The East Carolinian, September 10, 1985






She
(Sardinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.5
Tuesdav, September 10, 1985
Greenville, N.( .
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
On Sept. 28
ECU Greets Parents
l Vw. Bureau
More than 2,000 parents ol
1 -i' . arolina Universit students
ed to participate in the
annual Parents'
Weekend � i Saturday, Sept. 28.
jManncd for the
wel" v- movie on
' '� 'da) followed on
s rda) b tour; . ampus,
� at the home of
� and Mrs. lohn 1
Howell, a picnic lunch on the
eni the
' c I s oir, open house at
� lence halls, t and
smit houses; a free movie
ECU-1 e football
ai � da nigl i
Response from parents so tar
� mendous. "We've
ba tit kel � said
. lv) of
I �' Weekend
"The
students mav still use their
regular tree ticket on their ID
card to bring family members to
the games, so it's conceivable we
could hae a lot more than we
even know about
It is important, Speier savs. for
parents of students to become
familiar with campus facilities,
and to meet with faculty and staff
members so the parents will feel
more comfortable calling on
them afterwards if they have a
question or concern. "We're go-
ing to provide them with a list of
those people who will be in atten-
dance he said.
Parents will also receive a
special edition of the student
newspaper. I he last Carolinian,
containing an up-to-date
schedule of the weekend's events,
a campus map, a map showing
where lo park for the football
game, and an interview with the
chancellor.
"Some parents have never
been on our campus Speier
said. "This will be their first
time, or their second time � the
first time it was just to load them
into the residence halls and
leave
"It's our job to make
everybody feel good about East
Carolina said Page Aman,
committee member and alumni
field director. "A lot of the
parents who are coming are
parents of freshmen. When a
parent sends an 18-year-old off,
we want them to leel good about
the decision that a student has
make
Student Government Associa-
tion vice president Chris
Tomasic, Parents' Weekend
Committee co-chair, made sure
his parents, George and Fran
Tomasic of Durham, were the
first registered for the event.
We Won!
N.C. Drinking Laws Change
1 ICd
' stay at home to
ke note of
"s � olina's drinl .as.
1 ast veai. : Eina
' the na-
k driving
'aws � hours
� of
i p
VK on&
( : serai
Assembly has passed a bill to
raise the drinking age to 21 for
both the purchase and consump-
tion of beer and wine by October
1, 1986. But wait, the storv gets
better.
It seems the U.S. Congress and
other Washington bigwigs passed
legislation telling states to raise
the legal drinking age to 21 or
lose federal highwav funds �
almost five percent.
But don't feel too bad, though.
North Carolina officials weren't
happy with this federal blackmail
and they made several provisions
to look after the students. One of
the provisions states that if a
19-or 20-year old is caught with
beer or wine after the law is pass-
ed, he or she cannot be fined
more than $25. While it will still
See BEER, Page 6
By RICK McCORMAC
i o-Spon� tdlior
Before the largest crowd ever
to see a collegiate football game
in the state, ECU gave new head
coach Art Baker a 33-14 victory
in a game in which the Pirates
outplayed the Wolf pack in every
area.
ECU enjoyed their largest vic-
tory margin in the history of the
series between the two schools as
58,300 people watched Baker's
Pirates outplay their opponents
from the ACC.
N.C. State opened the scoring
in the first period, driving 78
yards in 15 plays. An Eric-
Kramer pass to Phil Brothers
covered the final seven yards for
the touchdown. Mike Cofer con-
verted on the extra point to give
State a 7-0 lead with 5:18 remain-
ing in the opening quarter.
Special team play turned the
momentum back to ECU's favor
as Ellis Dillahunt broke through
to block a Craig Salmon punt in
the end one. Dillahunt also
recovered the ball to give the
Pirates' their first points of the
contest. Jeff Heath's conversion
was good to tie the score at 7-7,
The Pirate defense then took
over, forcing the Wolfpack to
punt after three plavs. After the
State punt, EC L" took the ball at
their own 36. From there, ECU
went 64 vards in 11 plavs to take
a 14-7 lead.
The scoring drive included a
See PIRATES, Page 10
Pirate Pride
Two ECU faithfulls show off their Pirate Pride before Saturday's
ECl � N.C. State football game. The Pirate Attack stunned the
Wolfpack with swarming defense and an unrelenting offense.
Reagan Speaks To Roaring Crowd At State
Hv l)()l (, ROBKRxON
�"�' u � r.
pack-
Reynolds Coliseum
I wanted
11 W 'pack spirit
Was 'in his
u reform.
Re �� mparison ol his tax
ances in Con-
to Nortl Carolina State's
impionship in 1983
from the
people in the
seum.
"We mav be starting this battle
tor tax fairness as underdogs.
But, you students of N.C. State
know a thing or two about star-
ting out as underdogs and going
on to victory Reagan said.
"You began the '83 basketball
season near the bottom of the
polls, but you never lost heart.
You gave it all you had through
that final second of play when a
dunk shot won you the cham-
pionship. Well, I want to take a
little of that Wolfpack spirit to
Washington this fall and win one
for America Reagan said.
The President said the U.S. has
never been stronger or
economically as vital as it is now.
He added. "If 1 have one piece ot
advice for you, it's dare to dream
big dreams. Follow your star.
"Maybe some of you dream of
striking out on your own some-
day as enterpreneurs, starting
your own business or joining a
new start-up venture with ex-
citing ideas. There's never been a
better time he said.
Reagan then departed from his
prepaied speech with a story
about a young concert pianist
who overcame her arthritis and
started a successful business
"Her friends encouraged her to
do what she did best � baking
brownies. So, she started a
business selling gourmet
brownies to restaurants and
hotels � last year she made over
a million dollars he said.
Reagan said that there will
always be people who say "it
can't be done But he added.
"Just remind them that this is
America, and that there are no
limits except those that we put on
ourselves
In closing. Reagan borrowed a
line from the recent movie "Back
to the Future "Where we're
going we don't need any roads.
Just an open heart and trusting
soul to map the way. and those
standard American qualities of
hard work, determination, and
faith in the loving God who has
blessed our land
A public address system car-
ried Reagan's speech to the
crowd outside the Coliseum.
There, about 200 people shouting
"Freedom Yes � Apartheid No"
protested against Reagan's
policies toward white-minority
ruled South Africa.
Others were less critical of
Reagan. Lt. Governor Bob Jor-
dan said, "President Reagan is a
remarkable individual; people
listen when he talks. He spoke
about a lot of the positives of his
tax reform plan. But, he didn't
mention any of the negatives we
face, such as the federal defecit
U.S. Sanctions Against South Africa Ineffective
By JKRRIE McGOW AN
Stiff Wrllrr
"U.S. sanctions against South
Africa will not have any effect on
that country to end the apartheid
system said ECU economics
professor Brian Dollery.
According to Dollery,
American economic investments
only constitute 10 percent, while
European investments are still
only marginal. However, South
African investments within their
own country accounts for two-
thirds of total investments. Even
if the U.S. were to pull its in-
vestments out, the South African
government would buy up plants
and equipment and hire more
people, said Dollery.
"They are very
self-sufficient he continued.
'The white South African
government is very powerful.
They are highly trained and well
supplied. They'll keep right on
fighting regardless of sanctions.
So sanctions would be like trying
to put out a raging fire with a
droplet of water
If anything, it will hurt the
blacks who work there in South
Africa. Already, there is a 50-55
percent black unemployment
rate. If major industries such as
General Motors or Ford Motor
Company pulled out. Blacks
would lose their jobs to whites.
Then the government would buy
up the businesses. The situation
would there just get worse. All
this is unnecessary, says Dollery.
The Conventional Liberal
Perception and the Neo-Marxist
economic view are the two
schools of economic thought that
Dollery said could be offered as
an alternative.
The Neo-Mar.xists' viewpoint is
the philosophy to which most
white South Africans ascribe.
The economic growth stimulates
the white power and further en-
trenches the whites within the
government. The less foreign in-
vestments there is the weaker the
white power.
However, according to
Dollery, the other school of
thought is a more realistic and ra-
tional view. Dollery explained.
"The conventional liberal
perception says that apartheid in-
hibits economic growth. There
must be upward mobility within
the economic and social structure
for the economy to grow and
apartheid simplv stands in the
way More investments and
more economic growth would
force apartheid to dissolve, while
less investment would throw
things in reverse, said Dollery.
So the fighting will continue in
spite of sanctions.
Other alternatives are
boycotts, such as the sports
boycott in Europe. All team con-
nections in Europe have been
severed for cricket and rugby.
As for Jerry Falwell's position
in all of this, Dollery says that the
white South African government
likes him. However, he is pulling
figures and statistics out of his
head that are just not there.
Automated Circulation System For Library Near Finish
Wolfpi
I OWN PASQl Al -ECl rk�. U�
Mmck President
President Ronald Reagan was greeted by a jubilant greeting at N.C.
State University and an official State basketball jersey. Reagan
came to the NCSU campus pitching his tax reform program.
Reagan gave a 24 minute speech which was intenipted by applause
27 times.
By DOUG ROBERSON
�MTWiMm
Progress is continuing toward
the implementation of the
automated circulation system and
on-line catalogue for Joyner
Library and the Health Sciences
Library, said Dr. Ruth Katz,
director of Academic Library
Services.
"No one is more anxious than
we are to have this system opera-
tional Katz added.
During the 1984-85 academic
year, a Data General S280 com-
puter was purchased and installed
in the Brody Building computer
room. This computer will
manage the data base for the
automated circulation system and
on-line catalogue, as well as other
subsystems that will eventually be
added.
Currently, all of the system
software for the on-line circula-
tion system has been loaded and
Joyner-HSL bibliographic
records are presently being load-
ed.
"We're only a semester behind
schedule � that's pretty good
when you consider the enormous
amount of information we have
to deal with Katz said. "We
were told it will take 256 days just
to load the bibliographic
records she added.
Funds to establish a library-
network for the 16 schools in the
UNC system were recently ap-
propriated by the state
legislature. All of the universities
will be receiving money during
the 1985-87 biennium to establish
systens similar to the one being
implemented at ECU.
"ECU and UNC Charlotte are
about a year and a half ahead of
the other schools in the UNC
system said Katz. "We moved
ahead of the others by using
funds from our regular budget
she added.
ECU will use the funds
allocated by the state to expand
the capacity of the computer and
to purchase needed terminal,
printer and work stations.
"We also plan to purchase a
microcomputer backup system
for the on-line circulation system.
Then if the main computer goes
down, we'll still be able to serve
our users Katz said.
Katz added that most of the
equipment isn't visible now, but
Joyner Library, the Music-
Library and the Health Sciences
Library are connected by cable to
each other and to the Computer
and Information System in
Austin Building.
"We feel very confident that
we've picked one of the best
systems available and that
everyone will be pleased "Katz said.
t
� �� �. �






THE EAST CARPI .v
M PI I MM K 10, IK
CAREER FOCUS
t-rWr " �� igran designed o n
��� � i� , . pportunifies
before ,i , fr jra . u
A�s3nesoai at 2 30 a I 5 31
ECU WEIGHT CLUB
Announcements
Anyone
II
memoersh p ,tfl h� . , , .
. rttinq club please nonfatr p Yartx
5' 7M 3440 Pease lee
Witt! -he sh lg s, . .
COPiNG WITH STRESS
H" " 'BeI building Ihf Club i looking
- payers especially Freshman ani
�lores No e.Denente is needed The
ub meeting it Tfturi night an pm In
95 r1 crt vemor.al Gym Come on oo'
"tense and ex ting
I ( �' � �4S9 or Ralph and
Pave a 'V 3631
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
� Gamma Rno Sorority
� J ' reshmen and Sophomores
� M fashion Show Step Show
1 v " 'iSdav September 12 from
� � H Mendenhali it's tree
' ����� � M no gentlemen of SG
R �
Skateboarders
PIRATE WALK
'57
� idem �
P a- �
bepte Lt- - � .4,
IrVrignl � K � N 1 - . 1 .1
quired � stopby 'he ise
for turttx � na' Wright
s � Ma
ECANS
SAee's 1 �
g Bidg . Roo"
L.S.S. STUDENT SOCIETY
g a �
S.W. TEXAS STATE
1 ed jc ai v rtges c s � � .
Detween B 30 anc J0o-�' v it
dent cr between � . - .
s'uclenrs -eec the ���.�.
a'c Si lenti eceivi . � .
� guest � net at halt 1
PHI BETA LAMBDA
p- Bex Lambda
Tteei ��� �
Septembei at 3:01 - � .
Bus.ness anc Bus ness Ed ma
Come gP' - . �� �
� � � . ite .�. . � ai
1 '� �� J �. thru
Id 12 mid phf We are
�� . �� � n -s Ap
Be 1 ked up in the Pirate
A a � te SGA OH �
PHI SIGMA PI
feting w Cm
5 30 p n n e B-oiogy
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
dire, tor of VBA Program on Sept H at 3
pm in Raw I 101 New members wekome
PHI BETA LAMBDA
There will be a membership meeting on
Sept 11 at 3 p m ,n Rawi 342 This will be
open to all business and Dusness education
maiors Everyone is invited to attend this
meeting
SOCCER PLAYERS
To all female sexier players v0u are in
vited to play for ECU s g.rls dub
team it interested please 1 ontai �
Grosshandler at 7S8 8325 Rm WJ Clement
Dorm
SOPHOMORE OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY STUDENTS
Now s the time to pick up your appl , .
packets tor ,unior entry Applications must
be in the O T office by Nov 1 tor Summer 86
classes Can June Urback at 757 6�61 ext ?J�
or stop by 306 Belk to receive your applica
tton
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
THE SEARCH IS ON
- � the College
RepuD anson 1 ej �
�. � entei
l�Cl ' �. Ma' i
Guita' A
P m fju fai
p m Mdaie
2' Nov n 8
�d Sept 18 Nov 6 6 30 ' 5
VVpg Sep' 18 Nov 6. 8 9 15
Eastern Dance Sat Sept
S 9 45 a m intermediate
11 a ea- . . fer
tamei s to peri
Home, iming Week o II
Betsy Pe 4j
ATTENTION
The deadline lot pnn, :
float m ompel I
13
HOMECOMING PIRATE
All Homi
tact Mrs Y vonn. �
Sept 12
photograph stmy Any pi -
ECu pho' tl a . . , ted
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Basketban Officiating Sept 16 Nov M
t 30 9 30 p i'
'�' ' Matters Sept 17 �
6 30 9 30 pm interior Dps ji Drat ,
Sept 28 9 a m ip m rVomens Hi
� 22 7 9pm .
Educa' .
STUDENT ATHLETIC BOARD
iudent �� el B .�� ,
a)�fexi�.xa��ix� .kjXSksxsm
September ft 1 Mendenna
1 Rn a� � �
AKA SORORITY. INC
S T U O 1 �
be si
B

Of ttH � .
caier
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Depart 1 �
Auditor, Pa
1
' I 8

'
� �
ECU P
Hs M
HOME
l.KOtwt t�i, rn.m F tlYti �� -rv iJMJ
BAMZAt? STY Li SHOP 'rofessional Hairum'ng &
JOHNhYfAHlNCT
��- u
; n n'he
� � - 'itor
07 m Bob
'52 3587
FORENSIC SOCIETY
will be a mei � .
'eresfi .
���� mesaav Si
' ' lent Centei Please her k a'
r the roon � � .
� "� - ng me l bui
eefing cmv contat �
'� '57 9325 or
Taupe a 4
ADVANCEMENTOP
MANAGEMENT
� - � � � � proudly
" Eugene H , � person
' Can Gooding
??��?
ECU FRISBEE
Middle Eastern Dance Sat . Sept 21 Nov 23
9 45 10 45 am Speed Reading rh�,s
Sept 26 Nov 14 7 9pm Contact Continuing
Education. Erwn Ma
THE INVADERS
' ' ere w n be a mandatory meet.ng of 'he
Aomen s f r.soee Team ron.ght at 5 p m 105
B Memorial Gym Practices a be heir
Monday ana Wednesday from 5 ' i
and Sunday from 3 5 Come ou' and play
' " I'e w.th us
IRATES FRISBEE CLUB
��.��ntl0n all B.son ana sh U I mati �
h gti and the outlook s good tor a
season a 1 -hanns n"n nterested persons
or p . aids a' rhe bottom of
teH at � p .r- tjPS rnurs ana Sun
e ana ultimate will run till e drop
nportam lean meeting a be neia
'hers Sept � after prac � 1 � �
Temoers anc .nterested members shou
??!
� �� � ��-� � � �
ECU MENS RUGBY
'he E :i v.
their f-a
Arc and Thurs
ps are 0
Specials Good Thru Sept 30th
Stores Only
at Greenville 5
????��????
��???�??
eA o
Night Club
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25 Wine and Draft ail Night Long!
Friday
ECU Pregame Party Featuring
the ECU Cheerleading Squad
Door open at 8:00 p.m.
$1.00 Tallboys�50c Wine a. Draft
S2.50 Pitchers
Wear something with ECU on it and get in for a buck!
Daddy Cool plays the jams both nights
Beau's a Private Club for Members Guests All ABC Permits
Kentucky Nuggets Comm ?
9 piece Kentucky Nugfl
Kentucky Fr'es
Lg. Drink $2.89
Locations. ?
600 W Greenville Blvd 756 6414 T
2905 E 5th St 752 51M
Great Cheese Steaks
This Wed Thurs Fri.
Sept. II, 12, 13
Cheese Steak Sub
perustomer
Cheese Steak & French Fries
onlyip I . O
BIGUAIIDY KLCK t
758-6372
WURlfillllGMDOfS
m&
CODyrignr
Kroger s.iv
Ouannrv Ri
None Soid
1985
on
gnts Reservi i
terns ana Pr .
Fffpcrive trtr
SUB SlfUil
"A Complete Meal On A Bun"
Buccaneer Theaters &
Substation II
presents
"The South Bronx Hero"
Order our new "South Bronx Hero" special
ham, roast beef 'urVey & cheese
Lfl. $4.19 Sm. $2.39
KEEP YOUR RECIPT!
Why? Because if you order this sub or any of
our other 28 subs on the menu, and use your
recipt from Substation II at the Buccaneer
theater you get in for Va price to see "South
Bronx Hero" starting Friday 13th
Eat in or Hawe it delivered
215 E. 4th St.
Corner 4th and Reade
752-2183
BEER
Meister 1Z �OAQ
BraU . . Cans O
Wine
Cooler
Register To
WIN
A PAIR OF
Pirate
Football
Tickets
Kroger
will give
away 2
pairs of
Tickets For
Each of the 6
5 home games
REGISTER
EVERY WEEK
$renrams
JD
Honeydew
Melons
Video Movie
Rentals
NO CLUB FEES 24 HOUR SERVICE
Chip Dips
SiMPLt HOOK UP
sasrrr 29
REGUlAj-
Cola . . NRB
$i09
llcickfi Bu
ni) GE POUNl
tFtatcit
Okuw
8" Individual
Pan Pizza
$
SPRINGDALE
Chocolate r
Drink juc
�� ��
Tissue fc, rjr
IF Y
Pirate P
Imagine
We Ini
See Our Pe
Won.
JUST MY SIZE
PANTY HOSE
$
OVER
650
TITLES
BETA
& VHS
io Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvilii
-

- - �
� �� . -� - � . .
� � - hi

n You Help Us?
THE AEROBIC WORKSr
calories you might have I
all from you the first visi
!some every time you cc
ALL! We want you to ch
want to � we figure � 1
YOUR fat and calories V
I cvans � uownrown
757-1608 r W�1
� - 9:30
n
F - 9:30
S � 11:00
S � 1:00 fSunda
LI
ORI

Smal
Wed
Each run comes with certifi
I!
1





OY
� s
.e or
age
NG
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBEIU.98
m
m
Steaks
.
iiimnTi
� ���-� � i

OP
.�
Chip Dips
5119.
8" Individual
Pan Pizza
1ST MY SIZE"
ANTY HOSE
-69
- �� � p . .
t. - - e - m p �.
r� OVWfl � f -
- � �
J
Skateboarders Take Note
ECU Police Enforce Rules
B MIKELUDW1CK
co St MkM
Skateboard and bicycle regula-
tions will be strictly enforced on
the ECU campus, according to
Joseph H. Calder. Director o
Public Safety. "Idcaly, we would
have voluntary cooperation
lather than enforcement said
Calder.
According to ECU traffic
regulations skateboards are pro-
hibited from campus, and have
been tor a number oi years.
"This year we have seen more
skateboards than in previous
years said Calder. "We don't
Hist want to collect fines. We
would rather have cooperation.
We don't intend to take am ac
tion unless you are a habititual
offender he said.
Skateboards were prohibited
years ago because ol a serious ac-
cideni that occured at the Music
Building student lost control
oi his skateboard and it struck
another student in the back, put-
ting her into the hosipital for
three months.
Public Safety officers are gome
to continue to ticket bicycle
riders' violating safet) rules,
C alder said, because so main
students are riding on sidewalks
and riding on one-way streets the
wrong way.
State law maintains that
bicycles are considered to be the
same as motor vehicles and sub-
ject to the same rules and regula-
tions of motor vechicles. Also,
bicycles, and their riders, are sub-
ject to the same penelties and
fines of motor vehicles according
to Calder.
"There are more bicycle ac-
cidents than any other type of ac-
cident on campus. We haven't
had a year � and 1 have been
here sixteen years � when there
has not ben a serious bicycle ac-
cident said Calder.
"The majority of the time it is
the bicycle rider who is at fault,
but not always. If you do ride a
bicycle, you should ride defen-
sively. Especially if you are riding
your bicycle down College Hill
Drive. You (the bicyclist) should
really watch your speed and
watch out for cars coming in and
out of the parking lots.
"The bottom of College Hill
Drive is the worst part of campus
as far as bicvele accidents
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
� Cleaning done by the doctor
� Pain-free restorative dentistry
. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenvile, NC
758-4927

















fjljt ituatlmt tKaupa Ifratemtttj
PRESENTS
THE FIRST ANNUAL
Beach Volleyball Tournament
September 21,1985 at 10:00 and September 22, at 1:00
REGISTRATION: J20 00 per TEAM
HOW TO REGISTER:
Send HO 00, Name of Each Teem Member And Tee Shin Size, A Captain's Neme. Address end Phone
Number To:
Beech volleyball Tournament In person In Front Of
Phi Epsilon Kappa The ECU Rook Store
HPERO Dept. ECU (On College Hill Courts) Between !I:00 and I 00
Minges Coliseum On September nth and letti
GIFTS AND AWARDS
Tee Shirts For Each Participent. Trophies For the First Piece Team Members. Trophies For The Se-
cond piece Team Members. Medals For The Tnd Piece Team Members.









