The East Carolinian, October 1, 1985






�be Saat (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since V2.5
Vol.60 No.11
Tuesday, October 1, 1985
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Parent's Day Success
By HAROlDJOVNrR
"Parent's Day was a success
said SGA Vice President Chris
Tomasic. "We couldn't have
pulled it off without the help all
the hard work of the committee
and Dean (Ronald) Speier
More than 1.300 parents came
to ECU last weekend to find out
what their sons and daughters are
doing here, as well as talking to
ECU Chancellor John Howell
and other campus ad-
ministrators. A noon picnic lunch
occurred on the Mall, and
parents were entertained by the
ECU Dance Theatre, as well as
the ECU Choir and a local band.
The Untouchables. lunches were
sold by Servomation.
"We've heard nothing but
good things about ECU from the
parents Howell said. "I am
also really pleased to see that so
many parents are taking an in-
terest in what their children are
doing
Panhellenic Council President
Lisa Whit field said all the sorori-
ty houses were open to the
parents, "making it especially
nice for parents to see what kind
of house their daughter may be
living in All the fraternity
houses were also open for inspec-
tion, said Inter Fraternity Coun-
cil President Todd Patton.
"All the credit for the success
of Parent's Day goes to Dean
Speier said Student Union
President Mike Smith.
"Everything has gone really well.
Next year, 1 hope more people
become involved in Parent's Day
activities, as well as putting a lit-
tle more emphasis on
academics
Even ECU's Athletic Director
Ken Karr was impressed with
ECU's first Parent's Day. "1
think it's just another opportuni-
ty to get the parents involved on
campus and to develop an
awareness of what's happening.
I'm very pleased at the large tur-
nout he said.
And what did ECU's first
family think about the weekend.
"Parent's Day has given
everyone a better imnpression of
the University. Everyone has
done a fine job in planning for
this day said Gladys Brown,
mother of SGA President David
Brown. His father, Walter, add-
ed, "Parents want to see what
their children are doing. This is
the best way possible to show
them
Freshman Theatre Arts student
David Blanchard said his parents,
Carol and Ty, came from
Washington, D.C. to see what
ECU is all about. "We are very
impressed. We've noticed the
campus is very spread out, but
yet, compact Mr. Blanchard
said.
Tomasic's parents, George and
Fran, both said the program was
a success. "We hope ECU con-
tinues the Parent's Day
tradition
Lethargy Affects Students
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By BETH WHIC KFR
Exhaustion is one of the main
complaints of college students.
For some of us, it takes all of our
energy just to get through the
day, while others of us find
ourselves sleeping through after-
noon classes.
"Even fun things can be
stressful and cause fatigue.
Graduation from college can be
extremely stressful acording to
Mary Elesha-Adams, Health
Educator � Studervt Health Ser-
vices.
Sometimes the cause of fatigue
is obvious � you are studying all
night, or you are just coping with
pressure of personal problems.
"Stress will always cause some
tiredness sid Elesha-Adams.
Fatigue that cannot be readily
explained is more severe,
especially if it continues for
weeks or months. Anyone that
is exhausted for a long period of
time should see a physician to
rule out the possibility of
illness according to Elesha-
Adams.
In general, fatigue due to
depression or emotional stress is
present when you awaken, while
fatigue related to organic illness
mounts during the course of the
day, she added.
Eleshs-Adams said that fatigue
that has been present for more
than four months without any
physical problems is usually
psychological, while shorter
bouts stem from physical pro-
blems.
She also added that some of
the illnesses that cause exhaustion
are mononucleosis, low thyroid
production and hypoglycemia.
Eating habits are also related
to exhaustion. "Students have ir-
regular habits, and eat lots of
junk food. Eating a well-
balanced diet is essential to feel-
ing healthy said Elesha-
Adams.
Drugs are also related to ex-
haustion. "Those who use birth
control pills for the first time mav
experience tiredness. Those who
use caffeine often feel exhausted
since caffeine ups their
metabolism. Their metabolism
drops when they don't have caf-
feine and makes them tired
Elesha-Adams said.
Daytii e fatigue may also be
related to nighttime sleeping
habits. The most common distur-
bance is to stay up late on
weekends, sleeping until noon,
and going back to a normal
school schedule.
Compulsive overwork often
causes fatigue. Staying up iate to
study for an exam, drinking cof-
fee or taking pep pills may upset
one's stomach. "Taking pep pills
only makes you feel worse. It in-
creases the possibility of vomiting
and blood pressure goes up. Tem-
porarily, you may stay up, but
generally you're not going to feel
very good said Flesha-Adams.
"Instead of taking pep pills,
vou should try to exercise in the
evening said Elesha-Adams.
"To avoid exhaustion try to
keep yourself in the best shape
possible. If you are in good shape
then you may not feel as tired
easily. Try to get regular exercise
and do something each dav that
relaxes yc " says Elesha-Adams.
r. fi �, Work, Work, Work LE .���.�
Cotton Hall recently received new furniture dunnK renovations last summer. It was the first lime
since the dorm was built in 1925 that any major renovations had been made to the structure
Another refurbishing project on campus was the rewiring and redecorating of Id's
International House. Future improvements to campus facilities include the addition of a new
dining room wing to Mendenhall Student Center. See related storv on page 3
Fear Of AIDS Increases
Bv IK)l (, KOBFKSON
M�ff � rllf-r
(This ts Part I of a two-part
series dealing with the increasing
problem and fears of Acquired
Immune Deficiency Syndrome.
On Thursday, part li of the series
will cover other sexualv
transmitted disease including
chlamydia and gonorrhea.)
Fear of the unknown is part of
the reason for the current escala-
tion in public concern over Ac-
quired Immune Deficiency Syn-
drome, which is more commonly-
known as AIDS, said Mary
Elesha-Adams. ECU Health
Educator.
"Everyone has doubts and
fears about AIDS, even in the
medical profession. Doctors and
researchers aren't certain about
all the ways the disease mav he
transmitted. These uncertainities
Filter down to the public
Elesha-Adams said.
"Another reason for the in-
crease in public concern about
AIDS has to do with Rock Hud-
son having the disease. There's a
tremendous increase in publk
when a famous movie star con-
tracts a tatal disease she said.
Currently, medical profes-
sionals believe intimate sexual
contact is the primary way in
which AIDS may be contracted.
"Sexual intercourse with an in-
fected person is one way of con-
tracting the disease she said.
"V ery intimate. �
i is another wav � a
volving an exchange
fluids such as blood oi cai
spread AIDS '
According to the I S De
ment of Health and H
vices. AIDS is nearing ep
proportions. Since mid-19
more than 13,000 cases oi
have been reported in the I S
Approximately 500, ��
AIDS Related Complex (ARC
have also been reported.
"People who have ARC di
actually have AIDS i
Adams said, "but they do have
the potential for develop
disease.
See AIDS, Page 6
m y T 7" m ���.w�8 i uita.se, sue saiu. � Ann, rage G
New N.C. Seat Belt Law Effective, Practical, Police Say
By MIKE Ll'DWICK
oS�i Mitur
North Carolina's new seat belt
law went into effect. The new law
states, "Each front seat occupant
who is 16 years of age or older
and each driver of a passenger
motor vehicleshall have such a
safety belt properly fastened
about his body at all times when
the vehicle is in forward
motion
Director of Public Safety
Joseph CaJder said in a phone
interview, "We have no intention
here at Campus Police to set up
any road blocks to check for
compliance Calder added,
"However, if you get in an acci-
dent and you do not have your
seat belt on, then we will write
you a citation. In my frank opi-
nion, I don't think it will be en-
forced unless you are in an acci-
dent
According to Lt. D.R. Bullock
of the Greenville Police Depart-
ment, the Greenville police will
enforce the new law just like any
other law. "We will brief the men
on the new law, then if they see
an infraction it is just like any
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
you are at Rome live in the
Roman style; if you are else
where live as they live elsewhere
� St. Ambrose
other law. We will enforce it
Bullock said.
The new seat belt law stipulates
that between Oct. 1, 1985, and
Dec. 31, 1986, only warning
tickets shall be issued. However,
after Dec. 31, 1986, a violation of
the law will carry a $25 fine. The
law also stated that no license or
insurance points will be assessed
on a driver on account of a viola-
tion of the law.
Sgt. Stevens of the North
Carolina Highway Patrol said,
"As long as we write warning
citations, people won't wear their
seat belts - not until we write cita-
tions that carry a $25 fine will
people begin to comply
Stevens added that the new law
may seem an inconvenience but it
will save lives. "A seat belt will
save your life 80 percent of the
time. The fine is a small one, but
the intent (of the law) is to save a
life said Stevens.
Stevens clarified a few
technicalities of the new law. He
said that it is the responsibility of
the driver to make sure the front
seat riders wear their seat belt. He
also added that if there are more
passengers than seat belts, it is an
infraction of the new law.
Clarifying his position on en-
forcement of the new law,
Stevens said that he would pro-
bably not stop a violator on a
superhighway. However, he add-
Study?
BRYAN HUMIERT � Th� Salt Carolinian
ed, "If I saw a new model car on
a rural road and the driver wasn't
wearing his seat blt, sure I will
stop them
Finally, Stevens helped to
distinguish between fact and fic-
tion as far as some popular
beliefs dealing with seat belts. A
popular myth, said Stevens, is
that if you wear your seat belt
you will be trapped in a submerg-
ed or burning car.
According to the N.C. Depart-
ment of Transportation, Stevens
said that less than one-half of 1
percent of all injury-producing
collisions involve fire or submer-
sion. However, wearing a seat
belt could save your life in such a
situation.
If you are involved in a crash
without your seat belt, according
to the N.C. Department of
Transportation, you could be
stunned or knocked unconscious
and your chances of getting out
of a submerged or burning cat
would be even less.
Stevens said a popular myth
that gets many people hurt is the
one that believes you don't need a
seat beh on short trips or at slow
speeds According to the N C.
Department of Transportation,
more than eighty percent oi
accidents occur at speeds oi 4o
mph or less, and that 3 out of 4
accidents causing death occur
within twenty-five miles of home
Stevens said another popular
myth is the one that believes that
vou could be saved if vou are
thrown from your ,t: In fact,
according to the N.( Depart-
ment of Transportation, said
Stevens, your chances of being
killed arc almost twenty-five
times greater if vou are thrown
from the car.
Has that mid-semester fatigue hit you yet? It hasn't hit this co-ed, who is diligently studying for
those tests before the last day to drop a class this Friday. Funny bow tests always seem to come
at the same time each semester. Avoid the fatigue and the rush of craming for exams - study
well in advance, and you're sure to be prepared to celebrate that 'A
Ticket Rules Explained
Attendance at the ECU vs
Temple game was a near sell out.
The Temple game is a good in-
dication of the attendance ex-
pected for this week's homecom-
ing game and for the South
Carolina game.
Both the Miami and South
Carolina games are approaching
sell out status. However, the
athle ic department is sensitive to
the students needs for tickets,
and is working to make every ef-
fort to notify all students of the
standard policies for student
ticket pick up.
By following these policies.
students will maximize their
chances to get the tickets thev
desire. Remember all tickets are
on a first come, first-serve basis
Tickets are available at
Mendenhall Ticket Office 11-6
Tues Wed Thur. and at
Minges Coliseum 8-S
MonThur Mon. is reserved for
Student Group Pickups and
TuesThur. are general student
pickups.
.






