The East Carolinian, September 17, 1985






Gfte
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.7
Tuesday, September 17, 1985
Greenville, N.C
Job Market Shrinks
(CPS) � The job market for
1985 college grads � which many
experts hoped would boom this
year � "remains better than last
year, but falls far short of some
of our earlier predictions the
College Placement Council's an-
nual year-end Salary Survey has
found.
The unexpected downturn �
especially for some high tech ma-
jors � also has convinced some
experts that colleges aren't doing
enough to guide students through
the changing demands in the job
market.
Last spring college placement
officials predicted 1985 would be
a banner year for new grads look-
ing for their first jobs, breaking
the market out of a decade-long
slump.
Instead, 1985 has been "an in-
different vear says Judith
Kayser, CPC's manager of
statistical services. She blames
the nation's "listless" economy.
"This probably was a carry
over from the recession she
speculates. "So many employers
were adversely affected (by the
1980 recession), and the scars
haven't healed. Despite the
economic expansion in the last
two and one-half years, we
haven't been able to shake the
cautious attitude
Overall, companies made
44,479 job offers to new grads
this year, up from 42,393 otters
in 1984.
Starting salaries rose an
average of three to five percent
above last year's level, the CPC
reports.
But some recently "hot"
business and computer science
degrees didn't attract many of-
fers, the survey shows.
Computer science majors, who
for the past few years have en-
joyed abundant job offers and
top starting salaries, did only
marginally better than their
predecessors of 1984.
"From all one reads, computer
science is the place to be Kayser
admits.
"But in our survey one of the
biggest surprises was the lack of
movement in this category she
notes. "There were only a hand-
ful more offers than last year �
3,796. up from 3,773 in 1984 �
and a 1.8 percent increase in
average salary. And most of that
was eked out at the end of the
year
Engineering majors also are
enduring a less-than-robust job
market.
Petroleum engineering grads
continued to attract the highest
average salary, $30,996.
Chemical engineers were the next
most prosperous group, getting
average offers of $28,428,
followed by electrical engineers.
who averaged $27,396.
But the increases generally
didn't keep up with the inflation
rate.
Engineers also showed disap-
pointing three-to-five percent
gains in the number of job offers
they got.
Accounting and marketing ma-
jors got more offers and four to
16 percent salary increases.
General business majors,
however, drew 14 percent fewer
offers and only five percent
salary increases.
Masters of business ad-
ministration grads had the worst
spring of all: 20 percent fewer job
offers and flat starting salaries.
The abrupt cooling of the hot
majors has alarmed some
observers, who fret colleges and
placement experts are more in-
terested in offering popular
degrees than marketable ones.
"Students in high school hear
that jobs are good in particular
areas, such as computer science,
and they flock into colleges to get
degrees in those disciplines ex-
plains Henry Levin, a Stanford
sociologist and job market ex-
pert.
"But soon this bulge of majors
fills the demand, and the market
tapers back off. Then you're left
with hordes of students who
See JOB, Page 5
Girls, Girls, Girls JMt
EUTOENS - Th� East C�rolini�n
If you think you have been seeing more girts than usual this fall, vour eves have not been deceiving
you. According to Registrar Gil Moore, ECU'S co-ed population consists of 57 percent of the record
14,121 students enrolled at ECU. But, the number of males did not increase this year. Sorry girls.
And come on guys, there's a lot of catching up to do.
Auto Repair Guide Planned
Group Begins Lecture Series
The ECU Committee on the
Status of Women will begin their
fourth year of sponsoring Lun-
chtime Learning on Thursday
September IS at 12 noon, 221
Mendenhall Student Center. The
topic for the opening session is
Violence Against Women: A
Question of Social Values,
featuring Mary L. Louis,
chairperson of the Pitt County
Family Violence Program.
Family violence continues to be a
growing topic of concern in our
society. Of particular concern is
the question: why are the objects
of this violence predominantly
women? Discussion will focus on
the incidence of violence and the
social values that promote, en-
courage and allow violence
against women.
The I.unchtime Learning series
otters University faculty, staff
and students the opportunity to
share fellowship and learning in a
relaxed luncheon atmosphere.
Participants can bring a bag
lunch, or purchase selections
from Mendenhall Buftet Dining.
Other topics for this Fall include:
Maxine Hong Kingston: The
Chinese-American Woman's
Quest for Identity, with Dr.
Veronica C. Wang, ECU Depart-
ment of English on Oct. p
and Financial Planning tips �
Ideas that Pay, with Rebecca M.
Harris. ECU Division of Institu-
tional Advancement on
November 14- The sessions are
always at 12 noon in Mendenhall
221.
The Committee on the Status
of Women was formed in 1972 as
an advisory committee to the
Chancellor on issues of concern
to women. During the first tew
years of the Committee's ex-
istence, the focus was on pay
equity and self-study of the status
of women on campus. Although
the committee "still studies equi-
ty issues and advises the
Chancellor o our findings" said
Dr. Patricia Anderson, chairper-
son, "we have also broadened
our outreach to women faculty,
students, and staff through pro-
gramming
The committee is in its second
year of providing the Manage-
ment Development Series along
with the the BB&T Center for
Leadership Development. This
fall, the facultv staff workshop
will feature Dr. Mary
Bredememeier and "The
Academic Game which is a
simulation game experience
geared lo teach the politics of
academe. The Management
Development Workshop will be
offered on Oct. 7.
Bv HAKOin.lONNEK
Most students at . timt or
another will face the dilemma
having their car break down and
often the question ot where to get
the car repaired comes ip. I
ECU student said he thinks
has the solution, and the � tl
help of the Student Government
Association, a comprehensive
auto-repair guide tor students
ma soon r
"ECT its need a com-
prehensive guide so they will
know where to go auJ not get rip-
ped off said Kirk Shelley, a
senior majoring in Political
Science and former Speaker of
the SGA Legislature.
Shelley said he has begun
research on the list ot area caj
repair shops, as well as their list
prices for repair services The
book would also include a
reference for filing compla
about a particular place, he said.
"A lot of students don know
where to go to complain when
they feel they have been ripped
Alumnus Heralds Gift
By ELIZABETH PAGE
SUff Wrtlff
East Carolina University alum-
nus Ron Dowdy formally an-
nounced his $100,000 challenge
gift before the Annual Alumni
Leadership Conference held in
Mendenhall Student Center on
Saturday.
During ECU's annual tele-
fund, which is utilized to raise
monetary support for ECU by
calling alumni, Dowdy has
agreed to match every new dona-
tion dollar for dollar up to
$100,000.
"We need to help raise the
sights of our alumni and our ad-
vocates, and one of the ways the
alumni does that is by raising the
dollars of unrestricted and unap-
propriated resources for ECU
said Vice-Chancellor for Institu-
tional Advancement James L.
Lanier Jr. According to Lanier,
Dowdy's gift to ECU will do just
that.
Dowdy's gift is ECU's first
challenge gift. "I think the gift
will add a real spark to this year's
annual giving program said
ECU Chancellor John Howell.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds 9
Editorials4
Features 7
Sports 10
The good things of youth are
strength and beauty, but the
lower of age is moderation �
Democritus
Dowdy, a native of Alexan-
dria, Va began his business
endeavors with one gift shop and
small amounts of real estate in
Orlando, Fla.
"It's not easv to earn
$100,000 said Dowdy, "It
takes a lot of hard work and
determination
On Thursday night, Dowdy
paid tribute to his former pro-
fessors, including Howell who
was Dowdy's former Political
Science instructor, by giving
them a dinner at Greenville's
King and Queen Restaurant.
Dowdy spoke to a group of
nearly 50 retired ECU faculty,
where he told his audience that he
was just an average student who
made C's. "I graduated with one
extra quality point said
Dowdy, "and to this day I still
wonder how I got it
Although Dowdy was once
declared academically ineligible
while attending ECU, and lost a
Florida Congressional race, he
never gave up. Dowdy's $100,000
gift is proof of his great deter-
mination in the business world.
"I feel so happy and confident
about this gift said Dowdy,
"that I feel there will be more
gifts to come
According to Dowdy,
monetary gifts are not the only
things that help build an univer-
sity�it also takes teamwork on
the part of the entire alumni. "By
putting the alumni forces
together, they are paying ECU a
tribute and making it a great
young university of the south
added Dowdy.
Peeping Tom
JIM LIUTOINS - Th� last Carohnl.n
No, this isn't a mechanical peeping torn, but ECU workers using a
cberr- picker to steam dean Tyler Dorm. For many years, Tyler
has stood out admtst the other red brick dorms of College Hill.
Now, after its periodic cleaning, Tyler will become a more promi-
nent feature of the Hill, making everyone's life a little brighter.
In my research, I have found
there is a cost difference
$31 in brake jobs. And I doubt
most students realize this � mak-
ing the need for this guide essen-
tial Shelley said.
s(i .tided pam-
phlets before Ad Shelley said he
believes th iture will see the
value of this publication.
A! k will be recom-
me .dent a
what to do when
breaks down. "Hopefully, in an
emergency situation, the
owner will already have a place to
go in mind. But. that is not
always the case. B using the
guide, the student can have a
reference point in where's the
best and cheapest place to go
Shelley's cat repair report said
the average cost of a tune up for a
4-cylinder car in Greenville runs
about $34 and for an 8-cylinder
car $39. Oil changes average
about Si8 and brake jobs about
$53 lowing runs about $20.
Shelley said reports from the
Dept. of Public Safetv .
that there are approximately
10,000 automobiles registered
campus, and he said he believes
the guide is past due. "I hope the
SGA will see the value in a guide
such as this, which will help
students in the long run he
said.
Estimates cited in Shelley's
research were gathered through a
telephone survey, Shelley s
and if the book is appro .
updated list will be circulated.
Students who have a problem
with their car repairs should
to resolve the problem with
owner of the shop, the book said.
If that doesn't work, write a let-
ter of complaint to the company,
and prov ide as much information
as possible. (Copies should be
made of everything you do.) The
final step, if the problem still re-
mains unresolved, is to contact
Jesse Harris, Greenville Human
Relations Coordinator. City
Hall, Greenville. He can be
reached at 752-4137.
Lab Helps Students
By DOUG ROBERSON
When students hear the word
"lab they often think of
remedial work, such as Math
lab. However with ECU's
History Learning Laboratory,
the situation is quite different,
said Lab Director Evelyn
Boyette.
"The purpose of the history-
lab is to facilitate the teaching
and learning of history and
especially to help students
develop the skills essential to the
study of history Boyette said.
'The lab's not only for
remedial work � it's for all
students who want a better
understanding of history she
added.
During the 1984-85 acaderrc
year, appoximately 1,100
students (including repeats)
utilized the in-lab services.
"Students can come in and view
films and filmstrips or listen to
records and discussion tapes.
These and other materials pro-
vide enrichment opportunities for
the students Boyette said.
Many professors recommend
that their students use the lab, she
said. "Some professors require
their students to come in. Some
make lab visits an optional activi-
ty. She added that certain faculty
members place books and
periodicals on reserve in the lab
for use by their students.
Boyette emphasized that the
lab is as useful to the faculty as it
is to the students. "Lab assistants
(History Graduate Assistants) ad-
minister make-up tests to
students when requested by the
professor. This is very convenient
for the student and the
professor she said.
The lab also serves as a central
repository for audio-visual equip-
ment and aids the historv depart-
ment. Films, filmstrips and slides
are avalible to classes when re-
quested by the instructor. "This
is especially helpful to the facul-
ty. One of the lab assistants will
take the projector to the class,
show the film, and return the
projector to the lab Boyette
said.
Last year, the lab acquired an
Apple HE computer and five pro-
grams through the office of Han-
dicapped Student Services.
"Hearing impaired students have
first call on these materials, but
all history students are free to use
them she said.
The lab also has a VCR system
consisting of a camera, monitor
and recorder on permanent loan
from the media center. "We hope
to acquire more video cassettes in
the near future Boyette added.
"We hope that the lab is useful
to the students and faculty. We
plan to make it even more effec-
tive Boyette said.
The History Learning Lab is
located in Brewster Building's D
wing, room 201. Fall semester
1985 hours are: Monday-Tuesday
2-6 p.m Wednesday 12 noon-8
p.m Thursday 2-7 p.m.
' �
�" 4
s r s -
i





