The East Carolinian, September 12, 1985






tttoe lEaat (Earnltman
Serving the hast Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60 No.6
Thursday, September 12, 1985
Greenville, N.C
12 Paes
Circulation 12,000
In Effort To Control Noise
City Rule Affects All
Blow 'Em Away
TONY RUMPLE ECU Nws Bur�u
Marching Pirates are Hearing up for ECU's first home football game. After iast neek's vic-
tory in Raleiuh. both the football team and the Marching Pirates are practicing to blow away SW
Itxas Mate I niversitv this Saturday. Go Pirates!
Co-Op Program Benefits ECU
Bv V1IKK I I )W( K
a hiie
M
onlv
Bai aid hal every one m
volved in the co-op process, the
facuh and the student
i

i
. -
eedl ack
al process. Also,
by closely working with an
employer the faculty benefits by
iring current with an increas-
gly changing business world.
I I e student benefits are
tid Barrett. "They in-
earning money to help
defray college expenses, gar
il e experience, the oppor-
tunity to put something nice on
the resume, receiving academic
credit, and there is alwavs the
ity of being hired per
manently by the employer
As lor tiu- disadvantages ol a
co-op experience, Barrett said
there are a few However, they do
outweigh the advantages,
Barrett said.
Foi the student, Barrett said
there are two mam disadvan-
tages One is the necessity to
delay graduation, because
employers usuallv demand two
k terms The second major
disadvantage of a co-op ex-
perience is the strong likelihood
t.lat a student will have to
relocate
"The major disadvantage for
the employer Barrett said, "is
with training the student. But
that is a problem with any new
employee "
Barrett stressed that although
the disadvantages might seem
great, the co-op experience is very
valuable. "There is no com-
parison between the benefits and
disadvantages said Barrett.
He added, "The job market is
so competitive that without the
student going through .oop, it
would be erv difficult to uet a
job in a high quality business or
government agency
Next, the student must attend a
seminar that explains the
mechanics of the co-op process.
Finally, according to Barrett, the
student will sit down with a coor-
dinator and find a job. Barrett
added that the Co-op department
is open to all students; freshman
through graduate students have
found interships through the Co-
op department.
By DOUG ROBERSON
Staff Wrllrr
Fraternities, sororities, and
party-lovers in general should
consider Greenville's noise con-
trol ordinance before they "turn
up the volume" on their next
bash.
Greenville Police Chief Ted
Holmes said the city's noise con-
trol ordinance was established
with the interests of ECU in
mind.
"Greenville's noise ordinance
was worked out as a compromise
between the city and the Universi-
ty Holmes said. "We feel there
are fewer problems when
everyone involved works
together
The city's noise ordinance
classifies fraternity and sorority
houses as "residential" property.
This means fraternity and sorori-
ty members must obey the noise
ordinance just as other single-
family (house) and multi-family
(apartment) dwellers do.
The ordinance sets the noise
limit tor residential occupancy at
60 decibels between 7 a.m. to 11
p.m. and at 55 decibels from 11
p.m. to 7 a.m. "That's not verv
loud at all said Holmes,
Fraternity and sorority houses
can "boost" these noise levels bv
obtaining a special permit Also.
according to the noise ordinance,
each fraternity or sorority can be
granted one permit during the fall
semester and one during the spr-
ing semester.
The permits may be obtained
through the University by contac-
ting Betty Hardy. Director ol
Services, Mendenhall Student
Center at "57-6611.
With a permit, noise levels up
to K5 decibels are allowed. These
levels are measured from the ad-
joining property lines. "Even
with a permit, the acceptable
noise level isn't verv loud
Holmes added.
Holmes said the police depart-
ment doesn't specifically go out
to look tor parties with excessive
noise. "We don'i .heck unless we
get a complaint from someone
When the department receives
a complaint, an officer is dispat-
ched to the scene, "first, out
ficers will work with the students.
tell them there has been a com-
plaint, and ask them to turn the
noise down said Holme
It a second or tl .tint
led, the officer will re
the scene with a decibel meter.
"At this time the officer can issue
a citation or give the people
another warning � it's his discre-
tion Holmes said.
"If we go out a third time,
they're going to get a ticket he
added.
Holmes' advice to stude:
who plan to have a party is to talk
with their neighbors. "This will
give the neighbors time to make
plans, rather tham be surprised
by the noise he said.
Holmes said that the police
department is always willing to
help students who are worried
about potential noise problems at
their parties. "We'll be glad to
send an officer out with a decibel
meter to check the noise level
Holmes added that excessive
noise isn't the only problem en-
countered with parties. "We get a
lot of complaints about people
parking in the neighbors' drive or
walking through the neighbors'
yard.
"By law. the fraternity or
sorority is responsible for the a.
tions of everyone at the party �
regardless of whether the guests
were invited or uninvited he
said
Holmes said he strongly ei
phasies fraternities, sororitie
anyone giving a party to be aware
ol guests who have had too much
drink.
GOP Senator Recuperating
Group Promotes Success
Bx IH)l (, KOIII Ks)
�. el lenc e
a ademic
� the
H noi s icieties, said
� Melody O'Bl
I '� ! . of H
' one or two
Acs from each of the
�:i cam-
pus. "Right now our mam goal is
ave at least one representative
trim, each ol the honor societies
the Council said O'Brien.
"Our vice-president, Leigh
Ann Boub, has sent a letter to
honor organization not
already represented, inviting
them to our next meeting
O'Brien added
O'Brien said ECU has needed
an honor council for many years.
'The social fraternities and
sororities have their own council
and their events are fairly well
publicized � but very little is said
about scholarship and academic
activities going on around cam-
pus she added.
O'Brien said the Council has
generated a tremendous amount
o support from the faculty.
"Chancellor (John) Howell and
Vice Chancellor (Elmer) Meyer
HONOR, Page 6
I I PI) Sen. John
East, R-N.C remained home in
Greenville when the Senate con
vened after its August recess,
fueling new rounds of specula-
tion that illness would prevent his
seeking re-election.
"You'd like to have your cam-
paign underway said Carter
Wrenn, executive director of the
National Congressional Club.
"If he becomes a candidate, he's
going to have to deal with the
issue of health and vitality
East missed six weeks of Senate
work last spring because of a
hypothyroid condition; but
gradually was resuming his duties
and was working virtually full
time hen the Senate took its
break in early August.
"My understanding is John
had some sort of reaction to the
medication Wrenn said.
East confirmed that the persis-
tent problem could play a role in
his decision to seek re-election.
"It could bear on that, yes East
said from his home. East's press
aides in Washington said he
would not return for at least a
week.
"All I know is he won't be here
this week said Jerry Woodruff,
last's press secretary.
A statement issued bv East's
V ashington office �a d, "Dr.
Donald Tucker, Senatoi East's
Greenville physician said the
senator requires additional Mme
at his Greenville home in order to
return to full strength in the wake
ol his recent illness
"I really would like to take a
little additional time to get tullv
operational 1 asl told The
News and Observer of Raleigh.
East has already missed several
votes since the Senate convened
Monday, including a vote to close
debate on sanctions against
South Africa and a vote on
legislation filed bv Sen Jesse
Helms, R-N.C. to restrict court
intervention in school prayer
issues.
But asked whether health pro-
blems would force him to resign.
East said "No
A polio victim who uses a
wheelchair. East was hospitalized
April 20 to May 21 for treatment
of a hypothyroid condition. In
February, he had undergone
surgery to remove a blockage in
his urinary tract.
East resumed duties part-time
June 6, but said he is "not as
Professor Discusses Students' Cheating
strong as you would like to he
and decided to remain home after
the recess
"The principal problem is
hupothyroid condition which
drains me substantiall. I Last
said. "What I've been doing is
getting back over the impact of
that
Hypothyroidism involves the
failure of the thyroid gland to
produce hormones necessarv to
properly regulate the body's
metabolism. East's doctors have
said he has a severe form of the
disorder.
Tom letzer, chairman of a
committee East authorized to
chair a re-election bid, said no
decision had been made on the
campaign.
"We owe him the time to
recover to the point where he
feels confident in making the
decision Fetzer said. 1 think
he'd like to run
East is a former Political
Science instructor at ECU, Any
get well messages for the Senator
should be addressed U.S. Senator
John East, 215 Sou;h Evans St
Greenville.
Bv Bf IN WHK KKK
' trie most
ng a student can do in
om is i it. V hile
some get away with it. most
nd usuallv the guilt stavs
with the student for some time.
vMiat about the professor0
er than asking students to
pledge their honor not to cheat
during exams � papers,
there is little he or she can do.
"Nationally, x percent .if col-
lege students have cheated ac-
lii g to Ronald Speier,
associate dean and director of
Student Services
In an informal survey, five out
ol the ten TCI. students admitted
heating at one time during
their college career Many of the
lents also said they were reluc-
tant to tell a stranger what they
had done.
I ast year, 20 ECl students
were taken before the Honor
Board last vear on charges of
cheating in some manner. Most
of these students received an F in
the specific course as a penalty,
and only one ruling resulted in
the suspension of a student.
��,
Suzy (not her real name) was a
bright "Astudent who par-
tis ipated in class discussions and
made a 100 on her last major test
in a sophomore level literature
class. The night before Suzy's
literature test, she opted for a
night out rather than a study ses-
sion for the next day's test. Suzy
prepared for her literature exam
by making cheat notes.
Lucy Pake, an ECU English in-
structor, caught Suzy cheating.
Pake said her reaction as "sheer
disbelief" when she caught Suzy
cheating. How could she do
this to me?' I asked "I suppose
I had fooled myself that I was too
good a teacher to find blatant
cheating on a major test
The incident led to Suzy getting
a zero on the test, and Pake in
vestigated teacher's alternatives
to cheating in an article called
"The Cheating
She found little information on
dealing with cheating. "Student
teaching instructors never bring
the subject up; educational
psychology classes may brush
over it or ignore it as well; ad-
ministrators are not inclined to
address the problem said Pake.
"But while heads burrow deeper
into the sand, academic cheating
perpetuates in the real world of
the classroom, and teachers must
be able to deal with it Pake
said.
Pake, a former ECU student,
said she consulted her own
psychology textbook and found
that cheating was not even men-
tioned in it. In a later editions of
the same book. Pake found a
two-page discussion on high
school students self-examination
after a widespread cheating inci-
dent. The article recommended
that teachers "respond to the im-
mediate situation and deal with it
in a way that will not provide im-
plementing long-term action
The book also suggested that
teachers view cheating as a
"negative pressure which can be
eliminated. "This statement is
just another attempt at placing
the blame for education's pro-
blems squarely in the laps of
teachers said Pake.
Pake discusses the cheating
syndrome in her findings of a
1975 student-faculty survey at
North Carolina State University.
"Most cheating involves activity
during test taking � copying
from others, giving aid or crib
sheets � or plagiarism through
students.
The faculty at North Carolina
State also rated the practice of
stealing exams as high Pake
said.
Academically violating the
Honor Code at ECU consists of
the following:
� Cheating � unauthorized aid
or giving or receiving of unfair
advantage on any form of
academic work.
� Plagiarism � copying the
language, structure, ideas, and or
thoughts of another's or using
one's original work. Falsification
� statement of any untruth,
spoken or written, regarding any
circumstances relative to
academic work.
� Attempts � Attempting any act
which completed would con-
stitute an academic integrity
violation as defined herein.
"As students and technology
become more sophisticated, so
does cheating she said. In a
1980 U.S. News and World
See CHEATER, Page 3
Cheaters Never Win
J � MUMIHT - ECU POOH L��
National statistics show that 85 percent of college students admit-
ted to cheating at one time or another during their college career.
At ECU, an informal survey revealed that five out of 10 students
have cheated on a test. Educators remain baffled as to why students
do it, but one ECU professor offers her opinions. See related story
page 1. Note: This student's face has been changed to protect his
innocence.
?wr.
f
I





