The East Carolinian, August 29, 1985






Ullte �a0t (EarDlmtan
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.2
Thursday. August 29. 1985
Greenville, N.C.
22 Pages
t irculation 12,000
Team Spirits
Some �f the 104 high school students participating in ECU Summer
entures program show their Pirate pride on The Elizabeth II. a
replica of the 16th century ship that sailed to America and landed at
Roanoke Island, Manteo over 400 years ago. Students attending
the program studied advanced subjects in microscopv. geologv and
archeology over a five-week period. The Camp was sponsored bv
ne VC . Legislature, and next year's events are alreadv in the mak-
Young Scholars Receive Taste Of ECU
By HAROLD JOYNKK
Summer Ventures In
S ience and Mathematics pro-
n may have answered the
� erj of college life to 104
North Carolina high school
students recently, along with
n leaving ICl with some ad-
: knowle . tl will last the
- ters a lifetime
: Connie
- M gi am is similar to
ate 5 Governor's School and
also lunded b the N.C .
i �-K'si.nure. "All expenses were
paid foi the student Wrenn
said "lor each student, that
comes to about $2,000 each
Students in the program were
ake accelerated courses in
areas such as microscopv and
disciplines in math and
nee. "Some students attended
classes at the med school, while
others put their energies into the
department of geologv and ar-
cheology � whatever the student
was most interested in she said.
The "mini-university
Wrenn said, could not have been
possible without the help of
various ECU departments. "We
received help from a number of
departments including health
education, the couseling center
and public safety and Air Force
ROTC Handicapped services
provided interpreters and equip-
ment for our deaf students, and
they also taught sign language
classes to those hearing students
who were interested in learning
the language.
"Mendenhall Student Center
and lntramurals were great in
that they provided us with both
facilities and equipment
Wrenn said the summer theater
provided cultural entertainment
for the students and the Student
Government Transit System for
providing transportaiton around
Greenville and on Outer Banks
field trip.
"There was no apathy here
she said. "The students were verv
involved in academic and
residence life aspects of the
camp. Also, .he staff was ex-
tremely busy putting in as much
as 12 hours a day. while receiving
a lot of personal satisfaction and
rewards for the experience Manv
of the staff still correspond with
the venturers, even though the
camp is over
Some of the Summer Venturers
free time was spent working out
at Minges and swimming at
Memorial Gym. Other activities
included a variety of competitive
sports and learning the fun-
damentals of C'PR and first-aid.
Because a lot of the students
were from western North
Carolina, Wrenn said the trip to
the Outer Banks was an extra
treat for the future scholars,
where they visited the Elizabeth
II and The I ost Colony. "Also
a big help was 514th police com-
pany of the National Guard, who
loaned us the tents and instructed
us in campsite basics
"The program was a big suc-
cess tor the kids who came to
wamp and tor the staff who
organized the program. It was an
excellent op por tunny for
residence life advisors to get some
intense experience in the manag-
ment and planning of day-to-day
educational developmental ac-
tivities she said.
Health Center Offers Varied Services
Bv DOK, K()BIRs�)
M�ff Wntrr
be I 's Student Health Center
highest utilization rate (f
any ol the universities in North
Carolina, according to Director
lames McC allum, MI)
"During the last fiscal vear, we
aw 2,y61 patients McCallum
tid. ' That's more than Pitt
Memorial Hospital's emergency
m and the Family Practice
iter combined McCallum
led thai such a high utilization
ol the infirmary speaks well of
ECI Student Health Services.
All funding for ECU health
services is provided through stu-
dent health fees, he said. "This
includes personnel salaries,
equipment and supplies, drugs,
building
maintenanceeverything
However, every effort is made to
Keep health care costs down, he
said.
ECU's health fees rank
"around the middle" in relation-
ship to the other 13 schools in the
I NC system, but was at the "top
of the list" in terms of the
number of services the students
receive for their money. "Several
of the schools offer some services
for free, and charge for others.
We're the only one that provides
tree medication McCallum
said.
The only services students are
charged for are laboratory and
other procedures that must be
performed outside the infirmary.
Prescription drugs, such as birth
control pills, are provided to
women at no cost, which Mc-
Callum said is often less than half
the cost of the prescription
through a drug store.