'Ml IU kul im N
M I'll MBl K 17, Wx
INTHAMURALS
Bounce Into �x.clt�ment m infra
J on 3 basketball Regutrat.on ends I
��Dm piay starts Monday I Par
'�pate rather than Spi raft n
tramurais Tenms to iei doubles egistration
�xis tooay also Add a �� �
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Student NEA Chapter s
membership or.ve ara organizational
meeting Wednesday September 18 4pm
Speight 12�
AH Students interested in membersnip are
nvited to attend Those planning to student
teach this year are encouraged to be present
Applications ano add'iionai informal
be available at this rime
VETERANS
There has been a considerable amount 0t
mtere�1 recently m estab isti rig a ,ieran s
dub on campus Please plan to attend and
provide your valuable nput The 1st m
yy.ii be held on Thurs Sept 18 from 7 9 p m
In Rm 21? at Mendenha. Retrest ments .
te provided Please come ana help us m
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
The Brothers Pledges ar
t Sigma Phi Eds k a r � aN � .
sister rush on Monday Sepl I6ttl , � �
day Sep- e on out anc
meet me Sig E
from the a" tH
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB AED
The ECU Biology Club ano AEI have
a toofcou' Vonoa. Srp- 23 at a I
'he Caz.DO beh.no the Biology
Everyone is expected to bt
'o the feast rhere s �
B.oiogy Ciub ott.ee door Plea
soor as possible so c . . m what we w
need There will also t
meeting atte' the cook
which Or � .
undergraduate dept ot 6 g gy �
Oues will a'so oe tam
ECU SURFING
ne ream tr s ��,
deal conditions a' Cape ��
issed th,s contest .
te��1 later For more mforn
ie�t meeg '�� s Thursda
-oom 221 vienoennali A video of H
' 11 be sheim it
women are we.come Club due! �
ecfe) at the meet g
RACQUETBALL CLUB
Announcements
ECU Racauetba I Club w
� on meeting Wed Sepl
Vemor a Gym -
anyone who nteres'ec r
ball for oeggner o' a �.
.heck ' .x,
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega a national service
fraternity is Inviting all freshmen
sophomores and luniors to attend its fan
rush September 23 24 and 24 Places are to
be announced it you are interested and
would like more information call Ernest or
Debbie at Tit msa
ECU COUNCIL
OF HONOR SOCIETIES
'nursday Sept 17 at 7pm theECUCoun
n of HOnor Societies will hold an important
meeting Chancielor Mowell will attend and
refreshments will be provided
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
Zeta Beta Tau fraternity will be holding its
L. tttie Sister Rush on Wed . and Thurs from
8 11pm at the ZBT house 305 E !4th St
across from the ECU Strength Complex All
girls interested In be.ng ZBT Little Sisters
and guys interested in rushing ZBT are
welcome to attend For information call
752 58v5 Rides are available
EATING DISORDERS
Group to be organized Can the infirmary
�prvews Meetings will be on Fridays
11 12
WOMEN VOTERS
A Putin forum sponsored by the
� Pitt County League of Women
voters win discuss County City Schools
Merger Where Are We' on Tuesaar
iber 17. 7 30 p m at the First
Presbyter.an Church Elm and 14'h Streets
Greenville
fie pane, of speakers inc lude Dr Edwin
Acs' Super ntenje of Pitt County
' - s Kelly Barnh.li Chairman of P ft
County Commissioners John Mcknight.
Deputy Superintendent of Pitt County
v no, . .rooms member of the Con
soiidatec Board of Education and Freager
sanaers Coordinator of Federal Programs
tor P,tt County Schools
p�'es . �� and interested ; ' zen,
3eo to attend to become .rtormea as to
�ogress t0 date in 'he county
� , inn
. ,� t$
KAPPA SWEETHEARTS
� acca Alpha pv Sweethearts . ��
Center
GRADUATE STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP
fifKJ iwweo c. Wes � . - �
rre first meet . - be September . .� ���
�� enter ai p m par
pan-s srx
BIBLE STUDY
pheti
the Wesley I
r
Bill's
Fast Food
323 South Greene Street
6 30 a m 8 30 p
Buy One Fresh
Sausage Biscuit
Get One FREE
With This Ad
Go for
the Best!
Vote September 18th
Eva Ilmberger
Freshman Class
Vice President
begins on September 17 at 7 30 p m al the
Method,s! Student Center it ,s open to
students and staff without fee For more In
formation call 758 2030
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The Brothers ot the Eta Nu Chapter of
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity incorporated
are sponsoring a march and rally agamst
Apartheid rule in South Atr�fl The march
will be held on Wednesday Sept 25 at 12 noon
beginning between the Brewster Building
and the Musk Bu-ldmg The marc h will pro
ceed through campus concluding at the patio
of Mendenhali Student Center where keynote
speaker Reverend Artee Griffin, will make
nil presentation There will be remarks by
Vice Chancellor Volpe Dr Meer Dr Speir
SGA President David Brown and various
other university and community officials
Each and everyone of you are needed for
support Come and walk with the Alpha s for
a good cause
HOME COOKING
Come to the Methodist Student Center this
Wednesday night at �� 30 p m and every
Wednesday n.ght for a dehc .ous, all you can
eat home cooked meal with a short program
afterwards The meal is $2 at the door Jl SO
it you sign up in advance This week we will
se a movie about ways to show that we care
Can 7S8 2030 for reservations Sponsored by
Presbyterian ana Methodist Campus
V n:str,es
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Beg.nmng German Tues and Thu's
� 24 10 24 7 30 8 30 p m Beg.nmng Ger
man Tues ano Thurs 10 I II s, 6 7 30
P m Getting Organized Tues 10 1
� 30 9 30 p m Sailing �
on Sa' ano Sun 9 27 ;e R tat .
1985 Tues and Thurs 10 15 I' 'UOpm
Contact Continuing Education Erw
OFFICE WORKERS
Severa' pos�� ons h. . ivailabli
t.me basis for students w.tn strong
secretarial skills Contact Coopera' ,r
Education 313 Rawi Building
CAREER FOCUS
Sen.ors are you looking for that ����
upon graduation' Learn more about ft
available from the Office of Career Planning
and Pla.ement Listen to Career Focus on
WZMB th.s Wednesday at 2 30 ano 5 30
NAACP
'he fcu Chapter of naacp II meet
Thursda, evening September 1� m roo
Mendenhali
RUGBY
Proph.cies will be f.
cri made, and blood is sp.llea Teeth a
gnashed and heads shail crash a' the ECU
Rugby game and BAsf Sa' Sept 21st 2
p m Ecu vs Duke behmg the Allied H
Bid The Rugby Club is accepting new
players No Experience necessary Can BZ
"S� 4459
COFFEHOUSE MEETING
Our . . '
Sept 16th at 3 30 p m in the Coffeehouse
Mendenhali Student Cente-
persons are urged to attend For more �
Mai � n '52 9223
LEISURE SYSTEMS
STUDIES SOCIETY
ts first ��
Septen � �� , .
� ne interested i'c urg
544
TENNIS ANYONE?
Register foi ntramura
doubles competitor Deadlines are Seu'
16 17 Be a part of the a flon and excitement
flmurais Participate rather thai
fate
3 ON 3 BASKETBALL
Bounce nto the fall intramural scheduid
" " i on j oasketoa1. Registration
' H I' in Room 105 v
Pia, begins Sept 23
WHITEWATER RAFTING
Registration dead I ' � �� � � A- �.��'
Ratting Is today Come by room
Memorial �
Recreation Centers newest advent ��
SKISNOWSHOE
ano an enro
Snowsnoe Aes- a Hav
nfe lea
P h y E
eve
eo aboa- I - � there be at
�' " � ' - ' t � 26 at 4 i
persons For mo�-
israei a' 35'
PSI CHI
' here will be a I � � .
clay Sept 17 ��
ew eft
'o attend A iso anyone
Respec
HM
SGA
� :�� tor � �- " �rei
budge' repor's n
�� - by 5 OC. Tuesdar 'ieprr &�.
�n 'la a - let
We-Jriesday S�- - - -
-
formation
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
� Cleaning done by the doctor
� Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenviie, NC
758-4927
AFTER COLLEGE:
AIR FORCE
EXPERIENCE I
Graduating soon? If you're under 29 2 . I
moc - as an Air ForceOfficer Move up
withAIRFORC I I XPERIEN E. ,
wort fidd Expei
rce R
Call: Iiit Stephen Uhilf
Suite 202, 4KW Wake Forest Road
RaleiKh, N( rt(H
Vjyt 856-4012 (allollett
AIM HIGH
AIR FORCE
Night
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
iloOLL
F AT KROGE
f
items ana Prices
Effective thr
Sept 21 1935
on
DOLLAR DAYS
AT KROGER THIS WEEK
Register To
WIN. '
A PAIR OF
RIVER BLUFF
"Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments
kitl l.nM.L-m.rii and Maintcnaikc
� ikdnuMii vmiIioiiss & Bcdrtntm Cat den Xparimctii-
� Krtvhens Icature DtNlMvasltcrs tv DKp�KaU
� i ullaipotcd
� l'i !M;c I auudr I acjJiiio
� I � v rt�t
� � iWv I A included
�.I' .1' M ikonivs
� :wiiu i! I,i Shoppin-jcai.Ts Rcsiattra�t-s
� I ! Mils SctM'
Oiret lions: IIMh sireti I MttiMtin t� Ritr Bluff Road
. ei to Ki'iTuali' shoppim;enu-r.
PHONE 758-4015
Htb
Miller 12
Beer
O:
$500
Red Delicious
Apples
3 $
THE LADIES ZO
Ladies Only 8
Guys admitl
25c Wine and Ore
Friday
Warn Bam End of
Doors Open i
$1.00 Tall Boys �
$2.50 Pi
Ladies Only 8
Daddy Cool plays t
Beau's a Private Club for Members
Pirate
Football
Tickets
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
tickets for
each of the Cy
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
Fried
Chicken
1
lsAJ
Video Movie
Rentals
No Club Fees
24 Hour Service
REGULAR OR DIET
Cola . . NRB
8" Individual
Ran Pizza
3 $5
� mOOK up
VHS Player
Rental
DIET CHERRY OR REGULAR
Cola . . O Cans
CONDi' Ml
White Rain
Shampoo

NEW KROGER THICK CUT
Potato
Bdc
Chips. .
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
Greenville Blvd. - Greenvill
�ovittmt 'in
� - - �i Mmi mm � ,
�eaui'ea to o -moi, Jvj t- �
� IM - � - �ig�"j. or �.
rot o' '�� . - r
0 ��?r vi- Of IWW �
� . . . . j
'cvnoarjcw �rr ,
' � "5 r� va wg or i
� . . . �ti� �Ov.
t� KTverg
�' f�� rrrrnei3 o" t mm
Kat
Edger
Senior
Da
I





