The East Carolinian, September 26, 1985






1
She
(ftaroltntan
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since IV25
Vol.60 No. 10
Thursday, September 26, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
2 0 Panes
Circulation 12,000
Marchers Hear
Faculty Speak
B ELIZABETH PAt.r
stiff Wmrt
"Democracy, yes! Apartheid,
no was the apparent theme of
Wednesday's rally sponsored b
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity to
protest apartheid.
ECU Students, faculty and
Greenville residents, gathered to
protest the South African policy.
A march was also included in ihe
rally beginning at Fletcher Music
Building and ending at
Mendenhall Student Center
Protesters shouted,
"Democracy, yes. Apartheid,
no gathering a rather large
group of supporters as the made
they way to Mendenhall.
The mam purpose of the march
was to enlighten ECU students
and faculty who realK d
know what apartheid is. ac(
ding to Anthony Bunch, p
dent of Alpha Phi Alpha Frater-
nity.
keynote speaker Re rlee
Griffin, pastor of Corners!) �
Baptist Church in Greenville,
openly denounced apartheid,
ing. "it's time to denounce une
quivocaily the Reagan ad-
ministration's po cy of construc-
tive engagement" in South
Africa. "No longer will the .
tolerate the brutal it and
madness that runs rampant in
South Africa added Griffin.
Griffin also quoted Martin
1 uther King Jr. saying "an in-
justice anywhere is a threat to
justice everywhere
crowd ol nearly 250 people
responded with great enthusiasm,
interrupting Griffin's speech with
applause several times.
"Peopk be educated as
fai as apartheid is concerned
said sue Haynie, a junior major-
ing in psychology, "and this pro-
test rally is a perfect opportunity
to gain knowledge i ; it
Several EC! administrators
spoke out againsi apartheid at the
rally. ce-Chancellor for
Academic ffairs i)i Angelo
Volpe jailed the rally a "fine way
foi ' idei essing their
and whose
time �
Vice' ' Student
Life 1Uyet als spoke at remembering
a hen he saw
his'� v. Kriei ds be the sub-
"kn
know sv . a 1 Ov. -
cur:ii ry m hich have
simias been go-
See FACl 1 r Page 3
ECU Program Top
By DOUG ROBFRsON
Miff Wr1i,r
LCL is m the forefront of th
expanding rse ol technology in
education, said Dr. Cobel, Dean
of the School of Education.
A program started b the
School of Education's Rural
Education Institute is bringing
physics classes to five high scl
in coastal North Carolina Ma in-
teractive broadcasting.
"We have a teacher that goes
to five high schools throughout
Beaufort and Hyde Counties. He
drives a van that is equipped to
transmit the class he is teaching
to the other four schools said
Cobel.
He added, "He teaches one
day a week at each school�this
gives the student' a chance to see
thei ;i in persoi . as .veil as
: tel� � ision the rcs! of the
week
� obe sa d he Ui � ersity is us-
the "most contemporary
inology" to teach technology.
This is among the first interactive
systems in the country. Right
now the voice is carried via
telephone lines. We hope to have
both the audio and visual
transmitted by satellite in
near future "
John Spagnolo, a 1985 science
education graduate from ECU, is
teaching the physics course. The
system allows students to ask him
question in any of the five loca-
tions.
See EDUCATION, Page 13
�w��
Clean UdLeuTG1N$ThEtc�nnni.�
ECU is putting on the ritz this weekend for ail the visiting parents,
who'll slowly make their appearance on campus tomorrow.
Although we've been told ECU will operate as usual this weekend
� no special put-ons for the parents, except for the planned shows
� we suspect the students will be on their best behavior anyway.
�� �
4J
Apartheid Marchers
JIM LEUTGENS - The East Carohn.an
Hundreds of ECI students turned out Monday to protest against Elmer Meyer and Associate Dean and Director for Student Services
ph a;C"r m S�"th Vri?' The march' HMMWored by Alpha Ronald Speier. told the crowd that America does not need to fight
K.i.rf f � T" 8t , � �f MUSiC Bnd ended al Mend�,nha" ano,h" �W issue aKain, especially not supporting one in another
acuity members, including Vice Chancellor for Student life country.
Gloria Approaches N.C.Coast
Bv MIKE I.I I)M( K
I-ram 'Matt A Wire Keports
"What we are looking at here
is possible major to severe
damage in Pitt County, as large
as the storm is. it u should come
ashore here said Bobby Jovnet .
director of Pitt County Emergen-
cy Management. "Anything can
happen. Pitt County is currently
looking at its emergency manage-
ment plans, but we're waiting to
see what it (Gloria) will do add-
ed Joyner.
Hurricane Gloria, one of the
fiercest Atlantic storms of the
century, held a steady course
Wednesday night that aimed its
150 mph winds at the Carolinas,
where forecasters said they may
ordet hurricane warning early
Thursday .
Spewing gales o 40 mph along
a VM)-mile front and slinging hur-
ricane force winds of 75 mph and
up over a 125 mile front was ex-
pected to gradually turn from a
northwest track to a more nor-
therly course. However,
forecasters reported in midafter-
noon the course change was
delayed.
A hurricane watch was posted
in midafternoon from Edisto
Beach, just south of Charleston,
S.C northward to Cape Henry
V.A.
Hurricane force winds of
mph or higher covered a radius or
"5 miles in the northern
quadrants from the center and 50
miles m the southern quadrants
Ihe center of the storm is 25
miles wide An Air force plane
Hying m the storm found wind
gusts in excess ot 170 mph.
According to L PI reports, Neil
frank, director of the National
Hurricane Center in Miami.
saidIf it maintains its strength,
it certainly has a potential storm
surge of 10 feet. It could be as
strong as 1 5 feet
Frank explained that ratio
damage potential increases rapid-
ly as the sustained winds of a hur-
ricane increase.
from 110 n

miles an hour, it just isn't a 50
percent increase in destruction.
You have doubled the destruc-
tion Frank said. "So anytime
you get an increase of 10 to 15
mph in winds you really get an in-
crease in the impact in the
amount of destruction
Student, Resident Rapport Needed
By DOl C ROBERSON
sijff Urilrr
Co-operation among students,
local residents, and police is
essential in dealing with the varie-
ty of traffic problems around
ECU, said Greenville Police
Chief Ted Holmes.
"In the area around 10th Street
and College Hill Drive and along
5th Street, there's a tremendous
amount of pedestrian traffic. Of-
ficers patrol these areas regularly
� we can't allow speeding
because of the dangers
involved Holmes said.
The Greenville Police Depart-
ment reported that 7105 tickets
were issued last year. "These
were predominately speeding
tickets, but it's not a large
number when you consider there
were over 2100 accidents and 450
injuries in Greenville last year
he said.
Holmes added that people not
familiar with the pedestrian and
traffic congestion around campus
WERE responsible for many of
the speeding violations. "We find
that ECU students know the
hazards of the area and realize
speeding is dangerous he said.
"People don't go out and say
'I'm going to speed Holmes
said, "It's usually caused by inat-
tention or bad judgement
Holmes emphasized the
department's recognition of the
"potentially high price" students
must pay for a speeding ticket.
"We don't like to give students
a ticket. If you take the court
costs, add the fine, and then add
the fact that their insurance rates
may go up�there's a potential
for a pretty expensive price for an
error we all make he said.
Another major concern of the
department is motorists who
drink and drive. "From an age
standpoint, white males ages 21
to 25 are the problem. Over 50
percent of out DWI arrest (1984)
came from this group Holmes
said. "Most students don't tall
into this category�they're not
an out of proportion drunk driv-
ing problem he added.
Holmes praised students and
University officials for the effort
both have made in reducing the
drink driving problem, "The
students and University have
been very helpful. Students are
riding the bus or walking home,
rather than drinking after going
downtown
Another metnod of reducing
the number of drunk drivers is
the DWI roadblock. "We have a
$50,000 grant that has been
recently renewed. As a part of
this, we will be haying DWI
roadblocks again this year
Holmes said.
Parking on city streets around
campus is also an area of concern
for students, as well as residents
and police.
"We realize there is a parking
problem for students. There are
two basic problems the depart-
ment worries about. One is
students who park in 'No Park-
ing zones or driveways. The
other is parking in areas
designated 'Residential
Parking Holmes said.
He added that students who
park near intersections are
creating a traffic hazzard.
The residential parking zones
were created in 1981 as an effort
to reduce the number of non-
residents parking in front of
houses near the University.
According to the ordinance, a
resident may purchase one park-
ing decal for each car he owns.
Vehicles without permit are
limited to 2-hour parking in the
following areas:
E.4th St. between Biltmore and
Summit
Jarvis St. between 3rd and 5th St.
Harding St. between 4th and Mh
St.
See PARKING. Page 13
WZMB Offers New Radio Show
By HAROLD JOYNER
( u-Nm KdHor
To make the campus and com-
munity more aware of ECU's
radio station, a new, informative
and up-to-date news show is of-
fered each week on vour FM dial,
91.3.
"Rewind" is the brainchild of
WZMB's News Director Warren
Baker, and he said the concept of
the month-old program is to pro-
vide the listeners with a news cap-
sule of the preceding week.
The program is divided into
four segments, which consist of
international and national af-
fairs; state, local and campus
news; special reports; and inter-
views with campus personalities.
"I basically select the topics
Baker said. "And with the help
of newscasters Sheila Davis
(Price) and Jeff Chester, we
manage to put together a well-
produced show.
"This show is just an example
of my personal pledge to make
WZMB and its news department
more visable to the campus and
the community Baker said.
WZMB has tried to present
news-type capsules before, but
Baker said they were unsuccessful
because of listeners' short atten-
tion span. "Our 30-minute show
has two, five-minute newscasts,
15 minutes of an interview and a
15-minute special report he
said.
So far, "Rewind" has featured
SGA President David Brown,
Greenville Mayor Janice Buck,
Economics Professor Brian
Dollerv and Media Board Chair-
man Mark Simon.
Special "Rewind" reports have
included President Ronald
Reagan's visit to Raleigh and
Wednesday's apartheid maich at
ECU. A report on N.C. Gover-
nor James Martin's visit to
Greenville today will also be aired
next Sunday.
"A student should be able to
turn his radio on to "Rewind"
and get an update on last week's
news. Except for the interview�,
everything is real short and to the
point he said. "We never
designed the program to give an
in-depth view of the news � just
what happened last week
Several investigative reports
are scheduled. Baker said, but he
would not disclose any details.
Ideas for the interviews, as well
as general input about the show,
can come from the students.
Baker said. "If anyone has any
ideas, suggestions or criticisms,
they are welcome to stop by the
radio station anytime during
regular office hours.
"We want to make the station
more visible and to get more
students involved in WZMB. We
care about what goes on
campus Baker said.
The show airs every Sunday at
2:30 p.m.
On The
Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds 16
Editorials4
Parent's Day Weekend 5
Features -j
Sports 17
�The East Carolinian proudly
welcomes all visiting parents
this weekend with a special sec-
tion. For more Information, see
Page 5.
� f JT J j J f 4? s .
. ,� � m r
'b
I





I HI I ST KOl IN1AN
JEPI1MBER26, 1985
PSI CHI
and snow your
1 �� "ns are .n
hi ma.ibo� an,) mtu Deaeptea un
Announcements
� -� f
ZETA PHI BETA
' ' ' let PH Beta would like to
. v - met interested iaj.es to attend Our
� - � rherusll will beheld In
� It - P m on Thursday
�and see what true
�OOut
SPIRITCONTEST
It ubt ���. Monday Sept
' Ui �Sh prize Break out the
ECU SURFING
� ' 's ' � 'ravel,ng to A lm
� ' npete against
ltrt�at9a.m ana the
� Gym �'sam
� ' eai . vr Friday n,ght
� �
be next Thurs
i room t Vendenhan
'� ' A I � shown and
' '� ' " � l i Break np to
1 - �� ' I � h members
� 'earn members
� pete rh s Saturday
TICKETS FOR MIAMI GAME
" -k ' " ' Wiam gamp g0 Qn
� rhev are
� ' Office be?
' ' � t a�
the same aays
� � " ' � the r ECU
I activity j - -s
� �� �
PPHA
.
hold a
it the Cultura
'� are en
OMEGA PSI PHI
� Pti
� -��,���, . .
SCUBA DIVING ADVENTURES
D,veBon8,re Nov 27th Eight day seven
nigh, trip ,nc,udM .� ,are from j��
bea.h. boat, and mght d,v,ng For more ,n
torma-ion , all �ay Scharf Director of
Aquatics. 757 6441
SAM.
Our next meeting ,$ Wed Octoberat 3
P m ,n Raw, ,0. Furney James from the
P'ann.ng and Placemen, Center ana
Donald Rose from Burlmgfon Industries will
speak on careers, recru.tmg and job infer
vews Everyone is invited
ECU AMBASSADORS'
Congratu,at,ons New Ambassadors We re
really excited about ,W. years evenfs and
navmg you w�h us P,ease come join us at
our General meeting on oct 2 at 5 15 pm ,n
Vendenhalls- Multipurpose Room Old
memberes lets show them why were the
greatest organisation on campus
INTRAMURAL
REPRESENTATIVES
MEETING
Ail intramural Representatives mus a-
tend this meeting Any0ne ,n,eres,ed ,s
welcome and ,nved to attend 5 p m ,n
�oom Brews.er C ,03 ,s the place and
Aeonesoa, Sept 28 is the day
PHI ETA SIGMA
Ph. Eta Sigma wm have an organizational
-eetmg Sept � at 5 ,5 p'm " ��
Vendenhall All members old and new are
asked to attend If further questions can
Jack at 752 1081 or Or Ebbs
KAPPA SWEETHEARTS
e kappa Alpha Ps, Sweethearts will be
sponsoring a bake sale on Wed Sept 25 In
front of the bookstore
MOVIE NIGHT
his Sunday and ever, Sunday n.gnt a, 7
en.oy a thought provoking move ano a
"Qht snack free of charge t,s
ebe. vv.fhru' A Cause � w,fh James Dear
Discussion afterwards Can 7� 2030 for
rnore ,nformal0n Sponsored b,
Presbyterian ana Methodist CamCu,
ViHiSTr.es
LOOKING FOR A
PARTTIME JOB?
We have a wide variety of possibilities for
ECU Students Call the Methodist Student
Center at 758 2030 on Mon or Wed after
noons for more information
STUDY REVELATIONS
Join us Thursday, Sept 26 at 243
Mendenhall for an exciting in depth study of
the Book of Revelations The King Youth
Fellowship Bible Study invites all members
and welcomes new members to attend Con
tact Jack at 752 ,081 or Kevin at 758 5130 for
more information
NEW LEGISLATORS
All the new members of the SGA
Legislators are invited to attend an orienta
tion session Mon at 4 p m ,n 221
f n� k " �rOUP 'ha' iS tested �"
f md.ng out how the Legislature works is also
encouraged to attend
RHOEPSILON
The Real Estate cub, Rho Epsnon. w,n
meet on Wednesday Oct 2 in Rawl 103 at 4
P m Guest speaker will be Real Estate
Broker and ECU Graduate. Coby Heath An
organuatonai meeting will be held after
wards All interested students are invited '0
attend
N.C. EMPLOYMENT
SECURITY COMMISSION
Representatives from the Greenville office
of the N C Employment Security Comm.s
s.on will be on Campus Thursday. Oct 3
from 9 a m 4 p m at the Student Supply
Store tc recry students who are interested
in par, time lobs available through Employ
men, Security
VETERANSCLUB
Our second meeting of ,he semester win be
held Thurs . Oct 3 at 7 30 p m m the CoMee
Mouse (downstairs) at Mendenhall A few of
the topics on the agenda will be Veteran s
Day activities, a possible Veteran s
Awareness Day and the development of the
club constitution which will include the
discussion of the organizations purpose
Basically, this meeting will be a brainstorm
ing session and will give you an opportunity
to offer ideas and concerns Membership is
open to students, faculty, and staff who art
veterans, military personnel veteran
dependents, and reservists Come on out and
enjoy the fellowship Refreshments will be
provided
.
Art Majors
Commercial or
Otherwise
Parent's Day Is
This Weekend!
Offici
r
