S









IF You Are:
Pirate Proud, Enthusiastic, and a leader �














Imagine Yourself as an ECU ambassador
We Invite You to apply for Membership
See Our Representative in front of
The Student Store
Mon. Sept. 9th � Thurs. Sept. 12th
� ����
EXTRA - EXTRA
- WANTED -
FAT CALORIES
Con You Help Us? PA' V��� gg?
THE AEROBIC WORKSHOP is looking for any extra fat or extra
calories you might have hanging around � We won't try to take it
all from you the first visit � But we will convince you to leave us
some every time you come � until some day � we will have it
ALL! We want you to choose as many of the times below as you
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Downtown
v v.�v � 4 m tM)
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S IIH) (Sundays are $3 Dnp-in Hums nl
Bring this Ad For $5 Off Month
u 6:45
LIQUIDATION OF
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Under arrangments with insurance companies and various distributers of oriental rugs we have now
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Va Chicken$2.50
Vi Chicken3.79
Whole Chicken6.79
Beef Xabob2.99
Chunks of beef marinated in a blend of spices; then char-broiled.
Stuffed Fish3.35
Fish filet stuffed with broccoli and cheese; then steamed.
All dinners served with stir-fried vegetables and stir-fried rice.
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Fruit Platter2.99
Cold Plate 3 39
California Salad2.39Corn on the Cob75
Sandwiches Roast Boef, Ham or Turkey (Your Choice)$2.25
Garlic Bread47
Jalepeno Peppers10
DESSERTS
All sandwiches art made on French bread lopped with mustard. onions, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, jalepeno peppers, sour cream and served with potato salad and pickles Soft drinks, tea. beer, wine and sun coolers availableCarrot Cakt $.75 Frozen Banana $7S Vnt. Frozen banana dipped in chocolate; F lvv (hen sprinkled with chopped nuts, with coupon , Mere o mam banono or us vrhmn you purchta o : Frozen ttzz.rnp�
Banana Expires Sept. 30,1985
4
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IgASTCAROLINiAN SEPTEMBER 10. 1985
Stye iEaat (Unvalmiun l�
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, rmi.rn.
JAY STONE, Manamt Editor
Harold Joyner, � �, T ,
nAK!Ici ,OM L u vender. o��,wo,
R � -v M - � ANTHONY MAR TIN, au Mttnattr
KICK McCORMAC, (�� iOHN pCTCDK,
���-r- JOHN PETERSON, � Manar�
Sc ott Cooper. 0� u. Shan� qu�t
Debbie Stfvns Shannon Short. ,�m Manaf�
DEBB.L STEV ENS. s�. Andr�w Joyner
LOR.N PASQUAt. MIKE Ludwick
D.CHAN.LE JOHNSON. rrt STEpEN Sh�r
September 10, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Beasts In Heat
Fans Out Of Control?
VOW
XKrn
mm:
'pz&m;ecr&rt-��5PKyrj
tU?A�C4Ui.
They came together on a hot
afternoon in Raleigh, howling and
clawing at each other like wild
beasts in heat.
Under an azure Carolina sky, the
fierceness of their struggle brought
tears to the eyes of 40,000 God-
fearing fans.
They were twenty-two men who
were somehow more than men.
They were giants, idols, titans
Behemoths.
They stood for everything Good
and True and Right in the
American spirit.
Because they had guts.
And they yearned for the
Ultimate Glory, the Great Prize
the Final Fruits of a long and
viscious campaign.
Victory in the season opener- the
adulation of wealthy fans and the
possibility of being spotted by a
professional scout. -
They were hungry for it. They
were thirsty. For five long weeks,
from the first till the end of August
they had struggled and sweated in
preparation for this moment of
truth
and when dusk cast its murks-
shadows upon the turf in Carter-
Finley Stadium on that fateful
Saturday night in September, they
were ready.
To seize the Final Fruit.
They could almost taste it. The
smell was stronger than a ton of
rotten mangoes. Their nerves burn-
ed hke open sores on a dog's neck.
White nuckles. Wild eyes. Strange
fluid welled up in their throats, with
a taste far sharper than bile.
Behemoths.
Those who went early said the
pre-game tension was almost
unbearable. By 7:30, many fans
were weeping openly, for no ap-
parent reason. Others wrung their
hands or gnawed on the necks of
pop bottles, trying to stay calm.
Many fist-fights were reported in
the public urinals. Nervous
policemen roamed up and down the
aisles, confiscating alchoholic
beverages, and occasionally grappl-
ing with drunkards and dodging
empty fifths of Jim Beam. Gangs of
Seconol-crazed sophomores rushed
the fence and ripped it from its
hinges.
Meanwhile the Triangle press
referred to the crowd from the east
as bare-footed yahoos and
Philistines who were unable to
grasp the niceties of proper sporting
etiquette.
What? No the fine up-
standing students at East Carolina
University would never do weird
stuff like that.
Campus Forum
U.S. Must Support South Africa
Hunter S. Thompson paraphrased.
While the intent of those who are
opposed to the Reagan Administra-
tion policy in South Africa is com-
mendable, the reality of economic
preservation must prevail. Economic
sanctions against South Africa would
be more harmful to the oppressed
majority than apartheid itself.
South Africa's economy is based
on a tiangle network dependant on
England, the United States and
herself. Heavy industrial investment
in South Africa by Fortune 500 com-
panies has produced a healthy margin
of profit for American companies.
These same companies have provided
jobs for Blacks and Whites irrespec-
tive of the indifferences of apartheid.
The Reagan administration has ex-
pressed concerns to President Botha
while not jeapordizing the delicate
economic fabric.
Further if is not the place of the
American government to dictate
human rights policy to foreign states.
President Carter did not realize this-
and it contributed to his inevitable
downfall. The American government
has a responsibility only with regard
to protecting our own, in economic
agreements, mutual aid compacts.
foreign policy treaties and the preser-
vation of national interests.
The American government cannot
implore economic sanctions and
other punitive measures everytime
there is a human rights violation
under a government that is an ally
Do we not have injustices in our
system? It is refreshing to have an ex-
ecutive branch and home state
senators that employ the needs o' the
nation over the needs of those sub-
jected to discrimination thousands of
miles awav.
Jess Yates
Senior, History
lead in thai expression oi comm
opinion.
John Daughtr
Math Department
Ipock
Now that we have been exposed to
Gordon Ipock's racism in the
September 5th East Carolinian, this is
a good time for each member of the
East Carolina University community
to express his revulsion. I hope that
the editors of the East Carolinian will
Forum Rules
l he East t
expressing ah
drop them by
lions Building, a � en.
tran �
For purposes
ter �� ,
classification, address, phoi
and signatun authorise Letn
are limited to t en pages,
double-spaced oi 4
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and m nal
attacks Wm ur�utt.i S,ujt.�tK. J
faculty ana staff writing letter 'or
pane are reminded that th
to one even five issues.
Reforms Not Enough To Make Plan Fair
.
Reagan's New Tax Plan Unveiled At State
By JAY STONE
It was a ludicrous spectacle � a pep
rally combined with a presidential
speech; ostensibly one of great weight.
The heat was excruciating and few in
our party had slept the night before. My
companions drank huge vats of cola
and perspired them out in rivulets that
ran into lakes just as quickly as thev
could down them � all in a desparate
attempt to keep from dehydrating.
Eight bouncing Wolfpack sirens
gesticulated in a contrived way to music
that was worse than what I'm ac-
customed to hearing in dentist's offices.
Intermittently, someone bellowed "Go
Wolfpack" and later chants of "USA"
"USA" "USA" that sounded almost
menacing overcame the muffled hum of
the crowd. All around the coliseum ban-
ners and signs proclaimed humanity's
love for Ronald Reagan and the N.C.
State Wolfpack. Who could resist the
pull of the thing? When ROTC cadets
snap to attention people are inspired to
nationalism and school spirit or at least
a facsimile thereof.
And so it was that a gymnasium full
of people panted and gasped their way
through the national anthem and then
sat back down to resign themselves to
mute and frantic fanning with folded
programs while they awaited the arrival
of the president.
Meanwhile, outside beneath the
shade trees that stand opposite the front
entrance to the coliseum stood the
legions of dissent. Their signs were ex-
pressions of opposition, primarily to
Reagan's policies in Central America
and South Africa. Here and there one
or two urged the president to end the
arms race.
Though the press had prophesied that
members of the AFL-CIO and the Na-
tional Organization for Women would
be among the ranks of the 150 or so
demonstrators present, neither was in
evidence. No one could explain why this
was so. Nor could anyone explain why,
at a speech that had to do with tax
reform, a demonstration was organized
around foreign policy issues. The
prevailing sentiment seemed to be that
these were the issues that most aroused
public sympathy and the demonstrators
themselves.
Back inside the coliseum Ronald
Reagan, impervious to the crowd out-
side, delivered his pitch straight from
the three page text that had been handed
out to members of the press in advance.
The president said that his tax plan is:
"a good plan, a fair plan that helps
families and spurs economic growth
He added: "It will mean more jobs, big-
ger paychecks, and smaller taxes for
those who now pay too much. And it
will give America a powerful boost
ahead in the world
competition About the specifics of
his plan the president was decidedly
vague. Yet, he did say that he plans to
close tax loopholes and exempt families
of four making $12,000 or less from
paying any taxes at all.
PA SQL A l - rite East OhMm
In tact, no fewer than 65 tax breaks
are plugged or curtailed by the Reagan
proposal, including the second largest
business tax loophole on the books, the
$25 billion investment tax credit. These
progressive measures, coupled with the
fact that Reagan's reform package also
doubles personal exemptions to $2,000
for all filers and their dependents and
raises the standard deduction used by
low and middle-income taxpayers belie
the philosophy behind his recent experi-
ment with trickle-down economics. The
idea that a tax system designed to put
more money in the hands of the wealthy
at the expense of the poor and working
class will result in more jobs and higher
incomes for the poor and working class
has been abandoned even by Reagan.
Thus his recent tax reform proposal
alleviates the 58 percent tax increase
that has befallen people living below the
poverty line since the president took of-
fice in 1980.
Yet, Reagan's tax package is far from
being a genuinely progressive peice of
legislation. It caves in to powerful oil in-
terests by preserving the tax deduction
for intangible drilling costs � a tax
preference that Reagan's own Treasury
Department had wanted to eliminate. It
preserves the special tax exclusion for
capital gains � a $20 billion tax break
primarily benifitting the wealthiest 4
percent of all taxpayers. The plan con-
tinues to give business executives an
unlimited deduction for the three-
martini lunch, while taxing all
unemployment compensation and
weakening the tax break for child-care
credits.
In addition, Treasury department
figures reveal that a six-person family
with $600,000 could cut their taxes by
$70,000 under the administration's
plan. Only a $400 tax cut awaits a
typical $33,000 family of four. Reagan
has also promised lower tax rates for
corporations which is difficult to im-
agine since many of the nation's largest
corporations payed little or no taxes at
all in 1984. To lower corporate taxes, of
course, is not a bad thing in itself If
such a measure is offset by a more pro-
gressive tax which eliminates loopholes
and forces wealthy individuals to pay
their fair share, elimination of the cor-
porate tax could actually make addi-
tional revenue for the government. Yet
Reagan's plan will not do this on
balance. Instead, it will continue a long
tradition that has persisted in this coun-
try: a tradition of having the nation's
tax laws favor corporations and the
wealthy.
Reagan also said that he refuses to
raise taxes under any circumstances.
This can only give the average citizen
cause to ponder what he plans to do to
whittle down the current national
deficit. According to the Treasury
department, the entire Reagan package
will fuel a 1.5 percent rise in gross na-
tional product within 10 years, yet most
analysts consider this estimate to be an
optimistic one. Any additional efforts
to attack the deficit will have to come
from cuts in social programs, many of
which have already suffered repeated
cuts. Democrats are likely to oppose
such measures.
Reagan's proposal also has to run the
gauntlet of special interests who
generally organize to oppose any legisla-
tion that threatens them. The National
Apartment Association, for example,
has already labeled Reagan's plan
"devastating The National
Restaurant Association terms it "totally
unacceptable The American Council
of Life Insurance complained that the
reform package would "increase taxes
significantly and unfairly" in the life in-
surance industry.
It is not unimaginable that Reagan's
package will survive the assualt by
special interests, though, and the fact
that his tax reform package has some
merit cannot be denied. Some reform of
the existing system is certainly better
than no reform. Yet, when the current
tax system is congenitally regressive as a
result, to some extent, of measures
which the Reagan administration itself
has enacted, mild reform measures are
inadequate. Moreover, a reform pro-
posal that has been touted as "a second
American Revolution which, in reali-
ty, continues to cater to the wealthy and
special interests onl disillusions the
majority of Americans as to the pro-
spects for genuine tax reform and
responsive government.
(Editor s Sote: The data used in this ar-
ticle came from Jeff Drumtra. editor of
People And Taxes magazine, a publica-
tion based in Washington, DC.
New Heal
H, .
Heal 11
with 1
runnit
at.
reader
th,
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Healti





