalachian State
and Chapel Hill students frequently
run their own candidates for city
council, thus securing a voice for
students and integrating them into
the community.
A flyer presently being
distributed by the SGA puts it:
"If students, faculty and staff
members register in Greenville,
those seeking off'wc will be more at-
tentive to the needs of the campus
community and the relationship
between the campus and the city
will improve. Those who do not
register and vote give over the
decision-making process to others
and, thereb give up their voice in
the democratic process
The deadline for registration is
October 7. Anyone denied the right
to register should contact acting
SGA President David Brown or
Vice-President Chris romasic and
this newspaper.
We are happy to see that our own
Student Government Association
has made voter registration a high
priority this semester. It is pro-
viding information on the subject,
including times and places for
registration, at a table near the en-
trance to the ECU Bookstore. This
paper would encourage the SGA to
follow up its efforts by contacting
the university lawyer and making
sure that students are not thwarted
in their attempts to register.
AIDS Hysteria
Actor Rock Hudson's tragic
death yesterday at age 59 as a result
of Acquired Immune Defeciency
Syndrome � AIDS, has deeply sad-
dened many across the nation.
More importantly, it has increased
the awareness of the American peo-
ple as to the nature of the disease.
AIDS was first identified in this
country in 1981 and, though about
75 percent of cases have been
among gay or bisexual men, it is not
confined to the gay population. It
has also infected children,
hemophiliacs and there is evidence
that it has crossed over into the
heterosexual population.
While there is no evidence that
the disease is transmitted by casual
contact, (Available evidence in-
dicates that it is caused by sexual
contact or transmission of blood), a
wave of prohibitions aimed at
shielding those who are healthy
from AIDS victims has recently
swept across the land. Children
have been banned from schools and
workers with the disease have lost
their jobs.
This hysteria has been fueled by
the fact that there is presently no
known cure for the disease and
AIDS cases have increased from
fewer than 2,000 in 1983 to more
than 13,000 this year. The number
of AIDS cases is presently doubling
every 10 months, and one federal
agency has predicted that there will
be 40,000 cases in the U.S. by the
end of 1986.
Yet, all is not gloom and doom.
While many have been critical of
the Reagan Administration for
dragging its feet on AIDS funding,
the U.S. Congress voted yesterday
to increase funding for research by
$70 million more than what the
President originally asked for.
Funding issues now are more
critical than ever because the virus
believed to cause AIDS has been
identified, and extensive � and ex-
pensive � clinical trials are
necessary to find the drug or drugs
that can be used successfully
against it. Even more public sup-
port for research funding and
educational efforts aimed at high
risk groups will be needed in the
future.
For filing and typing
and taking dictation,
for making appointments
without hesitation,
for saving us millions
Opinion Polls Ludicrous
B MICHAEL KINSLEY
The New Republic
Ferdinand Marcos, president of all the
Phillippines, decided last month to put
off holding a presidential election.
According to him, a public opinion
survey had shown that most people
don't want an election. Even if Marcos
made up this remarkable poll, it's the
ultimate triumph for opinion-poll
democracy: an election canceled on the
ostensible authority of a poll.
The usual complaint about polls is
that they lead to democratic excess.
They put representative government on
too short a leash. Perpetually informed
of what the voters think on every issue,
politicians follow instead of leading. Mv
complaint is different: Polls undermine
democracv even here, where we have
real elections. That's because polls don't
measure public opinion. They create it.
Worse, they reinforce the impression
among voters and politicians that
untethered opinion is what democracy is
all about.
Some polls solemn 1) report people's
opinions about the unknowable. A
Washington Post � ABC News poll in
July revealed that 54 percent of
Americans don't expect President
Reagan's cancer to recur before he
leaves office. Thirty-three percent think
it will recur and 12 percent have no opi-
nion.
According to a Newsweek poll in
August, 52 percent of the public now
believes that an AIDS epidemic among
the general population is either "very
likelv" or "somewhat likely The more
you know about cancer or AIDS the
more you know that the correct answer
to these questions is "don't know Yet
only a few courageous citizens dare to
have no opinion.
It seems almost unpatriotic.
"Do you think most poor people are
lazy or do you think most poor people
are hard-working?" Thus a Los Angeles
Times poll asked last April. Perhaps it's
reassuring that 51 percent said "hard-
working" and only 26 percent said
"lazy But only 23 percent got the right
answer, which is "not sure
How can you be sure about such a
preposterous generality1 Vet the very acl
of taking the poll and publicizing the
results gives legitimacy and weight to
empty prejudices
At the other extreme are polls asking
people's opinions about indisputa
questioons ol fact. Accoi
Gallup Poll this month. 1 I pci
taxpayers are of the opinion that their
taxes will go up under Reagan's ta
reform plan. Forty-six per.en: believe
their taxes will go down. n fa vast
majority of people's taxes w wn.
Perhaps more seriously, a I
Reports poll concluded that almost one
person in five believes, incorrectly, thai
few if anv cancers are trea
Pollsters profit from the ignorance
their subjects. Are they under no obi
tion to correct it rather than leaving
impression that the treatability of cancer
is simply a matter of opinioi
No poll allows you to express your
reasoned views. You're not allowed
ask "What do you mean by Mav or
"Does 'somewhat' mean more or less
than 20 percent?" There is no answer
category for "This question makes no
sense" or "I reject your premises That
is because polls don't seek reasoned opi-
nions. Vague attitudes are what the)
want and what they impose on the
political system as reflections ot "public
opinion
Even the granddaddy poll question
about presidential popularity i�
tialiv unanswerable. The classic I
mutation is "Do you approve i
prove � ' .va Preside Re ig i
handling h "I think Reag .
done brilliantly - j
just disagree with him ab arly
everything v hat a
t their
on which the u
completely
judice, sail it an '
up as tl
;rs Yai �
�'
buil :
taxes would be
actually
obtained an money" and thai "a
vsould owe
V1 in increased taxes. People w
asked rw tax"
� a v
cut tor individuals)
Surprise, surprise. S
opposed
It's ridiculous to suppose tha I
can form a valid opinion about an :�-
like the taxation of "inside buildup"
whole-life insurance policies based ex
clusively on information supplied by a
pollster. There is no loophole in the I
sode that Yankelovich et al. could
manufacture a majority in fa-
their usual fee.
It's tune to stop listening t. these peo-
ple. Better vet. it's time to stop talking
to them.
Media Monopolies Proliferate
The compute
apologies but
seems to tt � �
tha' since it was
Tianrnaae a
mistake ot this
magnitude was
inevitable
By JAY STONE
According to the editorial in this
month's Mother Jones magazine:
"Gigantic media corporations are gob-
bling up smaller media companies and
the number of independent voices is be-
ing dramatically reduced Mother
Jones is frequently cited by the
mainstream media as a source for stories
requiring investigative reporting. It has
been an information resource on several
occasions for television journalists in
particular and it has won national
awards for its investigative reporting.
Mother Jones supports its allegations
against the U.S. media by pointing out
that the Village Voice and the New
Yorker are only two among a large and
growing number of publications that
have been recently acquired by media
conglomerates. More to the point, Ben
Bagdikian reports in his 1983 book, The
Media Monopoly, that by the early
1980s most American media '
newspapers, radio, television, books and
movies were controlled by 50 corpora-
tions, and these companies were in turn
interlocked with huge conglomerates
and multinational banks. (When a cor-
poration is said to be interlocked with
another corporation then one person or
possibly even several people sit on the
board of directors of both companies.)
Today the number has decreased even
more and the result, predictably, is a
new kind of central authority over infor-
mation.
The problem with this trend is that
frequently the very companies the public
needs to know more about are buying up
the media companies that should be
reporting on them. Simultaneously, the
influence of advertisers over the media is
increasing. In fact, for many magazines
in America, the advertizing income, not
circulation, is what keeps the magazine
economically viable. According to
Mother Jones, advertising for the
cigarette, liquor, automobile, and drug
industries alone provides over one
billion dollars in revenues for
magazines.
The lesson to be gained from all of
this is clear: the free and independent
press is an endangered species in this
country. It is being threatened by many
of the same economic forces which are
wiping out small family farmers in the
midwest in favor of large agri-business
corporations. Large corporations have
advantages when it comes to marketing
and merchandising their products
because of their relatively easier access
to financial resources, credit and other
such precious commodities. Legislation,
too, is skewered to benefit large com-
panies. Moreover, in our society, the
vicissitudes of the marketplace result in
a trend toward centralization of capital
and ever larger firms. Such economies of
scale might be advantageous for society
as a whole in some industries, yet in the
media centralization means less diversity
and a less critical posture for many
publications. Ultimately, this will mean
less information and a less democratic
society.
This general trend is not ameliorated
by the fact that, since Reagan took of-
fice, nonprofit bulk postal rates have
risen 88 percent. Even more disturbing is
the fact that the Reagan-sponsored
budget, which has already been passed
by the Senate, abolishes nonprofit rates
completely and increases nonprofit
postal rates overall by 391 percent. What
this means is that all political journals as
well as nonprofit educational organiza-
tions will be threatened, since they rely
upon the mail for communicating or
fundraising. The Reagan budget calls
for an astronomical increase in postage
rates, despite the fact that when last
winter's postal increase was approved,
the public was assured of at least a three
year grace period till the next increase.
In light of recent developments,
however, that grace period appears to be
vanishing since it has been predicted that
Congress will fail to appropriate enough
money to subsidize nonprofit postal
rates in 1986. Thus, even if the H
holds off the abolition of the nonpi I
rates, the new increases will still be crip-
pling for nonprofit organizations and
many publications. The change in non-
profit postal rates will affect, not only
Mother Jones, but also such organiza-
tions as the American Red Cr
Greenpeace, the American Cancer
Society and the American Civil Liberties
Union.
Perhaps it would be gratuitous to
point out that many of the organizat
affected by the recent budget cutting
measures are critics of the Reagan Ad-
ministration's policies. Making this
point, however, is not unwarranted since
using postal subsidies to support
political debate dates back to the beginn-
ing of the American republic. Why end a
practice that has served to strengthen
our country now0
Mother Jones made an impassioned
plea for contributions this month,
though it is the largest and most widely
read political magazine in the nation.
The New Republic and the National
Review, both owned by the same media
conglomerate, lose money themselves.
As a result of the Reagan administra-
tion's measures. Mother Jones has an-
nounced that it will attempt to become a
wholly reader-supported magazine to
avoid being unduly influenced by adver-
tisers. In the next two months the
magazine has announced that it needs to
raise close to $200,000.
The fad that such an appeal is being
made is a comment upon the nature of
our times. Democracy and a pluralism
of ideas are in danger of vanishing from
the American landscape, relics of a
fleeting and soon-to-be bygone era. The
ECU
truffi Staff Krp
Gramm
H� Karen -idle

,

.
.




John's Flj
�Order Larlv
'mS5.00
�$7.50 r
� W e a
GREENVILI
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I HI t AMAKOI IMAN
CM lOBf K 3, 1985
??
ycr o ws
en
le are
pre-
ired the
;elovich
thai 'a
ssue
: " in
i j
ed b) a
; tax
; idn't
MB
roliferate
pments,
i be
hat
ugh
11 sc