Experience the field of
commercial art and GET
PAID for it The East
Carolinian has one opening
for an advertising
layoutpasteup artist
Experience helpful but not
necessary. If you are
interested, stop by 2nd floor
Publications Bldq Mon-Fri
8-5
� The � us, CaroivMon ,� or etai opportune
� employe M. f V H

r
� ,?�































SUB slump
Elite's Clothing Store
2800 East 10th St Near J D Daw
sons
�?
OSTtWr
ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
YARNS
BASKET SUPPLIES
FURNITURE
MonFH.
12:30-5:00
Sot.
10:00-3:00
Ladies Fashion d Men 's Wear
SPECIAL GRAND OPENING BARGAINS ON
Ladies Sweaters & Jeans
and Men's Jackets
"A Comptote Meal On A Burr"
NOTICE
WE REGRET TO INFORM YOU THAT
AS OF SUN SEPT. 29th WE MUST
CHARGE $1.00 FOR ALL DELIVERIES.
CLIPCOUPON
With Coupon Receive
1 u ult
$
1
00
off our
We stock Jordache Lee. Ch,c Calv.n Kle,n and So
sson jeors
ECU ID 10ffo OFF
No.19
SUPER
SPECIAL
' -eese horn turkey bo
cappizoic
" ' special oni
COME AND GET IT SPECIAL!
a! onl'
215 E 4th St.
j
- CLIPCOUPON
Corner of 4th & Reade
752-2183
Anniversary
SALE!
sJ
Shetland
Wool
Sweaters

;v
Brody's own 100 Shetland wool
sweaters, with hand linked
crewneck, saddle shoulder and
2x2 ribbed neck, cuffs and waist
band Sizes S, M, L, XL Req
$28.00
Anniversary Special!
$21.99
Duckhead Trousers
Khakis are a staple in any wardrobe!
100 cotton trousers feature belted
plain front and are available in khaki,
navy, olive and grey Reg. $22.00.
Anniversary Special
$17.88
�"3 aKvry
�.�
Dyi :��� - � �
krcgfr sav
3uant . R :�-� - . � �
� - � Deaiei
K! miT
Register To
WIN.
A PAIR OF

Dirty Bucs"
The finest material fashioned into
shoes, where good looks and quality
make them first choice among men
everywhere! Reg. $58.00.
Anniversary Special!
$47.90
like no other men's store.
The Plazg
for men
Pirate
Football
Tickets
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
Tickets For
Each of the
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
r
t
Cooler
Potato
Chips
EXTKB
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� The Breeze A
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$2.00 Present Q
Off
The Admission Price C
)nly Friday, Septembei





I Ml I AMAROUMAN
SEPTEMBER 26, 1985
Day Is
ekend!
Officials Crackdown On Draft Resisters
fteai On A Bun"
ICE
FORM YOU THAT
9th WE MUST
ALL DELIVERIES.
off our
19
�R
TIT SPECIAL!
& Reade
83
K VSHINGTON, D. � PS
hi ni keeps
ate drafi resisters,
fficers sa
fall, 1985 the tit , were to
'nlisted formalh in the effort
e resisters isn't the ad-
ministrative nig they on e
expected it to be
1 .isi weel
sentenced D i id VVa i foi
ale � � refus
-v i ;tration
ouse ai
But college financial aid ot
ticers no longer have to help the
government punish, resisters, ac-
cording to regulations that went
into effect tins tall
Under a X2 lau popularly
called the Solomon Amendment
students must register for the
draft m otder to get financial aid.
To enforce the law, the l S
Department ot Education in 198
said that, suiting in fall. 1985
college aid officers would have to
verify if students were telling the
truth when they claimed to be
registered, and then would have
to deny aid to those who lied.
University officials forecast
massive administrative bo!
tlenecks complained the govern-
ment was making them do
something they weren't equipped
to do.
1 ederal officials have "no idea
ot the administrative problems it
will cause one financial aid of-
ficial said at the time.
"Validating each one of those
-indents will be very difficult
Hut this tall, when all the pro-
blems were to begin, aid officers
say the verification regulation has
been watered down, and is no
longer much ot a conc
I ducat ion officials agreed to
let aid officers ofl the hook aftei
they sampled student responses
to the draft registration query u
aid applications, and determined
W to 95 percent of students were
telling the truth.
In addition, the forms no
longer are required of ten
students or any other student
who don'1 have to register tor ihe
draft. Students now only have to
fill them out once while enrolled
al a school, rather than once
every academic year.
Dennis Martin of the National
i 1 inancila Aid
Administrators says he endorses
the revised requirement
No association members have
somplained about the work
tated by the revised reguia
tion he sa
Hut government efforts to
chase resisters continue.
Hatter stopped Wayte's com-
munity service, a frequent
sentence for other convicted
resisters over the last few years,
precisely because Wayte already
works as a volunteer at a school
and a soup kitchen in Pasadena.
Last week, U.S. District Judge
Terry Hatter sentenced former
Yalie Wayte to six months of
house arrest, and barred him
from performing any community
service for the same period.
Faculty Speak To Marchers
All-You-Can-Eat
ontinued'age lU.Ss poils metals come
Mom SouthVi! ica, Bi own said.
"we shouhnot susbstil
" Aparthei, it's a not sis racial injusl o subtle f
and i's tyra
simple said olpe. wh
1 SouthAfrica
and no; leaders.
h v
. id I
;ik we all klOVk "
sai �
Us�e.

"Our country lias fought this A political science student
issue once before, and we should wished to be anonymous said thai
not support the same thing in even though he was against apar-
another country said Associate theid, he was again
Dean and Director ot Student itself. He sugg 'lie rally
Services Dr. Ronald Speiet in a he held somewhere in Greenville
telephone interview. instead ot EC! 'scampi:
Men's Hair Styling
Pirate Fever
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East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th a Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD A SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
AU Transactions Confidential . i
BUY�SALE�TRADE
752-0322
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� Peter Adonis Show
� Doors Open 6:30 Ladies Show
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� At 9:30 PRE-GAME PARTY
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Saturday Nite
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� The Breeze Band Plays Your Favorite Beach and Top 40 Tunes
� Ladies Admitted For $2.00 Til 11:00
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$12.95
$10.95
$12.95
Smaller or Larger Cuts A vailable
C ompare Our Prices Compare Our Quality
We e Sure You 7 Be Back
Lunch Buffet M-F
11-2:00
5 meats � 6 Veg. Daily
Salad Bar
All You Can Eat $3.75
Fri & Sat Special
10 Oz. Sirloin
$6.99
Prime Rib (All YouCanEaij
$10.99
All ABC Permits
Owned & Operated by Riverside Oyster Bar
Hours Lunch M-F 11-2
Dinner Tues-Sat 6-10:30
7525001
'
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3ttf iEaat Ear0liman
Serving the Hast Carolina campus community since 1925
HRO! 1) JOYNI R i Vtm h
DANII M XI R K. , .
Rk K Mc ORMA . i
Scon c oopi k.
Debbie Sti vi s,
I ORIN PASQ1 !
DECH MI ! It HNSON
W4
Tom Norton, otma un,
Jay Stone Managing iduo,
TOM LUVENDER, Directm oj 4,hmLung
Anthony Martin, hu mmh��
John Peterson, m� ���
Shannon Short, ��-���Mn�n
Andrew Joyner, m &�
-
Mike Ludwick, ��� &��
Stephen Sherbin, Lifestyle, Edm
Opinion
Page 4
Apartheid
It is a land where blacks are not
allowed to vote for government of-
ficials or hold public office. It is a
place where blacks make up 72 per-
cent of the population, but most are
forced to live on only 13 percent of
the available land and this land is
the poorest and most desolate in the
country. According to the British
documentary "The 1 ast Grave in
Dimbazi only blacks who can
work are allowed to leave this land
that they are confined to called
Bantustans, and even then they are
forced to carry a pass issued bv the
government. If blacks are caught
without passes they go to jail and,
iccording to Amnesty Interna-
tional, are frequently tortured.
Blacks are paid much less than
tes. While black workers, com-
"1 percent of the labor
force, earn about 29.4 percent of
s hue workers, mak-
9 percent of the
force, make approximately
nt oi the total wages oi
In the area of
Kail I
feren
care the picture is no dif-
In 1980, the infant mortality
1000 births were 13 for
and 90 foi blacks. Perhaps
� iMiallv a result of the fact
hile tnere i me doctor for
J30 wl .is only one
� 19,000 blacks.
rhe hal erne s dear:
"�' a che ap and
' � a white
nl' d nies them
I ing an equitable
oi their labor.
pi ifir from this arrange-
e blacks are forced to
lei it.
' s of impending change
Yesterday's apartheid
ireness march involving nearly
n ECl students and some Green-
residents unleashed a political
een on this campus for
ars More to the point, it
essage from a substan-
k of the student body
� ice rose above the deafen-
ilence which usually prevails
to shout: "Democracy yes,
trtheid no A more eloquent
arid appropriate statement could
have been uttered. For
m :rac must come to South
Africa.
Vet, we must ask ourselves what
gible steps can be taken on the
of students at this university in
�he final analysis. Certainly divest-
ment is a tangible blow that can be
struck against apartheid. ECU,
however, has invested none of its
endowment fund in corporate
stock.Thus, it is not invested in cor-
: "rations doing business in South
Africa.
Other universities in the UNC
system are invested in South Africa
in this manner. Predominantly
black Fayetteville State University
ironically has invested 1.14 million
dollars in five companies doing
business in South Africa. UNC-
Wilmington has $510,000 worth of
stock in 11 companies with large
South African investments. Ap-
palachian State has 5894,1 (X) in 15
companies. UNC Greensboro has
$822,819 � a fifth of its total
holdings � in these corporations.
NC State has over $1.3 million and
UNC-Chapel Hill has $5.3 million
in endowment funds in corpora-
tions doing business in South
Africa. There are pro-divestment
movements at several of these
universities.
While endowment of our univer-
sity is not invested in South Africa,
part of our institutional funds
(money collected from dorm rentals
and so forth) which are managed bv
the State Treasury, are. These
funds are combined with institu-
tional funds of other schools in the
I NC system and invested in US
Treasury notes and commercial
paper issued by various corpora-
tions. Though ve have not been
able to obtain the exact dollar
amount of the investment in com-
panies operating in South Africa at
this time. Doug Chappell, director
of the state treasurer's investment
and banking division, told The Fast
Carolinian that some oi these funds
are invested in such companies.
It is clear that for an institution
oi higher learning which espouses
and supports democratic values to
support a regime which embodies
the very antithesis o such values is
a wrong that cannot go unaddress-
ed.
Since schools in the 16-campus-
strong UNC system do have in-
vestments in South Africa and ECU
is a part of that system it is clear
that we are not uninvolved.
Moreover, money from our school
has been invested in upholding
apartheid by our state treasurer or
our behalf.
We feel, therefore, that the
students at ECU should join in the
struggle of the students at other
schools in the UNC system who are
fighting against apartheid. We
should pass a resolution through
our student government legislature
calling upon the state and the UNC
system to divest themselves of all
holdings in corporations operating
in South Africa. We should send
copies of the resolutions to the stu-
dent governments of all schools in
the UNC system, the Board of
Governors, the state legislature and
Governor Martin. By so doing, our
university system and our state can
demonstrate its opposition to
racism and set an example for the
nation.
Students March In Protest
IH6AR1USS6 ARS 7D06H IMS FOR M SMNl 0W FARM,
Parents
ECU is planning to role out the
red carpet for parent's this weekend
when it anticipates that in excess of
2,000 parents of students will at-
tend the school's first annual
Parent's Weekend. Parents will be
treated to free movies, a picnic
lunch on the mall with entertain-
ment by the ECU Show Choir,
open house at residence halls, a
reception at the home of Chancellor
and Mrs. John M. Howell, the
football game on Saturday and still
more.
Parents will also get a special edi-
tion of the student newspaper, The
East Carolinian, containing an up
to-date schedule of the weekend's
events, a campus map, a map show-
ing where to park for the football
game, and an interveiw with the
chancellor.
We are happy to be of service to
the people who have sacrificed so
much in many cases to help make
an education possible for their
children. We salute and honor the
parents of our students and extend
our best hopes that they will have a
great stay here in Greenville.
Thanks are due also to the folks
who thought of having a Parent's
Weekend in the first place.
i
US Corporations Support South Africa
Divestment Strategy, Apartheid
U STONE
" I he South A'
siders it a � -dv ocate
divestment, whicl i surel)
how seriously I
His! 9g5
stratej
apartheid
inefl
tinual � �
sibility, ted Sta
It is. ofcours
administratioi cipal of
mural irresponsibility as the ver basis
.is policy
assumed power.
even the Administration
has been I i n: (derate us public
posture on sue as a result
oi the public � tcry igainst the apar-
theid regin ;en! ex s
inside tl untry. Foi example, there
tire Reagan's newly-announced sanc-
tions against South Africa, which were
proposed, both to appease the grow
opposition to his constructive
ment policy there and to head off a
stronger sanctions bill being proposed
by the Democratically-controlled House
of Reptescm.itr.es. The fact, however,
that Reagan's sanctions ate weak and
largely ineffective is no secret on Capitol
Hill or among anti-apartheid activists.
They are little more than a slap on the
wrist of the Botha regime which has an-
nounced its intention ol preserving apai
theid at all costs.
Another indication of the Reagan ad-
ministration's moderation of its statue
on apartheid is the shift in its rhetoric
between the spring and the summer.
When South African police fired upon a
large group oi black demonstrators
commemorating the 25th anniversary of
the Sharpesville massacre on March 21.
Reagan claimed a' a news conference
that the protestors were at leas? partially
to blame for precipitating the violence,
in which at least 19 demonstrators were
killed. "There is an element in South
Africa Reagan said, "who wants . . .
trouble in the streets
But by July, when Pretoria tightened
the screws b declaring a state of
emerenc. the Reagan Administration
was blaming the apartheid system. The
overwhelming votes in favor of anti-
apartheid legislation in Congress were
seen by the White House as a political
barometer.
Just as the Reagan Administration has
been compelled to moderate its position
on the South Africa issue those who op-
pose divestment mav be persuaded of
the logic of the tactic as opposition to
apartheid continues to mount in the
United States. For, the simple fact is
that the arguments against divestment
do not hold water.
First, the role of U.S. corporations in
South Africa is not, on the whole one
which encourages the abolition of apar-
theid. Secret General Motors contingen-
cy plans prepared in 1977 indicate that
the company would cooperate with the
South African government "in the event
of civil unrest" and theat "vehicles may
be taken over for Civil Defense pur-
poses
Control Data Corporation sold equip-
ment to the South African police in
violation of U.S. Commerce Depart-
ment regulations. Other firms such as
IBM supply computers used in maintain-
ing the pass laws, which keep all blacks
a pa
� i I
li a
Moi

v les,
I and computers Bv
erve its
norporation
ritract with SAS )1 ,
v i tnd Gas
n. is p . $4.2 billion
n plants to
p South Africa acheive energy self-
sufficiency and with in oil em-
bargo. Major I S. oil companies like
Exxon v ibf! '� � md Standard
(nl " supplying oil to