McCallum said Center's
ultimate goal is to educate
students, as well as to provide top
medical care. For example, a
"WeV� the only
(school) (hat provides
free medications
Dr. James McCallum
female student who requests birth
control pills is required to have a
Pap smear to test for cancer, a
full physical examination and at-
tend a lecture on the dangers of
the pill. "They are required to do
these things so they can make an
informed decision on the pros
and cons of birth control pills
he said.
Another educational aspect of
the Center is the self-help cold
center, which began in Sept.
1984. "W:e leach individuals how
to take care ol themselves when
they don't need a physician
He added that staff members
also lecture classes in any aspect
of health education, upon the re-
quest of the professor. "The stu-
dent body benefits great) from
the expertise of the Staff from
their instruction. Our people do it
because we feel health education
is beneficial to the student
bodv
Recent additions to the Center
included the hiring of two new
staff physicians and the C enter is
in the process of acquiring an
X Ray machine. Also, a program
to voluntarily screen students for
tuberculosis is planned to begin
sometime this year. "Eastern
North Carolina has one of the
highest tuberculosis rates in the
U.S. Students who are exposed to
the germ and test positive need to
be treated before it becomes ac-
tive at a later date
Backlog
Financial Aid Modifies Hours
By HAROLD JOYNKK
Due to an influx of about 1,300
Pell Grant applications to the
ECU Financial Aid office,
modified operating hours have
been set. setting aside more time
for the staff to process certain
validation procedures, according
to Director Ray Edwards.
The financial aid office has
been waiting since July for the
U.S. Government to approve
validation procedures ol the
grants. "We are faced with such
a backlog (of applications) that
there is no way we can process all
ol them before the semester is
over. That's whv we had to begin
a modified schedule "
I he hours of operations will be
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m Monday
through Friday . Students can still
call the office and staff members
will return their calls, Edwards
said.
"We realize everyone needs
� money, and we're trying as
hard as possible to process then
grants Edwards -aid. "We're
in the middle (between the l S.
Government and the students) of
this � and there jusl isn't am
humanly possible wav to process
all these forms in one day. The
government didn't equip us m
the information in a timely situa-
tion
The actual time necessary to
validate each application vanes
with each student, I dwards said.
However, "about 1 1 2 human
hours are involved and this
doesn't include mail time we wait
foi in getting signatures for
documentation. Our staff is
working at full capacity in this
complex, cumbersom situation.
ECU students who are unhap
py with the situation should write
or call their congressman to
display their pleasure, Edwards
said. "The actual validation pro-
cess is is a good thing � it
prevents any misuse of money
and it ensures that people who
need it, get it
Last year. S6 to $10 million
dollars in aid was given because
of inaccurate information, Ed-
wards said.
ECU students are not alone in
waiting for their money, Edwards
said. He contacted several
schools, who reported the same
problems of backlogging of Pell
Grant applications' approval.
"We're all playing by the rules,
so it's going to take some time
The decision to modify the
financial aid office hours was
made after discussion with Elmer
Mever, Vice Chancellor for Stu-
dent Life.
"We discussed the situation
and came to the conclusion that
without the new hours, it would
take us twice as long to process
the applications I dwards said.
"We did consider the serious ef-
fect on the kids who need the
money now, and we think we'll
get through the process a lot
taster
Hours -or the Center should
resume back to normal around
'he Nov. 1, Edwards said, and
awards should be made as soon
as possible.
Research Institute
Serves Local Area
B ELIZABETH PAGE
si.ff WrllM
To many students, the function
of the Wilhs Building is a
mystery, but not to the faculty
and staff of the Research
Development Institute.
RDI was established in 1964
with an initial role as a liason in
economic development. Since
then, the Institute has experienc-
ed major growth, and today it is
now involved in all aspects of
regional planning and develop-
ment.
RDI serves the 32 easternmost
counties of North Carolina, sup-
plying services and applied
research to local, state and
federal government agencies, as
well as organizations, individuals
and ECU departments.
Assistance can come in many
different shapes and forms, rang-
ing from business to art and
English to land management
studies. RDI utilizes students, as
well as faculty, m research ac-
tivities, which accounts for the
Institute's diversity.