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R COLLEGE:
IR FORCE
APERIENCE
k� your
up fasi
� portani
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00
Fried
hick en ijJ
4 J&
;
8" Individual
Pan Pizza
3 $5
EXTRB
THICK
-RTC
CHIPS
tato
IPS. .
5 Oz
$1
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j � - ��� �"qm �jv on �
-� � itgfn ��.
�"� rtHi irowf NW � Ot i
" "9 tf�t j� vj-g or j
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- �"0C " QuOC"1
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B
!Hl I AS!AikOl 1N1AN
SI PIl MB! k
!��
Respect Increases Roommate Compatibility
B BUHWHKK! K
M.ff Wrlln
Sharing a living space with a
stranger is often one of the most
difficult tasks college provides.
1 iving with a roommate can be a
fun-filled challenge or a
nightmare.
According to research b
Smith Jackson, three basic
characteristics determine how
well students will mesh together:
sleeping habits, stud habits, and
degree of neatness However,
man students do encounter
some amount of friction with
their roommates it's not un-
common.
ralking freely, sharing ideas
and opinions and the handling of
disagreements does not require
that people like each other. The
challenge of being a well round-
ed, mature human being is learn-
ing to negotiate.
To speak up effectively about
something you do not like
without offending the other per-
son in the process is an art.
Moreover, it is the way successful
roommates survive in the
cramped atmosphere of a dorm
loom
According to residence direc-
tors at ECU, fewer room changes
have been made this year than
last ear. Most students at ECU
this year are changing rooms for
reasons other than disharmony
with their roommates. "Many
students meet someone at orien-
tation the want to live with ac-
cording to Mary Frances White,
resident director of Tyler dorm.
White tries to help students
deal with roommate difficulties.
"I try to get the students to just
be patient and give it time if
they're not happy with their
�inmate White said.
Different lifestyles are the
mam problem at Aycock dorm
according to Connie Wrenn, resi-
dent director of Aycock. "Usual-
ly one student is an early riser and
one's not or one's social habits
are different from the others.
There is a lot of moving in and
moving out when freshmen meet
other students Wrenn said.
"Many students find other
students with a common interest
and decide to change rooms
said Wrenn. "Common interests
bring people together. Many-
students find it advantageous to
grow together with another stu-
dent who has the same common
interests Wrenn said.
Some students prefer a co-ed
atmosphere in the dorm. Accor-
ding to Kenny Jenkins, resident
director of Slay and Umstead
dorms, "The unique thing about
a co-ed dorm is the family at-
mosphere. The guys kind of
watch out for the girls. There is
better male-female interaction in
the co-ed dorm Jenkins said.
Dr. Barbara Engam, director
of the Health Resources Program
at Hood College and author of
"The Roommate Negotiation
Handbook suggests room-
mates make lists of ways to cope
with their problems. After com-
piling the list both roommates
should go over it together.
eliminating items that the other quality is stressed when coming
considers unacceptable. to a solution in this way
It all fails and no solution is at You may feel there is no love lost.
hand, it is important to end the even so you should still ha
relationship on a friendly basis. mature respect for your ex-
l ngram feels that a formal roommate.
Locote A, ro� I
o Patrol Station
EL TOKO
Watt 1 ft � - Dry i
Men ys Hair Styling
JOHNNY WEATHINGTON 2800 E
Phone 752 3318 G'een �le, N C d
All-You-Can-Eat
� A o
Nightclub
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 754 6401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25c Wine and Draft all Night Long!
r
Friday Night
Warn Bam End of the Week Jam!
Doors Open at 8:00p.m.
$1.00 Tall Boys � 50c Wine & Draft
$2.50 Pitchers
Ladies Only 8 p.m10 p.m.
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
Beau's a Privale Club for Members & Guests
All ABC Permits
30 to 60
OFF
All Frames
In Stock
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order
tor discount Not good with other
odvertised specials
SOFT
CONTACTS
59.00
pair
CO ON EXPIRES
SEPT 27 1985
COUPON EXPIRES SEPT 27 1085
lerfc SUNGLASSES 300 OFF
with coupon only
'Ak aboul our IO'o Senior ltlzns H c,n �nung in eye ex�m tor
Rate Ihfjamf da
The
i
Phone
756-4204
OPTICAL PALACE
703 Grwnvlll Blvd I Acmm r torn Phi Plaia N�i To LRA Kealtv
(mi M Harm Liei�a�d Oolit i�nOprn V 3i) � m lo 6 p tn Won f,
Monday thru Thursday!
4 PM-Close!
Enjoy all you can eat large freshly breaded
shrimp, served with French fries or (baked
potato after 5 p.m.). toasted Grecian bread
& cocktail sauce.
PLUS
All You Care To Eat Soup. Salad & Fruit Bar
SHONEYS
205 Greenville Bid.
756-2186
& Sigma Nu
present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday. September 17, 1985
Admission SI .50
9:00-2:00 A.M.
18 years SI.00
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
& Sigma Tau Gamma
present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, September 18, 1985
Admission $1.50
10C DRAFT ALL NITE
9:00-2:00 A.M.
18 years $1.00
PHI KAPPA
TAU
Sister Rush
Kathy
Edgerton
Senior Class President
Dedicated To ECU
jTouo) cL Cu�
Com Ouf ky fy Vlf
1�K j&f!
:00-uWir
I





Stye iEaat (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, om ����
Jay Stone������, t,0,
Harold Joynfr. ��, t i
Daniei Mai rfr , �M LuvENDER' � �
RK K M c )�1 ANTH�NY MARTIN' ��
KICK Ma ORMac ta�or , p
DEBB.F STEVENS SHANNON SHORT,
LoUNPawiia. ANDREW JOYNER. �.
C' ' - � � M.KF LUDW1CK.
I)KHAMIlJOHNSON� STEPHEN SHF.RB.N
September 17, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Elections
SlR-WMATCWtJ
THINK ABOUT A
COUNTRY WHgRg
THeHAOORirg 15
JReATBPAS2i!P
CfASS C77Z0VS
SVA MINORTV
f,
Students Should Participate
The great democratic promise
that was extended to students in the
1960's when they won the right to
control their own institutions has
yet to be realized in some respects.
Three decades ago campus
newspapers were circumscribed in
what they could write by their
universities' administrations. Dress
codes were enforced and student
government had little real say in
decisions affecting the lives of
students. As a result, controversial
speakers were banned from campus
as were controversial student
organizations and student govern-
ment was virtually a rubber" stamp
tor policies handed down from the
administration. Vet, most of these
restrictions were lifted as a result of
the struggles of student activists in
the 1960's, beginning with the
Berkely Free Speech Movement.
Recently, the real impediment to
making our student institutions
work for us has been a lack of stu-
dent involvement on the part of
many elements of the campus com-
munity rather than intransigence on
the part of the administration. Hav-
ing said this, however, it is impor-
tant to note that significant progress
is being made.
Tomorrow the elections for stu-
dent legislature will take place. In
addition, the campus' first club
awareness day will be held. Club
awareness day is simply an effort to
introduce students to campus
organizations and to increase stu-
dent involvement in these groups.
Both the elections and club
awareness day, therefore, have the
N0WM
TALKING ABOUT
COMPARABLE
WORTH.
"i
same goal in some broad sense.
They both strive to get students
more involved in running student
organizations.
SGA elections are only held twice
a year. The executive council is
elected in the spring while the
legislature is elected in the fall. The
elections offer students a rare op-
portunity to choose candidates who
will speak out on issues that affect
them over the course of a school
year. They should not squander
such an opening. The complexion of
the legislature and thus the issues
which it addresses will be decided in
tomorrow's elections. Several dif-
ferent groups are running a slate of
candidates in an attempt to get a
working majority elected. The Col-
lege Republicans, the College
Democrats, various organizations
which are funded by the SGA and
fraternities are all sure to be involv-
ed in this effort. Campus politics,
then, is not so different from na-
tional and state politics except for
the dearth of identifiable political
parties and issues. Yet, many issues
may be brought before the
legislature by groups working out-
side of it. It is, therefore, fitting that
club awareness day should be
scheduled to occur on the same day
as the elections. It will afford
students an opportunitv to see what
is happening at ECU that might in-
terest them in the way of extacur-
ricular activities. It will also in-
troduce them to groups that often
work to have an impact on legisla-
tion passed by student government
itself.
Campos Forum-
Legislature Candidates Endorsed
Students, tomorrow is one of the
most important dates on the ECU
caJendar of Student Activities. On
(Wednesday, September 18th from
8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. you have the
opportunity to vote. The voting stu-
dent body will elect a student
legislature which has the responsibili-
ty of allocating student fees, making
campus policy decisions and
representing the students within the
ECU community.
The duty of any democratic socie-
ty, community or college campus is to
vote and elect its governmental
leaders. We encourage you to utilie
this freedom. All candidates for an
SGA office are invited to participate
in the SGA Student Union Club
Awareness Day tomorrow in front of
the Student Supply Store. Students,
this is an opportunity to meet both
SGA candidates and representatives
from the various campus organiza-
tions. Remember. Wednesday,
September 18th is your opportunity.
David Bi wn
President Student Government
Association
Thomas
worked to ensure the appropriations
to the Senior Class were approved by
the legislature. As Speaker, I have
also worked with Senior Class leaders
to move Graduation from Minges
Colliseum on Friday to Ficklen
Stadium on Saturday. This has led to
a more enjoyable graduation, ensur-
ing more family members being able
to attend.
On top of the duties of being class
president, there are some special
areas of concern of mine that I hope
to change this year:
1 Work with the Traffic Office
and the Placement Center to assure
reserved parking areas for seniors
with job interviews.
2. Work with the faculty to make pro-
fessional examinations and job inter
views University excused absences.
3. Work to have a Senior Formal as a
memorable graduation activity.
These are realistic goais for the
coming year, but to make them hap-
pen I need your vote tomorrow, so
please vote for Kirk Shelley � Senior
Class President.
Kirk Shelley
Senior, Political Science
More
In the interest of correcting any
misperceptions which might have
arisen from last Thursday's
editorial on campus food the reader
should note that the piece was
critical of the campus soda shop,
the Croatan, and vending areas
throughout campus. The editorial,
which alleged that the nutritional
value of foods in the snack bars and
vending areas is substandard, was
not directed at cafeterias such as the
ones in Mendenhall and Jones
dorm. Both of these facilities are
supervised by Ira Simon and the
Division of Student Life. They have
ample salad bars, a variety of
vegetables and most offer non-
caffeinated, sugar free beverages
Some also offer whole grain bread
Though the emphasis on meat, (par-
ticularly beef and pork), and the
absence of a protein alternative for
vegetarians is lamentable as is the
absence of whole foods in general it
is safe to say that the campus
ca etenas serve a nutritionally
balanced meal.
Another point which must be
made is that the Croatan and Soda
Shop are not the responsibility of
the campus dining committee as was
originally thought. They are the
responsibility of the University's
business office. It is to these people
then, that the original remarks were
addressed. The original charge still
stands: in its snack bars and vending
areas our university is feeding us
tood that has no real nutritional
value and that, in fact, frustrates
the body s attempts to maintain a
healthy brain chemistry and thus to
foster intelligent thought. If the
public education system in our na-
tion doesn't care about the health of
students then why belabor the point
by making classes on physical
education, drug use, sex education
and health mandatory? Something
here smacks of hypocrisy
When I first came to ECU my
treshman year. 1 came with some
mixed emotions about college and
college life in general. After several
days I began to see and feel the
greatness of ECU and my fellow
students. At this time 1 knew 1 had
made the right decision to attend
ECU. Then I became active in various
student organizations and was
selected to serve on the Judicial
Review Board of the SGA. Through
these involvements I have had the op-
portunity to meet many new and ex-
citing people here on campus. One of
the most interesting things in talking
with these people is listening to their
hopes, plans, dreams and aspirations
for the future. Just as my fellow
students, I too have hopes and plans
for the present and future. While at
ECU I want to do my part to see that
we as students, and East Carolina as a
university, do our parts to make our
years in college the best they can be.
I feel I can fulfill this responsibility
through active participation in the
Student Government Association.
Therefore, I am running as a can-
didate for the office of sophomore
class vice-president, in the SGA elec-
tions on Wednesday, September 18,
1985. I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to ask for your support and
vote, and to assure you that if I'm
elected I will do my best to represent
and serve you in an honest, fair and
efficient manner.
Together, we can reach those goals,
and make a difference in our future.
Scott E. Thomas
Business
Sophomore
Edgerton
Shelley
My name is Kirk Shelley and I am
running for Senior Class President. I
feel I am well qualified for this posi-
tion and I need your help.
This year will be the fourth year I
have been involved in SGA. For the
last two years I have served as
Speaker of the House and last year I
was Junior Class President.
I also have had the privilege, while
serving as Speaker, to work with two
fine Senior Class Presidents and
learned from them. This experience
has taught me what is required to
make a successful graduation exercise
and how to inform the administration
of the needs of ECU's Seniors.
For the last three years, I have
I have never been one to voice my
political views, yet having known
Kathy Edgerton for so many years, I
have never felt so sure that one could
be as qualified or deserving of the of-
fice of Senior Class President.
As I'm sure you are, I'm tired of
students running simply for personal
glorification. Rarely do you find a
candidate able to represent the
University as a whole, while keeping
the individual student's concerns at
heart.
I could continue with an extensive
list of Kathy's attributes, former and
present involvement in the Unversity,
or tell you the many things she has
done for me. Instead, I'd simply like
to say that she is sincere and
dedicated in everything that she does
and one of the few people I can call a
true friend. She will represent East
Carolina well as Senior Class Presi-
dent.
Amy Griffin
Early Childhood Education
Senior
Purple & Gold
It took three days but th" good old
News and Observer took another at-
tack on East Carolina University.
Reteience: fence story Wed. Sept. 11,
1985. I would like to get some facts
straight on this bias news article. You
were correct that the fans on the fence
were ECU football fans. But the
statement by a NCSU official that the
fans were wearing purple and yellow
is not correct. Purple and gold were
the colors. Yellow is not a color ECU
wears! Just take a look at our foot-
ball schedule this year compared to
area universities.
I know that the fans were out of
line when they knocked down the
fence. But what do you think would
happen when ECU wins a game the
good old News & Observer does not
think we can win. Matter of fact the
State fans were tearing down another
fence at the game time, that is the
fence to get out of the stadium.
Thomas Combs
ECU Graduate of '85
Fans Uncool
We the Alumni of ECU wish to
apoloze for the behavior of the few
ECU animals that vandalized the
�VC. State Stadium after the game
It is embarrassing that apologies
have to be made. The majority
ECU students and alumni conducted
themselves with self control and ,
sportsmanship.
We feel that rhe follow .
measures should be taken:
Any misconduct, such as the van-
dalism and fighting witnessed last
weekend, should impose the punish-
ment of expulsion from ECU
A formal letter from East Carolina
University SGA should go to the
dent bodv of NCSU apologizing
this incident.
ECU should send oui
men at potential trouble game
help police restrain and report I
students who create disturbances
The Pirates Club and Band made a
most impressive showing. It is a
shame all this was overshadowed by a
few stupid people, the kind of trash
ECU does not need on campus.
Carmen S. Ban lev
Carol E. Hosper
Susie Sekalla
David R. Melvin
Nicaragua
There is much confusion todav
concerning the situation in
Nicaragua. Our government would
have us believe that the contras � the
rebel groups supported by the United
States government � are trying to
overthrow the "communist" govern-
ment of the Sandinistas. Reagan calls
the contras the "freedom fighters" of
South America, fighting for
"democracy Their tactics,
however, are anything but democratic
� barbaric would be a better word.
One man who knows the true story
is Reed Brody. In September of 1984,
Mr. Brody resigned his position as
Assistant Attorney General for the
State of New York and went to
Nicaragua, where he remained until
January. During his stav, he and his
team discovered and reported 145
sworn testimonies by eyewitnesses in-
volving contra terrorist activities.
These atrocities include assassination,
torture, rape, kidnapping and the
mutilation of civilians. Since his
report was published, follow-up
studies have verified the testimonies
of many eyewitnesses that Mr Brody
interviewed.
Reed Brody has come under attack
for his report on contra terrorism by
President Reagan, who accused him
of being paid $2000 by the Sandinista
government. Mr. Brody claims that
this is not true and that he received
nothing from the Sandinistas except
temporary housing and occasional
transportation to remote areas.
Other arguments against the con-
tent of Brody's report include accusa-
tions that the Sandinista government
has committed similar violations
against the civilians of Nicaragua.
There is some truth to this, although
the number of atrocities committed
by the contras far outweigh the
number committed bv the Sandinista
government. In addition, reports
made by America's Watch, (a non-
partisan organization which monitors
human rights) have shown a "sharp
decline" in such government abuses
since 1982. In no way do alleged
human rights abuses committed by
the Sandinistas therefore, justify the
present contra terrorism in
Nicaragua.
Reed Brody will be speaking at
o�? Wedncsday, September 18,
at 8:00 P.M. in C-103 Brcwster
Building.
Susan Haynie
General College
Altern
� HF in vnir Kf k