Thus. from
Kfrica is necessary because 1 S
lending md investment greatly
. hen the apartheid regime. As the
Senate Subcommittee on V fated in
inuary 1978 report: �'The net effect
oi American investment in South
Africa, has been to strengthen the
economic and military self-sufficiency
oi outh Africa's apartheid regime
Though the dollar amount of the U.S
investment is not so substantial that the
loss of such a sum would cripple the
South, African economy, the particular
sectors of the economy that are fueled
by American investments are crucial.
Without American investment in
automobiles, oil, energy and computers
it is reasonable to surmise that apartheid
would be deal: a severe blow. Perhaps
that is why the Internal Security Act of
1982 says that those who oppose divest
ment may be persuaded of the logic oi
the tactic as opposition to apartheid con-
tinues to mount in the United States.
For, the simple fact is that the
arguments against divestment do no!
hold water.
First, the role oi U.S. corporations in
South Africa is not, on the whole, one
which encourages the abolition of apar-
theid. Secret General Motors contingen-
cy plans prepared in 1977 indicate thai
the company would cooperate with the
South African government "in the event
of civil unrest" and theat "vehicles mav
be taken over for Civil Defense pur
poses
Control Data Corporation sold equip-
ment to the South African police in
violation of U.S. Commerce Depart-
ment regulations. Other firms such as
IBM supply computers used in maintain-
ing the pass laws, which keep all blacks
who the government chooses not to issue
a pass to confined to the Bantustans or
reservations where blacks are forced to
live by law.
Moreover, U.S. investment is concen-
trated in the most crucial sectors of the
South African economy � automobiles,
oil and energy, and computers. By
strengthening the apartheid economy.
U.S. involvement increases the ability of
the white government to preserve its
power. For instance, Flour Corporation
of California, on contract with SASOL,
the South African Coal, Oil, and Gas
Corporation, is providing $4.2 billion
worth of coal-to-oil conversion plants to
help South Africa acheive energy self-
sufficiency and withstand an oil em
bargo. Major U.S. oil companies like
Exxon, Mobil, Texaco, and Standard
Oil of California are supplying oil to
South Africa.
Thus, corporate withdrawal from
South Africa is necessary because U.S.
I
Note: There will be a lecture on South
Africa by Samual Asante, a visiting ro-
fessot from the Department of Political
Science, University of Ghana. The lec-
ture will be held in the Biology building,
room 103.
a I �

Africa, has bee- strengthen the
womic and military ifficienc)
partheid regime
I hough the dollar amount of the I S
substantial that
� such a sum would .ripple
tth frican economy, the particular
sectors ol the economy that are fue
by American investments are cru
Without American investment
automobiles, oil, energy and
it is reasonable to surmise that apart:
would be dealt a severe blow. Perhi
that is why the Internal Security Ac! X
!S2 �yj 'fiaf any person fn Sou A
Africa oi outside who supports div
ment commits the aime of
"subversion" ("terrorism" under the
lecessor law), for which the pena
is up to 20 years in prison. In spite of the
leaders of the trade un
�south African chui
black political organizations c
call for divestment.
In addition, it is quite possib
erican example of divestment
encourage South Africa's othei
principal investors Great Britain �
West Germany � to follow suit. W
have induced these nations to follow
lead on the stationing oi the Cruise a
Pershing 11 missiles on their soil,(i
that this was good) though West (
main was initially opposed to such
move, hence it is not unwarranted
believe that we might persuade them oi
the wisdom of heeding our council
the apartheid issue.
The Sullivan Principles, a volu
code oi conduct which calls for ;
segregation in the workplace and I
employment practices, are often toul
as an alternative to full divestment. Bv
adhering to the Sullivan Principles, it is
argued, IS corporations can be a I
for progress in South Africa. Ol com
even in 1984 only 122 of the 350 I S
companies operating in South Africa
were signatories of the six principles
Thus, compelling corporations to comp-
ly; with the Sullivan Principles would
quire new legislation with significant en-
forcement provisions. Vet, even if the
principles were observed the) would on-
ly affect the 66,000 workers employ
bv U.S. corporations, fewer than one
percent of all working people in South
Africa.
More significantly, however, the
Sullivan Principles make no demand for
change in the fundamental structure ol
apartheid, no demand for black politics
rights. Blacks would still be prohibited
from voting or holding office. They,
therefore, are not a promising tool for
bringing an end to apartheid. Even if
U.S. divestment caused the blacks who
are employed by U.S. corporations to
lose their jobs this effect would be offset
many times over by the impact that an
end to apartheid would have on the great
masses of blacks everywhere in South
Africa, particularly that huge majoritv
that is not employed by U.S. companies.
Hence, we see that, not only is divest-
ment a perfectly reasonable and in-
telligent strategy for bringing about an
end to apartheid, it is also a morally im-
perative one.






fflSI CAROL! uni
cftmi

?
tr
ll Kl
9-11:30 a.m.KtytNtrs
9:00 a.m.rt fxhibil
9-11:30 a.m.(ampuv It
9:30 a.m.snack Bar
9:30-1 p.m.student m
10-11:30 a.m.( hancelior
Parents'
l f�i Rurrtu
More than 2,00
1 ast Carolina Univ
are expected to participate in I
school's � -
Weekend on Satui(
Activr
weekend include a free mo
Friday evening, followed
Saturdav bv tours oi the campu
a picnic lunch
mall with entertainment bv tin
ECU Show Choir, open house a
residence halls, sorority l
fraternity houses; a tree m
and the ECU-Tempie footbal
game Saturday night
Response from parents s l
has been tremendous "VAe'vel
sold 1,129 football tickets.
Ron Speier. associa'e dear-
students and Parents' Weekend
committee member 'Thcl
students may still use thrH
regular free ticket on their
A





ARM,
1 nartheid
amen the
j
f the I S.
ripple the
theid
Perhap
� on in S(.uiff
app irts divest-
o t
he
lit)
he
and
ue to
�ssible thai ai
� � stment might
uher two
Great Britain and
� How suit. We
� follow our
he Cruise and
�il,(not
West Ger-
such a
irranted to
ide them ai
� �
i voluntary
� r non-
md '
ten touted
tment. B
pies, it is
� e a force
I i course,
e 350 L S
South Africa
principles.
ns to comp-
ples would re
ant en-
ven if the
would on-
rkers employed
fewer than one
eople in South
however, the
emand for
lamental structure of
- black political
be prohibited
ffice. They,
mising tool for
ipartheid. Even if
tused the blacks who
i S corporations to
m wild be offset
the impact that an
irtheid would have on the great
blacks everywhere in South
particularly that huge majority
not employed by U.S. companies,
Hence, we see that, not only is divest-
i perfectly reasonable and in-
telligent strategy for bringing about an
end to apartheid, it is also a morally im-
perative one.
ote: There will be a lecture on South
triccj by Samuat Asante, a visiting -ro-
I or from the Department of Political
�nee, University of Ghana. The lec-
ture will be held in the Biologv building,
room 103.
,1;
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1983
,�'



















?
































Friday
Saturday
Parents' Weekend
Sunday
. ,in, Pt"
� l,
p'ti Piad Shopping Cenlei
vVdJ
jr
fflsi cflfiOLine
5bf.9
. V �
I jt-�-niiite s 1
pptng entei
s?'


J StrtM �
dZ? fey
Parking Plans
Schedule of Events
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1985
9-11:30 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
9-11:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
9:30-1 p.m.
10-11:30 a.m.
Registration
Art Exhibit:
Campus Tours
Snack Bar Open
Student Stores Open
Chancellor's Reception
Mendenhall Front Lounge
Mendenhall Gallery
Mendenhall Patio
Mendenhall
Wright Annex
Mendenhall
12 Noon-2 p.m.
12 Noon
12:15 and 1:15 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
5:30-7 p.m.
7 p.m.
Picnic Lunch
Music School Performance
ECU Show Choir Performance
Open Houses
Movie: A Passage to India (PG)
(Free Admission)
SGA Transit to Football Game
Football: ECU vs. Temple
Mall Tickets Required
Mall Band Shell
Residence Halls
Fraternity houses
Sorority Houses
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Bus Stop
Ficklin Stadium
Parents9 Weekend
ECl Ncm Bureau
More than 2,000 parents of
East Carolina University students
are expected to participate in the
school's first annual Parent '
Weekend on Saturday, Sept. 28.
Activities planned for the
weekend include a free movie on
Friday evening, followed on
Saturday by tours of the campus,
a picnic lunch on the
mall with entertainment by the
ECU Show Choir, open house at
residence hails, sorority and
fraternity houses; a free movie
and the ECU-Temple football
game Saturday night.
Response from parents so far
has been tremendous. "We've
sold 1,129 football tickets said
Ron Speier, associate dean of
students and Parents' Weekend
committee member. "The
students may still use thfir
regular free ticket on their ID
card to bring family members to
the games, so it's conceivable we
could have a lot more
"It's our job to make
everybody feel good about East
Carolina said Page Ann
committee member and alumni
field director "A lot of the
parents whd are coming ar
parents of freshmen. When a
parent sends an 18-year-old off,
we want them to feel good about
the decision that a student has
make
U ts important, Speier says, for
parents of students to become
familiar with campus facilities,
and to .neet with faculty and staf
members �
Student Government Associa-
tion vice president Chris
Tomasic, Parents' Weekend
Committee co-chair, made sure
his parents, George and Fran
Tomasic of Durham, were the
first registered for the event.
� � � "�� V � - "V �� . �. ")fc - � r- . m m - �
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'





HE1 MSTCAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER,VM
24-Hour Services
During the regular academic
terms, the Student Health Center
is aailable to students 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week. Out-patient
clinic hours for the physicians are
8 a.m4:45 p.m. Mon. Fri. and
:30p.m5:30p.m. on Saturdays
and Sundays. The physician on
call is readily available during the
remaining hours at the discretion
of the charge nurse. Thus,
emergencies can be easiK handled
at An houi.
Because the Student Health
Service budget is derived entirely
from student medical tees, most
services rendered b the Student
Health Service are tree. The tees
-over all professional services.
selected drugs, and many
laboratorj procedures. Routine
allergy, insulin, or other injec-
tions are administered by the
nurses without charge, and the
serums can be refrigerated in the
Center. Confidential diagnosis
and treatment of veneral disease
are included in the services of-
fered. However, thecosl of meals
in-patients, lab tests perform-
ed outside of the Student Health
Center, prescription drugs, and
expenses incurred as a result of
referrals to off-campus physi-
' hospitals are charged to
idents. Students with han-
aps should be assured that
leni Health Services facilities
v accessible and that the
physicians are qualified to assist
with special problems and oi
ferrals.
The Student Health Service
o provides psychiatric services,
ch are available on a part-
e basis bv appointment only.
Gynecological services are
tilable at the Student Health
Cei 5 services include
ptive education and
eling, breasi and pelvic ex-
nation, pap .mears, all in-
ited lab procedures and writ-
prescriptions for oral con-
traceptives, and other ap-
ite medicaton. Pap smears
scheduled in advance bv ap-
ntment.
eciaJ requests for medical
A " : changes in class
ol health
Director of the
Health Service. Medical
rms I ir students who require
� privileges for parking,
assignments, and physical
n tor medical reasons
must be approved bv the
Director.
tor surgery and serious illness.
A group student health and ac-
cident insurance plan has been
selected by the Student Health
Advisory Committee and is
available to all ECL' students. It
is an inexpensive plan specifically
designed for the needs of ECL
students. A brochure will be
mailed to each student. Further
information can be obtained at
the Student Health Center.
ECU's Student Health Center
has the highest utilization rate ot
any of the universities in North
Carolina, according to Director
James McCallum, M.D.
"During the last fiscal ear, we
saw 52,961 patients McCallum
said. "That's more than Pitt
Memorial Hospital's emergency
room and the Family Practice
Center combined McCallum
added that such a high utilization
of the infirmary speaks well of
ECU's Student Health Services.
All funding for ECU health
services is provided through stu-
dent health fees, he said. "This
includes personnel salaries.
equipment and supplies, drugs.
building
maintenanceeverything
However, every effort is made to
keep health care costs down, he
said.
ECU'S health fees rank
"around the middle" in relation-
ship to the other 1? schools m the
UNC system, but was at the "top
of the list" in terms of the
number of services the students
receive for their money. "Several
of the schools offer some services
for free, and charge for others.
We're the only on that provides
free medication McCallum
said.
The only services students are
charged for are laboratory and
other procedures that must be
performed outside the infirmary.
Prescription drugs, such as birth
control pills, are provided to
women at cost, which McCallum
said is often less than half the
cost of the prescription through a
drug store.
McCallum said Center's
ultimate goal is to educate
students, as well as to provide top
medical care. For example, a
female student who requests birth
control pills is required to have a
Pap smear to test for cancer, a
full physical examination and at-
tend a lecture on the dangers of
the pill. "They are required to do
these things so they can make an
informed decision on the pros
and cons of birth control pills
he said.
Another educational aspect ot
the Center is the self-help cold
center, which began in Sept
1984. "We teach individuals how
to take care of themselves when
they don't need a physician
Cricket Inn
M 1 DEN1 HEALTH IV
Sl RANCE All students are
-�d to have health insurance
erage ol some type. It is im
'am to remember that the stu-
dent health fee does not cover the
ol x-ray, certain lab pro-
cedures, and referrals to off-
campus specialists in to hospitals
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
821 S. MEMORIAL DR.
Two Blacks From Hospital & Minutes From ECU
Snume Bus To Hospital Airport
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPER
VALET SERVICE
LUXURY ROOMS - AFFORDABLE PRICES
EXECUTIVE SUITES AVAILABLE
CALLCOlLtCT91�-7S-5544
BUY & SELL
WE PAY CASH ON THE SPOT
FOR
0 FURNITURE
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
TV'S AND STEREOS
APPLIANCES
(Large & Small)
SILVER, GOLD
& Collector Coins
?.�
L
I
Great n
Stea
, a great price
C
WATCHES, CAMERAS,
BINOCULARS, ETC
COIN & RING MAN
DOWNTOWN
CORNER 5TH & EyANS EVANS STREET MALL
I
-
s4 yuxit fUtice to eatf
STEAK HOUSE
Oyster

�- ,V�
Take-outs
Welcomed
710 North Greene Street. Greenville. N.C
752-0090
DINNER SPECIALS
Store Hours
M-VV 1J-9
TF.Sun U-io
Sat 4 10
V
Fisherman's Platterxi
Select 3 Items
Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrimp
Clam Strips
Steamed Crab Leas
Shrimp Creole
(Fri. & Sat. Only)
Oysters
Scallops
Catfish �
Barbeque V
Fried Chicken
50
Oyster
Bar
Now Open
Steamed
Oysters
Served
5:00 P.M.
'Til Closing
fS Captain's Platter
Select 4 Items
Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrimp
Clam Strips
Steamed Crab I egg
Shrimp Creole
(Fri & Sat Onlv
Oysters
Scallops
Catfish C Cfi
V Barbeque V�Ji
TXFrted Chicken
Fried Chicken
Fried Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Trout
Fried Oysters
Shrimp Creole
(Fri. & Sat. Only)
Soft Shell
Crabs
2 Large Crabs
2 Vegetables
All You Can Eat Extravaganza
Flounder
Deviled Crab
Barbeque
Fried Catfish
Your Choice Of
As Many As
5 Items
Steamed
Shrimp
1 Lb
(In The Shell)
Baked Potato & Salad
7.50
'With Alaskan
Crab Legs
$9.50
V
Steamed n
Seafood Feast V
AlxcL k L. t Ik
Alaskan Crab I fqs
Steamed Shrimp
Sautecd Crabmeat
Baked Potato
Salad
a �� � ' � �
- 4
Plavti
Iheve students take time out from J
wn, coartes) of Intramural Recrel
EC I students ant to know a littlj
In
vestors an
RINGCOl I
At Tlie Campus �l
1
an
T
��
���,svv.v.vw�
9 !
Clip Coi
Tailgating