be crip-
ns and
� nly
rgamza-
Red Cross,
inccr
"erties
tous to
rganizations
rtt budget cuttirig
Reagan Ad-
Making this
warranted since
dies to support
nebeginn-
an republic. Why end a
" �'� 1 ' lengthen
nade an impassioned
ns this month,
he largest and most widely
magazine in the nation.
Republic and the National
ith owned by the same media
imerate, lose money themselves.
result e Reagan administra-
measures. Mother Jones has an-
i ed (hat it will attempt to become a
reader-supported magazine to
j being unduly influenced by adver-
. In the next two months the
izme has announced that it needs to
close to $200,000.
he fact that such an appeal is being
lie is a comment upon the nature of
imes. Democracy and a pluralism
ieas are in danger of vanishing from
.nerican landscape, relics of a
ting and soon-to-be bygone era. The
ECU Committee Presents Simulation Game
From Staff Reports
The ECU Committee on the
Status of Women presents the
third workshop in the Manage-
ment Development Series on
Tuesday, Oct. 8. The workshop
entitled "The Academic Game"
will take place from 8:45 a.m. un-
til 4:30 p.m. in Mendenhall 244.
Sponsored by a grant from the
North Carolina Council on the
Status of Women, and funds pro-
vided by the Z. Smith Reynolds
Foundation, Inc the workship
will have as its leader Mary E.
Bredemeier, professor of Educa-
tion from Montclair State Col-
lege and co-author of THE
SIMULATION GAME.
Bredemeier's varied academic
career has focused in recent years
on the integration of her
simulation-gaming and sex equity
interests. Since co-developing
THE ACADEMIC GAME along
with six women psychologists for
the American Psychological
Association in 1979, she has
presented the game in many pro-
fessional settings.
The Academic Game is a sex
equity simulation game dramatiz-
ing the social-structural obstacles
to women's advancement in
higher education. Up to 30
players assume prescribed roles
for a series o interaction rounds
during which they try to earn
enough points from their col-
leagues to stay in the game and
advance to a higher rank.
During these interaction
periods, players engage in con-
versations with each other, ex-
change score sheets, and secretly
award points based on the per-
sonal or professional value of the
interaction, and on the in-
dividual's "reward power
Elements of the academic world
such as the Promotions and
Tenure Committee and a Word
Skills Game, simulating the
"publish or perish" principle,
provide additional opportunities
to earn points.
I game places particular em-
phasis on barriers to women
which are inherent in the
academic system and also
highlights the general effects ol
competitive reward systems on
the behavior of players and the
ethical dilemmas and conflicts
which often result.
The purpose ol this workshop
is twofold, lirst, the game is used
tn sensitize workshop par-
ticipants to the obstacles facing
women in the higher education
setting. Second, this workshop
will train facilitators to lead
subsequent sessions of The
Academic Game, so that the ex-
periences offered through simula-
tions can be repeated for other in-
terested groups in later sessions.
Participation in the workship is
limited, but interested persons
may contact Karen Grill at 6804
or Patricia Anderson at 6191
Grammar Hotline Helps All
B Karen Stelle
SUrt Wrttrr
Are you constantly faced with
a blank stare from your room-
mate when you ask a question
concerning grammar? EspecialK
when you are writing a paper and
find yourself instead taking a �
hopefully � educated guess
No longer.
A new program called the
Grammar Hotline is helping peo
pie answer questions that involve
writing problems. Hotlines, such
as the one in the ECU Writing
Center, are aimed at solving the
problems that writers experience
at the moment the writers have
the problem. More and more,
local businesses and industries
are solving the many writing pro-
blems, which surface from dav to
day, this way.
The Hotline works in such a
way that people do not have to
search for long hours through
thick and dull grammar books or
leave in search of that ever elusive
professor who will know the
answer. "The program attempts
to reach out to the actual places
where people are writing said
Patrick Bizzaro, director of the
Writing Center and Associate
Professor of English.
Anyone needing an answer to a
question can call the Grammar quickly search through an ap-
Hotline between 10 and noon propriate book for the correct
Monday through Friday, and 2 answer to the problem posed,
and 4, Monday through Thurs- said Bizaro.
day. According to Bizzaro, a
knowledgeable grammarian will
See GRAMMAR p. 6
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Homecoming parade breakfast and pre-game
lunch. Special meals to eat with us or take
out. Join us to kick off a day of fun with
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nu l M i roi 1NIAN
OCTOBER I, 198?
Group Starts Operation, Monitors Teachers
BOSTON, MA(CPS)- "All I
w is thai they have me on
heii list says Boston Universi-
political science professor
Howard Zinn "Whether they
ave agents in m classroom is a
vi question I liar's the most
isidious part of this whole thing:
verything is kept secret. You jusl
lon't know "
He may not know who is wat-
hing him, but he does know
Zinn, a self described "Marx-
t, socialist, and independent
adical is on a list of several
usand social science pro-
ss� ' s with leftist leanings.
nd so it in going across the
untn this tall as a new "uat-
� grout � Accuracy In
Vademia (AIM enlists con-
servative students to "monitor"
their professors tor "liberal"
slants and "misinformation
AIA has garnered so many stu-
dent volunteers nationwide that it
has dropped its original plan to
use senior citizens to monitor
classroons for liberal sentiments.
Now students, most with
grades and credits on the line,
will do the monitoring, reports
Les Csorba, AlA's executive
director.
While main students
volunteered independently, many
of them are also members of
campus conservative groups such
as the College Republicans and
Young Americans for Freedom.
AIA. in fact, has begun direct
mail campaigns to solicit campus
conservatives for money and sup-
Grammar Hotline
Serves Community
port.
All ot which conjures up im-
ages of "witch hunts "Red
Scares "McCarthysim and
"Thought Police" for critics in
the academic community, who
charge the monitoring practice
could have a "chilling effect" on
college classrooms.
They cite how the fear of being
branded a communits � and los-
ing jobs and grades � during the
fifties stifled thought on cam-
puses and, according to some
observers, so retarded American
scientific thought that it took
huge federal spending to restore
U.S. primacy in the sixties.
An offshoot of Reed Irvine's
Accuracy IN Media (AIM) � a
group which monitors the media
tor leftist biases and then con-
ducts publicity and letter-writing
campaigns against liberal of-
fenders � AIA was formed to at-
tack what Irvine and others feel is
the other great bastion of liberal
thought: the college campus.
"The response and need for
this service have been overwhelm-
ing Csorba savs.
"This organization really has
esploded with letters and phone
calls � hundreds of them �
from students on campuses in-
terested in helping us he adds.
"We now have almost 100 col
leges where students are in con-
tact with us about what their pro
fcssors are saying in class
The group hjas targeted the
social sciences, he reports, and
specifically professors with
liberal beliefs "because they have
been most guilty of violating (ob-
jective teaching) guidelines
But "any professor � right or
left � will be reported and expos-
ed if they are distorting the
facts
Among other things, Csorba
says, AIA will comolam to school
administrators, department
chairs, and the local community.
asas "printing up student com
plaints in our national
newsletter" when it finds pro
lessors who mention tacts with
which AIA disagree
Continued From p. 5

do not deal in
k explained Bizzaro
handing out the in-
houl checking on
ook up the exact
our books available on
i, as a con-
ipringing up accross the
and have been suc-
involving colleges and
is in the daily writing
place in the community
ai the businesses and industries,
thereby linking the university and
community, and also, building a
positive relationship between the
two, Bizaro said.
"We believe the Hotline has
tremendous potential in our at-
tempt to support the writing done
throughout Greenville and Pitt
County said Bizzaro.
Anyone who is interested in
calling the Grammar Hotline
should call 757-6399 between 10
a.m. and noon Monday through
I riday, and 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.
Monday through Thursday.
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cok2fW.XHT FILM �
DEVELOPING �
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One Coupon For Each Roll of Film
Student Stores
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Greenville, NC 27834
Tn,s coupon must accompany order.
I
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Piedmon
Empire Airlines In, and I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 3, 1985
achers
lational
finds pro-
vith
-firm led
t hicken & Ribs
830-1530
���
Specials
$12.95 :�
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11 a.m.� 11 p.m.
loped Here
R 14, 1985
FILM
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ROLLS
im
rsity
order.
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Piedmont Aviation Grows, Merges With Empire Airlines
Empire Airlines Inc. and Pied-
mont Aviation Inc. Wednesday
agreed to a merger in which Pied-
mont will pay $15 a share, or
about $40 million for stock of the
regional carrier.
Empire's stockholders and the
US Department of Transporta-
tion must still approve the
merger, which is expected to be
completed "in a matter of mon-
ths a Piedmont spokesman said
in Winston-Salem, N.C.
The takeover ends Empire's
own expansion plans, including a
move to Syracuse from its base at
Oneida County Airport, a deci-
sion that prompted Oneida
County to consider suing
Syracuse and Onondaga County
for luring away Empire.
The announcement also ended
a week of speculation in which
Empire refused to say who was
trying to buy its stock, which had
soared more than $3 a share from
$9.25 in the past week. The offer-
ing price is $5.75 above last
week's price.
"Piedmont has been growing
at regular intervals in the nor-
theast United States said Don
McGuire, a Piedmont vice presi-
dent. "In this case, we will have
an opportunity to make a quan-
tum leap up in the region
McGuire said Piedmont's total
cost of acquisition of Empire
stock would be about $40 million
and would take a matter of mon-
ths following approval by Empire
stockholders and the govern-
ment.
Under the agreement, Pied-
mont will buy 460,000 shares
from Empire's chief directors, in-
cluding President and Chairman
Paul Quackenbush, and has an
option to buy another 600.000
shares in authorized but unissued
stock. If Piedmont exercises all
its options, it said it would own
33 percent of Empirestock.
Piedmont, the nation's seventh
largest carrier, had been mention-
ed most frequently as the Empire
suitor, although Piedmont had
refused to comment
Student Transit Purchases New Bus
By BETH WHICKER
SUfTWrllrr
The Student Transit Service
will begin the brown route Mon-
day in a new bus.
"It has been needed for a long
time. The New bus will reduce
operating cost per mile. The new
bus gets eight miles per gallon as
compared to the three miles per
gallon the old buses got accor-
ding to Marshall Tucker, transit
manager.
"The new bus will carry 25
people. Transit is getting more
smaller and cost efficient, but the
big buses are still needed on the
purple and gold route said
Tucker.
"The bus will be used for sum-
mer school. It will be crowded at
times, and we ask that students
bear with us Tucker added.
The bus was purchased for
$30,000 with surplus money from
the regular operating budget.
One of the previously used vans
will be sold as it is no lonter in
use.
The new bus is the first pur-
chase since October 1983 when
the service purchased two pusher-
type, 62 passenger, rear engine
buses.
Approximately 2,500
passengers use the Student Tran-
sit Service everyday. The Service
covers 27 destinations every 30
minutes on three different routes.
"We are steadily growing in
number of routes and vehicles
said Tucker.
Tucker said that the ECU Stu-
dent Transit Service is the only
student operated transit system in
North Carolina. The only other
student operated transit service is
on the East Coast is at the
University of Maryland.
No increase in fees will result
from the purchase of the bus.
Also, no increase is expected in
the near future, according to
Tucker.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th & Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
�� All Transactions Confidential vs &
� BUY�SALE�TRADE J&tiF
f 752-0322 V
Hours. 9:00 �m-�:00 pm MonSal
Now Hiring
WZMB is seeking a Grants Manager to devise and im-
plement a grant solicitation program. Applications are
available in the WZMB studios. Deadline is Friday,
October 4.
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
P
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog. Cat. and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa arc accepted and financing is
available.
$U EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 7S4-W22
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES

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The Pitt County Fair
MIDNIGHT MADNESS
RIDE SPECTACULAR
Friday October 4th
11:00 p.m. till 2:00 a.m.
Rides and Fair Admission
$6.00
Show Your Purple At The
HOMECOMING GAME
Open Saturday 9:30-12:30
Student Stores
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by
East Carolina University
Tailgating Supplies
Available!
One Table of
Purple Shirts
Priced $2.50
reg. price $5.95
SUPER
Featuring
Eastern Carolina's
Largest Midway
Ride The
SPECTACULAR
Food and Games
RIDES
710 North Greene Street, Greenville, N
Take-outs
Welcomed
752-0090
DINNER SPECIALS
Fisherman's Platter
One Table Shirts
up to 40 off
Golf Towels
now $2.90
regularly $5.95
Select 3 Items
Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrimp
Clam Strip
Steamed Crab Legs
Shrimn. Creole
(Fri. & Sat. Only)
Oysters
Scallops
Barbeque V �W �)U
Fried Chicken JJ
Oyster
Bar
jM Now Open
Steamed
Oysters
Served
5:00 P.M.
Til Closing
Store Hours
M -W 11-9
T.F.Sun. 11-10
Sat. 4-10
ain's Platter
Select 4 Items
Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrimp
Clam Strips
Steamed Crab Legs
Shrimp Creole
(Fri. & Sat. Only)
Oysters
Scallops -s
Catfish S
Barbeque
Fried Chicken
All You Can Eat Extravaganza
Fried Chicken
Fried Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Trout
Fried Oysters
Shrimp Creole
Flounder
Deviled Crab
Barbeque
Fried Catfish
Your Choice Of
As Many As
5 Items
7.50
'With Alaskan
Crab Legs
$9.50
Soft Shell
Crabs
2 Large Crab
2 Vegetables
6
Steamed
Shrimp
1 Lb.
(In The Shell)
Baked Potato & Salad
Steamed
Seafood Feast
Alaskan Crab L fqt
Steamed Shrimp
Sauteed Crabmeat
Baked Potato
Salad
6
7