I
.
.


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Alcohol

Contlnued From Page 1
Job Outio
C
war
"It'
pro !
ieven-to
P
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LITTLE
Tuesf
Thur;
803 HOOKER RO,
ii j





I Ml 1 AS IAROI INIAN
SEPTfcMBfcR 17, 1985
; WORE
A&OUT
APARTKEP.

�ff t-Mk ,
ndorsed
zed the
ga ne.
tp gies
� ducted
good
wing
he van-
ned last
arolina
the n i u -
� zing for
a : � c
� ECU
bances
and made a
lowing. It
-hadov.
e kind
Nicaragua
�day
� tin
-vould
: as � the
'he United
are trying to
mmunis . . ern-
Reagan calls
fighters" of
ghting for
tactics,
democratic
a better word.
'� �� true story
ember of 1984,
; gned I position as
reneraJ for the
j went to
remained until
- and his
ted !45
esses m-
i �� vnies.
nation.
ipping and
ce his
ed, follow-up
he testimonies
r ��' Mr Brody
ler attack
nsm by
ised him
12000 by the Sandinista
Mr Brody claims that
hat he received
dinistas except
� and occasional
remote areas
'he con-
adeaccusa-
� .government
milar violations
�t Nicaragua.
this, although
ities committed
far outweigh the
Hed by the Sandinista
nment In addition, reports
America's Watch, (a non-
an organization which monitors
ights) have shown a "sharp
e" in such government abuses
1982. In no way do alleged
ghts abuses committed by
landinistas, therefore, justify the
K contra terrorism in
fagua
rd Brody will be speaking at
Wednesday, September 18,
0 P.M. in C-103 Brewster
ng.
Haynie
ral College
Alternatives Available For Thrifty Students
B BETH WHICKER W�� W�
�u.� a. it
B BETH WHICKER
SUM Writer
Most students tend to overs-
pend - usually in the area of
books and snacks With federal
aid on e downswing many
students are having to watch their
Purse strings more carefully.
You can save more than you
think by buying used books from
tne bookstore or from other
students. If you only need a book
a few times during the semester,
then you may find Jovner
I ibrarv has it on the shelves.
It you are on a meal plan, br-
ing snacks from the cafeteria,
preferably fruit to satisfy those
!0 p.m. hunger pains. If you buy
sour own groceries never shop on
an empty stomach as this can
prove to be a financial disaster as
well as a caloric one.
Phone bills tend to be
astronomical during your first
year of college. The only
available long distance service in
this area is Carolina Telephone &
Telegraph Co. Through AT&T,
Carolina Telephone offers special
rates during different days:
�8 a.m12 noon � Full price is
charged.
�12 noon-1 p.m. � 25 percent
discount.
�I p.m5 p.m. � Full priced is
charged.
�5 p.mII p.m. � 25 percent
discount.
�1 p.m8 a.m. � 50 percent dis-
count.
� 5 p.m11 p.m. � Saturday
and Sunday � 25 percent dis-
count.
�All other times on Saturday and
Sunday � 50 percent discount.
Sprint and MCI have announc-
ed plans to install long distance
service in Greenville within the
year. These companies offer dis-
count rates all day.
For the student who can't af-
ford telephone calls, writing let-
ters is another option to save
money. You can write all you
want for a mere 22 cents and you
can spend all day thinking of
what you want to say without
leaving out anything you wished
you had said.
Banks in Greenville offer a
wide variety of services, and so it
would be advantageous to
evaluate every bank and savings
and loan before choosing the one
that best suits the student's needs.
Some banks require a savings ac-
count for free banking and some
don't. Certain banks offer pro-
grams especially designed for
students, you may have to look a
little harder.
Most students are not aware
that their parents' homeowners
policy usually covers about 10
percent of premises belongings.
This will protect your belongings
in your dorm room or apartment.
If your parents have estimated
their home furnishings at
$40,000, then you are probably
covered for 10 percent of that
amount or $4,000. To use this in-
surance you need serial numbers
or identifying marks on your
possessions and a police report
should anything be stolen. The
Dept. of Public Safety can loan
students equipment for marking
their property.
These policies usually do not
cover anything except what
belongs to you alone. For exam-
ple, it would not cover your
neighbor's radio, so be careful
with other's possessions.
Credit cards can establish a
student credit rating. You can
obtain a credit without collateral
or a parent's cosignature through
the College Credit Corporation.
Up to 90 percent of students who
apply receive credit.
VISA also issues special stu-
dent credit cards for $18.00 per
year with 18 percent interest to
students with good credit history.
RALEIGH - (I PI) North
Carolina's consumers might gulp
a bit when they see liquor prices
go up next month, according to
members of the state's Alcohol
Beverage Control Board.
Prices in the more than 300
Mate owned ABC stores will go
up because of combined factors
such as a federal tax hike and in-
creased labor costs by the
distillers of liquor.
The increase will mean the
average cost of a half gallon or
1.75 liter of 80-proof liquor will
rise by about $1.11 to $1.25 per
bottle. A fifth will be about 55
cents more expensive and a pint
will cost about 30 cents more.
Price
HOT SPRINGS � (UP!)
Searchers waited for night lull
Monday to again send up a heat
detecting helicopter that can
sense humans on the ground and
start roving patrols for two
fugitives charged with gunning
down a state trooper.
A three-day search by a 300
member posse and several teams
of bloodhounds has failed to find
any sign of the men charged with
murder in Saturday's slaying.
However, troopers said the
believe the fugitives are still
hiding in the treacherous
wilderness of Doggett Mountain
and are possibly surviving on
fresh apples
RALEIGH � (UPI) The State
Attorney General's Office won a
temporary restraining order
blocking Seaboard Systems
Railroad's proposed sale of land
along hundreds of miles of aban-
doned railroad tracks.
Some eastern North Carolina
families claim the that easements
alongside the railroad tracks
abandoned in 1980 rightfully
belong to them.
The state was seeking to void
one sale and block further sales
of the right-of-ways except to the
adjoining landowners of another
railroad.
SPRING CITY (UPI) The
Tennesse Valley Authority has
taken steps to ensure that all
welding work at the Watts Bar
Nuclear Plant will be inspected
according to government stan-
dards and 1,600 construction
workers will return to work, ac-
cording to TVA officials.
Welding at Watts Bar was
suspended Aug. 21 and more
than half the construction
workers on the site were tem-
porarily furoughed pending re-
evaluation of the welding pro-
gram.
The Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission reguires utilities to in-
spect welders' work at specified
intervals, and TVA was not
following regulations.
Continued From Page 1
Job Outlooks Skeptical
r
bandwagon too
into a glutted
jumped on the
late, and exit
field he says.
Colleges should
warn students of
levin contends.
"It's not all that difficult to
project, because there's typically
la seven-to-nine year cycle bet-
do
the
more to
changes,
ween when a discipline is in de-
mand and when it reaches its frui-
tion he says.
Liberal arts majors, recenth
thought to have the worst job
prospects of anyone, enjoyed the
most improved job market this
year, getting four-to-seven per-
cent increases in pav.
Specials Good Thru Sept 30th
at Greenville Stores Only
2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscuit
1 Mashed Potatoes wGravy
$1.89
Locations:
600 W Greenville Blvd. 75A 6434
2905 E 5th St 752 5184
VOTE
SCOTT
THOMAS
Soph. Class
VICE-
PRES.
Hell Represent You!
Pi Kappa Phi
a
LITTLE
BY THE LAKE"
Announces
SISTER
RUSH
Tuesday, September 17 . . .
. . . Don Pierion Night
Thursday, September 19 . . .
. . . Beach Blast
AT THE HOUSE
803 HOOKER ROAD
For Information or Rides
Call 757-1999 or 758-1700
Before 6:00
LOOK
What's New For You
From ECU'S Student Union
N 5 I CO : Come See Wat ECU's Organizations Have To Offer
Wednesday, 10:00-3:00
In front of the Student Store
Sept. 18th
Films:
"Beverly Hills Cop"
Hendrix Theatre
Productions:
Sept. 19, 20,21
Dinner Theatre "Last of the Red Hot Lovers"
Sept. 20 & 21
Rm 244 AAendenhall, 6:30 p.m.
Tickets available Monday-Friday 11:00-6:00
Central Ticket Office, AAendenhall
ECU Students and Guest: $9.00 All Others: $14.00
NO DOOR SALES.
Call 757-6611, x266 for Reservations
Visual Arts Committee:
"Recent American Works on Paper"
Smithsonian Art Exhibit
AAendenhall Student Center Gallery
Travel Committee:
Sept. 21-Oct. 19
New York Trip
Hawaii Trip
(Thanksgiving) November 1985
Dec.31,1985-Jan. 7,1986
For More Information
Call 757-6611 x266
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
.��
I