Chicken & Ribs Comb
jjl Whole Chicken
l Full Rack BBQ Ribsl
4 Corn on the Cob
or
?2 Whole Chickens.
i4 Corn on the Cob
2 Full Rack BBQ R
4 Corn on the Cob
or
bs
xtras:
Potato Salad (Reg. 7c)
Maccaroni Salad(Reg. 67c).
$ Pasta Salad (Reg. 47c)
wvwvwwvvvvww' Expires Dex
Open 7 Days
Corner of lOtn 4
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1985
&� w
W to- eatf
HOUSE
V ��f
���- ,v
I !
lirt's Platter
e t 4 items
)f Yournoire
s650 v
avaganza
s7.50
With Alaskan
( rab Legs
$9.50
Steamed
Seafood Feast V
s
Steamed Shri
Salad
$795
7
i
Intramural Activities Are Fun
- �
Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices (IRS) is an exciting, leisure-
oriented facet of student life on
the ECU campus, according to
the Office of Student Life. Its
name is synonymous with enjoy-
ment, relaxation, friendship,
physical activity, voluntary par-
ticipation and a welcomed break
from the study routine. The
Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services, located in
Room 204 of Memorial Gym-
nasium, is responsible for men's,
women's and co-receational in-
tramural activities, informal
("free play") recreational ac-
tivities, recreational swimming,
sport clubs, outdoor recreation,
adapted recreational oppor-
tunities and the recreational
equipment check-out services.
The department also provides a
sports medicine program for
sport club and intramural par-
ticipants, with provisions for first
aid, preventive and rehabilitative
services.
INFORMAL RECREA-
TIONAL OPPORTUNITIES �
tree play opportunities are
regularly available at Memorial
Gymnasium and on a limited
basis at Minges Coliseum. The
Memorial Gymnasium facility in-
cludes a multi-purpose gym-
nasium, exercise rooms and a
"fixed weights" weight room.
Minges Coliseum includes a
"free-weights" facility, recquet-
ball courts and a multi-purpose
gvmnasium. Playing fields
'ocated in the Ficklen Stadium,
College Hill and Allied Health
areas are available for students
on an infoimal utilization basis
when the areas are not scheduled
for intramural activities. Picnic-
areas (tables and grills) are
located within the College Hill,
Central and West campuses.
� Over 35 hours of recrea-
tional swimming are available
each week through the Memorial
Gym and Minges Coliseum
pools. Early morning, mid-day,
afternoon and evening hours are
scheduled for each weekday, with
an expanded afternoon schedule
for each weekday, with an ex-
panded afternoon schedule
available during weekends.
RECREATIONAL EQUIP-
MENT CHECK OUT SER
VICES � Students may check
out a wide variety of recrea-
tionalsports equipment from the
Memorial Gymnasium equip-
ment room (MG 115). Such items
as basketballs, footballs, golf
clubs, tennis and racquctbali rac-
quets, softball gloves, volleyball
standards nets and horseshoe
equipment are available at no
charge.
U.
JIM LEUTGENS Th� Eiil Carolinian
Playtime
These student take time out from classes to enjo a little fun in the
sun. courtesy of Intramural Recreation Services � the only IRS
LCI students want to know a little better.
Investors and Parents:
)M KS UNITS AM AVA1LA
FOR RESALE. . AR STUDENT COUVC
ik � ms sou in si: - - m
WIT, . . m � ?R INFORMATION THE
INITS AfAi � 1 ��� TART AT $37,90 ' .
� �
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At Tlie Campus mEast Carolina University

mrv pei mi
3PERTV BROKERS
919 756-84IO
830-1530
f.wA,wwvAw Clip Coupon
Tailgating Specials
j Chicken & Ribs Combo$12.95
Jl Whole Chicken
il Full Rack BBQ Ribs
j4 Corn on the Cob
or
l Whole Chickens$12.95
?4 Corn on the Cob
i
il Full Rack BBQ Ribs$12.95
?4 Corn on the Cob
Extras:
Potato Salad (Reg. 67c)50cServing
Maccaroni SalatHReg. 67)50cServing
Pasta Salad (Reg. 47c)50CServing
Expires Dec. 8, 1985 r
Open 7 Days '1 a.m. �11 p.m.
Comer of 10th & ChoHes Blvd.
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
jMrits&n3o
CHILDREN
ANYTIME

BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center ,
Held Over 2nd Week
YEAR OF THE DRAGON r
3 SHOWS PAIL V 2:00-5:00-8:00
Starts Friday Jane Fonda in
"AGNESOFGOD"
Shows 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00 PG 13
Starts Friday
Raik B P putar Demand
COCCOON pc,3
Shows 2:00-4:30- 7:00-9:15
��at -WOMEN fcHSXEHI
LA TI SHOW AT "
$HMt�ii:x pi a v" UEZMSStiSM x�
NOriun i MaX I AAV
HO PASSES
mrmtm
Tjcjyr()cr VbftMinuib welcomes
E. C. U. PARENTS
ALL
For parents weekend take advantage of the delectable
All You Can Eat A. Drink Specials featured at
7tf Vlrfor Qicstaumnb
Crab Legs & Chablis
Sweet and Succulent Alaskan Crab Legs
?� �?
$10.95
�?-??-
Shrimp and Chablis
Tender shrimp fried, boiled, or broiled
$10.95
?�.�.
Beef & Burgundy
The best Prime Rib ever'
$10.95
All specials include a stuffed or baked potato
and a trip to our 40 item Salad Bar
Come and taste the extraordinary!
We promise you won't be disappointed
Special Parenu IHy
Weekend Hours
Frl. 27th from
5:00 p.m10:00 p.m.
Sat. 24tb from
5:00 p.m11:00 p.m
Arbor Restaurant
I .vated at the Ramada Inn
301 Greenv.Ue BivJ
Greenville, NC 27834
Auto Specialty
"The Engine People"
629 Dickensen Ave.
2 Blocks From West Campus
Downtown
Next Door To Pirates Landing
758-1131
Auto Specialty welcomes all parents to
ECU. We would like to take care of all
your auto service needs. Auto Specialty
feels that it is important that parents of
students attending this university be
consulted when a students auto needs
servicing. We will be glad, if requested, to
call a parent about any problem that
may arise with the students auto during
the hisher stay at ECU. We take the time
to show you the problem and fully explain
any repair.
H.L. Austin, President and Owner of
Auto Specialty and a graduate of ECU,
knows that many times the student is
taken advantage of. Auto Specialty is
dedicated to give the student honest and
reliable service at a reasonable price.
Come see wrut makes us different from
the rest.
�All Types General
Repairs
�Complete Radiator
Shop
�Machine Shop
Engine Rebuilding
�Foreign Car Engine
Rebuilding
�Oil Change
�Tune Ups
i





8
IHE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 26, lv
Center Helps
All students are encouraged to
seek guidance regarding the
employment process and career
decision-making. Call or drop by
the office in Bloxton House to
discuss any areas of concern
which you may have pertaining to
choosing an occupation or ob-
taining employment. SIG1, a
computerized system of Interac-
tive Guidance and Information is
available for all students to use at
no cost. The system helps in-
dividuals make informed career
decisions. A vast store of occupa-
tional data, developed over a 10
year period of time and made
current each year, is available for
students to draw from. SIGI
helps its users to clarify their own
values, explore occupational op-
tions, develop educational plans,
and learn how to make informed
decisions. This program is excep-
tionally easy to use with very little
orientation or assistance. Come
by or call the office to make an
appointment. Occupational
Literature � for assistance in ob-
taining information on business
firms, school systems, govern-
ment agencies, and career plann-
ing, resource rooms are located in
the building and are available to
all University students and alum
ni. Take advantage of this service
and become acquainted with the
opportunities for employment in
all the various occupations.
Workshops are conducted on in-
terviewing techniques, resume
writing, job search strategies, and
the various aspects of career
planning. A listing of these
workshops is circulated each
semester, and is printed in The
East Carolinian's an-
nouncements, giving the time and
location of each session. Video
equipment is available for prac-
tice interviewing. Appointments
can be made by contacting the of-
fice. Job Openings � Students
who register with this office are
notified of vacancies which exist
on a monthly basis via a job
openings list. Interviews - As a
part of the monthly job guide,
registrants are notified of
recruiters who will be visiting the
campus and are given an oppor
tunity to sign up tor the inter
views.
Campus Media
Student-sponsored media at
East Carolina University operate
under the authority of the Media
Board. Publications at ECU in-
clude THE EAST
CAROLININAN (semi-weeklv
newspaper), the BUCCANEER
(yearbook), REBEL (literary
magazine), and EXPRESSIONS
(minority publication). WZMB is
the student-operated FM radio
station serving the campus and
surrounding area. The Photo Lab
is responsible for providing the
photographs for the various
publications.
The members of the Media
Board include: Presidents of the
Student Government Associa-
tion, the Student Union, the Stu-
dent Residence Association, the
lnterfraternity Council, the
Panhellenic Council and Minori-
ty Students Organization. Other
members include the
representative-at-large from the
Student Residence Association, a
day student appointed b the
Board, an administrator ap-
pointed by the Chancellor of the
University, and a faculty member
representing the Faculty Senate
The Vice Chancellor for Student
Life serves as advisor
ECU Alumni Center
According to the ECU Alumni
Center, students are "alumni in
residence
According to Assistant Direc-
tor of Alumni Affairs Page
Aman, studnts are only students
for four or five years, but they
are alumni for the rest of their
lives. "We want graduates to
maintain contact with ECU as
their lives change said Aman.
The best time to begin those ties
is while they are still students, she
said.
"We want students to know
about the services and relation-
ships available to them through
the Alumni Association said
Aman. ECU would train the
students to be alumni.
Students get new jobs and
often times move away to an
unknown region. THe AJumni
Center is trying to make an "ex-
tended family" that would be
very beneficial to the young
alumni.
Through the Alumni Associa
tion and alumni chapter involve
ment, today's students can
graduate with ready contacts
from the Alumni Association,
which in many instances can ease
the situation of being far away in
a new job.
ECU Ambassadors, a student
group of official University
representatvies, provides a
natural liason between the
students and alumni. Sponsored
by the Office of Institutional Ad-
vancement, Ambassadors work
closely with the Alumni Associa
tion hosting special functions on
campus for the Chancellor,
visiting lecturers and artists, or
prospective students. Am
bassadors also conduct campus
tours, speak on recruiting trips
with the Admissions Office and
call alumni during the Annual
Giving telefund
TAIL-
GATE
N
ime
Out
m��t
RIVER BLUFF
� � A partn �
jement and Maintenance
es & ' Bedroom Garden Apartments
�� Rood
sP1T1RJEPTAPS
cAEEVaA R1L
ARjKfP ORitGO
R1SW EEEmhmE
�APlEL iTEASEp
AIL. A"IBrNJN
PEL110BBALT IO
ELAW;AIIPES S
H!BYIEAJRQSiAM
p ?1 11 sPARHAD
AGosN IEERLE
C0NSTE RNAT10N
TREEWE11�DES
Process & Print i
2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 P-eces of Chicken
l Biscuit
l Mashed Potatoes w Gravyi
$1.89
1J1M I
???????????????.
13V2$ per print i
L i � �"
Now $4.73
Carolina East Mall
North Enirai i , .�
756-6078
OPEN MON SAT
8 AM to 9 PM
�' ns
600 A Greenville Biva 7S6 6-134
2905 E 5Th St 752 5184
??????�?????????
X
Tailgate With Time Out
On Football Saturdays!
Chicken Bucket Specials
6 Pc. & 2 Biscuits0oW '4.74
9Pc. & 3Biscuts0y $7.1 1
12 Pc. & 4 Biscuits 0nW '9.48
15 Pc. & 5 Biscuits 0M $1 1.85
21 Pc. & 6 Biscuits016.59
Also Try Our Breakfast Buffet
6am -10 a.m.
only $2.49
Located off comer of 10th & Cotanche Streets
Ocen 24 Hours
758-2098
I
t V� 10-i 8
South Park
Amoco
4tfttk
AMOCO
756-3023 24 hrv
'Tired of perfumes and ties?
GET A TAN FOR CHRISTMAS
A
rz
V
V

COME TO
DECEMBER 31, 198-JANUARY 7, 1986
FOR ONLY $769.00
including airfare from RaleiqhDurham
AND
hotel accommodations.
$100.00 DEPOSIT REQUIRED
CALL NOwTUMTfE'D SEATS AVAILABLE'
call 757 6611, x266 for more information
or come by the Central Ticket Office Mendenhall
sponsored by the ECU Student Union Travel Committee
HOME COOKED FOOD
Welcome Parents!
Call "Jokes On Us" for delivery of
tailgate food - fried chicken, etc.
Daily Specials $2 .25
:n
.�
J
'
.� �
Complete Repairs
on
ALL MAKES
��������������
Get Ready For �
The Weekly �
Time Trials
��������������?
5 FREE PLATES With Purchase
of Meal Plan
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take-Outs 752-0276
OPEN 7 DA YS A WEEK 11 AM-8 PM
SPORT
TOURING
RACING
Down East
Cycles
Bicycle
Post
Offici
WASHINGTON
-
I
l

ACROSS

Tr
"�I ' i �.i
�� i
I
�-
"g �-�
DOWN

Bac
Fa .

is" � �
Richfood Mil
'2 gallon cc
California L
$1.00
2 he
Deli Sp
Potato Sala
Turkey Bred
G
��������� ����������
.i





ni Center
Through the Alumni Associa
and alumni chapter lnvolve-
;oda's students can
luate with readv contacts
he Alumni Association,
stances can ease
being tar awa in
s, a student
University
des a
r.een the
Sponsored
nonal Ad-
lors work
Vssocia-
is on
ot lnstit
artiNt. or
dents. Am -
act campus
fcruitmg trips
v ffice and
g the nnual
d
TAIL-
GATE
Ut
1i Time Out
Saturdays!
het Specials
$4.74
$7.U
$9.48
'11.85
s16.59
$2.49