NEW POLICY
SEDUCTION IN
ino tiny I
be folio-
A H 01
Because of) �� red sp,
itevote to announcement
guidelines are heretofore u
groups ro departments si ! � ��
lourKement
�ALL ANNOUNLtViN- e v
WILlBEPRiNTtO.f SPAu
�ANNOUNCfcWfcNt lO�
ORGANl7AT,ON A rH RUN IN ONc
ONE EDITION OF IMF t AS
NiAN
�When space limitationi ea 11 is �� . , � �
oo �he moii recent announcer
following s- wn , h v ending
importance I will be printed . , A
deviation from "lev
�Campus organliation meet
�Academic announce � . �
etc
� mtramura1 and
�Co op employ mer" .
�Church and relig
Arcctty pertaining ti students
�All campus pa" es not devoh
�Club or fraternity cm tororitt . � � . ��
are devoted fo i ri � . j
�Other annoor'cenAev vered �
the above rules but that an
There II he absolutely n
messages printed in this s,v I or A Is
fast Carolinian reserves'f � j � � edit a
nouncrments lor non ess,��� 1 ft �
grammar punctuation spe
or .be'
MEDITATION SEMINAR
A med.tat
beu" �� ad � � � nei la �� � �
oevji" at T p m on jesja t-v �� oei
the (oHeehouse ot the v. � .
center A donat.on of 1
IK) from others s request �
course Viart Ruth Blackwel
cou-se under 'he sponsoi � . � ��.
Suddh.st Mediation a ���,� Study
PHI ETA SIGMA
MENDENHALL
" � at September
i Red Mot i overs Dinner
�e's Contact central Ticket Of
aenhall student Center 757 411
' he student un.on Productions Commit
Bv
fee
AUDITIONS
lot Madnyai Dinners Mag,
Jugglers Mimes or the like tor
an Era style of entertainment
eld on sept 25th 4 5p m
�"� '4 30 pm For appointments or
� �� � Union Office tszaan
� � � .
SISTERS
PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE
�� '
ECU SURFING
" s ii �� at 10 a m Sun i
� as You cai �� .
��i meeting last week
� ' ' ' it � a. �� ght ano
� '��� at 8 00
' � ' � - � v � . �
evtew f a surf movit
A rne to attend
PRIENDSOF ECU LIBRARY
-
� . .
ited -
an ��
ts first
l -
� Eta S-gma a � a
Thursday September
September ?) a,i membt
fenc tn.s meeting rt
Mendenhall
SENIORS GRADUATE
STUDENTS
information abou' the
anu Placemen- Service ca .� ��.
Meetings tor all students �.�
Septembe' � at 3 p n v, �. � . 144
September at 4 Rawi
September I2af3p n Raw
t'on Recruiters and Res �
K beo
POETRY READING
pdu Aade p � v.
ft s Monday at 8 3i
rtrove c ubt p'siSth ano Eva
"�� u"eas - if �
'Vi, .
�gfoti l - ,
APA FRATERNITY
if h t n their Marc I �
t the A pa � � �
��� �
������
img and Brewsti
. .�
Rewi
tChurchw .
� � � witl
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ent. the v �
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COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
� � ' . I the i .
- � . v ppt ia at 8 p n
' � �� - enter Rm ?2l Our
o e a k e t � � s �.
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N C STUDENT LEGISLATURE
THE EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE I �
, I. Vt lit s
A SI ANON Of sSi , vNi i, i IMI US I'llUI HI I I ), y
n n c,k r �
YcXe Kv PHE THREE 0ft
- STE
VC. II, i �
iii
Oc lobei g iy at h 1 S p in
Octobei 1 t 2 1 in
Julu

. DANCE
The Learned THEATRE
l.adit'S I . bruars �
Mai, ti I I I
f rbruan 1 15
Call: (in (ireenville) 757 6390
Writ: (,f ntrral Manager East Carolina Playhouse. ECU Greenville NC 27834
Come By:Mrtsnl Theatre Arts Center. 5th & Eastern Streets. r
Monday through Friday. 10 00 a m 4 00 p m
mmmux
Any student intrested in serving
on Honor Board or the Academic
Integrity Board should fill out an
application for these positions by
Monday, Sept. 16, 1985.
Applications are available in the
S.G.A. office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Be a Part of the
best Student Judicial System in
America.
, f0��0000�000�0oQi
900000000000000000000
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11


(MANUAL BAPTIST
CHURCH
invites
ALL STUDENTS
to Sunday Worship
with
College Sunday School at 9:30
Worship Service at 11:00
Sept 15 Luncheon immediately
following the Service
Imonuol Baptist Church
1101 S. Elm St.
Announcements
Cheaters
ontinued rrom Pae )
AH members are reminded of the donut
sale this Saturday morninij This is a very
important protect Meet in the Venoenhaii
parking lot nearest Rmggoid Towers at 8 00
to picK up donufs We will meet in
Mendenhall 221 Monday at p m An
freshmen contacted at orientation and other
interested students are encouraged to at
tend it there are any questions please call
Glenn Perry at 752 0414
MASS ON CAMPUS
5 30 p m Saturday at the Newman
Center 11 JO a m Sunday Biology Cec
ture HalKRm 1031 9 00pm Sunday at
the Newman Center
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance win hold
its first meeting of the semester today at
p m m room 247 at Mendenhall Student
Center We will have a speaker Ms Jackie
Hawk.ns from CSO to speak about what CSO
can offer us This meeting will not be long so
all members and interested guests are en
( our aged to attend
ECU STUDENT UNION NEEDS
CHAIRPERSONS
fhe Forum Committee provides lectures
debates symposiums and other related pro
grams Aletture featuring carry L.nvileon
V�a.s�m� Maior Frank Burns jno
more rias oeen scheduled tor November
The Travel Committee sponsors sue r �
as New York Hawaii ana Bahamas Cruses
along with the Travel Adventure F ,im
Series
Appl.c afions tor these pos,fiOns or for com
m.ttee meibershps on the Student unon s
twelve omm,ttees a" �. al � at the Stu
dent union Off'ce Rm J34 Mendenhall
Student Center For more information con
� �� e Student union Oft,ce at 757 6AII ex!
210
PRE MED
Alpha Epvlon Of � s preheaith pro
�rsvons honor SOC e �, A h�l(J IT'S .
meeting on Tues Sept 1? at 30 d m
room 307 Flanagan The aues' speaer A
be Dr Dean Ma,ft Director of a
�t the ECU school ot medicine Ac � lesv �
students are encouraged to a'tend There
, so be a AED officers meet . it
p m
ECU AMBASSADORS
Ai v nat
Wednesday Sept ie
enhali
1 gene' i � � ng 0n
at s 15 p m m room ?u

PSI CHI
ere be a Ps Cti meet ng or
Sept 17 at 5 30 p m ,n the P�- Ch
� � �'� � . urged
� '��
DO YOU LIKE TO CLOWN
AROUND
Show your spirit and be a r lown in the ECU
Homecoming Parade For more details call
Barhara at 7S� 4473
YOU'VE HEARDOF HOT AIR
BALLONS
Well we're ,nfo helium Anyone wants to
help with bailons for the homecoming
parade should contact Barbara Winfrey at
758 4473 no later than Sept 27 1985
BEING IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Here s your chance Any student
organiration that would l.ke to be In the 1985
Homecoming Parade should contact Bar
bara Winfrey at 758 447 no later than Sept
25
RETRACTION
The Homecoming Con �
� ng for entertainment for homecoming
weekend
LIESURE SYSTEMS STUDIES
SOCIETY
The Liesure Systems Studies S� ��. A
faye a kick off social Wednesday
September It at 7 p n � ��. vu.t, P,rpw
room at Mendenhall ,tudent Centef
me nteresfedis . �� �. For
-formation can the Lte�ure Systems
StuC � er,t 'S' 6484
PENN STATE CHARTER
trip p
� "�'� '� ' ' �5! caving from
�' ' ' f an ,t �
Feturn follow ng the foorba . � - . ,��
ne first set ,
" � �'
� ng �
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY
STUDENTS
Deadline for ma� ng appl a- 0- I � .
'he 1�8� profess,o , � . .
November 1 1985 All general collet �
OS . preregus-tes � I �
� '� I b. end of Spr.og I98� An.eo ��
Professions Admissio . �
on Novemt � p. n n deadline s Oc
'ober 19 Applications packet ire 1 tx
� I up dur r, p)
Tnerapt Departn t � ift
� . � �.�
STUDENT ATHLETIC BOARD
�� ���:�
' lent Centi
yellowbelt rank and above �
tend Begmnmg . lassis a, '� . I Any
questions a I hm� lot -s, '
ASSE RT IVENESS TRAINING
A rhrpe " wordsnoc Otter
�t no cost Hy " - � . ' ;�
S�ptemt�i 9.H rQ Or
tobpr 3 AM tnre? SSS'Ons a ' t OT I
�rom 3 pm 4 pm 1n UM ift
Anne ' 757 6661 Th� worksriOp a
htplping memMrs 0 Vr yu t �
rtssfrTivH agre&stve nno nonatM
h�haviors Par tic p�Ms CAR lrn how to e�
�"pspond To inttprpprsonrt! tttuatiOt
I ��� . i
M - ' �
STUDY SKILLS
prepai. �
-
Rep
,
SUB SIBTHT
PSI CHI
Ps C- "ifi"t!i"s havi not i
the r certiticati
library � intact a Ps ff � �
KARATE CLUB
Karati b�
��� � 's and ' �

� � � � . ,
"A Complete Meal On A Bun"
Buccaneer Theaters &
Substation II
presents
"The South Bronx Hero"
Order our new "Soutri Bra
ham, roast Dee rufiiev & � .se
Lg- M.19 Sm. $2 39
KEEP YOUR RECIPT!
Vyhy? Because ,f you order this sub or any of
our other 28 subs on the menu, and use your
recipt from Substation N at the Buccaneer
theater you get ,n for 12 price to see "South
Bronx Hero" starting Friday 13th
Eat in or Have it delivered
c 4th and �:
Adolesce
H i IA l)(k
Resume Photos
Register To
WIN.
A PAIR OF
BEER to
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
013 24 rirv
Pirate
Football
Tickets
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
Tickets For
Each of the
5 home games'
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
Ordm
t, I
1-r J
BUY ONE POUND
GET ONE POUND
Chip Dips
Mei
Unwasl
Basi
Shop Monday Th- I
" '
i
I





i SKILLS
i g
-
A Bun'
Theaters &
ation II
sents
a 39
RECIPT!
00
Chip Dips
$119
8" Individual
4 Pan Pizza
3 s5
UST MY SIZE"
ANTY HOSE
$-69
J
Cheaters Battle Right Versus Wrong
I HI AS I I AkOl INI AN SI HI I MHI k 12. !Y
Continued From Page 1
Report article, instances of
students cheating bv the use of
microcassetc tape recorders.
stvrage of exam answers in the
mcmor of hand calculators and
tin ear radios being used to aid
m passing an exam were cited.
"Cheating is widespread
said Pake. A 1979 Carnegie
Council report (used in Pake's
research) found that most
students had to cheat to receive
the grades the wanted.
Pake cited six reasons why a
student may cheat, getting her in-
formation from David Barnett
and Jon Dalton:
� Parental and university
pressure to achieve good grades;
� classroom environment in-
cluding test types, quality of pro-
ctoring and peer attitudes;
� student intelligence;
� the need for approval;
� confusion as to what con-
stitutes cheating;
� and the degree of sophistica-
tion of moral judgement.
Speier said he believes peer
pressure is one of the main causes
of cheating. "We at the universi-
ty level are not an elitist group,
but a microcosm of what's out
there. Students don't realize that
when they cheat, it reflects on
others he said.
"It lessens the value of your
degree he said. Speier also
pointed out that cheating can put
other students at a disadvantage
if the test given is graded on a
curve.
Professors are urged to bring
cheating cases before the Honor
Board. "Choosing to hand a
cheating incident over to the
school judiciary allows a panel of
other faculty members and
students to make an independent
and more objective judgement
Speier said.
Pake said she feels that one ot
the solutions to the problem of an
ECU student cheating would be
to report the cheaters to a central
bank.
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owaer
Adolescent Health Center Opens Doors
B LISA DVVYKR
Miff Wrilri
Pediatrics, under the PCI
School ot Medicine, has grown to
cover a vital stage in human
development � thai of
adolescence.
The new Adolescence Health
Center offers those - primarilv
age 13 through IS � with a
chance for health care treatment
geared especialK for them.
Resident staff member
Deborah Hayes said, "a person
in this age group is not jus! a
child. But. neither is he an adult.
We don't want them to sit in a
waiting room with a bunch of
crying children. Adolescents have
a whole new and different set of
problems According to Hayes,
"The center is representitive ot
the future trend in adolescent
health care
W hile primarily focused on
general services such as physicals,
the Center also offers services for
anything from acne to
gynecological problems. Hayes
said the Center can refer patients
for areas requiring more expertise
such as counseling for bulemics,
anorexia and other general
psychological problems. On
referrals, they only follow pa-
tients in terms of their general
health. "Others, such as suicidal
patients, are better handled by
the psychological department
Hayes said.
The Adolescent Health Center
uses the same fee schedule as
Pediatrics.
Resume Photos
b for S8.00
14 for $12.00
Quality at reasonable prices
Rudy Photographv
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Greenville, N.C
752 5167
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From Highway Patrol Siatian
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weekday
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917 W�t Morgan St.
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Good Selection of Reptiles
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PHONE 754-9222
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T-Bone Steaks lb. $2.09
Baking Potatos each IOC
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& oz bag & up
Buy one at Regular Price,
GET ONE FREE!
Regular or Diet
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Limit 2 with $10.00 or more food order
Additional Cokes 11.09.
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Kingsford Charcoal
10 lb bag $2.49
PRICES GOOD THROUGH SATURDAY,
SEPTEMBER 14TH
211 JARVIS STREET
2 BLOCKS FROM ECU
OVERTONE
Supem0
�t
-r 4 4 -f ' - s j j