1HI I AM i AKDI Sv
(X lOBfcR 1, !Vx
Announcements
ZETA PHI BETA
Tr iad.e� of Zefa Ph, Beta would hue to
ivlte all other interested lad.es to attend our
Fall Formal Rush on Wednesday Oct 2 at B
o m m Mednennaii Coffeehouse Come and
see what true sisterhood is an about
STOP SMOKING
Quit smoking before Thanksgiving Smo
"ig cessation class will begin on Monday
Oct 7. at 4pm at the Student Health Center
Call Mary Eiesha Adams a? 75: 4g4t for
more information
NEW SORORITY
General meeting will be held �o a g rfi
nterested m forming a new sorority at ECU
TMe meeting will be held on Oct 3 at 6 X
P m in Room 221 Menoenhaii Student
Center
STUDENT ATHLETIC
BOARD
Mill mee' Monday Oct
Mendenhaii Student Center
p m
1 and Oct 21 in
in Room 221 at 4
GET CAUGHT UP
IN THE EXCITEMENT
Come 10m us tor the tes' � ����. f-r ja j
P m Clydesdales and the P.rates .nvade
Ficttlen Saturday 10 am Tre Soir.t of ECU
Parades oown Elm ano Fifth Streets Satur
day 2pm ECU P.rates vs v .
' .anes Sunday 2 o m S'udent un.on
presents live m Concer. -P r0ng
on the Man
OMEGA PSI PHI
The Brotheres of Ups.ion Zea Char-
Omega Psi Ph, Fraf inc would like to
.ou to part, witti us on Omega Homf
Aeekend Stan 0tt the .eiebration at � �
� 'eo Touch THursday Oct 5
10 2 We w.H then take the par �. �
i. edon.a S Wright Cultural Center Faj,
from )0 2 and not stopping until we reacr-
Memor.ai Gym Sat Oct 5 for our Sem
formal Homecomingnighi .��
Don t m.ss the excitement
ECU RACOUETBALL
ECU Racguetbaii Club will rv
on Wed Oct ; 5 p m at Me-
RmlOS Open to anyone wh
mg m begmner or advance 1 . �
us and have fun with us
STUDENT UNION FILMS
The Goos Must be Craiy scheduled for
Wednesday Oct 2 has been canceled In its
place Mendrix Theatre will be showing Par
don Mon Affaire at 7 p m and The
Graduate at v p m
ECU AMBASSADORS'
Congratulations New Ambassadors We re
really excited about this years events and
having you with us Please come Oin us at
our General meeting on Oct 2 at 5 ISpm in
Mendenhalls Multipurpose Room Old
members lets show them why we're the
greatest organization on campus
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
There shall be a meeting of the ECU Col
lege Republicans tonight at 7 p m Oct I, in
Menoenhaii Student Centre Room 221
EATING DISORDERS
GROUP
An eating disorders group will Be started
In October at the Student Health Service
The group will meet every week, starting
Wednesday Oct 16 Call Deb Strayhorn for
more information at 757 6841
ECU SIGN LANGUAGE
Learn to talk with your hands and become
familiar with deaf culture Come m and 10m
us Be part of the club The next meeting win
Be Tues . Oct 1 5 30 7 30 m joyner Library
B 04 We II be electing the officers
SCHOOLOF EDUCATION
The Department of E lementary Education
�v schedule Upper Division Interviews
begnnmg Monday Oct 14 Each eligible
student must submit an application for ao
� vs on to the department OHlc 1 Spe.ght
102 B ' By Fr,day Oct 4 The application en
titled Application tor Admission to Upper
Dvision of Teacher Education at East
Carolina un �. 5 udeti n ne ap
pendices of Ae'cor?-e to 'eacher Educa
tion 1 Appie BiX)�
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Ac( v, �. a ' d ts second
meeting on Mon Oct rtti in Room 244
Mendent-aii Our speaker will be Residence
L 'e Dorm Director Daw- W nf to dscuss
T me Managemen' An members are en
couragec to attend Le' �. A ge! some tips
tor a more productive semes-?-
COPING WITH STRESS
" ��' � " ass jrtered by the Un ,cn �,
se is Cen'er lor s'udenfs v0u
All Frames
In Stock
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order
?or discount Nor good witti othe,
advertised specks
COUPON EXPIRES OCT 11,1985
SOFT
CONTACTS
59.00
pair
COUPON EXPIRES
OCT H. 1985
WHJIN CAr-IKti LA. I II, lyBO WN- ' '� ' T�-
coupon only
Ask about our 20- Vnior iriens �� "(range an ee tx�m for
R"tr the same da
ou on
The
,7
Phone
756-4204
OPTICAL PALACE
703GrM�vlll. Blvd Acr�� f ,om p,� p� N�, To R
JUrt. Uce�.edOl.1.n Op,n ,3Q.m 6 p m
CLIFF'S -J?
Seafood House and Oyster Barj
J Washington Highway (N C 33 Ext Greenville North Carolina
Phone 752-31 72
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
$3
25
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp 43
Hours 4:30-9:30 Mon. -Sat.
r-NEWLY REMODELED -
Classifieds
Identify Sources of Stress. Make Pt v(.
Changes Manage Your Response to
Stressful Situations Learn to Relax im
prove self confidence Plan to attend an four
meetings October 8, 10 15 and 17 from 3 4
pm m 305 Wright Anne� No ajyin(
registration is required Call or stop by the
Counseling Center tor further information
(307 Aright Anne� 757 6A&H
N.C. EMPLOYMENT
SECURITY COMMISSION
Representatives from the Greenville oftice
ot the N C Employment Security Commis
sion will be on Campus Thursday Oct 3
from � a m 4 p m at the Student Supply
Store to recruit students who are interested
m part lime jobs available through Employ
merit Security
PRE MED
Alpha Epsilon Delta will hold it s next
meeting on Tuesday, Oct 1 at 30 p m in
room 307 Flanagan The guest speaker will
be Dr Jack Wilkerson speaking on Family
Practice All interested students are en
couraged to attend Homemade Ice Cream
will be served following the meeting There
will also be a short exeiutive meeng for
AEO officers at 7 p m
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology CluD is havng ,ts
semester plant sale Thurs Oct JanoFr,
Oct 4 from 7 30 a m to 1 p m at the Biology
Greenhouse Room sin We have
plants to choose from anc
pr.cees There is also a sign up �
Biology Club Door for those wtl a v v, help
Ae need you
SGA JUDICIARY
There wi,1 be a mandatory �
tor all new Honor Board and R . Boara
members on - ues
& Kappa Sigma
Present
Ladies
BEST LEGGS CONTEST
Tuesday October i, 1985 9:00-2:00 a.m
85C Cans All Nite
Prizes
Admission Si H
I St tp I 25,00 plus 1 year's Free Pass to the Elbo
A HO 3 Dplus 1 year's Free Pass to the Elbo
Of J 3 XD plus l year's Free Pass to the Elbo
I.
tniries can sign up at the club 9:00 p.m.
Mend '
H .
Stud
e
h ��� ' HOHrkSOS
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
, � �

-
-�� � A
JOHNNY WEATHINGTON
Phone 752 3318
EL TORO
Men's Hair Styling
Homecoming Week Special
September 30th to October 5th
Chicken Salad or Shaved Horn Sandwich 65
5 oi Ice Cream Cup 27
Soda Shop - Wright Building
andCroatan i
�????? ???????4�44 ??-�
I
Now Hiring
'ZMB is seeking a Grants Manag r to
plement a gram solicitation progi
available in the WZMB studios
October 4.
WhHcv frkd fain
? tls Gooo
?
?
?
?

?

2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of O
1 Biso
1 Mashed Potatoes w Gray,J
SI.89
ECU
AlTH
columm
itb Mar Uuh Adanj
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
Pirate
Football
Tickets
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
each of the
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
Nacho
Bugles

PLUS
DOUBLE
MANUFACTURERS J&?
COUPONSJoe, ,�
;�
KIMil.hX
'Ajljlx iul
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
Becks
Beer. . .
Gallo
Gewurtztraminer
$249
"MmmII
i91 BIGCH1LL
Surf
Detergent
respuiv
sneezing or cough
-
i

Coca
Cola.
Orange
Juice
yew
Ckcict
yhmcAan Tfuau
Video Movie
Rentals
No Club Fees 24 Hour Service
OVER
650
TITLES
BETA
& VHS
Luncheon
Meats . . .
99
Choose From:
v Bacon
is0 Chive
VHS Player
Rental
$28
Deli
Chip Dips
BUY ONE LB Nacho
GET ONE LB Cam
v French
Onion
John's Fl
1
m Order Karl tor
, S5.00
�t�"S7.50 j
-5

k.r t
Fried
Chicken
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
The Pitt
MIDNIG
RIDE SP
Friday
11:00 p.m
Rides and
SUPER
.
SPEC
Fooi

I � -it
I





TEST
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IHl I AS!AkOUNlAN
OCTOBER 1, 198?
li'VW J 4
Special
berSth
Cup 27
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bo T
j�ravy
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4 O
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�ONS!
.tore
lent
149
Orange
Juice
109 m
rm
:�Kl
Fried
Chicke

Students Have Travel Choice
B DOUG ROBKKNON
SUM Wrtte.
Before embarking on their next
Toad trip ECU studerUs
should consider Piedmont
Airlines' Commuter Service as an
alters.alive to long-distance driv-
ing.
According to Customer Service
Vent for Piedmont Commuter
Matt Woodruff, students can fly
from the Pitt-Greenville airport
to main cities for about the same
price as flights from larger air-
ports
"Price is one of the good
things aboul Piedmont Com-
muter. A person can fly from
Greenville to Newark, N.J or to
Washington, DC. for basically
the same price as flights from
Raleigh-Durham Woodruff
said.
"It costs $60 to fly from
Greenville to Newark. The fare
from Raleigh is $59. Plus, people
can save by not having to drive to
Raleigh and back he said.
Saving time is another reason
passengers often choose to fly
rather than drive.
"Flight time from Greenville
to Raleigh is 25 minutes. Flights
to Charlotte take about 55
minutes Woodruff said.
"When you consider the time it
takes to drive over 200 miles to
Charlotte, the savings are pretty
substantial he said.
Currently, Piedmont has seven
arrivals and seven departures
from Greenville each day I he
planes serving Greenville are a
Beech 99, which seats 15
passengers and two crew
members. A larger plane carrying
30 passengers, two crewmen and
a flight attendant also Hies to
Charlotte each day,
Darlene Baker, a senioi in
ECU's School oi Nursinj
she rode on the Piedmont com
muter and added that the planes
are "reasonahh comfortable.
"The plane wasn't as luxurious
as a large jet. The flight was hum
py and the engine noise was loud.
But, basically, the plane
comfortable she sai
Baker added that Piedn
tare, arc reasonable when the
savings in time and driving costs
are considered.
"It's a pretty good deal.
Especially it you have to drive to
Charlotte or Asheville and back
lie weekend. Not to mention
the wear and tear on your car
she said.
Since Piedmont began serving
Greeenville in May. 1985, rider-
ship has increased nearly 300 per-
cent. VV oodruff said.
"There's a possibility Pied-
mont will be offering full-time
students a reduced fare in the
ire. We hope even more
students will use the commuter
service then he said.
ECU Flu Season Commences
HEALTH
j:oLun