�HI UM MQLIN1AN SEPTEMMRr
IW
Exchange Program Beneficial
By MIKE LI DWICK IK K. .n, u.f�; . W
By MIKE LL'DWICK
The ECU International Stu-
dent Exchange Program is a pro-
gram in which an ECU student
can study abroad and receive col-
lege credit.
Robert Hursey, coordinator
for ISEP said, "The purpose of
1SEP is in the interest of further-
ing world peace and understan-
ding and the promotion of an in-
ternational exchange of
knowledge
Hursey said that the ISEP pro-
gram benefits all involved. He
said that the students benefit by
coming into contact with another
culture. Moreover, ECU benefits
from the high academic stan-
dards of the foreign students.
Finally, foreign countries and the
U.S. benefit by dispelling the no-
tion of "dirty" Americans.
Hursey said that the "advan-
tages of the ISEP program far
outweigh the disadvantages.
ISEP opens up more than 60
overseas study sites to students,
which includes some of the top
rated universities in the world
Hursey said.
Other advantages Hursev
outlined were being able to attend
a foreign university for the cost
of ECU, excluding travel ex-
penses, and with careful planning
the student can receive academic
credit. However, Hursey said
that the experience itself is most
valuable. "The experience can't
be estimated in time or money.
You become much more ap-
preciative of your own
background. It's a broadening
experience Hursey said.
Hursey mentioned one major
problem with students enrolled in
the ISEP program is culture
shock, which comes with ad-
justing to a different society and
culture.
ISEP program information
states that any full-time student
who will have completed at least
one year of college-level work at
the time of placement and who
has a cumulative GPA at least 2.5
can apply
Honor System Explained
ByJERRIEMCCiOWAN
Nuff Writ
One of the goals of a univer-
sity is to achieve a high stan-
dard of integrity with our
honor system, said Ronald
Speier, associate dean for stu-
dent services at a recent
meeting of home economics
majors, entitled "Excellence
in Education
He said he would like for
ECU to improve the existing
honor system, possibly attrac-
ting better professors, better
students and better potential
employers to the school, who
often search out top students
for higher-paying jobs.
"I ask students to improve
their academics � to add
some validity to their degree
Speier stated.
Speier maintained that
education and discipline go
hand-in-hand. A student must
learn from the very beginning
that school is to be taken
seriously, he said. Ten years
down the road, a student
might be grateful for taking
that extra hour to study in-
stead of going to a party
Speier stressed that ECU
wants employers to have a
good word for us in the job
market.
The student's case will be
heard and the student has the
right of appeal, according to
the documents.
Phi Epsilon Kappa Fraternity
Presents
THE FIRST ANNUAL
Beach Volleyball Tournament
September 21,1985 at 10:00 and September 22, at l :00
REGISTRATION: $20.00 per TEAM
HOW TO REGISTER:
Send $20.00, Name of Each Team Member And Tee Shirt Size, A Captain's Name, Address
Phone Number -r
Beach Volleyball Tournament ln -e rtri , �:
Phi Epsilon Kappa PeLs�n ,n Front Of
HPERDDept. ECU B ne EU Book Store
Minges Coliseum � Between 12:00 and 2:00
On September 18th and 19th
REGISTRATION DEADLINE:
September 19, Limit space available
GIFTS AND AWARDS
CO�SPONSORS
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
The Trophy House
Grogs
Pantana Bobs
Get down to business faster.
With the BA-35.
If there s i me thing business
students have always needed,
rhis iv if an affordable, busi-
ness-oriented cab ul.ir r
1 he lexas Instruments
BA-35, the Student Business
Analyst
Its built-in business
formulas let you perform
i implicated finance,
�k counting ,tnd statistical
functions the ones rh.it
usually require a lot ai nine
ind i sta k of reference k�ks
likr present and future value
calculations, amorrizatii ns
and balloon payments.
The BA-5 means you
spend less time calculating,
and nn.re rime learning.ne
keystroke r.ikes the place
i t many
The calculator is just p,)rr
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a hxk that t( llows most
business courses: the Business
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professors helped us write it,
to help you get the most oul
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powerful combination
I hmk business. X
the BA $5 Student
Business Analyst
irj

Texas
Instruments
Creating useful products
and ser j � , ,r v
-INSTANT REPLAY
One Hour Color Prints
One Hour Enlargements
Overnight Black & White
and Slides
Overnight Portraits
Cameras and Accessories
Black & White Paper
and Chemistry
10 Discount to Students with ECU I.D.
(Excluding Cameras and Outlab Work)
We
use
PARER
for a Good Look
Instant Replay
The Plaza
355-5050
Open: MonSat. 10 AM? PM
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'Dungeoniiiastl
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is a
anc
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char act ei
througr
computei
tin
ment gone a
has
computer, l
Gwi
is lei
ref e
doesn't a
die" to a
ter M)
the incredil
tio-
immortc:
playmate
M �
HowT
f
i.
VWiV
I
Barbara and Dftlton Hcn dine al
The are served f� Michele. one
Off The Wire
Swa
Ck
stories
The
source
i
beer
(ion
4 a.m. Uu
ment �
more in
section calle
an effort to hr
even the mo
Seven former s
transcendent?! meditation are
suing the Maharishi Ma
Yogi for $9 millio ming
the mystic caused them perma-
nent physical and mental '
while trving to teach then
fly.
The plaintiffs, six men and
one woman named in the suit as
John or Jane Doe. sa thev were
disillusioned to discover that
"flying in fact constituted hop-
ping with the legs folded in the
lotus position
The seven are accusing the
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi of
fraud, breach of promise,
negligence and infliction of
emotional distress
The suit � filed in federal
J





plained
ak .
S
00
Address
To:
:n! Of
Store
and 2:00
and 19th
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ed. One
ie Elimination
sportsmanlike
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na Bobs
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IKPIUN V Mlt-KBIN
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I
en i to undergo seven
challenges (interesting, huh) Of
course, Excalibrate has the re
quired ability, so Mystema cap-
tures Gwen and forces
bratc to pla.
Armed with Cal (in a new im-
� ed wrist model), the first
begins.
I wo little Ewok-style critters
swipe Cal from an unconscious
Exca and run as he starts
vake (the chase is on).
xcalibrate follows then
ent temple. The temple ai
eated the sanctuary in
a giant sphinx-man
. edibly original'i
:11am has a gigam
�head that
ilts
ne, so does
Fogether, the symbiotic
lue laser bolt i
the ol' ruby Exit monster,
1 u. � as Mysten
. ith some i a
lied ghouls interested
in appetizer. Excalibrate fig
them to their
Ra
Rai .
Rat spit faces Excalibrate with
xcalibrate-the-Ghoul Ratspit
savs the ghoul is the ultimate
result ol 1-xcahbrate's defiance of
Mystema. Excalibrate doesn't
buy it. "This is only one of many-
possible ends he says (lights
Hash and bells ring!) This is the
magic answei Excalibrate suc-
cessfully, completes Mission Two.
On and on, 1 xcalibrate and
Cal ravage, battling hghtdragons,
heavy metal bands, Jack the Rip
pet and Co a mad slasher, cave
monsters, a fallen angel, and the
nants rid Mad Mav
movie Over hill and dale, almost
Grandmother's house thev
went
Finally, taunting Mystema
with such stinging lines as
"there's no fool like an old fool"
I "the word is: torge it the
athletic bxcahbrate gets a one-
on-one match with Mystema the
All Enflaming (and the audience
get .i no-win bout with 'the
lman').
So. how di :nd?
WHO ARES!
s Hint.
the i
They all eel n in
UNGCONMASreR
How To Handle A Hungry Man: Quincy's
Photo b 1 orin Pasqual
Barbara and Dalion Alien dine at Quincy's. a new. unusual steakhouse on Route 264 in Greenville.
They are served h Mkhele, one of Quincy's hostesses.
Off The Wire
Swami Says Fly Me
Bv MfPHKN sHfRBIN
and
BRIAN B1KRUHN
0.
fa
.
dim
It
steal but I ities
; e
s . i
dooi
the ma! ��
'v welcome along with
will
be completely sati; I
is taken b
ning women a;
cow. tray is carried
able bv istess
.phere is plea
classi music the
backgroun a ftini
. een in the ail V
all whai you'd expei ma
steakhouse
"Steaks and then some" is not
the empty nunto that one would
expect from othei steakhouse
town. As the meal appears on the
table, you know you're in for
�ks as uood as it tastes.
and it taste .
Quincy's, established in the
earlv '60s (and making stead)

� i


'�
agree

pop
trd oi rrans-VS

this yeai .i - 2fs
per )ast fiv
Plai
� .
LSI
But ba �
Quincy's
steak houses. i varietj
selections i

Q

tde Quit ight
lly, kind
It
.
irvive agu
ei ' �
aith
.
i e lines
. every night
d opening It's not
eve; trange bat they've at-
many return
tomers � e day - they've
pen.
rhey take pnde in their n
expect otl .�ee with
why we're proud
to beA C I I ABOVE
indeed, thev are.
mini-
me
-inter
nstant
� to the
. � . . ion, have
been a bit oj a relief on produc-
tion nights whi '� last until
4 a. m The I � � Depart-
ment wili be publishing the
more interesting 'blurbs' in a
section calit " The Wire' m
an effort to bring our readers
� n the most tri tai news.
� ��
Seven tormer students
transcendental meditation are
suing the Mahanshi Mahesh
Yogi for $9 million, claiming
the mystic aused them perma-
nent physical and mental harm
while trying to teach them to
fly.
The plaintiffs, six men and
�rje woman named in the suit as
iohn or Jane Doe. say they were
disillusioned to discover that
"flying in fact constituted hop-
ping with the legs folded in the
lotus position
The seven are accusing the
Mahanshi Mahesh Yogi of
fraud, breach of promise.
negligence and infliction of
emotional distress
The suit - filed in federal
court in Washington - claims
that increasingly lengthy cycles
tit transcendental meditation,
IM. caused the seven
negative emotional,
psychological and physical ef-
fects
"Because of the stress exerted
on the body as a result of the so
called practice of flying, (the
plaintiffs) suffer severe and
continuing pain" in their joints,
the suit says.
The Maharishi International
University College of Natural
law in the nation's capital and
an affiliated group, the World
Planned Executive Council,
declined comment Tuesday,
saying they had not seen the
lawsuit.
the local police at tins point. If
anybody was in an airplane car-
rying coke they wouldn't be fil-
ing a (light plan Barker said.
The skydiver was carrying
survivalist equipment, including
night goggles, knives and ropes,
police said. He was believed to
have died of massive internal in-
juries.
Authorities said an autopsy
was planned.
A skydiving smuggler carry-
ing more than 50 pounds o co-
caine with a street value of $50
million plunged to his death in a
backyard Wednesday when his
parachute failed to open, police
said.
Jack Barker, spokesman for
the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration regional office in
Atlanta, said no airplane ac-
cidents were reported in Ten-
nessee during the night.
"This would be a matter for
Charlotte Carle Duncan oi
Ocean Ridge, Fla is willing to
go to jail to defend her right to
air her clean laundry in public.
Duncan says despite a town or-
dinance and neighbors' com-
plaints, she will continue to con-
serve energy by hanging laundry
on her backyard clothesline. "1
don'l want to go to jail over it,
but I will she said. The town
code prohibits residents from
hanging laundry unless the area
is screened from the street and
nearby residences. Of nine
clothesline complaints logged
over the past two months, three
have been against Duncan. "If
aesthetics is an objection, I fail
to see what could possibly be
objectionable about the sight of
clean, colorful clothing cheer-
fully flapping in the breeze
Duncan w.ote in a letter to the
lown Commission. "If delicacy
is a probelm. I could dry the un-
dies inside a pillowcase '
Kenneth Young may have
been prepared for the snow, the
rain, the gloom oi night, but all
that walking apparentlv got the
better of him.
The U.S. Postal Service, ac-
ting on a tip from Young's
landlord, found 4.M4 pieces of
undelivered mail dated between
November W84 and April of
this vear in the former carrier's
apartment.
Young, 28. said he did not
deliver the mail to the East
Cleveland addresses because he
had sore feet, postal officials
said
Please See OFF, page 8.