8
I Ml ST R( INIAN
(XTOB1 R J, IW
Glass Arrowhead Found By ECU Professor
GREENViLLI Pieces
carefully chipped glass identified
as arrow! nents have
been found among centuries old
Indian artifacts in a coastal tract
being investigated b E( I scien
tists under a grant from the
America's 1 out Hund n
niversai v Committe ! asi
arolina Hank
' v l archaeologist
believes the glass I tropean
origin and
arrows ol an exl
tribe inhabit
village, ai
l
�lers in v
" 1 he d
be; int
I
as spe
summer dit.
ped the
gonquin
and
� UI fl V'Jlli
HvH
. C

i
broken pots and fragments of
other decorated pipe stems, stone
projectile points, some copper ar-
tifacts, a bear tooth and deer
antlers. A nearly complete
outline of an Indian long house
has been observed in the excava-
tions But the most interesting
find, according to Green, ma be
the two glass arrowhead
fragments.
firsl we found some flakes
-Mass hut then James Holle)
(research assistant) found the tip
a glass point said (ireen.
n another glass point was lin-
gered. Both points are made
�m gi 1 ottle glass.
points could indicate
contact with the English of the
Roanoke voyages said Green.
e) could be from a latei
ips from Jamestown.
W e jon't know yet he
I Hoiie began digg
ing at the site early in July, aftei a
� e turned up some pottery
eld be)
wee' � Mattamuskeet and the
)re ol the Pamlico sound The
Is
resent da 'own
fngelhard, a small farm and
fishing community.
For several years ar-
chaeologists have searched in
vain for the 16th century Indian
village called Pomeiooc generally
believed to be in what is now
Hyde County. The village was
visited by explorers from Sir
Walter Raleigh's 1585 settlement
attempt on Roanoke Island.
"Early maps and drawings by
John White had given us some
idea of where the village was
Green said. "But the maps are
not specific
The village was shown on
White's maps as located on a
stream between Lake Mat-
tamuskeet and Pamlico Sound.
But in two previous surveys by-
archaeologists Cindy Cook and
Loretta Lautzenheizer on 16th
century artifacts were found in
hundreds of acres of fields in
Hyde County. However, their
work helped eliminate several
areas o( the low-lying county as
potential sites.
last May. Green and Holley
set out to conduct a brief follow-
up surve in the same area. Aftei
one-and-a-half weeks of survey-
ing some 700 acres near the lake,
Holley found some small pieces
of pottery in a corn field next to a
field that had previously been
surveyed. The pottery shards
were of the type associated with
late 16th century coastal Indian
culture.
"These were the first artifacts
from the last portion of the late
Woodland Period (ca. A.D.
1500-1650) that had been found
in Hyde County said Green.
Combing the field, they col-
lected more pieces of the pottery
called "Colington Simple-
Stamped Ware The pottery is
characterized by the mixture of
crushed shell in the clay and sur-
faces stamped with a crude criss-
crossed pattern of lines. They
also picked up numerous pieces
of smoking pipes and flakes of
stone chipped off in the process
of making projectile points and
other tools.
"We felt that this was not a
temporary camp site. It appeared
as a good possible candidate for
the village of Pomeiooc Green
said.
The village is best known and
illustrated in the maps and draw-
ings of John White, an artist with
Sir Walter Raleigh's 1585 expedi-
tion and the appointed governor
for the ill-fated Lost Colonv of
1587.
White's drawings show a
relatively small village of mat-
covered huts surrounded by a cir-
cular palisade (wall) constructed
of small poles. Green said tr.e
huts inside the palisade may have
belonged only to the village cl
and spiritual leaders. Other
families probably lived nearbv
White visited the village on Ju-
ly 12, 1585, in the companv ol
Richard Grenville, Ralph Lane
and Thomas Hanoi, who were
among those commissioned by,
Sir Walter Raleigh to establh
colony in the land that had I
claimed for England in ic�
Professors Edit Book About Reagan Policies
georges
ihair designers
For The Latest
In Contemporary
Hair Styling
Bv 1 M 1 M kj
i
tnbutor to the book, told how he oi Civil Rights politically less in-
believed the Reagan administra- fluential by appointing people
with little or no credentials
� the tion made the U.S. Commission
ars"
sen.

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756-6200
The
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CHINESE RESTAURANT
ff)t Luncheon
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only $1.99
Luncheon Buffet 11:30-3:00p.m.
All YOU Can Eat Only $3.95 (Under 6 Free)
More Than 10 Choices
Seafood Dinner Buffet
Friday & Saturday 6 to 9 p.m.
only $6.99
Dinner Includes
Fried Scallops. Fried Shrimp, Fried Fish, King Crab Legs, Sea-
food Delight, Shrimp Fried Rice. Shrimp With Lobster Sauce,
Kung Pao Shrimp, Egg Roll and Soup.
All ABC Permits - Take Outs Welcome
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Open 7 Days A Week
11:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m.
756-9687
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(Located Corner Of Dickinson & Memorial Dr.)
15 Ft. Wchfes on a &ft.S�eeo
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ttARSK'sSutftSrft,
Twinkle, T
B Mt.PHr.N MU.KHIS
� ��
"Sr
lashes of light thai a -
dark skit ol
Sailors used to aus
journey b) them,
on them. Iherf
there isn't even a St. ; ��
"The) ma U
going .
just hk
drama-
rou.
"M e 're all goini
It our tin
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filled
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Coke
Is It!
By C APP IVEV
Miff ttntrf
-
thn .
however. Coke be.
the cola market a .
million consumer
product. To bring
Coke" to the market, the c
pany launched an ad
campaign won
and sales incre
read
The ; eas
ed the
response to the failure
"New Coke This enhanced
company's success ccordii .
Roberto Goizueta, the Coca-(
chairman, the adve
paign vv,a- noi a p
Coke sa
Shoi
"Coke
companv beg i
�lion line.
sweatsl
label hu the rr a
sumc- started fc
These 1
are the essence
temporary ass . .
sue.
of the clothes. The sw�
are available m u
with flashes
desu
The stone-washed dei
sim 1 'he Lev? supet
jeans. The capn-cut give
silhouette look, a popula
One F
By Warren Baker
"They really trip my gourd.
you know Dave said casuallv as
he knocked a dent out of his 1964
Ford Fairlane. Dan looked
his head nodding in approval
"All they do is get in the dan
way Dan said. He handed Dave
a ball peen hammer "Don'� I
the tally board
On the driver's side, little bicv
cle caricatured with x's on e
drawing sat perfectly aligner
rows of ten. They looked
branded cyclists similar
bicycle signs that adorn
I taaaaoaiMtt





ofessor

ges
signers
l test
oorarv
?
ATION
ig Beds
7C
756-6200
�����
Ceeo
I Ml I NI i K() INIAN
Features
CK lOBIR 3, 198?
Twinkle, Twinkle
Little Stars
Bv s I-Pill-N sIHKBIN
� ��
S. Imo's Fire is the electric
�' light that appear in
h ikies, out of nowhere.
used to guide their whole
r'te b them, hut the joke's
"i. There is no tire
i isn e en a St. Elmo.
made if up, to keep them
ig � hen the going got tough,
n make up our own
us through the
all going through this.
time on the edge. "
BUI) Hixx
"Si. I Imo s f ire"
w
see s. I ��
few
an; m er. Ii ga e
. E
pertorm-
v.
Coke
Is It!
BPP IVE
I
siff V�rhrr
I Pepsi have
fl nk wars
pas! ear,
k � � egan slipping in
: :gan a $4
esl for a new
"New
market, the c
an advertising
h millions. Stocks
the product
my then releas-
ke f lassie" in
e failure of the
' This enhanced the
jeeess. According to
'ueta, the Coca-Cola
an, the adertising cam-
� " 'a plot to increase
but was it ?
only after the release of
ke Classic the Coca-Cola
began producing a
line Jeans, blouses and
sweatshirts bearing the Coke
: the market, and the con-
started buying.
These ready-to-wear fashions
are the essence of everything con-
temporary. Classic, cool-weather
sweatshirts add to the sporty style
the clothes. The sweatshirts
are available in whites and blues
with flashes of reds in various
designs
The stone-washed denims are
similar to the L.evi super straight
jeans. The capri-cut gives the
silhouette look, a popular style
lives ol these seven developing a
tors?
The starring roles were played
bv Emilio Estevez, Demi Moore,
Rob 1 owe. Andrew McCarthy,
Allv Sheedy, Judd Nelson and
Mare Winningham - a group Col-
umbia Pictures calls "an outstan-
ding ensemble of some of today 's
most talented, accomplished and
handsome young actors
Rob I owe is probably the best
known cor in the group Aside
from his portrayal of Billy Hixx,
the talented but irresponsible sav
ophone player in St. Elmos I irt .
I owe has received high marks in
such films as Class, The H
t Hampshire, Oxford Blues,
Youngblood and The Outsiders
Lowe has more ol a California
style about him. using terms like
radical, happening, and gnarley.
He is verv serious about his
showbiz career. He attends
Hollywood parties and screenings
with such fervent regularity that
many of his have dubbed him
"Shecky Show hi" and "Warren
Bcatty of the Eighties
I owe apparently has an exp
sive streak in him. Ac s I
Elizabeth kae, a Rolling Stone
writer, "His house is a I gl tech
.eior's paradise" thai I owe
had redesigned and d tted. It
i a has gray carpeting, black
and blue linoleum, pale-orchid
and blue walls and tiled sun!
bathtub
maid � i gift I
foster with whom he filmed The
Hotel ew Hampshire.
His closets contain clothes
from Segal and Charivari, and
his stereo and video set-ups are
nothing short of the finest. He
even has a restored 1950s black
leather diner booth in his kitchen.
It is not hard to image that
1 owe has expensive tastes,
however. His last two pictures
�ssed him $400,000 each.
Still, he has no illusions that it
could all disappear as quickly as
ii came. Says 1 owe, "I'm going
for the highest level o success in
this business, unilaterally, and
you don't get a lot of mistakes at
that
Mare Winningham, starred in
St. Elmo's fire as Wendy
Beamish, the socially conscious
good spot; hopelessly infatuated
with Billy Hixx (I owe). In her
early twenties, she already has an
Emmy Award to her credit as
Best Supporting Actress
Amber Waves which she received
il 1980.
Judd Nelson played lec
Newberry, the resident politician
Is ambil igh to
rifice his ideals I icceed in
Talented new star Andrew McCarthy (center) is shown here in one
s He is one of the hottest young actors in show business today
but never
�lends.
Nelson says he hates being
simply beca is I his ac
fame. "My iod, suddenly 1 have
like a hui
But I don't I � m best
friends he explains. "Moths, as
1 understand it. are attracted to
the light, and moths don't want
bewhal a drag to be a
moth
Emilio 1-steve played Kirbo
Kreager. Kirbo is an aspiring law
student who almost leaves his
career behind to reinterest a
:�'throb.
Estevez is also trie soi ol actor
Martin Sheehan. He is elated,
-ever, that he has been ah'�
his film career with
er's reputation.
He has performed in Tex, The
Outsiders, Repo Man and The
Breakfast Club.
The character of Julianna
"Jules" Van Patten is brought to
life in St. Elmo's Fire by Demi
Moore. Jules is sophisticated
beyond her years and recruited
right out of college to be an inter-
national banker. She is saddled
with the responsibility for a dying
stepmother that she despises.
Blame It On Rio, Young Doc-
tors in Love, Xo Small Affair
and General Hospital have
featured Moore's abilities as an
actress, as well.
of his recent films Heaven Help
Actresses do a lot of promo-
tional trips for movies and they
usually get treated quite well.
Moore worries that she may be
getting spoiled. "When we go on
these trips she explains, "the
studio takes care of everything.
They take care of our room, our
room service, our telephone calls,
the transportation, and once you
get treated like that, with the best
hmos and the best hotels,
know, you don't want to lose
perspective She continues.
Please See El MO, page 11
Not So Right?
Cappy Ivev models the new Coca-Cola clothing line available
trend of the '80s.
The varsity vest is one of the
many variations of this season's
Coke line. The vest can be coor-
dinated with any of the solid blue
of eggshell over-sized shirts. A
double wrap would be an inex-
pensive accessory and would add
a flashy touch.
Also included in the Coke fall
fashions are the paisley print
blouses. These blouses give new
femininity to simple shapes and
evocative autumn colors-greens,
russets and touches of gold.
All of these fashions are
available at Belk-Tyler Co. and
other major department stores
across the country. According to
Anna Fernandez, a buyer for
Belk-Tyler Co. in Washington,
N.C the clothes are doing
quite well. The consumers seem
to enjoy the new Coke fashions.
They consider the clothes all-
American with the reds, whites,
and blues and the classic Coke
designs
Coke's spring line will be arriv-
ing soon in soft pastel colors and
Pfco.o t) Mrphen Shrrbin
at Belk-Tyler in Greenville.
prints
So, if you haven't done so
already, start creating your own
casual and comfortable wardrobe
with this year's new Coke line.
The styles are appropriate for
weekends and fun-filled times.
Although the "New Coke"
was a failure, "Classic Coke"
has succeeded. The fashion line,
a classic also, will surely boast
future sales for the Coca-Cola
Company.
By PATMOI I.OV
suff �nirr
C kay, here we go again. Time
to get serious � enough
about the trivialities of life.
Enough about the joggers and
boozers, the satanie messages
planted in records, enough about
the absurdities that are commer-
cials. Enough said about
cheerleaders with too many teeth,
and names such as Candi, Sandy
and Dawn. No, it's time to move
on; it's time to "broaden my
horizons as it were.
I've reached the age where the
majority of my friends are mar-
ried � or at least engaged. Folks,
I'm 22. Now I realize this is
neither a great admission, nor a
cause for sympathy; however, I
long for the days when 1 was 18.1
had no worries when I was
younger � save for getting the
car from dad, or whether or not I
was finally going to be allowed to
use the Trojan I had carried in
my wallet for six months. Yeah,
life was more simple then, and
remembering those days, I have
to wonder why anybody would
complicate his life with a thing
such as marriage.
1 have dated a few women for
extended periods of time, and the
relationships always ended in tur-
moil. I don't blame the women at
all; it was I who obviously
couldn't handle the emotional
commitment. I mean, I just
couldn't see staying with the
same person for 60 years; that's
an awfully long time to be putting
your teeth in the same glass, isn't
it"1 Then come the anniversaries.
I am naturaliv forgetful; I
simply don't place much
significance on duvs best left
forgotten. I have no desire to
celebrate my 60th anniversary
with a person who can no longer
control her bladder. I'm quite
certain she wouldn't want to
spend her last years with an old
reprobate who watches reruns of
"Gilligan's Island reeks of
Pabst Blue Ribbon and leaves the
toilet lid up when company is
over. Someone should write a let-
ter to the producers of "The
Love Boat "and tell those people
that their show is a bunch of
crapola. Love just isn't that sim-
ple. I figure a modern marriage is
good for two to three years �
four tops. After that, people
simply run out of things to say to
each other.
Think about it. What do
couples do for the first three
years of marriage0 They ball their
brains out, right? Then what?
They spend the last year of their
marriage talking about it.
There's not much left then � ex-
cept maybe "Monday Night
Football" and "General
Hospital No thank you. I much
prefer the single life � although
eating peanut butter and crackers
can be a tad monotonous. I have
yet, however, to lose an argument
myself.
This leaves me with girlfriends.
They're a curious species,
girlfriends. I view them as sort of
mini-wives. Notice, if you will,
that when you have a girlfriend,
the relationship begins to go
Please see WHY, page 11
One For The Road!
B Warren Baker
suff S ni�
"They really trip my gourd,
you know Dave said casually as
he knocked a dent out of his 1964
ford Fairlane. Dan looked on,
his head nodding in approval.
All they do is get in the darn
way Dan said. He handed Dave
a ball peen hammer. "Don't hurt
the tally board
On the driver's side, little bicy-
cle caricatured with x's on each
drawing sat perfectly aligned in
rows of ten. They looked like
branded cyclists similar to the
bicycle signs that adorn quiet
neighborhoods.
Dave grinned at Dan as he took
his oil-stained rag and polished
one of the bike riders' terror-
filled faces. To some people, the
D&D brothers are heroes; to
bicyclists, the D&D brothers are a
nightmare on four wheels.
"It's sort of a public service,
you know Dave said as the
hammer's blows rang on the
Fairlane's white metal body.
"Normal bike riders we have no
gripes with. They ride on the
right side of the road and don't
cut in front of oncoming cars
"That's the majority of
cyclists Dan continued. "We
usually take care of the ones that
ride on the sidewalks and the
ones that don't obey the rules of
the road
"That's where we come in
Dave said.
Dan leaned up against the car
and tossed the hammer to Dave.
"You know Dan said, "I'm
a business major with a three-oh
average, and I don't have to take
that crap from bicycle riders who
think they own the durn
sidewalk
Dave popped open a cold one
and nodded his head.
"He's right Dave said after a
Please see BIKERS, page 12