With Mary Elbha Adams
WHAT IS THE FLU AND
HOW CAN IT BE
PREVENTED?
Flu, or influenza, is a group of
viruses that attack the respiratory
tract. Most infections occur dur-
ing winter when humidity is low
so that mucous membranes are
dried out and are easily
penetrated. One person can have
repeated cases of the flu because
there are so many different flu
viruses already and new strains
are being created naturally
through genetic mutation.
However, after exposure to one
dn oi flu virus that person
imes immune to that par-
ticular strain, but is still suscepti-
ble to other strains.
Prevention can take several
ms. Since the flu virus is a
respiratory bug ir is spread by
sneezing or coughing. The sneeze
or cough contains microscopic
moisture droplets of the virus.
The droplets are then inhaled by
unsuspecting victims. Therefore,
simply avoiding other students
with flu-like symptoms will help.
Also, try to avoid stress because
resistance to flu is due to the in-
tegrity of the immunological
system. Eat and rest properly and
d fatigue.
HOW DO I KNOW IF I HA E
THE FLU AND WHAT CAN 1
DO TO FEEL BETTER?
Fever, cough, sore throat,
headache, muscle aches and
fatigue are some of the symptoms
that let everyone know a "bug"
is going around. Having these
means you may already have the
flu; the only treatment is symp-
tomatic. Avoid exertion for 24-48
hours after your temperature has
returned to normal. Aspirin helps
for muscle aches and headaches,
and salt water gargles are useful
for a sore throat. Also, steam in-
halation, from a vaporizer,
prevents mucous secretions from
drying out, and decongestants
can be helpful for sinus symp-
toms
Usually, complete recover) oc-
curs in uncomplicated cases.
However, complications can
result; the most common arc
secondary bacterial infections.
Which cause a persistant fever
and cough for more than 5 days.
If those symptons persist, come
to the Student Health Service
because antibiotics are needed to
cure this infection.
1 LIVE IN A DORM. ART
THERE ANY SPECIAl
THINGS I CAN DO WHEN 1
FEEL SO LOUSY I DON'T
EVEN WANT TO GET OUT (1
BED?
Your roommate can be a kej
person. Ask him her to make
sure you have water and other
drinks and ice within your reach.
Also, you may want to ask
himher to keep an eye on you
John's Flowers and Gifts
503 E. 3rd St.
�: mi
The Plaa
756-1160
Order Early for Homecoming Corsages
$5.00 plain $10.00 fancy
Jj yv $7.50 with Greek Letters
T Group Discounts for 20 or more.
� We also carry balloons and candy
The Pitt County Fair
MIDNIGHT MADNESS
RIDE SPECTACULAR
Friday October 4th
11:00 p.m. till 2:00 a.m.
Rides and Fair Admission
$6.00
SUPER
Featuring
Eastern Carolina's
Largest Midway
Ride The
SPECTACULAR
Food and Games
RIDES
when you walk to the bathroom
oi shower in case you become
weaker or get diy.
Your resident advisor on your
hall can also be helpful I
Your adv isor can che
see if you need anv as
i ach dorm has a first aid box
has aspirin, and other
medications thai can provide
le relict from flu symptoms.
Don't feel guilty about asking
roommate and friends for
taiK S
CONTACT LENSES
$105.00
$145.00
.Y WEAR
JNDED WEAR
OPTOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
OD
PA
� �
fBariafoCeivter
S ROLLS RCIWBITS VINYL WALLPAPCR Til
1009 DkMnton Avenue T5� ��ST
ECU Student Special
Carpet Remnants
Extra
20
off
Regular Discount Price
With Copy of This Ad.
Over 600 Remnants
All Sizes
Bring Your Own Measurements & Save Time
BargawC�ter
ROLLS. REMNANTS. VINYL WALLPAPER & TILE
1004 UK KINSON AVt M t
Ph
ap am A Pi VUa-Mastcrt hargr
� JO"UUd CashOrCbeck
Support The
ECU Pirates
� A O
Night Club
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIESZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25$ Wine and Draft all Night Long!
Friday Night
Warn Bam Pre-Homecoming Game Jam
featuring the ECU Cheerleaders!
Doors Open at 8:00 p.m.
Wear Purple and Gold and get in
for JUST $1.00
$1.00 Tall Boys � 50 Wine & Draft
$2.50 Pitchers
ALL NITE LONG
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
Beau's a Private Club for Members & Guests
All ABC Permits
$1 .00 Off With Coupon
Wednesday October 2,1985
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
November 27-December 1,1985
Spend your Thanksgiving holidays in style in New York . . . Macy's Parade, Broadway
plays, galleries, museums, shopping, and touring the city. Prices for the trip are:
� 99.00 per person in a quad occupancy room
� $115.00 per person in a triple occupancy room
� $130.00 per person in a twin occupancy room
� $180.00 per person in a single occupancy room
Included in prices are transportation and hotel accomodations.
A limited number of theatre tickets for Radio City Music Hall, Cats, The Odd Couple,
and 42nd Street are reserved for purchasing in the Central Ticket Office.
Contact the ECU Central Ticket Office, 757-6611, ext. 266, for more information.
Sponsored by the Student Union Travel Committee
j
i
i ji





3U? Eaat (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. ��, ���,�
Jay Stone w
Harold Joyner, fc I()N1 luvender, ,�.� ��
Mike Ludwick. , w .�� Anthow S. Martin, �,� v,�
Rick McCOrmac. v �� jOHN PFTl KS()N , ,rJi
Scon Cooper, , & Shannon Short, ��. u
DFBBIfc Si EVENS. ANDREW JOYNER. , op a�,w
LORIN PASQUAL, EMMmM ��,� Bill M11CHEI! . � � ���� ����,
StfphenShirbin. DeChanileJohnson, r�
October I, 1985
Opinion
Pae 4
Greenpeace
Recent revelations regarding the
French Secret Service's involvement
in the bombing of the Rainbow
Warrior have embarrassed the Mit-
terand government before the
world community. The bombing of
the ship, which belonged to the
American based environmental
group Greenpeace, was apparentlv
carried out by French Secret Service
agents in order to prevent the Rain-
bow Warrior from engaging in anti-
nuclear protests against French
nuclear testing in the South Pacific.
While no one is alleging that Mit-
terand personally gave the order for
the Rainbow Warrior to be bomb-
ed, it is clear that remark made b
him before the incident occured en-
couraged French officials to go to
extremes to stop Greenpeace from
interfering in the tests. Mitterand
told the French armed forces "to
ban by force if necessary, all
unauthorized entry into Trench ter-
ritorial waters Subsequent efforts
to prevent a full investigation into
the matter by officials within the
Mitterand administration have cast
further suspicion upon the highest
levels of the French government.
As is the case with most scandals
involving the higher levels of
government, however, one of the
most damaging aspects of the
Greenpeace affair has been the Mit-
terand Administration's attempts
to cover up evidence which might
prove politically damaging to it.
Only last week the French govern-
ment filed charges alleging a breech
of national security against five
military officers suspected of leak-
ing information to journalists
about the French secret service's
role in the bombing. The charges
came only a day after Prime
Minister Laurent Fabious went
before the nation in a television
broadcast and placed responsibility
for the bombing on the defense
minister and cheif of intelligence,
both of whom were fired from their
jobs.
The move was obviously an at-
tempt by the Mitterand administra-
�Campus Forum-
Rebel Yell
French Bomb Ship
uon to silence those who would im-
plicate the higher tiers of the French
government. The Mitterand
government's duplicity becomes all
the more apparent in light of the
fact that it was the New Zealand
government, (the Rainbow Warrior
was docked in New Zealand) after
carrying out its own investigation.
which charged the French Secret
Service with the bombing. New
Zealand Prime Minister David
Lange has himself accused the
f rench government of attempting
to do a whitewash job in carrying
out its own internal investigations?
Vet, as In These I imes
newspaper pointed out in its
September 11 issue, "the scandal is
that in France there is no scandal
Though a man, photographer Fer-
nando Pereira, was killed in the
bombing, most of the 1 rench press
and political class have treated the
whole episode as a farce. 1 he first
Louis Harris poll conducted on the
affair in France showed only 50
percent agreeing that "a country
like France doesn't have the right to
use methods such as were employed
against the Greenpeace boat
Much larger majorities were oppos-
ed io making anyone resign even
though 70 percent said they ex-
pected the government to hide part
the truth. And 19 percent said
the Secret Services were right to use
force to prevent the Greenpeace
campaign but "shouldn't have got
caughi "
Something which does not make
French politicians appear anv
nobler in the eyes ot the world com-
munity is the fact that many accus-
ed Greenpeace of having Com-
munist ties. Brice Lalond, trench
chairman of Freinds of the Earth,
has correctly characterized these
allegations as "absurd He added
that he was "ashamed of France
For those who are familiar with
Greenpeace's campaign's to save
whales and seals from slaughter
such allegations are an affront. We
urge the Mitterand Administration
to clean its house.
TO THC SOUJ-H PAe,f,C THCf CAC- �-
A �rLOAOOf�AVilto)rteTALlTS
THCiR issii- to fftorrsr Jftfttfr
FK�)CH A)VCL�AK. TCSTS O TH� �C&��
TH�t fotioT ruey
UJITM
RAMBEAU
Urban Enterprise Zones
Congressman Jack Kemp, a
Republican from Buffalo, New York
and a presidential candidate for 1988.
has made a magnanimous proposal to
solve inner city decay and unemploy-
ment. He wants to continue the Reagan
revolution which has brought America a
less than four percent inflation rate and
a less than six percent unemployment
rate. If we are losing jobs to the so-
called "trade deficit then why is
unemployment lower than ever
The Right View
SANDY HARDY
Concerning the article. "N.C.
Sucks in last Thursday's East
Carolinian; it is my understanding
that the East Carolinian regards itself
as a liberal newspaper. I applaud this
fact as 1 consider myself liberal as
well. My family has called North
Carolina home for many years, in-
cluding those spent under the flag of
the Confederate States of America,
and yes, I am very proud of my
Southern heritage. It appalls me that
the management of this newspaper
would allow such an article to be
printed anywhere other than in the
"Opinion" column. In reference to
your decision to print "N.C.
Sucks as well as to the article
itself, I would like to quote from Mr.
Dunhill's article, "Finger in throat,
please � Tacky! Tacky! Tacky
Furthermore, if the pompous Mr. W.
Bernard Dunhill, III (or is it the
turd?) does not like the politics, at-
tire, female population, dialect,
economy, or social life offered by
North Carolina, someone should re-
mind him that our borders are not
closed and I would personally like to
drop-kick him over it. As I recall, the
article also mentioned something
about his having been "led to the
brink of resignation Whatever post
is held by Mr. Dunhill, be it staff
writer or human being (very doubt-
ful), such a move would be greatly
applauded by myself and other con-
tingents of "the North Carolina men-
tality Long live the Confederacy!
T.M. Harris
Senior, Biology
For State
Parent's Weekend
I would like to congratulate the
Parents Weekend Committee on a
job well done. I feel that the commit-
tee has put on an event that has
started a tradition. As chairperson of
the committee, I really want to give
thanks to each and every one of the
committee members for their support
and hard work. Once again, thank
you for your support.
chns Tomasic
Chairperson of the Parents' Weekend
Committee
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorise Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Some areas of the country that may be
losing jobs overseas, such as North
Carolina with textiles, have a lower
unemployment rate than the national
average. Some areas, however, have a
higher rate of unemployment. Inner
cities are a good example.
Blacks and Hispanics have a much
higher rate of unemployment, even
though unemployment has recently
dropped for them. Many ethnics live in
depressed urban areas that need
revitalization. Discrimination is not the
cause of unemployment among urban
ethnics, as the Democrats would have
the minority poor believe, so the
Democrats can keep minorities where
they want them�on a leash. The real
cause has been the migration of capital
out of the cities.
Capital migrated to the suburbs along
with the middle class. Middle America
left the cities as a result of government
housing subsidies which encouraged
building and buying on cheap real estate
in the suburbs.
Republicans want to free the inner-
city poor from destitution to become up-
wardly mobile. We will do this through
economic stimulation triggered by an
Urban Enterprise Zone Act and not by
the Democrats' typical panacea of
throwing your tax dollars at the pro-
blem, a practice which promotes graft
and corruption.
The Urban Enterprise Zone Act is
based upon the theory that a more
laissez-faire type attitude can increase
business investment in a depressed area
and entrepreneurship will follow. This
will be done through the relaxation of
regulations and taxes. Certain tax
refunds will be paid also. Proponents
say jobs will increase, possibly exponen-
tially, along with an increased tax base
resulting from increased productivity.
The urban problem stems from cities
that own many inner city areas, caused
by a failure of the former owners to pay
taxes on the property. It is cheaper for
owners to give up their property than to
keep it. The property has become less
valuable than the taxes assessed on it.
The property cannot be sold because it is
not worth buying. Cities and states have
offered to give the property to anyone
willing to pay assessed taxes on the pro-
perty. There has been little response to
this proposal.
The reluctance to continue upkeep on
inner city property causes the depressed
and decaying area to grow. The property
does not attract enough rent money
from business or residents so it is aban-
doned. When the depressed area has a
building close down because the rent
doesn't produce enough money for taxes
and upkeep, the rent value of neighbor-
ing buildings increases and the problem
spreads.
As businesses and buildings close,
jobs and residences decrease. Thus a
population is stranded and must collect
welfare pensions. This decreases tax
revenue and increases spending of col-
lected taxes. Many people choose to
become squatters in the dilapidated
buildings. Shops and stores close and the
area becomes an urban desert.
Suburban sprawl has been accredited
vMth causing inner city decav. People
move up in the world and they move out
of the city into a nice neighborhood with
single-family dwellings on big lots. It is
considered a sign of status to make it out
oi the rat race or ghetto. As the people
have moved out, so have taxes
businesses, jobs and property value. On-
ly the poor are left, having been given a
ghetto and then an urban desert out of
what once was an economically viable
area.
There are many causes attributed to
suburban sprawl. One is the 'Federal
Housing Act of 1949. Also other laws
created to help people buy homes are at
the root of the problem. These acts in-
clude the Veteran's Administration loan
programs, the Federal Housing Act
mentioned above, and some Great
Society programs of the Johnson era.
These successfully put more people into
the category of being financially able to
buy homes. This sped up the spread of
suburban areas and left only the poor
and destitute in the urban areas.
It is cheaper for owners to give up their
property than to keep it. The property
has become less valuable than the taxes
assessed on it. The property cannot be
sold because it is not worth buving.
Cities and states have offered to give the
property to anyone willing to pay assess-
ed taxes on the property. There has been
little response to this proposal.
Revenue sharing introduced city
governments to using federal money to
build sewage and water lines, electrical
lines, and gas pipes in suburban areas.
The Urban Development Action Grants
helped to improve the infrastructure of
dilapidated areas, but it was still un-
profitable to conduct business in these
areas.
The current enterprise zone proposal
demands cooperation between the city
and the affected area concerning licens-
ing regulations, taxes, infrastructure
construction and Urban Development
Grants being used in the area. Also, low
income housing construction would be
eligible for these grants and other
regulatory and tax proposals. The
capital gains tax on investments would
be eliminated. This would encourage in-
vestments from all types of investors
such as multinational corporations
down to small service businesses. Also,
the area would be declared a Free Trade
Zone. This would allow elimination of
import duties, tariffs, and other import
and export regulations. This would en-
courage warehousing and high
technology industries to locate in the
enterprise zones, but other industries
would profit from this also because of
duty-free resources from abroad.
There would be tax refunds for
employers and employees; a five percent
refund for employees in the zones would
be enacted. However, it would be
limited to $1500 in order to prevent high
salaried employees from abusing the
zone. .Also a five percent refund would
be given to employers from the amount
they spend for Comprehensive Employ-
ment Training Act employees. This
would encourage employers to hire un-
skilled workers in need of training. The
funds from CETA would help offset the
training costs as would the refunds.
Various other regulations would be
eliminated from state and local govern-
ments as long as they wouldn't harm the
environment or the residents. Inner
cities being surrounded by all socio-
economic classes have the potentia
attract capital back into the inner city
To fight the argument 'hat the poor
would be kicked out and would be left
wondering, "Where are we to go? I
ould say that they will disappear into
the lower and middle working classes
and some eventually will become quite
successful. However, some people will
always be poor and also poor people will
always be around no matter how pro-
sperous an economy there is. America.
being the great country that she is,
should care for her truly destitute; yet
we should not guarentee a middle-clas.
lifestyle to everyone by a free unearned
check. We should provide ample oppor-
tunity instead by promoting the general
welfare.
When an Urban Enterprise Zone
begins, the poor will be used for unskill-
ed labor. These jobs generally pay les
tew people are willing to commute for
these jobs; therefore local poor will be
hired. With experience manv laborers
will turn into skilled workers. Therefore,
these poor will disappear. Service in-
dustries will hire and train, through ap-
prenticeship, various numbers of un-
skilled local workers. These would in-
clude mechanics, plumbers, electricians
cooks, waiters, bakers and appliance
repairmen.
Other jobs would appear also through
initiative and entrepreneurship. There
would be an increase in employment.
These stores would also increase
employment. Stores would be set up for
commuters to do some quick shopping
before and after work. Restaurants
would cater to locals while some would
specifically cater to upper classes, main-
ly commuters.
Education in these areas would
definitely improve with prosperitv and
socio-economic levels. Taxes will" fund
the schools, and parents with jobs will
provide better role models for children.
City and private construction projects
will provide many jobs early after the
establishment of the enterprise zone and
would continue with prosperity as it
does in other prosperous areas' There
will be a need for more buildings for of-
fices, factories, warehouses, housing
and stores.
In this era of concern for tax rates and
budget deficits, Congress must be
careful with how it spends its money
from tax revenue. An Urban Enterprise
Zone Act will save taxpayers money
because it depends on private funding of
economic growth by entrepreneurs
rather than government funding by a
bloated bureaucracy. Ultimately, it is
the only solution that we have to the
problem of urban blight.
Oh sure I just love mterms �ac- they re nr .
outs�ae of watcng soap operas ana ecr a suga-

