The East Carolinian, September 24, 1985






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(ftarnUrttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.9
Tuesday, September 24, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
'iv Wf fc�
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Legislators Begin
New SGA Year
Swearing In
JIM LEUTGENS - Th� East Carolinian
More than 50 students were sworn in at Monda s Student Housed several bills were introduced. The legislature will
Government Association s firs( meetin of hf m5 yw encouraged o
Senior Class President k,rk Shelley was elected Speaker of the find out what their representatives are doing nCOUn"
Possible Power Increase
WZMB Gets Application Approval
By MIKE LLDWICK
fo-Nnn Mil or
The Media Board approved a
power increase proposal by
WZMB General Manager Kate
Abbott Monday. Abbott propos-
ed to aJlow the current WZMB
FCC application to lapse, and
reapply to the FCC for a new
operational frequency and power
increase
The new application would re-
quest a new frequency of 91.9
and an increase to 3,000 watts, or
3 kilowatts, of power.
The frequency change is need-
ed because of WZMB's in-
terference with WUNC's signal in
the Greenville area, Abbott said.
The WL'NC Director of
Engineering, David Wright, said,
"The new frequency would put
WZMB two channels away from
WUNC and provide for better
reception for both stations
During the meeting, Media
Board member Kirk Shelley voic-
ed some concerns about the pro-
posal. He was mainly concerned
about the need for a power in-
crease, because he maintained
that WZMB was conceived as a
student station run by the
students for the students. Shellev
said that with the power increase,
there would be a need for profes-
sional full-time management
because of the increased audience
that would go with an increase in
power.
However, "applying for a fre-
quency change and a power in-
crease does not commit you to
build such a station Wright
said. "The frequency spectrum is
limited, but if you do not file
now, you will not get that fre-
quency later
The Media Board was swayed
by Wright's argument and ap-
proved a motion to change the
frequency and increase the power
wattage of WZMB.
In other Media Board business,
the Media Board approved a new
position on the WZMB Executive
Council, that of grant manager,
who would be in charge of fin-
ding grants for WZMB. Abbott
said
The income that is generated
by ihis position is needed, she
said, to buy new discs for
WZMB's compact disc system.
Currently there is not enough ap-
propriated money to purchase the
discs, which often cost more than
albums.
By HAROLD JOY.NER
( �Nwi Kdilor
More than 52 ECU students
met last night as the 1985-86 Stu-
dent Government Association's
first legislature convened Mon-
day night.
SGA President David Brown
greeted the legislators, who heard
summer reports of the Executive
Council.
This year's legislative body en-
compasses approximately 30
students who are new to the
SGA, said Lisa Carroll,
secretary.
Selecting Kirk Shelley as
Speaker of the House was the
first duty the legislators faced.
Nominated by Graduate Class
President Lisa Roberts, she said
Shelley's "experience in student
government and his true leader-
ship qualifies him to lead the
SGA for a smooth year
One of Shelley's primary goals
was to organize committee
chairmen before the SGA meets,
which he said would make sure
bills were fully understood, as
well as making them more signifi-
cant. He said he would also like
to see the SGA book exchange re-
instated and the production of an
ECU Auto Repair Guide begin.
Shelley, who is also Senior
Class President, has served in the
SGA for four years, two of which
were served as Speaker of the
House.
Two bills were introduced to
the legislators, one of which pro-
poses the possibility of transferr-
ing funds from Pirate Walk and
SGA Rug Sales from SGA to Stu-
dent Residence Association.
The other bill proposed that
appropriations be made to ECU
Ambassodors. Both bills will be
assigned to a particular commit-
tee and will come back to the
legislators for a vote.
Expenditures from May 22 to
Sept. 13 totaled $11,278, accor-
ding to Treasurer Tony Braswell.
The largest amount, $6,752, was
appropriated to the Homecoming
Committee and $1,850 was for
use in preparation of Parent's
Day Weekend Also, S5"75 was
appropriated to the SGA Elec-
tions Committee
Ail legislation maintained b
the Executive Council this sum-
mer aie subject to final SGA ap-
proval.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for Student Life and Rudolph
Alexander, associate dean and
director of University Unions ad-
vise the SGA. Julie Skinner,
University Unions business
manager serves as business ad-
visor to the Legislature.
Lonely Freshmen Rises
Cocaine Users Face Problems, Risks
B BETH WHICKER
In an informal poll, 10 out of
20 students surveyed on the ECU
campus have used cocaine at least
one time.
On college campuses, cocaine
is fast becoming the current drug
of choice. "Being up and being
fit, cocaine fits the mind set ac-
cording to Mary Elesha-Adams,
Health Educator for Student
Health Service.
Cocaine is not the champagne
of drugs that is was thought to be
in the early 60s. Cocaine was
thought to be entirely pleasurable
and relatively safe with no habit
forming properties or dangerous
side effects.
Recent studies have shown that
cocaine affects the body more
drastically than suspected, and
there is even more evidence that
certain changes affect the brain
under the influence of cocaine are
irreversible.
The latest statistical studies
show that there has been a
dramatic drop in the cost of pur-
chasing cocaine. With the price
going down, cocaine has spread
to the college market. "The
availability of the drug is one of
the major reasons of its spread to
college campuses Elesha-
Adams said.
Statistically, cocaine users bet-
ween the age of 16 and 24 suffer
more brain seizures than adult
users, have more accidents, make
more attempts to take their own
life and tend to get in to legal
trouble.
Cocaine has a stronger impact
on the body, wliich is still
developing during the college
years. The drug's potential for
damaging liver and lungs is
greater to college age group.
Drug dependency also develops
at a more rapid rate.
According to a 1984 national
survey of 60 students known to
have a dependency on cocaine, a
majority connected feelings of
anxiety, depression, paranoia,
memory dysfunction and poor
coordination with use of the
drug.
ECU Renovations Progresses
Not every person who tries co-
caine becomes addicted. The pro-
cess of addiction is gradual.
The first sign of dependency is
being unable to limit the amount
of frequency of the drug.
The second stage of dependen-
cy involves a total preoccupation
with thoughts of the drug and
finding it a crucial part of one's
life.
The most crucial stage is when
one uses cocaine despite the
negative effects it has on the
user's life. These effects include,
physical problems, frequent
arguments or paranoia.
If you have a problem with co-
caine, or want to help someone
who does, call 1-800-COCAINE.
LINCOLN, NE (CPS) - Col-
lege students, particularly enter-
ing freshmen, are more lonely
than virtually all other social
groups except single parents,
alcoholics and some high school
students, according to a resear-
cher at the University of
Nebraska-Lincoln.
"We have been very surprised
to learn that college students are
one of the more lonely groups of
people we've surveyed over the
years says John Woodward,
UNL professor of human
development, who has given his
loneliness test to thousands of
people � including over 400
students � over the past 20
years.
After asking respondents how
'they feel and behave in specific
social situations, Woodward
rates them on what he calls his
"loneliness index
"Ironically, what we have
found is that high school and col-
lege students � who you would
expect to be the least lonely of all
people � rate very high on the
loneliness index, while the elderly
� who you would expect to feel
lonely � are the lowest group on
the loneliness index he reports.
The only people lonelier than
entering freshmen, he says, are
alcoholics, single parents, rural
high school students and female,
inner-city high schoolers
"We believe that students are
lonely for a good many reasons
Woodward explains. "Most of
them hve been uprooted from
their family support systems,
their life-long friends, and are
searching to establish a new sup-
port system in a strange place
among strange people
In addition, he says, "college
students are in a period when
they have to make new decisions
about all sorts of things � com-
mitting themselves to college,
building a philosophy of life, set-
ting rules for moral behavior,
what classes they will take � and
decision-making is a very lonely
process
"College is indeed a time of
shaping and building for
students agrees Thomas Cum-
mings, a counseling education
specialist at Arizona Sate Univer-
sity.
Loneliness, says UNL's Wood-
ward, "is a very normal human
condition, but it becomes a pro-
blem when it interferes with so-
meone's ability to function
By DOUG ROBERSON
MTIMtoi
The renovation of Wright
Auditorium and construction of
the new classroom building are
among the improvement and con-
struction projects in progress at
ECU.
According to James Lowry,
Director of the Physical Plant,
Wright Auditorium is located in
one of the most congested areas
on campus. "Many students have
been asking why we put up a
fence near the student supply
store. The reason is the area is
needed to enclose tools and
materials that are needed for
construction- it's a holding
area he said.
Lowry said that the renovation
The
Announcements2
Classifieds 8
Editorials4
Features 7
Sports 10
Foul deeds will rise,
Though all the earth o 'erwhelm
them, to men's eyes
Shakespeare
of Wright consists of two phases
of construction. "In the first
phase, we replaced the roofs on
the entire building. A new
balcony was installed as well as a
new stage lighting board and
lighting system. We also
lengthened the stage � now we
can accomodate a 100 instrument
symphony orchestra he added.
Other improvements in the
first phase included installation
of an elevator, "raking" of the
auditorium floor, and accoustical
modifications.
"We're now in the second
phase of renovation, "Lowry
said "The third floor area over
the lobby is being converted to
house the Counseling Center.
The Air Force ROTC will also be
moved to the third floor. Then,
the second floor, will be con-
verted to areas that can be used
by actors, muscians, and
others he added.
Other second phase im-
provements will include the in-
stallation of fixed seating, im-
provement of restrooms and a
new elevator in the southwest
corner of the building. "This
elevator will be for transporta-
tion to the Counseling Center and
the balcony Lowry said. Of-
fices for a person who will even-
tually be responsible for Wright
are also planned, he added.
Regarding construction of the
new classroom building, Lowry
said he was "extremely
surprised" at the lower than
estimated bids. "The architects
designed a similar building for
UNC Charlotte four years ago.
The cost of that building came in
at $55 per square foot. With in-
flation, we estimated our
building would cost about $61
per square foot he said.
"When we got our bid, it was
about $45 per square foot- that's
$10 less than four years ago. We
were pleased and surprised
Lowry added.
Lowry emphasized that several
factors were involved in the dif-
ference between the estimated
cost and actual bid, but quality
was no among them. "Certain
things cost more in a large city
such as Charlotte. Transporting
concrete is less expensive in
Greenville- little things like these
make a big difference. But the With the Increase of recent renovations at ECU, many more protective fences mav nt.rt .� ,
quality of the building isn't af- to protect the students from flying debris and co-eds from construction workers Thi?VaJ!?!en8
fected by the price he said front of Rawl Building is part of the second phase of Wright Auditorium. When comnSS'
See Wright p.2 Wrl�fct AudorlB,B �" ���� to hold a 100-piece symphony orchestra P�,
Renovations Continue
i-�LIUT�NTh,Itl(Cr(
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THE EAST CARPI INII an
SEPTEMBER 24. 1985
BLOOD DRIVE
The Pitt County Tidewater Region of the
American Red Cro� � operating at
emergency status The Air Force ROTC
Detachment 600 at ECU will sponsor a blood
drive to aid the Red Cross on Sept J4 &, 25
?rom 12 noon to 4 p m in Menaenrta 11 room
244
NASW CORSO
Will meet on Sept 30 at 4 Mm the AH 103
All who are interested are urged to attend
HOMECOMING COMMITTEE
Show your spirit! Any organization that
would like to ride in the parade should con
'act Barbara at 75 4473 Get your organ,ia
tlon involved'
LACROSSE CLUB
Anyone interested m playing on the men's
lacrosse team in the spring or fall semester
your reply is necessary by Wed Sept 23rd
For more info call 757 0707
ICE HOCKEY
CLUB
There will be an organizational meeting in
room 105 B Memorial Gym on Wed Sept 25
at 4pm There are forms that have to be f'H
ed Out by an members All interested per
sons are encouraged to attend if you cannot
make It, or need more into call Mike White
at 752 1332
STUDENT UNION
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE
Talent needed tor magicians iuggiers
mimes etc for the Madr.gai Dinners Audi
'�ons heid Sepf 25 4 5pm and Sept 26.
3 4 30 D m For A pots into call 757 Mil ext
210 iW F 8 5pm)
BIBLE STUDY
Have you heard' There s a new Bible
Study on campus! it's caned Search for
Truth! Exciting relative subiects such as
EndTime Prophecy ano the Truth about
Creation Come to Menoenhali every Mon a'
B 30 p m room 212
ECANS
Meeting Sept 26. 1985 .n Nursing Bidg
Room 101 at 7 p m New members nvited to
attend Old members Be There1
PRESBYTERIANMETHODIST
FELLOWSHIP
Come to the Methodist Student Center this
Wed night at 5 30 pm and every Wed night
or a delicious, all you can eat home cooked
meal with a short program afterwards TIM
meal is tt at the door, il 50 it you sign up ,n
advance This week our worship will em
phasize the names we use to address God
Call 758 2030 for reservations Sponsored by
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi will hold its first dinner
meeting on Wednesday. Sept 25 5 X p m
At Western Steer (loth St Please plan to
attend
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
A national service fraternity is having .ts
tan rush on Sep' 23 in the Mendenhal!
Multipurpose room featuring a submarine
party from 7 � p m and on Sept 24 in
Menoenhall room 238 from 7 8 30 p m All
freshmen, sophomores and luniors are in
vited to attend
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
Attention students, faculty and staff Come
walk with the Alpha's m their March ana
Rally against the Apartheid System of South
Africa The march will be held on Wed , Sept
25 at 12 noon beginning between the Music
Building ano Brewster Building and ending
at the patio of Mendenhail Student Center
Rev Arlee Griffin of Cornerstone Baptist
Church will be the keynote speaker with
remarks by SGA President David Brown, a
professor from the political science depart
ment. the Chancellor and various other
university officials Each and every one of
you are needed for support against apar
thetd
NEW SORORITY
General meeting will be held for all girls
interested in forming a new sorority at ECU
The meeting will be held on Oct 3. at 6 30 In
room 221 Mendenhail
PHI BETA SIGMA
Announcing our Formal Smoker on Sept
W In Afro American Cultural Center at 7
p m All interested men should come and
check out the Brothers of Xi Nu Chapter at
ECU G O M A B
We will be having a party at the Cultural
Center from 10 2am and it's free to all ECU
Students and their guests
Any young ladies interested in becoming a
Sigma Dove should report to Mendenhail
Multl Purpose room Sept 25 at 8 p m
WATER SKI CLUB
The first meeting will be Toes Sept 24 in
the Mendenhail Coffeehouse from B 9 30
p m Prospective members please bring re
quired forms and $10 membership fee
Everyone is urged to attend because there is
much to be discussed
SMOKING CESSATION
SUPPORT GROUP
Participants are being recruited for t
Young women's Smoking Cessation Support
Group which focuses on self management
and positive reinforcement There will be 7
sessions i 1 vs hours each) that are required
during the period of Oct 7th Nov 1st (fall
break will be observed) Develop new friend
ships as well as new skills toward positive
health management Call 756 5662 after 5
p m if interested In more info
ZETA PHI BETA
The ladies of Zeta Phi Beta would like to
invite an other interested ladies to come and
enioy a night of elegance at our fail Formal
Rush The rush will be held in the Cultural
Center at 8pm on Thursday. Sept 26 Come
and see what true Sisterhood is all about
ASSOCIATED GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
ECU STUDENT CHAPTER
Will meet on Oct 1 at 4 p m in F102 All
construction management maiors are urged
To attend
Announcements
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Will hold a meeting Wed , Sept 25 at 4 30
in Rawl 342 All Business and Business Ed
maors welcome Last day to pay dues is
Oct 17 Come get involved, make new
friends and have fun
PPHA
Pre professional Health Alliance will have
a meeting Thurs Sept 26 at 6 p m In the
Cultural Center All members and Interested
guests are encouraged to attend
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Ser
vice In ttve Bloxton House is offering one hour
sessions to help you prepare your own
resume Come to either session and receive
handouts and an overview. Meetings will be
held in the Career Planning Room of the
Bloxton House at 3 p m on Sept 26. Oct 7
and 9 An evening session will be held at 7
p m on Sept 26
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Win meet at 8 p m on Tues , Sept 24 at
Mendenhail Student Centre in room 221 For
more info call Sandy hardy at 757 0711, Bob
Smith at 752 9320 or Matt Clarke at 752 357
LAW SCHOOL
Ever thought about Law School? To have
an opportunity fo talk with someone from an
Admissions Committee is available to ECU
Students Last Year the representative from
the University of Richmond Law School talk
ed with a few individuals and with about 8
people af one time Sign up at the Career
Planning and Placement office for a similar
meeting on Oct 4 between 2 and 5pm
INTERVrWING WORKSHOPS
Career Planning ano Placement is offer
mg these one hour sessions to aid you In
developing better interviewing skills for use
your job search A film and discussion of
how to interview through this service will be
shared Sessions will be held In the Career
Planning Room at 3 p m on Oct 3 and 7
Wright Renovations Proceed
Continued From p.l
The depressed state of the
building industry was also a fac-
tor for the lower than estimated
bid, Lowry added.
Lowry said bidding on con-
struction of the classroom
Correction
In the Sept. 12 edition of The1
East Carolinian, Kathleen!
Monahan was reported asbeing a
sworn officer. This isnot thel
case, and she reports thatshe was'
"an uniformed officer" Wej
regret the error.
building was close, "On a project
of this size, I'd say the bidding
was very, very close. The general
contractor's bid (R.N. Rouse-
Goldsboro, NC) was only-
Si 7,000 less than the next bidder.
That's close when Rouse's bid
was about 5.6 million dollars
He added, "You'd worry
about it a little bit if one bid wa�
way out of line- either high or
low. But all of the bids on this
project- general, electrica,
mechanical, and plumbing con-
tractor's -were all close.
Lowry said contract execution
for the classroom building bagan
last week. "This usually takes
about 2-3 weeks. After the con-
tractor signs the contracts, the ar
chitects meticulously go over
them. Then the university, and
finally the state attorney general
(Office of State Construction)
signs them he said.
Lowry added the University
plans to begin using the new
building by fall semester, 1987.
"Construction will take 21 mon-
ths. We hope to be able to use the
building by August, 1987. In
order to do that, we're going to
need to move in equipment by
July- but I can't predict at this
point if we'll be able to do so
he said.
LOOK GOOD
When Your Friends
W See You Back at School
30-60 off
All Eveqlass Frames wDurchase of Rx Lenses
Ray Ban Sunglasses. . . 30 off
Pjzza
Transit
"Authority
LARGE
Select Group of Frames
For Men. Women and Children
W Single
Vision
Lenses
Rx -t- or - 4.00 Power
27
95
BIFOCALS
W fraoiei
25 Hat Tea
48"
Kt t I
VftHk
FACETED
�OLISHED EDGES
$25
1
Reg. $40 Now
20
Senior Citizen
Discount
Sale ends Oct 4. 1985
1 Discount Per Eyeglass
MoslP'Cord
VKA
pucians
CALL US FOR AN
EYE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
OF YOUR CHOICE
311 Pjrdyiew Commons
Across Ftom Doctors Par
Phone 752 1446
�� m�u �� ai Tan o .rrm
Open Mon -f n � AM hi S 30 PM
�eectier-Kwttey-Otaeenauifl Oflctan
r, n oo �JStMj'
Locoted Acto� Frorr.
H.ghwo Patrol Station
EL TORO
Men s Hair Styling
JOHNNY WEATHINGTON
Phone 7523318
Style Cut $6 00
Wash & Blow Dry $10 00
2800 E Tenth Sf
Greenville, N C 27834
C�m�dyZpne
ANOTHER DIMENSION IN SIGHT & SOUND
Cfckkoil � IlKvifl
Tailgate With
Time Ovtf
Open 24 Hours!
DRIVERS
WANTED
Starting Pay $3.50 Per Hour
Plus Mileage Pay & Tips
(Can Add Up To $8.00 Per Hour)
FLEXIBLE WORKING HOURS
Apply In Person From 1:00-4:00 MonThurs.
At P.T.A.
(Corner of 14th St. and Charles St.)
164 rhpdss Norther
( � tM d'olirn
f Reserved seating for two shows every Wednesday
� Call 758-5570 by 6:00 on Wednesday for Reservations
� Doors Open 7:30 First Show
1015 Second Show
� Ail these young comedians have appeared at Charlie
Goodnight's in Raleigh Many have appeared on The
Johnny Carson Show and Late Night with David
Letterman
Call 758-5570 for a FREE RIDE to
on the
' r-
-�&�T& tflicfe
Private Cub JIABC Permits
$ 1 Ofl the Admission Price!
off Good 0nly Wednesday
present coupon September 25th
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
November 27-December 1,1985
Spend your Thanksgiving holidays in style in New York . . . Macy's Parade, Broadway
plays, galleries, museums, shopping, and touring the city. Prices for the trip are:
� 99.00 per person in a quad occupancy room
� $115.00 per person in a triple occupancy room
� $130.00 per person in a twin occupancy room
� $180.00 per person in a single occupancy room
Included in prices are transportation and hotel accomodations.
A limited number of theatre tickets for Radio City Music Hall, Cats, The Odd Couple,
and 42nd Street are reserved for purchasing in the Central Ticket Office.
Contact the ECU Central Ticket Office, 757-6611, ext. 266, for more information. '
Sponsored by the Student Union Travel Committee