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I Dip
I'M A
rrACH6fi
um Rules
students, i
State
D C.)
i�
4
P45?. 41 - Tht East Carolinian
I HI hAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1985
New Health Q & A Column Begins
Beginning today, the Student
Health Center, in cooperation
with The East Carolinian, will he
running a weekly health question
and answer column. Interested
readers are encouraged to send
their questions about any aspect
health or preventive health in
care oj 1 he lastarolinian news
editor or fUrv Elisha Adams,
health educator � Student
Health Services
H hen sending in your ques-
tion, please sign vour name.
ng with vour IP number. This
rmation will be held in the
- confidence, and no
names wilt be printed in the col-
umn Hnt ever, due to the lack of
HEALTH
COLUMN:
With Mary Elisha Adams
time, we are sorry that there can
be no personal replies.
What services are offered for
women at the Student Health
(enter?
The Student Health Service pro-
vides confidential prevential
diagnosis and treatment of health
problems specific to women, as
well as educational services.
Routine pap smears and pelvic-
exams are provided by appoint-
ment. Morning and afternoon
appointments are available as
well as evening appointments on
Thursday. There is a small fee for
the pap smear. Appointments can
be made by calling 757-6317.
Sexuality classes are offered at
the Student Health Center on
Mondays at 10 a.m. and
Thursdays at 3 p.m. These classes
will also be taught in the evening
in many ot the residence halls
during September and October.
Attendance at a sexuality class is
necessary before making an ap-
pointment to obtain a method of
contraception from the Center.
What Birlh Control Methods
are available at the Student
Health Center?
Oral contraceptive agents
(birth control pills) are available
by prescription. One pack or cy-
cle of pills costs five dollars.
Students should plan to buy three
packs of pills at a time.
THE 1
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�(w MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
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A complete line of Roffler & Sebring Products
HOURS
MON. Fri.8:00to6:00
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5195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks a! addi
nonal cost Pregnanc Test, Birth Control, and
Pioblem Pregnanc Counseling hot turther
information call 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
1-800-532-5384) between 9 A M and 5 P M
weekdavs
RELEtGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 WMt Morgan St.
RaMgh, NC
TRA VEL EXPRESS
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break cruises and trips.
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(919) HTRRVEl-
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I aiee Pool
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Private Balconies
C Ofueuicnt In Shopping Centers & Restaurants
II Bus Service
rbireclions: loth Street Kxlension to River Bluff Road
Nevt to Ritergale Shopping C enter.
PHONE 758-4015
59.00
pair
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SEPT 27, 1985
:
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and will be announced on the air.
CALL: WZMB within 9 minutes and 13
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ALL YOU CAN EAT .
LOOK
What's New For You
From ECUs Student Union
RIBS!
RIBS!
RIBS!
o -n


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Recreation
Bingo Ice Cream Party
AAendenhall Multipurpose Room 6:30
Minority Arts Presentation
Sept. 10th

.Every Wednesday from now until Dec. 18th between 5:00 - 9:00
DarryYs 1907, Greenville, is celebrating the Holiday Season early with
,an ALL YOU CAN EAT FEAST of our tender, juicy beef ribs for the
unbelievable price of $7.95. We'll even include a free salad!
SO . COME AND GET A TASTE OF
fA
800 East 10th St GreenvHIe
Cotton Patch Gospel"
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Campus Awarness Day
Come get to know ECU'S
organizations in front of the Student
Store 10:00�3:00
Movies
7:00 "Network" Sept. 11th
9:30 "Being There" Sept. 11th
7:00-9:00 "Mrs. Soffel" Sept. 12, 13,14
Travel
New York Trip
Hawaii Trip Dec. 31, 1985-Jan 7,1986
Call 757-6611 Ext. 266 for more information
THE GREATEST STORY EVER RETOLD
COflWI PATCH
uospel
I Cotton Patch Information:
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 1985
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre, ECU
Advance Tickets Still Available untill 6:00p.m.
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Ctr.
ECU Student and Guest: $1.50
ECU FacultyStaff and Dependants: $2.50
All others and at the door: $4.00
Sept. 10th



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f
HI I s
Ki l S AN
M I'll MBf-K 10, 1985
Congress Reduces Student Loan Cuts
N hen il returns from
month, Congress
seen v to make minoi
in the way hanks
loans as it takes
on the federal finan
Beer
( ontinued From Page 1
be

conse-
ing to pay
illegal for so-
the current
ei and wine in
� �� to sell beer or
in this new law,
olds will he given
to soli, transport,
dispense alcoholic
can't drink
stipulation is that the
son" adhere to
ith employment
mission rules
' ies maj come
II and it will he up to
to provide the
ith alternative ac-
mark it on your
liking age is go-
9g
Bui the seven-month battle h
the higher education community
to thwart administration pro
posals tor sharp cuts in fin tncial
aid climaxed last month when
( ongress approved a budget
resolution calling foi 9r billion
tor student aid tor the fiscal year
beginning Oct. I.
Ihe resolution translates into
modest increases in most federal
aid programs, and a modest cut
ol S8(X) million over the next
three years in the Guaranteed
Student 1 oan program
Ihe resolution was a deteat tor
the administration, which had
sought a $2.3 bill,on cut in the
$8.8 bilhon student aid budget
tor the current fiscal year.
" Ihe cuts will be much less
drastic or dracoman than what
we were facing at one point, but
some trimming will be
necessary says Dennis Martin
ol the National Association of
Student financial Aid Ad-
ministrators.
������
rhe resolution requires the
GSL program to save $100
million this fiscal year, but Mar
tin thinks it can be done without
.hanging the eligibility re-
quirements for GS1 loans.
One likely change, Martin
says, is that banks will be re-
quired to dispense student loans
in two segments during the
academic year.
Currently, most students get
their federally-guaranteed loan in
one lump sum .
A dvertise
I
To
Subscribe
�J?� iEaat (Earnlmfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
A great way to let your parents know what is going on around
the Eas Carolina community. Send them, two times per weeka
copy of the only college newspaper recognized by the orth
Carolina Press Association. Call 757-6366 "
-���??.
'1HHHH,
il
Tar Landing
Seafood
Tues Wed Thurs.
Night
Shrimp Dinner
Trout Dinner
05 Vion Road
Mon
I ' Sai

��.��
- � � � � � � � � WW�W
Student Government Elections
������.�
. Gain the Perience of a lifetime-be a part of ECU s Student Gov
i he following positions are available:
ernment Association.
�- 25 Dorm Representatives
25 Day Off Campus Representatives
� Class Presidents, Vice-Presidents, and Senior Class
Secretary Treasurer
Elections arc Wednesday Sept. ISth
� Candidates Meeting 5:30p.m. Tuesday Sept.
� Filing Ends 5:00 p.m. Tuesday Sen. 10th
MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD
i


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In 'Com
Bv slf H
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Pirates
Bv PHJi i iP.if UN
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poured dow
swai
0
Enthusiastic Pirates' fans had plentJ
33-14 victory at 1 arier Hnlev Madiul
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anding
d Thurs,
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Dinner
Dinner
� �






