Practical research, targeted
towards regional issues, through
coordination of ECU faculty is
another role RDI assumes. Fin-
dings of the research are usually
published a.s how-to manuals,
atlases or studies, assisting with
problems concerning research
and publication topics from
throughout the region and cam-
pus.
RDI accepts requests for
assistance as well as identifies
problems in the 32-county region
in initiating actions to address
those problems.
A client may receive assistance
by submitting a written request
and describing the nature of
assistance desired.
Director Janice Faulkner will
respond to the request, depen-
ding on the urgency of the pro-
blem.
ECU Cadets Win Honors
Bv ELIZABETH PAGE
staff Wrlifr
While many students were en-
joying their summer vacation, 23
ECU Army ROTC Cadets battled
the heat at the annual ROTC Ad-
vanced Camp at Fort Bragg,
N.C
More than 3,600 cadets from
111 schools along the east coast
participated in the events. Nine
cadets were from the Tarheel
State.
Since the ROTC program has
to be an extension of a larger
group, ECU competed with
NCSU as their parent unit, and
placed 12th overall in the contest.
The division also won first place
in two of five rated areas.
Of the nine state schools, ECU
posted the highest overall score
and was awarded the Governor's
Trophy for that performance.
The Governor's Trophy is award-
ed to the school that has the
highest overall rating among
North Carolina at Advanced
Camp.
The ECUNCSU group was
also rated number one among
North and South Carolina
schools, which awarded them
with a second trophy. The
ECUNCSU group also finished
first place in the field of military
skills � critical phase of the Ad-
vanced Camp. Here the Cadets
learn and practice such skills as
marksmanship, land navigation,
and applied leadership in tactics.
This is a test to prove a cadet's
potential to be a good officer.
Cadet Wade Sokolosky, an
ECU Industrial Technology ma-
jor finished first among the two
schools ranking him 22nd out of
3,600. Sokolosky, a Beaufort,
N.C. native, felt that ECU would
have finished much higher if they
had competed alone. "If ECU
were a separate institution, we
would have probably finshed
sixth or eighth Sokolosky said.
"It was their scores that kept
us from being higher, but our
scores brought them up higher
he said.
Professor of Military Science
at NCSU and ECU Lt. Col.
Anderson said he was not surpris-
ed at the performance of the
cadets at the Camp. "I,
strength of any organization ties
in its people, and our students are
among the very best. Our
students have shown that they
can excel in every area that is
deemed necessary for success in
not only the military, but in vir-
tually any profession added
Anderson.
Number One
r�L mLST? y.PCed top honors ,n M �nnu,U competition held at Fort Bra. N C
S? ill f�k,� ��JZ' " IndB8tri�l Technology major, placed first �on tl�e two schftaaldf.
him 22nd out of 3,600 cadets from different states. Gov. Jim Martin, second from teft T
Sokolosky with the winning trophy. Also shown 1, Dr. Barry Dnvall andTHddurLUvaT
m 0
f " �
.1





1 Hj t-ASI i AKoi INIAN
AUGUST 29, 18
Announcements
INDT
� position are currently available
' students concentration m manofjcturmg
kith a maior power fool manufacturer .n
� � Bern Tiese pos.t.ons provide eacellent
pei erne (or students .nterested in
Khanical engineering ano pay a 00 per
�nore information contact
" v� Education 313 Rm Big
CONSTRUCTION
"ANAGEMENT
� ' - ipportunitt s a.a lapie tor
' '�g - I onstruction
kg the proiect manager in a J38
� -1 � a pi � j in
" � . client
l� sneo
'� ' perative Educ' Rawl
for i 'her informs'
SECURITY GUARDS
�vailabU � part t,me
puardl �� � .t.pnv He area
� � . over 18 haw r,n,porta
CM g to work weekends. Con
p Off ice 13 R a B
OFFICE WORKERS
. � �� � � �. . , 1 ntacl
HlCI - IV. :� 0
TKE
� � sisters of
" � �010
- � � s vs won
as -t was
I �
248
D'
LAW SOCIETY
� -��
Our goes-
: iav d B Stevens Ea i
New officers w
embei s � id " �
r more nforrnato
Ragsdd � -4
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
m Canc- 17 Oct 15
V m . V tt �� � . . '
-s Sept
PEACE
COMMITTEE
r . �� -� .�
� � � � .