i itt ft
Stormy S
BEA PI) fr
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courv

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Dean Wt

didatt -
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as Dear.
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and Director
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and as a memb.
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Off Highway n
THE LADIES ZOC
Ladies Only 8
Guys admitt
25 Wine and Drai
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Pre-Game Party with t
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get in for J i
Doors Open
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$2.50 Pii
MEMBERSHIPSPE
$2.00 New
Daddy Cool plays th
Beau's a PrivateXlub for Members I
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Kim





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 24, 1985
foceed
� 2 3 weeks After the con-
signs the contracts, the ar-
I is meticulously go over
he university, and
c attorney general
State Construction)
said.
the University
using the new
semester, 1987.
n wiii take 21 mon-
ne able to use the
August, 1987. In
we're going to
equipment by
edict at this
RS
ED
er Hour
Tips
Per Hour)
G HOURS
MonThurs
hades St.)
i
I
I
uiber 1,1985
jy's Parade, Broadway
for the trip are:
ats, The Odd Couple,
lOffice.
more information.
Stormy Seas Slows Historic Ship's Voyage; Exports Prevail
BEAUFORT - (UPI) Rough
seas from a tropical depression
caused the Elizabeth II to slow its
course this weekend, but took lit-
tle time away from the ship's ex-
pected Tuesday arrival in
Beaufort, officials said Mondav.
Thj $650,000 replica of a 16th
century sailing ship anchored at
the mouth of the Neuse River
Sunday because of the rough seas
and because "they wanted to stay
m a safe harbor said Meg
Gunkel, a spokes woman for the
state Cultural Resources Depart-
ment.
The vessel, which has been
under full sail for most of its six-
day maiden voyage, is expected
to arrive in Beaufort about noon
Tuesday. Officials had been
afraid the Elizabeth II, the
centerpiece of the state's 400th
anniversary celebration, would
remain forever in the Manteo
berth because there was no
money to pay crew expenses and
the cost of a tug to pull the ship
out of its dock.
But Capitol Broadcasting Co.
in Raleigh donated $20,000 to
pay for the ship's first voyage.
The Elizabeth II is expected to
stay in Beaufort until Oct. 2 and
then make a daylong trip along
the Neuse River to New Bern.
CHARLOTTE (UPI) � At a
time when some American in-
dustries are faltering under the
weight of imports, many North
Dean Wins Award
Maff 4 Wire Reports
Dr. Ron Speier has been
nominated for the position of
Vice President of Commissions
of the American College Person
nel Association. The election for
this position will be conducted
during December, 1985 to
January, 1986. Over seven thou-
sand members of the Association
will vote for one of two can-
didates for this position.
Dr. Speier currently serves a
Associate Dean of Student and
Director of Student Services at
1 CU. Prior
to this position Dr. Speier served
as Dean of Students at La Roche
college. Associate Dean of
Students at Radford University,
and Director of Campus Ac-
tivities Student Union at
Ashland College. He received his
doctorate from Virginia
Polytechnic Institute and State
University.
At the present time Dr. Speier
serves as chairperson of commis-
sion IV (Students. Their .
uvities and Their Community)
and as a member of the Editorial
Board, the By-Laws Committee,
and the membership committee
of ACPA. He has authored
several articles in local and
regional publications and has
give numerous presentations at
national conventions.
The American College Person-
nel Association is a division of
the American Association of
Counseling and Development
dedicated to promoting student
development in higher education.
The Association unites the func-
tions, services, and programs of
college and university student af-
fairs professionals which includes
areas such as admissions, finan-
cial aid, counseling, career ser-
vices, commuter programs,
residence life, activities and
health services. As the largest na-
tional professional organization
of student affairs professionals
with over seven thousand
members. ACPA conducts ongo-
ing professional development ac-
tivities for members, provides the
vehicle for profession-related
social and political action, and
determines and maintains ethical
standards in the profession.
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Carolina businesses are defying
the odds of foreign trade barriers
and making their mark in ex-
ports.
"You hear so much about im-
ports but we've got a lot of
businesses that if it were not for
exports they wouldn't be in
business said Norwood Creek,
a trade specialist for the state
Commerce Department.
"We very rarely do a domestic
job said Wayne Cooper, head
of Charlotte's Arcon Interna-
tional Inc which makes and sells
grain silos to 34 countries around
the world, including the heavily
agricultural regions of the Middle
East, Latin America and Africa.
The company's annual sales are
more than $15 million.
Coopers company is among an
estimated 900 to 1,200 North
Carolina firms that are mastering
the export maze and finding suc-
cess in world markets. State
Commerce Department officials
estimate North Carolina
manufacturing firms export
about $8 billion in goods and
parts annually.
About 95 percent of the state's
manufactured products could be
exported if North Carolina com-
panies knew the rules of the
game, were innovative and were
willing to work hard to overcome
trade, language barriers, govern-
ment officials and export experts
said.
UPI- In an effort to advance arc-
tic research and help thaw Soviet-
American relations, a noted U.S.
atmospheric scientist has sug-
gested the two nations create a
research park on both sides of the
Bering Sea.
Walter Orr Roberts proposes
that the research park include
about 50 miles of the easternmost
tip of Siberia, 50 miles of the
westernmost tip of Alaska and
the 60-mile-wide strait seperating
the two countries.
"Within the zone, cooperative
research could be conducted on
biological, environmental, an-
thropological, cultural, at-
mospheric, oceanographic and
other fascinating aspects of this
unique regions Roberts said.
"It could be a tangible sign of
cooperation between the world's
two most powerful nations,
whose relations today are at a
deep impasse.
"I can forsee no national
security hazard from either na-
tion's standpoint he wrote.
"But I can picture great benefits
scientifically and in numan
terms. It is worth a try
Roberts, who is a president em
eritus of the University Corpora-
tion for Atmospheric Research in
Boulder, Colo said both sides of
the Bering Strait have lagoons,
bays, rivers and other common
environmental factors of great in-
terest to ecological researchers.
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�te East QJaroIinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, am
Jay Stone, HanugmgtM�
H AROL D JOYNER. o. Mn. Utar TOM LUVENDER. t� MMrtM
Daniei Malrer. ��� �, Anthony Martin. � �-
RlC k McCORMAC, s�( fdl�� jOHN pETERSONi , rnill mmm,
Scott Cooper, �, s�, Shannon Short, ����, w
Debbie Stevens, �� andrfw Joyner, w b���
LORIN PASQUAL. Gmmmm fitfr MlKE LUDWICK, � , � Erw
DeChanile Johnson. � �,��� Stephen Sherbin. .�.�, ��
September 24. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Scandals!
The Good, The Bad, & The SGA
The fact that this fall's Student
Government Association Elections
were marked by scandals, accusa-
tions and in-fighting should not
cause anyone undue surprise.
Previous SGA elections have been
conducted in a similar vein.
The recent "dirt" involves a feud
between the newly elected Speaker
of the House Kirk Shelley, and SGA
President David Brown and his ap-
pointed Elections' Chairperson
Sven VanBaars.
The primary possible violation
which Shelley was questioned on
(for the arcane jargon of politics, no
actual accusations are made until
charges are officially filed) involved
a list which he allegedly made up,
containing more than 20 names of
candidates, who students were urg-
ed to vote for.
The list represented the combined
forces of the N.C. Student
Legislature, the campus ROTC,
some fraternity members and the
College Republicans. The CR's, in
fact, passed out the list from their
table in front of the Student Supply
Store.
There is, of course, nothing
wrong in this per se as other groups
have done similar things, albeit less
successfully. VanBaars, however,
questioned Shelley about including
production costs of the list on his
expense report to the elections com-
mittee. Also in question was
whether or not permission had been
granted to put the candidates'
names on the list. Certainly some
were not, and according to Brown,
this is a violation of the spirit, if not
the letter of the rules which govern
SGA elections.
Shelley, however, was miffed at
the fact that it was only he who was
questioned about the list, and at the
fact that the results of his race for
senior class president were not
released until one day later.
Moreover, Shelley said, is the fact
that the results of his race were
withheld from publication in The
East Carolinian, possibly causing
some suspicions among students
and unnecessary embarrassment.
VanBaars, on the other hand,
claims that his action was designed
to spare Shelley any unnecessary
embarassment by withholding all
allegations and voting results until a
full investigation could be made of
the case.
From here the trail of blame and
suspicion grows so dark and murky
that it is impossible to wrap it all in-
to one neat bundle and lay it at
anyone's feet. Suffice it to say that
all charges against Shelley were
summarily dropped, and he has
been vindicated.
Shelley also said Brown and Van-
Baars were conspiring to prevent
him from winning the election as
Speaker of the House, and thus
thwarting their control of the
legislature.
While it is likely that Brown may
have worked for the election of
Shelley's opponent, we think it is
unlikely that any attempts were
made to rig the election or to bring
charges against Shelley in order to
suffocate his political career.
Vet, we find that we must agree
with Shelley on a couple of points.
F:irst. a system in which the ex-
ecutive appoints the elections
chairperson, who can theoretically
be manipulated to the advantage of
the acting president and thus arous-
ing suspicion, is not fair.
Second, there is no compelling
reason to have withheld the release
of "unofficial" results of Shelley's
race from the paper last Thursday.
The fact is that the appointment
of the elections chair became the
responsibility of the Brown ad-
ministration because last year's
legislature was unable to appoint an
elections committee.
The end moral of this story is that
the legislature will probably see a
semester of bitter, factional rivalries
and in-fighting behind closed doors,
as well as a constant struggle bet-
ween the so-called equal branches of
student government.
And as we don't forsee the fall of
Rome before the next election, we
urge you find out what the SGA is
doing.
�Campus Forum.
Students Asked To Support March
The time has come for all students
and faculty to unite in opposition to
the South African system of apar
theid. Under this system 23 million
native Africans are prevented from
acting as anens by 4 : million
whites. This system is ethically repug-
nant and should inspire moral
outrage in people concerned about
human rights throughout America.
Apartheid must be crushed!
On September 25. 1985, starting at
12:00 noon between Brewster
Building and Fletcher Music
Building, the greek fraternity Alpha
Phi Alpha, with endorsements from
Students for .Economic Democracy
and other campus organizations, are
holding a march through campus in a
show of support for those South .
Africans resisting the apartheid
system
The time has come for our campus
to put to rest its apathetic posture.
Too long known only as a party
school, Fat Carolina has an oppor-
tunity to make a stand for interna-
tional freedom! The time is right for a
unified front against racism and
totalitarian domination.
Jeff Whisnant
Graduate, Philosophy
Left-wing Bias
An ECU tradition, that has existed
over the last few years is still with us
this year. The student newspaper's
editorial page exists as a liberal soun-
ding board and U.S. government de-
nouncer. Its contents have tradi-
tionally ranged from being moderate-
ly liberal to extremely communist.
The editors of the paper carry on
the tradition proudly. From Patrick
O'Neal, who as far as 1 know, is still
serving time in prison for breaking in-
to a nuclear missile plant and
spreading blood on missile com-
ponents, to Greg Rideout. whose
views and editorials were often con-
sidered brainless and sophomonc, the
editors of the East Carolinian have
attacked conservative thought
relentlessly. Jay Stone, our current
managing editor, while being ob-
viously intelligent and a refreshinglv
good writer, still proclaims leftist
ideals twice a week. So be it.
While some of us have tried to op-
pose the editorials in the past, the ma-
jority o' the people either shake their
heads in disbelief and go on to class,
or just ignore.the editorial page com-
pletely and read the Man-O-Stick
strip. For those who ignore the
editorials I would suggest you con-
tinue to do so. For those who read it
and disagree, I implore you to write
in, opposing the views of the paper in
the way you see fit. One-sided jour-
nalism is boring, left or right.
Bill Green
Graduate Student, Business
Editor's Sote: While in the past the
editorial page has seldom been ' 'ex-
tremely liberal in its content and has
never been "communist it is true
that recent issues have indeed leaned
toward an "exriremelv liberal" or
democratic left perspective. The East
Carolinian ran an ad asking for a
conservative columnist at the beginn-
ing of this semester and people were
contracted to write as a result of the
ad; however, they have yet to submit
anything for print. In addition, we
are in the process of securing the
hts to conservative William F.
Huckle 's column which we will run
on a regular basis. While I have toved
with the idea of adopting a
pseudonym and masquerading as a
conservative from time to time, I
hae concluded that both camps,
rmht and left, are best served if I re-
n true to my noblest inclinations.
Ma: head editorials have never
pretended to represent anything other
than a particular editor's opinion.
That is why "Other Opinion" is
presented alongside it on the same
pane. All opinions are welcome on
our editorial page. We encourage all
interested students to submit. Finally
Patrick OWeal has never been
managing editor of the East Caroli-
nian and we have had conservative
editors in the past.
Forum Rules
The Eastaroiinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop 'hem by our office in the Publica-
tions Buildma, across from (he en-
trance of Jovner I ibrar.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsj I �
are limited to two typewritten panes,
double-spaced or neatly printed. Ali
tetters are subject to editing for brevt-
ty, obscenitv and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one everv five issues.
OfFi
By Jay Stone
Farm Aid, a concert designed as much
to publicize the plight of the American
farmer as to raise money on his behalf,
rocked and boogied a crowd of over
80,000 in Champaign, Illinois Sunday
night. The concert included perfor-
mances by blues, country, and rock ar-
tists as well as videotapes of groups such
as Alabama, who were unable to be
there in person. In addition, a number
of noted celebrities, including actress
Sissy Spacek and Senator Tom Harkin,
made appearances in order to help
viewers better understand the plight that
farmers in America are currently facing.
1 here are six million farm residents in
the United States and the vast majority
of them are part-time small farmers who
hold other jobs that often subsidize a
losing farm operation. The present farm
crisis focuses, not only on the 400,000
middle-sized farms, but also increasingly
on the 300,000 farms that gross more
than $100,000. These are the "family
farms" of varied descriptions, but most
involve an extended family who own
(but increasingly also rent) the land that
they farm.
The survival of these family farms is
not simply a question of nostalgia or
Christian charity. Nor is it primarily an
issue of bailing out a banking system
that is over-burdened by insolvent
farmers. The question is: "What form
of ownership and control does society
desire?" Without some kind of com-
prehensive program designed to save
family farms from financial ruin in-
creasing concentration of land owner-
ship and corporate-style industrialized
agriculture will be the result. Ultimately,
large agri-business corporations couid
control the supermarket chain which
sells products to the consumer, the com-
pany that manufactures finished
foodstuffs from raw produce, and the
land which grows the raw produce as
well.
Increasing debt is the trend that seems
to have become established in much of
the country � particularly the Midwest.
A recent report by the U.S. Department
of Agriculture showed nearly one-third
of family farms were holding debt equal
to 40 percent or more of their assets. But
with farmland prices continuing to
plummet, in many areas at least a per-
cent a year, and with forced sales and
foreclosures pulling the bottom out
from under even that asset base, the
potential for sever economic dislocation
accelerates daily.
This is especially true when the prices
for farm products remain below the cost
of production, guaranteeing that in the
struggle to pay debts to banks and credit
and loan institutions, many farmers will
simply fall further behind. For example,
the Ohio Department of Agriculture
estimates that one-fourth of the state's
farmers will go out of business this year
through foreclosure, bankruptcy or
voluntary liquidation.
The reasons for the current farm crisis
are varied. The rise of countries such as
China and Argentina as export countries
and the establishment of countries once
dependent upon the United States, such
as Saudi Arabia, as agriculturally self-
sufficient nations is a large part of the
story. Foreign competition has resulted
in the closure of many overseas markets
to American products and thus a glut in
many commodities which has forced
prices down below the point where they
make up for the cost of production. Yet,
part of the reason why American farm
products are losing out overseas is the
currently overvalued dollar, which is a
result of the tight fiscal policies of the
Federal Reserve. These fiscal policies
are, in turn, prompted by the enormous
deficits which the Reagan administra-
tion has amassed since coming into of-
fice. The money supply is tightly
restricted in order to keep a reign on in-
flationary expectations which might be
generated by large-scale government
borrowing and spending. This also leads
to high interest rates which hurt farmers
who are dependent on loans from banks
for seed, fertilizer, and farm equipment.
Yet, this is only the backdrop against
which the real drama involving a power
struggle between competing interest
groups is played out. Many involved in
the struggle to save small farmers believe
that corporate interests are intent upon
using the current crisis as an opportunity
to consolidate their control over the
food production chain. The crisis, they
believe, will force farmers to sell off
their land at low prices to corporate bid-
ders. The Reagan administration, it is
maintained, is the ally of the corpora-
tions in this struggle. A proposal from
Agriculture Secretary John Block would
quickly reduce price supports for major
agricultural commodities as part of a
"market-oriented" policy. According to
a new projection of the effects of
.arious farm policies by the Food and
Agricultural Policy Research Institute, a
market-oriented plan would reduce com-
modity prices by 15 to 20 percent. For
wheat and corn, dollars earned per acre
over variable costs would be halved.
Since prices now are below the average
cost of production, even more farmers
would be eliminated quickly. Even with
current prices supports and an expanded
international market, prices would not
rise enough to help.
The only hope for farmers, at this
stage of the game, and for their lending
institutions and farm equipment
manufacturers who are fast approaching
bankruptcy with them, is a major
reworking of the current agricultural
system. The Farm Policy Act of 1985,
sponsored by Senator Tom Harkin
among ethers, promises exactly that.
The heart of the legislation is tederal
government intervention in the
marketplace to guarantee a minimum
price to cover at least the cost of produc-
tion. As a corollary, the government
would regulate supply, in conjunction
with a proper referendum, to avoid
overproduction. That would eliminate
all subsidy payments from the federal
treasury.
As the minimum for farm prices is
raised .government reserves would be
sold in times of shortage to prevent price
surges. But the bill also provides increas-
ed funding for humanitarian aid to
hungry nations ultimately aimed at pro-
moting their agricultural self-
sufficiency. And it calls for stronger
support for Food Stamps and nutri-
tional programs for mothers, children
and the elderly.
Not only would such legislation great
ly raise farm income, providing a partial
solution to the current crisis, but it also
would be less costly to the government
than Reagan's program and increase the
value of exports significantly more
(although cutting the actual volume
somewhat). Consumers would pay
more, even though in some products it
would be barely noticeable � a few
cents more for a loaf of bread, but
perhaps a 25 percent increase in meat
prices. Ultimately, the percentage of
consumer spending for food might in-
crease from 16 percent to 18 percent,
still far below the proportion paid in all
other industrialized countries. But after
that one-time increase, food costs
should stabilize.
The Harkin bill will come up for a
vote in the Senate tomorrow. The
organizers of Farm Aid are hedging their
bets on the passage of the bill and on the
hope that they will raise $50 million for
debt-burdened farmers over the course
of the next year. Thus far they have
earned $9 million from ticket sales and
contributions. According to George
Smith of Telemarketing Corporation of
America, follow-up events such as the
sale of videos and albums will earn the
concert's promoters the additional cash
that they need.
I
Alumn
pwi Bureau
Anorexi
H WH
� A
1