p
Hj EAST KOMMAN OCTOBER3.198
(TTRTRNYNPHtN A- SHERBN and BR.AN K
CLASSIFICATION: TOP SECRET
CODE NAME: PROJECT MARATHON
MISSION: INFILTRATI
INVESTIGATION OF THE
RESTAURANT
By Sovelove and Cherry
ON AND
MARATHON
Pl4f6: 560 EVANS
NORTH CAROLINA
STREET, GREENVILLE,
in Green
BRIEFING: The Marathon is the place to go
e, for Greek food that is authentic in every respect
They have been serving the same loyal customers for nearly
seven years
Greek salad, Souvlaki sanaWhes, and Aegean grilled cheese
are only a few of the selections you'll find there But if you r
one for Greek food, still the Marathon has something for you
Subs pizza, or trad,tional burgers and sandwiches are also
available, and the Marathon serves different daily specials seven
days a week.
The Marathon made its debut back in 1 978 and has been going
strong ever s.nce Owner'operator Dimitri Koutavas has done
most of the cooking since the place opened
Greek beer and Greek w,ne are things you'll find in no other
restaurant in town, and they're definitely worth sampling
AGENT'S REPORT: We talked with the
Koutavas, and asked h,m what his speaalty is. He rep
tverythmg. I mQke everything special He prepare
Greek food with the aid of his partner, N,ck Panted
certain that everything is prepared in exactly the sar
every time, to ensure p-oduct consistency
A unique Greek pastry, baklava proves that the fe
dients the better the taste Baklava is prepared with pc
honey, and fresh-chopped walnuts and baked until it
brown Simple ingredients make tor a deliciously swe.
� ir mouth delight
But the most popular th.ng I have is my stet
says Koutavas "Sometimes I sell over 200 of then
steak and cheese sub is just that steak and crees.
tomato, mayonna.se and fried onions � . . k
Of the Greek wine and beer Koutavas say
to order mv wine and beer three or four vee
a long time to ship it here all the wav from Greece "
Two of the menu items the Sou -
nowhere else and it you're not familiar vs th Greet I
bably don't know about Souviaki (pronounced -
po tenderloin, mannated in spices and o
terness Gyro (jee roi is iamb, formed ii I
� sseried tor hours to bring out the flavor ar �
� which the Gyro dishes are prepared. Both are ,
' -ou haven' tried them .� �
RECOMMENDATIONS: mvew
freshness of the food, and the variety ot rrw
Marathon is an e ceptionally good value
The Marathon is also within walking distance of campu
youd prefer they also deliver Free, of course
prices are very reasonable, perfect for the cc
budget, and a great idea for the student who doesn -
a ride
� MISSION ACCOMPLISHED �
W0t
Process & Printi
i
i
1312C per print i
Now $4.73
C urolina East Mall
i
756-6078
OPI N MON SA1
8 M to 9 I'M
II
I
I
I
If
I
I
NOW AVAILABLE IN OUR SHOP!
� CONTACT
A Novel by Carl Sagan
� DANCING IN THE LIGHT
by Shirley Madame
�THE SECRETS OF HARRY BRIGHT
by Joseph Wambaugh
� TEXAS
by James A. Michener
CENTRAL BOOK
NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open til 9.30 PM Seven Days A Week
Sv
"For The v i
Wants To Dress r
October 5th is Homecoming at ECU. So why not
dress in style with a new outfit by:
Union Bay - 100 Cotton Sweater
Cotler - 100 Wool Blend Dress Pants
Koman - 100 Cotton Dress Shirts
We also have Pierre Cardin argile socks Paisley
ties, and Kangol Hats.
Be the hit of the ball game,
Come to the Style Shop - Plaza Mall
10 off for all ECU students
Hours 10 9 MS Go PlVotes!
4�
American Legion Agricultural
IP
�to
2�
After the Homecoming Festivities
on Saturday, Come to the Great
Pitt County Fair. It will operate
Saturday Night as long as you are
there. Don't forget that tonight is
College Night. Students admitted
for $1.50 with ECU ID for the Pitt
County Fair-Eastern Carolina's
Greatest Regional Exposition.
1

I.
i!


i
� fim

���
Super
Salad Bar
$1.99
ALL YOU CAN EAT
For The Month of September
Until 10:00 p.m. 7 Days a Week
Sunday Night Lasagna Special
i:

i
i
I:


ii
'i

�i
I!

ECU
Homecoming
Corsages
$2.99
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Flower Boutique
601 E Greenville BIvd
$3.50
Elmo Sti
f Pa�e v
" because you can get
to ' � kxI they can tre
and how good thmgs can be
know h� there's some'
� A"d
eas; Ad ail disappe.
Ke
performed by �
k ' � owe, Heaven Ht
otl
e on th .
more oi a
sh-
ews be
� were very .
They were great. B
� .
� �
I
Sore
If You Arelnterel
A New Soror:
There Wi
General Meet!
At 6:30 In
Mendei
��l�Ci�iiMI�iS�iiM �
IV
QLStt.
TheSp
Paradi
and 5tr
- Sat
TheE(





IHJ I AS! AKOI IMAN
CK UiH H 1 1983
11
? ��������,
if111
???
mg
es
3.50
Elmo Stars Deal With Fame
Liniffiiniiiiiiir
i ontinued fron Page
because you can gel so used
to how good !he ean treat you,
and how good things can he. you
know when there's something
wrong And you can sec how
easily m could all disappear
hat's it like to begin a jour-
nalism career at the obituary desk
a Washington newspaper?
Kcvm Dolenz would he the one to
ask
I he character of Dolenz was
performed b Andrew Mc arthy
who has also starred in ('lass with
Rob I owe, Heaven Help Us, and
McCarthy is earthy than the
ers when it comes to plac
importance on things He comes
across as more of a "black
sheep nd he is uncomfortable
. interviews because of a point
ealized while watching Judd
�n, il Sheedy and Rob
1 owe on the Donahue show.
they were very good and they
were er charming and in-
telligent and funny and stuff.
I'hev were great. But it kept
gnawing at the back of my head:
l hat J� k do we have to
say? We're twenty-two year-old
kids. There're people in fVkmg
Beirut getting killed, and we're
talking about how we're suffer
ing or we're out there or we're
happy or we're sad. 1 mean, oui
lives are very dramatic and real to
us, and we feel all the pains and
whatever that anybody does at
any age. But they're only impoi
tant to us
Last, but by far the least, is the
femme fatale that has stolen
man a young man's heart today
Ally Sheedy portrayed the suhsh
aspiring architect, I eslie Hunter
unable to commit herself to mar
nage to her live-m bofriend.
Alec (Nelson).
Sheedy debuted in Bad Boys
with Sean Penn and ha.s since
starred in It argames, Oxford
Blues, rhe Breakfast Club, and
television's Hill Street Blues
At twenty-three years old,
Sheed, too, fears losing all the
glamour and attention, but more
important to her is to avoid suc-
cumbing to the corruption of try
ing to keep it now thai she ha il
"I love my work fhere's
nothing else I'd rather do, but 1
see pitfalls. I he mam pitfall o
success is fear that you are going
to fail confides Sheedy. "Peo
pie get control cray thinking '1
have to do something to keep it
now that 1 have it
"1 don't like living in fear oi
being corrupted she continues.
"I don't want to live :n fear, and
I don't want to live in corruption
either
Notoriety isn't always a good
thing Many people, including
these rising siais, need to feel that
they are ordinary as well. It boils
down to a sense oi relation, the
need to be "one oi the gang
but in their field it's going m be
tough.
Why Marry

tiUllfUlintnTTn
( ontinued from Page V
downhill much faster than in
marriage It's true. If I date a girl
for two w eks, she considers it a
license to raise hell and throw
things at me. And we argue
Lawsy, lawsy, lawsy, do we
argue. Only our arguments aren't
over the national debt; no, our
arguments are over things of
much more importance � like
who is going to sleep on the wet
spot. Believe it people � it's an
important issue when you're
sleeping on a single bed. See what
spending eight hours a day �
every day with the same person
can do to your mind0
My purpose in writing this is
simply to warn people about
what to expect trom a relation-
ship. Once you get involved,
not only have to watch your butt,
but your companions as well �
see why things were so much
easier when you were younger0
I have a warning tor guy
are in a relationship now, but
don't wish to see it progress too
far. Men, if you don't want a per-
manent relationship, all you have
to do is keep track of your shirts
Once your girlfriend starts to
borrow your shirts, "because
they remind her of you head
tor the door because talk about
marriage isn't too far behind.
��� � � .
New
Sorority
If You Are Interested In Forming
A New Sorority At ECU,
There Will Be A
General Meeting Tonight
At 6:30 In Room 221
Mendenhall.