Foreig

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Campus Reno
Bv Br.FH VHI( KKR
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ma
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Chicken A Bisevfrs

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112 E. 5th St. 758 4798
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Sunday
$:
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1, 1985
fGffcio
ZGCT TU�y
C-�AUa6
EAU
Zones

i
I
Ml
h '
I
would
amount
e Employ-
This
ire un-
B The
' fsci the
� inds
� aid be
ca) govern-
arm the
Inner
all soc
potential
r poor
- aid be left
e to go0 1
appear into
� � :ng classes
� ecome quite
pie will
. pie will
a pro-
America,
thai she is,
. destitute; yet
i middle-class
v unearned
ample oppor-
. the general
: Zone
ed for unskill-
paj less so
. minute for
� will be
�. laborers
Therefore,
service in-
rough ap-
�-�rs of un-
rhese would in-
� electricians,
and appliance
: ear also through
eurship. There
employment.
increase
ould be set up for
� shopping
Restaurants
� me would
3 upper classes, main-
in these areas would
th prosperit and
Taxes will fund
hools, and parents with jobs will
� role models for children.
instruction projects
de many jobs early after the
establishment of the enterprise zone and
ild continue with prosperity as it
does in other prosperous areas. There
will be a need for more buildings for of-
fice warehouses, housing
and stores.
In this era of concern for tax rates and
budget deficits, Congress must be
-ful with how n spends its money
from tax revenue. An Urban Enterprise
Zone Act will save taxpayers money
because it depends on private funding of
economic growth by entrepreneurs
rather than government funding by a
bloated bureaucracy. Ultimately, it is
the only solution that we have to the
problem of urban blight.
�3iM� yt
U
Foreign Teacher Fights To Teach At School
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
tCPS) � University of New Mex-
ico assistant professor Margaret
Randall is a native of the U.S.
with a husband, parents and a
brother who are U.S. citizens.
But now she thinks the govern-
ment may force her off campus
and out of the country, primarily
because she has associated with
leftists.
Randall became a naturalized
Mexican in 1966, and last sum-
mer, after she applied for perma-
nent resident alien status in the
U.S an Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS) of-
ficer grilled her about her friends,
activities and writings during her
23 years in Latin America.
"It was a political inquiry
says Randall's attorney, Michael
Maggio. who, like Randall, now
expects the INS to reject
Randall's application for permis-
sion to stay in the U.S. sometime
this fall.
If that happens, Maggio says
Randall will appeal.
And that battle, Maggio
predicts, will become "a focal
point of national attention"
because he says few people
challenge those rulings.
"Margaret Randall is being
told that even though she lives in
the land of her birth, has parents
and a husband who are American
and teaches at an American
university, she can't stay here
because of what she thinks
Maggio says.
"The higher education com-
munity ought to be concerned if
the INS is going to be a brain
police
U.S. immigration law allows
the INS to reject visa applications
from applicants who have joined
or affiliated with communist,
Marxist or "subversive"
organizations.
The INS also can reject ap-
plicants who have advocated
communism, anarchism or op-
position to organized govern-
ment, or applicants who may
engage in activities that would be
"prejudicial to the public in-
terest
Rejecting applications for per-
manent resident status � as op-
posed to turning down requests
to visit the U.S. � on political
grounds are more rare.
"Both categories are equally
politically obnoxious says
American Civil Liberties Union
attorney Steve Shapiro.
"But in terms of the conse-
quences for building a life, rejec-
tions of permanent residency
status are much more
devastating. The human dimen-
sion involved is greater
However, Joshua Koltun, a
legislative aide to Rep. Barney
Frank (D-Mass), argues
Randall's case probably wouldn't
affect many other people.
But Frank has sponsored a bill
to narrow the number of political
exclusions from the U.S.
In the year ending Sept. 30,
1984, 253 applications for perma-
nent residency status were re-
jected for political reasons, ac-
cording to figures compiled by
the State Department's Bureau of
Consular Affairs.
The State Dept. rejected about
600 potential visitors for political
reasons during the same period.
Prominent academicians like
South African poet Dennis
Brutus and Latin American
literature professor Angel Rama
are among those denied perma-
nent residency for political
reasons in the past.
Rama, who was teaching at the
University of Maryland, was kill-
ed in a plane crash before the
final outcome of his case was
determined.
Brutus eventually received
political asylum, after which the
government dropped objections
to his request for permanent
residency status. He is now an
English professor at Swarthmore
College in Pennsylvania.
As in the Brutus case, Randall
has attracted the support of pro- nationsl writers' organization,
minent U.S. writers in her an- have petitioned the INS in Ran
ticipated battle with the INS. dall's support.
Randall, an American studies Norman Mailer, Gay Talese
professorhas written about 40 and Kurt Vonnegut Jr among
books. Leaders of PEN. an inter- others, have signed the netition
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tITW�t Morgan St.
Campus Renovations Continue
Bv BETH WHICKER
Staff Wrllrr
ECU's newest renovation pro-
ject aside from the new classroom
building is a proposal to add a $3
million dining wing to
Mendenhall Student Center.
Mendenhall Student Center was
occupied first in 1973 and has not
been renovated in any form since
that time.
"We have 14.(XX) students on
pus and a cafeteria that only
-ca 350; the dining facility is far
from adequate. Students living
on West campus and Central
campus have to go to College Hill
dine said Rudolph Alex-
ander, director oi University
Unions, and associate director
. lent Activities.
"We have had a food service
ad ise us on equip-
ment arid the size of the cafeteria.
Meeting rooms are needed since
Mendenhall's meeting rooms are
booked. The staff has
great room to be used
additional meeting
rooms and offices according to
1 he project is slated
I98
� ECU'S oldest
buildings, Cotten Hall, received a
complete overhaul over the sum-
mer The operation is the first
renovation since Cotten
was constructed in 1925
During the summer, the
building was rewired, repainted,
and a new lighting system was in-
stalled. The $700,000 project also
provided a new heating and air
conditioning system for the
dorm.
The International House, a
building used to house foreign
students, was also renovated this
summer.
"It was desperately needed;
we'd had some wiring problems.
To my knowledge no major
renovations had taken place since
ECU obtained the building 10 or
12 years ago said Dan Wooten,
ECU director of Housing Opera-
tions.
During the summer the
building was rewired; the kitchen
was redecorated, and new carpet,
paint and furniture was added to
the structure.
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CHICKEN BISCUIT ABSOLUTELY FREE!
(OHer Expires December 31 '985)
Man Chow
CHINESE RESTAURANT
f�r Luncheon
W Special
only $1.99
Luncheon Buffet 11:30-3:00p.m.
All YOU Can Eat Only $3.95 (Under 6 Free)
More Than 10 Choices
Seafood Dinner Buffet
Friday & Saturday 6 to 9 p.m.
only 6-99
Dinner Includes:
Fried Scallops. Fried Shrimp, Fried Fish, King Crab Legs, Sea-
food Delight, Shrimp Fried Rice, Shrimp With Lobster Sauce,
Kung Pao Shrimp, Egg Roll and Soup.
All ABC Permits - Take Outs Welcome
Cantonese & Szechuan Cuisine
11:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m.
Open 7 Days A Week
756-9687
? rv�
2217 S MEMORIAL DR GREENVILLE
(Located Corner Of Dickinson & Memorial Dr.)
RIVER BLUFF
' Spacious Affordable L uxurv A par! men is
�Professional Management and Maintenance
�2 Bedroom Townhouses & 1 Bedroom Garden Apartments
�Large Pool
�ECU Bus Service
Directions 10th Street Extension to River Bluff Rood
Next to Rivergate Shopping Center
PHONE 758-4013
Tailgate With
Time Ovt!
Open 24 Hours!
CKSIE
RECORDS
We Buy
Used Albums it
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
t
112 E. 5th St. 758 4298
AFTER COLLEGE:
AIR FORCE
EXPERIENCE
Graduating soon1 If you're under 29 1 2 � make your
move � as an Air Force Officer. Move up fast
with AIR FORCE I XPERIENC E. You'll do important
work in our chosen field. Experience a
challenge. An opportunity. A special
lifestyle. For your country and
yourself, talk with an
Air Force Recruiter
today.
Call: TSgt Stephen White
Suite 202, 4109 Wake Foresl Road
RaleiRh, NC 27609
(919) 856-4012 Call Collect
AIM HIGH
AIR FORCE
Upcoming Events
for
Student Union
Films:
"Pardon Mon Affaire"
and
"The Graduate
"Places in The Heart"
Wed Oct. 2
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Oct. 3, 4, 5
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Super
Salad Bar
$1.99
ALL YOU CAN EAT
For The Month of September
Until 10:00 p.m. 7 Days a Week
Sunday Night Lasagna Special
Wednesday's originally planned film The Gods Musi Be Crazy has been cancelled.
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE:
"Recent American Works on Paper" Through Oct. 19
Smithsonian Art Exhibit
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery
SPECIAL CONCERTS COMMITTEE:
The Spongetones Sun Oct. 6
. 2:00-5:00 p.m.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE:
Thanksgiving Trip to New York Nov. 27-Dec. 1
Christmas Trip to Hawaii Dec. 31-Jan. 7
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 757-6611 Ext. 266
$2.99
ALL YOU CAN EAT
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU





HI I s ! i. KOl INIAS
i K )i�Ht R I 1985
Legislators Begin Year With Debate
H VKOI It JC MR
tcked i n
da nigh; as
� ' g adual-
?pes o SGA
d around
Board Du-
ke the
list, and
Ml 10
Hoard
as the
h Hoard.
" allowed to
( � �
Howe
- - . said the
an ex-
. fore
an
ature kirk
' n the
made
m-
lei ts
� class
d : he
�ted
A IDS Causes
Public Fear
rum Page 1
�� a
RC
i
sex
MD
Smokers
Smoke More
Than Average
H "III! M K
the
Research
North
ive the
as doc-
: ii ted
North
king they
'hers in
Elbert
I the
department.
ups are
ime the
below the 30
i IHover.
ling more
I ' American
rhe Heart
I he 1 ung
� e word
' percent ol
the dangers
I Glover.
public doesn't
dangei oi smokeless
I been a 41 per-
use per year
' ' i public doesn't
u gers because it is
menon and fairly
� er
moke because
new freedoms they e.x-
ivhen leaving home.
smoking makes
�f an adult
- hey are break-
away from home and ex-
imenting on their own said
ner.
nor interiewed.
A' this writing, no Executive
( ouncil spokesman was available
for comment.
I lie Executive Council consists
OI the SGA President, vice presi-
dent and treasurer, as well as
each class president.
new legislative procedure
change in presenting bills was an
nounced at the meeting by
Shelley. Instead of each legislator
presenting a bill to the legislature,
"all new hills, except those that
the author intends on suspending
the rules on, must be given to the
Speaker by 4:45 p.m. on Mon-
days the announcement read.
I egislatoi Coralie Patterson
said she didn't like the bill, as it
would "lose the identity of the
legislator" m presenting bills.
"SGA representatives are just
that � representatives. People
know who you are and know who
to go to if they want to get a bill
introduced I Ins change has
some about because a lot ol the
legislators are lazy and don't
want take the trouble to find out
about a bill
"It is my sincere hope
Shelley said, "that this new pro
cedure will insure that no hills arc-
lost and that student groups will
know who to contact about a bill
they are interested in. Hills have
gotten lost before, and I don't
want it to happen again "
C ommittee members and
chairmen were also selected.
Heading up the Rules and
ludiciary ommittee is Si i
Ieeter; Appropriations Commit
tee is Dwayne Wiseman; Screi
ings and Appointments
Jonathan Withington
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ALL VARIETIES
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ALL FLAVORS
Lender's Bagels
SOMERDALE CRINKLE CUT
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, 20 s
11 oz
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General Merchandise Specials
Fine
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EXCLUSIVELY AT A4P
Royale Aurum Genuine Gold Bands o,
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Fine Porcelain China
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In The Habit
Not
By STEPHEN SHERB
of thf � .
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Oct. 1,
B UARREN BAKKR
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Ben Ber
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Entertainment
Page
In The Habit Of Sex ?
Not Agnes Of God!
B STEPHEN SHERBIN
IJtmtftm Mhor
-t scream shatters the stillness
� the night. The convent comes
life and rushes to the source.
small, bare room on the third
�r lies a nun. In violent con-
rast to the black and white habit
s a crimson cloak of life's blood.
This opening may seem com-
n, but the story that follows is
anything but ordinary. Agnes of
God is a landmark film that is
destined to be a heavyweight con-
tender at this year's Academy
Awards.
It is the story of an innocent,
voung nun, Agnes, who gives
birth in a cloistered convent in
Quebec.
The child is found dead, and
Agnes, played by Meg Tilly,
claims to have knowledge of
neither the pregnancy nor the
birth.
Jane Fonda portrays Dr. Mar-
tha Livingston, the court-
appointed forensic psychiatrist
dispatched to St. Mary
Magdalene convent to determine
if Agnes is mentally fit to stand
tnal for manslaughter.
Anne Bancroft is Mother
Superior Miriam Ruth, the head
of the convent, and self-
appointed defendant of the fate
of Agnes' soul. Not only does the
Mother Superior insist on Agnes'
innocence, she also suggests the
possibility of a miracle birth.
Thus, a conflict arises between
Dr. Livingston and the Mother
Superior over the future of the
young nun.
Agnes of Cod is directed by
Norman Jewison and adapted
from screenwriter John
Pielmeier's controversial. Tony
Award-winning Broadway play
of the same name.
The play has been translated
into seven languages and per-
formed in 14 countries, and was
originally written for three ac-
tresses on a bare stage.
"With the exception of two
chairs and an ashtray remarks
Pielmeier, "there was no set. All
the scenes took place in the doc-
tor's office, and the piece
depended completely on the three
actresses. It was a very bare-
essential kind of play
"The most exciting aspect of
adapting the screenplay for
Agnes of God says Jewison,
"was dealing with this conflict
between faith and logic in the
scenes with Jane and Anne. Since
one represents the secular world
and the other represents the
religious world, you have these
battles w here the two of them are
slugging out their respective
points of view. Pielmeier has also
thought to bestow a sense of
humor on both of the characters.
so in the midst of this powerful
struggle, there are some wonder-
fully light moments
Agnes of God is the first film
in several years to hae women
playing all the lead characters.
"It's not often that you find a
film with women in all the
leading roles Jewison points
out.
When speaking of the casting
of Jane Fonda, Anne Bancroft
and Meg Tilly, the director
remarks, "We have three of the
most exciting actresses working
today It's the power of John
Pielmeier's story that attracted
these three actresses.
"What it forces you to do is to
begin to probe how you feel
about miracles, faith, innocence
� about the human need to
believe in things that can't be ex-
plained says actress Jane Fon-
da. "These are very fundamental
questions that have been debate
for centuries. This film isn't go
ing to answer them, but I thin'
it's a good time to re-raise the
in an artistic context
Bancroft was also intrigued by
the spiritual aspect of the
screenplay. "After seeing Agnes
of God she urgesI would like
people who believe in God to
think again and people who don
believe in God to think again, a
well
The film is set in an old On-
tario boys' school. Academy
Award-winning production
designer Ken Adams was enlisted
to transform the historic
Rockwood Academy into the
convent.
"The convent in the play is a
very cloistered one he saysso
it is almost completely separated
from the outside world. What we
were tryng to do is to contrast the
exterior, secular life in Montreal
with the interior serenity of the
actual convent. I tried to keep the
design as simple as possible, at
the same time giving a certain
y
Men Tilly stars as a young nun and Jane Fonda plays a psychiatrist in Agnes of God
warmth to the interiors, as
though the nuns live in a com-
plete world of their own
In order to portray both the
settings and the characters
authentically, the cast visited an
actual convent. "We attended
vespers with the Sisters of the
Benedictine, whose convent was
about 45 minutes outside of
Montreal" recalls the director.
"They were always so giving and
understanding and never asked us
why we were there. I would take
Anne, Meg, and Sven (the
cinematography director) and
several others. At five minutes to
five, we would ring the little bell
and ask if we could partake in
vespers. They would sing the
most beautiful songs in Latin. It
was fascinating to get into that
life as much as one was allowed
The work of the Dutch painter
Vermeer had the visual effect
they were seeking. "When I think
of Agnes of God, I think of
Vermeer's rich dark tones and the
way the light hits the faces and
hands in his portraits explains
the director. "That's the look
that we were looking for
The cinematography director
hired for the film was Sven
Nykvist, whose credits include
such films as One Day in the Life
of Ivan Demsovich, Pretty Baby
and The Postman Always Rings
Twice. Nykvist approached the
film a if it were shot in black and
white. This was necessary, not
only because of the lack of color
n the nuns' costumes, but
lecause of the lack of color in the
Canadian landscape, which very
much reminded him of Sweden.
"I try to simplify the lighting,
composition, the movements
Nykvist explained. "The lighting
is born during the rehearsals,
where I have a silent collabora-
tion with the actors. I'm not in-
terested in science fiction and I
don't have a technical
background, which is why I love
photographing faces so much �
to try to find something of the
soul in the human being
Jane Fonda complimented, "I
think it's going to be a verv
beautiful film to look at because
of Sven Nykvist's work. He's a
genius
The crew for Agnes of God
have turned out a marvelously
impressive film �
Oct. 1, '85: The Day The New Music Died
By WARREN BAKER
surf rllrr
"You seem to be taking this
rather calmly I said.
Ben Berry hill, manager of
Premiums, looked up at �ne with
a smiling face and patted me on
the back.
"I'll cry later he said without
skipping a beat.
Greenville's alternative music
bar went under Monday night,
and a few of the regulars came in
to express 'heir condolences. I
was one of the mourners, clad in
my dark U.Va. sweatshirt and
deck shoes.
We talked a few minutes about
the possibility of raising prices at
the door and on the drinks, but
Ben shook his head and mention-
ed that his current clientele would
probably not be so current with a
price hike.
Money was the issue at hand.
"I'm pissed off he said
angrily. "I feel like I've been rip-
ped offin a big way
Rent and utilities took the big-
ger pieces of the pie away from
Premiums, and Ben said he was
sorry it worked out that way.
"It basically boils down to
money he added. "It sucks. It
shouldn't boil down to money
As the stout I was drinking
became warmer, Ben continued.
Many cigarettes found their way
to the ashtray as the conversation
continued.
"But this place is a great place
for what I had it for, you know,
because we had lots of fun. We
had bands. We had inexpensive
beer. And that's a good combina-
tion, but it just doesn't pay off
He hopes for a next time. He
hopes the lessons of the past will
pay offat a later date when the
debts are paid off.
Overall, the new music brought
in by the more progressive
rockers of North Carolina was
the mainstay of Premiums.
"I think the bands are great
He paused for a moment. "All of
them
A man dressed in a black
jacket came over and pointed to a
sticker pasted to his coat.
R.I.P. Premiums.
1985-1985
Ben grinned again. His eyes
and hands moved back and forth.
We cut off our talk for a few
minutes as an old friend of Ben's
stopped by for a chat. I took a
look around the premisesone
more time.
Beer lights adorn the wooden
walls, as well as a flickering
"Welcome to Miller Time" sign
that graces the wall behind the
bar. The sparse crowd became
bigger as time wore on. The
regulars exchanged their
greetings, ordered their beer, and
reminisced. The Guiness was
tinished and a wine cooler seem-
ed like the next best bet.
1 noticed a sign that hung just
inside the doorwav.
"He who drinks and drinks
with grace is always welcome in
this place
I waited.
Ben finally returned and talked
about his staff and how great
they were to work with.
"Well he finally said, "Do
you have any more questions0" I
again asked him about how he
was taking everything so calmly.
He rambled a little bit and finally-
said, "It's my own fault, really
for not being careful to begin
with
Careful, or not, Ben feels that
he succeeded in making
Premiums a cozy and "con-
genial" place. He admitted that
he hated the so-called pickup
bars, but added that if you got
lucky at Premiums, well, that was
good, too.
The grin was beginning to
disappear for a second as he
thought about what would hap-
pen as the bar's hours became
numbered.
"I think that, uh, tonight I'm
just gonna sit here and think
about the good of times we had
here He laughed. "Maybe,
later on, cry
"Don't worry he added.
"We'll be back again someday to
move your soul on the dance
floor with the wild and crazy lit-
tle, small bands that love to come
and play for you. That's why we
were herejust to play for you
.Another friend of Ben's stop-
ped by to talk, and I figured our
brief conversation was over. The
wine cooler was all but finished,
and so was Premiums.
A girl sat next to me and glanc-
ed at the notes on my pad.
"What's that " she asked.
An article on Premiums I
answered. My pen continued to
scrawl on the paper.
"They're closing, you know
she said with a frown.
"I know I said.
"It's sad she said.
I finished the cooler and nodd-
ed my head. "1 know
WANTED!
The Dating Game
BERKELEY, CALIF. (UPI) -
If you have trouble finding dates
and making friends, don't
despair. With a little expert help,
you can improve your social
skills, a California researcher
says.
"If you are not satisfied with
your social life, you can make
this an exciting adventure rather
than a risky enterprise said
Eileen Gambrill, a psychologist
and professor at the University of
California, Berkeley, School of
Social Welfare.
She offers a step-by-step ap-
proach to developing and mainta-
ing relationships in a new book,
"Taking Charge of Your Social
Life
She also teaches a course on
"relationship ecology which
includes tips on recognizing peo-
ple who are open to forming
friendships, maintaining and en-
ding conversations, interpreting
verbal and nonverbal cues,
handling difficult social situa-
tions and terminating unwanted
relationships.
GambriU's formula for social
sucess: "Clarify your social
goals, plan how to achieve them,
pursue them one small step at a
time
Before they are able to fid that
perfect friend or lover, she says,
most people must first shed their
unrealistic expectations about
friendship and love.
"Many people make the
frustrating mistake of expecting
friendships or relationships to
develop too quickly Gambrill
said. "Hoping to find the perfect
friend tomorrow or the perfet
love this week is guaranteed to
make you miserable
Relationship seekers should
move slowly, first increasing their
interactions with acquaintances
and friends, then moving on to
improving their love lives, she
says.
"A satisfying social life is as
much, if not more, related to
developing friendships as to
developing romantic relation-
ships Gambrill said.
Happenings On Campus
Peter Adonis Traveling Fantasy Show brought fantasies to life for a capacity crowd at TW's Nightlife Friday.
Due to it's increasing success at
ommercial box offices, the sur-
rise foreign comedy of the year,
The Gods Must Be Crazy, has
een pulled from distribution to
ion-commercial houses, such as
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre.
Substitutions for 77ie Gods
Must Be Crazy, originally
scheduled for this Wednesday at
8 p.m. have been made. Screen-
ing in its place are two other com-
edies, Pardon Mon Affaire and
The Graduate, at 7 and 9 p.m.
I