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I
J V


PURPLE

PLACE


















� �







MIGHT
Friday and S
�10.00 p.rr
SCHEDULE
tHome F-
College Hill
Cannon Court
Eastbrook
River Bluff
Kings Row
Village Greene
"Departure for last i
the hour
"No bever�jes or food a

- r"
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 24, 1985
'0a7"�5
3rt March
i.
� � will run
e toyed
ing a
is a
time, I
camps,
ered if I re-
nclinations.
never
g other
is
n the same
velcome on
wage all
Finally,
never been
e East Caroli-
�v. nae had conservative
in the past.
Forum Rules
welcomes letters
� view. Mail or
� in the Publica-
from the en-
vy
;tion, all let-
, major and
phone number
r(s). Letters
rewritten pages,
tly printed. All
� iiting for brevi-
jnd no personal
.�ted. Students,
� ritin letters for this
d thai they are limited
tes.
armers
. for humanitarian aid to
ultimately aimed at pro-
heir agricultural self-
�nd it calls for stronger
ppor hood Stamps and nutri-
nal programs for mothers, children
d the elderly.
Not only would such legislation great -
rajse farm income, providing a partial
Solution to the current crisis, but it also
lid be less costly to the government
lan Reagan's program and increase the
r'alue of exports significantly more
Jthough cutting the actual volume
mewhat) Consumers would pay
lore, even though in some products it
mid be barely noticeable � a few
:ents more for a loaf of bread, but
erhaps a 25 percent increase in meat
mces. Ultimately, the percentage of
msumer spending for food might in-
ease from 16 percent to 18 percent,
.till far below the proportion paid in all
her industrialized countries. But after
It hat one-time increase, food costs
Ishould stabilize.
The Harkin bill will come up for a
jte in the Senate tomorrow. The
(organizers of Farm Aid are hedging their
bets on the passage of the bill and on the
f ope that they will raise $50 million for
debt-burdened fanners over the course
, of the next year. Thus far they have
earned $9 million from ticket sales and
contributions. According to George
Smith of Telemarketing Corporation of
America, follow-up events such as the
sale of videos and albums will earn the
concert's promoters the additional cash
that they need.

Alumni Chapter Wins Prestigious Award
ECU News Bureau
The Tidewater, Va chapter of
the East Carolina University
alumni association has won the
Outstanding Chapter of the Year
award for its organization and
activities, and its president has
been named Volunteer of the
Year.
The ECU Alumni Association
office announced the awards,
which were presented at the an-
nual alumni association Leader-
ship Conference here Saturday.
The Tidewater chapter received a
bann to display at functions and
its president, Dave Englert of
Chesapeake, Va received a pla-
que.
The Tidewater chapter, which
embraces ECU alumni in several
southeastern Virginia
municipalities and counties, stag-
ed a number of alumni activities
during the past year, including a
musical gala at the Chrysler
Museum in Norfolk and a
covered dish supper.
Englert, of the ECU class of
1965, was recognized as the alum-
ni volunteer who has provided
the most service, time and sup-
port for the association. The reci-
pient is selected by alumni
association members and the
ECU Institutional Advancement
staff.
"Dave is the type of person
who loves to have a reason to
come to East Carolina. He never
misses a board meeting; he never
misses a home football game. His
chapter is organized, and he is
Anorexia Causes Severe Problems
B BETH WHICKER
siff � rlln
Anorexia nervosa and bulimia
are eating disorders which may
cause death if not treated. And
the concept of having a slim, trim
body has resulted in a dieting
nightmare for a number of
students.
According to Mary Elesha-
Adams, Health Educator of Stu-
dent Health Service, "Anorexics
and bulimics self-concepts
becomes distorted. They both
view themselves as being
overweight
Anorexics severely restrict their
food intake, sometimes vomiting
after meals. The anorexic is nor-
mally on a very strict diet and has
very high standards for weight
loss. One is defined as anorexic
when they lose 25 percent of their
normal or previous body weight.
'The anorexic person is
withdrawn and isolated Elesha-
Adams said.
"Bulimia is more common, but
is easily hidden. Bulimics are
characterized as not grossly
overweight or just slightly
overweight Elesha-Adams
said. Bulimics take in large quan-
tities of food, usually sweets and
starches and remove the food
from their body by induced
vomiting or laxatives. A
bulimic's self-control alternates
between their self-restraint and
impulsiveness, she added.
"Both are a psychological pro-
blem that ends in a medical pro-
blem Elesha-Adams said. Both
the anorexic and the bulimic have
marked feelings of inadequacy,
and both have a distorted sense
of self-worth.
Both eating disorders can stem
from disturbed parent-child rela-
tionships, or an insecure self im-
age. "Many times an older
daughter has fear of growing up
and starves herself for attention.
Many coaches encourage their
athletes to lose weight to better
themselves for sports Elesha-
Adams said. "By losing weight
rapidly the anorexic and Bulimic
gets feedback and attention
The road to recovery is a long
one, and problems are not cured
overnight. The bottom line is
those with eating disorders have
to decide for themselves to get
help
Students who have friends or
roommates with eating disorders
often wonder what to do in terms
of therapy when the victim
refuses to believe that they are ill.
Ultimately, someone with an
eating disorder will have to seek
help for themselves, as hospitals
and centers cannot infringe on a
person's rights and force treat-
ment upon a victim.
As a result, the friend of the
anorexic or bulimic is encouraged
to offer no feedback, what-
soever, to the victim. By offering
feedback one is giving attention
to the victim he so greatly desires.
Recently anorexics and
bulimics have been treated by try-
ing on clothes of others that the
victim most wanted to be the size
of. Upon dressing, the victims
realize their abnormal body
weight.
always ready to have any kind of
function Page Aman, assistant
director of alumni affairs, said.
Aman said the Tidewater
chapter's musical gala ranked
among the best ECU alumni
chapter events ever held. "It took
a lot of planning, work and
dedication from a lot of people
she said.
Other ECU alumni association
chapters which were in the runn-
ing for the annual outstanding
chapter award included the
Durham-Orange County chapter,
the Pitt County chapter and
Rocky Mount chapter.
A 1966 alumnus, Ronald E.
"Ron" Dowdy of Orlando, Fla
announced that he and his wife
are establishing a $100,000
challenge gift to be met by new
and increased gifts to the Univer-
sity during the 1985-1986 ECU
annual giving campaign.
"A tribute is given to ECU
everyday by all of us who are
graduates and by all of you who
are here today Dowdy told the
leadership conference audience.
"Every alumn who
remembers ECU, whether by
volunteering to call during the
telefund or hosting a chapter
meeting or giving up a Saturday
to attend committee meetings at
the leadership conference is of-
fering a tribute he said.
Dr. Jane Hopkins of the
University of Richmond Institute
for Business and Community
Development, agreed with
Dowdy's assessment of alumni
service.
i
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W