:

� ��7
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
November 27-December 1,1985
Spend your Thanksgiving holidays in style in New York . . . Macy's Parade, Broadway
plays, galleries, museums, shopping, and touring the city. Prices for the trip are:
� 99.00 per person in a quad occupancy room
� $115.00 per person in a triple occupancy room
� SI30.00 per person in a twin occupancy room
� $180.00 per person in a single occupancy room
Included in prices are transportation and hotel accomodations.
A limited number oi theatre tickets for Radio City Music Hall, Cats, The Odd Couple,
and 42nd Street are reserved for purchasing in the Central Ticket Office.
Contact the ECU Central Ticket Office, 757-6611, ext. 266, for more information.
Sponsored n the Student I'nion Travel C ommittee
t. ��. '
The Spirit of ECU
Parades down Elm
and 5th Streets
- Saturday 10:00a.m.
The Clydesdales & The
Pirates invade Ficklen
Join the pep rally
-Friday 7:00 p.m.
ECU Pirates vs Miami
Hurricanes 2:00 p.m.
The ECU Student Union presents live in concert
THESPONGETONES

on the mall
Sunday 2:00 p.m.
HOMECOMING '85 -
OCTOBER 4,5 & 6
HOMECOMING IS AN SGA FUNDED ACTIVITY
I





12
THE EAST CAttfH NIAN
IHIOHIK 1. 1985
Playhouse Festivities Bikers Beware
1 he American musical comedy the wicked pirates thet.ck.n u -�- ? M A �
The American musical coined)
version of Sir James Barnes fan
tasy Peter Pan will be presented
by the East Carolina Playhouse
al 8:15 p.m. Oct. 9-12, with a
special matinee performance at
2:15 p.m. Oct. 12 in ECU's
McGinnis Theatre.
Produced last July by the East
Carolina Summer Theatre (the
professional company in
residence on the ECU campus
each year), the production
features a new cast, who will use
the same costumes and scenery of
the professional company.
The story of the show, which
focuses on a little boy who
wouldn't grow up. has not been
altered from the original novel by
Barne; it is the same Broadway
musical in which Mary Martin
Ntarred as Peter in New York dur-
ing the 1954-55 season and in the
first television spectacular on a
nationwide network in the spring
of 1955.
The Darling children still fly
right out their nursery window to
partake of high adventure in
Sever-Never Land, populated
with fearsome pirates, renegade
Indians and incredible animals.
Tinker Bell, the entrancing lit-
tle fairy who speaks only with
blinking lights and tinkling
sounds, is still helps save the
children from a terrible fate.
Wendy mothers the little lost
boys; Peter does noble battle with
the wicked pirates, the ticking
crocodile pursues Captain Hook -
and good still triumphs over evil.
The epilogue written by Barrie
for his book "Peter and Wendy"
is not normally used in stage pro-
ductions but is presented in this
musical. That's because "it's the
perfect way to emphasize Peter's
immortality said Director
Edgar Loessin. In addition, there
are such popular songs as "I'm
Flying "I've Got To Crow
the nonsensical Indian number
called "Lgg-A-Wugg and the
rebellious theme song of the
motherless boys, "I Won't Grow
Up
Light and shadow play very
important roles in the musical.
The important shadow is Peter
Pan's own, and at the beginning
of the show, he is in search of his
lost shadow.

Also of note are the acting
auditions for Anton Chekhov's
drama THE THREE SISTERS
which will be held Thursday and
Friday, October 3 and 4, in the
Messick Theatre Arts Center at
the corner of Fifth and Eastern
Mreets on the campus of East
Carolina University in Green-
ville. The auditions will begin
each evening at 7:30 pm in room
205. Considered to be one of the
finest dramas of the 20th century
THE THREE SISTERS is about'
three young women who share a
desire to escape the tedium of a
provincial town and return to the i
bright lights and excitement of
Moscow. The play has 22 roles to
u nast by direct�r Cedric Win-
chell. Most of the actors should
be capable of performing
characters in their 20's; however
there are two parts for men in
their 60's, one role for a woman
in her 60's, and several roles for
men and women in their 30's and
40 s Scripts are available for
reading in the ECU Joyner
tlSca7.Rfvc Readin8 Room.
THE THREE SISTERS will also
be part of the East Carolina
Playhouse's 1985-86 production
season Performances are
scheduled for November 20-23 in
McGinnis Th.atre. ECU
students, faculty, staff and local
residents are all invited to audi-
nc�,r,Jurther rmation
call 757-6390 in Greenville.
Greenville, N.C The piM
County American Legion
Agricultural Fair, which runs un-
til Saturday, got its 66th season
under way Monday. Plans have
been under way since November
of 1984 to make the 1985 Fair the
largest and finest fair in North
Carolina east of Raleigh
The Pitt County Fair
September 30 thru October 5.
1985truly Eastern North
Carolina's Greatest Regional Ex-
position! Attendance �oal for
)0(MKs)nr
j&ssi.axvvxw" beCTdov.Hna
( ontinued from Page 9
long gulp. "I'm into nuclear
physics, myself. One day, Dan
and I decided to get together and
pick up some of the chores that
Campus Security misses
"We used to have a nice Cor-
vette with purple and gold
stripes. Then one day, we see this
moped cruisin' between people
on the sidewalk. I gun the engine,
Dave pops open the passenger
door
"We don't do mopeds
anymore Dave said soberly.
Dave grinned at Dan.
"People think we just try to
hurt people Dave said. "That's
not true, of course. In fact, we
have an insider working at the
rescue squad. He usually follows
us around picking up the pieces
hurdlers. It's usually vroom,
crash, jump. It's so neat. We're
thinking of asking Intramurals to
make our idea into a sporting
event. Vroom, crash, jump.
That'd be neat
Dan took a beer out of the
cooler and drained half the can.
"You know Dan began, "we
just want to make the sidewalks
safe for the pedestrians
Brewster and all of a sudden you
hear 'tic-tic-tic-tic-tic'? You turn
around and it's too late. That
sucker's right up on you, and
you've got thin tread marks on
your face
"That's the most irritating
damned thing in the world
Dave concurred. "Some of those
bikes seem to creep up in you. It's
like a silent attack. I think CBS is
doing a documentary on it
Something like. The Unheard
Enemy: An ECU Deception
"Then you have those guys
who ride down the road facing torrorrow
oncoming traffic. That's against Dave grinned as
the law, for gosh sakes
"They don't do it when they
get doored Dave said, his face
solemn with a sense of purpose.
"Some people think we're
vigilantes said Dave. "We like
to think of ourselves as protec-
tors of the pedestrians
Dave picked up the hammer
and started pounding on the cat
door
"We just need to keep the ol'
car in shape for our next rende-
vous Dave ,aid
"But first, as always Dan in-
terjected, "studies come first
I've got an ECON tes'
he sipped his


r

r
Heineken
"You're right Dave chimedl
in. "Got a big nuke history test
coming up.

m
- - �' ssw
JOHNNY WEATHINGTON
Phone 752 3318
EL TORO
Men's Hair Styling
V �
��
28001
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
� Cleaning done by the doctor
� Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert C arill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenvile, NC
758-4927
� . ��� w,
Mum Corsages $6.00
with purple & gold bow and football
Rose Bouquets $5.00
Also Rose Corsages and More!
We Use Only The Treshest
Tlowers
1
I

r�
)
GREENVILLE
Chicken&Biscuits
Chicken & Biscuits
OPEN 24 HOURS CALL 758 2098
football Tail-(,atinK Chicken
Buckets At Special Prices:
- Buckets - � edl - -
6Pc BUCKET(&2bi ,its
9Pc BUCKET 8.31
'2Pc BUCKE S. 4
15-Pc BUCKET & i
c BUC" u.ti 16 59s 305
COUPON
FREECHICKEN BISCUIT
BUY ONE CHICKENS ES4
VED LI
CHICKEN BISCUIT ABSOLUTELY FREE!
res December 3' ' 985-
Classifi
VI
U 74
� 48
S3 79
FOR Sfi
tx
Newman
Catholic Student Center
I
I
I
I
I
!
953 E. 10th Street
Greenville, NC27834
Saturday
Campus Mass Schedule
; 5:30 p.m. in the Biology Lecture Hall Rm 103
I Sunda:
I Q-m� am' in !he B,�,0gy Lecture Hal1 (Rm. 103)
9.00 p.m. at the Newman Center
f Wednesday:
�?���Newman Cemer ,f0"� bdinner i
eWma,VCenterisoPendailyfrom8-30am to I
ECU Student Special -
Carpet Remnants
Extra
20
Off
Regular Discount Price
With Copy of This Ad.
Over 600 Remnants
All Sizes
Bring Your Own Measurements & Save Ti
me
mnT re
y Bf�i I L Pruiiairrc umvi
ROLLS. REMNANTS VINYL WALLPAPER & TILE
100 DICKINSON Alt N(t
758-0057 v�T�r
NEEDTYPiNG l
rOOV FOR Rf
�ING SERVICES
TL m rmnr
All Weekl
Eligible F
Must Be
All
AL
mimmniimox
i





r HI fcASI C AROLINIAN
OCTOBER 3, 1985
13
Doonesburv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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Biscuits
uits
4 4
S3 79

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. - . .

7. .N
.
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Classifieds
SALE
�"OR SALE: Commodore VIC 20
ter with a hookups anc some
ling: 6 qame 'apes
e recor � ier
r a th tei � Dro
� �, p f
� expansion cart� lg and
refei "anuais S200 Call An
5366 or 7 52 '346
need typing etters Resume's,
apers etc Call Karen at
498
:OOM FOR RENT: Cose to cam
I . . � - � � md utii �
58 7640 i � � ,vation.
FREE!
TYPING SERVICES: Pa'
ar a ��
all formats, proofreading & spelling
corrections included Low rates
757 0398 after 5pm
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
'ronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Cal Janice at 355 7233 after 5 30
USED TIRES FOR SALE: Good
price, any size guaranteed Call
757 1247.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: And
wora processing. Term papers,
reports resume's, letters, etc.
Reasonable rates Call Teresa a?
758 4509 work or 355 6794 after 6
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Skylark
Green and tan 4 door Air condition
ing. P S. Am Fm Stereo Tilt Wheel
Great shape S3 500 or S5O0 down ano
take over payments of $148 a month
or best offer Call 758 2174 between
9am 5pm Ask for Tony
TYPING SERVICES: Provided by a
professional woman with IBM Cor
reeling Selectric typewriter
Familiar with ail styles Call Debbie
at 756 6333
FOR SALE: 19" Peugot ten speed
t ike Great condition. Call 752 1642
FOR SALE: 2 Smith Corona
typewriters, like new $30 each Call
756 4514 206 Berkshire Rd Green
ville, NC 27834
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience m typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names ano addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU Students S
and F Professional Computer Co
11111111111111 Hill
(Back of Franklin's) 757 0472
TAILORED PRODUCTS: Men's &
women's alterations Located in the
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Mon. Fri 9 6. 756 3"12.
FOR SALE: Sunn Bass AmpPower
Amp 200 watts Call 757 0558 after 5
FOR SALE: Stero System
AMFM Dual Cassette $200 Hide
a bed Sofa and 2 chairs $250
757 0039 or 758 7020 ask for Wade
FOR S-LE: Twin Size Bed Matress
and box springs $20 Call 758 5747
or 752 7774 and ask for Denise
STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE:
Moving into an apartment and have
too much furniture? Call us at
758 5449 Prices vary depending
upon size and number of pieces
PUPPIES FOR SALE. AKC
Chocolate Labrador Retriever Pup
pies These pups are "magnums"
Weight 3lbs at 2 weeks old
Wormed and ready 10 19 85 $200
Chris Smith 793 9205
PERSONALS
MALE SENIOR: Needs a date to
homecoming This is not a marriage
proposal just a date Call Mike at
752 2692.
McGARRET FIVE O: You might
make the play offs if you qet a real
Quarterback!
T.C.M.G.D.I Get a due No trat
wants you ignorance is bliss1
TO MY BIG BROTHER TINO:
You're the damn best! Oops, sorry
about the cussing! Peanutbutter
cookies & don't forget the rose! Par
ty at Homecoming! Love Ya! Your
hi SiS
CHOPPIN: Get ready to throw aown
at Homecoming! I can't wait! Love
Ya, CJ
SIG EPS: DON'T THINK that this
weekend isn't going to be a blast
'cause it is Love Your little
Sisters
KAREN: Looking forward to this
weekend I hope you will be able tc
hang By the way, what time do you
have to go on Sunday0 John
AOTT'S: Are you ready for a pa'r
are ou ready for some
fun . Cocktail is here ana so are
roasts get psyched!
STUDENTS Become a trained stu
dent volunteer ana help promote
responsible decisions concerning
alcohol Annual membership drive,
for ECU Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will be Wednesday. Oct
9th at 5 p m in Allied Health room
101 All old and new members en
couraged to attend
NEW STUDENT REVUES
Formerly the Freshman Register,
will be distributed beginning the
week of Oct 7th if you or your
parents purchased one, come by the
Buccaneer office 2nd floor Publica
tions Bldg between 9 am and 5
p rn and pick it up You MUST have
your ID car
NEED CASH&: instant loans on
stereor, TV's, gold, silver or any
valuable items Southern Gem &
Pawn 752 2464
LOST: Gray Persian cat wearing
white flea collar Lost in Easfbrook
area If found please call 757 2687
Sentimental attachement Reward
offered
JILL: Enjoyed the lunch the other
day! Next time bring the whole
sorority
ZBT: All Brothers, Pledges and Lit
tie Sisters are reminded of the
Champagne Breakfast at the house
on Saturday at 10 a m. and the post
game cookout immediately follow
ing. Congratulations to our new
pledge class member, Russ, and the
new little sister initiates See ya on
Saturday
SIG EPS: Be ready for one jammin'
weekend1 Don't party too
hard, save yourselves for the ONE
AND ONLY Champagne Breakfast'
JULIE, KAREN, JENNIFER,
WARIA, JANIE AND WENDY: Be
ready to throw down this
weekend! Michael, Tim, Robert,
James, Alex and Joe
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom Apt m Wilson Acres. Call
758 7244 Ask for Jamie
RIDE NEEDED FOR FALL
BREAK: TO NORTHERN
FLORIDA Jacksonville or
Tal1 ihassee Will help pay for gas
Call 758 4682
ROOMMATE WANTED. To share 2
bedroom apt $142 50 . utilities
Call 752 4270, ask for Ken
HELP WANTED: Sales clerK, no ex
per ence necessary Saturday work
reauired Good personally, neat ap
pearfce, dependability a must
Convienent hours Call 1 946 9551
HELP WANTED: Part time sales
clerk stock person No experience
necessary Flexible hours Neat ap
pearence and dependability re
WANTED: Chest of drawers If have
one to sell call 758 7481 after 5 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Non smoker to share 2 bedroom
trailer $175 a month includes
utilities, cable and basic phone 4
miles from campus
BABYSITTER NEEDED: RN seek
mg weekend babysitter � evenings
References needed Please respond
to PO Box 4205, Greenville, NC
27834
DELIVERY PERSONS: Needed im
mediatly Must be 18 yrs old need
car with insurance and valid
driver's license Apply at Speedy
Reedy's, 2711 E 10th St Greenville,
NC
ROOMMATE NEEDED: A 4th
roommate is needed to share a 6
bedroom, 2 story house on 14th St
across from the ECU Strength Com
plex Rent is $125 per month
deposit and '4 utilities The
available bedroom also comes with
a small s.tting room. If interested
contact 752 5895
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Christian
roommate needed to share 2
bedroom duplex $135 includes
utilities 1 a bath. Call 756 8676 after
5 30
RIDE NEEDED: Looking for a ride
to New Jersey for Fall Break Can
leave at 1 p.m Oct. 18th. Will pay for
part of the gas. Call 752 0796, ask for
Dan
CORRESPONDENCE My name is
Robert L. Hollins and I am seeking
friendship, understanding and a let
ter exchange with anyone that is
willing to write! We can only be
strangers once I am a black male of
38 Write to Robert L. Hollins
06519 016, Delta Unit, F.P.S PO
Box 14550, Memphis, Tennessee
38184 0550
THE FAB SIDE
quired Can 1 946 9551
Presents
Our
Special
END
OF THE
WEEK PARTY
FREE ADMISSION FRIDAY
Oct. 4, 3:30 til 7:30
RAFFLE
FOR
$50!
AH Weekly Winners Are
Eligible For Grand Prize Drawing: Expense Paid Trip For Two
To The
t
Must Be Present To Win
All Cans 85C
ALL DAY
n
BAHAMAS!
Spring Break
1986
lllllllllllllH.il
��������������-�����������������
iiiiiifuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiniii
i