����
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
SEPTEMBER 10, 1985
Page"
New Stars Appear
In 'Comedy Zone'
B STEPHEN SHFRBIN
Afresh, progressive style of
entertainment has recently
come to town. TW's "Comedy
one" started this summer
amidst a whirlwind of support.
The "Comed Zone" hosts a pair
stand-up comedians every
Wednesday night and is an enter-
taining alternative to the usual
(ii eenville festiv ities.
"Comedy clubs have only
ently gotten popular in the
itheast commented Steve
Ebstein, last Wednesday night's
star performer. "When 1 first
started in comedy, we performed
an v where fraternity parties,
birthday parties, anywhere
There were only a couple of corn-
ed clubs a r o u n d. ' He
explainslt only been the last
few years or so that comedy clubs
have started becoming popular
Ebstein, originally from
Brooklyn, now lives in Houston.
He has been on the comedy cir-
cuit for several years. It's evident
in his style and manner. "1 think
I'm the only person who lias ever
been both Ronald McDonald and
the Magic Burgei King he says,
Th has not always been
Says EbsteinI've only
recently started making good
money. 1 guess I'm finally what
you could call midd . class But
Ebstein says he is no: going to
it. "You ki he last
comedian to make it big doing
stand-up comedy was Steve Mar-
tin, and he even had a boost b
hosting 'The Tonight
Showmy goal is just to be a
better comic
Still, Ebstein has had his share
of adventure. He has plied his
trade at such prestigious night
clubs as The Comedy Store in
Los Angeles and has recently per-
formed in a television special call-
ed "The Texas Outlaw Comics
Opening for Ebstein was a
talented young comic, Jordan
Brady, who contrasted well with
the older headlinerThat's 'Jor-
dan' as in the river, and 'Brady'
as in the Bunch he informed his
audience.
Brady has only recently started
touring the circuit. "I started out
making good money. I quit col-
lege to do comedy explains the
twenty-one-year-old Richmond
native.
"My age has made a dif-
ference. There are a lot of things
1 can get away with just because
I'm young, but there are a lot of
topics that I can't talk about, like
serious relationships, because
people look at my age and
sayOh, sure I don't come
across as being believable
Brady never expected to per-
form in Greenville last Wednes-
day "I met Steve (Ebstein) at a
'comic condo' in Richmond last
night (Tuesday), and he said he
was supposed to perform here.
So he made a phone call and
found out that the opening act
hadn't been heard from. So they
asked me to open. That was this
morning. They want me to do 35
minutes. I don't know if I can do
35 minutes
Bradv did 35 minutes and
Lost!
Editor Abandons Staff
JIM LEUTGENS - Tht E�it Carolinian
Comedian Jordan Brady. 21, performed Wednesday night at TW's
Nightlife in Greenville. Bradv participated in the new Comedy Zone
a long overdue showcase of stand-up comedy entertainment.
more, much to the delight of the
crowd. These two performers put
together a fantastic display of
talent. One member of the crowd
complimented, "They 're better
than Eddie Murphy
Each act performs two shows
on Wednesday nights, and TW's
has gotten such a response to the
"Comedy Zone" that they must
now take reservations. Hut it's
worth the effort and a refreshing
change.
Pirates Plunder Wolves' Den
By PHILLIP Jl'MAN
M�ff U rltft
Saturday night, under the
white, hot halogen lights of
Carter-Finlev Stadium, the East
Carolina University Pirates
romped over N.C. State's
Wolfpack to the tune of 33-14.
But the show of Purple Pride that
swept through crimson territory
was much more than a victory.
The Pirate Attack had begun.
A record 58,300 fans jammed
the stadium. Four skydivers
tumbled out of the sky and land-
ed on the field carrying the game
ball. A recording of State's wolf-
howl echoed across electric air.
and fans warmed to fever pitch as
ECU won the toss. The national
anthem came to a close, a roar
went up in to the twilight, and the
biggest rivalry in the state came
to its moment.
It all went basically as planned
until the clock showed less than a
minute left in the game. With the
final score already on the board,
Pirate fans first showed signs that
their enthusiasm would overflow.
Spectators began to gather at the
lower edge of the grassy hillside
at the end of the field. They
poured down the bank and
swarmed against the chain-link
fence which barricaded the end
zone. In seconds, it was clear that
the fence would not hold them.
On the lower right-hand side of
the visitors' stands, the trend
continued. The bottom edge of
the stadium quickly filled with
masses of raging Pirates. The
clock ticked and then stopped.
'That's like asking me
if I like apple pie
� Art Baker
Head Coach
With four seconds left on the
board and the Pirates in posses-
sion of the ball, N.C. State called
time out. It was too much. The
crowd hesitated only a moment.
The fence at the end of the field
bulged and collapsed, and the
mob spilled onto the green. On
the opposite end of the visitor's
stands, people rolled over the lip
of the stadium likewell, like
pirates.
By this time, the announcer
was pleading. Pandamonium
took the field. The first point of
the attack was the shiny red goal
post. For a moment or two it
looked as though it would fall.
But NCSU security managed to
appear at the right moment and
deflect the swarm of fans in a dif-
ferent direction. The jubilant
Pirates surrendered the goal posts
in exchange for the entire field.
Moments later the fifty-yard line
was buried beneath thousands of
sports fans. In the center of the
mass, a purple and gold banner
waved merrily above the heads of
the rampant participants.
Flashbulbs popped as
photographers scrambled for
shots of the joyous occasion. The
East Carolina marching band
heralded the uproarious display
of purple pride, and streamers,
neon-white under the stadium
lights, unfurled against the night
sky.
For a few moments, the an-
nouncer tried to restore order.
Both teams knelt on one knee in
their huddles, and the joyous
mass of spectators dispersed to
cover the entire field. Fans ran,
ecstatic in the glory of it all. The
stands were chaotic with celebra-
tion. Finally, the clock was allow-
ed to run out, and the conquest
was complete. Above, the bluish
halo of the stadium, fireworks
burst brightly against the night
sky. Pirate Pride knew no
bounds.
W'hen asked Sunday about the
tremendous enthusiasm shown by
ECU supporters at Carter-Finlev
Stadium, ECU Coach Art Baker
said, "That's like asking me if I
like apple pie He added that
the loyalty of the fans was a big
factor in the game and was cer-
tainly a pleasure for the team.
"My wife was coming down
the elevator when she heard an
N.C. State official say, 'East
Carolina may have won the ball
game, but they certainly didn't
know how to win with class
said Baker. "I thought that to be
sort of a surprising comment. I
remember back when the N.C.
State basketball team won the
ACC tournament and some
See PIRATES Page 9
By WARREN BAKER
6:50 a.m.
"I think she overslept said
Jay Stone, managing editor of
The East Carolinian. He was
referring to Lorin Pasqual, the
entertainment editor. She was
late, and Jay's hair was redder
than usual.
Reagan was scheduled to speak
in Raleigh around 11:30, but our
entourage needed to hit the city
limits before 9 a.m. in order to
get the proper press credentials.
As the big hand slowly moved
towards the twelve, dread began
to set in. I couldn't find my
cigarettes, and I knew that Lorin
smoked. Where was she?!
The entourage I speak of con-
sisted of myself, Jay, Lorin,
Harold Joyner (News Editor) and
Doug (a staff writer whose last
name never made it into conver-
sation). We were a jolly bunch,
ready to see the President in ac-
tion on the N.C. State campus.
As Lorin rounded her car into
the parking lot, a wave of relief
came over us as we gathered
together our respective press kits:
tape recorders, cameras with
lenses that resembled bazookas,
pens that actually worked and
press notebooks with unintelligi-
ble scribblings in them. All we
needed were cigarettes and gas,
so we decided to stop at a service
station. This was the first
mistake.
I rode with Lorin because she
smoked. Doug and Harold rode
in Jay's car becausewell, I real-
ly don't know why. Maybe it was
because of all of the cameras and
bazookas in Lorin's back seat.
As Lorin and I got into her car,
we saw a brown blur. It was Jay's
car flying onto the highway. We
tried to catch up, but it had
vanished from the face of the
earth.
"Do you know where we're
supposed to get the press
passes?" she asked.
"I know how to get to
Raleigh I said, hoping she was
joking. She wasn't joking.
Mutually, we decided to rough
it. If worse came to worse, we'd
stop by City Hall for informa-
tion. Of course, we didn't know
where that was either. From that
moment, I felt a sense of adven-
ture setting in. I lit a cigarette, sat
back in the bucket seat and relax-
ed. An ad venture yeah!
Many miles and tobacco fields
later, we were on the outskirts of
Raleigh. Lorin's car rolled to a
halt because that's what red lights
are for. Luckily for Harold,
Lorin obeyed stop lights.
"Look she said as she
pointed to a service station on the
left.
I could barely see Harold stan-
ding at a telephone booth. Then
his eyes caught the familiar sight
of Lorin's car, and he dashed
over. Harold was all smiles as he
moved aside the bazooka and
crawled into the back seat.
"Jay left me here to catch you
guys in case you didn't know
where you were going
"Harold I said, "What if the
light had been green?"
"Oh well he said. We laugh-
ed. Nervously, I might add.
We found the appointed hotel,
the Velvet something, and talked
up to tht reception desk. The
lady at the desk commented dryly
that the people with the press
passes had already left.
Lorin was quick.
"Did this guy with red hair and
freckles she began as she was
cut off by the receptionist's nod-
ding head, it seemed that Jay had
caught the head press lady as she
was walking out the door. Lucky
us, 1 thought. Where's Jay?
Jay was nowhere to be found.
The brown blur had struck again.
In the back of our minds, we real-
ly wondered if Jay had managed
to get the passes. If he struck out,
we could always sing songs on the
way back to Greenville, songs
like, "Oh where, oh where has
our editor gone
We were a jolly bunch, though.
A determined bunch. We were
going to see Reagan, and that was
all there was to that.
The three of us managed to
find the auditorium. We even
found press parking. We also
found a lot of policemen roaming
around with walkie-talkies. We
found a lot of things including
the press entrance. We found
everything � except Jay.
As we stood in front of a line
vaguely resembling recent lines
outside of Whichard, who should
come sauntering along out of the
sweltering heat but Jay! He was
grinning ear to ear, press passes
in hand. Doug was faithfully in
tow.
We were happy.
Security was tight. Metal detec-
tors were stationed just inside
each entrance. Secret Service men
stood around the auditorium as
their eyes darted hither and yon.
Reagan seemed to be on his way.
As the place began to fill up,
N.C. State cheerleaders took ad-
vantage of the press corps and the
captive audience. They started in
See STAFF Page 8
From The Not So Right
No Room For Roommates
By PAT MOLLOY
S�aff Writer
Roommates. The topic for today is roommates.
Not nuclear waste, or parasitic insects - although
roommates fall somewhere in the middle of these two
categories as someone or something you wouldn't in-
vite into your home.
To those of you who live on campus, I extend my
sympathies. I was also subject to the great travesty
known only as the Housing
Department. My first year at East
Carolina University, I was placed
in Belk Dorm and told to live with
a roommate who looked as if he
had gotten into a fight with
shrapnel - and lost.
I'll never forget him. His name
was Brad, and aside from being
ugly, he was very cross-eyed. Now
I'm not condoning the ousting of
all ugly people on campus, but
Lord, in some instances it has to be
done.
Brad was an enigma to me. He
never tried to get laid, and he
would get drunk from just two
beers. Being the average, bone-head freshman that I
was, I would guzzle down nine or 10 cold ones, and
spend the rest of the evening trying to jump on
anything that looked even remotely feminine. I've
woken up in some peculiar places - but that's another
story.
Eventually, Brad failed out of school with a blaz-
ing .30 grade point average. I've often wondered
what became of Brad - I'd like to think he's doing
J1U1IUT�� Th. , we�. but the truth is he's probably doing social work
JIM LEUTOBNS - Th� Kit Carolinian Qut jn fjzarcl I ick
Enthusiastic Pirates' fans had plenty to cheer about Saturday as their team crushed the Wolfpack in a The followin vr I hw ,h b i . -a
33-14 victory at Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh. P m Ivltoowmg yiU' ' hveo w,th Scot I stayed in
Belk because my finances dictated I be thrifty. Scot
was quite forgettable. In fact, I've forgotten his last
name already. This dude was a bore. And I'm talkm'
BORE. The only constructive thing Scot ever did
was wake up. He would get up, turn on the televi-
sion, and become a vegetable for 14 hours.
To this day 1 believe he had a crush on Viki Steub-
ing. Scot had another undesirable trait: He was
stupid - supremely stupid. To phrase it another way,
Scot was brain dead. How he got into college I'll
never understand. Scot also failed out of school
aJJ which is understandable because
r?3
he never saw the inside of a lecture
hall the whole time he was here.
The next year I lived alone, but I
never failed out of school - which
brings us to the present.
I'm living with two roommates
now. so I'm going through a form
of culture shock. One of them,
H� rible Hal. is in the living room
mM studying. If there's one word I
i�v. could use to describe Hal, it would
m be "deranged The man is men-
tally stable, I think; he's just wild.
He recently quit smoking, so he's
going through some emotional
changes right now. For instance,
when Hal has a sinus problem, he can't be like a nor-
mal person and clear his nasal passages in the
bathroom - Hal just blocks one side of his nose and
blasts the floor. I'm breaking him of this habit by
locking him in his room with no supply of tissue. I
estimate he can stay in there for two days before he
blows himself right out of the room. Horrible is also
very handy with mechanical things. I haven't seen
anything that he can't fix - except his love life.
Hal is looking to settle down a bit. He's feeling
that his golden years are passing him by, and he
See OH Page 9
� � � . ' ' 4 -rf 4 j � 4 4 jj & m m
K -i -I