V
?te Repairs on MAKES
(jet Ready For � The Weekly � Time Trials �
Bicycle Post
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 26, 1985
A I
Officials Fear Easier Student Loan Default s
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS)
The U.S. Department of
Education has changed the way
colleges calculate their student
loan default rates.
While the department savs it's
just trying to catch scofflaws,
some campus loan officials fear
the change will make it easier to
cut student aid in the next federal
budget.
I'sing the new formula, the
default rate is more than twice
what it was under the old for-
mula, lending credence to ad-
ministration warnings that the
default rate is out of control.
Critics worry the re-figured
rate will improve the Reagan ad-
ministration's political efforts to
make it harder for students to get
Guaranteed Students Loans
(GSLs), thereby cutting the pro-
gram's cost.
Loan officials expect the ad-
ministration to propose cutting
ACROSS
i Part of fireplace
5 Corded cloth
8 Hits lightly
12 Solicitude
13 A Gabor
14 Seed coating
15 Wooden vessel
16 Pastime
18 The self
19 Sun god
20 Pintail duck
21 Printer s
measure
23 Coroner
abbr
24 Part of jacket
26 Plague
28 Permit
29 Male sheep
30 Yearly abbr
32 Animal coat
33 Watch pocket
34 Singing voice
35 Guido's high
note
36 Small lump
3' L ock of hair
38 Period of time
40 Old name for
Thailand
41 Greek letter
43 Roman 51
44 Mast
45 Full-time
service
abbr
47 Time gone by
49 Scoff
51 Beverage
52 Dismay
55 Woody plant
56 Marry
57 Poems
1 2 3 A l5 6 �33�F ST" W 47 B45 'HP7 j�B8 9 10 11 3�pl 14 I " fc 16
52 J5354
DOWN
1 Ocatnx
2 Side by side
3 irritate
4 Symboi for
tellurium
5 Repulse
6 Cry of
Bacchanals
7 Equa I .
8 Symbo I
tantalum
9 E Kist
10 Coloring
substances
11 Wild p
16 Mergv
1 7 AtM und
20 Blemish
ipita �
Oregon
28 Imitate
29 I ii In �� ibure
Numbers
33 Di! '
T 1984 United Feature Syndicate
34 Sandarac tree
36 Blouse
37 Crown
39 Spanish article
40 Squander
4 1 Agreement
42 Man s name
44 Withered
45 Century plant
46 Lairs
48 Single
50 Recent
51 Succor
53 Compass point
54 As far as
he Puzzle
the GSL program again next
February. Congress has rejected
similar proposals for the last
three years.
Currently, about 3.2 million
students receive GSLs.
"It's obvious the department is
prepar. g an onslaught (on loan
programs), using the default rate
as the leading edge of this
onslaught says William
Clohan, a lawyerlobbyist for the
Consumer Bankers Association,
whose member banks make 80
percent of all student loans.
"They're trying to make an
argument for legislative changes
they want in these loan
programs Clohan contends.
Jean Frohlicher of the Na-
tional Council of High Education
Loan Programs is particularly
miffed. The department im-
plemented the new formula
witru ut warning or public com-
ment.
"I suspect it (the formula
change) is designed to discredit
the GSL program to make it
easier to get Congress to go along
with the budget cuts the depart-
ment wants Frohlicher savs.
Education department
spokeswoman Sharon Messenger
denies any political motive for
the change.
She dismisses loan officials'
criticisms as "inappropriate
"They shouldn't be finger-
pointing or trying to shift the
debate from the issue
Messenger says.
"The issue is that there is $5
billion in student loans that are in
default, and anyone who suggests
that is not a problem has a dif-
ferent perspective than the
department
"We're trying to assure tax-
payers and students that tax
dollars are being well spent
"We 're trying to assure tax-
payers and students that tax
dollars are being well spent
In August, Education
Secretary William Bennett per-
sonally heralded the
department's newest tool to catch
those who are not meeting their
payments on federally-
guaranteed loans: the Internal
Revenue Service will withhold tax
refunds, beginning next year.
Department officials quietly
revealed the new default rate for-
mula during the first week of
September.
The new formula includes two
categories of loans previously not
counted: loans in litigation and
loans judged uncollectable.
When those loans are added,
the default reate for 1984 is 7.4
percent, as compared to 3.3 per-
cent under the old formula.
The default rate jumps to 9.4
percent if loans in default that are
eventually paid off also are in-
cluded.
Opponents of the change
acknowledge there may be a
sound basis for making the
change. It is unclear, they say,
wheter private-sector loan agen
cies calculate uncollectable loans
in determining default rates.
But they note that, with one ex
ception, the default rate has been
declining steadily since 1980
They suggest department officials
would have a harder time convin-
cing Congress to cut the program
if the default rate was small
getting smaller.
A key representative of univer-
sity financial aiu officers,
however, is less concerned about
the formula change than the loan
officials.
u�nnii�imiiiiiiiiiiinTi��,r
The Foreign Service Officer
Written Examination and other
employment opportunities in the
Foreign Service of the United
States will be discussed by Mr.
Paul Canney, Department of
State, on Oct. 1 at 9:30 a.m. in
Brewster C-101 and at 3:30 p.m.
in Rawl 130. Interested students
are invited to attend.
mmni im�niiii�nni� WMMMXB
VOO . . .00 , -
' 00 t II S.U.
iM'BarsalKCeCer
ROLLS REMNANTS VINYL WALLPAPER & Til
1009 Dickinson Avenue 7SA-4MS7
ECU Student Special
Carpet Remnants
Extra
20
off
Regular Discount Price
With Copy of This Ad.
Over 600 Remnants
All Sizes
Bring Your Own Measurements & Save Time
Barsaiiv
S ROLLS RfMMANTS VINY1
ROLLS. REMHAMTS VINYL WALLPAPER & TILE
00� Dll KINMlN fVI Nl I
Ph
aOaVfl�ai C'Mh Or Check
OVERTONS
-� .
- t � s. r MEal
is RIGHTS -�
Supw
�jk&
Inc.
Great For Cookouts!
25 OFF
All Coolers In Stock
Make Your Selection Now!
Regular or Diet
Pepsi Cola
Limit 2 with $10.00
or more food order
Additional Pepsi's $1.09
2 Liter Bottle
99
Richfood Milk 95
12 gallon carton
Crisp
California Lettuce
$1.00
Natural
i:
2 heads
Beer
6 pack � 12 oz cans i
Overton's Finest
Heavy Western
Sirloin Steaks $1.79 lb.
T-Bone Steaks $1.99 lb.
Great For Cookouts!
$i
Grade "A" Fresh
Whole Fryers
39
UmH 2 t-oock per customer. Additional 6-pocka $2.19 each.
Cabana
Deli Specials
Potato Salad 89$ lb.
Turkey Breast $3.49 lb.
I
lb.
Limit 3 per customer with $10 00 or more food order
Baking Potatoes
10C each
Cheese Puffs, Popcorn,
or Potato Chips 6 oz bag & UP
Buy One At Regular Price,
GET ONE FREE!
Go Pirates Beat Tempi
'��e��eeee�e����M�e�e�eee��e�eeee��eee�ee�eee�
Del
Monte
Catsup
quart bottle
through Saturday, Sept. 28, 1985
. �
� �
���





ttffc
Janet Bissette
Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Martha Hudson
Sigma Sigma Sign a Sororitv
Tracey Mann
Air Force ROTC
Donna San Marco
Student Union
EAST
Nina Lynn Blanton
Slay Dorm
Judy James
Method:�� Student Center
Naomi McLaurin
Kappa Alpha Order
Tinger Simmons
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority
CAROLINIAN IS
V
P
Amy Chapman
Panhellenic
I eearson
Chi (Imei
Maureen Jicka
1985
HOMECOMIN
Paige I uther
Alpha Delta P S �i
CANDIDA T
'W"
kim Mitts
East Carolina Honors Organization
&. � �
Jodie Mae Mosher
Phi Kappa Tau Fraternitv
ng� M
5
t
Renee Sullivan
Sigma Alpha Iota
01 ��
Angie Tucker
Ph� Beta Lambda
Demse Walls
Greene Dorm
4.
��� .���.
i





NIAN IS PROUD
TO
Kathy Edgerton
mbassadors
Kelly Griffin
Student Council for Exceptional Children
Mdurei
Marcia Juranite
White Dorm
19 85
k)MECOMING
CANDIDATES

i
Angela Neal
Delta Zeta Sorority
Angie Tucker
Phi Beta Lambda
Denise Walls
Greene Dorm
Becky Kerber
Tyler Dorm
� �
Robin Mahlmood
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
Jenny Lynn Phillips
Fleming Dorm
Debby Walls
Alpha Phi Omega
pRESE
Ella Hedgepath
Umstead Dorm
r
- s.
Pat Kingston
NC Art Education Association
f-tt ��
Volanda Renee Richardson
Clement Dorm
Debra White
Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity
ATT
Candy Horton
Jams Dorm
I
A
Julie Latimer
Alpha Xi Delta Sorority
Christine Roman
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
Lisa Whitfield
Alpha Phi Sorority
Pam Wingate
Alpha Kappa Alpha
�� �
,
'
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i





THfcEASTCAROllNIAN
Lifestyles
September 26, 1985
N.C. Sucks!
By W. BERNARD DL NHILL III
optdti to mi of 11 o�i rwfr"
In thought, word, and deed,
it reminds me of a cross bet-
ween the Reverend "Pass The
Loot" Bakker and Ted "I'll cross
that bridge when I get to it" Ken-
nedy. Ah, North Carolina! This
veritable "Garden of Eden" is
snuggled blissfully between that
grand old Commonwealth of
Virginia (father of the Second
Messiah, Robert E. Lee) and
South Carolina, the state that
started all that crazy crap back in
the 1860's.
North Carolina is the land of
the backwoods village. It's
former residents defintely had
creative minds. Just looking at
the names of some of the villages
can show us what generations of
North Carolinians have done
with their free time, for instance:
Snow Hill (pronounced Heeuul).
Pink Hill (Let's skip this one.)
Chocowinity (Anywhere near
Nestle Quick?). Oh, and please
don't forget that ever beckoning
locale yum Morehead! What
a name! And thev call this the
"Bible Belt"?
Let's face it. this is a ed-up
state. Don't Democrats out-
number Republicans (who?)
three-to-one? Then for God's
sake (Pardon me, Mr. FalwelL)
why is this state credited with the
two most conservative senators in
the nation? For cryin' out loud,
one was just elected to his third
term! Oh, and your newly elected
governor, R-E-P-L-B-L-I-C-A-N
Governor, has served twelve
distinguished years under the
banner of the elephant, not to
mention that in last year's elec-
tion this state swung "Reagan-
Bush, Four More Years by
more than a handful. Don't get
me wrong, Republicans are great
guys (and gals), but all of this
can't be credited to sound famih
planning. The GOP doesn't work
miracles (Right, Jerry?). No. sir.
So what's the deal? North Caroli-
nians can vote Republican as long
as they don't admit it, right?
Well, "Long live the Con-
federacy I guess.
And now for something com-
pletely different � North
Carolina attire. And different it
is! Take a look around. Finger in
throat, please. Tacky! Tacky!
Tacky! The typical N.C.
businessman wears khaki slacks
(preferably garnished with a duck
head), a white button-down shirt.
a yellow linen tie (also adorned
with fowl), a "kelly green"
blazer, and a pair of Dexter
(Poindexter?) penny loafers. This
is well-dressed? Are you kidding
me? Barnum and Bailey need
look no farther! I know where
the fashion-god wasted no time.
Fortunately, the females here
dress more tastefully.
N.C. girlsdon't think I have
no complaints in this department.
Making-up their minds, much
less their faces, is definitely not
their forte. They ought to keep in
mind (in very small letters to pre-
vent over-crowding) that if the)
let the guys out there know exact-
ly what they want, thev would
greatly improve their chances ol
getting it. However, 1 hope thev
don't mind if it's "kellv greei
orth Carolina
deep a'er, culturally
Paolo bi Ml Pfeolo I ad
"Culture Whut's that
should be the expected answer bv
visitors to North Carolina bored
with their hotel rooms. There just
isn't anv vet I. too, am patiently
waiting till 1997. I'm sorry to
burst a bubble. North Carolina,
but "layin' out" is generall) not
sidered a cultural experience.
In tact. I'm fairly safe in stlvnu'
that N.C. culture and old
Roanoke have a lot in common
� absence.
In my desperatlev long trio of
vears as a North Carolina resi-
dent, I have been enlightened,
delighted, amused, and embar-
rassed discovering a few biarre
Please see NO page 15
From The Not So Right
Not A Fireside Chat
B PAT MOLLOY
staff Wnier
I spoke to my editor, Steve,
and he had an excellent idea
for a columnreally. However,
I'll not tell you what it was simply
so that I might use it for another
week when I run out of opinions
� that'll happen the same week I
show up for every class on time.
No, dudes and dudettes, what
I'll talk about this week is
anything I want. I'm just going to
go off on anything that that
chaps my tuckus. I'll bitch about
everything and nothing. Now. 1
know that each of you would love
to do this, but you don't work
here; I do. You see, it's mv job to
be pissed off.
Have you ever tuned in to the
People's Court? Of course you
have. But have vou ever watched
Doug Llewellyn? Doug's the guy
who jams the microphone into
the litigant's face and asks:
"Judge Wapner called you a
boneheaded space mutant, anv
comments?"
Well Doug. I have a few com-
ments for va. Where's your
freakin' neck. Doug? Did it go
south along with your chin'1 You
have no face, man � just eyes, a
"Da' teeth, Antonio, look at doze teeth!
nose, an upper lip that never
moves � and nobody knows if
vou have anv teeth. And from
there, your face meshes with your
chest. And Doug, get a new tie.
Pastels went out with bell-
bottoms and medallions.
Wouldn't you just love to hide
about fifty piranhas in Doug's
waterbed? Enough about the
moronon to pillage.
Freshman chicks grieve me to
no end. I mean they really tee me
of. They're so iffy, know what 1
mean? I'll give you an example:
You bring a babe back to your
room after going downtown.
What's the plan? Get her drunk
and do unnatural things to her,
right? No way � she's got other
things on her mind. You're lying
in bed with the girl au naturale,
and she whispers in your
ear, "Can you just hold me
tonight?" Of course I'm miffed,
so I reply, "Nobut my room-
mate might Get the hell out of
my bed. Why even bother to
come to my room? I'm not
responsible for your emotional
well-being; I have problems of
my own. Go talk to Dr. Ruth �
let her hold a naked nineteen-
year-old girl all night � I could
spend that time drinking.
Who believes cheerleaders? A
wave of nausea crawls over me
every time I think of one. I just
can't help it; they are always so
damn happy. Why? I just want to
Please see ON page 16
Pfcolo b Staaiey Lean
I Can Explain, Your Honor. Honest!
By WARREN BAKER
s��ff rtiw
" can you see you,
Your bright legs shining in the
sun,
You got your hair slicked back,
Wayfarers on, baby.
I can tell you, that style of yours
Will soon be gone.
After the long shorts
Of summer have gone "
Maybe I overreacted. I really
don't remember.
Things start so innocently, you
know. Then things seem to build
up and soon the guys in green
coats take you '
Ssssh. They're back again.
Look at them staring at me with
their beady eyes. They think I'm
crazy, but those guys don't know
what I've been through. I've tried
to explain things to them, but
they end up scratching their bald
heads and writing little
clandestine comments in their lit-
tle clandestine notebooks.
I can trust you, though. You
know me.
It was the long shorts of sum-
mer; not khakis but long shorts.
Ther's a difference, you know.
Khakis are usually tan with no
frills attached. Long shorts are
something altogether different �
frills attached.
I remember when my room-
mate modeled a pair for me. The
different colors and shapes at-
tacked my vision with a barrage
of bad taste. It looked as though
his long shorts had been used as a
test palate for 300 different
brands of spray paint. As he
walked out of the dorm room, I
noticed my hands beginning to
sweat. I shrugged off the inci-
dent.
The next day I nearly found
myself in convulsions. On my
way to class, the long shorts of
summer came out of the wood-
work. They were all around me. I
felt surrounded, no way out.
Ssssh. Those people are staring
at me again. Wait a minute and
they'll be gone soon. They just
don't understand.
Then the dreams began, or
shall I saynightmares. I'm
walking down by the Student
Supply store and all of a sudden I
see them coming. Long shorts
with smily faces, teddy bears,
small hearts, big hearts, color
schemes that would offend the
Rainbow Coalition. Some even
had people's names imprinted on
them, names like 'Muffy'
�BiffSkip and 'Chip.
The faces of the crowd are
adorned with smiles and glazed
Please see LONG page 15
Pledges Guide
To Greeks
By CAPPY IVEY
suff Wrlier
Fraternities and sororities
have been fighting reputa-
tions since long before the release
of 'Animal House At times,
however, these stereotypes may
come in handy. Rush has just
ended and the "toga party" im-
ages may have been beneficial to
the organizations.
Now the fraternities and
sororities have new, innocent
pledges with no knowledge of
Greek life. These students, usual-
ly freshmen, have no concept of
the life they will lead for the next
ten months. Fraternity pledges
must suffer through "Hell
Week sorority pledges must en-
dure endless tests.
In order to make life easier for
the pledges, a list of articles need-
ed for a successful pledgeship
follows:
Alpha Delta Pi: Pledges, be sure
to stock up on your add-a-bead
necklaces. It is a race between
you and Mr. T to see who can
wear the most chains around
your neck.
Alpha Omicron Pi. A tank top
always shows off muscles, so
have one monogrammed with the
sorority letters and let everyone
see what you're made of.
Alpha Phi: Pledges should in-
clude Dance 101 in their cur-
riculum: linedanees are such a big
par: of all your mixers. If you
learn the dances, you could be the
next Rockette.
Alpha Xi Delta. A must for these
pledges is to get their hair cut in
the same fashion as their big
sister. Also, since the sorority is
known as 'the plastic sorority
practice forgetting any GDI's
name. This way you can pretend
not to know them at a later date.
Chi Omega. Be sure to bring your
father's tax return to all
meetings. Modeling school is also
a necessary requirement. One can
then learn the proper walk, in-
cluding the slightly elevated nose
Delta Zeta: A flask is needed for
all football games. A wise pur-
chase would also be anything to
keep your beverages cool. Beer
huggers and coolers make nice
gifts for sisters
Sigma Sigma Sigma: Inexpensive
articles are needed to be a pledge
of this sorority. Just bring a trus-
ty cigarette lighter to the house in
case it ever gets rolled
For those of you who have
pledged a fraternity:
Alpha Sigma Phi: Any article of
clothing you have that makes you
look like a bum is acceptable
Most of the brothers apparently
prefer sweats.
Beta Theta Pi: With the money
you'll save by not buying any
socks, invest in some boxer
shorts.Make sure the shorts are
extra long so everyone can tell
you are wearing them. Also, pur-
chase a trenchcoat for the winter;
a coat withe flasher" appeal will
do nicely
Kappa jha: A tube of crazy
glue should suffice, but be
forewarned: being stuck on
yourself could be messy business.
Lambda Chi Alpha: No Lambda
can survive without the basics:
khaki pants and a navy blazer.
Actually, any article of clothing
that enhances the 'preppy' look
will do.
Phi Kappa Tau: These gentlemen
are recognized for their elite
status. However, most of them
seem to work at Cubbie's. Seek
employment there and save your
paychecks for more polo
underwear.
Pi Kappa Alpha: This fraternity
is new on our campus. AJJ a
pledge needs if one jersey with
the fraternity letters on it,
preferably in the colors of the
organization. A box of detergent
Please see GREEKS page 15
ATTN: Stephen
BERRYMAN
A. SHERB1N and BRtAN K
CLASSIFICATION: top secret
DISBURSEMENT: for eyes only
CODE NAME: operation review
MISSION: INFILTRATION AND INVESTIGATION
OF THE ARBOR RESTAURANT
LOCATION: the ramada inn, greenville
NORTH CAROLINA Lt'
BRIEFING: The Arbor is one of Greenville's more
elegant restaurants. It underwent major renovations last
summer, lending it an ambience of chic sophistication
(The type of atmosphere that 'Yuppies' adore) that didn't
exist previously.
The decor is a cross between a garden arbor and a
tropical cafe. Its pastels range from powdery blue to ra-
diant peach to subtle mauve with deep green and beige
undertones. Furnishings include a variety of wicker and
light wood.
Meals range in price from $7.95 to $15.95. Each entree is
accompanied by a choice of potato, a loaf of hot bread, a
trip to the salad bar and a otats of the house wine
Also of note is the wine list, ft boasts selections by
several blue ribbon vineyards, both foreign and domestic
The house burgundy, according to the restaurant
manager, Terence McEnally, is a generic wine byjKG
V,Tehy; h IT6 h�Ue Chab,is is Prced by Franzia
The host and h.s watte ateff are cordial and more than
willing to suggest wineVmfntrees that complement one
another They do all they cato ensure that your �it is as
pleasant as possible. rw�fwi��
AGENTS' REPORT: The Arbor has the potential
� S!LL "If jar particular tocollege
students. The atmosunere is appropriate for a auiet
romantic dinner or an Impressive business Interview
The Arbor offers several all youcan eat and drink
specials aimed toward college student st�
chabhs .re the highlights on Wednesdays and ?rw.ys
Thursdays have baen set aside for crab legs and orim. rih
and burgundy 1� the offering for Saturdays Thertor is
and � exceptionally cozy atmosohere tS a �1
definitely te�rves a look. aTm�Pn�re, The Arbor
The prices ere not too high for the v�r�n� -��
dent to squeeze out of their SS!b1AS2S2 StU
an impressive evening out wK?i2��
sex. However, transportation may onZntSS?1
those without cars. But if its worthTth�PtrilP Pb,ems to
away. Bnjoy! 'ts worth the trip, people will find
� MISSION ACCOMPLlCHcn
Suppo
M I (vm Bureau
The School ol Nurs .
Carolina Univers
ECL's profession
celebrate the 25th a
its founding durii .
Weekend Oci
man wl
ting it established
Rep Waltei B
who introduced it.
General Asseml
school at then i
lege. and
reception
presented fc
ECU Cba
Jones of Fan
a second
N.C. Hou
1959 and
his bill
were
state needt-
to ediK
Departm
C ontinued from Pa
broadca
how
ediKd'
technoli
ba-
'�1 :
whoi
i
The
ing
commit ; ; .
same
Parking
Problems
Pondered
Continued I- rom Pagt 1
Lewis St. betw
. 6th .
Elm St.
W. Rock Rd bet wee: -
Edgewood Dr.
Holmes said the
has begun i
to studei
residential are
we'll star; a
next week-
He added. v.
tow a
trouble betweei
reside;
and :
Holmes
dent repres
resident ar
an effort I
problem
The Tar Rivet V a
Ass.
around ECl
representing tl
with the res
believe the) migl
cess, not to mei
relations involve
.
Fitter Patter
Just a hint of what's to be
expected as Hurricane Gloris
moves near the N.C. Coastline
See related stor on Page 1. '
���
. �
- - 4T
i
I �'