8
I Hi- lSh VKUl IMAN
M Ml MHl k 17, 198
Prize-Winning Poet Will Read At ECU
Pulitizer-Prize winning poet Carolyn Kizer, of Spokane, Wash
By LOR1N PASQUAL
burukant fu�r
m ulitzcr Prize-winning
m poet Carolyn Kizer will pre-
sent a poetry reading and lecture
at 8 p.m. Sept. 23 at Jenkins
Auditorium.
Kizer, a native of Spokane.
Washington, has written several
books of poetry, including
"Yin "The Ungrateful
Garden "Knock Upon
Silence and "Midnight Was
My Cry: New and Selected
Poems
In 1959, she founded the jour-
nal Poetry Northwest, which she
edited until 1965. She served as a
specialist in literature for the
United States Department of
State in Pakistan from 1964 to
196: and worked as the first
directoi ol the literature program
tor the National Endowment for
the Arts during the following five
years
A graduate ol Sarah I awrence
College. Kier has served as a
fellow of the hinese government
in comparative literature at Col
umbia University and has lived in
Nationalisthina tor one vear.
She has also taught and lectured
in universities throughout the
U n t r - v
Kizer, fto, at husband,
John Marshall Woodbridge, live
in Berkeley,
Her appearance is made pos
hie by the EC! Poetry I orum, a
campus litera y group dedicated
to the discussion and criticisn
poetry written b) fI students
and faculty
Most group members, who
range from beginning to advam
ed writers, attend the informa-
tional meetings to have their
work critiqued
The meetings are on the first
and third Tuesdays of each
month in r
Anyone interested ii
should bring eifi
their work
lor n re
Peter Makuck E I P
I irun 1 �
�����������
Off The Wire
���������
Young, who quit his job in
June, has been charged with
obstruction of mail, which car-
ries a maximum fine ol $100 or
six months in jail. The
undelivered mail was found bv
his landlord in the garage of the
apartment building
"Young told us that his feet
hurt and he could not finish his
route said Portal Inspector
William C. Helfrich. "I asked
him whv he did not return the
undelivered mail to the post ol
flee, and he said he was afraid
he might get into trouble
Most of the mail consisted ol
dated circulars. Helfrich said
"We didn't gel m
plaint about non-delivery he
said.
� ��
Vn I nal Revenue Service
agent who "wa ; -
of I knowledj
of the nation's tax system to file
nearly 50 false returns asking
foi SI 15,000, a prosecutor savs
Assistant U.S. Attorney Tena
Campbell said Tuesday IRS
agent Gerald Has, accused ol
48 counts of filing false tax
returns and one count of mail
fraud, was bored and wanted to
buy an accounting firm.
"Mr Has was just plain sick
of his job, uist plain tired of the
Internal Revenue Service
PKKSr
dr. dennis a. o'neal
University Optometric
Eye Clinic
612 East Tenth Street

( an said Has
had be buy an
$120,000.
"(i , Mr Haw
d, ' W i 11 you Iower t e i 1
1 pa : �� ecutor

� ��
.
le
NEIL SIMON'S
LAST OF THE
RED HOT
LOVERS
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
BRO
A FUNNY-BONE TICKLER
ON THE SUBJECT OF SEDUCTION
The Student L man Productions C ommittee will present "Last of the Red Hot I oven "a eil Simon
comedy, on Sept. 21 and 22 in room 244. Mendenhall Student Center. The performance will he
presented by the Alpha Omega Players, a nationally acclaimed repertory group hosed in Rockport
8 things a man does
i a first date that make
me want a second.
1. He loses arguments gracefully
2. He opens doors for me and follows
other rules of chivalry without flinching.
3. He can handle his liquor.
4. He doesn't care if all I want is
a salad and a white wine spritzer.
8. He shaves.
6. He discusses anything but point
spreads over dinner.
7. He has enough confidence to
compliment me, and doesn't expect me to
immediately return the favor.
8. When he asks me up for an after-
dinner drink, he serves up Cafe Irish Creme.
POi.
3ran
mem or y
Kurt
LfcK
AAP
NEV
PI
$
L-

Celebrate the moments of your life
with General Poods" International Coffees.
MM
NBBpq
DATE: wed sept 18 TIME
Thur. Sept. 19 l ��� �
PLACE: ECU Student Store
Soving Include All Qvofity Mugs
iJHERFF jOMES
Ofrsfcm o C�u�tioi Company
Lowest Prices Ever.
MM
i
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I
PILOT
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ECU
tenhall
ending
pics '
call
��-r v
Optometric
Clinic
PKRSONAI.S
Of
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST O
a Mis
Room ;48 7
�STO
HE ARMY.
3U CAN BE.
DEAR THIEF
' " � �� person .
rtall Norfold Island
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� "ad That
for 15 : do not want to
friends
jddenly ac

RUSSELL J - ' ten and

neet? Contact me C I
SIGMA PHI EPSILON � � q Eps
iy, Sept
ers,
Golden �
BROTHERS OF PHI KAPPA TAU:
Psi Pie �-�� iss ap-
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1 to kir'
LYNN
an be
SALE
RINGGOLO TOWERS



FOR SALE
-
extr i � ipes,
� ' oro
3ram cassette.Programei s Aia,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference n S200 CaM An
thony at 757 636 '346
FURNITURE FOR SALE
mar' � �
nitore quick! Single bed, chest of
drawers, and chair for $75 Call Tony
at 757 0964
FOR SALE: Math Statistics 3228. All
problems worked in book and
workbook Call Bob 752 2579
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Skylark
Gieen and tan 4 door. Air
conditioning PS Am Fm Stereo
Tilt Wheel Great shape, $3,500 or
$500 down and take over payments of
$148 a month Call 758 2174 between
9am 5pm Ask for Tony.
WRITER'S BLOCK CURED: Send
$2 for catalog of over 16,000 topics, to
assist your writing efforts and help
you beat Writer's Block For info
call Toll free 1 800 621 57451 In II
linois, call Authors' Research, Rm
600 407 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL
60605.
NEED typing. Letters Resume's,
Term papers, etc Call Karen at
752 0498
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
fronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 530
WORD PROCESSING. We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU Students S
and F Professional Computer Co
� Back of Franklin's) 757 0472
THE MIDDLE MAN: Apartment
� ng Roommate Referral Service
210 E 4th Street Suite number 2
across from Sub Station II. Let us
help Ou fmd the apartment or room
mate you're looking for Call
830 1069
TYPING SERVICES: Provided Dy
professional woman with IBM Cor
rectmg Selectric typewriter
Familiar with all styles Call Debbie
'56 6333
MOPED FOR SALE: Puch Cobra
year old Requires no license,
' nsurance Great shape Sell
S500 Call 752 2496 after 6 p.m
s or leave message
FOR SALE: 1975 VW Beatie. Stick
�' �'� C Tapeaeck. fuel injection.
good condition Will enter
any reasonable offer Call
re 4 p m
1968 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
6 Engme Cheap, dependable
' � on 25 mpg 752 5260