'II t AM
R '1 !1 A
MI'll MM H 10, 1VK
Staff Deserves More Consideration
ontinued From Page 7
on theii cries ol Wolfpack pride
and how the were going to whup
up on those nast Pirates 1 ittle
did they realize
V reportei friend ol mine bor-
rowed m handkerchief. His face
glistened with perspiration, and
he needed the handkerchief to
keep his face dry when he went
on camera. I nevei saw him
X' speech, we talked to a
tors and a tew of
protestors
� � campus strce'
ds in hand As vou'd
'he stree you could
� in a cafetei
today. sh the
maitrc' d said. "Apartheid is 20
teet down, and about 30 feet
down the way you'll find a
generous portion of San
Salvador
With faces on film and voices
on tape, we climbed back in the
car and cruised tor food. Satiated
and leady for home, we left the
restaurant and jumped in our
respective cars. Harold moved
back into Jay's car � which has
an conditioning. I stayed in
form's ear. She smokes, you see.
Jay left us behind again
because we decided to stav
behind and get some more
smokes. 1 was broke, and Lorin
consoled me with a pack of
tobacco.
As uc nuned out of the
Raleigh city limits, I found that I
needed my handkerchief. Bad im-
ages of my reporter friend
decorated my thoughts.
"I need some Kleenex I an-
nounced. "I need some Kleenex
or I'm gonna do something really
rude I.orin started to worry.
Obviously convinced that I was
capable of doing something rude,
she pulled over to a service sta-
tion. I was broke, and Lorin con-
soled me with a package of
Kleenex.
After driving along for a few
more miles, we deduced that we
were lost. Really lost, as in
"Where is Rocky Mount in rela-
tion to Greenville?"
Lorin manuevered her car into
another service station, and both
Reduced Green Fees To
ECU STUDENTS
ot us walked inside.
"Do you want something to
drink she asked She was tired
and she needed a quick response.
"Yes I said. I was broke,
and I.orin consoled me with a can
of grapefruit juice. After we ask
ed a nice gentleman for direc-
tions, we headed hack to her car
"Do you know how to drive a
four-speed she asked. She was
tired and she needed a quick
response.
"Yes I lied.
As we sped along and got lost
again, 1 could see I orin out
the corner ot m eye, cringing
I treated her transmission like a
four-speed blender. We tried to
get directons at a Rescue Squad
Weekdays Onh
with current
College ID.
FARMVILLE
COUNTRY CLUB
For More Information
Call
station. No one was home We
were finally put on the right track
by some construction workers
who were lounging about on a
dead end road
Soon, Greenville signs started
popping up, and I could teel the
adventure ending We pulled in
the parking lot, unloaded the
gear, and stepped into the air
conditioned offices ot I he last
arolinian.
I was tired, and 1 orin was ex
h a u s t e d Funny thing,
thoughJay, Harold and Doug
(Robcrson, I've come to find out)
were nowhere to be found.
The brown blur had struck
again.
Doonesbui
Ja Stone
I he Fast (
in action.
i managing
arolinian, w
editor of
as missing
�iv: ��.
IE-
753-3660
ii
mm
mssrn
�.I S()S , SIM , -s i
feu R
V
JIMLEUTOENS The Eait Carolmiar
'Comedy Zone '
omedian sieve Ebslein. 32. shown here at IU Nightlife, delighted
the crowd during last Wednesday night's Comedy one
THE THRb I
LISTERS
SotrmWi .
t
9 12 at � 15
&

Mli,i, . � m'
Th . . DANCE
The Learned THEATRE
ji's i. . .
A, VJ I ebiu�r i.
Call, itiirvcin ,iiti 7r; � t�M
Write: (rvwal Man tcm Carolina Playhouse. ECU. Greenvife NC 27834
(Com By:NW� k Tlvatr Art, (Vnier r�h & Eastern Street
McfKiav. through I r.l�u 10 O0 a m 4 (Ml p m
GmEdyZpne
ANOTHER DIMENSION IN SIGHT & SOUND
ii

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A V.
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Has My Pri
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the sprii 31. Wl � �
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1985
Doonesbury
7
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
SKOANP M
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50 JHA1'SIA1HY
lOLfRE CALLING
W� GROUP

'APARJ-AIQ
RJGW
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KAW KXJ SR � " h.riN7HE . MB? NOTESM4T7� MfiMWE wef wars P�PU6NW?
A'� '���� ' ' -
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(gffitSBESL i.�)
Pirates Rowdy
As ECU Halts
Pack Challenge
Continued From Page 7
private property was destroyed at
the game, but I don't recall hav-
ing heard that because of that
N.C. State didn't have any
class
Both teams played good foot-
ball, said Baker, adding that he
was pleased with the outcome of
Saturday's match. The game was
Baker's first as ECU's head
coach.
East Carolina's Chancellor,
John Howell, who also attended
the State-ECU contest, said, "It
was an exciting game. was ex-
cited. I didn't want to tear down
a fence, but I am older
The chancellor stressed that
while tremendous loyalty to the
Pirates is always appreciated,
fans should be "just a little bit"
less zealous in their attempts to
carry the team off the field.
One Trailways bus driver
didn't mind the enthusiasm,
however. After the game, she was
asked why she has been driving
Pirates to and from games for
seven years.
"Everybody likes a winning
team, honey she said smiling.
' �' aV '��� -��� i. W
JIM LeuTOEMS - Jh� Eatt Caroltnian
Jubilant Pirates' fans converge on the field at Carter-Kinley Stadium
Saturday to celebrate their team's victory.
Oh Where, Oh Where,
Has My Privacy Gone?
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Continued From Page 7
doesn't want to he alone. It there
are an women reading this who
� the ma he interested in
Horrible, please contact me
through the 1 jv . arolinian - I
may have to take you out first to
ensure ou have no com-
jnicable diseases
I astl) is Mark not the same
from Belk. but Mark is
almost cls ugly. This may account
foi Mark's lackadaisical attitude
irerning women Mai k is in a
severe drought. I believe the last
time he was with a female was in
the spring of '81. When I first
met him, 1 thought Mark was in a
coma he never raises his voice,
and ins han nevei moves. Then,
one night he and Hal and i were
sucking down a few, and I found
out Mark was aalifornian.
Suddenly, it all made sense
The lack of temper, the stick-
on hair, and the Bermuda shorts
were just pan of the California
make-up. I guess end this arti-
cle with Mark ii seems every
time I mention him, I get an urge
to yawn
"Hev dude, sui f's up
Editor's Note: All characters are
fictitious. Any resemblance to
real individuals is purely coin-
cidental.
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757 1327
Before September 17
Head Coach
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355 2265
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B�chr Kirkl�y-Dio�nsir�o, Op'ictan



















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I'HKlAS1 C AROl INI AN
Sports
s (Ml MBt H 10, 1985
f 'd r 10
Baker's Debut Successful
Pirates Maul Wolf pack
himirph WUCCANKXM
Ken T�ylor (47) makes a hit on Wolfpack ball earner Rick, horn (33)
as Jeff Turner(46) and Bubba Yaters (39) converge on the play.
Continued from Page 1
19-yard pass from Ron Jones to
Tony Baker on a crucial third
down situation, keeping the drive
alive. Later, on second and 10
from the Wolfpack 18, Jones
found tight end Mike Gainey
open accross the middle for the
score with 12:46 remaining in the
second period.
The Wolfpack answered back
with 7:33 left in the quarter.
Kramer capped the 13 play
80-yard drive with a seven yard
touchdown pass to fullback
Rickey Isom. Kelly Hollodick
converted the extra point to tie
the score at 14-14.
After both teams were unable
to mount drives in their next
possesions, ECU took over on
their own 12-yard line with 3:17
remaining in the half. ECU mov-
ed the ball to the State 28, where
Jeff Heath attempted a 45 yard
field goal. The kick was true,
however ECU was penalized for
having only 10 men on the field.
The five yards made little dif-
ference to Heath as his second at-
tempt easily split the uprights,
giving ECU a 17-14 advantage
with onl :08 left in the half.
The second halt was all ECU,
as the Wolfpack ottense was con-
tained as they were only able to
mount one serious drive. Kevin
Walker's interception of a
Kramer pass at the goal line, with
7:56 left in the game, ended any
hopes of a N.C. State com-
eback.
The Pirates received the open-
ing kick off of the second half
for the score. Heath again was
good on the extra-point and E I
led 27-14.
In the final moments of the
third quarter, State went tor the
first down on fourth and two at
the Pirate 38. Kramer's pass was
batted into the air and caught by
Isom who was tackled short of
players, but I'm ready,
the roses too K �
'
'It's
4 7 don V think you can measure the value of this
win to our program. It was a big win over our big-
gest rival the win really gives us more
credibility. "
�Art Baker
and moved 4 yards in eight plays
to the State 30, where the drive
stalled. Heath came on for the
Pirates and connected from 46
yards to give ECU a 20-14 lead
with 11:57 remaining in the third
quarter.
Later in the quarter, the
Pirates once again used the play
ol the specialty .earns to their ad-
vantage. The Wolfpack Jeff
Gethers fumbled a Tim Wolter
punt inside the State 10-yard line.
ECU's Jeff Turnei recovered to
set up the Pirate offense.
On third and goal from the
tour, Jones bootlegged to the left
and hit a wide-open Scott lewis
r1 jj1 V T w T �-VKUI,cnscwascon- and hit a wide-open Scot, Lewi
ECU Rolls Past Rival Wolfn
B S;()HV)PR ' ard was installed above h,�in ,h �� u, . J MT
the first down.
From there. ECU marched 62
yards with some heip from a
roughing the passer penalty. An-
thonv Simpson carried the
the final six yards for the score.
ECU went for two on the conver-
sion try and failed, giving the
Pirates a 33-14 lead. There was
no further scoring in the contest
and the Pirates went on to win bv
1 points, eclipsing their 1971 vic-
tory margin (31-15) ol 16 points.
The win was the first tor I c I
during the Baker era, and
first-year coach was overjoyed
with the outcome.
"I feel tor lorn Reed and his
the greatest win I've
� the team made a . � � � �
and it paid off
Baker fell the win a
sweeter due to 'he I i
came against the W
"I don ��
measure the
our program B �
was a big win over
rival, before tl
to see a game
win real ,
credibility
Baket fell
a ti ue "tean
'i the
special teams mal
when they wei
"We ha
im. We wii
But I've j
sive line played a Bakei
tinued. " I.
Our stafl w
design
that he :a �
Hake- wa