I HI EAS1 CAROI INIAN
Pirates Ready For
Sports
OCTOBER V 1985
Page 14
By RICK McCORM AC
&
scon COOPER
NfKr1� Mil,in
After a home loss to the Tem-
ple Owls last week. ECU will
have to regroup when they host
Miami (Ela.) this weekend for
homecoming.
The Hurricanes, coming off a
vengeful 45-10 drubbing over
Boston College last week, pose a
powerful ground attack with a
better-than-average passing
game.
"Miami has the type o offense
that makes things happen ECl
assistant coach Rex Sponhalt
said. "Their skill people pose a
threat every time the ball is snap-
ped
Leading the potent Hurricane
attack will be junior quarterback
Vinnie Testaverde, who inherits
the spot vacated by former all-
America Bernie Kosar. However,
the Pirate coaching staff believes
that the quarterback position is
still in good hands.
"Testaverde is perhaps the best
drop-back passer that we will
face all year coach Art Baker
stated. "He is just as good a
passer as Kosar, but probably is
more agile and mobile. He's very
dangerous
ECU coach Rex Sponhalt,
who scouted the Hurricanes in
their victory over Boston College
last week, agrees with Baker's
assessment of the 6-5, 218 pound
signal caller from Elmont, NY.
"He's very elusive and plays a
heads-up game Sponhalt said.
"He complements everything
Kosar did. He's in that same
class
Although the Hurricanes are
solid at the quarterback position,
ECU is still searching for
answers. With Ron Jones remain-
ing the starter, the Pirates have
made some changes as junior
Darrell Speed has been working
out at the split end spot. The
number two quarterback position
is currently held by freshman
Brad Walsh. The Pirate offense
hasn't shown the consistency that
is needed to be successful, accor-
ding to the Pirate coaching staff.
"The story of our offense the
past two weeks has been missed
opportunities. We've gotten less
than average play at quarterback,
with four or five ousted plays
Baker said. "If we can find so-
meone who can perform better
than Ron in practice, I'll play
him. But I'm not going to throw
my hands up and give up on Ron
Jones
Baker accepts much at the
blame for the lack of success at
the quarterback spot.
"Ron's biggest problem is
reading the defenses. College
tootball is so sophisticated these
days, both the quarterback and
the receiver have to be able to
read coverages Baker said.
"We've been working on it all
year long, but we're not ex-
ecuting on it in games. Maybe we
need to simplify things
One offensive aspect that has
pleased coach Baker has been the
running of senior tailback Tony
Baker. Baker currently has 388
yards on 77 carries for an im-
pressive 5.1 yards per carry.
"Tony has played his fourth
consecutive good game Baker
stated. "It anything, he's too in-
tense - trvmg to carry too big a
load himself
One major advantage for the
Buc offense is that Miami hasn't
faced an option team this year.
Second-year Hurricane head
coach Jimmy Johnson shows
concern tor the Pirate offensive
unit.
"I CU has a lot of talented
plavers and possesses a great deal
of overall team speed Johnson
explained. "I'm really concerned
with our ability to stop the p
lion. We haven faced a team
that runs the option we've on-
ly taced one or two option teams
in the past cdi
Defensively, for the Pirates to
he successful, they will have to he
See MEN, page n
Pira
OVERALL: 2-2
Sept. LAST CA1
N.C. St,
Sept .14SW T�-EA
Sept .21EAST i
Sept .28T�-
Owvl
EAST U
Opponents.
I he Pira
tests. EC
les have been celebrating for the past 14 homecoming con-
I will have their hands full when they go for No. 15.
Women Netters Fall; Men Victorious
m -
������.
No. 2 seed Becky Clements crushes this backhand
By DAVID McGINNESS
siiff � nlrr
The womens' tennis team lost
Tuesday to a strong Peace i
lege team that was able to sweep
the top four singles matches.
Although lacking in depth, the
top four women on the Peace
team were all strong enough to
capture straight set victories.
Number one ECU player Ann
Manderfieid was defeated by Jen-
na Coleman 6-0,6-1.
Peace c ollege's Kim Penn-
ington beat ECU's second singles
player Becky Clements 6-2,6-4.
Third singles player Ana
Ziemer was only able to score two
games in her 6-0,6-2 loss to Shorn
Kidnev
Lisa Eichholz fared slightly
better in her 6-2,6-3 loss to
Peace's Kim Vaughn
Susan Mont joy, ECl 's
number five woman, pulled out
d set tiebreaker loss to
Elizabeth 1 utz with a 6-1 third set
k tory.
Number six player Holly Mur-
ray dominated Nita Smith
6-1,6-3.
In double- play, the Lady
ties lost their one and
matches bul came up with a
i win in the third,
n Manderfieid and Amy 5
Eichholz came back with a 7-6 f
win over Kim Penninj and �
n Kidney in the second set
a '� " loss in the I

However, after leading 6-5 in the '
third set they lost the tiebreaker
for a . ol 0-6,7-6,6-7.
I - rania Myers and Maria �
Swain suffered a 6-1, 6-4 stra
set loss to Jenna Coleman and i
Kim Vaughn.
Becky Clements and Holly
Murray trounced their Peace Col-
lege opponents Elizabeth I utz
and Nita Smith 6-1,6-3
The ECU men's team got a
much needed win over Campbell
College yesterday, despite play-
ing without number one plaver
Dave Shell.
Shell suffered an injury to his
See MIAMI, page 15
I

.
Nan
To:
Ant
TOTALS
Opponei
OPF
PASS
Name
Ron Jones,
Barrel IS;
TOTALS
Opponents
John Taylor goes down the baseline with this forehand smash.
EAGLE
world
tes�
I �� ' " !
SCHEDULE
Oa :
Rock? N. N
Oci 4 Pep K
G r I
Oct 5 Rob
Roben "
Pat 11 i
u n try
trv and
an.
Ocl 6 Bicentenni
1-5 p m New Ben
For more information all 1
Bee: SrWti taheusei
wholesaler in Greenville V
I





. '
4 wC i
m
� s � - �
asl 14 homecoming con-
� t no for No. 15.
victorious
Set MIX Ml. page 15
I; avt-iine with this forehand smash.
-3
E ,
UVu-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 3. 1985
15
Pirate Football Statistics
OVERALL: 2-2Home: 1-1
Sept
EAST CAROLINA
N.C. State
7 10 10
7 7 0
6 � 33
0 � 14
Sept. 14 SW Texas State 9 7 0 0�16
EAST CAROLINA 7 6 7 7 � 27
Road: 1-1
(Carter-Finley Stadium: 58,300)
Highlight: Jeff Heath 9 pointa; 50-yard FG
Sept. 21 EAST CAROLINA 3 0 7 0�10
Perm State 7 7 0 3 � 17
(Ficklen Stadium: 28,411)
Highlight: Tony Baker 164 yds rushing, 1TD
Sept. 28 Temple 7 0 7 7�21
EAST CAROLINA 0 7 0 0�7
(Beaver Stadium: 84,266)
Highlight: Ron Jones 219 yds total offense
(Ficklen Stadiuu: 32,087)
Highlighy: Kevin Walker 1 int, 1 blked punt
50,766
30,249
71,283
TEAM STATISTICS
SCORING ATTENDANCE
EAST CAROLINA17 23 24 13 � 77 (19.3) TOTAL: 203,064 AVG
Opponents30 21 7 10 � 68 (17.0) Home: 60,498 AVG
Road: 142,566 AVG
OPP ECU
FIRST DOWNS 80 67
Rushing 48 48
Passing 29 15
Penalty 3 4
PENALTIESYARDS 20165 16152
FUMBLESLOST 85 116
THIRD-DOWN CONVERSIONS3367 (49.3) 2563 (39.
TIME OF POSSESSION120:17 119:43
(AVG) (30:04) (29:48)
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
TOTAL OFFENSE (Top Three Only)
Name G PLAYS RUSH PASS TOTAL APG
Ron Jones, QB 4 114 216 343 559 139.8
Tony Baker, TB 4 77 388 0 388 97.0
Anthony Simpson, FB437 1410141 35.3
TOTALS 4 275 915 358 1273 318.3
Opponents 4 300 768 608 1376 344.0
ECU HI: 385 vs Penn State, 921
OPP HI: 358 SW Texas State, 914
Miami Invades For
Homecoming Tilt
7)
APPTDR
4.91
5.11
3.82
4.64
4.65
Continued from Page 14
more aggressive up front while
getting help to defend the runn-
ing game.
"We'll have to put pressure on
the passing game and put heat on
Testaverde, and continue to play
strong coverage Sponhalt
said. "Our perimeter people have
to be more tenacious and we'll
need help from the pursuit people
outside
The Miami defense, although
young, is very capable. Only
three seniors make up the defen-
sive slate, while five sophomores
and two juniors (including three
in the secondary) and one
freshman make up the remainder
of the starting lineup.
Senior honorable mention all-
America's John McVeigh and
Kevin Fagan spearhead the unit
from their defensive end posi-
tions. Coach Baker feels that the
Miami defense is tough and com-
pares to the '83 national cham-
pion team.
"They use a 4-3 alignment and
they play very aggressive and
reckless Baker said. "They're a
carbon copy of the '83 team
With the Pirates owning a 1-1
record at Ficklen this year, coach
Baker feels that ECU needs to
improve in front of the home
folks.
"It is a thorn in my side that
we haven't played well at home
Baker said. We have to work on
that this week
The Pirates will be trying to
win their fifteenth straight
homecoming contest. ECU has a
20-5 record for homecoming
games since 1960. The largest
Ficklen Stadium crowd was
1983's homecoming attendance
of 3,767.
PASSING
Name
Ron Jones, QB
Darrell Speed, QB
G-S
4-4
3-0
TOTALS 4
Opponents 4
ECU HI: 127 vs Penn State, 921
OPP HI: 235 N.C. Stafp , 97
PAPCPCTYDSLGAPGINTTD
682435.33435285.833
2150.015155.000
702535.73585289.533
1065551.860851152.074
M
Tony Baker (43). the main weapon in the Pirate ground attack, will try
to move up the all-time ECU rushing ladder.
EAGLE SNACKS brings the
world-famous Clydesdales
to your home
state and ours.
i
Eagle Snacks arc made in Robersonville, in the
heart of eastern North Carolina. To celebrate
Robersonville Day and the great spirit of our
state, we're bringing the Anheuser-Busch
Ivdesdales home lor lour days oi parades, visits
and excitement. Come loin in
the tun with these animal
superstars and Eagle Snacks.
SCHEDULE
Oct. 3 Tarrvtown Mali. 2 6 p.m.
Rok Mount. NC
Oci 4 Pep Rally, East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 7 p m
Oct. 5 Robersonville Day
Robersonville, NC
Parade begins 11 a.m.
Country Hair-arts & crafts, live coun-
try and rock music, southern specialties
and Hagle Snacks. Fair ends 6 p.m.
Oct. 6 Bicentennial Park.
1-5 p.m. New Bern. NC
For more information, call Roger Vie at Jeffrey's
Beer & Wine Co Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
wholesaler in Greenville. NC. 919 758-1515.
Robersonville
New
Bern
rfAQJF.
.SNACKS -
NORTH CAROLINA-
The Home of EAGLE- SNACKS
t$$fttt tttttttt 11 t H�M��WW�W�W���W�W��M�MiMiJ1M��
Cassettes
SAVE UP TO $5.00
Top Artists! Major Labels!
Many, Many More! Classics Included!
Come Early For Best Selection.
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Get Your Favorites at Big Discounts!
.
����� -��� -��-
4