TYPING SERVICES: Familiar with
formats proofreading and spell
orrections included Low rates
757 0398 after 5 p.m
PROFESSIONAL TYPING AND
WORD PROCESSING: Term
papers, reports, resume's, letters,
etc Reasonable rates. Call Teresa
a' 758 4509 work or 355 6794 after 6
p m
ABORTIONS LP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$v Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cos; PregnaiK Test. Birth Control, and
Problem Pregnano Counseling. For further
mation call 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
800-532-5384) between 9 AM and 5 PM.
weekdays
RELEIGH WOMEWS
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
fl7WMtMorgoiiV
RottudR
THE
HEADHUNTER
MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
RiVERGATE SHOPPI NG CENTER
A complete line of Roffler 8, Sebring Products
HOURS
AAONFri. 8:00to6:00
Sat, 8:00 to!2:00
9'9
"52 8855
re
HERFF JONES
Otviuon oi Carnation Company
Ever,
MARK WAIN
NEVER KNEW
PILOT PEN.
He wrote beautifully without our Razor Point marker pen
and our Better Ballpoint Pen .
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SEPTEMBER P, 1985
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICES: Word Processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as 11 75 per page, in
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I HI t-ASIAROt INIAN
Sports
SEPTl MHI-k 17, !V Page 1'
Pirates Down Bobcats 27-16
B SCOTT OOPK.K
Behind the strong running of
senior tailback I'ony Baker, ECl
defeated a tough and
emotionally-high Southwest
Texas State 27-16
Baker, who rushed for 164
yards dnd one oudoov,n on just
20 carries, led the Pirates'
second-half surge to overcome a
well prepared Bobcat squad
"They were taking away the
outside in the first halt Tons
Baker said. "At halftime we had
-iy and go outside
In the first halt, the Bobcats
began their opening possession
on theit 20-yard line. The Pirate
defense hen: somewhat, allowing
SWT to penetrate as ;ar as the
ECl 44 Then, alter a quarter-
back sack b Medrick Rainbow
kle behind the line b
Robert Washington, S"A i w,as
forced to punt.
With 10:53 left in the opening
od, Kevin Walker responded.
Walker's heavy rush resulted in a
blocked punt that he also
scooped up and ran 43 vards into
the endone. With Jefl Heath ad-
� the exi it, ECL1 quick-
7-0.
S 1 retaliated b driving' s4
plays
ed extra point, ECU led 7-6
ftei ECl wa ible to m
SW1 � heir
own 36-yard line. The Bobcats
moved the ball and converted on
a Jesse Williams 41-yard field
goal, taking a 9-1 lead late in the
first quarter.
Freshman Reggie McKinney
took the ensuing kickoff 63 yards
to the SWT 35. However, the
Pirates were unable to capitalize
on the good field position.
The ECL defense responded
again as Ellis Dillahunt in-
tercepted quarterback David
1 onghofer. His 12-yard return
gave the Pirates the ball at the
SWT 23 ECU moved the ball
close, but was unable to get in the
endone. The Pirates settled for a
Heath 21-yard field goal.
1 CU would once again
penetrate deep into Bobcat ter-
ritory. On a crucial third-down
play, Ron Jones completed a
52-yard bomb to Baker. ECU
now had a first and ten on the
SWT five-yard line. After two
running plays, the Pirates go!
their second Heath field goal to
take a 13-9 lead with 8:25 left in
the half.
After both teams couldn't
move the ball, EC U came up with
another turnover. Vinson Smith's
interception gave the Pirates the
ball in SWT territory. However,
three plays later, a Jones fumble
gave the ball back to the Bobcats.
The Bobcats then marched 78
vards in 12 plavs, elapsing 3:33.
A Longhofer five-yard pass to
Wayne Coffey put SWT up 16-13
at halftime.
"After the first half, we had to
calm down senior cornerback
Kevin Walker said. "We had
some errors in the first half, but it
picked up.
"I've been in situations like
this before Walker added.
"We're a good second-half team.
We responded and got into our
game plan
In the second half, the Pirates
wasted no time in regaining the
lead 20-16 on a Jones 15-yard
touchdown pass to Amos Adams.
ECU used 3:40 to go 75 yards in
seven plays, including a 47-yard
scamper by Baker.
The Bobcat offense looked as
if it might threaten, but the ECU
defense responded as they forced
SWT to punt.
The Pirate offense was also
forced to punt, after a clipping
penalty backed them up. EC I
gave the ball to SWT at their own
20.
The Bobcats were for real as
they took the ball to the Pirate
11-yard line. On the first play of
the fourth quarter, Walker in-
tercepted Longhofer at the one
and returned the ball to the Pirate
nine.
Despite a 27-yard gallop bv
Baker, the Bucs were unable to
move the ball thereafter. The
Bobcats then took over and mov-
ed the ball down field. The Buc
defense stiffened and forced
SWT to punt from their own 48.
The Pirates then took over and
showed their power as they drove
the ball 80 yards on 18 plays. In
their most impressive drive of the
game, the Bucs chewed up almost
eight minutes as Baker scored on
a one-yard dive. ECL took a
27-16 lead after Heath added the
extra point.
On the Bobcats next play from
scrimmage, Walker got his 12th
career interception. This iced the
game for the Bucs as they have
improved their home-opener
record to 13-2 over the past 15
seasons
Despite the victory, coach
Baker felt that the Pirates played
poorly.
"We didn't have the en-
thusiasm that we need for us to
play well Baker said "1 have
to do a better job to prepare this
team.
"We were certainly not in the
right frame of mind Baker add-
ed. "It leaves a lot to be desired. I
hope we learned our lesson
The Pirates are a perfect 2-0
and to keep that perfection in
tact, ECL will have to be more
than ready when they travel to
Beaver Stadium to battle the
Perm State Nittany I ions.
JIM LtUTOINS Tlvt F�, .
Vinson Smith (44) persues a Bobcat runner during the Pirate win
Pirate Soccer Team
Expects More Wins
Bv DAVID McOlNNTSs
Man Wrtlrr
As Stephen Brody enters his se
cond season as head coach o the
ECL Soccer Team, he hopes the
Pirates will make 1985 their best
season in the program's history.
Brodv expects the positive al
titude within the team, which lias
a solid core of returning players,
to help lead to a winning season.
The team, which has trained
since August ninth, loses only
three playe - from last year,
while at the same time gaining
some valuable recruits. Mac Ken
dall of Great Falls, Va. and Mark
Eliades of Edison, N.J. should
make strong contributions as
jtoalkeepers. Halfbacks Robert
in nation in 'S4), I N( Charlotte
(vwri Sun Belt Conference in
'84), American I nversity (top 20
in NCAA division I), and N.C
Wesleyan (12th in nation NCAA
division III).
Although some positions are
-till being contended for, the star-
ting lineup will look about like
this:
�Jkeeper George Podgor-
ny.
Fullbacks Mike Murray
(sweepen. Pa Golden (stopper).
Palmier drossi (inside), I arrv
Bennet (inside).
Midfield � David Skeff-
ington, Jeff Kime and Mike
Lugossy or Chris Lugo.
Forwards � still in contention.
Spikers Optimistic;
Seek Winning Season
B JA'ir I SIMPSON
surf wnirt
Things are looking bright and
shiny at Minges itn,
especial foi ECU's women's
volleyball team
Coach Imogen Turner. n
in her third season here at Ii
is ver excited about hi his
season
' Turner h
recruiting vear tha'
dream about She picked
main valuable plav �
to her three returnies. The varsi-
� -quad is composed ot the
foil. . eople: S Baker.
AJyson Barnes. Donna Davis,
I raci (.ail. Vickie Colder, v
Guida, Martha McQuilla-
Smith. Sandra Willis and i
Kandro'
( ach Turner I a
timistic outlook and � .
�vard to a successful season.
"I'm iooking forward to a win-
ning season coach 1
"I think we've .
the CAA Champions
The squad has alread
one serious
fson Barnes will be
the first ten matches H
ach Turner fee
do quite well, ban . .
injuries.
"The schedule
beginning Turn
'tie eas:
-
would like for evei
out and suppi
sea-
With the addi
�-u, the LCI Lad Pit
volleyball tea
their way Towards a suac
season. The Lady Bucs' first
Wednes
. N.C
W cieyan in Minges C
"Our conference is one of the best soc-
cer conferences around
�Stephen Brody
JB HIMBtKI )�K .fotuu
Good Head!
Second-year head coach Stephen Brody has set a goal of eight wins for
the Pirates this season, which would be a school record.
Larrison of Raleigh, Mike
Lugossy of Mercerville, N.J
and Will Podolak of Basking
Ridge, N.J. should prove very
valuable as well.
The talents of the incoming as
well as returning players will be
needed considering the Pirates'
'85 schedule. "Our conference
(Colonial Athletic Conference) is
one of the top soccer conferences
around said Brody. ECU's op-
ponents include: N.C. State (fifth
Brody is pleased by the effort
and performance of his team so
far. "Communication is better,
intensity is better said Brody,
"the big problem right now is
getting everybody together as far
as soccer sense is concerned
Brody has two main goals for
the team in '85; to score at least
two goals per game, to be 5-2 at
home and 6-6 away. "This would
give us eight wins, the most in the
school's history said Brody.
Sept�
Sep:20-21
Sept2
Sepim 2
Oci3
Oct.9
Oct.12
Oct.15
Oct.17
Oct.23
Oct.25
Oct.M)
Oct.30
Nov.1
Nov .i
Nov .j
Nov3
Nov5
Nov. 8-9
-
VOl I EYBAI I SCHEDULE
New esle
I C -Charlotte Invitational
iW c aroiina, I NC-Wilmington)
Duke
w ake Forest I nh ersity In1
tional
I Wake Forest, S . n, W.
Carolina)
Methodist
Atlantic Christian College
UNC-Wilmington
C. Wesleyan
Si Andrews
Methodist
Atlantic Christian College
Catawba
Sl Andrews
C oastal Carolina College
W ake Forest Universit)
UNC-Wilmington vs Wake
Forest
UNC-Wilmington
William &. Mary Invitational
VCL) vs Wilmington
VCL vsECl
Colonial Athletic Association
enville
( ha
Durham
Winston Salei
Greenville
Greenville
Wilmingt
Rocky Mount
t ireenville
Fayetteville
W ilson
Launnburg
rinburg
Greenville
Greenville
Greenville
W Hliamsburg
Greenville
Greenville
Fairfax.
Baker Happy To Win Despite Inconsistency
ByWc5sI�S�RMA was not pleased with the play of can turn the intensity level on and mented. "And we simply aren't a drive on the Pirate aoal line ��H h.nr �. . V .
By HI(kMtt()RMA(
( o Sport r dttor
I irst-year head coach Art
Baker was less than impressed
with the plav of his football team
Saturday night as the Pirates
struggled before defeating
Southwest Icxas Stale, 27-16.
"I was embarrassed to not play
any better than we did in our first
home game Baker said. "If we
play like that against Penn State
we will get embarrassed
The Division I-AA Bobcats,
the only non-Division LA school
on the Pirate schedule, outgained
ECU in total yardage (358-326).
Southwest Texas had a 20-16 lead
at the half before the Pirate
defense shut them out in the final
two quarters of play.
However a win is a win, and
Baker was more than happy to
come out of Saturday night's
contest with a perfect 2-0 record.
"I'm happy to play as poorly
as we did and still win the game
Baker said. "I think I did a poor
job of preparing our players for
this team, althougth I thought we
had stressed that they weren't as
bad as they looked last week
Although ECU did win. Baker
was not pleased with the play of
the offense or the defense. He
placed much of the blame on a
lack of intensity that was lacking
as compared to the N.C. State
game.
"There are times when you go
into a football game and the in-
tensity level just isn't there the
coach said. "Players don't have a
valve on their helmets that you
can turn the intensity level on and
off with. They either prepare well
and come out with intensity or
they don't "
Some will say that the Pirates
suffered an emotional letdown
after playing and beating N.C
State last week. Baker felt that
could have been a possibility.
"We didn't play with very
much enthusiasm Baker com-
JIM LIUTOCNS - TIM f til C.rotlm.n
Kevin Walker (37) blocki a punt that he returned for a touchdown.
mented. "And we simply aren't a
very good football team when we
play without enthusiasm
One area of particular concern
for Baker is the Pirate passing at-
tack. ECU quarterback Ron
Jones completed only three of 11
passes against the Bobcats, and
has hit on only 11 of 29 on the
season.
"Its no secret that in order to
be a good football team you have
to complete more than 11 passes
in two ballgames Baker said.
"The fault isn't all Ron Jones'
either. We have young receivers
and they still aren't being as con-
sistent as they need to be in runn-
ing their pass routes
Baker felt the keys to the Pirate
victory was two crucial scoring
drives in the second period and
some great individual defensive
plays.
Kevin Walker led the way for
the defense. Walker opened up
the Pirate scoring by blocking a
punt and retui ing it for a
touchdown. This was the second
time in two games ECU has
scored on a blocked punt. Walker
also intercepted two passes, one
of which killed a Bobcat scoring
drive on the Pirate goal line.
Walker attributed the blocked
punt to hard work, and said one
of his goals is to block a kick in
every game.
"Every day we spend 30
minutes before practice working
on blocking kicks Walker said.
"Last week on the block they (N.
C. State) let Ellis Dilliahunt go
free, this week (S.W. Texas State)
they picked him up so I was
free
Walker said the key to the se-
Toay Baker (43)
cond half was just a matter
getting the defense settled down.
"At times you just have to
toughen up Walker continued.
"We just had to calm the defense
down We're a good second-half
team, but we have yet to establish
ourselves in the early going
Walker's interception at the
goal line came on the first plaj
the fourth quarter, as the Bobcats
were driving for what would have
been a go-ahead touchdown
Walker felt the play was more the
design of good defensive prepa a
tion rather than a great individual
effort.
"I was just in the right place at
the right time the senior cor-
nerback said. "We ran a lot ot
good defensive calls and the
coach had me positioned in the
right place at the right time "
In addition to Walker, Baker
singled out senior tailback Tony
Baker. Baker, who rushed for
164 yards, could have easily net-
ted 200, according to Coach An
Baker, had the downfield block-
ing been better.
Coach Baker also singled out
See PIRATES, Page 12
Baker,
Heath And Ihr Record
Book v,
aga.
last
pla - � ki
time
190-pound . .
native a
in the P
field .
po;
career
be.
held r
222
yards
careei
klCr � '
sha
nv. �
ly
(it

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point
sch i
de;
89
( ARLFR s( OR1NG i IS!
1.
222
2 JI I
4
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k at
XP
42; 1
LG
BAKER AND IHr RK OKI;
BOOK
wa
Hig
16-1
anc
ed
ECl
The 5
now
yards d
mate :
the Cl
former New
Hid
Baker need
move into sixth pu
yards to take
Baker trail:
S
�- �
Pa
tim
The �
the seve
fell jus

1982
Nrc OND-H 1) Is 1
CHARM: EC
ven to be
half during
the .
In
Carolina S
S uthwest I"e�
voung Pira
allowed a p
half. Tha
shutout footba
N
State the f
just 152 va
the second hall
yards in
quarters
FIRM HMr MN( I 1
victor ovei N
State gives I
AREHXISG
MASSAGE
JLST 1
PHOSE CALL
AHA)
Misty Blur
Relaxation
Studio
A Al I
746-9997
I POLES SOUTH OF THt PLAZA
Private Roorm
�All Girl Staff
"Complete Body
Massages
HOURS
Mo�Thur�
11 a.m. - 12 Midn.o-
Fri. A Sat
11 o.m. - 1 am
Reopeno unde' e� Management






I Hf I S I AKOl IMAS
M Pit MM W
11
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cusori
isistency





'he
� : talker. B
it
Baker Baker, who rushed
164 .ould have easily net
�. cording ach Art
: the downfield blok
mg been better
Baker also Mngled out
Sw PIRATES. Page 12
Baker, Heath Closing In On Career Records
I he Record
nine points
Heath nd
Book W lh hi
Southwest rcxas State
Saturday night, senior
kickei leff Heath moved m
second pi.ice on c I 5 all
g list 1 he f 0.
pound Virginia Beach,
o accounted foi nine points
es' 27 16 victory (two
- tls and three extra
ves him 210
ti poil isl P shv ot
s all time
d is currently
npler with
20 and Is)
m 42 foi his
any 1 c I
Heath
ered the i field goal
h previous
3 H wns
:ason fie record
te field
1 e a s �
-
the
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( AKHRt ORING 1 IS!
1971 73)
3 65
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! 67
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OND-H l Y Is IHI
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vet North
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fense has
iring the sec
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tball.
�� n li fense allowed
a
fter yielding 191
irt(
HHsl IINU S1N E 1977: "he
ahwest Texas
E I a 2-0 record
� RELAXING
MASSAGE
JUST A
PHONE CALL
AWAY
Misty Slue
Relaxation
Studio