�le East (Earnlmtan
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925
roM Norton, amummm,
Jay Stone wamtuta&iuor
HAROI 1) JOYNER, Co �,���
DANIE1 MAURER, ����,
RKK McCORMAC, comport,fito
Scot I COOPER, co-spomBmo,
Debbie Stevens, s
1 ORIN PASQl At . Emermmmtm Ethio.
DeChanile Johnson. w���,
Tom Luvender, ����,�
Anthony Martin, ���, ���
John Peterson. � M-Mfr,
Shannon Short. ����, ����
Andrew Joyner. .
Mike Li dwick. c� v�, &,�
Stephen Sherbin, ,��, �,�
September 12. 198
Opinion
Page 4
Campus Food
Afo For Thinking People
To walk into any of the snack
bars or vending areas on this cam-
pus is a monumentally depressing
trip. Certainly, it is not a journey
that an person who is even remote-
ly concerned with good eating con-
templates with relish. No, the snack
bars at ECU do not offer one of
Western civilization's finer culinary
experiences.
Yet, it is not the fact that most of
the food here is aesthetically drab,
cold and served with a profound
lack of imagination which inspires
these thoughts. The real absurdity
here is that an institution dedicated
to enhancing the lives of its students
and facilitating their growth
physically and intellectually would
offer them 50 different varieties of
dung to eat in its dining facilities.
Even a slightly health concious per-
son must be reviled at the sight of
rows upon rows of processed guano
so high in refined sugar that it
precipitates a bout with sub-clinical
hypoglycemia almost as soon as it is
swallowed. Though medical science
has proven that whole grains are
more health) for people than pro-
cessed grains our snack bars and
vending machines continue to
thrust white bread, nabs and all
manner of other nutritional absur-
dities upon us.
Indeed, it has been clinically
established that excessive sugar
consumption over a period of time
results in mood swings, vertigo and
even symptoms which mimic
psychosis in over 40 percent of the
population. In the absence of a
stable and healthy brain chemistry
how can the intellect be expected to
excell? Certainly it cannot. Hasn't
the absence of fiber in the diet been
sufficiently linked to diverticulitis
and cancer of the colon to compel
all thinking people to minimize the
use of processed grains in their
diet? Salt too, is an item that is in
abundance in the foods found in
our snack bars and vending
machines, yet it has been linked to
high blood pressure.
The ubiquitousness of this excre-
ment in our snack bars is, of
course, justified by the argument
that a private vending company
stocks them and gives the students
what they tend to buy the most of.
Vet, is it credible that student de-
mand will support the inclusion of
no more than two kinds of fruil and
only one kind of sandwich made on
whole wheat bread while there is a
veritable cornucopia of crap? One
is led to suspect that this is an in-
stance in which demand is being
shaped b the dictates of the market
rather than the other way around.
Of course it would be considered
extreme to suggest that the snack
bars should be purged ot all of the
poison that thev peddle. No one
here is promoting thai course oi ac-
tion. et. it seems entirely
reasonable to insist that more
healthy foods should be included in
student institutions which, in ef-
fect, have a captive audience. Othei
schools such as Guilford College in
Greensboro have acted to make
healthier foods available to
students. This university should do
the same.
Our student government has a
committee which is responsible for
overseeing the dining facilities on
campus. We urge them to take im-
mediate and decisive action on this
critical problem.
Conservative Arguments Flawed
Affirmative Action Fine
Meditation
There is no path to truth. One
must be free of all paths in order to
find it.
� J. Krishnamurti
MiCHAEI KINSI h
Ihf Nf� Krpuhli.
"We are greatei advocates � � affir
mative action than almost any .id
ministration that's comi . Bui
(we're) equally opposed to discrimina-
tion. Numerical goals and discrimina
non based or, numerical goals i
wrong So say Vti i ey Get ra Ed
win Meese
In the greai debate over affirmative
action, both s I kidding
themselves.
Supportei � t irrent pra
re's a nee between "goals"
and "qu( i ritics ridicule this
dist � Meanwhile, thev invent a
distil eir own: the dread
s quotas vs. some Platonic ideal of
disci ition free affirmative action.
I fie critics are right about goals and
quotas. In practice, government-
enforced "goals" lead to reverse
discrimination just like outright quotas.
Under current law. the only way an
employe! in be excused from meet
an established goal, base on the racial
breakdown ol tl � is by pro �
ing that every ci n in the hiring pro-
cess is essential to the job.
Since no hiring process, oi at least no
tood one. is utterly mechanistic and ob-
iective, tins burden of proof is near-
impossible to meet. So racial favoritism
is inevitable.
In August, someone leaked a draft ad-
ministration order repealing the key af-
firmative action rules for government
contractors. These rules, imposed bv the
Nixon adminstration in 1969. are what
made numerical affirmative action part
of American life. The draft order would
end the use of numerical goals and
would forbid the labor Department to
use racial statistics as evidence of
employment discrimination Yet ih
ministration insist, that it I
mative action.
" I rue affirmative a
per released la � I
19S6 budget, "K
quotas or preferential tn
So what is
I' consists ot "vigorous
ilified minority a e,
didates; encouraging (mm, � �
women) to apply tor opportunities in
ch thev have been traditionally
under-represented; identity , riers
opportunities (and) devisii ning
programs to overcome such barriers "
I"he controversial dra ler requires
all government contractors to hav
m,no' recruitment and traininj
gram. I his emphasis s intended to pro-
ve the administration's sincerity a
moves to eliminate goals and quotas
Hut this so-called "true affirmative
action hardly avoids the alleged poison
racial favoritism. After all. most
Americans MUild do better in the game
of life with a bit more recruitment and
training. I here are whites a- well as
blacks who miss opportunities thev
could benefit from There are men as
well as women who lack skills that
would allow them to prosper more
" I rue affirmative action" offers peo-
ple an advantage based on their race or
sex and denies that advantage to others
' the same reason jus! as surely as any
quota.
Just like the logic of hiring goals, the
logic of true affirmative action depends
on the false assumption that getting
ahead in America is a mechanistic pro-
cess. There is a stage called "opportuni-
ty at which special efforts on behalf ol
disadvantaged groups are permissible.
At the next stage, though, called "selec
r

!
"
-

' � ideration, alth igl
trily a
weight Got

se who
cipled
must abandon tl
ertheless support "tn
action nythii t . -�, does
the victims
illeged
start a
about whei
and.
horse.
I he trouble with this eleg
tion is that all admissions and hiri a
decisions come down to a "yes" oi
"no If race plays my role as a "fac
tor" it will be the determininj � m
some cases. In tl ose cases, whites will be
disadvantaged because of -heir race
Rebel Group Attacked By Former Contra
By EDGARC HAMORRO
In recent weeks the U.S. press has
reported signs of a dramatic escalation
the contra war to overthrow the
Nicaraguan government. This is a pro-
spect to be feared, not celebrated.
Nothing positive will be gained from
continuing to destroy the Nicaraguan
people and their economy, because the
contras in no way represent a democratic
influence on Nicaraguan politics. A
growth in contra strength to 20,000,
25,000 or even 30,000 men in the coming
months would only add to the suffering
of a war that since 1982 has left more
than 12,000 Nicaraguans dead. 50,000
wounded and 300,000 homeless. Will the
Reagan administration realize this after
30,000 have died? After 50,000? Why
not stop the war now0
The contra army does not represent
the democratic forces opposing the
FSLN (Sandinista National Liberation
Front). The FDN (Nicaraguan
Democratic Force) was created, trained,
financed and encouraged by the Reagan
adminstration, repeating the same in-
terventionist tactics that gave us Somoza
and the National Guard from 1931 to
1979. This U.S. proxy force is the seed
from which only new Somozas and a
new National Guard can grow. By
mid-1984, 46 out of 48 of the contra
comandantes were former National
Guardsmen.
In 1979 the FSLN united and led the
opposition that defeated Somoza. Six
years later the social achievements of the
new revolutionary society are many. But
some people in the FSLN are abusing the
original nationalistic concept, replacing
it with Marxism-Leninism. Many San-
dinistas have relied heavily on the Cuban
model, which has led to excessive
regimentation, planning and militariza-
tion. For example, the state farms, the
literacy and health campaigns, and the
CDS' (Sandinista Defense Committees,
neighborhood organizations) are carbon
copies of the Cuban experience.
Dependence on Cuba and the USSR is
too stong, and there are indications that
as U.S. hostility continues, Marxism's
influence among the Sandinista leader-
ship is growing. This has fueled
Reagan's Cold War crusade.
In 1982 1 became a contra leader, one
of seven directors chosen by the CIA to
lead the Nicaraguan Democratic Force
(FDN), the largest group fighting the
Sandinista government. At that time the
CIA told me that in only one year we
would accomplish our goal of
democratizing Nicaragua. I accepted the
job believing I was a Nicaraguan patriot
fighting for democracy in my homeland
with the support of the U.S. It later
became clear to me, however, that to the
CIA, I was just another employee.
As a spokesman for the FDN Direc-
torate in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, my in-
terviews and press contacts were closely
monitored by CIA operatives. The CIA
had advised me to be careful of the
"sharks" of the American press who
"only want to make news and sell
newspapers The CIA regularly sent
the station chief in Tegucigalpa a wire to
reprimand and correct what I was saying
to the media, as they did, for example,
on April 5, 1983 and Nov. 7, 1983. On
another occasion 1 was instructed to say
that the FDN's objective was to put
pressure on the Sandinistas to engage in
political dialogue.
In 1983 the CIA hired "Latin assets"
� mercenaries from other countries,
such as Argentina � to plant mines at
Nicaragua's Port Corinto. In September
the CIA station chief in Tegucigalpa
brought me a communique written in
perfect Spanish to be read to the interna-
tional press. The statement said that the
FDN was responsible for the Port Corin-
to mining.
After working regularly with the
press, I became uncomfortable with the
lack of credibility we had developed
from such lies. I felt that the FDN need
ed dignity and integrity with the press,
and I decided to challenge this deception
and tell more of the true story. I oppos-
ed the recommendations made in the
CIA "Psych-Ops" manual, which advis-
ed the contra to hire professional
criminals and to create martyrs from our
own supporters. I described to the press
FDN's cooperation with the CIA. The
more I asserted my independence and
honesty, however, the more I was dislik-
ed by the men I was working with.
When 1 complained about the use of
professional criminals advocated in the
CIA manual, a replacement agent told
me, "The mistake my predecessor made
was that he put everything down in
writing. Those things are done, but they
don't get written down It was this
code of secrecy and lack of debate on
planning that made me feel like a pawn
of the CIA. I realized that the FDN had
been reduced to merely a CIA front
organization.
Contact with FDN fighters on the
Nicaragua-Honduras border, perhaps
more than anything else, made me
decide against military efforts to over-
throw the Sandinistas. 1 was told that in
the contra war all prisoners were ex-
ecuted. A eomandante said that he had a
special rule of thumb to decide who
would live and who would die. If the
prisoner was caught with some ammuni-
tion remaining with him, he was spared
But if he had none left that meant he
had fired the last shot � that he had
fought to the end. He had to be killed
because this indicated that he was a
brave and committed Sandinista.
I learned that it was routine to seek
out and kill people working for the
Nicaraguan government. I heard
repeated stories of executions of in-
formers, collaborators, government
agency workers, cooperative workers,
bank workers � anyone suspected of
being a Sandinista. The CIA and the
comandantes believed that sabotage,
rape, torture, execution and other
atrocious tactics would terrorize the
population into supporting the contra
cause. Jimmy Carter's human rights,
they said, were "out" and Ronald
Reagan's big stick was "in
1 realize now that the FDN was born
in "original sin the original sin of
U.S. intervention. I thought I was deal-
ing with the democratic United States of
America. I was wrong. I did not realize
that anything the CIA does can be
denied. Everything was carried out in
such a secretive and totalitarian manner,
and the CIA operatives' view of history
was so simplistic, that I knew I was deal-
ing with the same mencans"
who carried out the dirty work of the
counterinsurgency wai against C
Sandmo in the '20s and 'Mis. These men
ould only make Nicaragua less
democratic. 1 would no! .ucept being a
puppet of their plans, and they fired me.
The I S contra war has only polariz-
ed the Nicaraguan conflict into two
hostile camps legitimate political
moderates have been forced to chose
between equally undemocratic sides If
they try to exert a democratic influence
within Nicaragua thev are perceived as
creating links to the contra and are
repressed. If thev join the contras thev
become tools o the CIA and I S in
t erven tion.
The Reagan administration's war to
"Americanize" Nicaragua has denied
Arturo Cruz, parts of the Catholic
Church, the business group COSEP, the
Conservative Party and other moderates
any real national reconciliation.
Democracy may never come to
Nicaragua if this policy continues It is
time to end the insanity of this war. Too
much of the countrv blood has alreadv
been shed.
Edgar Chamorro, who served as a
director of the icaraguan Democratic
Force from December 1982 to
Sovember 1984, has emerged as an
outspoken opponent of Reagan ad-
ministration policy on Nicaragua.
This article was exerpted with permis-
sion from In These Times, a bi-weekly
paper based in Chicago.
Writing Cei
"

I

rT:
o
� All Homeco
applications mus
Mendenhallj n
13, 1985.
�.4 Homecom,
Yvonne Move w
13, 1985.
'dm
Call Ahead(
Drive Thru
830-1530
Broiled Chicken
Barbequed Chick
Chicken.
: Chicken
W hole Chicken
Beet Kahob
Stuffed Fish
SALAD!
Chef Salad
Fruit Platter
Cold Plate
Califorina Saiad
SANDWICH!
Roast Beef, Ham on
(Your Choice)
AM im � - -ttj.
DESSERTS
Carrot Cake $.75
Froien
� � -