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
-OCTOBER 3,1985
Pigskin
GAME
Miami-ECT
UNC-Georgia Tech
South Carolina-Pittsburgh
Wake Forest-Tennessee
Duke-Virginia
Florida-LSI
Maryland-VC State
S.W. Louisiana-Southern Miss
Ohio State-Illinois
Arkansas-TCl
Notre Dame-Air Force
Tennessee Tech-Georgia Tech
S T A N DING S
ZIGGY MEWS
RICK McCORMAC
TOM NORTON
K & W PRODUCTIONS
SCOTT COOPER
TODD PATTON
JOHN PETERSON
BILL DAW SON
ZIGGY MEWS
Miami by 3
Georgia Tech
South Carolina
Tennessee
Duke
LSU
Maryland
So. Miss
Illinois
Arkansas
Air Force
Georgia Southern
LAST WEEK
6-6
6-6
6-6
7-5
7-5
5-7
6-6
4-8
RICK McCORMAC
ECU by 3
Georgia Tech
South Carolina
Tennessee
Duke
LSU
Maryland
So. Miss
Illinois
Arkansas
Air Force
Georgia Southern
OVERALL
34-13
33-14
33-14
32-15
31-16
29-18
29-18
28-19
Heats
TOM NORTON
Miami by 10
UNC
Pitt
Tennessee
Virginia
Florida
Maryland
So. Miss
Ohio State
Arkansas
Notre Dame
Georgia Southern
TODD PATTON
ECU by 3
UNC
Pitt
Tennessee
Virginia
LSU
Maryland
So. Miss
Ohio State
Arkansas
Notre Dame
Georgia Southern
K A W PRODUCTIONS
Miami by 1
Georgia Tech
South Carolina
Tennessee
Virginia
Florida
Maryland
S.W. Louisiana
Ohio State
Arkansas
Air Force
Georgia Southern
JOHN PETERSON
Miami by 7
UNC
Pitt
Tennessee
Virginia
LSU
Maryland
So. Miss
Ohio State
Arkansas
Notre Dame
Georgia Southern
SCOTT COOPER
ECU by 4
UNC
South Carolina
Tennessee
Virginia
LSU
Maryland
So. Miss
Ohio State
Arkansas
Air Force
Georgia Southern
BILL DAWSON
Miami by 14
Cieorgia Tech
South Carolina
Tennessee
Virginia
LSI
Maryland
s V Louisiana
Ohio State
Arkansas
Notre Dame
Georgia Southern
Indivl
M-W-F
M-F
M-F
Sat.
IRS HOURS
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
7 a.m8a.m.
12 Noon-1:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m6:30 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Free Play
3 p.m4.45 p.m.
3 p.m5:30 p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
M-Th
Friday
Sat.
Sun.
�4:45-10 based on aailahilitv
M-W-F
Sun.
Miages Pool
8 p.m9:30 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
M-Th
Friday
Sat.
Sun.
M-F
WEIGHT ROOMs
Memorial
9 a.m8 p.m.
9 a.m. -5:30 p.m.
I 1 a.m5 p.m.
I p.m5 p.m.
Minges
3 p.m7 p.m.
TRAINING ROOM
10a.m12 noon
M-Th
2 p.m6 p.m.
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
Memorial Gym 115
MTn 9 a.m -9 p.m.
Fnda 9a.m. 5:30p.m.
at 11 a.m5 p.m.
Sun 1 p.m5 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Rental Information Center
M&F l:30p.m5p.m
Wcd&Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
(Hours vary in accordance with
the seasons)



























204 Easf Fifth Str�vt 7;q a-
758 1427 Open Mon.Sat 10 M 9
Happy Homecoming From Apple Records!
NEW RELEASES ON SALE THIS WEEK:
Cheap Tr.rk 5tarship Miam, V(e
Wnevla JohnWa.te Motels Motley Co
zanne vega Jimmy Buffen Squeeze
John Cougar Mellencamp
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Many More Albums & Cassettes On Sale - Check Us Out'
NfW RELEASES IN THIS WIIK INCLUDI�
Maxx Wamor (LP & Cassette)
Morris Day
Steve Morse Band
Block Flog
Fear
CASsrrri specials
TDK SA 90 (H,gh B,as) 2 Pock - $5 ��
Sony HF 90 (Normal B.as) 2 Pock - $2.9
GO PIRATES BEAT MIAMI!
OVEPTON'S















a
















k

.11
ATTIC!
THURS.
Illusion &
Trezor Rex
Ladies Night
FRI.&
SAT.
Avalanch
i
THURS. & FRI
Mi F GREENVIUi II I v-
quantity h - ��. �
(ty&n
Inc
GO
ECU
DORMS FREE ECU $1.50 j Ruggers
In Early
Oreo Cookies & Cream
Ice Cream
Afl Varieties
$1.99
12 gallon carton
Tailgate with Over ton's
GO
and The Pirates! ECU
Overtoil's Finest
Fritos C2S1B? Heavy Western
Corn Chips M8
etpepsj Regular or Diet
Pepsi Cola
Limit 2 with $10.00
or more food order
8 oz. bag
$1.
Additional Pepsi's $1.09
2 Liter Bottle
99
����)
Regular or Diet
7-Up 2L�erBo�le 99
Richfood Milk 95
12 gallon paper carton
Busch Beer
$3 "
12pack-12oz. cans
Battles & Jaymes
Wine Cooler
Deli Specials
Potato Salad 89 lb.
Turkey Breast $3.49 lb.
Roast Beef $3.49 lb.
4 pack-12 or. bottles 52
���������e�eee�ee�w���e�e���0
Sirloin Steaks $1.79 lb.
T-Bone Steaks $2.09 lb.
Grade "A" Fryer Leg Quarters
or
Whole Fryers
39 ,�.
Limit 3 whole fryers with $10 00 or more food order
Small (100 ct)
Balling Potatoes
10$ 1.00
B GEORGE KI EIN
ECU Ru
set
da ai the expense
palachian State Rugl
22-9
However, foi
straight week, the Pi
the points. VS
gave the Mountaineei
3-0 lead onadr .
The Bucs responded
wa
taking a 12-3 lead at tt
Eight of the 12 first-hai-
ere scored by fullbaci
kicker Mike Brown, wh
team's leading scorer. The other
tour points were k . Pirate
Cabana
Cheese Puffs, Popcorn,
or Potato Chips 6 oz bog
Buy One At Regular Price
GET ONE FREE!
Tender Fresh
Broccoli
bunch
HI-DRI
Paper Towels
Giant Roll 4yV
Del
Monte
Catsup
79
quart bottle
Come See Us For All Your Party Supplies! We Have � -
Plenty of Ice, Coolers, and Your Favorite Beverages. Go Pirates!
Pricet effective through Saturday, October 5, 1935
Pirate ruggers look serious fo
outside center George Klein.
After ECU blocked a kick. Klein 1
scored the on! first-half r on a
short sprint. c
The second half was clearh I
dominated by the Pirates
Despite the six-point effort from
the Appalachian club, ASL never
really posed a threat to ECU, ac-
cording to club president and
player Bill Zimmerman
"Appalachian really had an dj
� all-around good team Zimmer- pi
man said. "But we played great,
we really looked sharp
Two more tries were added bv
; ECU ruggers in the second half.
; extending the Pirate margin.
; AJan Blankenship added another
! try to his season total of three, N
while Bob Tobin picked up his sc- r
ATHL






is Up
s( oi J OOPKR
WVsON
TIC
FRI.&
SAT.
Avalanche
S. & FRI.
E ECU $1.50
n's
GO
ECU
it's Finest
y Western
G-
� �
s $1.79 lb
aks $2.09 lb.
Leg Quarters
�v
J

i
i
Tender Fresh
Broccoli
bunch
79
Del
Monte
Catsup
79
quart bottle
o Pirates!
Saturday, October 5, 1985
mi EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 3, 1985
17
Individual Statistic Leaders
RUSHING
Name
tony Baker, TB
Ron Jones, QB
Anthony Simpson, FB
Bobby C lair , FB
Tim lames , FB
Reggie McKinney, TB
Darre 1 1 Speed , QB
rerry Paige, TB
Jarrod Moody, TB
TOTALS
Opponent s
G-S
4-4
4-4
4-1
4-3
2-0
2-0
3-0
2-0
2-0
ATT
77
46
37
28
4
1
6
1
2
GAIN
399
272
142
134
31
5
10
1
1
LOSS
li
56
1
6
1
0
4
0
0
NET
388
216
141
128
30
5
6
1
1
APC
5.1
4
3
4
7
5
1.0
1 .0
1 .0
APG
97.0
"4.0
35.3
32.0
15.0
2.5
2.0
0.5
0.5
LG
47
42
15
26
15
5
6
1
1
I'D
1
1
2
0
0
0
o
o
0
4
4
205
194
998
853
83
85
915
768
4.5
4.0
228.8
192.0
47
27
4
5
258 vs Penn State, 921
307 Temple, 928
ECU HI:
OPP HI :
SCOReng
Name
'�: t Heath , PK
Anthony Simpson,
' mes, QB
Mike Gainey, TE
-is Di1Lahunt,
Sco t t Iwi s , TE
Amos Adams , FLK
n Walker , CB
ny Baker, TB
LS
FB
FS
TD
0
TDRl'DPTDM
000
200
100
010
001
010
010
001
100
2XPT
XP
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
�nts
9
9
4
5
3
4
IV N
;s am
i s Adams , rLK
my Smith, SE
mv Baker, TB
: � Lewis, FK
' lines , FB
Lair. FB
G-S
4-4
4-3
4-0
.
4-3
REC
9
5
4
3
2
1
1
YDS
109
67
67
65
37
11
2
2
0
TD
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0-1
0-0
LG
35
15TD
19
52
33
11
9
8
8
APC
12.1
1 J.4
16.8
17.3
18.5
1 i .0
XPA
8
0
0
0
0
0
I I
0
-
FGM
5
0
0
0
0
0
I)
0
0
Fl - A
6
(j
0
0
0
6
J
TP
23
12
6
6
'
b
6
25
55
Kev :n WaIker
.s Di1lahunt
No
9
1
35 8
608
YDS
61
80
7
52
51
14. 5
11 . i
AVG
30.5
8.9
7.0
43
to
1
0
4
12
8
149
4 3
12
43TD
16
Men Netters
Get Much
Needed Win
continued from Page 14
right ankle which kept him out of
the match and may prevent him
from playing in next
Wednesday's match against
Pfeiffer College. The team, and
Shell will get a chance to rest and
recuperate this weekend as they
have no match scheduled.
The men went into the doubles
play with a 4-2 lead and won two
doubles matches before the third
was called due to rain.
"They needed a win today
assistant coach Robert Long said.
"But they didn't play as intensely
as they could. They went into the
match thinking it would be easy,
and it affected their concentra-
tion and intensity
With or without the services of
number one Dave Shell, the men
will need to be at the top of their
games next Wednesday against
Pfeiffer, according to assistant
coach Robert Long.
"They thought this would be
an easy match coach Long
said. "They didn't play with the
concentration and intensity they
are capable of
The men, who are now 3-5, will
need to play at the top of their
games against Pfeiffer, who has
just come off an 8-1 win over
Campbell.
Top-seeded David Shell.
Ruggers Unbeaten
In Early Contests
B GKORGE KLEIN
C aalribmtat rlur
The ECU Ruggers took their
second consecutive victory Satur-
day at the expense of the Ap-
palachian State Rugbv Club,
22-9.
However, for the second
straight week, the Pirates yielded
the first points. ASU's fly naif
gave the Mountaineers an early
3-0 lead on a dropkick.
The Bucs responded in a big
way by scoring the next 12 points,
taking a 12-3 lead at the half.
Eight of the 12 first-half points
were scored by fullback and
kicker Mike Brown, who is the
team's leading scorer. The other
tour points were scored by Pirate
cond try of the season on a long
run. Scrummers Mark Whitley
and Ralph Campano sprung
Tobin with heads-up-play and
hustle. Mike Brown added
another two points to make the
final margin 22-9.
Zimmerman was very pleased
with the team's effort and
especially with the play of flyhalf
Doug Eckley.
"He puts stability in our
wing Zimmerman stated. "He
kicks well and he's really quick.
Also, he is improving very
much
The Pirate ruggers travel to
Raleigh Sunday, Oct. 6, to take
on last year's state champions.
The game is scheduled for 2 p.m.
Plant Sale
ECU Biology Club
Thurs Oct. 3
Fri6ct. 4
7:30 a.rnl :00 p.m.
at the
Biology Greenhouse
Room S-lll
Call' 'Jokes On Us' 'for delivery of
tailgate food � fried chicken, etc.
Chicken Box
2 pieces and bread
$1.50
Daily Specials
$2.25
i
j
5 FREE PLATES With Purchase of Meal Plan
OPES 7 DAYS A WEEK UAM-8 PXt
I
512 E. Nth St. Near Dorms
Call for Take-Outs 752-0276
XvvvyvaAVt�a�1K1
jfcJW
Then get in on the ground floor in our undergraduate officer
commissioning program. You could start planning on a career
like the men in tins ad have tad .u.m have si �me great
advantages like
� Earning $100 a month during the school year
� As a freshman r m ph m �e,
you could complete your basic tram
ing during two six-week summer
sessions and earn more than $1100
during each session
�Juniors earn more than $1900 durmg one ten-week
summer session
� You can Like free civilian thing lessons
� You re commissioned upon graduation
If you re looking to move up quickly look into the Marine Corps
undergraduate officer commission-
mg program You could
start off making more
than $17,000 a year $
We're looking �m a favgood men.
Pirate niggers look serious for meeting with N.C. State.
outside center George Klein.
After ECU blocked a kick, Klein
scored the only first-half try on a
short sprint.
The second half was clearly
dominated by the Pirates.
Despite the six-point effort from
the Appalachian club, ASU never
really posed a threat to ECU, ac-
cording to club president and
player Bill Zimmerman.
"Appalachian really had an
all-around good team Zimmer-
man said. "But we played great,
we really looked sharp
Two more tries were added by
ECU ruggers in the second half,
extending the Pirate margin.
Alan Blankenship added another
try to his season total of three,
while Bob Tobin picked up his se-
on the Wolfpack Intramural
Fields.
According to Zimmerman and
co-captain Campano, this game
will be "the test" for the Bucs.
The Wolfpack are coming off a
devastating victory over UNC-
Wilmington, 44-0.
While the rugger A-team show-
ed supreme power, the B-team
also looked quite good, accor-
ding to Zimmerman and Cam-
pano.
"The B-tcam held their own
the two stated. "We have a lot of
depth this year. Our B-squad
compares to many A-teams ac-
cross the state
ECU is now 2-0 and will tackle
N.C. State on Sunday, Oct. 6 in
Raleigh.
ATHLETICS
See Capt Carlker at the Student Supply Store-Wright Building on Oct 8-10
or call 1-800-722-6715.