CAM
7469997

�' " AN �
8 MlltS SOUTH Of THf PLAZA
'Private Rooms
�All Girl Staff
'Complete Body
Massages
HOURS
MonThort.
11 am. - 12 Midnight
Fri. A Sat.
11 o.m. - 1 a.m.
Reopened Under New Management
heading to Penn State this week
It's a teehng not man) Pirate
teams have enjoyed ot late I he
last time .in ECU football team
was 2-0 after the season's firs!
two weeks was 1977 when Pat
Dye was head coach. I hat season
saw the Pirates open with a 28 2
victor) over North Carolina State
and P 16 win over Duke. 1 his is
onl) the 14th time in 50 seasons
oi intercollegiate competition
that ECU is perfect aftei its first
two games Three Pat Dye teams
did it (1974, 1976, and 1977),
three Jack Boone teams did it
(1953,1960, and 1961), two
Clarence Stasavich teams did it
(1965 and 1967), two Bill Dole
teams did it tls4s and 1950), two
John C'hnstianburv teams did it
(1940 and ls41) and one Sonny
Randle learn did it 11972).
Ml s STATE OY PENN-
SYLVANIA:Although this is the
first meeting between Venn State
and ECU, the Pirate are ver
familiar with, the state ol Pe
sylvania.
I his week's trip to Universit)
Park. PA, will mark
time in as mam years the Pirates
will play in the state ol Penn-
sylvania. I he 1982 and 1983
seasons saw ECU
Philadelphia to play Fempie
le las; season EC! di
17-10 decision to P
The Pirates are 2-2 vs the state
Pennsylvania, handing Temple
defeats in 1982 and 1983 while
. decision le Owls
1984
4ft IN A ROW:With its 6 s record
ol a year ago, Perm State extend
ed its record of non losing
seasons to 46, an NCAA record.
1 he Nittanv 1 ions last lost
more than thev won in 1SHH when
the record was i 4-1. Since then
Penn State has posted 26 straight
winning seasons( 1939-64), two
500 seasons! 196; and 1966) and
17 more winning seasons Penn
State is 330-103 9 since that 193K
season, counting its two victories
in 198V I hat works out to a
winning percentage
During those 46 seasons Penn
Stale has won a national chain
pionship (1982). played in 21
bowl games, posted unbeaten
seasons five times
(1947,1968,1969,1973 and 1978)
and claimed 16 I ambert
Trophies, which signifies college
football's Pastern championship.
NO. 24:Pc I 's 1985 schedule has
been ranked 24th in the nation in
a recent poll released bv N(
I he Pirates' 19S opponents
posted a 51-43-1 mark in 1984,
deleting any games played against
EC I Foui teams on ECU's 1985
schedule also made howl ap
pearances in 1984 Perm State
placed 4.Vd out ol 2 teams
r-inked as the Nittanv I ions' 198
opponents posted a combined
54-52 1 record in 1984 Penn
State also faces four teams in
1985 which made a bowl ap
pearances m 1984
IHK I AM TIME:Penn state
faced a team from the state ol
North Carolina was Nov. 6,
1982. when the Nittanv lions
defeated North Carolina State
54-0 in Beaver Stadium.
I he Nittanv Lions are 13 3 vs
the state ol North Carolina, with
15 of those 16 games coming
against North C arolma State
Penn State faced the University
ol North Carolina in 1943, losing
19-0
Perm State sports a 1 3-2 record
against the Wolfpack of N(
State, with the two losses coming
in 194 and 1975
WILL BK IHK BIGG�ST:A
crowd approaching 80,000 is ex
pected tor this Saturday's game
at Penn State, which would be
the largest rowd E l has e
plaved m front ol
I he Pirates have onl) played in
front of two crowds in excess ol
70,000 in the school's histor)
73,943 at Florida in 1983 (a 24 17
loss) and 73,800 a' So
( arolma in 1984 (a 42 20 loss)
Penn State' Beaver Stadium
seats 83,770.
t5?F
,ime
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Take Time-Out For Breakfast!
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and Robert Browning had
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And of course, she wouldn't have had to
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1985 AT&r Communications
AT&T
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12
1HI t -VM i Ki INKS
M I'll 1HI k i � 1985
Bomb squad
B JENNETTE ROTH
SMI Wrlln
Flag Football i shaping up in-
to quite an eent tor the Depart-
ment of Intramural Recreational
Services. Although top men's
pick BOMBSQUAD remains the
leader of the pack, outstanding
play from Jams LAGNAF and
McC.ARRFTT FIVE 0 have
charged the leaders in this ear
competition. Scoring the most
points in an game for the week
with 4" was 1 AGNAF, putting
them in fifth position in the polls.
McGARRETl 1 11 0 moves in-
to third. I AKI BOYS remain
number two while PI KAPPA
M PHA holds the number three
spot.
I asi week's 'Game of the
Week' saw the
SHAKEMASTERS and B.C.
EXPRESS score a total of 63
points in the second halt alone
At the halfway mark.
SHAKEMASTERS lead 12-0 un-
til both teams surged in the se-
cond hall ending in a 40-37 vic-
tor for the SHAKEMASTI RS
In the ladies' league, top pick
Pirates
Look To
Penn State
Continued from page 10
defensive lineman Medrick Rai;
bow, offensive tackle 1 im
Dumas, linebacker BubK;
Waters, defensive back Ellis
Di Hi hunt and center Ken
Bourgeois tor their pla in
victory.
Baker is happy to get this u �
behind him and now he must
look ahead to the challenge ol
facing a Penn State squad ranked
in the top ten b most polls.
"It's a great opportunity for us
to go up to Penn State and play in
front ol 80,000 fans and repre-
sent the university Bake said.
"We're going to have to
eliminate mistakes and pla as
hard as we can on every pla it we
are going to come out ol there
with a wm
� � � � �
IRS HOI RS
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F "a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 Noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F 3:30 p.m6:30 p.m.
Sat. p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. l p.m5 p.m.
M-Th
Fridav
Sat.
Sun.
M-F
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
9 a.m8 p.m.
9 a.m5:30 p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges
3 p.m7 p.m.
TRAINING ROOM
M-Th 10a.m12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Free Play
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m5 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
�4:45-10 based on availability
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
Memorial Gym 115
M-Th 9 a.m9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat H a.m5 p.m.
Sun l p.m5 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
RentalInformation Center
M&F 1:30p.m5 p.m.
Wed&Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
(Hours vary in accordance with
the seasons)
PERSONALS
To all of those who tried to tear down
the goal posts at State: it was a good
try. We'll have to make a better ef
fort after we beat Miami at
Homecoming, better yet, after the
Temple game in two weekends The
Fellas
ROOMMATE WANTED. Male or
female for three bedroom apart
ment, $106.33 rent plus !3 utilities
Call 752 2018, ask for Lewis or leave
a message
CHRISTIAN FEMALE ROOM
MATE NEEDED: To share 2
bedroom duplex S135 includes
utilities r a bath Call 756 8676 after
5:30
ROOMMATE WANTED: Close to
campus $147 50 month Heat and
water included plus ' i utilities Call
758 7643
I NFORCERS hold on with an
undefeated rocord while SI A
MAMAS take the number two
spot. IT EMING, DEI I A I I A
and KAPPA SIGMA STAR
Dl S i IRS round out the top five
m female gridiron action.
Co-rec softball registration
ended with, a total ol 2? teams
mixing it up on the diamonds of
ECU. last seat's champs, SKI
IP AND FRIENDS look to he
the leaders ol the season followed
b) DODGE CITY HI SI I ERS,
FRIED CITY GANG, I HP
NATURALS and championship
spikers, (,()()!), BAD AND PHI
I Gl Y.
Tennis singles registration end
ed last luesdax and the swingers
are out in full force this semester.
Over 80 students have registered
m tlie men's and women's
leagues, making one of the big
gesl tournament turnouts ever.
I ast year's men's intermediate
champion I homas Rogerson has
moved up into the open division
and will more than likely meet
some verv tough competition.
Sheryl Redman, now in the open
division, seems to be the women's
hopeful.
This week, be sure to sign up
for three on three basketball and
CO-rec tennis doubles Registra-
tion will be held in room 24
Memorial Gym. Call 757-6387
for more information.
And here's another IRS
newsflash. In the latest flag fool
ball action, BOMBSQUAD
de tea ted the W H I I I
SHADOWS 416 I AGNAI
flagged the INVADERS 25-8 and
the SERIOUS DOGS dogged'
the CYCLONES J2-18 Garry
Bishop, all-star for the BOMBS
QUAD, singlehandedlv pounded
the WHITE SHADOWS with
three interceptions and three
touchdowns. All this action wa
held Sundav night on
gridirons adjacent to F- is. r
Stadium.
Ik sui I foi the Out-
R n enter's
ip to the Uuharrie
Nati � i I oresi October 11,12
and 13 Registration deadline is
ibei 4 I he Department ol
Intramural Recreational Services
id venture of a
it your camping
equij and ii in
I national outdoor
recn � room 11
The IRS out-
BBHBSSBSHH -mWpV VlTU
" rn WALL PRICE
703GRE1
P&Q BRAND
Sandwich Bread
' j 24 OZ-
V 4t loaves
89
C
LIMIT THREE with COUPON BELOW
AND ADDITIONAL 10 0C OR MORE PURCHASE
asss
MARKET FRESH
U.S.D.A. CHOtCF
Ground Beef Chuck Roast
5 lbs. or
x"vtmore
SAVE
71c - f

,
lb.
GROUND FRESH DAILY
88
0
CRISCO
REGULAR�BUTTER FLAVOR
Shortening
30c
3 to.
Ill
can
LIMIT ONE WITH AK VOiTiONA. 10 U0 OR MORE PURCHASE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
LIQUID 5'OFF LABEL
Clorox Bleach
58c
CALIFORNIA SEEDLESS
White Grapes
0
3 SAVE y,
40s �
"MA
lb.
39
�s -v Bone
SAVE
81
In
C -k
�,
lb.
88
c
FRESH
Fryer Breast
"f SAVE
? 81c
WAREHOUSE PRICES
WAREHOUSE PRICES
SAVE
60' gal.
" jug
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
CHED-O-BIT
Fort6 Slices
US D A CHOICE
I SAVE
30G

8oz.
pkg.
89
0
Vt
Rib Eye Steak
1
SAVE
01 ib f Boneless
t�
v-a
Cocktail Juice
FWANCO AMERICAN
Spaghetti
VAN CAMP
Pork N' Beans
6
314
(
4
4
6 oz
cam
75oz
8 02
can
3 oz
ARMOUR
Potted Meat
REGULAR � THIN � VERMICELLI
�� SAVE .
Spaghetti m�
lb.
A4P
Cream Cheese
DEANS FRENCH
Onion Dip
KRAFT
American Singles
LIGHT N LIVELY
Cottage Cheese
8 oz
cln
16 oz
ctn
12 oz
pkg
12 oz
ctn
79fly
79TiJ
169?y
797�3
398
General Merchandise Specials
MOTOR SUPREME
Motor
Oil
SAVE
qt�
1
00
59
'CPI
A&PCOUPON
P&Q BRAND
Sandwich Bread
AT
24 oz.
loaves
bHTJCKU? COUPON AND ADOmONAL
10 00 OR MORf PURCHASE
GOOO THRU SAT SEPT 21 AT A4P
657
ALL VARIETIES
A&P
Pizza
DONALD DUCK FROZEN
Orange Juice
BANQUET
Cream Pie
ANN PAGE
Handi Whip
SAVE
; 20
PREMIUM
Gallo Wine
REGULAR � LIGHT
Old Milwaukee ��
1 w
10 oz
pkfl
12 oz
can
14 oz
12 oz
ctn
3ltr
Ml
79
99fcTj
891fnj
79.
4"gij
General Merchandise Specials
Fine
Porcelain China
EXCLUSIVELY AT A&P
Royale Aurum Genuine Gold Bands or
Crown Platmo Genuine Platinum Bands
M.00OFF
Fine Porcelain China
Completer Piece
X�.
each weekly place
setfng piece only
79
� BlF purc
DELI SPECIALS
SLICED
j Beer
v
ctn of
�. 12 oi
4
49
Boiled HamB 189
FRESH BAKED
French Bread
14 Oz.
lo�l
49'






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Title
The East Carolinian, September 17, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.424
Location of Original
University Archives

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