MH
Guide
eeks
walk, in-
-ievatcd nose
- lask s needed foi
w. pur-
thing to
Beer
make nice
j inexpensive
be a pledge
?ring a irus-
�e in
nave
article of
ai makes
is acceptable.
hers apparently
e money
buying any
some boxer
Make sure the shorts are
ne can tell
lem. lso, pur-
he winter;
er" appeal wtll
be of crazy
be
being stuck on
. be mess business.
v I ambda
. the ba
izer.
.lothing
preppy' look
- ��ulemen
� - elite
them
ee
e your
:
Kappa Alph - fraternity
nrw on out campus. iNA a
ne jersey with
it,
� the
-?:ergent
GREEKS page 15
BRIAN K
SECRET
VESTIGATION
-EENVtLLE,
tf Greenville's more
- a or renovations last
chic sophistication
Dies' adore; that didn't
en a garden arbor and a
from powdery blue to ra
tti deep green and beige
variety of wicker and
i $7.95 t0 $15.95. Each entree is
& potato, a loaf of hot bread, a
3385 of the house wine.
if It ooasts selections by
'ds, both foreign and domestic,
ccording to the restaurant
5 a ge- ne by J.K.G.
r produced by Franzia.
itaff are cordial and more than
d entrees that complement one
�toen; � at your visit is as
IT : The Arbor has the potential
ktive, particularly to college
fe is appropriate for a quiet,
Vessive business interview,
eral all you can eat and drink
college students Shrimp and
on Wednesdays and Fridays.
Jside for crab legs, and prime rib
ling for Saturdays. The Arbor is
-tion and will be gear.ng itself
iege crowd this year.
I0NS: in light of the efforts
make their guests comfortable
ozy atmosphere, The Arbor
tgh for the average college stu
oudget, particularly if it means
with a fun person of the opposite
Stion may present problems to
ts worth the trip, people will find
COMPLISHED �
IHE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 26, 1985
13
Supporter Visits Home School
ECl Nt� Bureau
The School of Nursing at East
Carolina University, the first of
ECU'S professional schools, will
.elebrate the 25th anniversary of
ts f unding during Homecoming
Weekend Oct. 4 5 and honor a
man who was instrumental in get-
ting it established.
Rep Walter B. Jones, DSC
who introduced legislation in the
General Assembly to establish the
school at then-East Carolina Col-
lege, and will be honored at a
reception and receive a citation
presented by Dr. John Howell,
ECl Chancellor.
Jones of Farnuille. N.C was
a second term member of the
N C. House of Representatives in
1959 and plunged for passage of
his bill on grounds that nurses
were in short supply and that the
state needed an additional school
to educate and train them.
His efforts were supported by
the president of ECC, Dr. John
D. Messick, and the dean of in-
struction. Dr. Leo W. Jenkins
The next year Jenkins sue reeded
Messick as president and began
efforts to have the rapidly grow
ing college declared a university,
a campaign which succeeded in
1967. ECU now has nine profes
sional schools
Dr. Eva Warren became the
first dean of the School of Nurs
ing and 52 students were inrolled
in the firsi class in the fall of
I960.
During the pas' 2 years, the
School of Nursing has awarded
degrees to approximately 1,500
graduates, rhis fall, there an
nursing students including
undergraduates and 10 tate
students, according to Dr. Emilie
D. Henning. the dean.
Jones is to be honored at a
reception given by the : I ol
Nursing at 6 p.m. Friday Oct. 4
at the Brook Valley Country
Club, Henning said. A resolution
commemorating the veteran con-
gressman's efforts on behalf of
the School of Nursing will be
presented at the Oct. 4 meeting of
the E I Board of Trustees.
Dr Roella M. Sclotfeldt, pro-
fessor and dean-emeritus of nurs-
ing at Case-Western Reserve
University, Cleveland, Ohio, will
deliver a celebration kevnote ad-
dress, "A Glimpse into the
Future of Nursing at a
seminar-panel program at 4 p.m.
Friday at the Brook Valley club.
On Saturday, the school will
have a special 25th anniversary
celebration float in the annual
ECU Homecoming Parade and a
nurses' tailgate party is planned
for students, faculty and alumni
prior to the Oct. 5 Homecoming
football game, Dean Henning
said.
Noted Map Drawer Visits
Greenville - Paul Pugliese,
chief cartographer for Time
magazine, will visit East Carolina
University, Sept. 29-Oct. 1, to
speak to art and geography
classes and to meet with a former
professor who inspired his in-
terest in maps some 25 years ago.
He will discuss his work and
show some of his illustrations on
Monday at 2 p.m. in room B102
of Brewster Building The public
is invited to attend.
As chief cartographer for
Time, Pugliese is responsible for
the maps and charts published by
Time and by TimeLife Books in
New York. He says his interest in
maps began 25 years ago when he
was a student at the University of
Arizona and was taking a class
under Dr. Simon Baker, now an
ECU professor of geography.
Pugliese is visiting Greenvill
at the invitation of his former
professormi
Department Sound
������ ������SC�as4Xsfts��'i
:
K
�;
Continued From Page 1
Cobel said the interactive
ladcasts were an example of
how technology is changing
education. He added thai
technology would not affect the
basic educational process.
"I don't think we'll see
wholesale changes in the cur-
riculum because of technology.
The basic skills o reading, work-
ng with numbers, writing and
communicating will remain the
Name he said.
Parking
Problems
Pondered
Continued from Page 1
Lewis s; between 3rd and 5th St.
f 6th St between Maple and
Elm St.
W. Rock Rd. between 14th and
Edgewood Dr.
Holmes said the department
has begun issuing warning tickets
to students who park in restricted
residential areas, "next week,
we'll start giving real tickets. The
next week�towing begins
He added. "We really hate to
tow a student's car. It causes
trouble between the students and
residents, as well as the students
and police
Holmes suggested that a stu-
dent representative meet with
residents around the campus in
an effort to alii the parking
problem
The Tar R;e: Neighborhood
Association covers the are
around ECL. It some
representing the students met
with the resident association. I
believe they might have some suc-
cess, not to mention the good
relations involved he added.
Fitter Patter
Just a hint of what's to be
expected as Hurricane Gloria
moves near the N.C. Coastline.
See related story on Page 1.
Cobel emphasized tl
outlook for teachers is optimi?
"The projections e have show a
continuing need for teachers in
the future. One-third ol N
Carolina's teachei - . ible
for retirement in
future
Cobel added teachei pav
creases have also attracte
students who would
teaching career. "We 'ady
begin to see an inc
ment
Newman
Catholic Student Center
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500 N. Greene
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Campus Mass Schedule
Saturday:
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Sunday:
11:30 a.m. in the Biology Lecture Hall (Rm. 103)
9:00 p.m. at the Newman Center
Wednesday:
:30 p.m. at the Newman Center (followed by dinner
and fellowship)
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Students:
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-





14
HI I S!AKoi INKS si PTEMB1 K 26 1985
OooiK'sburv
BY GARRY TRUULAU
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Bloxton House Helps
Dreams No cuin
B (,ISA SANDY


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Sl.ff Wnii-r
�H Hiding the job to match
one's career dreams after
graduation may prove a difficult
task. I ocated behind Mendenhall
is ECU's careei planning and
placement service. Bloxton
Rouse is reads to assist students
in getting the jobs they want. In-
stead oi stepping out into the job
market unannounced, they are
given an extra edge
Bloxton Rouse prepares the
undent with a resume and
workshops on interview skills.
I he student also learns of the
necessity ol establishing creden-
tials and where to receive on the
lob training before graduating.
It a student hasn't decided on
any one occupation, information
is available to point tow
careers that fit thai student's
�crests, NK.l is also available
Sled is ,i computei designed
help students make med
career decision- Ii can answei
questions about b sa at
position availabiiil.
ett
"Bloxton House is a .
. eful serice
says Bloxton Rouse Directoi
I urney James. "Your work is a
very, very important part ol a
sour ife ou Spe1(j so much ()(
youi life doing it. It should be
satisfying and rewardii
Bloxton House does not catei
the Northarolina area alone.
I he job possibilities extend all
Over the country, and, in a tew
occupations, all over the woi
InKtober, company represi
to lojj
encourage all
job hui Mai
i i
June says lai
� I

poii
tutu: Wil
fulfilled
Homecoming Wee1 Special
September 30th to October 5th
Chicken Salad or Shaved Ham Sandwich 65C
5 oz Ice Cream Cup 27C
Soda Shop-Wright Building
and
C roatan
-B 1 il Mi MM �- ' 1 i ram and �
Hot Lovers Play For Sellout j
tU Milt IU mov �
jb.iJAS.v.iiifi,yvvirT
� MUCH r H)
Staff Unin
Neil S o! the
Red Hoi 1 overs" is bi
� ,
ayei 's I
- : iresentei
Me
Sent
A ,i S
. . . '
i te Hi
' . tweni
I opening his
.
� . lay
B
best w a
He
.
r
v Bai
� .
woman whom Barnes meet!
restaurant. Barney's seo
i ith Bobbi Michel
�s who smokes n
nal purposes
leanette I
� � it ai
- x at nship.
!eai . - eless
s 8.2
perv � . �
rhe ca parts
��
' Bai ney . i.
� est and -ss His
I i
perl ince
� satile Diana Kii c played
both Elaine Navazio and Bobbi
Mi : She was more effective
i l us, at isiu
' Nava owever,
gave Bobbi Michelle the
?e ol absurdity the role need-
s botl traders,
Duma Kirk delivered some ol the
ws tunnies! lines.
Devon Dabbs, role av the
desp; . leanette I is! ei. had a
an the other actors
She wa commendable in that she
ga e a gi od d lepth to
' � it w ise 'w hiny' e Her
tei is also responsible
the play's theme: there are still
decent people in this world.
Directoi Drexel H. Riles also
deserves a round ol applause He
casi well considei
t (whicl
way, an apa 11. I he .
een acts
' fore and he show
e pauses more enj �y a
� �
c rhis i I gi
?-� � be back on campus
lary 21 22 per torn;
Wednesday ief
ckets
nly hah as good
ill it pi
RCCONOS
We Buy
Used Albums &
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St. 758 4298
. � sM
� P.
t '
II'
�Mi.
"3
, . DANCE
' earned THE-ATRF
adit s
Call: (in Greenv,IWi 757 6390
5Wte: -Gwma' Mn9�f E" Carolna Playhouse ECU. Gtvcnvie NC 27834
Cmmm Sp Mntfdi Theatte Arts Center. 5th & Eastern Streets
Monday through Friday. 10 08 a m 4 00 p m
Hat ill II
i?ET
VILLAGE
DONNA CDWARDS
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Salt water and Fresh water Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card sad Wsm art accepted and financing is
available
5)1 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C
PHONE 75 9222
27834
AFTER COLLEGE:
AIR FORCE
EXPERIENCE
i a 11 n j ' 11
is j � i �
1 1 i'l Rll Si