PNTRAS,
OR


I
? �

' a
Contra
Writing Center Begins Grammar Hotline
I HE EAST C AROLIMAN
Sfc PTfcMHER 12, 1983
B M1KK LllWKK
rhe ECU Writing Center pro-
vides a vital semce not only to
freshmen, but also to other ECU
students and facuk)
rhe Writing Center is under
the direction of Patrick Biaro,
who said the purpose of the
e entei is to prepare freshman tor
success hi Inghsh 1100.
"Some of the freshmen just
aren'l prepared tor English 1100.
40 to 4 percent of all freshmen
are really in need of extra support
m their writing said Biaro.
He added that many of the
freshmen did not have the skills
necessary to succeed in a
freshman writing class.
Bizzaro outlined three skills
that the English Department
agreed upon as necessary for suc-
cess. "One is to take a general
subject and narrow it � that is to
focus on a subject. Second,
students need to be able to follow
a pattern of organization and
stick to a topic. Finally, they need
to avoid major errors in grammar
and spelling Biaro said.
According to Bizarro, the
Writing Center uses a discovery
process to teach students how to
write. "If a student has problems
with writing, we will use some of
his writing instead of making
them work from a workbook. We
help the students discover the
answers to their problems said
Bizarro.
A new service of the Writing
Center will be the Grammar
Hotline, which he said will be
available to answer students'
questions about grammar. Ro-
seanna Lee, who Bizarro said was
ALL IE !
CO
A
:o
Deadlines
For
Homecoming
All Homecomming float, dorm and house
applications must be turned in to Jon Curtis (204
Mendenhall) no later than 5:00 Friday, September
13, 1985.
� All Homecomming Pirate candidates must contact
Yvonne Move no later than 5:00 Friday September
13, 1985.
see announcments
m ii, rr � �� r u , mmta rnniipwiMjtfMiiitfiniMaiUi mi n m Piimmni nmgi� mm �mini
"an expert in grammar will
staff the line. Bizarro added that
the philosophy of the Hotline will
be "to look up everything The
hotline is expected to begin in
about a week and a half, he said.
The Writing Center will con-
tinue to offer workshops on dif-
ferent topics. "We usually get
full-time faculty in the English
Department to give a presenta-
tion on writing that could be
useful to students Bizarro said.
Among the topics this year are
spelling, punctuation, use of
journals, editingproof reading
and writing anxietv.
Correction
In Tuesday's edition of The East Carolinian, an error in the
Parent's weekend article said a reception would be held at the
Chancellor's house. This is not correct. It should have read: A
reception at Mendenhall Student Center.
Also, in the same edition, the drinking age for beer and wine will
be raised on September 1, 1986, not in October as another stor
reported. We regret the error
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Fresh chicken marinated in citrus juices, a blend of
herbs, & other "secret" mgredents; then Char-broiled.
Barbeqiied Chicken Fresh chicken smothered in western style barbeque
sauce; then char-broiled.
1
NEIL SIMON'S
LAST OF THE
RED HOT
LOVERS
lew I
. ,lr'
l
It Fluence
� ed as
I and are
i they IA in-ivar to ienied � the ' athoiic ' )SFP, the er moderates
�liation.
m a �C me to
.araj.i tinues. It is
end !imt'his ar. Too
1 Sblood has already
it hamorro, who served as a
he uaraguan Democratic
��n�; December 1982 to
nber 1984, has emerged as an
� � n opponent of Reagan ad-
ration policy on Sicaragua.
This article was exerpted with permis-
from In These Times, a bi-weekly
oper based in Chicago.
Va Chicken$2.50
Chicken3.79
Whole Chicken6.79
Beef Kabob2.99
Chunks of beef marinated in a blend of spices; then char-broiled.
Stuffed Fish3.35
Fish filet stuffed with broccoli and cheese; then steamed.
Alt dinners served with stir-fried vegetables and stir-fried rice
SALADS
Chef Salad$2.99
Fruit Platter2.99
Cold Plate3.39
Califorina Salad2.39
SANDWICHES
Roast Beef, Ham or Turkey
(Your Choice)$2.25
411 sandwiches art made on trench bread lopped with mustard
oiuotu mayonnaise iriiucr. lomalr. jotepenv peppers sour cream
and rrvtd �nd ptttatu salad and pickles
Sfl drinks, lea. beer wine and wine -oo4ers availabie
DESSERTS
Carrot Cake $.75 Froien Banana $75
SIDE ORDERS
Potato, Pasta or Macaroni
Salad$.67
Vegetables95
Corn on the Cob75
Garlic Bread67
Jalepeno Peppers10
iFree
with coupon
Frozen banana dipped in
chocolate; then sprinkled with
chopped nuts.
iFrozen
Have a Frozen banana on us when
W ������� X�� purchose a dnner from our menu
! OUO till it Pease Present fh.s coupon before you
Expires Sept. 30,1985
'A FUNNY-BONE TICKLER
ON THE SUBJECT OF SEDUCTION
DINNER THEATRE
SEPTEMBER 20 and 21,1985 6:30 p.m.
244 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
ECU GREENVILLE
Tlc�U itilrtti Monday - Friday. 1 1 OO jn. HlrOO pJtU
OmM Ttdtat Office, Mmdirnil.
ECU Students and QuMt $�� Al Othem 114.00
NO DOOR SALESI
Cai 767-6611, x?66 for Reaervattona.
!
Sponsored by the Student Unton Producttona Commtttee of Eaat Carolna UntvaraHy
� J





HE j AMAkOMMW si PTEMBER 12. iw
ECU Force Helps
B hi lABr 1H PA(.K
Miff Wrili-l
The Arm) has an Arm)
Reserve, Cities have a Reserve
Police Force, and ECU. too, has
a Reserve Police Force.
The ECU Police Reserve I nil
acts as an auxiliary ECU Police
force. The ECU Reserve Force
began in 1980 under the direction
of former ECU detective 1 t.
t �enc McAbee.
Since the program began, it has
grown from a five member force
to a current 21-member force.
Reserve Coordinator Kathleen
Monahan heads up the Reserve
Force I his is Monahan's first
yeai with the Reserve Force, but
- no! her firsl situation with a
ce woi k force.
"I used to be a sworn officer,
and the further mside the depart -
1 went, the more removed I
from police work, but now
I back m it again said
Monahan
Monahan's new job is one she
-avs she doesn't consider too
have many difficulties. "The
hardest thing lor me is who I am
going to hire. Thai's such a hard
thing tor me, especiallv since
there are a lot of good
applicants said Monahan.
In order to qualitv as a Reserve
Officer. A student must be at
1 e a s t a second -s e m ester
freshman, a full-time student, 18
years old of age. in good standing
with the ECU, have no prior
criminal record, have a minimum
gpa of 2.5, and complete an in-
terview with Monohan
I tic purpose of the ECU
Reserve force is to provide field
experience foi students who are
interested in seeking careers m
law enforcement or other related
professional areas of law enforce-
ment, Monohan said. The ECU
Reserve force attemts to improve
under standing and communica-
tions between students and
Public Satetv.
Let Us Be Your Church
Home Away From Home
Come Worship With Us!
Peace Presbyterian
Church
Bill Goodnight
Pastor
9:45 Sunday School
11:00 Worship
Ramada Inn. 264 Bypass (temporary meeting place)
Call 752-0055 for transportation
Football Tailgating
Chicken Bucket Specials
Bucket(6pc & 2 biscuits)$4.74
Bucket(9 pc & 3 biscuits) $7.11
Bucket(12 pc & 4 biscuits)$9.48
Bucket(15 pc & 5 biscuits)$11.85
Bucket(21 pc 4 6 biscuits)$16.59
10 pc Wing Bucket (w3 bis.)$3.79
mchitsM Town
IAIft
IIVERSI
q5ar-
!92$242
i-i
Ut M i
qREEjSfVILLE
toll CHALJESLVp
M m
OKN 2jf HOURS
I COUPON
FREE STEAK BISCUIT
BUY ONE STEAK BISCUIT,
AND YOU GET A
STEAK BISCUIT
ABSOLUTELY FREE!
(Offer Expires December 31,1985)
COUPON
FREE CHICKEN BISCUIT
BUY ONE CHICKEN BISCUIT
FRIES & MEDIUM DRINK,
AND YOU GET A
CHICKEN BISCUIT
ABSOLUTELY FREE!
(Offer Expires December 31,1985)
Located At the Corner of 1Cth & Cotanche Streets
Ottiring th "Bott Food On The Comor
Honor Council
i ontinued From Pag?
are behind us KM) percent �
they've been erv enthusiastic
about the council
O'Brien added that the Coun-
cil's faculty advisor, David
Sanders, has been extremely
helpful as well.
"We're striving to better
advertise lectures and guest
speakers who conic to campus.
We feel it's very important to an-
nounce scholarship recipients as
well she said.
I ong range goals tor the Coun-
cil include providing various pro-
grams designed to help incoming
freshmen and possibly acquiring
a chapter ot Phi Beta Kappa on
campus.
"Phi Beta Kappa is a very
prestigious honor society. One ol
the reasons we can't get one at
ECU is thai we (E 11) give more
athletic scholarships than
academic ()'Brien said
"We're hoping for a large tur
noul at our next meeting because
we have a loi ot at tivities planned
tor this year and we'd like to see
all the honor organizations on
campus represented added
O'Brien
fo�Ww FnW (tea
Specials Good Thru S�pt 30th
at Greenville Stores Only
� Kentucky Nuggets ComM
9 piece Kentucky Nuggvtt
Kentucky Fries
Lg. Drink $2.89
Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd 75 434
2905 E 5th St 753 514
t
�- 4
REQUIRED
COURSE
Serving W Greenville
Campus:

���
� �

758-6660
Serving E. Greenville
752-6996
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
FREE.
4
Mi �
AWriA

COi" TMH
XEO STO RCL SST
CATALOG
CtXA
ENTER CHS EF
T 8F
x��t
�y?
xot
LASTX
PG12SII
'V S suggested list price
Don't Walk
Ride The Bus
to
College Hill Dining Hall
And The Gallev
Everyday the SGA Transit Gold bus
which runs from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m stops
at Mendenhall Student Center at 20 minutes
after the hour, and arrives at College Hill six
minutes later. Then there is another pick up at
Mendenhall at 10 till the next hour, which ar-
rives at College Hill at 4 till the hour. So next
time you are hungry, whether it's for
breakfast, lunch, dinner, or a late night
snack, take advantage of the SGA Transit
System and catch a ride on the Gold bus to
College Hill Dining Hall and The Galley.
( olleje Hill Dining Hall
Breakfast 7:00-9:30
unch 11:00-1:30
Dinner 4:30-6:30
The (,alle
I unch 10:30-2:30
Dinner 4:30-7:30
1 ate Night Snack
30- II:00
'� fttm
tree.
Get our new $49 software module
when you buy an HP-41.
It's a deal thai i calculator that
no equal
Our new HP 41 Advantage software moduli
1 -K ol ROM One and a half times the capacity of am
othei HP 41 module 1 arge enough to hold the most
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You v:ct comprehensive a n it � math func-
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Our new module is also sub programmable So you
can quickly access just a portion of a program,or trans-
fer that section to your own program
And its even menu-driven That eliminates overlays
and reduces the number of prompts
In short, you get everything it's going to take to help
you make the grade in everything from linear Algebra
to Physics to Electronics to Statics and Dynamics
The HP-41 is a deal all its own. Its operating
system is so advanced, it doesn't need an "equals"
key. Little wonder it's preferred by more engineers
than any other calculator.
This is a limited time offer Call (800) FOR
HPPC. Ask for Dept. 658B, We'll instantly give
you the name of a dealer who has no equal
Do it now. The pbjne call is free
But our new module won't be for long
HEWLETT
PACKARD
I'm a student who has no equal Here's my
proof of purchase to pane it Please
send me m free software module
Stan
Zip
srnai umber
Mail coupon with proof of purchaae to
Hewlett Packard Co . co irect Mail
ProjeciaM-M. P O Bon 10598
Portland. Oregon 9209
Oft.t nnl rdem.hl. M HP drmtr HP 41 null br punht.rd
b�l�e,n HlV�.r�d 11IVtS tnv.lop. mu.l tx po.tm.rkrd
b I23IRS t.ood unit in I S �. aid w tort prohibited Uird
01 n.trtd.d h !�� tiP rmplottt pUI(hn� not rlifiblc Mlo�
f1 ��li for drlorri
Cold
O
BKINHrHHM
H
S
Nightclubs
' Artie will opt
weekend h
met�
Mar;

Re.
ing
the V-
E( I
"he New Deli
Pl
Us
Premiums
alterr.
with the orij
The 1 Plus .
Premiun
toms and their
Rhythym
day, and
up on v
Cultur.
Japanese D;
In Daring
rt i
"Dai
coun
i her
tht
dance wou
had I
snap
Yoshiyuk
old memb;
dance troupe , .
death on Tuesday
Mutual I ife B
Washington
been giving a re
dance " lohoi :
Prehistor) i � I ei
holding Takada br
Takada. with shavei
nearly naked, and
white rice flour, fell
landing only a few fee
crow d
"I though;
at first said David B
reporter covering a portioi
Ji
HH Tit;1!�a"