8
fHE EAS1 c RQ INIAN
OCTOBER ivk
SALE
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC 20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorder player,
oystick modem with terminal pro
gram cassette,Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals $200. Call An
thony at 757 6366 or 752 7346
NEED TYPING: Letters Resume's,
Term papers etc Call Karen at
752 0498
FOR SALE: '74 Fiat 124 Special.
Perfect body, good tires, new bat
tery and tune up parts Needs some
work Runs fine as is. 1st $400 takes
if. 758 2997
ROOM FOR RENT: Close to cam
pus, $U0 covers rent and utilities
Call 758 7640 for more information
FOR SALE: Royai Electric
typewriter $200 Call Susan at
758 5488 or 758 8241.
FOR SALE: 1981 Honda Accorc
4 door. Green, 68,000 m.les extra
dean $5,600. 752 2110 Todd
FREE KITTENS: 9 wks ola tram
ed Black, grey and white 752 0189
TYPING SERVICES Familiarwittl
all formats, proofreadingspelling
corrections included Low rates
757 0398 after 5 p.m.
WORD PROCESSING: We Offer ex
penence m typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names ana addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or roioaex
cards. Our prices are extre-
resonable ana we always offer a 15
percent discount t0 ECU Students S
and F Professional Computer Co
(Back of FranK- i's '� " 3472
THE MIDDLE man Apartment
Listing Roommate Referral Service
E 4th Street Suite number 2
across from Sub Station II Lei us
help you find the apartment or room
mate you're looking fc Car
830 1069
TAILORED PRODUCTS: Men s S.
women's alterations Located in the
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Mon Fri , 9 6 756 3312
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Ex
perience and quality work, IBM
Selectric typewriter Lanie Sh,ve
758 5301
FOR SALE: Sunn Bass AmpPower
Amp 200 watts Call 757 0558 after 5
FOR SALE: Sfero System
AMFM Dual Cassette $200 Hide
a bed Sofa and 2 chairs $250
757 0039 or 758 7020 ask for Wade
FREE KITTENS: One male and two
females. Call 758 1393
FOR SALE: Twin Size Bed Matress
and box springs $20 Call 758 5747
or 752 7774 and ask for Demse
USED TIRES FOR SALE: Good
price, any size, guaranteed Call
757 1247
ROOM FOR RENT: Close to cam
pus$U0 covers rent and utilities
Call 758 7640 for more information
STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE:
Moving into an apartment and have
too much furniture? Call us at
758 5449 Prices vary depending
upon size and number of pieces.
PUPPIES FOR SALE: AKC
Chocolate Labrador Retriever Pup
pies These pups are "magnums"
Weight 3lbs at 2 weeks old.
Wormed and ready 10 19 85 $200
Chris Smith 793 9205
ALPHA DELTA PI SORORITY
Would like to fhank the cm
OMEGA'S, KAPPA SIGMA'S, and
the PHI TAU'S for a Jamin' time
Hope we can do it again soon L
Alpha Delta P, Sisters and Pledges
TKE'S Our Box n Ox social was a
blast T'was better than any in the
past Halloween is coming up soon
So let's party together in wild con
stume Love, The Sigmas
BUY A FRIEND
GDI
WANTKI)
PERSONALS
WARRENSY. Cocktails
Homecoming are almost h
psyched for a great ween
ya, Babus Ames
NEED CASH: Instant loans on
stereos, TV's, Gold, Silver or
valuable items Southern G
Pawn 752 2464
SIG EPS: Come out and support
your little sisters at Bea
Wednesday night! Lasl I
was a success let's do I
Wednesday! Your I ittle Si; I
ROOMMATE(S) WANTED:
room and bathroom. 32
od Villas Call 758 0479, ask
ny
ROOMMATE WANTED: Share 2
bedroom apt in Wilson Acres Call
758 7244 ask for Jamie
MALE SENIOR NEEDS DATE
Need date for homecoming Th,s s
not a marriage proposal just a
date Call Mixe at 752 2692
FEMALE ROOMMATE '
roommate needed to srare 2
bedroom duplex $13' -des
� 'ies t bath Call 756 6676 aftet
5 30
RIDE NEEDED: Looking for a
to New Jersey for Fan �rea Can
' nt'd on Page
Doonesbun
y4
lb. Steerburger
and Fries
.
There will be a
MANDA TORY TRAINING SESSION
for all new Honor Board and Review Board Members
on Tuesday, October I, 1985 in Room 244 Mendenhall
at 7:00p.m. Please contact Dr. Ronald Speir's office if
you can V make it. 757-6824.
only
$199

5'
� THERE ARE TWO SIDESTO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
it :


i


Man-O-Stick
- -
. - A
inn
is I 'C � I ' I .
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
3005 East 10th St.
Greenville
&�-
jftififr.
�tffrv
tmr
asv
American Legion Agricultural
3 0?K33�
� ruly Eastern Carolina's Greatest Regional Exposition! "J
. 30th
thru
OCT. 5th
V.
X
THE EXHIBITS � our
bit buildings wil, house theSesSbl WED-�URS. NIGHT 6:00 P.M. ALL WEE K " "
to be found pertaining to Agriculture In- "backforthe3-cnn.MtKv� - , . w:�JLL TT bounty Fairs 18
dustry, Education and Science as well
as livestock - AN ON GOING TR ADITION
AT THIS FAIR FOR 66 YEARS:
S
THE MIDWAY-Amusements of
America will bring to Greenville c col-
ossal "State Fair" type midway with 40 to
o0 thrilling rides, shows and other attrac-
tions. This is expected to be the largest
midway of any fair ecst of Rcleiqh � as
was in 1984.
ATTRACTIONS: TUES-
8�ht5 7:30 PM BAND
High School bands from Pitt and sur-
rounding areas will perform in the grand-
stand section - sponsored by local Band
booster organizations.�ADMISSION FREE
ccck for the 3' - consecutive year! Jake
Plumstead & Tonny Petersens a
cckea Hell Drivers Auto Thrill Show
having ust oiayed the Va. Stare -air at I
en rhe way to the N.C. State Fair� Grand-
stand areaADMISSION FREE.
ALL WEEK � The 1910 "Carousel
ueen Band Organ will be on disc
and playing nightly. - Truly a modern fa
with plenty of nostalgia! Rest area in front
of the organ.
ALL WEEK � Direct from the Easterr
iia.es Exposition � Springfield, Mass
Commerfords Petting Zoo and Circus
Menagarie � feed, pet, and see the exc
tic animals. (Small charge fcr pony end
elephant rides. ADMISSION FREE
amg Village of Yesteryear
recog-
3d now as one of me ;ecamg exhib,ts c
' e anywhere - steo back from 1985
nese t ngs are noT repjjcas
cur were brought ntact - the site ana
formed into an acua: village.) ADMISSION
Buy a ticket fcr an Armband fcr Tues mart
from your local Band Booster Club!
Wednesday. Oct 2
or Citizens Da - All Se
Citizens AaTinec
'ee
' ' � �� � College Night
� � � mmur �. ;ege j
�. It luder �
6 Big Days
& Nights
Sept. 30;h-Oct. 5h
1985
PITT COUNTY FAIR
Eastern Caroiinas Greatest Regional Exposition!
Soonsorad oy the American Lsgion Posts of Sreenviile, Farmviile 1 Ayaen
ADMISSIONS - Men Thru Fnaa
Aaults bo.00, kias free until 6pm kids St Sn
at nighr and en Saturday. "
MONDAY & THURSDAY �
ArmbancI nights. - Buy an armcand ar he
gate fcr $7.00 ana get unlimited rides on
the midway � 6 p.m. until.
TUESDAY - ArmDand night
$ .00 armDGnd from the Band V
Jubs of Pitt and surrounding counties and
get unlimited rices on the midway.
SATURDAY - Armcands on sa,e
from 1-6 p.m.
ur-
H-
� -
Tooth
T&ws. fm - TIT
. THING i
j'
jk
b
lA
$KZ�
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MR. ECU CONTEST
Wednesday October 2, 1985 9:00-2:00 a.m. Admission $1.00
850 Cans All Site
Prizes
1 C7C AA Cash or Gift Certificate & 1
Si Jp D.UU year's Free Pass to the Elbo &
Dinner for two at Chinatown
Express
Cash or Gift Certificate plus 1
Free Month at Gold's Gym & 1
vear Pass to the Elbo
Cash or Gift Certificate & Gift
Certificate at Marsh's Surf &
Sea plus 1 year's Free Pass to
the Elbo
Entries can sign up at the Elbo 9:00p.m.
2nd $25.00
3rd $15.00
Sponsored h
ranklin I anninp Salon Al ithing
I H
K' v kel Musi
Time Out
Stop Shop
For Heads Only
Vtan-O-Stick
BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
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Marsh's Sur Sea
Art A C amer.i
Flamingo Rev
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Suies f . .
East Carolina Student Union's
Special Concerts Committee
presents
HOMECOMING FINALE
FEATURING THE SPONGETONES
THE SPONGETONES