HI AM AKl)l nian SI PTEMBER24, �
Public Interest Funding Suspended At Rutgers
PHILADEI PHIA pa � a,u�,�. i .��, cJ. C
PHILADE1 PHIA, P, ,i cs,
In a decision that could change
waj student groups nation-
e funded, a federal ap
s court has ruled that Rutgers
ongei use a "negative
ff" system to fund its
�resi Research Group
the system, Rutgers
uuenis i
IRC' chap
W.5U tee to the
unless the check
i registration
ation they wanted to
c m ne
it's a Astern designed to ex-
it apathy contends Joseph
iwyer with the Mid-
Atlantic Legal Foundation, a
conservative legal group that pur-
sued the PIRG case.
The U.S. Third Circuit Court
ot Appeals agreed, saying the
New Jersey Public Interest
Research Group chapter, which
leaders say was formed to cham-
pion consumer interests, primari-
ly is a political � not educational
group.
Vs a result, the PIRG infringes
on the First Amendment rights of
students who don't agree with its
positions, but who, by Rutgers'
order, must pay fees to it, the
court said.
The decision overturns a Julv,
HEALTH
With Mary EJisha Adams
��an 1 Keep From (rfttinu
old?
- illnesses,
� .is common colds,
' by viral infections
fortunately,there are no
prevent getting a
I you stay away
and drugs, as well
ning a balance of rest.
� you may
better chance of avoiding
Id. Moreover, you
try to avoid close
eople who already
What Can I Do To I real Mv
Id?
cold is a self-limited illness.
m
� ease the
Here
rhese
�ate the tiny hairs
ut the
: the
- ' s tsses
:es,
iclp
. �
Hi-
steam
help.
??�????�?????��������
�Avoid hot showers or baths as
extreme heat can cause dizziness
or fainting.
�Rest for a day or two to help
tight the symptoms of your cold
reduce the chance of infecting
other people. Sleep with your
head eievated on pillows if sinus
drainage is present.
�Gargle with warm salt water to
help reduce the pain and swelling
found with a sore throat. Cough
drops, throat iozenges, and hard
candv aKo relieve throat irrita-
tion but should not take the place
of gargling.
Medications that may help to
relieve cold svmptoms include:
�Aspirin or non-aspirin pain
relievers They will reduce fever
and relieve body aches.
�Decongestants will relieve stuffy
�ses and stopped up sinuses
�Antihistamines will relieve
rgy-type -vmptorns such as
watery, itching eves, a runny
���J sneezing.
( H on Decongestants
es will relieve
� sc accompanied bv
, watery eyes, and
sneeing.
The self care cold clinic at the
Student Health Service provides a
quick checklist ol and symptoms
and treatments, and you can use
d clinic 24 hours a dav.
sever. days a week
It vour old svmptoms do not
get better after tour to five days
should see a health care pro-
vider tor evaluation and addi-
tional treatment.
pecials Good Thru Sep? 30th
a' Greenville Stores Only
!
i
-�??????
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9 piece Kentucky Nugget
Kentucky Fries
Lg. Drink $2.89
Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd. 75A-4434
2905 E 5th St 752 514
'??MMI�(�
i CLIFF'S -4
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Highway N 33 E1 . Greenville. North Carolina
Phone o2-31 72
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THE EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE
pi fsenfs
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Write: di'ivrrii Manager Kas) Carolina Ptavheu" Ml
Come By:M.s. i. Theatre .Arts Votft "t v aj�n �-����.
Mo'tii.V. lhKUQ 1 i .i r. MNJ , �� .(MI
rax
1984 lower court ruling in favor
of the negative check-off funding
system. PIRG lawyers say thev
will appeal the new ruling.
Many campus organizations
advocate specific political posi-
tions that may not be popular
with a majority of the students.
says John Sims, lawyer for the
Rutgers PIRG.
But only PIRGs, he adds,
allow students who do not sup-
port it to recover their fees.
"Universities should he able to
make their own decisions about
what programs they want to
fund Sims says.
But Sims isn't sure the Mid-
Atlantic Legal Foundation,
which is funded by a number of
conservative activists to counter
more liberal legal foundations
like the Environmental Defense
Fund and Common Cause, is
wholly concerned with students'
rights in the case.
"I think the Republicans want
to challenge the PIRGs he says.
Conservative and Republican
students in New York, Min-
nesota, Maryland, Iowa,
Michigan and Idaho, among
many other places, formally have
challenged PIRG fee structures
over the last three years.
The College Republican Na
tional (Ommittee reporledlv
culated a memo in spring,
instructing local groups '
disrupt campus PIR � ;ha
suggesting tactics ranging !
infiltrating groups to challeng .
fee structures in student .
ment debates
The Rutgers PIR
student support. Suns says. In
campus elections last spi .
when more than 25 percent ol the
. lents participated, about 90
eni of those voting endorsed
ihe negative check
Bu1 "if the (court �:�
�turned dified, we
have to stop the fee, " savs David
f J 'gers' !ega; taff
- R u t get
a positive chec ater
I?
Uid d
precedent, � predic
- lie funding �
(io H?2?!COLLEGE to the army
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
The hardest thing about break
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my take,
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Armv
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also the oppx)rtunir tor
n t �nly acm ss America ; it i
ahn ad
M �st imp rtai i
expect ,i first rate pi
tessi nalen
from v ti ��� . �
� i u
m usiciai I � � � .
ARMY BAND.
BEAU YOU CAN
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WIN.
A PAIR OF
Coors
Beer
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Rutgers
.tied, about 90
voting endorsed
iurt) decision is
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J
THI Hs ku INIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 24, 1985
Fage
Movie With A Hidden Message
Sci-Fi Flick Atypical
By DOUG ROBERSON
SUff Writer
reator, a new release from
Universal Pictures, doesn't
live up to the promotional and
advertisement portrayals of the
film. Thank God. This uniquely
funny motion picture is a
welcome relief from the barrage
of mindless, sci-fi comedies that
have flooded theaters this sum-
mer.
Based on the novel of the same
title by Jeremy Leven, the film
teatures veteran actor Peter
O'Toole as Dr. Harry W'olper, an
eccentric but brilliant scientist.
Harry is determined to clone his
dead wife from cells he took from
her 30 years earlier. Aiding Harry
in this monumental undertaking
are his graduate assistants, Borris
(Vincent Spano) and Mellie
(Mariel Hemmingway.) who will
supply the fertile egg needed in
the cloning process.
One of W'olper's colleagues.
Dr. Sid (David Ogden Stiers, of
the television comedy MASH
fame), suspects that Harry is in-
volved in "illegal cloning ac-
tivities" and attempts to have
him shipped out to a research
center for mentally decrepit doc-
tors. In the meantime, Borris
finds his true love, and Mellie
falls for Harry.
It is these relationships that
make Creator different from the
"My Real Genius Science Pro-
ject" genre.
Borris' girlfriend, Barbara,
suffers a stroke and is kept alive
by life-support. Dr. Sid deter-
mines that Barbara is brain dead
and her life-support device
should be discontinued.
But, Harry and Borris have
other plans. They convince Dr.
Sid to give them two days in
which to help Barbara dance
through Harry and Borris' head.
Finally, Borris concedes that if
Barbara dies, he doesn't want to
attempt to clone her.
At this point, the deeper mean-
ing of Creator comes into focus.
Harry accepts that a clone of his
wife wouldn't actually be her. He
then pours her frozen cells into
the sea and accepts his love for
Mellie.
Back at the hospital, Borris has
been talking to and finally pray-
ing for Barbara for two days. At
the last moment before her life-
support must be terminated,
Creator reveals the true meaning
of its title.
Creator is loaded with
hilarious one-liners and sci-fi
fluff, but it is the film's glimpses
into mankind's perception of life
and death that make it unique.
Too bad Universal chose to
promote the former and not the
latter.
Creator will probably gross a
bundle from a bunch of 13-year-
olds who thought they were going
to see a computer spit out a
voluptuous sexual plaything.
What they will see, however, is a
great movie with a message. As
Harry W'olper says, "Get the big
picture � see Creator
The Creator proves to be more than a brainless, boring sci-fi movie.
Speilberg's 'Amazing Stories' Offers Intrigue
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) � Can
one enormously creative movie
maker change the face of televi-
sion?
Steven Speilberg. the master-
mind behind Jans, E. T Indiana
Jones, already has.
Speilberg's impact jolted the
medium more than a year before
his new show, "Amazing
Stories was scheduled for
broadcast. It makes its debut
Sunday with an episode personal-
'y written and directed by-
Spielberg.
When it was announced last
year that the bearded, bespectacl-
ed king of motion picture box-
office thrillers would produce an
anthology series for NBC's
1985-86 and 1986-87 seasons, the
significance was not lost on other
producers and the networks.
Spielberg's magic way with au-
diences inspired NBC to offer
him an unprecedented 44 half-
hour shows, each with a budget
of between $800,000 and SI
million - over a two-year period.
That's confidence.
The network subsequently an-
nounced it would also offer
viewers another 1985-86 season
anthology, remakes of the old
"Alfred Hitchcock Presents"
suspense stories. CBS rushed into
production with "The Twilight
Zone updated versions of Rod
Serling's eerie tales of the occult.
In that respect, Spielberg
already has profoundly altered
the fabric of TV programming.
Last season there were no an-
thology shows on the air. With
rare exceptions, the anthology
has been a losing format in the
ratings.
Although NBC is promoting
Spielberg's series as a package of
"wonderment, fantasy, irony
and comedy the filmmaker
himself calls the show "an eclec-
tic mixed bag of short stories
He has directed two of the
shows for the new season and ex-
pects to direct three or four next
year.
Asked why he chose to take so
much time from his motion-
picture career to produce
"Amazing Stories Spielberg
grinned and said, "I'm a TV
junkie
"When I was young my
parents wouldn't let me watch
TV. One of the first shows they
let me watch was 'The Honey-
mooners Later it was 'The
Mickey Mouse Club 'Dragnet'
and 'Your Show of Shows
Spielberg, who often says his
films reveal the little boy in
himself, loved "The Twilight
Zone"and other shows that
scared the socks off him as a
child.
"There is no blood and very
little violence in these episodes
he said. "Some of them are very
scary and some of them are not.
It's a mix of drama, comedy, and
suspense. Some shows are avant
garde, others are family oriented.
Each show may not appeal to
everyone, but there is something
for all viewers over a period of
weeks.
"I'm not out to scare kids or
be a bogeyman. Seventy percent
of our shows are not too scary for
anyone. NBC has provided the
opportunity to move a show to a
Greeks Face Investigations, Charges
WATERVILLE.ME. (CPS) �
Last year, the commission ap-
pointed by trustees of Colby Col-
lege to review problems with the
school's 11 fraternities and
sororities adopted a recommen-
dation no one had anticipated:
withdraw recognition for all
greek organizations.
And this fall, the college has
opened for the first time without
greeks on campus.
"We had tried creating new
standards for them two years
earlier says administrator Earl
Smith. "They had an impact in
some cases, but they didn't have
much of an impact overall
Amherst College in
Massachusetts soon followed
Colby's lead. But even schools
that didn't go as far are spending
this fall giving greek organizatons
unprecendented nationwide
scrutiny
There is nothing new about
disciplinary sanctions against in-
dividual greek chapters, but even
national greek leaders
acknowledge the heat is on as
never before.
Already this fall, officials at
Florida, Duke, Lehigh and Dart-
mouth have investigated and filed
charges against some jf their
fraternities. In addition, Loyola-
New Orleans administrators say
they will soon bring criminal
charges against two former frat
members.
"We're under attack says
Mark Mullinix of Alpha Tau
Omega's national organization.
"There is an increasing public
outcry fueled by dramatic stories
of misconduct, much of it
relating to the way women are
treated by fraternities Mullinix
says.
National fraternity leaders
complain they want to solve the
problems, but don't want to lend
credence to what they say is an
unfair emphasis on problems not
unique to the greek system.
Greek membership this fall is
at an all-time high of about
250,000 students, up from
100,000 in 1972.
Pulitzer Prize Poet
Visits ECU Monday
i
Puiizer Prixe winning poet Carolyn Kizer read from her newest
book Yin.
Happy, excited and
vivacious, Pulitizer Prize-
winning poet Carolyn Kizer en-
thralled a crowd of nearly 200
Monday night during a poetry
reading in ECU's Jenkins
Auditorium.
The 60-year-old Spokane,
Wash, native � sporting a long,
flowing gray dress, matching
shoes and large dangling earr-
ings � spoke with enthusiasm
and natural spark that belied
her age. While reading for more
than 55 minutes, she focused on
topics such as love, women,
feminism, family ties, hope and
dreams � all of which have
become trademarks of her
work.
The wide variety of her
poems included "Pro f mina
a humorous, but philosophical
three-part work written 20 years
ago as a tribute to feminism;
"Bitch a comic account of a
woman's encounter with her ex-
husband; and "Children a
bittersweet work about the trials
and tribulations of
motherhood.
Much of her interest in poetry
began at a young age. As a
child, her mother and father
would read her poetry by famed
romantic writers such as Walt
Whitman.