??????
� entucKv NuQflets Coma
s piece Kentucky N
Kentucky Fries
Lg Drink $2.89
t Bivd 75 4434
St 752 5184
�????????????????????i )
I! Bining Half
cold bus
p.m stops
20 minutes
ege Hill six
pick up at
, which ar-
ii s next
it's for
late night
Trai
d bus to
alle.
'� ���
iUlt'
iting
. i.
I I R
intly j
iua!
ee
ng
m
HEWLETT
PACKARD
oupon ith proof-of purchase to
blett Packard Co . co Direct Mail
lecuM-M.P O Bos 10598.
Jland. Oregon 97209
�Ml m HP dealer HP 41 muii be purchased
IS I BvalapM muii be postmarked
ittd ntttj in i. N A oid where prohibited. taxed
Iini b� . HP employer purchases run eligible Allow
. '�� � i�!ivrr
I HI HS1 Ko XN
Entertainment
SEPTl MM! k 12 1983 Page
1 Cold Showers And The Freshman Syndrome
H STEPHEN M1KRBIN
And
BRIAN RFKKWIAV
Have
across campus,
and oi
eye you catch

st of you
�es, bin tha
i
e comes ove

you a-
pose, shou
a s
iing
ICK .
developing those great female
bodies just keep improving.
However, science has somehow
failed in the area of mat urn and
common sense. Now, as ever, it is
common knowledge that these
last two traits are not fully
.leveloped for at least two more
years.
There are a number of ways to
recognize mosi freshmen women
s) Probably the easiest wa
spot them is the bubble gum,
"Probably the easiest
nay to spot them is the
bubble gum, which
pops loudly at various
intervals (and gets
strung in the most
unusual places). '
whichpops loudly at various in
�id gets strung in the
FRESHMAN' siunusual places).
1 is recognized b the
hei speaking voice as
conversation,
-ai all within range
�hear her everv
�bother most
then
pens to a I

Mod
. ai opinion
is fascinated b wl
� � wledge that
he are discuss
ng cl ' unlike
gh school trauma
In sh e often have
say hi ' �e a need
Hots pots
Nightclubs
The Attic will open a rocking
weekend with the heavy
metal sounds of Ice Water
Mansion on Thursday. On
Fridav, the Attic offers the
new sounds of Xavion.
which is presently under
contracl with sy lum
Record � Satui d a �� ' s
patrons will hear the ar
rock of PG � 13. and clos-
ing out the weekend is the
straight ahead rock 'n' roll
of High Risk on Sunday.
All shows begin at 9:45
p.m. With the exception of
the Xavion show, admis-
sion is free Dorm
students and Si fot all other
ECU students.
The New Deli presents the
popular '60s tunes of The
L'suals on Saturday at 10
p.m.
Premiums serves up the best in
alternative music beginning
with the original sounds of
The 1 Plus 2 on Thursday.
Premiums hosts The Phan-
toms and their brand of
Rhythym and Blues on Fri-
day, and wrapping things
up on Saturday is Southern
Culture on the Skids with
some original music All
shows begin at 10:30 p.m.
TW's Nitelife opens their
weekend festivities this
Thursday with the top-40
beat of The Blind Date. Fri-
day's patrons will enjoy
some sounds to shag by as
Chairman of the Board of-
fers up their ever-popular
beach music. A victory par-
ty will end the weekend on
Saturday as patrons
celebrate the slaughter of
South West Texas by the
Pirates. Supplying top-40
music will be Staircase. All
shows begin at 9:30 p.m.
On Campus
.Mrs. Soffel, starring Diane
Keaton and Mel Gibson, is
a movie based on the true
story of a prison warden's
wife who falls in love with a
condemned man. and then
proceeds to aid in his escape
from prison. Mrs. Soffel
will be shown on Thursday.
Friday and Saturday nights
at 7 and 9 p.m. Admission
is free to ECU Students and
guest with valid ID. and to
ECU faculty and staff with
a fall semester movie pass.
Japanese Dancer Dies
In Daring Aerial Show
, mm M.ff And Uirr K
They had performed the
"Dance oj Birth and Death"
ountless times before. Once
again the four of them hum; by
'heir feet, suspended high above
the ground But this time the
dance would not end as the others
had This time the rope would
snap
Voshiyuki Takada, a 31-year-
old member of the Sankai Juku
dance troupe ot Tokyo, fell to his
death on Tuesday outside the
Mutual 1 ite Building in Seattle.
Washington. The troupe had
been giving a rendition of the
dance "Johon Sho" (Homage to
Prehistory) when the rope
holding Takada broke.
Takada, with shaven head,
nearly naked, and covered with
white rice flour, fell six stories
landing only a few feet from the
crowd.
"1 thought"?! was a manequin
at first said David Boeri, a
reporter covering a portion of the
dance subtitled a "Dance of Birth
and Death
Witness Jean Colman said she
had expected the rope to catch
Takada as he started falling, but
he "just kept falling
The three remaining dancers
paused in their routine and hung
silently for a few minutes. Then,
instead of continuing their
downward spirals, slowly made
their way back to the roof. The
four members of the company
left the building without com-
menting.
The five-member Sankai Juku
dance company is an avante-
garde Japanese dance troupe.
The style of dance they were per-
forming, called Butoh, was
created in the 1960's as a revolt
against both the traditional
Kabuki theatre and the in-
terference of Western ideals
which had become prominent
following the disaster of WWII.
It returns the dancers to elemen-
tal forces including near nudity,
as the dancers wear only a
G-string.
say it aloud.
Does this sound harsh to some
of you? If so, let us each reflect
for a moment on our freshman
year. Remember the strange
things most of us did? For those
of you with short memories, I
guarantee that your friends can
refresh you with several stories
you'd rather not remember
Don't get me wrong. I have
nothing personal against
freshmen. On the contrary; thev
are a constant source of amuse-
ment.
It should not be overlooked
that the term 'Freshman' includes
both genders (although 1 know
several who don't seem to belong
to either). Which brings us
down to the Freshman male, or
Exhibii B.
The freshman male is a uni-
que individual, to say the least.
He is much easier to distinguish
in a crowd than Exhibit A. He is
noted for his somewhat gangly,
post-adolescent appearance and
confused expression His glazed-
over eves clearly show that he has
rarelv seen so main students in
one place, although he tries hard
convince you he is perfectly at
home in his new surroundings.
We've all seen them:
notebooks in one hand, ECl
map in the other, whispering to
one another in tear of the whole
student bodv eavesdropping on
them, exposing the fact that thev
really are as lost as we perceive
them to he
rhe freshman male persona
mains character flaws nor
unlike those of rhe freshman
female
r
twih;
IrTfnr
Wo WortC- & I i
. - a rvsj
lor instance, brains are not
known as an Exhibit B's 'strong
suit For this, however, thev are
not to blame After all, this is
why thev are among us the pur-
suit of knowledge. However,
many of them do not know this
yet. They shall continue to think,
tor at least another semester, that
'college' is synonymous with
'party' (The fault is ours We
must humbly admit that, ai
E.C.U. when the word is spoken,
the animals are loosed).
Class is another trait that is
sorelv lacking in most freshmen.
Thev are buying nicer clothes
these days, but the way thev weai
them belies the geek in their
blood, lust today 1 saw a .

meandering across campus spor-
ting his best rebel-without-a-
cause look, not to mention a
madras shirt. Van Heusen tie and
Ferrarri sunglasses I didn't have
the heart to tell him that the com-
bat fatigues and the cowbov
boots ruined the whole
So instead 1 just grinned and
-aid, "Preltv sharp outfit. Ace
He snapped his head around
and beamed. "Yeah, well 1 kinda
view dressing as an art form
Pooi gu (It boggles
mind to imagine him as the future
de-igner of a leading line of
menswear, bur considering the
direction fashion is taking these
days, nothing will surprise me in
a few years I
1 guess what we're really trying
to sav is that freshmen have a
long wav to go.
Only after their grade point
averages have borne the brunt of
a semester without sleep and
endless hangovers will they have
learned I esson 1 of the 'College
ie ECU is also a university.
We don't hold that against
them; we only want to rub it in a
bit, as we expect they will, some-
day
We, as upperclassmen can only
: our sympathies and wish
the best of luck in the coming
vears to all the freshmen in the
tss of 1989
God knows thev'11 need it.
As The Stomach Turns
Breakfast Of Champions
B WARREN BAKKR
and
LINDA CHAPIN
I was the day of the vegetable.
Something strange happens
to the usually calm township of
yden on this September day. An
unusual sweet smell dominates
the air as the residents leave their
homes and head for the old
railroad tracks in the center of
town. Thev are possessed with
thoughts of green things cooking
in huge steaming vats
It is the festival ot the collard.
They come in droves, not just
from the innocent town of
Ayden, but also from the not-so-
innocent city of Greenville. They
come from all over, driven by the
passion.
The passion for the collard.
Local radio and television sta-
tions arrive in town to witness the
event. For the past 10 vears,
news editors call their reporters
and tell them, "It's happenning
again What they see is
unbelievable-a small town going
through a metamorphosis.
They see the bands playing.
Beautiful, smiling women, dress
ed in swimsuits, line the streets,
their faces and bodies drawing
the lens' of the cameras.
Children with cotton candy faces
run rampant in the street.
The morning turns into after-
noon as the crowd begins to
gather around a platform. Men
with hungry grins are seated ai
Collard: This vegetable
has been called many things
� most of which are rather
distasteful. Pronounced
ctfwlerds by most suthin
folks, it is a variety of kale,
having a crown of edible
leaves. It is also a variant of
Colewort, which sounds
about as appetizing as the
word collards.
tables, a fork on one side and a
glass of tea on the other. Located
in the center of the table is the
sacred vegetable.
An announcer wanders about
the platform watching each con-
testant closely. The people below
are in a freny as the emcee eggs
them on. Bowls of collards are
placed in froi
ticipants, and so e ritual
begins.
Glistening gi raves move
from fork to moutl nind-
boggling speed. Glasses �: tea
are Filled and I The
sweet smell is there along
� rinegar.
Then, without warning.
gangrene sets in. Gangrene is a
plague that infests the unholy
eater who eats too fast or
hesitates too long. The collards
strike the stomachs of the weak
and show the contestant who's
boss. Rejection of the sacred
food is quick and painful because
massive quantities of collards
cannot dwell in the bodv of the
weak-stomached ones.
As time draws nigh, the strong
are separated from the feeble. At
last, a single soul sits unscathed
at the table, and the announcer
seeks the audience's approval of
the chosen one.
The crowd roars with delight as
cameras and microphones move
about to capture the significance
of the moment.
Yet, the day is not over. Yes,
the bands have played and the
Collard Queen has started her
reign, but there is moremuch
more
The sun begins to set as a few
re bands take the stage and
play the music of the festival.
N ' collard music, but something
strange called. Beach Music.
.� crowd becomes entranced
with a droll rhythmic beat that
causes them to participate ir
what is called 'shagging
The night is broken by a
cascade of ferns wheel lights and
children screaming for more
money. The once dazed com-
munity is coming down from
their mutual trances and, the
day's hysterics have settled into a
dull roar.
The innocent and not-so-
innocent begin to pack their
belongings together and head
home. Soon, the only lights that
shine are the lone street lamps,
and the only sounds that play are
the echoes of a festival gone by.
The festival of the collard is
over, and the city of Ayden has
once again returned to normal.
The collard is safe for one
more v e a r.
The Usuals
LOKIN PMQUAL - Ttw f it Carolina!)
The LsuaJs, a 1960s rock n roll band, will be making their first back with its original members: lead singer Sam Madison drummer
Greenville appearance of the school year at 10 p.m. Saturday at the Scott Stutts, bass player Myron Black, guitarists David Brockman and
New Dell and Thursday at TW's Nightlife. The three-year-old band is Duke Ellis and drummer Scott Stutts.
H