Sunday
October 6, 2:00-5:00 .
o
py
c
ramsite MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
ECU
Homecoming
w
Corsages
Flower Boutique
601 E G'eer e
$3.50
Grecrt
Mon. Tucs. Wed.
8oz Sirlion
99
Sirloin Tips
$2"
s4 yteat place to eatf
Western
Sizzlin
WH av
;i�.iKi

i





I HI I SI � HH S
Owls Topple Pirates
Sports
( '( l Hl k ,
By RI(KMi(ORMA(
i o Spam Mltm
ECU dropped its second con-
secutive toot ball game Saturday
night to Temple University 21-7,
a the Pirate offense never solved
the Owl defense.
Temple, using primarily an
eight-man front on defense, forc-
ed the Pirates to throw the ball.
Unfortunately, ECU was only
able to complete four of 21
passes, which led to the Iik
"You're not going to have a
good football team if you cannot
throw and catch the ball ECU
head coach Ait Baker said at the
post game press conference. "We
onl had one good drive the en-
tire game, and that was in the
fourth quarter. We Mopped that
one ourselves by dropping a
pass
The game started on a good
note for the Pirates, as senior
cornerback Kem Walker once
again came up with a big play for
the Pirate defense.
Temple tailback Robert
Palmer fumbled or; theKvl'
and Walker recovered I
ing opportunity �a- wasted as the
Pirate offense was unable
move the ball, and Jeff Heath
came on to attempi a 35
field goal. Heath was wide to
right, for his first miss 0 the
season, and the teams remained
scoreless
Temple wasted no time getting
on the scoreboard. They marched
80 yards in 14 plays to take a
lead.
Tailback Robert Palmer, who
rushed for 184 yards on the nig
led the Owl drive. Palmer carried
the ball for 50 of the 80 yards
eight carries. He scored the first
of his three touchdowns from 11
yards out. Bill Wright converted
on the extra point to make it 7-0
with 3:11 left in the first quarter.
ECU tied the score in the se-
cond quarter after Walker came
up with another big defensive
play. With Temple punting from
it's own 36, Walker busted
through for his second blocked
punt of the year and the Pirates
took over at the Temple 28.
After a series of running plavs
by Tony Baker and Bobby Clair,
the Pirates had first and goal
from the Owl five.
After a run by Baker netted
nothing, Jones kept the ball on
the option around the right end
for the score. Heath's p.I was
took over and marched 68 yards
to go up 21-7. Once again it was
Palmer who did the damage,
scoring from the three-yard line
to put the Owls ahead 21-7.
The Pirates however did not
quit, as they promptly moved the
ball into Owl territory. After
Jones gained 19 yards on the first
play. Baker followed with 15
more to put the ball on the Owl
42 The Pirates moved the ball
down to the Temple 26 before a
dropped pass on third down stall-
ed the drive
From that point on, both of
ECU's final drives were ended by
interceptions, as the game ended
21-7 in favor of Temple.
"It was a must game for them
and they were reallv well
I don't think we played our best footballWe
didn't seem to play with a great deal of
enthusiasm
mmmmm "Art Baker
good and the game was tied 7 7
with 5:58 lefl in the opening hair.
The score remained tied until
near the ei c third quarter
en a Pirate turnover set the
Owls up deep in Pirate territory.
An attempted screen pass k
Jones, thrown into .i crowd, was
tipped and picked off by Temple
tackle Doug Davis. Davis return-
ed the ball down to the Pirate six.
Palmer then carried the ball
over from three yards out tor his
second score o the night.
Wright's conversion made the
score 14-7 with 5:21 let! in the
�V:c! the Pirate offense was
unable to move the ball, Temple
prepared Baker said. "They
trolled the line of scrimn
When voi.
scrimmag n quarters.
usuallv wii
Baker placed much of the
blame for the Pirare loss on
himself.
"1 don't think we played our
best football Baker said. "1
don't think I had our players in
the right positions for them to be
successful. I have to take the
blame for that myself. We didn't
seem to play with a great dea I
enthusiasm. We aren't a verv
good team when we don't play
with enthusiasm
W'hile Bake w. disappointed
Ron Jones (8) throws down field as the Pirate offense line protect For the 1
EC I passing name will have to improve, according to coach Art Baker
sful, the
by the plav of his team, 'here
were a couple of bright spot
the Pirate faithful.
Kevm Walkei continued his
amaw with a I
punt, a tumble re I an
interception. Tailback I
Bake also played we
� 80 yard
him pa
fourth place
ing list.
"If we had 2;i
Perl ke K K
Walker i and L.
ild be a
�mmeni
Overall, Baker was di .
in tl ise, del
-
Men Netters Fall; Women Win
BvDAViDM.tiiwv 7 ���-wmm j MMML
By DAVID McGINNESS
Sl�ff Wrilrr
After as; g
UNC-Wilmington last Wednes-
day, the men's teai
short in Spider In
nis Tournment this weekend.
The Spider Invitational is
Oi tour team round robin style
irnament. The Richmond
Spiders �ted William and
Mary. Eastarolina and Rad
tord University in the two day
competitii
Top seed Dave Shell, who
Lame of! a big win against his
Dan Lament hits a forehand in a match played at the Minges Coliseum
tennis courts, where ECL will host Campbell University tomorrow.
Lady Buc Volleyballers
Troubled With Schedul
l Nt'W opponent last week, lost
to Harvie of William and Man
7 5, 6-1. Shell defeated Goodall
of Richmond 6-2, 7-6 in the
round two consolati acket.
In round three of the same
bracket She was defeated bv
Chaney of Richmond 6-3, 6-3 to
rush seventh in his High
Jon Melhorn was the top
finisher for the men with a 6-0.
6-3 victory over Iierney ol
William and Mar v. Melhorn
finished fourth in the "C " flight.
In doubles ECU's best results
came from John Anthony and
Pat Campanero. After a three set
first round loss to Policastro and
Slobin of Richmond, the two
came back for a 6-2, 6-3 win over
Jones and Reed of Radford
University. They went on to win
again in a comeback victory over
Nease and Waggoner also oi
Radford. 3-6, 7-5, 7-5.
The men are now 2-5 and will
host Campbell University tomor-
row at the varsity tennis courts at
3:00 p.m.
The ECU women's tennis team
emerged victorious this weekend
at the Eastern Collegiate Invita-
tional Tournament at Meredith
College.
"I was very pleased with the
womens' play this weekend
Coach Pat Sherman said. "Their
play in the doubles is really com-
ing along, and it shows
The Pirate women swept the
doubles events while capturing
the number four and six flights in
the singles competition.
I he number one doubles ream
Ann Manderfield ai
Eichholz maintain- .
this -
their n
round i h e v . :
Winston Salen I
Degroot and Mot
In the se;
ther straight -
t arawan and Hatfield ol Mars
Hill College 6-1, (
In the finals Mukerjee and
Smith ol Atlantic Christia
lege fell to the I
another straight set via
EC! .
The number two doubles team
oi Maria Swam and Tyra
Myers defeated Messich and
Hornthal or Mars Hill in the
semi-finals after receiving a bye
in the first round. Swain and
Myers squeaked by in the second
set tiebreaker after shutting out
their opponents 6-0 in the I
set. In the finals the two defeated
Van Meter and Rilev oiampbell
College 7-5. 6-4.
The number three doubles
team of Holly Murray and Becky
Clements also emerged as flight
champions. In the first round
they were forced to play three sets
as Cochrane and Core of Mars
Hill won the second set 6-3 before
losing by the same score in the
final set. In the semi-finals the
Lady Pirates trounced Gregotv
and Haneline of Winston-Salem
College 6-0, 6-0. In the finals the
two were again straight set victors
against Mattock and May o
Campbell College, 6-2, 6-3. With
By JANET SIMPSON
SJaff Writer
The Lady Pirate Volleyball
team had a little trouble this past
week as they managed to win on-
ly one of their six matches.
The Lady Pirates started the
week on Wednesday by traveling
to Durham to face the Lady Blue
Devils. Duke, who is one of the
better teams in collegiate
volleyball, was considered by
Coach Turner as the toughest
team they would face all season.
Despite a good effort by ECU,
the Lady Blue Devils won in three
games, 15-6, 15-10, 15-1.
Friday and Saturday were
spent in Winston-Salem at the
Wake Forest University Invita-
tional. Even though the Lady
Bucs came up short, losing four
of their five matches, they got to
avenge an earlier loss to the
University of North Carolina at
Charlotte.
Friday, the Lady Pirates fell to
host team Wake Forest, 15-4,
15-11, 15-13. Later in the day
ECU battled Stetson University
before losing, 15-10, 16-14, 15-7.
The Lady Bucs took the opening
game from Western Carolina
University, before dropping to
the Catamounts, 11-15, 15-1
15-7, 15-10.
Saturday started out bright for
ECU as they handled UNCC in
three consecutive games, 15-11,
15-8, 15-9. However Furman was
victorious in the Bucs final
match, 15-12, 15-9, 15-11.
The Lady Pirates, who are 2-8
overall, will face Methodist Col-
lege Wednesday night, Oct. 3 at
6:30 in Minges Coliseum.
their wins in this weei our-
narnem Cfcmems- and M
Ms � .
igles ip
In nun
V. V
Mukei jee oi AC C s-4, 6
sen
'ound.
In the number
Clements rolled over
opp
Mars Hill 6-0, 6-0. H wt
Maxwell ol U c
6-4, 1-6, 4-6 in the semi I
Maxwell wenr on to u
flight.
:ny Ziemer lost in the finals
ot the number three flighl
W endy Smith after giving up only
five games in her first two mat-
ches.
Lisa Eichholz controlled I
number tour flight with straight
set victories in the semis and
finals. Eichholz shut out Karen
� -land oi Mars Hill in the se
cond set after winning the first
7-5. In the finals she topped
Kathv Riley of Campbell 6-3, 6-3.
In the number five flight I ad)
Pirate Holly Murray lost 6-1, 6-1
to Susan Mattocks of Campbell
in the semi finals after receiving a
bye in the first round.
After a first round bye Maria
Swain went on to capture the
(light six championship. Maria
defeated Buffy Kirby of Mars
Hill 6-4, 6-2 in the semi finals and
Laura May of Campbell 6-2. 6-3
in the championship match.
�s e i
won rhe
Becky lements serves as Amy
Zeimer rallies in the background.
Athletic Department
Outlines Ticket Policy
rnntmiipri (rnm D,� i � �
� ��at o. A� -�"� � . J,M L1UTOENS � Tha East Carolinian
Just as Amos Adams (6) draws a crowd, so will Ficklen Stadium So he
sure to get your tickets before it is too late!
Continued from Page 1
Only a limited number of the
half price student guest tickets
are available, and they will be
issued on a first come, first-serve
basis on Tues Wed. and Thur
until the student guest tickets are
exhausted. Once the half price
student guest tickets are gone
only full nrice ($14) ticket will
be available.
Because of the past demands
on student tickets, students have
been able to pick up tickets on
Friday. However, if students wait
untd Friday to pick up tickets
the tickets may not be available
Therefore, we urge all students to
take advantage of, and follow the
student pickup days of Tues
Wed and Thur. in order to have
a chance to get good seats.
1 - tlVnith Carolina game
because ot fall break, the Athletic
Department will cater to the stu-
dent needs and student pickup
davs wil be. group pickup-Thur.
Oct. 17. regular student pickup
Fn.Oct 18, Iues.Ocr 22. Wed
Oct. 23, Thur. Oct. 24 Conse-
quently, it the students do not
Pick up all of their rickets tor
South Carolina on Thur In
Tues Wed and Thur (Ocl
18, 22. 23. 241 all the remaining
tickets will go on sale at the full
� ol $14 for everyone. This
policy will be strictly enforced for
the South Carolina game.
Nevertheless, no tickets from
the student allotment will be sold
to the general public until the
students have had their oppor-
tunity to pick up student tickets
on the days mentioned above.
I
Baker
K I SPORhlNfORMMItlN
HAKt.K VO, s i k, () 4
SPOT: V
against Temph
tailback Tony Bal
fourth place
rushing
The 5-11, 17
Point, N native n
career rushing
former E I .
lins (2,207)
England Pati
628 yards in th
ing seven gan
school's ail
Baker needi
jump into the '
held by Bit
with 2,512 car
The
record be
Crumpler, wh
yards in three se i
CAREER -
1. Caric
(1971-73)
2. Theodore -
(19" -
3. Bu
(1967-69)
4. TONY BAK1
TWENTIE'
jAMES HORI