In later years, as in her prize-
winning book "Yin she
focused her poems heavily on
women, relationships and sub-
dued feminism. "I take as
strong a stand as I can without
antagonizing people she said.
"I am the kind of radical that
makes other radicals look
fascist
Kizer, who lives with her hus-
band, John Marshall Wood-
bridge, calls herself a "terrible
gypsie with a yen for travel-
ing.
In between writing and
reading at universities
throughout the country, she has
visited a host of countries, in-
cluding Pakistan and China. "I
like to get away from my island
of tranquility and see what the
rest of the world is like she
said.
later time slot if one is open in the
e.ent a particular show is too
scary.
"I hope to get all of the family-
audience. If it doesn't come out
that way. we'll work harder the
second year. If it's not good then
we may try something else in the
future
Spielberg has refused to allow
critics to preview his show. He is
similarly reluctant to have
reviewers get the first crack at his
movies. He believes audiences
should experience a film or a TV
show together without being pre-
conditioned by reviews.
"My name attached to 'Amaz-
ing Stories' may help bring atten-
tion to the series he said, "but
it doesn't make that much dif-
ference. I want the show to stand
nUsowiiWordofrnouthwill
make it or stop it in its tracks.
"I've returned to TV for the
challange to bring back shows 1
used to love like anthologies
"I hope there's a 'Wow' fac-
tor, a visual flash like there has
been for 'Miami Vice in some of
our shows. We've put the pro-
duction values up there on the
screen
Spielberg is overall producer of
"Amazing Stories He approves
the scripts - working on many of
them - hires the directors and
supervises the casting. Once the
individual project was jelled, he
turns the episode over to the
director entirely.
"I try to give the directors a
choice of two or more scripts
he said. "After that, they have
full autonomv.
Trip, Clubs Hot News!
Times Square Broadway
Greenwich Village New York!
That, and more, is what's in
store for ECU students who take
advantage of the East Carolina
University Student Union Travel
Committee's annual Thanksgiv-
ing Break trip to New York City.
The 46-passenger buses, pro-
vided by Carolina Trailways, will
depart Mendenhall Student
Center (West parking lot) at 8
p.m Nov. 27. Passengers will
arrive about 7 a.m. Nov. 28 ai the
Hotel Edison, located at the heart
of the theatre district.
Since that day is Thanksgiving,
visitors can catch the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade or tour
at their leisure. Optional guided
tours will be made available as
well. Tickets are available (some
at a special discount) to the
Broadway shows Cats, 42nd
Street, and The Odd Couple, as
well as to the Radio City Music
Hall's cuinual Christmas Show.
Buses will depart from Hotel
Edison at 9 a.m. Dec. 1 for the
direct return trip to Greenville.
The full price of this trip is $99
per person in a quad occupancy
room, $115 per person in a triple-
occupancy room, $130 per person
in a twin-double occupancy room
and $180 for a private room.
These prices include charges
for round-trip bus fare, hotel ac-
commodations and baggage
handling (one bag per person) in
New York City. Not included are
meals, admissions and transpor-
tation within the city.
All payments must be in cash
or money order payable to the
Central Ticket Office. The $25
registration fee is due upon ap-
plication, and forms are available
from the Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall. The balance is
payable on or before November
1.
For more information, call the
Central Ticket Office at
757-6611, line 266, between 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. Mondays
lhrgjridays
Mghtclubs
The Attic begins the weekend
on Thursday with The Point, a
variety rock 'n' roll band.
Ladies will be admitted free un-
til 9:30 p.m. Then, on Friday
and Saturday, the band Silent
Run will present its brand of
rock. For information, call
752-7303.
The lineup at Premiums this
week features the bands Bad
Sneakers on Wednesday,
Greywing on Thursday, The
Other Mothers on Friday and
Other Bright Colors on Satur-
day.
Comedy will dominate the stage
at TW 'j Sight life Wednesday
with special guest Chuck Mon-
tgomery. Then on Friday, Peter
Adonis, of Male Review, will
showcase his talents at 7 p.m.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m and
the Band of Oz, which will take
the stage for a evening of beach
music, will follow at 9:30 p.m.
On Saturday, the top-40 and
beach-music band Breeze will
perform there.
On Campus
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee will present David Lean's
films Dr. Zhivago and A
Passage To India at Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall.
Showtimes are 8 p.m. Wednes-
day, and 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday,
respectively. These films are
free to ECU students and guests
with current ID's and to ECU
faculty and staff with current
semester movie passes. ECU
faculty and staff members may
bring one guest per pass. Dr.
Zhivago, based on a novel writ-
ten by Nobel Prize-winning
author Boris Pasternak and
released in 1965, depicts Russia
in times of trouble. In A
Passage to India, a 1984 drama
based on E.M. Forster's novel
of the same name, the struggles
of British-occupied India and its
attempt to reach freedom come
tQ life
?� �
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8
JHEEAST CAROLINIAN
SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS. Two units
for sale Efficiency 8th floor, one
bedroom 4th floor. Units completely
furnished, carpeted, air conditioned,
and include kitchen appliances.
Please call (day) 201 532 7993 (after
5p.m201 431 0768, or write Mr.
Celidonio, 99 Wilson Ave Freehold,
NJ 07728
FOR SALE: Commodore ViC 20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorder player,
ioystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette,Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals $200. Call An
thony at 757 6366 or 752 7346
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Need to
get r,d of furniture quick! Single bee
(like new) $50, Gold Chair good con
dition)$15. 752 0964
WRITER'S BLOCK CURED: Send
$2 for catalog of over 16,000 topics, to
assist your writing efforts and help
you beat Writer's Block For mfo
call Toll free 1 800 621 5745( In II
linois, call Authors' Research, Rm
600, 407 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL
60605.
NEED TYPING: Letters Resume's,
Term papers, etc Call Karen at
752 0498
FOR SALE: '74 Fiat 124 Special.
Perfect body, good tires, new bat
tery and tune up parts Needs some
work Runs fine as is. 1st $400 takes
it 758 2997
yLSEPTEMBER 24 ,9g5
neater bate, economical, efficient
19.500 BTU's Radiates warmth 360
degrees Used 3 months Reduced to
$70 Accessories included. Call
758 5459 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1 80 Column Text Card
tor Apple HE Slightly used, $90
price neg Epson RX 80 printer, less
than a year, like new $250 price neg
Call after 6 p m at 758 6296
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU Students. S
an-1 f Professional Computer Co.
(Back of Franklin's) 757 0472.
THE MIDDLE MAN: Apartment
Listing Roommate Referral Service.
210 E. 4th Street Suite number 2
across from Sub Station II. Let us
help you find the apartment or room
mate you're looking for Call
830 1069
TYPING SERVICES: Provided by
professional woman with IBM Cor
reefing Selectric typewriter.
Familiar with all styles Call Debbie
at 756 6333
MOPED FOR SALE: Puch Cobra
One year old Requires no license,
tags, or insurance Great shape Sell
for $500 Call 752 2496 after 6 p.m
ask for Cnns or leave message
TYPING SERVICES: Familiar Witt)
all formats, proofreading and spell
ing corrections included Low rates
757 0398 after 5 p.m.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICES: Word Processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding papericall for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after
6 15 p.m.
Selectric
758 5301
typewriter Lanie Shive bite'n to me LAS
FOR SALE: DP weightlifting
machine Capable of 30 exercises
110 lbs of weight, padded bench Us
ed 1 month $140 758 3583 after 5 30
FOR SALE: Sunn Bass AmpPower
Amp 200 watts. Call 757 0558 after 5.
PERSONALS
ATTN. DONUT DEMONS. Than
snowstorm Friday morning was too
much, paybacks are hell. AOTT's
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: Con
gratulations to all of our new little
sisters! Ya'll will have a meeting
one night this weekcontact Lynn
(752 6855) for more info.
SIG EPS: Come on out and support
your little sisters at Beau's Friday
night! Details later.
WEND: You're too confusing! Sorry
about Virginia. Still having pro
blems with my necklace When does
the next bus to Cherryville leave?
Rich
GH SS-23: Greg is 22 so we are told
He's really half stepping and getting
old. An old fuddy duddy you might
be, but remember you will always be
LET IT BE KNOWN: Yearbooks are
included in your tuition so you don't
have to purchase one. The 1985 Buc
caneers are NOT here yet, but we
will definately let you know once
they arrive.
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Non
smoker. $175 month, utilities includ
ed. Cable included 4 miles from
Campus. Call 752 1642.
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED: In
terested in making money part time
photographing campus activities?
No experience required, we train. If
you are highly sociable, have a
35mm camera and transportation,
give us a call ai 1 800 722 7033.
GET PAID FOR YOUR EFFORTS:
Look toward a future with
America's fastest growing food
delivery company. Earning poten
tial up to $8 an hr Flexible schedule
Full and part time positions
available. Must have economical
car. Call or stop by the office. Joke's
on Us, 320 E 10th Street, 757 1973
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom house Pay ' 3 rent plus ' 3
expenses Contact Vicki or Angie at
752 5236
PART TIME POSITION: Answer
ing telephones and light typing
12,30 530 Mon Fri Call Pam or
Ginger at 758 6200
BABYSITTERS NEEDED: Various
times Nights and weekends Ex
perience and own car a must Call
between 5 10pm 756 2684
STUDYING ABROAD. Interested m
studying abroad? information on
academic exchange opportunities
throughout the world through ISEP,
the International Student Exchange
Program, at ECU. Costs are
available from Dr. Hursey, ISEP
Coordinator Austin 222. Phone
757 6418 (Office) or 756 0682 (home).
WANTED: Student with car to worK
two afternoons a week. Help mother
with 9 & 11 yr old children. Call
756 4409 after 6 p m
OUTSTANDING Are you
energetic, enthusiastic, self
motivated? Great, then we have the
iob for you! Opportunities to earn
good commission, with base hourly
pay always guaranteed Evening
hours, perfect for serious student,in
terested in earning extra money, yet
leaving time for homework and par
ties! If you want to be a part of the
unbeatable telemarketing team, call
Donna at 758 5595 between 3 8. 7 p m
MASSAGE PERSONS WANTED
No experience necessary will train
Apply m person Misty Blue Relaxa
tion Studio Hwy 43 S 746 9997
HELP WANTED: Outside work,
$3 50 per hour, need 3 people,
7 30 10 30 Thurs morning or l 4 Fri.
afternoon 756 9618 Good stead op
portunity
WANT TO LOSE WIEGHT? Series
of classes offered to female ECU
students involving diet counseling,
exercise programs, and group sup
port For more information call
Celia Helms at 355 2541 or Linda
Harris 756 1765 between 8 30 10 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Christian
roommate needed to share 2
bedroom dup'ex $135 includes
utilities 1 '2 bath. Call 756 8676 after
5 30
RIDE NEEDED: Looking tor a roe
to New Jersey for Fail BreaK Can
leave at 1 p m. Oct 18th. Will pa for
part of the gas Call 752 0796, ask for
Dan
REWARD: Free trip to Datona
plus commission money WANTED
Organized group or individual tc
promote the number 1 Spring Break
Trip to Daytona if interested in our
REWARD, call 1800 453 9074 IM
MEDIATELY ! Or write
DESIGNERS OF TRAVEL, 1334
West Hampton Ave , Menomone-
Falls, Wise , 53051
'd on Fae i 2
THE
The Best Deal At The Best Club In Town.
Student Special
' 75 VW BEETLE. me greenvery
LIBERAL MALE EXOTICgood condition stick shift, a c,tape
DANCER: For info call Jon atdeck Best offer over $2,000Call
756 7601756 4840
$25
MOCoraC pee
HoU��,0n
per month
Our Full Facility Co-Ed Club Features
The Best In Weight Training & Instruction
DAPPER DAN'S: Vintage clothing
1920 I960), jewelry ano collectables
are now available at Poorman's
Flea Market on Hwy 264 between
Washington and Greenville. Open
Sundays from 10 6. See Danny
FOR SALE: Loft ideal for low
ceiling dorms Good condition $65
Call between 8 10 p.m. 756 1546
FOR SALE: Omni 105 Kerosun
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: 72
Yamaha 250 Fully reconditioned,
low miles, "lookm' real sharp"
$400 Call 752 2692
TAILORED PRODUCTS: Men's &
women's alterations. Located in the
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Mon Fn , 9 6 756 3312
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Ex
perience and quality work. IBM
Aerobics
Two Weight Rooms
Steram Room
Sauna
Whirlpool
Social Events
Lockers
Private Dressing Rooms
Showers
Professional Personal
Instruction
The
York Olimpic Weights
(Including Bench & Squat Machines)
Dynacam Machines
Exer-Bikes
Therapudic Message
Nutrition Instruction
Call Lynn or Dave
For Free Visit!
Today
SPA
Southpark Shopping Center
756-7991
&AOTT
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tues Sept. 24, 1985
9:00-2:00 A.M.
Adm. $1.50
Ladies $1.00
1CW DRAFT ALL NITE
&TTK0
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wed Sept. 25, 1985
9:00-2:00 A.M.
Adm. $1.50
Ladies 18yrs. $1.00
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
Mon. Tues. Wed
8oz Sirlion
$2"
Sirlion Tips
$2"
4 yn&zt frOxce t ecttf
Western
Sizzlin
Upcoming Events
for
Student Union
Films:

Dr. Zhivago"

A Passage to India"
Sept. 25
8:00p.m.
Sept. 26, 27 & 28
6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Sept. 23-Oct. 19
NOTE: As a special offer for Parents' Day Weekend,
Parents of students are admitted free for the Friday and
Saturday showing of "A Pas-age to India
Visual Arts Committee:
"Recent American Works on Paper"
Smithsonian Art Exhibit
AAendenhall Student Center Gallery
Parents Day:
Special Showing for Parents of
"A Passage to India"
(Parents of students admitted free.)
Entertainment and Lunch on the Mall.
Homecoming is almost here!
Sponge Tones on the AAa 11 0ct. 6
(Sunday of Homecoming) 2:00-5:00
Be on the Lookout for More
Homecoming Activities for You
from the
Student Union!
Sept. 28
m
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c
a
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
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Sept.23-Oct. 19
Sept. 28
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I rote Donna San Marco
or Homecoming Queen
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BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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BY GARRY TRUDEAU
mi USTENERS �CR
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dEu AS A PUBLIC SERVICE WBY
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PASH a ON A POSTCARD
AND MAI WITHOUT Dt AY-
Jtangres3man
Thomas Ofaill
House Speafcor
US Congress
Washington. D C
Dear Tip:
Yes! I would IlKo mor�
information on the fol
Rep C.E Gallagher
$221,000'
Rep Edwin Edwards
$25,000
; Rep Wm Minshall
$31.000;
Rep N Galif lanaKis
$10.500!
. i Rep John J. McFall
4,000
; 25 Other Repreeenta
tives ?
3 6 Senators
, Yourself
06,000 in parti09
Hold public hearings now?
Yours for a Clean Congress.
Overkill
ftcfiecfia�fcffi�� "�
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BY FRIEDRICH
OR TV� worse?!
THFfcASTAROL1N1AN
SEPTEMBER 24, 1985
DRUG STORES
Kerr Drugs Coupon
Ovarton's
Shopping Center
201 S Jarv.s St
& Carolina East Mall
Greenville N C