" "
i





HI EASTJ VROLJNIAN SEPTEMBER 12, 1985
Doonesburv
� � �W H&5A6L 1 -I
'� 0UR.ZUL $
iARR fRUDl AU
-
� - NINE i
� i ii
V' jfl
� so � .
(5065 �. i .
ot��� WlHl c iU
����W�. N.C. 27114
" C�y �� 1
l
RONNIE
� �. ' SWWRS WR
A54CE
CHORD'
)
1 HETWrTHBISh �
TUK)UJHL ��: - rj V
W47 0 AMRP l K
s
f
K
i � ' .
�.
5
S
J
TtkroHU
wvlcorotd
Dinner Specials
T�k-0Mt�
Fisherman's Platter
Select 3 Iums of Your
( hoice
i �
� U6HJMY so NO
e FIRZ BLACK
' fWtl LW �
? Ml F 1KB I
'
yt �.
Shrimp
Floundei
I rout
( rab Cakes
Deviled Crabs
Steamed Shrimp
- lam Snips
I ned Chicken
Steamed
� rab 1 e-s
Shrimpreole
' ' � � (),
Ksters
Scallops
( atfish
Barbeque
S5so
Fried Bay
Scallops
All You (an
Lat
$499
Captains Platter
Select 4 Iu
( '
Shnmp
Flound
Devile :
rips
dhie
$6S0
Man-O-Stick
BJf,JARRELL ft JOHNSON
Pi
Fried Chicken
Fried Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Trout
Flounder
AU You Can Eat Extravaganza
Your Choice of
As Many As 5 Items
$750
With Alaskan
Crab Leg $9.n
Shrimp c reole
Deviled:
Barbeque
Fried Catfish
Fried Ba Scallops
Fried Oysters
Steamed Shrimp
In I he shell
One Found. Baked
Potato & Salad
$699
Soft Shell C rabs
2 Large (rabs
2 Vegs
$695
Steamed Seafood
Feast
X askan Crab I
earned Shrin
Sauteed c rab Meal
Baked P �
cv Salad
7' 5
VVaJynlThe Plank
W � 5 vj C
�:
' - - �: V �� AAIHX To S��
Hick
BY A GU
Super LUNCH Specials
hurd� ()nl
Hickon fTKiked
Iexas Slvle
Barbeque Beef
11:00-2:00 PM
s
R�M�rt&�R OLtTi Tclassic
lx.0 jcip-T MUN-STEPS?)
�?�.M�rtBe�. WH� Vqu Wee y
5CV6 AD YOUR D�?EAH
� � jAS MA?4W?ADY7
- . r fbes
Qi
f-
�V ���� ' � � r-
�� "A '� � ' '� f- You
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f
Meats and Seafood
Scallops
Shrimp
Trout
)sters
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Rounder
Fried Chicken
BBC; Chicken
Country Style Steak
Veal Cutlets
Hamburger Steak
Barbeque Dinner
Cattish
Wedned�� (Inh
Chicken & Pastry
2 e)e!able335
i
�OvJsXi
CHOICE OF
1 Meat
& 2 Veg.
ONLY
$335
Includes ;a
A beverage
egeiable P�if:
Choice of four vejjriab
egetabltN
Beets
Slaw
Boiled P tatoes
Potato Salad
French Fries
ams
Black-eyed Peas
Collards
Rise
Mashed Pol
String Beans
Apple Sauce
Brunswick Stew
( abbage
i
1
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MYEN6LISM ClA&S?
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�IARt,M0TAri A TOAST Tt)
AlcomOLkjarc THiri�oorr
Steamed
Shrimp
In the Shell
(6 0 )
With 2 Vegeiables
$350
Alaskan
Crab Legs
With 2 Vegetables
$350
Steamed
Seafood Feast
Includes Crab I egs(60j
Sauteed Crab Meat (2 0z
& Steamed Shrimp
�4
50
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4 4-33
SEAFOOD DELIGHT: Choose from: Choice of three seafood, Sh
Sops. C'am S,riPS' Tr�U1' F1�U"d- - SvSbsTSS
$399
10 !����� WH Car, mt Ai
Monday-Wednesday 11-9
Thursday, Friday, Sunday 11-10
Saturday 4-10
SALI
�INGCC
FOk
79 (
FOR
FOf-
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BEAT the CVAT
The CMA
Tricks �
The Plaza
Deli
T
1
Good Musit
io w; v pm
�������tl:
Phi Epsil
THE
Beach V
September 21 191
REG-SI
HOW TO REGISTER
Send J20 00 Same o' Each Tea'
Number
Beach Voiieybaii Tournament
Phi Epsiion Kappa
HPERD Dept ECU
Mmges Colueum
GIFTS AND AWARDS
Te� Shirts For Each Participant 1
cond Place Team Members Medai
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co of Gre
The Trophy House






m
4
J
t
J!
Tat-Ost
ais
i

i
a
ill's Platter
M5
earned Seafood
Feast
Meal
Rib Eye
en A. Pas
egetables
steamed
Seafood Feast
$450
ds, Shrimp,
iled Crabs & Bav
11-10
1

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I
i
SAIF
RINGGOLD TOWERS Two units
sale Effii encv 8th floor, one
OOm 4th floor Units comply. .
shed carpeted air condition
le kitchi es
iftei
431 0 '6� M wi te Mr
"old
FOR SALE Commodore VIC 20
puter with all hookups and s
�' as including 6 game tapes
storage recorder pi
� mode nal pro
cassette Programer's Aid
expansio - l and
$200 Call An
� it 757 63M
FURNITURE FOR SALE
� and net � �ur
- �� bed c hest ot
" ony
�t 757 0964
79 CHEVY CUTLASS CAPRICE 4
led. ery qood con
Hi 757 37
FOR SALE: Math Statistics 3228 All
'ems worked in book and
� :iook Call Bob "
FOR SALE � - - . ark
r ee i � - Air
Stereo
eel Great shape $3 500 or
�i ana tab I
' � � - "
DP WEIGHTLIFTING MACHINE
� of 30 e- 110 lb1-
weight, padded bench, used one
month, $U0 758 3583 after 5 30
SUNN CONCERT BASS AMP AND
POWER AMP: 200 Watts $200 also
5000 BTU air conditioner $100 Call
757 0558 after 5 00 p m
FOR SALE: DP Body Tone 300
Machine Brand new and in ex
cellent condition Great deal Call
757 3436
1985 SCHWINN TRAVELER: Ex
cellent condition Call 757 1947
FOR SALE: Weight bench $15
Mini trampoline $30 Call 756 5090,
ask for JP
WRITER'S BLOCK CURED: Send
S2 for catalog of over 16,000 topics, to
assist your writing efforts and help
you beat Writer's Block For info
Toll free 1 800 621 5745(ln II
linois, call Authors' Research, Rm
600 407 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL
60605
NEED TYPING Letters Resume's
Term papers, etc Call Karen at
752 0498
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5 30
WORD PROCESSING: We otter ex
perience m typing resumes, theses,
te hnical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
tters labels, envelopes or rolodex
:ards Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
nercent discount to ECU Students S
and F Professional Computer Co
I Back of Franklin's! 757 0472
THE MIDDLE MAN: Apartment
Listing Roommate Referral Service
210 E 4th Street Suite number 2
across from Sub Station II. Let us
help you find the apartment or room
mate you're looking for Call
830 1069
TYPING SERVICES: Provided by
professional woman with IBM Cor
reefing Selectrlc typewriter
Familiar with all styles Call Debbie
at 756 6333
LET ME DO YOUR TYPING FOR
YOU: Reasonable rates Profes
sional work Call 756 0479
BURGLARS BEWARE: Door
Alarm li is watching. Protect your
room or apartment Hang Door
Alarm II on inside doorknob Call
752 5695 or write P O Box 3226 for
demo
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Non
smoker $175 month, utilities includ
ed Call 752 1642
PART TIMF: Soccer Coaches need
ed afternoon hours Call Pitt Com
munity Schools at 752 2934 ext 276 or
267
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED: In
terested in making money part time
photographing campus activities'3
No experience required, we train It
you are highly sociable, have a
35mm camera and transportation,
give us a call at 1 800 722 7033
GET PAID FOR YOUR EFFORTS
Look toward a future with
America's fastest growing fooj
delivery company Earning poten
tial up to$8 an hr Flexible schedule
Full and part time positions
available Must have economical
car Call or stop by the office Jokes
on us. 320 E 10th Street, 757 1973
YEARBOOK OFFICE Now accep
tiong applications for staff positions
Apply at Buccaneer office, Publica
tions building
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT Per
sonal attendant for disabled student,
on weekends Eight to ten hours
Wilson Acres Females preferred
Contact Rick Creech 758 3214
TWO FEMALES NEEDED To
share a room in furnished town
house Rent reasonable Call
758 7264
HELP WANTED: Organist Pianist
for North West Christian Church,
Kmston NC Call Church office at
522 0997 or 522 1667 or 522 5566
ROOMMATE WANTED Female,
non smoker seeks like roommate to
share 2 bedroom townhouse apart
ment $147 50 plus a utilities Call
758 9941
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male or
female for three bedroom apart
ment. $106 33 rent plus ' 3 utilities
Call 752 2018. ask for Lews or leave
a messaoe
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
To share two bearoom apartmer'
Wilson Acres . rent and utilities
Furnish own bedroom Call 758 6028
CHRISTIAN FEMALE ROOM
MATE NEEDED To share 2
I HI I AM AKOl IMAN
bedroom duplex $135 includes
utilities r a bath Call 756 8676 after
s 30
ROOMMATE WANTED Close to
campus $147 50 month Heat and
water included plus ' 2 utilities Call
7 58 7643
EARN EXTRA MONEY While at
tending classes, students wanted to
provide notetakingtutoring ser
vices for disabled students on cam
pus For an application, contact Pro
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Students Brewster A 114 or call
757 6729
NEEDED PART TIME BABYSIT
TER: To keep 4 yr old child and do
light housework, m the evenings
Hours flexible References required
Call 752 5643 between 6 7pm
SI Pll MM H 12, 1VK� V
NATIONAL ADVERTISING FIRM:
Seeks representative from your
campus Post national cue its and
handle on campus promotions No
direct sales Excellent opportun.ty
for career directed Average $5 6
per hour Commission plus
piecework Flexible hours Call
1 800 426 5537
LOST: White and gold Cocker
Spaniel 7 yrs old 151 lbs Last seen
3rd and Lews Reward for child's
Det 752 6369
PERSONA!S
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: Don't
forget abou' the MANDATORY
meeting Sunday at 9 This will be an
extremel important meeting so
please attend1
Page 12
ii
Welcome Back ECU
Appreciation Special
At

BEAT theCMAT!
to ' .
The CMATExposed
Tricks from20 Tests
�s r - 1 �
A.
the body shoppe
Exercise for Today's Woman
Call or come by for a free workout
758-7564
1 Mo. $21.95
(Reg. $28)
1530 Ex 14tfcStr�t
3 Mo. 57.95
(Reg. $72)
Brtrifi in this ad tor extra week with the one month or the whole semester for 3 month (ECU
ID. required).
The Plaza
Deli
7W -
The Plaza Mall
Greenville, N.C.
756-4024
Good Music
10 AM-9 PM
Parts Assembly Before The Game
The Plaza Deli
Located At The Plaza
New Concept In Deli's
We Offer
Fresh Squeezed lemonade and Orancdc
Dall Specials Orders to Go
New Sandwiches
Pita Wabbit and English Knight
Visit Kurope And Never Ieave The Deli
Good Times
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Are V e Having tun Yet
����������������������������it


"
lhA Bypass Norfhe.isl
GreonvilU North.irnliru
10 Mkow wm crr j





Phi Epsilon Kappa Fraternity
PRESENTS
THE FIRST ANNUAL
Beach Volleyball Tournament
September 21, 1985 at 10:00 and September 22, at 1.00
REGISTRATION. $20.00 per TEAM
MOW TO REGISTER
Send J20 00, Name of Each Team Member And Tee Shirt Sixe, A Captain's Name, Address and Phone
To:
In Person In Front Of
The ECU Book Store
Number
Beach Volleyball Tournament
Phi Epsilon Kappa
HPERDDept ECU
Minges Coliseum
(On College Hill Courts)
Between 12:00 and 2:00
On September 18th and 1?th
GIFTS AND AWARDS
Tee Shirts For Each Participant Trophies For the First Place Team Members. Trophies For The Se
rond Place Team Members Medals For The Third Place Team Members.
CO�SPONSORS
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
The Trophy House
Grogs
Panfana Bobs




















Presents
Thursday tVite
25C Draft All Nite
Blind Date Playing the Best In Top 40.
Greg Allinson Spinning Your Favorite Solid Gold
Roek and Roll Tunes on the Band Break.
Friday Nite
Pregame Party
Chairman of the Board Bringing You The Best In Beach.
Mr. Beach John Moore Will Spin You Favorite
Beach Tunes On The Band Breaks.
Admission Special Til 10:00
Saturday Nite
Victory Party
Raleigh's Favorite Top 40 and Beech Band Staircase
Bring Your Football Ticket Stub and Get $1.00
Off The Admission Price

September Membership Special�Memberships $2.00
Call 758-5570 for a FREE RIDE to
� on the c
Private Club � All ABC Permits
si
�i