18
1 HI t M
AKOI INKS
IH lOBiR 3, 1S�K
C�J?fcMM Highlights Intramural Week
B JUVNKTTKROIH
serf �ran
I he Depar i ment of
Intramural-Recreational Services
Co rec softball league is putting
out the hits. Three big games will
make up today's highlighted ac-
tion with leads that see sawed un-
til the final out was thrown.
In the first game of the week'
opers Ligaments faced the
ed Nuts against the Ball Breakers
In their first two contests, the
Mixed Nuts easily outscored their
opponents displaying an
awesome offense and a steady
defense. This game was no dif-
ferent as Trey Williams and Mike
Shytle helped Mixed Nuts capture
a 4-0 lead at the end of the first.
I he only threat imposed on the
Mixed Nuts occured in a later in-
an eye. But, in the top of the fifth
inning a Bud Busters four-run
surge threatened a Bad News vic-
tory putting them ahead 4-3.
However, the offensive powers ol
Bad News were unmatchable as
they were able to put together
four more runs and hold the Ball
Busters at 4. Final score 7-4.
Intramural putters beware'
Rick Klein is this week's low
scorer so far with a sensational
round of61. Congratulations will
be PUTT in writing!
The Department ol
Intramural-Recreational Services
would like to inform the par-
ticipants of flag football, putt-
putt, 3-on-3 basketball and co-rec
softball that all the games that
have been rained out will be
rescheduled. Team captains
should check the bulletin board
in the lobby of Memorial Gym-
nasium and or contact the
graduate assistant in charge of
that particular sport to determine
the new playing date, time and
location.
Punt, pass and kick registra-
tion begins Oct. 7-10. Stuart
Holland, in the men's division,
and Johnnie Pratt, in the ladies'
league held the strong arms and
feet last year setting records in
both their divisions. To register
tor this years competition, stop
by room 2(4 Memorial Gym
Do you recall the names
Powerhouse and the Naturals9
These eight alley cats captured
last years all campus bowling
championship. This year's com-
petition is close at hand with
registration beginning Oct 16-17
Sign up in room 204 Memorial
Gym. All games will be held in
The MendenhaJl Student C enter
Alley.
Cross Campus Run registra
tion will end Oct. 5 at 5 p m Be
sure to sign up for your fit trip
across the beautiful E I, campus
on Oct. 5. Room 204 Memorial
(iym is the place to put your John
Hancock.
) Rice Paces Penthouse Bottom Twenty
m Penthouse magazine's ajehrh vraamA u .u�� .L .
Intramural flag football is providing a great deal of excitement as the
team's are rapidl approaching the playoffs.
ning when David Bustle muscled
I three run homer. The "Nuts'
ed once again and left with a
5-3 victory to boas; their 2-0
bad
1 I W A
B isters in .
Bad News, led I
d ern Robert
hree runs oi
lews for the Bud
�' contest as
Rai d � Baysden
'is. quickly notch-
'he scoreboard
Bud Busters could bat
Lady Pirate
Volleyballers
Have Trouble
B JNr i SIMPSON
s �.�' I v - I r �
" � I ' University In-
a ngle
it N.C w esleyan Col
and Duke Uni th
lad Pirate
lev Dall
cam s
ids
t
I he
al 2 8
their
' ' � �vei
in
15-4, 15-4
came last
5a lurinj he Wake I ores!
na hen they defeated
I N( t in straighi games, 15-11
-
rhe brightness oi these two
ns is somewhat dimmed by the
- ' c- the I ad Pirates have
suffered.
I ��' ' nigh they went to
; ' a with some momentum,
the I NC-Charlotte Invitational
to be anything but
EC I dropped three mat-
� to UNC-Wilmington, host
m I C C, and Western
C arolina University.
I he 1 ad Pirates next disap-
ntmeni came at the hands of
nationally recognized Duke
University. The lady Blue Devils
won in straight games, 1-6
15-10, 15-1.
Winston-Salem wasn't too
spitablc to the Lady Bucs
ter. They however did get the
opportunity to avenge an earlier
loss to L NC C . The win
was sandwiched between losses to
ream Wake Forest, Stetson
University, and Western
( arolina.
Despite the lack of success for
the team, Traci Gall is having a
fantastic season statistically. Gall
currently leads the team in kills
with 63, solo blocks with 23,
blocking assits with 54, digs with
41, and is tied for the lead in ser-
vice aces with Ann Guida who
has 17.
Gall also has the best hitting
percentage at 25.6 but is closely
followed by Donna Davis at 23.7.
Davis, Traci Smith, Guida,
Vickie Golden, and Martha Mc-
Quillan are also having good
seasons as for as statistics go.
This volleyball team is very
talented and is definitely better
than their 2-8 record says.
mixed squad called Selyer.
Behind two runs at the bottom o
the sixth. Coopers Ligaments
rallyed to put together three runs
and take the lead, 5-4, going into
the seventh. Hungry for then
firs! victory, Selyer pulled out all
stops in the seventh, scoring three
runs before heading off the dia-
mond with a v ictorv
The next matchup put the Mix-
Penthouse magazine's tjjghth
annual list of the "20 Worst Col-
lege football Teams" appears in
the magazine's October issue
I arry I inderman, America's
leading expert on collegiate in-
competence on the field, con-
tinues his controversial predic-
tions for the upcoming 1985-86
season.
WORST 1 IVE
At the top of this year's
"roster of the rotten" is Rue
("In '84. new head coach Watson
Brown led the Owls to a 1-10
record, and this sear Rice will of-
fer further proof that it belongs
at the very bottom of the college
heap"). Rice is followed by
Oregon State ("Given an offense
without superior talent and
defense with just three returning
starters, he only place the
Beavers are going is nowhere"),
Northwestern ("The Wildcats
averaged less than a touchdown
in their nine losses last year"),
the University of Texas at El
Paso ("I I.P.P. hasn't had a
winning season m fourteen years,
and this fall will add another
stone to its monument o
misery"), and Columbia ("Even
among Ivy League fans, only
masochists hail Columbia")
UN MOST TERRIB1 E
Linderman continues his list o'
losers with 1 ouisville ("The Car-
dinals have courage, but no ar-
tistry"), Colorado ("The But
faloes figure to remain home on
what's become their own perma-
nent range last place in the Big
light Conference"), Duke
("Duke's stringent academic re-
quirements and the Atlantic
- oastonference's ever-rising
level ol football competition mav
be too much for any coach to
overcome"), Cincinatti ("The
University ol Cincinatti remains
committed to an institution for
the athletically deranged"), and
Vanderbilt ("Vanderbilt has
never won a SIC football title
and the Commodores aren't
about to break with tradition this
year").
The lineup continues with
Texas Tech ("The Red Raiders
are a sure bet to shoot themselves
down this season"). North
Carolina State ("With no real
patsies on their schedule and
hampered by a defense that's all
kid gloves, the Wolfpack will
finish the season looking
sheepish"), Colorado State
("The Rams are just not read) to
butt heads with the big boys").
I ulane ("Don't be too surprised
il the New Orleans school resorts
to its famous Blanche
Du Bois Streetcar Named Desire
defense, which has always relied
on the kindness of strangers"),
and Indiana ("The big ques'
Will the Hoosiers' defensive
finally stop opponents from sc
ing more than thirty points a
game? The big answer V
Rounding out the list are Na- .
("Navy's going to be a a' ea
throughout the current sea
Memphis State ("Memphis State
now seems ready to reclaim
rightful place in the 20 V.
Kansas State ("It's hard be
ruthless when your offense
toothless"), California ("1
vear's Bad News Bears scored
than fourteen points a game and
gave up twenty-tour against a
slightly easier arra oi opp
than they're ah it i take on"),
and Mississippi ("Until the
:e themselves defensively, the
Rebels will continue march
backward").
:V
Before you moke
long distance commitment,
make sure you know
what you're
If Fletcher Christian and Captain Bligh had
known what being stuck in the same boat
would mean, chances are neither would have
set foot aboard.
You'll get trouble-free, reliable service. Immediate
connections�even during the busiest hours.
Guaranteed 60 and 40 discounts off our Day
Rate on state-to-state calls. And operators to
And it you re stuck in the same boat with a long assist you with immediate credit for wrong
distance company that doesn't give you all the numbers and collect calling,
services you need, it's easy to harbor mutinous So when you're asked to choose a long distance
thoughts. company sign aboard with AT&T. With AT&T Long
But when you pick AT&T as your long distance I distance Service, you'll never be left stranded,
company you know you're in for smooth sailing. Reach out and touch someone
i
AT&T
The right choice.
,1





Harden
New
BigDekjxe Burger
New
Bacon Cheeseburger
New
14 lb. Cheeseburger
Thicker and juicier
than Burger King,
Wendy's or McDonald's
��
Underneath it all what really matters is the burger
It s a basic fad to end up with the best, start with the best
rbatswhy we start ouf Big Deluxe "Burgers. Bacon
( heeseburgers and ' �. lb (heeseburgers with the thickest.
uk lest burgei around
Fhtckei and uiciei than McDonald's Quarte� Poui li
the new Burgei King Whopper' and Wend s Single
rhe thickest Andtht uicies1 rwo more reasons why
Hardees is where good people go for good food
Valuable coupons on reverse side
Where good people go for good food.





TRY HARDEE'S NEW POUND BURGERS
Our Thickest, Juiciest, Most Delicious Ever'
: : �;� � � �� . . .
easepresenl pon before order
ton � ; � � . � �.
� istomern �� � ��
Oct 16. 1985
Expires
. : : . ' " : " � : : ��- restaurant
' ' ' �'�� rdering � .
'���:�� � �.
�' � � ' ; : � ;
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Oct 16 1985
: ' " rbreakfast .� itparl patingHorde restaurani
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good Oct 17-Oct 31.19850ffer
YOU BUY A BACON CHEESEBURGER
; : � 'breakfast! ii itparl patinaHarde r�
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lies tax due Not g In ml
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good Oct 17-Oct 31. 1985

-I-
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Oct 16 1985
Expires

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Expires
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good Oct 17-Oct 31 1985
Hardecx
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restaurants Please present :
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 3, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.429
Location of Original
University Archives

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