You Could Be
all. I syi Stephen W hitt
Suite 202. 4IIW Wake Ft.rest R.khI
Raleigh. N( 2"6(rV
tm X56-4012allollecl
AIM HIGH
AIR FORCE
Framed!
Frames
50 Off
til Sept. 31
affordable fashion eyeweai & contact lenses
The Plaa Greenville, N.C. 756-mi
Commuter
" scooter
Peppy 49cc engine gets
over 100 mpg
)Qth. quiet shaft
I te � no chain to oil
�� adjust
� Autolube mixes oil and
gas automatically
� Simple Mck starting
� Full street legal
instrumentation and
lighting
STAN'S CYCLE CENTER
801 DICKINSON AVENUE
TEL 757-0592
GREENVILLE, NC 27834,
YAMAHA
Built for the ftin of it
TSO
$599
plus tax

Long She
The Plaza Mal
E. Greenville Bi
355-5222
Wa
Selecti
value a
10 discount fi





Helps
reams
campus
� "i
start the
! the
A
sili
n
dp, .1
a i be
special
ed Horn Sandwich 65
�im Cup 27C
�" x t
W.W.VilMMM
t f
� f
III

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Am Playhouse ECU. Greenville NC 27834
er. 5th & Eastern Streets.
0 00 am 4 00 p m
M
M
�"�
ramed!

!v7 Se?f.31
hi mil �r�� sss
� "ST Z Z .�
PVPrtf& contact lenses
756-V771
cflfTti
urant Downtown
he
Opening
ay�October 2
2
Dinner 5-10
I Ml JAMAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 26, 1985
15
No Culture In North Carolin
phrases executed with a distinct
North Carolina flavor. The firt
time a girl told me she had been
trying to "get-up" with me 1 pro-
mptly invited her into the nearest
oom closet. 1 originally
thought that get over it" was a
discreet way of earning me that a
ousehold pel had left it's
signature in the area. Needless to
a 1 was wa off base. The wide
spread use of t-ddie Murphy's
"trim" reminded me of the lining
mi a fur coat - this time 1 didn't
miss by much!
A wide variety of incidents
such as these have led me to the
brink of resignation. Battered
and bruised by this unique en-
vironment, each new example is
written-off, credited to what 1
have come to call the "North
Carolina mentality This is a
state where car salesmen are
dignitaries, country lawyers are a
dime a dozen, and "Reverends"
are filthy rich (Right, Mr.
Angeley?). North Carolina has
the type of thinking that causes
people to come to a complete halt
before making a right-hand turn,
to pursue tobacco farming like it
may actually get them
somewhere, to avoid using turn
signals until after their third acci-
dent, and to actually believe that
"the South" will rise again! Sar-
tre was right. Hell is other people
(Sorry, Jerry) and I'm serving my
time now. Enjoy it, North Caroli-
nians.
Long Shorts Of Summer Fading Fast
v'U's. and each hand carries a mug
ol beer with 'Cubbies' imprinted
on the side.
lo mv horror, I look down and
see myself wearing the long
shorts of summer. Ennui sets in,
and 1 feel compelled to buy Fer-
rari sunglassses and a pair of
Wayfarers. 1 want to cruise in my
Volvo, hang out at fraternities
and pla tennisl don't even know
� ow to play tennis! My knees
hake and m hands sweat, and
then somebody veils, "Hey guys,
let's party And 1 wake up.
�s I relate this to you. 1 feel
cold all over. I need to tell so-
meone, though.
1 can trust you. You know me.
s the nightmares continued. 1
:ed to lose some of my self-
control. I tried to figure out why
people wore these these
things. 1 wondered if they were
borrowing their younger
:hers' and sisters' pants
because thev couldn't afford to
go out and buy a decent pair for
themselves. Granted, some
peoples' thighs should be hidden,
but, my God, wear a pair of
slacks.
Sure, a tailor makes a measure-
ment error in Paris, and everyone
must consider the mistake vogue.
What a horrid idea.
Then it happened. I don't
remember where 1 found the
scissors. My mind recalls getting
a care package in the mail from
Mom and feeling happy because
it temporarily relieved my visions
of the shorts of summer.
Inside the package rested a pair
ofofI'll never forgive her for
sending me a pair of long shorts.
My hands searched and found a
pair of scissors, and I began fo
cut and cutand my voice cried
out with laughter and sighs of
relief.
I located my roommate's
shorts. Snip, snip, snip. I was
ecstatic.
My body leaped from the bed,
and 1 raced into the hallwav,
scissors waving in my hand.
The police say 1 attacked quite
a few people until I found this
guy with shoulders bigger than
most people's cars. Officials say
he used mv head to create a new
door in Aycock dorm. I learned
later about the people with green
A RELAXING
MASSAGE
JUST A
PHONE CALL
AWAY
Misty Blue
Relaxation
Studio
CALI
jackets. They're standing out!
the door, right now .
1 can't move my arms oi legs
The padded floor and walls are
nice but I really miss the dorm.
But what 1 don't miss are
The long shorts ol summer.
I hank (iod. winter is on its way
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost Pregnancv Test, Birth Control, and
Problem Pregnancv Counseling For further
information call 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
l-800-535384 between 9 AM and 5 P M.
weekdass
RILIIGH WOMIN-5
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
t17WOTfMorBHiS.
RoMf. NC
746-9997
Pfcoio b U I Pkoio 1Mb
Greeks
may be helpful also, since the
shirt is worn every day.
Tau Kappa Epsilon: This require-
ment is genetic. No pledges over
5'8" will be admitted. These
fellows are known for their par-
ties so bring something to aid in
the festivities.
Welcome to Greek life,
pledges. Hopefully the next few
weeks will be filled with fun and
few hardships. In the years to
come you will look back on this
and say, "Yes, it was worth the
hassle but first you have to sur-
vive.

Chicken & Biscuit

Tailgate With
Time Out!
Open 24 Hours'
B MILES SOUTH 01 TMf PLAZA
' Private Rooms
All Girl Staff
" Complete Body
Massages
HOURS:
MonThuri.
1 1 o.m. - 12 Midnight
Fri. & Sot.
11 o.m. - 1 o.m
"� . � Jl :er Nev, Vci
Joke's On Us
Open this Saturdav at
3:30 p.m.
I-or tailgate lelier !
Out
IhnntT
I un h
( all
7 im;
)IGMh MU fWQNITY
Afr incite ik,e Wfrnerv Y
� Little Sister Rusi �
wtcLrvtfiiyTlvvrfy
ftpt X5 7(o '
9:00 until
fvr mere U(firrztifi - ISS'JCJtO
HOY Ccrrvc $h fatfk h lUt
ikmB &frd party KliiuJSbv
The Plaza Mall
E. Greenville Blvd.
355-5222
Pbza
355-5222
"For The Man Who
Wants To Dress To Impress"
"dress to impress East Greenville Blvd.
� Lee Jeans
Assortment of Colors
������� Union Bay �������
Sweaters and Jeans
������ Ocean Pacific �����
Variety of styles & Colors
��������� Heet ���������
New Line by Union Bay
Selective styles of Cotler jeans
value at $37.50 now on sale for
$15.00
10 discount for all E.C.U. students with student I.D.
Go Pirates
and
ATTIC
ATTIC
Present
I SILENT RUN


Friday, Sept. 27th
ECU
DORM
FREE
ECU
GEN.ADM
$1.00

4 I
I MM
4 m r
- - - - -





16
I Ml I AM i Akoi INIAS
Sl-PIt MBt R26, l8?
Classifieds
SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS Two units
tor sale Ettiaency 8th tioor, one
bedroom 4th floor Units completely
? urmshed, carpeted air conditioned,
and mciude kitchen appliances
Please call idav1 201 532 79V3 (after
Sp m 20! 431 0768 or write Mr
donio 99 Wilson Ave Freehold
NJ 07728
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC 20
c omputer v ith all hooKups and some
extras including 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorder player,
ovsticK modem with terminal pro
im cassette Programer s Aid
� t"�Dansion cartridge ana
nanuals S200 Call An
�Moo, al '57 636 Of ?52 7346
NEED TYPING setters Resume s
m papers etc Call Karen at
49C
FOR SALE74 Fiat 124 Special
. jood fires new bat
le up parts Needs some
� Runs.is is 1st $400 takes
� 156 2997
LIBERALMALE E XOTIC
DANCERFor info call Jon at
'56 '601
DAPPER DANS. Vintage clothing
.1920 I9deweiry and collectables
are now a.a able at Poorman's
Hwy 264 between
Wasland Greenville Open
Sunca ,sti-on 10 6 See Danny
FOR SALE1 80 Column Text Care
for App: E Slightly used S90
.cson RX 80 center less
ke new $250 price neg
cl Cllr af 758 6296
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
typewriter Reasonable rates
a Jar e al 355 T233 after 5 30
ROOM FOR RENT: Close to
Dus $140 covers rent and es
Can T58 764C or more nformation
FOR SALE: Ro,a EN tr
typewriter $20C Call S.sa- a
58 B241
FOR SALE: 1981 Honaa ��
- � e s, e x t r a
� � ' . 1 COG
FREE KITTENS 9 a � s frain
WORD PROCESSING Ac offer ex
j resumes theses
� ' � � " - � " merged
etter � enve opes or roiooex
caras Our pnees are extremely
ind we always offer a 15
' : C . aents S
IF � : uter Co
Back f Franii n's ' � ' 472
THE MIDDLE MAN: Apartment
Jfi n "ate Referral Ser� e
E x,r Street Suite number 2
ss from Sub Station II Le1 c.
: he apartment or room
re 00I1 ng for Call
'369
TYPING SERVICES Prov 3ec Dy
onal womar- a th BW Cor
re ting Se lee trie typewriter
ir a rh all sies Call DebD.e
' "56 6333
T 'PING SERVICES Familiar a ft
� 'ormats proofread g ana spen
ng corrections included low rates
757 0398 after 5 p.m
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICES Aora Processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
doc � " services including
reports 'erm papers, dissertions,
theses resume's and more All work
is computer checked agamst 50,000
wora electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, m
eluding papencan for specific
rates; Call Mark at 757 340 after
6 15 pm
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: 72
Yamaha 250 Fully reconditioned,
low miles, "lookm' real sharp"
$400 Call 752 2692
TAILORED PRODUCTS: Men's &
women's alterations Located in the
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Mon Fr- ,96 756 3312
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Ex
perience ano quality work, IBM
Seiectnc tpewriter Lanie Shive
758 5301
FOR SALE Sunn Bass AmpPower
Amp 200 watts Call 757 0558 after 5.
PERSONALS
PI KAPPA PHI: Welcomes the
you.ig ladies who are joining our Pi
Kapp Family See ya tonight at 8 30
for inductions at the house
PHI KAPPA TAU: Congratulations
to our new little sisters and welcome
to the family inductions will be Fri
day mte at 8 30 with a party follow
ing Bring yourself, your liquor and
your enthusiasm11 (Mixers provid
edj
CHI O'S AND ADTT'S: Get ready to
throw down and party tonight Along
with the Amateurs, the Phi Taus and
Kappa Sigs are sure to show you
girls a night to remember!
PI KAPPA PHI: Little sister pledge
induction at the house tonight at
8 30 Formal attire Party after
wards Pi Kapp football Sunday
night 7pm against Sig Eps on field
2 Brotherhood, Monday night will
be dinner out at Western Sizzlin on
10th St at 5
1 Kfc'S: Get ready to RUMBLE and
STUMBLE tonight with the Alpha Xi
Deltas
ALPHA XI DELTA: The sisters of
Alpha Xi Delta would like to
welcome the Beta Kappa pledge
class Janet Bissette, Michelle
Boyd. Shiela Cam, Wendy Croom.
Amy Cullifer, Karen Edgerton,
arin Ford, Clark Greene, Jessica
Hester, Jessica Hughes, Tanya Hull,
Kim Hunt, Margot Kent, Alison
King, Mary Beth McAllister,
Vanessa Mecimore, Laura
Musselman, Kim Palmer, Angie
Phillips. Amanda Roberts, Whitney
Smith, Susan Petty, Dee Kellam,
and Jennifer Jarvis
PHI TAU PLEDGES: Lookm good!
Keep up the hard work and don't get
cocky! Show us how far you can go!
CATHY: Now that the MCAT is
over, it's time to spend more time
with Fred!
SPIRIT CONTEST. At Cubbies 9
Monday the 30th $25 cash prize
Sponsored by LSS "Break out the
purple and gold
ECU FOOTBALL TEAM: There
isn't a person on this earth that can
say that we didn't beat Penn State
Everybody gave their best You as
players gave me more than I asked
for I was at the game, I saw
everybody give me 110 percent 1
was more proud of you than any of
the four years I've been here The
Penn State fans knew we should
have won Enough about Penn State
Temple is a very good team, they
lost to Penn State by 2 points We lost
bv 1 Temple kicked our butts last
year We're piaymg at F:ckien tnis
year again, 1 don t plan on having
'he same results as last year
Everybody m the USA still doesn't
know about us Temple feels the
same way
They've played a schedule that
would K;ii most programs St they
could be easily 3 0 I know it will be
hard to get up for this game, but you
must Like I've said all along, give
me your all and I'll be happy Be
proud of yourselves Good luck and
give it your best The Fan.
LET IT BE KNOWN: Yearbooksare
included in your tuition so you don't
have to purchase one The 1985 Buc
caneers are NOT here yet, but we
will definately let you know once
they arrive
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Vote
Maureen Jicka tor Homecoming
Pirate She is the only represen
tative of the Business School
Remember to vote today for
"Maureen Jicka "
LOST: Yellow labe retriever
Healthy, friendly, slight curvature
in tail $Reward$ Sentimental at
tachment Call at 355 5318 or
752 9940
SIG EPS: Come out and support
your little sisters Friday night at
Beau's!
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS: Don't
forget about our meeting Sunday
night at 9!
swxn,
i j fin vit.
WANTED
WANTED: 27 bike, male's frame
Call Dirk 758 0596
ROOMMATE(S) WANTED
Private bedroom and bathroom, 32
Wildwood V.iias Call 758 0479. ask
for Johnny
RIDE NEEDED. Going to D C this
weekend? Please give me a ride! : '
Can leave anytime Fri Will help pay
gas. etc Call Ai,758 8326 PLEASE'
CHILDREN (9 13): Group tor
overweight pre adolescents Tw
graduate students appealing for
children (ages 9 13) to participate n
self help group Emphasis on nuti
tion intake and exercise Those in
teresteo call 752 0863 or 753 2401
oni'd on Pajfe : B
On Big Teeth And Unnatural Acts
know why. Do they know
something the rest of us don't0
Maybe the) know where Jimmy
Hoffa is and jus! want to keep it
a secret.Of course, it could be a
glandular problem. It you've ever
met a cheerleader, you know of
what I speak - if you are one,
that's your problem Something
in heaven went desperatelv wrong
when cheerleaders were created.
It's almost as it God had an over
abundance of teeth, so he simply
crammed them into certain pen
pie's mouths and made them
cheerleaders. It's quite a shame,
too, because Mime fairly
tive people are cheerleaders But
try to speak to 'em. "Hi, how are
Cheerleaders have a stock
response to anything vou would
evei care to ask. so, while I
like a Stein way, they repiv.
Oh. I'm super, just really, really
pe r. . . S l 1' E k .
super lord, spare me '���
don just up 1
die. I) 1 I .
Writing this
sometimes a pain in
Just imagine, evei � � ave
pull v ords fron
are worthy I - .
aren't that man 1
l
t any ra
e, a sreies of que