I HI 1 SI t RlH INIAN
Sports
St-Pit MHt K 12 1YN
Huge 10
New
warn
tancrback Ron Jones (8 ltd the Pirate offense to their opening vic-
aamsi N.C. state last weekend. Jones and his teammates will try
improve their record to 2-0 when the take on Southwest Texas State.
By RANDY MEWS
Spertal Id id t.uirllnin
Is 1985 a new beginning for
Pirate football? Your guess is as
good as anyone's, because that's
a question the most prestigious
prognosticates won't even
touch.
1983 saw the Pirates finish the
season at 8-3 and among the na-
tion's Top 20, while last year
ECU plummeted to their worst
record (2-9) in more than a
decade.
Heading into last weekend's
regional rivalry with N.C. State,
most observers gave the
Wolfpack a flight advantage.
However, after ECU's impressive
33-14 victory, many are wonder-
ing if the magic of '83 might be
restored under the guidance of
first year coach Art Baker.
Not only did the Pirates hand
the Wolfpack their largest margin
of defeat in the historv of the two
teams' 16-game series, but they
did so in front of the largest
Bobcats' Morale
crowd (58,300) to ever witness a
sporting event in the state of
North Carolina.
There can be no question that
ECU's victory over the Pack
came as a shock to those who
witnessed the Pirates' dismal
season a year ago, but one should
also consider the state of the
Wolfpack football program.
N.C. State finished with a 3-8
record last year and was
predicted to finish no better than
sixth in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference. Also, if it wasn't for the
play of ECU's specialty teams
( w h i c h resulted in t w o
touchdowns), the final score
would have only read 20-14.
Despite the caliber of competi-
tion offered by the Pack, one
cannot deny that the Pirates' per
formance was anything short ot
spectacular. The offense moved
the ball with relative ease, while
the defense stood firm in holding
State scoreless in the second half.
Perhaps the most impressive
facet of ECU'S performance was
that of the kicking game. Baker
dubbed the play of placekicker
Jeff Heath and punter Tim
Wolter as "sensational
Heath booted field goals ot 43
and 50 yards and was true on all
three of his extra point attempts.
He is considered one of the
premier place kickers in the na-
tion, and now only needs 22
points to become ECU's all-time
leading scorer.
Wolter, a freshman, also came
through against State by compil-
ing a 41.6 yard-per-kick average
Baker said Wolter "had excellent
hang-time on his punts despite
hemg informed only 10 minutes
before kickoff that he would be
the starting punter.
Offensively, Ron Jones
displayed consistency at quarter-
back after being awarded the job
over Darrell Speed less than a
week before the game Although
Jones only completed eight of 18
passing attempts, he engineered
Bv s( ()j iOOPKR
' V I .
I he Bobcats were rated ninth
he Division I-AA preseason
Offensively, they return
starters, with two of the
ers making the Football
ews preseason I-AA all
�n
.
Div
I
as
� SV T v Ss ever
I and
. v e �'�
V I has
� - 1 he
X
� ite.
move into the No. 10 spot on
SWT's all-time list, 1euth heads
the offensive unit that led the
Cult Star Conference in total of-
fense in '84 (over 370 yards per
game). Quarterback David
1 onghofer also led all players in
total offense with his PS.y yards
per game.
According to defensive line
coach Rex Sponhaltz, the Bob-
and repeated the task again in
'82. They were led by Jim
Wacker, now with Texas Chris
tian University of the Southwest
conference.
ECU offensive line coach John
Zerhelt feels that the Bobcat win-
ning tradition could play a part
when SWT comes to Ficklcn
Stadium.
" The have won national
limited action. 1 inebacker Shaw
Woods is out with a broken foot
and strong safety Jimmy Nelms is
doubtful with a rib injurv
After last week's loss, head
coach O'Hara feels that his team
is down and out.
'7 have great respect for East Carolina
and for coach Art Baker. East Carolina
is probably as good a team as SWT has
ever played
�John O'Hara
John O'Hara
or running back Eric Cob-
ble and junior offensive tackle
Kevin Meuth return to lead the
�cats. Cobble has 1,490 yards
ishing and needs just 144 to
cats' offense may be tough.
"They predominately run the
veer offense Sponhaltz said at
Monday's press conference.
"They're like BYU, with the split
backs. We expect them to throw
against us
The Bobcats have tasted glory.
SWT won the NCAA Divison-Il
national championship in 1981
championships Zernhelt said.
"They're going to be carrying
that tradition on
Zernhelt further spoke of the
outstanding talent on the SWT
defense. However, the Bobcats
have been hit bv some key in-
juries. Defensive tackles Sam
Ramirez and John Tarvin are still
sidelined, though Tarvm mav see
Jordan To Play In Golf Tournament
'Ac par- 28.2 noinrs n�r um U� rinU,i m� r. ,v,�,u� .�- .i . v .
Eric Cobble
"The morale isi good
O'Hara said. "We're emotional-
ly drained and I'm verv concern-
ed � we're searching for
answers "
the option with accuracy and did
not throw an interception.
On defense, the Pirates wep
their best. 1 ineman David Plum,
Medrick Rainbow and Aaron
( arter showed vast improvement
from a year ago Linebacker
Robert Washington led the team
with 12 tackles and Kevin Vvalker
and Keith Ford commanded
respect at the corners
1' asked to summarize EC! s
performance, one � j � ,ave
difficulty m finding a weakness
The Pirates' displayed a i
team effort - an ingredient
was completely missing in 1 -
The Pirates should hav-
easy time of it against Div
I AA Southwest rexas State
Saturday night (7 p.m . Ficklen
Stadium), but the true te I
ECU football team :ome
against the likes ol the nati
elite � Penn State, Auburn.
Miami. Southai
Game
However. O'Hara's troubles
don't end with his defense. He
feels that the Pirate defer,
loaded, as evidenced last week
"They intimidated N.C State
thev t . right to them.
that's the sign ol a good team
O'Hara said. "Thev've got a
tremendous secondary, with
tremendous talent back there.
The up people are qu �
. active
"We need il ur run-
ning attack (to be successful)
O'Hara added. 'We're going
e lo keep then. dance "
ECl coach Art Baker feels
that the Pirates are ready and
he's happv to be at home.
"I'm delighted to play at home
tor the first time Baker said
smiling at Monday's conference
"We've never filled the stadium
and it's a great time to fill it up
'They could be a verv
dangerous team for us to plav
Baker added. "We've g
make sure we correct our
mistakes � we'll be pushing our
players to keep their feet on the
ground
par
83 1 astern
brity Golf Classic
pi 16, announced J.
Hooper, I"ournament
will benefit
: McDonald House of
lina. Jordan
hairman of the
: McDoi aid Houses
84 NBA Rookie ol
Ian ranked third in
28 2 points per game. He ranked
fourth in the NBA in steals with
196. Drafted as the third pick in
the first round in the 1984 NBA
Draft by the Chicago Bulls, he
led the team in 19 statistical
categories. Jordan was also nam-
ed the 1984-85 Seagrams Player
of the Year.
He was named the Co-Captain
the United States team that
won the gold medal at the Los
Angeles Olympic Games in 1983.
During his tenure at UNC, he
NBA averaging
Ranked Ninth In World
was a member of the NCAA
Championship team, where he
scored the winning basket against
Georgetown during his freshman
year. He was also named to the
all-tournament teams in the
NCAA Final Four and the ACC
Championships, 1981-82.
At the Eastern Carolina
Celebrity Golf Classic. Jordan
will join PGA Professionals,
Miller Barber, Fred Hawkins,
Jim Ferree, and Buck Adams. In
addition, NASCAR driver Terrv
Labonte, the 1984 Winston Cup
Grand National Champion, will
be on hand. The classic will be
played at Brook Valley Golf and
Country Club in Greenville. Ad-
mission is free and tee times for
the professionals and celebrities
will be announced la e next week.
In addition to his work with
the Ronald McDonald House
program, Jordan has been active
in many other children' causes
such as Special Olympics.
Bv Kit KMc(()RM(
iI sophomore Lee McNeill
: :hool this
spending his sum-
�me of the
tigious track meets in
the world.
M . Neil! most recently captured
in the 100 meters at
Vv rid I niversity Games held
- 'be, fapan 1 he meet, accor-
ding to EC U track coach Bill
( arson, is the third most impor-
'aiv I eel in the world. On-
ly the Olympics and the World
Games are considered to be of
more importance.
McNeill led the race until the
final 10 meters where he was
rtaken by Nigeria's Chemo
Imoh and Cuba's Pedro Gomez.
McNeill, who usually is
strongest at the finish, could have
easily finished first at the World
University Games. However, he
just didn't have the strength in
him to hold on at the end.
"His last 20 meters are usually
his strongest Carson said.
"But, he just ran out of gas. He
ran in the qualifying trials, the
quarter-finals, semi-finals and
the finals. He has just never ran
that much before in
Trackster Enjoys Success
. ORMAC competition v��c .� . .
competition
In addition to running in the
World University Games,
McNeill also competed in some
of the most elite track meets in
the nation and abroad. Among
those were:
�The U.S.A. Championships, In-
dianapolis, lnd.
�The Pacific Conference Games,
Berkeley, Calif.
�The U.S.A. vs. West Germany
Track Meet, Bremen, West Ger-
many
�The National Sports Festival,
Baton Rouge, La.
What makes McNeill's summer
so impressive is the fact that he
never finished worse than third
place in the 100 meters in any of
these meets.
During this streak of excep-
tional running, he has defeated
such notables as Olympic
medalists Carl Lewis, Sam Grad-
dy and Thomas Jefferson.
McNeill also defeated current
world record holder Calvin Smith
and N.C.A.A. champion Terry
Scott.
These performances have earn-
ed McNeill the number nine rank-
ing in the world in the 100 meters,
according to Track & Held
News.
"His whole summer has been
remarkable Coach Carson
said. "To never finish worse than
Lee McNeill
third in these type of meets is a
great accomplishment
McNeill, who was not heavily
recruited out of high school, ac-
complished all of this despite run-
ning under some adverse condi-
tions.
"It was really hot and humid in
Japan McNeill said. "I also
had to get used to the change in
time zones, and the ten-hour
airplane flights were the worst of
it all
Despite the long airplane
flights, McNeill enjoyed himself
overseas a great deal and gained a
lot from the experience.
"The people in all of the coun-
tries were really friendly he
said. "I also made a lot of friends
among the athletes, both in the
meets overseas and at the Na-
tional Sports Festival. It really
was a good experience
Coach Carson was extremely
pleased by McNeill's perfor-
mance this summer, and feels it
was truly a once in a lifetime op-
portunity.
"The whole experience has just
been marvelous for Lee. He
knows he can handle himself in
any situation Carson said. "It
will be hard to match this again.
We now know that we have a tru-
ly great sprinter on our hands
McNeill had to miss some class
time to participate in the World
University Games, and that may
cause him to not attend the
World Games held Oct. 4-6 in
Canberra, Australia.
"It still is up in the air as to
whether or not he will attend the
World Games Carson said.
Former UNC standout Michael Jordan is coining to Greenville to hHn
raise money for the Ronald McDonald house.
"All of his professors, the
Registrar and everybody has been
real understanding. I would like
to thank them all for cooperating
and letting him compete for
himself and ECU
Carson went on to say that to
ask the professors to let McNeill
miss more class would be "asking
a lot However, he is trying to
work something out that would
allow McNeill to arrive at the
meet later than the other athletes.
This would allow McNeill to not
miss as much class time.
"We're going to take it one
meet at a time and try not to put
too much pressure on him Car-
son continued. "It all has come
so fast that we want to slow him
down a bit and see how
everything is going
For all of his success, McNeill
seems quite unaffected bv it all.
He would not speculate on his
chances for the Olympics, saving
that just competing in the trials
would be an honor for him.
"I'm just going to try my
best McNeill said when asked
about future goals. If the past
summer is -any indication of the
future, McNeill's best may be
good enough to do more than
just compete in the Olympic
Trials.
Nort
Game
VW xas State-E I
i SI l N(
Duke-West irxmd
Georgia Lech-V Male
lemple Penn Nait
MiamiHa. -I-
S.W. J ouisiana na f f,
Southern Miss,ssippi -Auburn
Gas leth-Iuisa
Pittsburgh-Ohm State
Mm higan-Notre Dame
'Kit Me�
Bill j
THE
Ihur.
Ice Water
Mansion
sat.
PG-13
Dorm's Free, r( I $
�XAVION� 38 Dai
18 Weeks MI Kotatl

EAST C.
St
NEEDS
FORUM A
The Forum Coi
symposiums, arc
featuring Larry L
Burns, and more h.
The Travel Coi
Hawaii, and Baha
Adventure Film Sei
Applications foi
memberships on thi
available at the Stui
234 � Mendenhall SI
contact the Student
jEINSTANT
�One Hour Color Pi
�One Hour Enlaregl
�Overnight Black a
�Overnight Portrai"
�Cameras and Acc
�Black and White
10 Discount to S4
(Excluding Com
Instant Replay
The Plaza
355 5050
.�





irates
w , U ac and did
on
-� es wci e at
; avid Plum,
. a and Aaron
cement
I inebackei
d the team
. Kevin Walker
commanded
ECU'S
d have
d
t i !984
avc an
Dn ision
as Mate
Ficklen
� the
a come
Game
ables
. He
veek
N State
hem,

. � here.