$1.00 OFF ANY NEW PERSCRIPTION. Get acquainted with
CHIP. Customer Health Information Plan.
� Remembers All The Medications You Use
�Get Protection Against Drug Interaction
�Prints Detailed Labels And Recipts
�Keeps Records Needed for Taxes & Insurance
Coupon Good at Greenville Stores Only
L
l-�p,rci H! 1 Ith
To transfer your prescription to Kerr from another pharmacy, simply furnish us with your
current prescription number and where it was filled We take care of the rest.
Generic Drugs
SAVE UP TO 50
ON PERSCRIPTIONS
Kerr's Generic Drugs have the same active ingredients and meet the same
Federal Government standards as their name brand equivalents. Plus, they
carry Kerr Drug's promise of the same high quality found in name brand
drugs.
Kerr Drugs Coupon
$1.00 Off
on Photo Processing
With This Coupon
We offer 24 hour service at Kerr or You Get it Free.
Y iptrti -
i
What ' jr mt
NlatUTs f . it
NfostTs p
Vxi.
tths'ws
pack
COKE,8 Diet Coke,
Tab, or Sprite.
6 pack cans. Reg. $2.19.
You SAVE 60C
Buy Several.
ox or
oz
r'
Flask
00
iOO
Discount
Karr's Policy. Kerr Drugs r�srv�s the right lo limit quantities of
�It items Karr's policy is to provide you with the (torn advertised
at the price advertised. It due to some unforeseeable ctrcumstancee
the Item Is not available, a rain check will be Issued to enable you
to buy the item later when available.
With $10 or more order
With ECU ID
and coupon
�II ottwr tpaciait txciudao
�xplrttOct ntti
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I HI EAS1 I AROI INIAN
Sports
SEPTfcMBhR 24, 1VH5
Page 10
Nittany Lions Slip By Pirates
By RICK McCORMAC Pni'����iB. nc
Bon 1�� BV I. .u w ' B HUMBERT - T� E.� C.rol,nn
Kon Jones (8) had the best jjame of hi career Saturday against the Nit-
tany Lions. Jones passed for 112 ards and ran for 127 more.
Pirate DeU
By RICK McCORMAC
( o-Sporu Mllor
Art Baker's young ECU foot-
ball team found out they could
play, with anyone Saturday, as
they lost a 17 10 decision to No. 8
Penn State in a game the Pirates
could have easily won.
An indication on how the
afternoon would go for the
Pirates came on the game's open-
ing possession. ECU's Kevin
Walker intercepted a John Shaf-
fer pass and returned it to the
Nittany Lion 4-yard line before
being tackled. However, a penal-
ty for an illegal block below the
waist on the return moved the
ball out to the ECU 48.
Three plays later, ECU
ailback Tony Baker fumbled,
giving Penn State the ball at their
own 45.
Such was the day for the
Pirates, as five fumbles, three of
which Penn State recovered, were
the difference in the contest. On
the afternoon, the Pirate 'freeze
option' offense netted 385 total
yards to 354 for the Nittany
Lions.
After Baker's fumble on
ECU's opening drive, Penn State
took over on their own 45-yard
line. From there, the Nittany
Lions marched 55 yards in seven
plays, with John Shaffer hitting
Eric Hamilton with a four yard
pass for the score. Massimo Man-
ca converted on the extra-point to
give PSU a 7-0 advantage with
8:06 remaining in the opening
quarter.
The Pirates showed they
weren't about to be intimidated
by the 84,266 people on hand,
(the most ever to witness an ECU
game), on their second posses-
sion.
ECU started from their own 20
with sophomore Ron Jones direc-
ting the Pirate attack. Jones
slithered through and around
Penn State defenders for runs of
21, 16 and nine yards, marching
the Pirates 63 yards in 11 plays
heore the drive stalled.
However, Jeff Heath came on
for the Pirates and connected on
a 34-yard field goal, to make the
score 7-3 in favor of the Nittany
Lions with 4:04 left in the first
period.
Neither team was able to mme
B SCOTT COOPER
( � Sport, tdlior
Despite a 17-10 loss to the
eighth ranked Penn State Nit
Lions, ECU proved to be a powei
to be reckoned with.
Before the game. ou c
feel the high-intensity level of the
Pirates as they worked
their pre-game drills. However,
the Beaver Stadium .row
84,266 seemed verv relaxed.
Coach Baker and Nittany I
head coach Paterno ex.
pre-game comments on the fifty
After the national anthem
the releasing of the navy blue
white balloons, the teams took
the field.
The Pirates established their
potent running attack as they
totalled 258 yards, compared to a
mere 150 for Penn State. E( I
basically dominated the final
statistics by netting 385 yard
PSL's 324.
"Our players played a hard,
physical game coach Art Baker
said. "I'm extremely proud of
our players, they poured
everything they had into this
game.
"It's great to be able to play a
team of the caliber of Penn
State Baker continued. "But I
am disappointed that we didn't
win. When you have the oppur-
tunity to beat a team like Penn
State, you have to take advantage
of it
ECU won the toss and elected
to start with its big-play defense.
After two quick first downs, the
Lion offense looked as if it was in
gear. However, when bandit Vin-
Walker
th in
Smith blind-sided quarter-
back John Shaffet and forced an
pass, Kevin Walker got his
ption of the year.
U; - � the ball to the
si but a penalty on the
� 1 it back to the
ECl
rrenth tied for
ttion in interccp
game average
ildi ' cash m on
niscue as lonv
Bakei tumbled three plays later.
After Penn Stale mounted a
drive ol it t turnover, the
Pirate 12 play
63-yard drive that ended with a
Jet: Heath 34-yard field goal.
The Pirates now had the
momentum they needed as they
were handling their own with the
Nittany Lions. The ECU defense,
who was led bv senior linebacker
Rob Washington and
sophomore free safety Ellis
Dillahunt, was keeping the Bucs
in the game.
"We made a lot of mistakes,
but we played pretty well
linebacker Washington said.
"We try to make them have to
pass and then pressure the
quarterback. We know our
ec ndary will do a good job.
"The defense has confidence
Washington added. "If 1 miss a
tackle, 1 know that someone will
be there to make it. We can stop
anybody in the country
Washington seemed to be
everywhere as he made eight
tackles, including two sacks.
Dillahunt had four unassited and
a total of six tackles.
Shines In Loss
the ball in their next offensive
series. However, misplays on the
part of ECU's Jones led to two
fumbles. Although ECU
recovered on both occassions,
they put freshman punter Tim
Wolter deep in his own territory
Wolter responded with a 28-yard
effort which put the Lions in
business at the ECU 44.
It took Penn State only
seconds to drive the 44 yards to
take a 14-3 advantage. Aft
rushing play netted only two
yards on first down, John Shaf-
fer hit tight end Brian Silverling
for 18 yards down to the Pirate
24. From there tailback Kevin
Woods scooted 24 yards for the
final points scored in the opening
half.
ECU scored the only
touchdown of the second halt
their second offensive possess
W'ith the Pirate offensive line
controlling the line of scrimmage.
Jones ran the option to neat
perfection in driving the Pirate
64 yards in I 1 plays. 1(1
verted on three crucial third
down situations. Anthony Simp-
son scored the touchdown on a
fullback dive play on third and
.even from the Nittany I
eight. Heath converted the e
point making the score 14-10 in
favoi ol Penn State.
The Pirate defense the
a punt arid E I' took over on
their own nine. After two runn-
ing plavs gamed 16 yards, Junes
hit Amos Adams for 13 vards out
to the ECl �
On the next play, Jones rar I
41 vards, keeping the ball on the
option plav to the PSl 20
running plays up the middle
Simpson netted five vards, setting
up the turning point ol th .
On a crucial tl five
from the Penn State . e in
the grasp of a would be tackier,
Jones pitched to Baker. Baker
fumbled while strug . yar-
at the Lion's nine.
the third quarter and the Pii
- threat.
mpei
and a lot ol times tl him
trouble EC I in
See BAKER.
The Pirate offense struggled a
bit as ECU was forced to punt on
three occassions in the second
period. However, quarterback
Ron Jones, who rushed for 127
yards on 15 carries and passed for
112 yards on nine completions,
felt that the Pirates were the bet-
ter team and that he can perform
better with time.
"I feel like we should have won
the game Jones said. They
weren't as fast as we were.
"I have to relax and keep my
poise Jones added. "I don't
feel that I have reached my pass-
ing potential yet. With the help of
the coaches, 1 feel I'm going to
half.
"We've been a second half
football team Baker said.
"Ron (Jones) executed a great
deal better. He completed some
early passes � it took some
pressure off the offense
The fourth quarter saw both
defenses take control. A Nittany
Lion field goal with under four
minutes remaining, gave PSU a
17-10 lead.
The final three and-a-half
minutes saw eight penalty flags
dropped, including three PSU
pass-interference calls. If not for
a Pirate holding call with less
than a minute to play, ECU
"The defense has confidence. I know if
I miss a tackle someone will be there to
make it. We can stop anybody in the
country
�Robert Washington
would have had the ball on the
make it
The Pirates made a valiant
comeback effort after trailing at
the half 14-3. The second half has
been the Pirate charm this
season. Penn State's fourth
quarter field goal has been the
only points allowed by the stingy
Buc defense.
The Pirate offense also took
control in the second half. The
offensive line controlled the foot-
ball and marched on a 64 yard
11-play scoring drive midway
through the third period. Accor-
ding to coach Baker, ECU is
always stronger in the second
PSU 13. Coach Baker feels that
the late-in-the-game situation is a
tough one and his players handl-
ed it well despite the lack of
preparation.
"W'e didn't know what to ex-
pect Baker said. "We haven't
been in that position before. I
would like to prepare more for
that in the future.
"We have to try to go back and
re-group Baker continued.
"Next week we have to play a
team that gave Penn State a
tough game, so we can't feel
sorry for ourselves.
�� HUMBERT
Th. E�tt Carolinian
Gang Tackle
ed Penn State, holding the Lions to 150 yards rushing.
TT �A. A 1 � a j , ' ld'nR ,he l ions ,0 � �'ds rushing.
Netters Adjusting To College Tennis Plav
By DAVID McGINNESS Another factor especially af- need of each soon and in m� V
By DAVID McGINNESS
Suft Writ?
An extremely young ECU
men's tennis team lost against
Guilford College, Belmont Ab-
bey and Atlantic Christian Col-
lege last weekend at Guilford.
This was the second quad tour-
nament loss for the Pirates, who
lost four of their six singles
players from last year.
While Coach Pat Sherman
believes early wins would have
given her team confidence, she
believes that the losses have
helped to motivate the team to
work harder in practice.
The Pirates face a difficult fall
schedule, especially in the early
part of the season. However,
Coach Sherman believes this will
help give the young Pirate team
the experience it will need to be
competitive in the '86 spring
season.
"The freshmen haven't been
exposed to this level of play
before Sherman said. "Going
from high school to Division-I
college play is a big adjustment
In addition to the tough
schedule, the team plays many
challenge matches for seeding.
This will hopefully give the
players the mental composure
and confidence that is needed to
play at this level.
Another factor especially af-
fecting a young team is patience.
In high school points are usually
short and one or two good shots
will usually win them.
"The players need to develop
patience and concentration
within their game Sherman
said. "Instead of hitting one
great serve and a good volley,
they need to be able to hit five or
ten great shots
In addition to being mentally
ready, the player must have the
physical conditioning to be able
to play well in long matches,
sometimes more than one per
day.
To achieve this Coach Sher-
man began by giving the players a
summer tennis program. It con-
sisted mostly of sprint and
"suicide" drills which could give
players the speed and agility they
would need. Long distance runn-
ing does less good foi a tennis
player than sprints of 30-45
seconds. This is because they
need to sustain short bursts of
high energy exertion in real
match situations.
During the off season
(NovFeb.) the players train with
weights at the ECU Strength
Complex. ECU strength coach
Mike Gentry developed strength
training programs tailored to the
need of each sport and in many
cases, to the individual athlete.
"In addition to increasing
players' strength, the training
helps to prevent chronic
injuries coach Sherman said.
Dr. Sherman became head
coach of the Pirate men's and
women's tennis teams during the
fall of 1982. Since 1966 she has
coached tennis at the University
of Iowa, Gustavus Adolphus
College, The University of
Wisconsin-River Falls, and
Winona State University.
During her college tennis
career, she was either champion
or runner-up in every collegiate
tennis tournament that Winona
State University entered.
Sherman believes that what
each member of the team does
greatly affects the whole team.
"Goals cannot be reached unless
each member of the team works
to make them a reality she said.
Coach Sherman is assisted by
Robert Long of Roabora, N.C.
Robert is a P.E. Major at ECU
and travels with the men's team
as acting coach.
On Wednesday the Pirates will
face a strong UNC-Wilmington
team. The Seahawks have the ad-
vantages of good new talent as
well as a solid returning line-up.
"That will be a good test for
our players to really see where
they are said Sherman. ECU
students, faculty and staff are
urged to come out to the varsity
courts at 3:00 p.m. Wednesday
afternoon and show their support
and encouragement for the
Wed ECU MEN'S FALL TENNIS SCHEDULE
rri3i o �a .
(ECl Richmond. W illiim ft M�r, Radford)
Wed Oct. 2
"�. Oct. 9
rnMl. q. 1 j
(ECU, Campbell. UNC-W, Coastal Carolina. FrancU Marion)
I"J , Oct. 15
Fri-Sa' Oct.25-2�
Pirates.
The following is the 1985 men's
fall schedule.
I NC-Wllmlagton at ECL
ECL at Spider Iavit.
Campbell at FCl
Pfdffer at ECl
ECL at LNC-W Fall Iavit.
Colonial Athletk Assoc Ch.mplon.hlp ichmad
lit Matches:
Looking To Bright Future
I
By JANET SIMPSON
Staff Wrltar
On Wednesday night, Sept. 18,
the Lady Pirate volleyball team
opened their season with a win
against N.C. Wesleyan
Very satisfied was how Coach
Imogene Turner felt about her
team.
"Everything went very well
Turner said. "The offense,
defense, serving and just
everything
The team only made two ser-
vice errors the entire night and
were well into the second game
before making a receiving error.
There were 29 kills and 11 service
aces in all.
Coach Turner feels her squad
is right on schedule. "They have
a very bright future ahead of
weekend. The Lady Bucs came
up short against UNC-
Wilmmgton 15-5, 15-5, 15-8.
They battled UNCC for four
games before losing 13-1 15-10
1510, 15-10.
them the coach said "Thev're i U Westcrn Carolina