it intere
�'�
positiv
questions
Bufl
B idwe er, ti
1 k '� a
� - F�I�N
PI

Choosing a long distance
company is a lot like choosing
a roommate.
s

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s
X



I
s
X
X
s
X

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Its better to know what they're
like before you move in.
id
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Living together with someone for the first
time can be an "educational" experience.
And living with a long distance company
isn't any different. Because some companies
may not give you all the services you're used to
getting from AT&T.
For instance, with some companies you have
to spend a certain amount before you qualify for
their special volume discounts. With some
others, voice quality may vary.
But when you choose AT&T, there won't be
any surprises when you move in. You'll get the
ii
c 1985 ATaT Communications
same high-quality, trouble-free service vou're
used to.
With calls that sound as close as next door.
Guaranteed 60 and 40 discounts off our Day
Rate�so you can talk during the times vou can
relax. Immediate credit for wrong numbers.
Operator assistance and collect calling.
So when you're asked to choose a long dis-
tance company, choose AT&T. Because whether
you're into Mozart or metal, quality is the one
thing everyone can agree on.
Reach out and touch someone;
AT&T
The right choice.
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W
HI I AM i K()l ININN
Sports
SEPTLMBLR26, 1985
Page 11
The E��t Carolinian
Jl HUMBERT
K I quarterback Ron torus (8) had the best game of his career last week, as he rushed for 107 yards and
passed for 112 mon in the Pirate loss to Penn State. The Pirates will need another good game from the
sophomore this � ni:t against a tough lemple team
Pirate Ruggers Maul Devils;
Battles ASU Here Saturday
iu i) u in

i
team.
� lumacher said It
with the wing ex-
vei well
ime is b two
ei (cams oi "scrums" on
or field ol 100 meters
ts rhe set um consists
ards and seven
' gain con-
�� run or
igl ' ipright goal
� sinning goal is
�a point
kick
i
:
me i utj except toi
. which are lairh
:ni.
� is a hard hitting, fast
1 lie intense com
ids) � �
1(X)
1 here are man) rules and
strategies in this sport, which
looks to most American's like a
came ol "smear the queer
1 he on-field game is only half
of rugb though, fter each
match the teams get togethet and
party. Members of the team are
good friends, and as the)
socialize together, they call the
rugby team "the ultimate frat
Everyone is united to come
� with the team. Practices are
, Wed. and rhur. at 4:00
behind the Allied Health
building No experience is
neeessan and dues are $10 pet
semester. Ihe team also unites
everyone to come out and watch
'heir match against ASU this
saturda) at 1:00 p.m. Said team
captain Daid Schumacher.
"( ome out and support your
gers and then we'll all go sup-
port out Pirates as they take care
� 1 emple
IRS Almost Anything Goes Soon
Bv IKKO'I

'






'
(
Running
tobet 5 ; ol
8:00am -
iral fun may
: away, but just see
i. can do through the
tramural-
� October.
�nth begii h punt, pass
kick and will end with
basketball.
Bowling
Volleyball
i
'� Basketball
Rag 1 ootbal
14-15
' fficials are needed for the up
co-rec flag football and
� � 1 xpertise is not
ng on m-
Registration
Oct. 14-15
Oct. 16-r
Oct. 16-r
Oct. 28-31
Oct. 28-31
Oct.
les
Lady Pirate Tennis Team
Trounces Campbell Camels
rhe Lady 1
led I :
ollege
8 1 on 1
Ma 'ed
Vfissic Registci Second
seeded Beck) lements over-
powered I) Va i � 0, 6-0
Vji ner topped
rth s� fled
I Rile) �
� �
I, No. 5
I
No. 3 seec
6-3, 6-0
! t Eicl ' �
6-3. H iw
first set easil) t
Susan Moi
r-2, 7-5. No 6 seeded Holl) Mur
ra knocked off Ma � J.
The I ady Rues swept all three
doubles matches as they
torious in si
Manderfield Eicholz downed
; Register-Poole 6-0, 6 0 Swaim-
'� Myers defeated Rilev-Van Meter
6-1, 6-3 and Mont iov -Clements
topped Mattocks Ma) 6 0, 6 4
The Pirate women are now 4-1
- on the year and will compete in
� the Eastern Collegiate Tourna
mem in Raleigh this weekend.
I
necessary. Ihe Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
will tram anyone interested
through a series oi clinics con-
ducted b) their own Lynette
Ginn Those interested in soccer
officiating should mark their
calendars for Oct. 14, 9 p.m. in
room 102 Memorial Gym. The
co-rec flag football clinic will be
held the same evening at 7p.m.
The deadline for the outdoor
recreation center's backpacking
trip is quickly closing in. The trip
will take place Oct. 11, 12, 13 in
the Uwharrie National Forest.
The Department oi IM-Rcc Ser-
vices will provide equipment,
transportation and all the excite-
ment of the 'great outdoors' for a
nominal fee. The last day to sign
up is October 4 at 4p.m. in
Memorial Gym, room 105-B.
This is the last adventure trip oi
the semester, so be sure to sign
up.
On Tuesday, October 8, at
5p.m. in Brewster C-103, the
Intramural-Recreational
Representatives Meeting will be
held. All representatives should
attend along with anyone else in-
terested in the IRS and its pro-
grams.
Pirates Seek Revenge
Owls Invade Ficklen
By SCOTT COOPER
&
RICK McCORMAC
sport rdUtr
After last year's 17-0 home
opening loss to Temple, ECU will
try to get a measure of revenge
when the winless Owls invade
Ficklen Stadium this weekend.
"They are the best 0-3 team in
America defensive line coach
Rex Sponhaltz said. "They have
made some costly mistakes �
like us, that cost them some
ballgarnes
Temple, in their first three
defeats this season, have lost by a
total of seven points. They lost to
Boston College 28-25, Penn Stale
27-25 and last year's national
champion Brigham Young 26-24
The Owls will be led by a
strong running game showcased
bv junior tailback Paul Palmer,
who's the nation's fourth leading
rusher. Palmer, who rushed for
over 200 yards against Penn State
two weeks ago, joined the elite
group ol led Brown and Tony
Dorsett. The) are the onl) three
running backs in history to have
broken the 200-yard mark against
the Nittanv Lions.
nother stead) performer in
Owl back field is junior
quarterback I ee Sa Salt com-
pares much with Penn State
quarterback John Shatter, accor-
ding to Pirate coaches.
"Salt is as good or better than
Shatter Sponhaltz said. "He
has a good arm, quick release and
good toot speed which was
something that didn't concern us
at Penn State
Temple coach Bruce Arians, in
his third year, is 1-1 against E( I
Arians feel- his team is ready foi
a hard-hitting contest.
"We're ready to win Arians
said. "The team is really excited
and shows a lot oi ettort and en-
thusiasm. It's going to be a real
physical ballgame
Arians feels that his Owls must
contain the high-powered freeze
option attack oi the Pirates, it
they are going to be ful.
"To stop the option, first you
have to stop the due Arians
said. "Then you have to contain
the QB and the pitch
Defensively, lemple is a very
physical unit that moves around a
great deal. The) are the last ma-
jor college team to play the split-
six defense, allowing them to br-
ing four men to either side of the
ball. According to offensive line
coach Paul Anderson. lemple
will give ECU a tough test.
"It's going to take a lot more
preparation for us 'his week
Anderson said. "It's going to be
a real big test. I 'hey .ome at you
� the) attack the offensive
line
EC! coach Art Baker is con-
cerned with the almost extinct
split-six defense, because it takes
awa) the runninj ne and
forces the pass.
"Y e're going to K uble
unless we can throw the ball
Baker said. "We must continue
to improve our passing game, if
we want to get better.
"It's a real tribute to coach
Arians Baker added. "There's
been no letup since he's been
there � he's the reason tor their
success
Even though lemple is located
in the large metropolis of
Philadelphia, and ECU is located
in rural eastern North Carolina,
tch Baker sees a similarity bet-
ween the two schools.
"The two programs are very
similar Baker said. "We're
both struggling tor identity and
gaining recognition in a hurry.
There might just be a great one
out there Saturda).
"Our players have a very vivid
imagination ol the Temple game
last year Baker continued.
"They were verv much embar-
rassed b) the wa) they looked
� � � �
Senior place kickei Jeft Heath,
who scored tour points last
weekend, is getting closer to
becoming the school's all-time
leading scorer. He now trails
1 arlester Crumpler by only eight
points.
Crumpler scored 222 points
during his career which spanned
m 1971-73. Heath has 214
points witli eight games remain-
ing, in this, his senior season.
He also is just five extra-points
sh) of becoming the school's
careei leader in that categor) as
well. I he current record is 89.
Soccer Team Takes Two Matches
B DAVID MCGINN ESS
SUff Wrilrr
The ECU soccer team played at
their highest level this season and
came awa) from the N.C.
Wesleyan Socceilassie with two
wins.
In a game against the number
18 ranked George Mason Univer-
sity, on Saturda) Sept. 14, the
Pirates lost 2-0. However, this
was the first time (All has been.
held to two goals this season and
coach Stephen Brod) was well
pleased with the Pirates' perfor-
mance. "It showed me and the
team that the) can play with just
about anyone the) want to said
Brodv.
On Sunda) Sept. 15, the team
plaved against Old Dominion
University to a double overtime
0-0 tie. GMU, ranked fourth in
the Mid-Atlantic Region, came
into the game at 4-0. Goalie
George Podgorney had a
remarkable 26 saves for the
Pirate effort.
Last weekend the team traveled
to N.C. W'esleyan for the N.C.
Wesleyan Soccer Classic. In the
opening game ECU came away
1-0 victors. The Pirates
dominated offensively with 35
shots on goal compared to 10 for
Methodist. Howard David Skeff-
ington scored the game's only
goal on an assist from Palmier
Grossi and Will Podolak. Coach
Brody felt that the Pirates should
have scored a possible five goals
considering the number of ;hots
taken.
In the finals the Pirates faced
N.C. W'esleyan. The Pirates went
into the game with three players
injured and lost 3-0. Brody felt
that even considering with a tired
and injured team the Pirates
played well below their potential.
The Pirates have now won
their last three games played after
losing their opening three. Their
trend of improvement will be
tested this coming weekend as
thev face two of the strongest
teams on theii schedules.
( i. Saturda). September 28,
ECU will travel to W ashington,
D. ace numbei six ranked
American I nivei sit). Amei i
is fielding two All-American
playei s and will . certainly
be the strongest team on PC I "�
schedule. I lie Pirates' strateg)
will be to trv and shut down the
American offense with complete
man-to-man coverage. Basicall)
they will be playing foi a draw,
although it an) shots come open
the Pirates will go for the ball.
"We're going to go up there and
see i! we can just hold them
;aid Brody.
' )n Sunday the Pirates will turn
m the finesse and sheet ability
oi the American team to the size
and physical power of Navy.
Although powerful, the Navy
team has ahead) lost to James
Madnon University, who the
Pirates defeated 1-0. Brodv looks
tor ECl to win this one. "I think
if we go up there and are not in-
timidated by their size, that we
can give them a good match
The young ECl soccer team is showing much improvement this
season, and currently stands 3-3 as they prepare for a tough road trip.
Shell Leads Men Netters Over UNC- W
JIV i FuroENS ltu tar
Ann Manderfield
Bv DAVID MCCINNESS
SUff Writer
Behind the excellent play of
top-seeded David Shell, the ECU
men's tennis team defeated a
tough UNC-W'ilmington team 5-4
at the varsity courts yesterday.
In the No. 1 match, Shell
defeated his old high school
teammate Jeff Robins 7-6, 4-6,
6-1. The two played together at
Robert E. Lee High School in
Virginia. Robins played in the
No. 1 spot, while Shell was the
No. 2 man.
"I've played him in tour-
naments six times Shell said.
"And I have never beaten him
before Both men piay an ag-
gressive serve and volley game,
where Robins has an especially
strong return of service.
However, Shell would not give in
as he got his raquet on almost
every ball that Robins hit.
The Pirates' second seed
wasn't as fortunate. Freshman
John Taylor was defeated by
UNC-W's Terry Gratz in straight
sets 7-5, 6-4. No. 3 seed Dan La-
Mont had to use a tiebreaker
before defeating John Peacock
7-6, 6-1. Fourth seeded junior
Greg Loyd posted a 6-4, 6-2 vic-
tory over Troy Furbay while fifth
seeded freshman Paul Haggar
took one set from UNC-W's
Marcus Luke before dropping the
match 5-7, 6-2, 6-1. No. t seed
Jon Melhorn took care of Tom
Allen handily 6-1, 6-4.
After four of the top-six Pirate
seeds took their respective singles
matches, two of the three
doubles' teams also posted wins.
The Seahawks won the No. 1
doubles, but fell in both the se-
cond and third spots. The team
of Robins-Gratz defeated Shell-
Haggar 6-4, 6-1. ECU Freshman
Timmy Morris and Melhorn had
a three set match with Peacock-
Furbay. Morris-Melhorn won
6-2, 4-6, 7-6. And the third-
seeded team of senior John An-
thony and sophomore Pat Cam-
panaro breezed past Luke-
Wooten 6-4, 6-3.
The Pirates will next see action
this weekend when they travel to
Richmond, Va to compete
against Richmond, William &
Mary and Campbell.
Mistake
We would like to correct a
misprinted tennis score that ap-
peared in an earlier edition of
The East Carolinian. In the
previous match between ECU
and Belmont Abbey, ECU was
victorious in that match 5-4.
We 're sorry for the error.
IBS i
m i
f - . . , r m '






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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 26, 1985
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Hamburger A Fries $1.00
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Longnecks 85c
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� Regular Haircut$5.50
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has openings for the following positions:
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 26, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.427
Location of Original
University Archives

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