i
bx successful)
� �
�me
Maker said
.da; rice
filled the stadium
I it up
Vve ve
a
�la

ichael Jordan is coming to Greenville to help
lid McDonald house.
I ike
ha'
McNeill
asking
�ving to
t would
at the
kthletes.
not
it one
to put
'Car-
� ntinued. "It all has come
" thai we want to slow him
down a bit and see how
everything is going
For all of his success, McNeill
seems quite unaffected by it all.
He would not speculate on his
chances for the Olympics, saying
that just competing in the trials
would be an honor for him.
"I'm just going to try my
best McNeill said when asked
about future goals. If the past
summer is any indication of the
future, McNeill's best may be
good enough to do more than
just compete in the Olympic
Trials.
Norton Leads Predictions
dame
S.W. Texas State-EC!
LSI -IV
Duke-West Virgina
Georgia Tech-VC . State
lemple-Penn State
Miami! 1-la i-Rice
S.W, I ouisiana-l ouisiana lech
Southern Mississippi-Auburn
1 cxas Tech-1 ulsa
Pittsburgh-Ohio State
Michigan-Notre Dame
Tom Norton
ECU bv 20
LSU
W. Virginia
Georgia Tech
Penn State
Miami
S.W. Louisiana
Auburn
Tulsa
Ohio State
Notre Dame
Scott Cooper
ECU by 15
LSU
W. Virginia
Georgia Tech
Penn State
Miami
S.W. Louisiana
Auburn
Tulsa
Ohio State
Notre Dame
Rick Mct'ormac
ECU by 24
LSU
W. Virginia
Georgia Tech
Penn State
Miami
Louisiana Tech
Auburn
Tulsa
Ohio State
Michigan
I odd Patton
ECU b 15
UNC
W. Virginia
Georgia Tech
Penn State
Miami
S.W. 1 ouisiana
Auburn
Tulsa
Ohio State
Notre Dame
John Peterson
EC U h 14
1 si
W. Virginia
Cieorgia Tech
Penn State
Miami
S.W. Louisiana
Auburn
Tulsa
Pittsburgh
Michigan
iHK Mews
ECU b 28
1 si
W Virginia
Georgia lech
Penn Stale
Miami
I ouisiana 1 ech
-uburn
lulsa
Ohio Stale
Michigan
Bill Dawson
ECU bv 17
1 SI
W. Virginia
Georgia Tech
Penn State
Miami
S.W . I ouisiana
Auburn
Tuisa
Ohio State
Notre Dame
K & W Productions
ECU bv 23
LSU
W. Virginia
N.C. State
Penn State
Miami
S.W. Louisiana
Auburn
Tulsa
Ohio State
Michigan
Standings
Tom Norton
Scott Cooper
Rick McCormac
Todd Patton
John Peterson
Ziggy Mews
Bill Dawson
Record
10-2
9-3
9-3
9-3
9-3
9-3
G.B.
I HI l AS AKOI ISIAS
St (Ml MBt H 12, IVX
11
THIS IS YOUR
CHANCE!
East Carolina University Varsity Women's Track
Team would like to extend an open mvitotion to all
women interested "n trying out for the team
N�dmd Arc:
Sprinters
Jumpers
Distance Runners
Field Events People
Asst Coach
Rodney Blacknall
757 1327
Before September 17
Call
Diane Leary
757 6384
Head Coach
Wayne Miller
355 2265
THE
Thur.
Ice Water
Mansion
sat.
rri.
XAVION
PG-13
Sun.
High
Risk
lirm Free, HI Sl.OOlKxcepI XAVION)
0NS0LI DATED
"HEATRES
jdultss2.oo5
CHILDREN "?
ANYTIME J
mMMHiEiwnk.
791-3307 � Gr��nvill� Sqitar Shopping C�nt�r
AI()N�38 Dates with Hall & Oats
18 Weeks Ml Rotation 80.000 albums sold.
l;0o Ends Today
� THUNDER
WARRIORS �
Starts Friday
"South Bronx
Heros"
R
1 00
300
500
700
9 00
Ends Today
RETURN?;
LIVING DEAD
The t
1 00
3 oo tnds Today
5 00 9 Deaths of the
,0� NINJA R
V oc
FRUSAT ,
uTf$Mow Hanky
0�I100 .
storr, n 30 rankY rxx)
ho pasj.es �
Starts Friday
Inple 320
Horror Features 5 20
ndi Ilvr IJOl Sp�i���. 7 20
9 20

Starts t'�rida
Dungeon Master
3 10
5 10

artompu
P(i�13
Americas
Newest .
Pkmt
Si
u
Beta Theta Pi
i
Thur Sept 12
6:30-10:00
Beoch Cottage
Fii S�pt 13
6:00-11:00
Tope Show featuring
"The Bootman & His Crew"
BYOB
At ECU Ampatheater
Once a Beta always a Beta
More information call
758-5833
757-0351
4
X
. V . . . .
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S
Student Union
NEEDS CHAIRPERSON FOR THE
FORUM AND TRAVEL COMMITTEES
The Forum Committee provides lectures, debates,
symposiums, and other related programs. A lecture
featuring Larry Linville on MASH, Major Frank
Burns, and more has been scheduled for November.
The Travel Committee sponsors such trips as New York,
Hawaii, and Bahamas Cruises along with the Travel
Adventure Film Series.
Applications for these positions or for committee
memberships on the Student Union's twelve committees are
available at the Student Union Office (Room
234 � AAendenhall Student Center). For more information
contact the Student Union Office at 757-6611, ext. 210.


INSTANT REPLAY
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Enlaregments
�Overnight Black and White and Slides
�Overnight Portraits
� Cameras and Accesories
�Black and White Paper and Chemistry
10 Discount to Students with ECU I.D.
(Excluding Camera and Outiab Work)
Instant Replay
The Plaza
355 5050
We
use
FREE
2nd Set of
Prints
At Time of
Processing
(Max 5 Rolls)
FREE
Roll of Film
With One Roll Processed
And One Roll Purchased
(Limit 1)
o
o
o
c
3
n
o

Cv
0s-
ft
O
c
' 3
n
o

a.
o
0s
v
ft
O
c
3
o
O
�o
10 Discount With Copy of Ad 10 Discount With Copy of Ad
RIVERSIDE
315 Stantonsbure Road
STEAK BAR
Across From Hospital
Greenville's Most Unique Restaurant
Largest Steaks In Town USD A Aged Choice Beef
You Cook We Cook
10 Ft. Live Charcoal Grill
24 0z.TBone
24 Oz. Sirloin
15 Oz. Rib Eye
15 Oz. Sirloin
12 Oz. Filet Mignon
vou cook
we cook
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Smaller or Larger Cuts A vailable
Compare Our Prices Compare Our Quality
We e Sure You V Be Back
Lunch Buffet M-F
11-2:00
5 meats � 6 Veg. Daily
Salad Bar
All You Can Eat $3.75
Fri & Sat Special
10 Oz. Sirloin
$6.99
Prime Rib tMYomcmEm
$10.99

All ABC Permits
Owned & Operated by Riverside Oyster Bar
Hours Lunch M-F 11-2
Dinner Tues-Sat 6-10:30
752-5001
10 Discount With Copy of Ad 10 Discount With Copy of Ad
A '
�ossCsxr
� �i






12
IHJ fcASI K, u
SI
I MM K
?5 7a Football Enjoys Exciting Opening
"SU ��y job;fa Sco�, Lisccand Scon Gibbs who pi.chtd �eld wins bv. j�� u . , .P. . tL 0
B JENNE1 IK KOI II
Mifl Wnl,
Onlj two days into fall flag
tootball competition and there
has alread) been a season full of
spectacular plays.
Undei the 'great connections'
category, quarterback I odd
Brawley ol Alpha Sigma Phi
threw foi 50 and 40 yards to
receivel Darryl Mobe resulting in
two touchdowns Renee Grant,
oi Fleming Hall, could be the
es Heisman hopeful a she
scored 3 touchdowns with 45, no,
and ; said iuns
'Working on the chain gang1 is
an eas) iob foi Scott I isec and
David Hawkins, members of th
'Scott Cham c rang I hree
touchdowns were scored as this
dynamic duo hit the gridiron
nd what aboul Barn I ollis
from ' The Boozers' who caught
foul I O lasses.
� malK . undei the Great t iame
category, excitement swelled
from beginning to end in the
Mpha Sigma Phi 'A' vs. Kappa
Sigma 'A' match up. With 45
seconds left in the game. Alpha
Sigma Phi tied the contesi on a
pass from John Nauehton to
Scott Gibbs who pitched out to
Mien Hi vam for the score. Miss
ing their extra point attempt,
Mpha Sigma Phi and Kappa
Sigma went into overtime. I ndet
intramural flag football rules,
overtime is determined bj
penetration Each team gets fout
plays, which are alternated from
the mid field line. At the end ol
eight plays, the team which
penetrates into the opponents'
Cross Country
field wins b a six inCh markteai
ning 1 point), Kappa Sigma took
the win on a 15-yard run from
Greg raylor.
All this action came from the
first mght of flag football pia
Be sure to get out to the IM-R1 (
fields and catch the fevei in-
tramural flag tootball.
W itli the closing oi team Putt
1'ut! registration comes Sneaker
Sam's newest top picks. Pla
begins Monday, Sept. 16 Here
how things look on the putt putt
paths ol Highway J3
I. Chi Omega
2. darrett Aces
i Sigma Phi Epsiion
4. Kappa Sigma B
f Clement
I lie mixed match up has been
determined by predicted low
scores. Good luck putter
Don't miss out on as adventure
Hot Spi i
ride of a lifetim
of N
tion,
ride itself ai
11 i egi tei

THE
organizati
"tt S .let iis coun-
da. September
�� ll i unners ini com
in varsit ci run are
Minges
Ticket Office
Hours
strongl) mcouraged to attend
Ihe meeting will be held
p.m. in the front of Vfinge i
iseum.
Mi
iges v
a
c a m e
;ket of
: sjax
On Ft
is at 10.
DON I Miss Ul K
�"OSEI
RsB. Mil I s A NASH
reensb, ro id � N
10 n �. c .
I nhmited
Hoari In
IKs HOI K
SWIMMING POOI s
Men �
MW-1
Ml
M I
s u
fa ' c- 1
at :
Restarted "vulin Onl
Ht I her.
le Best Deal At The Best Club In Town.
Student Special raCs
$25
HO �a
per month
Our Full Facility Co-Ed Club Features
The Best In Weight Training & Instruction
Aerobics
I wo Weight Rooms
Steram Room
Sauna
Whirlpool
Call Lynn or Dave
For Free Visit!
Today
Social Events
lockers
Private Dressing Rooms
Showers
Professional Personal
Instruction ,
I he
York Olimpic V eighi
(Including Bench & Sq
Dynacam Machines
Exer-Bikes
Therapudic Message
Nutrition Instruct!
SPA

Southpark Shopping Center
756-7991
4i
1 w
M
12 Noon ! K) p
'� ; � ; -
Minges Pool
-
WIK.H I KOI Ms
Memorial
� �
i !
Minges
M

$
Ml-MORI I (, M M( M
Free Plav
! !� p.m. -4:45
! '�
PERSONALS
ECU FOOTBALL TEAM V
great
gar . v
now playing a Team fr �
everv,Dod�' knows It �" �� �
they in the best Well lei � �
: � � � r ex a; thai H or tti
Carol -a espec ally East Care
has fooroai! piaers that are better
. a �0 Kpep giving
100 percent, never give up � u sa.
row much sp-r � fans have tor
ou. we are prouc of ,ou. so go into
Saturday's game �� .�. ng that
everyone is behind you TOO per
Good Iuck The Fan
BILTMORE GIRLS: Help me f.na
shoes ana my ora- e1
agam like every weekena L
Curt
CHI OMEGA SISTERS Thanks so
much for selecting us as your
pledges We're reaj excited ana
we're lookng � -� - to a )i
year We lov . � � . Beta I
silon Pledges
HOWARD SPRAGG: It's been so o
ooo long Have you lost you re how
to manuel? We're stuck on Step 3
Help needed
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS: No
big brother meeting on Sun Sept
15th. Watch for announcement next
week for Big Brother Rush Come by
the house more often
PI KAPPS Thanks for a great pref
party air ban was too much fun
Choo, Choo. Choo. Choo. Choo, Choo.
Chco, Choo. ChoooChooo AOTT
CONGRATULATIONS To the Beta
Zeta piedge class of AOTT Get
psyched for a great semester Love
your Sisters
ATTN LUTHERAN STUDENTS:
Become involved with the Lutheran
Student Association Congregational
Picnic Sept 15th at Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church 11 30 am Service
at 10 30 See you there
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST Of
Later Day Saints is having a M,s
sionary Fireside Meeting once a
week on Wednesday, Sept 18 at
Mendenhall St Ctr Room 248. 7 9
SWM, TALL DARK AND HAND
SOME: 26, Grophic Designer, in
terested in meeting bright, trim, at
tractive SWF who enjoys music, out
-foors and life Send letter photo to
Mr. Barnes, Box 580 Atlantic
Beach, NC 28512
Choosing a long distance
company is a lot like choosii
a roommate.
It's better to know what they're
like before you move in.
Living together with someone for the first
time ran be an "educat k nal" experience.
And living with a long distance company
isn't any different. Because some companies
may not give you all the services youre used to
getting from AT&T
For instance, with some companies you have
to spend a certain amount before you qualify for
their special volume discounts.With some
others, voice quality may vary.
But when you choose AT&T there won't be
any surprises when you move in. You'll get the
1985 AUT Cor,
same high-quality, trouble-free service youre
used to.
With calls that sound as close as next door.
Guaranteed 60 and 40 discounts off our Day
Kate�so you can talk during the times you can
relax. Immediate credit for wrong numbers.
(operator assistance and collect calling.
So when you're asked to choose a longdis-
tance company, choose AT&T Because whether
you're into Moart or metal,quality is the one
thing everyone can agree on.
Reach out and touch someone.
AT&T
The right choice.
n





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Title
The East Carolinian, September 12, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.423
Location of Original
University Archives

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