� '�- r, � ' .
together
Giving up only 14 points, the
Lady Pirates won jn three
straight games; 15-6, 15-4, 15-4.
The team, however, wasn't
quite as fortunate while playing
in the UNC-Charlotte Invita-
tional at Davidson this past
(
has a talented
the Lady Bucs
15-6, 15-12, 15-10
Overall the team is 1-3 and will
travel to Durham to play Duke
on Wednesday. They will also
participate in the Wake Forest
University Invitational over the
weekend.
Holme,
LA
M � ,
ren 1
his
"I �
ren 1
Spii -
makm.
Spii I
hea.
vici
cham
over H
tiona! B
1
I
his up �
him
'Ti .
"W
T h e v a a
H lme;
Baker Not
Satisfied With
Moral Victory
Continued from pajt- 10
Bar
hit
ran
Penn
man .
ur "
Th
ty tl

range Bat
pc:
'
reg .
he
ma
I
On
over on tl
ed dow
get n
� '
th dowi
Stale n. hut ihe pa w.i
back due to a holding pena
Jones had Smith wide
the end zone on an eariiei
the final drive However

the Penn State del

-

plav of his young quarts
"Lo � . ack, I �
-ked more with F
type of situation Bak
"We haven't been in tha
tion before � at the end I
game
Although ECU outpla
tradition rich Nittany 1
almost everv category, I
coach Art Baker was not c
vuh a 'moral victory '
"1 can't ever see mysell be
satisfied with a moral vi
the coach said. "Weplaye
good football team, on
terms throughout the
They are certainly dc
their top-ten rank
"I'm certainly encouraged
e had a chance to wii
ballgame and we didn't take
vantage ol :he opportune
continued. "I'm extremely
of our players and am just verv
disappointed that we d d
win
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irates
I HI AMAKOl IMAN
SI HI I MBJ K 24. 1985
11
Holmes Retires After Spinks Stops Streak
s 1 GAS. N
c'
L I'll
CL" 10
A uiker
.warm-
Play
invii
ii k t
. M 1
� InMt
. M I
� Rk nmond
I
Watches;
t Future
ime
Si
. 5 H
� tour
! 15 10,
I arohna
wl i � .dented
� : � Bu

� and will
i Durham to plas Duke
The will also
in the Wake Forest
Invitational over the
Spinks wouldn't mind a
. but I an Holmes says
ig days are ovci
think 1 an deserves a
gave me a chance
I �aid after his history
k ng performance.
SP � came the first light-
yweight champion to score a
ovei a heavyweight
und decision
� Holmes was foi the Interna
ting 1 ederation title.
' now Holmes
�' suite following
loss, which prevented
tying Rocky
� 49-0 record
, ad.
�ou think 1 "lost?
e .i rematch
i d ol the decision in
Baker Not
Satisfied With
Moral Victory
Continued from page 10
H a� fighting foi
. : he took a good
faull I onv Baker, he
' it pla like he
the first
he Pit lies in the
th 3:49 re-
game. Manca hit
b Penn State
xECl
ed a penal-
ave probably
i field goal
; !ine the
IS need-
win.
Also.
he time re-
nal of-
. ve, ECU took
� and march-
1 I 24. but could
thei before time ran
complete a pa
I
, hm the play was called
a holding penaltv .
j Smith wide open in
earlier plav in
However, he had
he
� Dm
�nse
vere un-
ve.
fault the
we had
iv -
n Baker said
been
it the end I the
tI outplayed the
N ttany, Lion
ttegory, ECU
Baker was not content
� . ral victor
' eer see myself being
�� ith a moral victory
"We played a real
team, on even
ighout the baligame.
ainly deserving of
k
rtainly encouraged, but
ance to win a big
nd we didn't take ad-
opportunity he
'I'm extremely proud
and am just very
thai we didn't
ELEK-TEK . . .
SAVES YOU MORE
ON CALCULATORS
I 1
CALCULATORS
� � � �
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"M tA( KABD
�While hmited supplies last
PTILLINCMS. ALASKA
, i � . ��� Madd og
tSfl MM " �� p�
� . �' - SC IS
� ���
I m il Xi
which all three judges gave
Spinks the last round This gave
Spinks a one point margin on
two officials' cards He won by
three points on the third card.
"It was in the cards for me to
lose said Holmes, who added
that he has been bothered this
year by a pinched nerve in his
neck
"I hate to make excuses foi
myself he continued. "Cod
always gives you a sign when to
quit
Most boxing observers feel that
pressure will be put on Holmes
for a rematch.
Butch Lewis, who promotes
Spinks' fights and co-promoted
Saturday night's match, said he
wasn't sure what was next tor
Spinks
Before the fight, NBC had ol
tered $3.5 million foi Holmes to
go atter victor) No 50 against
somebody like AJfonzo Ratliff
Nov . 22, which is during a r.i
sweeps period
Ratliff also lost Saturday,
night, dropping the World Bv
mg Council cruiserweight chain
pionship in a 12-round decision
to Bernard Benton
first defense by Spinks cei
tainly would be attractive to NB
oi the other networks or to MB .
which telecasted Spmks' upset
victory.
lewis said Spinks could hold
both the undisputed lig
heavyweight title and the IB!
heavyweight championship foi
days
When someone asked which
tie Spmks would relinquish, b
Spmks and I ewis laughed.
)ne intriguing tight possibility
itioned was a tight between
Spinks and Marvelous Marvin
Hagler, the undisputed mid
dleweighl champion. The weight
limit could be 175 pounds
"I don't want to tight
Hagler Spinks said.
How about foi $10 million,
Spinks was asked
"Then it would be out of my
hands he said with a grin. "I'd
sav, what do you think Butch
"You know we've got to con
sider it 1 ewis said, also grinn-
ing.
Spinks, who weighed 2o)
pounds, 25 pounds over the light-
heavy weight limit, said he "fell I
needed the 15th round to win "
But he added that he had no
doubts after the final bell, that he
had won.
"I knew 1 was going the
distance the 6-1 underdog said
"He didn't hit as hard as 1
thought he could hit Muham-
mad Ah told me, 'You stay with
him tor six rounds and his legs
will be gone
Holmes, who weighed 221
pounds, will be 36 on Nov 3
Holmes' trainer, Richard
diaehetu said he would have no
part in any Holmes comeback at-
tempt
The Great Pitt County
Fair will be
here all next week
More about it later
I Gave Selective Service
My Autograph!

vV

If Elizabeth Barrett
and Robert Browning had
AT&T's 60 and 40 discounts,
it would have been a terrible
loss for English literature.
ML
'�,
m

And of course, she wouldn't have had to
restrict her feelings to a mere sonnet's
length, either.
After all, you can always think of one
more way to tell someone you love them
when you're on the phone.
Let us count the ways you can save.
Just call weekends till 5pm Sundays, or
from 11pm to Bam. Sunday through Friday,
and you'll save 60 off AT&T's I av Kate
on your state-to-state calls.
Call between 5pm and 11pm, Sunday
through Friday, and you'll save 40 on your
state-to-state calls.
So when you're asked to choose a long
distance company, choose AT&T. Because
with AT&T's 60 and 40 discounts, you
can satisfy your heart's desire without
exhausting your means.
Reach out and touch someone
1985 A
AT&T
The right choice.





12
THEEAS1 CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER24. M
Intramural Co-Rec Softball Action Begins
B JFANNETTK ROTH
Slaff Writer
Co-recreational Softball swings
into action once again this week
at the Allied Health Fields.
Last week the EXECU-
TIONERS and MIXED NUTS
each soundly defeated their op-
ponents 19-0 giving those two
teams the highest total of runs
scored for the week.
The best game of the week
matched up Good, Bad & ugly
and the Bud Light Ballbreakers.
Ranked No. 5, GOOD, BAD &
UGLY came back from a seven
run deficit in the last inning to
defeat BUD LIGHT BALL
BREAKERS 11-9. Games are
played from 4:00 until 8:00 pm
during the week.
Flag Football continues on the
intramural fields adjacent to
Ficklen Stadium. This weeks line-
1RS HOURS
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 Noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F 3:30 p.m6:30 p.m.
Sat. 1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
M-Th
Friday
Sat.
Sun.
M-F
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
9a.m8 p.m.
9 a.m5:30 p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges
1
p.m p. m.
TRAINING ROOM
M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
M-Th 2p.m6 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Free Play
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m5 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
�4:45-10 based on availability
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
Memorial Gym 115
M-Th 9a.m9p.m.
Friday 9a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat 11 a.m5 p.m
Sun 1 p.m5 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Rental Information Center
M&F 1:30 p.m5 p.m.
Wed&Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
(Hours ar in accordance with
the seasons)
WANTED
FURNISHED APT: Available for
sublease Two bedroom duplex For
more info, call Greg at 752 2110 or
757 6366
CORRESPONDENCE: My name is
Robert i Hollins and I am seeking
friendship, understanding and a let
ter exchange with anyone that is
willing to write! We can only be
strangers once I am a black male of
38. Write to Robert L. Hollins
06519016, Delta Unit, F.P.S P.O
Box 34550, Memphis. Tennessee
38184 0550
A RELAXING
MASSAGE
JUST A
PHONE CALL
AWAY
Misty Blue
Relaxation
Studio
Bt ����� . 4S��!
AS Nl VI R IFORE
CALL
7469997
GREEN. E
.��
wfcRfc
VANCEBORO
MWY 43
8 MILFS SOUTH OF THE PLAZA
Private Rooms
'All Girl Staff
'Complete Body
Massages
HOURS:
MonThuri.
11 a.m. - 12 Midnight
Fri ft Sat.
11 am - 1 a.m.
Reopened Under He Management
up includes the No.l ranked EN-
FORCERS against the KAPPA
SIGMA STARDUSTERS on the
ladies side. The SIGMA SIGMA
SIGMA gals will also tackle the
gridiron against DELTA ZETA.
Be sure to catch the PEN-
THOUSE RAIDERS as they
meet SLAY STUDS and the
BROOZERS against
AUTHORIZED PARKING. The
A-TEAM faces the GRAPE
STOMPERS and PI KAPPA
ALPHA will meet KAPPA
ALPHA in fraternity action.
After last weeks play, the
men's top five picks have chang-
ed places again. Although
BOMBSQUAD and the LAKE
BOYS continue to dominate
play, the UNTOUCHABLES
have dropped from the lineup.
McGARRETT FIVE-0 has
moved into third place after a
39-19 win over the UN-
TOUCHABLES. PI KAPPA
Al PHA is in the number four
position while SIGMA PHI EP-
SILON takes the fifth spot.
CAMPUS CRUSADE has
moved into the number three
position below the ENFORCERS
and SLAY MAMAS. Still
undefeated, these 'crusading'
female football standouts may be
the Cinderella story of the year.
The gals from FLEMING hold
the number four spot while
ALPHA PHI steps in at number
five.
Be sure to register next week
for the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
cross campus run and Almost
Anything Goes. These two events
are often the most enjoyable ac-
tivities on the intramural
calander. Registration for the 2.5
and 5 mile cross campus run will
be held Sept. 30-Oct. 5. Almosr
Anything Goes registration is
from Sept. 30-Oct. 3 with the
event taking place Oct. 9th at the
bottom of College Hill.
There's still time to sign up for
the outdoor recreation centers
Uwharne National Forest
backpacking trip. Deadline for
the weekend adventure is Oct. 4.
To sign up, drop by room 204
Memorial Gym or call 757-6387
Be sure to tune in each Tuesday
and Thursday at 2:30 and 5 30 to
the Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services Tennis
Shoe Talkshow. Activity
highlights and interviews head up
the list of exciting shows for your
enjoyment on 91.3fm WZMB
sew
wk smt
�.w ccpr 22 THRU
H3
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Fine
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 24, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.426
Location of Original
University Archives

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