"1 wirr .
enough rcd
" Lru
mistake;
and a
By SCOTT COOPER
( Sp.r1 fdllm
Fifty �, ighi thousand ai i
ftundn . � u , the largest . i
?vei attend a football game in
the state ol North Cai
nessed a bitter in-state ri
saw ECU roil to an im-
isive 33-14 victory over N.C
State.
Carter-Finlej Stadium wa
popular spoi Sat . � v as
the Pirates dnd the Wolfpack
opened their 1985 seasons.
brand-new electronic
ard wjs installed above
the crowded grass endone where
some 2,500 tans gathered. I he
'� displayed al! colors
and impressive designs
throughout the evening.
X the teams entered the field,
re was an added feeling ol ex-
:ment. All the pre-game hype
was over and the players' emo-
tions were as high as Jeff Heath's
� �
f c I won the toss. Pirate
v- Maker elected to kick
off. Coach Bake; wanted to
begin the game with his defense
or perhaps to look at an
unknown Wolfpack offense.
Defensive coordinator Dor;
Powers says the biggest wondei
was their (State's) passing game.
"Our major concern was their
throwing the ball Powers said
'Their quarterbacks were
unknown to us � and it took us a
while to adjust.
"I saw a football team show a
lot oi determination out there
Powers continued. "Ellis
Dillahunt played really well and
To B.ktr ,43, �, ,��,�. ,he line for rd.gt ,g.ins � c St,� siZTy,
K I Fbelo La
K.K (Kem Walker) had a
great dav - he's setting himself
up for an exceptional year
Before 'he season began.
Coach Powers spoke ol " the
defensive unit. Powers sel a goal
that would allow his deter,
block one kick per game. Who
would have ever guessed that this
would be so crucial, just 13
minutes into the season?
With 2:11 remaining in the
opening period, sophomore
Dillahunt made the play ot the
game. Blocking Craig Salmon's
punt and recovering it in the end-
zone tied the game at seven, and
was iust an example oi things to
come.
Though the Pirates allowed
just one other touchdown, ECU'S
defense stiffened and began
creating turnovers for Ron Jones
and the high-powered offense.
Coach Baker had only positive
thoughts about his defense, as
they dominated the second half.
"I can't give them enough
credit Baker said. "The hung
in there and won the ball game.
We controlled the line of scrim-
mage in the third and fourth
quarters
When Jeff Heath connected on
a 50-yard field goal with .08 re-
maining, ECU took a 17-U lead
and much momentum into the
lockerroom.
While the Pirate kicking was in
good hands, there was some
doubt about the ECU punting
game, at least before the game.
Freshman Tim Wolter wasn't
told he was the starting punter
until game day. Wolter respond-
ed in a big way. He boomed his
first collegiate pun) I .� jv
Perhaps his best puni can
J:18 left in the thud .
Wolter hung one high into
lights, making Gethers mi
the ball. This gave the Pirates a
big break, which .
touc hdow n.
"I didn't find out 1 wa
punt untf,
"�e W "j
� nervous since 1 w
thinking aboul
i g h ;
ttelv
W
e ENTHUSIASTIC , PaXe 11
Swim Teams Bolstered By Newcomers
BV DAVID Mf(.lMS �, i:r ,
Tony Smith (13) hauls in . crucial 19-yard reception that set UD the
Pirates second touchdown as Tim Dumas 7Jh f�n i P
Ron Ey ,9). ,�d P.�. H.tt.rd�69r�"k'�� V ,7�
By DAVID McGINNESS
siiff Wrlier
As the ECU men's and
women's swim teams begin the
first half of their '8586 season,
coach Rick Kobe has high hopes
for the Pirates because of a large
number of returning veterans as
well as a strong recruiting class.
"This is our first year with a
veteran team said fourth-year
head coach Rick Kobe. "Seniors
Kaut, Pittelli. Hawkins. Cook
and Robaczewski will help give us
the depth and experience we'll
need to achieve our goals
The '85 recruiting class, in-
cluding five junior-national
qualifiers, should make strong
contributions even during their
rookie season.
"The freshmen aren't being
weaned Kobe said. "They're
here to contribute from the first
meet
Hopefully such contributions
will produce some qualifiers for
the fastest meet in the world, the
NCAA championships. '84
freshman Bruce Brockschmidt
missed qualifying last season by
only half of a second in the
100-meter freestyle.
To begin the process of getting
into competitive shape, the
Pirates enter a two-week running
program. The program ends with
a biathlon in which both men and
women will swim two miles, run
live and then swim one more.
During the regular dual-meet
season, they swim about fourteen
thousand yards daily, as well as
participating in weight training
programs.
Prior to their first regular dual
meet, the Pirates will split up for
their PurpleGold meet. The pur-
pose of this scrimmage is to see
which swimmers will perform
well under pressure.
ECU opens its dual-meet
season against Furman Universi-
ty on Nov. 7. The Furman
women are ranked in the top five
of NCAA Division-II, while the
men had the fastest ranked
backstroker in the U.S. in
8485.
The Pirates swim next on Nov.
18 against N.C. State, a team
ECU has yet to beat. "They're
the top team on our schedule
said Kobe.
On Nov. 23, both men's and
women's teams will travel to
Charlotte for their first away
meet. UNCC, whose program is
very new, should be ECU's
weakest opponent.
On Dec. sixth, both men and
women will swim against Navy at
Annapolis.
"The Navy men and women
are always tough said Kobe,
"Our guys have lost to them for
the last five years
Unlike most NCAA pools,
Navy's is 25 meters long insted
of 25 yards. That gives them a
distinct home advantage since
training on a 25 meter pool
makes competing on one easier.
The five foot difference between
the two may not seem like much,
but it can make a big difference
in a swimmer's rhythm.
On Dec. 8, the ECU women's
team will swim at home against
the University of New Hamp-
shire. "Our women will have to
swim well to win said Kobe.
"They're (N.H.) coming down
for one reason, to swim against
ECU
On Dec. 14th, the Pirates will
swim their final meet of the
FallWinter season against
American University here at
Minges Natatorium. According
to coach Kobe, American is "a
good team however, he feels
that both the men and thewomen
should win fairly easily.
From Dec. 28th-Jan. 5th the
Pirates will travel to the North
Palm Beach Aquatic Club in
Florida for their Christmas train-
ing session. The team will train in
two, two-hour sessions each day.
On Jan. 2, ECU will swim against
John Hopkins Unversity at Palm
Beach.
With a good group of new
talent combined with the senior
leadership, both the men's and
women's swim teams should pro-
ve to be a power in the east.
A
w
i
&
w" � w
, -n-
HI
t (
WflWf
� i
a r

J

The swim team will open their 19S5 season, i� November.
Sport Cl
Variety
Bv If SNr I fc,
un; .
II
tion for tenn
Enthusiastic
Spectators
Rage
Continued from Page 1(1

voca
w a

his
seated
s fai a
we
COi
Ba k
of not
bee
� � w
stakes
out
fhev ma
mi- �
Wi t h
and
opener, i
'butterflies'
plav Howe(
case foi U l
"Our kids
well said 1 (
dinator D M
Carolina
In the last mini
tions ran high a
readied thems
game celebra
NCSI police wa-
celebration as thev tried
back the crowd Despite efl
the PA announcer, the P
fans would not be leff s
their on-the-field celebrati
With the concern for the -
of the fans, N -
wouldn't permit the climl
the goalposts
Coach Ait Baker wa imp
ed with the LCI fan supp
would like to see a big fur
the Pirate home opener against
Southwest Texas State on S
14.
�&mm





I HI I �iS!( Hi IN1AN
SH'II MHt K 10, 1V��
il
Ifpack
Sport Clubs Offer
Variety Of Activities
Opener
mwam, mmvmmm
-
tston (70),
JpMHP iWBWBW? nr
i

9 �
MSJ
? c
open their 1985 seasons in November.
rU JrWr I Ih KOIII
something
exciting to do during
free time you have'1 It
Depa 11 in eni o t
ional Sei ices
sport
iiH
UlP
lub
her
ma be
petjtioi
� ill di
m the scene
on tii oui
M sbee Club, the
vi to Hip their
club Quite
ive already
need
V i v.i H'gdon
v Memoi
idie

S
M il Gym

R
petition,

be a
things this year. Here's youi
chance to upset the defending
champion and take a swing at
Fhomas Rogerson, last year's
men's intermediate champion
1 adies, we've got two divisions
foi you, too. Diane Sweeney
walked away with the champion
ship cup last yeai for the in-
termediate division. Although the
hkes of $180,000 will not be seen.
we otter tun, competition and
fitness tree of charge. Register in
room 105 Memorial Gym from
x 00 a m -5:00 p.m. through to
Guess what's here golf tans'
I cam putt-putt is in the air.
Registi ation for-the-fun-of-it
begins Sept. 9-10. Pick up your
irust putter and head down
Highway 33 to Greenville's er
own putt-putt headquarters
Sources sa last year's men's
lean champions 'THE HI R
NOI is' are exactly that,
'HI KM OUT' So fellows,
here's your chance to win the
coveted all-campus IRS t-shirt.
1 adies, 'Alpha Delta Pi' may
or ma no' he back to defend
their title but here's hoping
Nancy 1 opez's ol ECU make it
out to this year's putt-putt
course. It's all for-the-fun-of-ii
with intramural team putt-putt.
Flag tootball begins this week
on all the intramural placing
fields Good luck participants,
have a sate and exciting season.
Arriving
Wednesday
Let Everyone
Know the Score
Hr. � tMfUKSJ�aK�iS'KCMt���i�
�s
,o
'���.