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ft
tod' MLML w
if6.
Department
ficket Policy
g
b�
! Hi (ASH AKOi IMAN
i !OHI K IYK5
11
Bflfcer Overtakes Collins In Career Yardage
I l SPORTS INFORMATION 5. Anthony Collins football. mu� . O
lAtf MOVES l (. 4
SPOT: With his so yards rushing
nst Temple last week, senioi
ailback loin Hake: moved into
th place on ECU's all-time
ing tisi
Ihe 5-11, 176-pound High
iint. Nc native now owns 2.262
areer rushing yards as he passed
iei K I great Anthony Col-
's (2,207), now with the New
Md Patriots. Maker needs
8 wnds in the Pirates" remain-
i seven games to become the
ols all-nine leading rusher.
cr needs just 251 yards to
p into the No spot, now
I by Butch Colson (1967-69)
2.512 career rushing yards.
Ihe school's all-time rushing
rd belongs to Carlester
rumpler. who rushed tor 2,889
Is in three seasons (1M" 73).
v R R Rl SH1NG 1 is 1
carlester Crumpler
1971-73)2
rheodore Sutton
977-80)2,730
Butch Colson
967-69) 2 512
- rON BARt R(1982
2.262
Anthony Collins
(1977-80). 2,207
ECl AM) HOMECOMING:
Miami-Florida is without a doubt
the most notable Homecoming
opponent in ECU's history.
Ihe Hurricanes, 1983 national
champions, were ranked in
several preseason I op-20 polls,
and come into Greenville fresh
off an impressive 45 10 victory
over Boston College in Foxboro
Mass
The Pirates sport an impressive
20-5 record in Homecoming
games since I960, with their last
deteat coming in 1970 when
'hern Illinois handed ECU a
14 12 defeat. The current streak
is at 14 straight Homecoming vic-
tories. ECU's five Homecoming
losses since I960 are as follows;
1966: Richmond 28-16
1967: The Citadel 21-19
1968: Tampa 28-21
1969: Davidson 42-2"
1970: Southern Illinois 14-12
All live Homecoming losses
since I960 were consecutive
defeats, "his will be only the se-
cond time PCI plavs host to a
Florida scho I Homecoming,
fampa no longei plays collea
football
hi MIAMI (FLA.): This
young series has the Pirates on
the short side as Miami-Florida
holds a 3-0 series edge.
Ihe last tune the two teams
met was m 1983 when the Hur-
ricanes defeated the Pirates by a
slim 12 7 margin on their way to
an 11-1 record, Orange Bowl vic-
tory ovei Nebraska and national
championship. That 1983 season
ranks as most successful in
Miami football history, and
ironically ECU's 8-3 1983 record
also ranks as one of the school's
most successful since becoming a
major independent in 1977
I his will be only the second
time Miami-Florida has ever
visited Greenville, NC, and
Ficklen. Ihe 1981 season saw the
Hurricanes, led by quarterback
Jim Kelley, now with the USFI
New Jersey Generals, beat the
Pirates 31 6. At that time, the
Hurricanes were also coached bv
How aid Schnellenberger.
Below is 'he series breakdown:
1980: Miami-Florida 23, FCC 10
1981: Miami lorida 31, ECU 6
; Miami-Florida 12, EC! 7
183 game saw the Pirates
come within one pass of upsetting
the No. 5 ranked Hurricanes but
quarterback Kevin Ingrain's pass
to spin end Stefon Adams at the
goal line was knocked loose by
ECU tight end Norwood Vann as
time expired.
ECl VI RSI S THE Si VS7V
STATE: This will be the sixth
straight season the Pirates will
play a Division-IA team from the
state of Florida, and the Pirates
are still looking for victors No. 1.
Entering Saturday's game
against Miami-Florida, the
Pirates have found themselves on
the short side of the score against
Sunshine State schools eight
times since 1980, the first season
1 CU began upgrading its
schedule to compete with the
other Southern Independents.
The Pirates are 0-3 vs the Hur-
ricanes ot Miami-Florida, 0-1 vs
the dators ot Florida and 0-4 vs
the Seminoles of Florida State.
The Pirates were outscored 214 to
87 in the tour-game Florida State
series, 24-P m the one game
Honda series and 66-23 in the
Miami Florida series As a
whole, the three Honda sch
have outscored ECl 304 to
an average ot 8 points per game
to 1I 's 16.
lampa is the only other
Honda school to appear on
l( 1 all-time opponent list,
with that six-game series taking
place from 1953 55. 1963, 1V68
and 1971. Tampa, which no
longer plays college football, held
a 5-1 series advantage.
KEVIN K.K. WALKER: Senior
cornerback Kevin Walker has en-
joyd a season's worth ot success
in just tour games.
Ihe 5-11, 185-pound
Greensboro, NC native has now
picked oft five opponent passes
in four games, with two coming
against Southwest lexas State.
Also he has blocked two punts,
returning one 41 vards tor a
touchdown against Southwest
Texas State. His blocked punt
against lemple set up ECU'S on
ly touchdown.
Walker was tourth in the na-
tion in interceptions entering the
Temple game with his 1.33
average, and is now averaging
1.25 a game through four games.
xs alkei is also just five intercep-
tions 5hy of the single season
ECl record ot 10, held bv Jim
Holding during the 19"7 season
Walker also owns 14 career in
terceptions. which leaves him
eight shv ot Holding's career
record ot 22, which he acheived
from 1973 through 1976 Walkei
also shares with seven others the
1t single-game record o! three
interceptions, which he ac
-omphshed against Temple
1983.
LOOKING LIKE 1983: rhrough
three games of the 1985 coU
:ball season it is looking a
like 1983 tor ihe Miami H tl
ricanes.
That 1983 national champ
ship season saw the Hurricane
open with a disappointing .
loss to 1 lorida, then rolled to 1 1
straight victories, including
thrilling 31-30 win ovei Nebra �
in the Orange Bowl. I hi!
saw the Hurricanes drop tl
opener to Honda 38-23, but have
since rolled to victories over Rice
(48-20) and Boston I
(45-10). with both games on the
td. This week's game
the Pirates will be Miami
straight road game
Somewhere,
somehow,
someone's
going to poy.
TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX .SILVER PICTURES ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER "COMMANDO" RAE DAWN CHONG
- JAMES HORNER m JOSEPH LOEB III MATTHEW WEISMAN � JOSEPH LOEB III & MATTHEW WEISMAN �STEVEN E. OESOUZA
JX RICHARD TUGGLE � JOEL SILVER "B MARK L. LESTER �m'
-JCVKXi- C bpofjyfo,
Coming October 4th to a Theatre Near You.





i:
MI I v K I i A N
McGarret Five-0 Leads IRS Football Action
h jf annt i 11 roih
Stall W-ur.
Intramural
inues to d aciii
v schi w .mis in
independe
Mc iai reti Kixe-O ai I ake
Bo s v tssualt a
both eai ned �"� ei w
UMt's Mi i Ui't'K'
. �, i.n red t ive i :
k,�;
Bted Sij I) 4
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Kappa psiloi '( ' 4 6 w
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u .1.
�lav Sv V.
he Ci
d
I -
i S i
M(
' ! ampus. R gins ihis foi the upcoming fall activii
week Ihe Cross Campus Run Soccer, Bowling, Volleyball
- : ' �' mile a) ret 1! will ,oon be
�uk � warm youi wintei
� mi i ,i
i.
vea
.
VN
1 asi t arohna I nivei sit
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B.
ttonal whims I i mon inl rma
la ' n regarding any ol the I V;
menl ol Intramural Recreational
rs Services upcoming events, a
� ! - �
'�'
Don't torf
k adventure on h bad Iai '
I the D i
ol Intramural � jei Gym, r
horseba. K i idmg ti ips i-
H38
U
Frwh Daily
FOOD LION
rnCtt IN ffcw M �M nlff
Sft4a Oettfctr 6 IMS
Lb
Holly Farms Grade A
Whole
Fryers
V
Fresh Pally
5 U. Pack or More
Ground
� Chuck
forms
ftoHq
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef Round Full Cut
Boneless
Round Steak
We reserve the
right to limit
quantities.
USDA Choice Family Pack
USDA (
CHOICE
HslhFarmj Grade fl Regular & Counry Style
Cut Uf Chicken
58
Cube
Steak
US No. 1
white
JR. HOI R
SWIMMING POOl S

M-W-I ' a.m
� �
M i
M V
Ml
1 I
1 I
Minges Pool
-
WEIGH! ROOMs
Memorial
-
Mint's
IRMMNG ROOM
MKMORU1 (AMNVMl M
Y ret- Pla
M I h 3 p.m 4 45
; r
11 a.i
Sun I p
�4 4 10 based lit
EQ1 IPMEMUK KOI I
Memorial Gvm 115
M-Tl
I rida � 5:301
Sa:
Sun I p.m '
WANTKI)
eaveatlp.m Oct 18th Will pay 1 �
part of the gas Call 752 0796 ask tor
Dan
REWARD Free '� ' Daytona
plus commiss.or n r�ey � �� NTEO
Organied group it to
promote the - I i � ! Sor ng Bre
Tr.p to Datr a (interest) our
REWARD, can 1800 453 9074
MEDIATELY1 Or write
DESIGNERS OE TRAVEl. 1334
West Hampton Ave Menomonee
FatlS, AV 53051
CORRESPONDENCE My name is
Robert i Hoiims ana i am seeking
fr.endsfup understanding and a � I
ter exchange with anyone thai 5
wnmg to write1 We can only be
strangers once I am a black male of
38 Write to Robert i Hollms
06519 016, Delta Unit. EPS PO
Box 34550, Memphis, Tennessee
38184 0550
Greenville NC
$109
2 Liter Diet Coke Caffeine Free Coke
Caffeine Free Diet Coke Cherry Coke
T 1
Each
Sweet Urge
Western
Honeydews
Greenville N C
Pkg of 6 12 Oz NR Bottle Reg & It
Budweiser
Pkg of 12 12 Oz Cam Reg & It
Coors
3 liter Burgundy Chablu Rhine Ro�e
Masson
1o
J
99'
22 Oz Dishwashing
Palmolive
� 99 M
48 Or WHHtPink
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Grapefruit
r� Juice
2 Ak
49 0ttrx
6800 EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
:4 Detergent
Hi
s. .





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Title
The East Carolinian, October 1, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.428
Location of Original
University Archives

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