Ladies
I ast chance to take advantage of hast Carolina
Fitness Center's . price sale.
only S1c 00
a full semester
of
aerobics
(lass Schedule
Mon.
Tues.
Wed
Thurs
1
Sat.
Sun.
3:15
3:15
3:15
5:15
3 lc
11:00
4:30
4:30
4:30
4 30
4 30
4:30
5:4
5:45
5:45
5:45

T-Shirts
$5.95

U.B.E"
SI ft COTAUK HE
(.BIIWHll N C C
les began
Enthusiastic
Spectators
Rage
( onlmued from Pae 10
a
me ap
hen S
e north
Kra � � � to hear
band
II otten.se
Bal ' - Pirate
rate
�. . ' he
iur offense
R : a super job
things I he team is
nfident in him.
: make some
Bal added. "Hut
ivei hard thai
foi those
f : on hand
� the season
e would think thai
rflies' :ome into
H this was not the
1(1
kids really responded
aid E l offensive coor-
r Doi Murrj "I he more
here, the better. It was a
performance for last
na
the last minute of play, emo-
ran high and 1 C I tans
lied themselves tor the post
ebration. However,
SI police wanted no sort oi
bration as the tried to hold
I k the crowd. Despite efforts
� PA announcer, the Pirate
would not be left short of
:heir on-the-field celebration.
With the concern for the safety
the fans. N SU police
ildn't permit the climbing of
the goalposts
Coach Art Baker was lmpress-
Mth the 11 fan support and
Aould like to see a big turnout for
the Pirate home opener against
Southwest Texas State on Sept.
14.
I
'��'�������'����������
Aerobics
Bring in this ad
1 C. fitness Center
Where Ihe Winners Train
1102 Evans St.
(jteenville, N
758 9584
I nds Sept. 16th
� 4 . . . .
Before you make
a long distance commitment,
make sure you know
what you're getting into.
If Fletcher Christian and Captain Bligh had
known what being stuck in the same boat
would mean, chances are neither would haw
ot foot aboard.
And if you're stuck in the same boat with a long
distance company that doesn't give you all the
services you need, it's easy to harbor mutinous
thoughts.
But when you pick AT&T as your long distance
company, you know you're in for smooth sailing.
You'll get trouble-free, reliable service. Immediate
connections�even during the- busiest hours.
Guaranteed 60 and 40 discounts off our Day
Kate on state-to-state calls. And operators to
assist you with immediate credit for wrong
numbers and collect calling.
So when you're asked to choose a longdistance
company, sign aboard with AT&T. With AT&T Long
Distance Service, you'll never be left stranded.
Reach out and touch someone
c 1985 AT&T Communications
AT&T
The right choice.
- �� �.
i





WANTED
HELP WANTED: Students in
terested in security guard work who
are 18 years of age or older, able to
satisfactorily complete a Criminal
Record Check, hae very depen
dable transportation, willing and
arjie to work weekends,holidays and
nights, contact Maior Catapano at
758 21?4
ROOMMATE WANTED: Non
nth. utilities mclud
ed i. a ?S: 1642
part TIME: Soccer Coaches need
ifternoon hours Call Pitt Com
ty Schools at 752 2934 ext. 276 or
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED: In
ested in mak rig noney part time
photographing campus activities'
No experience required we train, if
you are highly sociable, have a
m camera and transportation.
� e us a can at l 800 722 7033
GET PAID FOR YOUR EFFORTS:
' ward a future with
� ' ��' ca's fastest growing fooa
�� .�"� company Earning poten
'iai up to S8 an hr Flexible schedule
pull and part time positions
available Must nave economical
ii Call or stop by the office Joke's
Us. 320 E 10th Street 757 1973
fEARBOOK OFFICE: Now accep
'iong applications for staff positions
pDv a Buccaneer office, Publica
tions building
�ART TIME EMPLOYMENT: Per
int for disabled student,
on weekends. Eight to ten hours
Vils res Females preferred
tact R - Creech 758 3214
TWO FEMALES NEEDED: To
re a room "own
house Rem re asonable Ca
758 '
LOST ��� ma . CocKer
Spa � ' � � 51 lbs Last seen
- �
SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS units
E �� ency 8th floor.
� �� floor units complel
arpeted, air conditioned
� ' � en appliances
lav 201 532 7993 (after
p m 201 431 0768, or write Mr
� donio 99 Wilson Ave Freehold.
.
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC 20
� '� ��� ' � ' -�okups ana some
uding 6 gamp 'apes
� iette storage recoraer pir.
den � � tern nai pro
.assette Prograer's Aid,
nory expansion cartridge and
efen :e manuals. S200 Can An
" 757 6366 or 752 7346
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Just
irried and need to get nrj of fur
�jre quick! Single bed chest of
� ��� s. and chair for $75 Call Tony
�� 7 57 0964
79 CHEVY CUTLASS CAPRICE: 4
aoor Air conditioned very good con
P -ase can 757 3717
FOR SALE : Math Statistics 3228 All
problems worked in back and
"book Chapters 1 8 Call Bob
752 2579
FOR SALE: 1982 BuiC Skylark
Green and tan 4 door Air
conditioning PS Am Fm Stereo.
Tilt Wheel Great shape, $3,500 or
$500 down and take over payments of
SU8 a month Call 756 2174 between
9am 5pm Ask for Tony
FOR SALE: Trees ideal for aorm
room Also new 10 speed cheap
756 2820 ask for Ross
BUNK BED FOR SALE: Sturdy
wood frame, mattresses included
S75 f.rrn Call after 6 00 p.m
756 0354
D P WEIGHTLIFTING MACHINE:
Capable of 30 exercises HO lbs of
we.ght, padded bench, used one
month, $U0 758 3583 after 5 30
FOR SALE: Smith Corona
typewriter Electric, almost
new 756 6504
'74 VW BEETLE: Excellent condi
tion 758 5712 after 5:00 p.m
SUNN CONCERT BASS AMP AND
POWER AMP:200 Watts $200 also
5000 BTU air conditioner $100 Call
757 0558 after 5 00 p m
ADORABLE AKC YORKIE: Male 8
wks old, first shots, wormed $200
Call anytime 752 4829
FOR SALE: Math Statistics 3228 All
problems worked in back and
workbook Chapters 1 8 Call Bob
752 2579
PERSONALS
CROSBY STILLS AND NASH:
Tickets are now available at Apple
Records for their Sept 18 concert in
Greensboro Price includes good
ticket and comfortable round trip by
bus
WRITER'S BLOCK CURED: Send
$2 for catalog of over 16,000 topics, to
assist your writing efforts and help
you beat Writer's Block For info,
call Toll free 1 800 621 5745 (In II
linois, call Authors' Research, Rm
600, 407 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL
60605
BURGLARS BEWARE: Door
Alarm II is watching Protect your
room or apartment Hang Door
SI I'll MHI K 10, IV8
Alarm 11 on inside doorknob Call
752 5695 or write P O Box 3226 for
demo
NEED TYPING Letters, resume s,
term papers, etc Call Karen at
752 0498
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
Becky Latham at 752 5998(8 a.m. to 5
pm) 17 yrs experience in typing
theses. scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters
WORD PROCESSING We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
resonable and we always offer a 15
discount to ECU Students S and F
Professional Computer Co.(back of
Franklin's) 115 E 5th Street
757 0472
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The Golden
Hearts would like to welcome the Sig
Ep 1985 Fall Pledge Class we're
looking forward to meeting you all!
Love the Little Sisters
THE MIDDLEMAN. Apartment
Listing Roommate Referral Service
210 E 4th Street Suite number 2
across from Sub Station l. Let us
help you find the apartment or room
mate you're looking for Call
830 1069
GWM: Age 24, seeks similar,
preferably in 30 or 40 age range, who
is interested in developing a life with
me Write to me You won't regret it.
P O Box 4273, Greenville, NC 27836
LET ME DO YOUR TYPING FOR
YOU Reasonable rates Profes
sional work. Call 756 0479,
SAILBOAT CHARTERS: Day sail
on Pamlico River $20 per person for
all day charter. Coast Guard licens
ed captain Groups of up to 6 Call
Capt Greg Smith at 1 975 3300 after
6 00 p m.
DELTA ZETA: Congratulations new
pledges Get ready for a great year
We love you, sisters of Delta Zeta
LAMBDA CHI'S: The football game
was really great, especially the ride
to State The buses were rockin' all
night long, with Lambda Chi's and
DZ's you can't go wrong It was a
BLAST The sisters and pledges of
Delta Zeta
PI KAPPA ALPHA. The Alpha class
would like to congradulate the new
Beta class pledges N Assad, J
Beall, C Beauchamp, B Bennett, S
Bobbins, J Calisto, S Christian, K
Crowe. T Crunk. G Garrison, Z.
Green, F Heath, K. Hidalgo, B
Jackson, K Lancaster, J. Melhorne,
D. Noel, P. O'Brien, S Oliver, N
Pate, K. Plotkin, D. Shell, W. Thorn
ton, G Vorhees, C Watson, and M
Winfree
Bill's
Fast Food
Corner 4th & Greene St.
757-1898
OPEN 7am � 8pm
Monday through Friday
2 Hot Dogs, French Fries
Medium Drink
$1.99
Home Cooking
Daily Specials
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xmmlTOWALL
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37c
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"c
each
dozen
48
0
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REGULAR � ELEC. PERK � AUTO DRIP
Maxwell g��
House coffee
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WAREHOUSE PRICES
KRAFT
Grape Jelly
i-
SAME
80c
2 lb.
jar
99
C
POLY BAG
Mahatma Rice
KELLOGG S
Raisin Bran Cereal
CARNATION
Breakfast Bar
PACKETS
Sweet N' Low
VAN CAMP
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bag
25 5 07
pkg
6ct
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pkg
PorkN'
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QUAKER
Quick Grits
; save

16 07
cans
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each
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LIMIT TWO WITH COUPO AMO AOOfTKMAl 10 00 OB MOHf PURCHASE
GOOOTHBUSAT SEPT 1 AT A4P ���
"TSSW
TIL
10
,PW
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BONELESS
Rib Eye Steak
Boneless
f SAVE
� 101
X.
X
LB
lb.
098
GOLDEN RIPE
Bananas
SAVE
20
LB
lb.
29
0
MARKET FRESH
Ground Beef
5 lbs. or
r more
SAVE Ground
8Y
V
Daily
-r
lb
88
C
MARKET
Sliced Bacon
0
r SAM
n
A ��'
lb.
98
WAREHOUSE PRICES
MRS. FILBERT'S
Margarine Qtrs.
SAVE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Cubed Steak
2
99
- 59c'
1 lb.
e pkgs.
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 CK
CRISP N TASTY
Jeno's Pizza
PACKERS LABEL
Frozen Potatoes
BANQUET
Cream Pie
HOT N BUTTERY
Downyflake Waffles
CHED-O-BIT
0
198
lb. I
11 07
pkg
5 lb
pkg
14 ox
pkg
13 07
pkg
General Merchandise Specials
Cheese Food
Slices
OEAN S FRENCH
Onion Dip -
SPREAD
Blue Ribbon
REGULAR � LIGHT
SAVE
i 20
Fine
Porcelain China
EXCLUSIVELY AT A4P ON SALE THIS WEEK
Royale Aurum Genuine Gold Bands or piin
Crown Platino Genuine Platinum Bands
M.OOOFF
Fine Porcelain China
Completer Piece
oj�.
each weekly place
setting piece only
79�
Cln of
Old Milwaukee �
Beer 12
12 or
can
4
49
WITH EVERY 3 00
PURCHASE
DELI SPECIALS
GLAZED OR SKINLESS
ALL FLAVORS
Riunite � .
Wine 5
1 5 rtr
Ml
4
49
Longacre Turkey
PASTRAMI OR
Corned Beef
lb
lb
399
369
I





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Title
The East Carolinian, September 10, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.422
Location of Original
University Archives

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