I 61
:a a" -
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
���,��
� ' " � - - 1 Art C 0
������ � v.e" lakt � 11
ZBT BROTHERS
AND LITTLE SISTERS
��
:C Conventior Piease � �
HONORS SEMINARS
All University faculty who plan to submit
proposals for sprmg semester Honors
sem.nars need to send the proposals to David
Danoers Director of the Honors Program
rn Ragsdale(6373) by Fnoay. September 6
Seminars are topic oriented and often ,nter
disciplinary and team taught Honors
students may also request seminar topics
ano suggest faculty members to teach the
courses
The Honors Committee makes the final
selection from among proposals submitted
can 757 6373 or come by the Honors Office
Ragsoaie. for nformat.on
REGULAR LIBRARY HOURS
Regular library hours are as follows Sun
l P m to 12 midnight Sat 9 a m to 8 p m
Friday Sam to v n m Mon Thurs Sam
'0 12 midnight The library will be open
tabor Day Mon Sept 2 from 8am t0 12
midnight
HIKERS ANDBIKERS
The S.erra Club invites you to come to its
Opening program featuring a report on bicy
de tourmg Nova Scotia and in eastern NC
An interested persons welcome Monday
Sept 9th and every 2nd Monday thereafter
at 8 p m m the basement of the Presbyterian
church utfl ana Eim St Greenville
PHI SIGMA PI
Back to school p.cn,c Saturday August
31st Meet at Elm Street Park at 4 00 For ,n
�0 can 752 0007
LIBS 1000
Students enrolled in LIBS 1000 fall
semester should be aware of the following
schedule of meeting dates Aug 26 Oct 9 �
sec' 9 20 42 43 Aug 27 Oct 8 � sect 8
Aug 27 Oct 10 � sect 1 7 44 299 Aug 28 Oct 9
' sect 21 Oct 14 Dec 2 ' sec 1 31 41 46 47
t.l5 Dec 5 � sect 22 30 45 18 49
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Scuba'Sept 3 26 1 10pm Dance Factory �
Sept 5 Nov 7 5 30 6 30pm Small Computer �
Sept 7 9am 4pm Beginning P,ano �
Sept 9 Sov 18 6 30 7 30pm Intermediate
P.ano � Sept 9 Nov 18 7 30 8 30pm Contact
ng education Erwir Hsu
WELCOME BACK
AMBASSADORS!
Hope .ou had a 'atas'it summer and are
ready tor a b.g year Our first Genera'
eel be neid on Sept 4fh Weanesca,
a' s ispm n ,ne Multipurpose room n
Meno-
WELCOME BACK BROTHERS
OF PI KAPPA PHI
FRATERNITY
(.� the � oft a Dang
Ski sure 'ush s us' as em it ng ana
�' ' Bro'herhood will De Sunaa� n.gnt
liwities S'J" a' 8am Mor
ind Wed A �� s sters should De
Jul a' the P kappa house a 'he same I me
' ' ' �' � ' � p �appa
ALL NURSING STUDENTS
GRADUATING FALL
SEMESTER
1 order t0 receive your Nursing P,n ,n
- Der orders must be placed in the Sty
tores Ar,ght Build.ng no later than
September 20 1985 O'ders should be placed
at the Jeweir, Counter Orders musl be paa
in full when the oroer s placed
LIFEGUARD
Opportunity for students holding WSI cer
titications to lifeguard and assist In swimm
mg instruction In Greenville Contact
Cooperative Education 313 Rawl Building
SALES POSITION
Several positions available on a part time
basis m retailing establishments located In
Greenville For more information contact
Cooperative Education, 313 Rawl Bldg
WHITEWATER RAFTING
TRIPS
The last day to register for the Whitewater
Raftmg Trip near Asheville is Sept 12 1985
All intramural Representatives must at
tend this meeting. Anyone interested is
welcome and invited to attend Spm in room
Brewster C 103 15 the place ana Wednesday
Sept 28 is the day
TEAM PUTT PUTT
Putt Putt ,or the fun of f with m
'ramurais Registration tor fall team Putt
Putt w.li be held Sept 9 10 In roum 105 B
Memorial Gym its all for you intramurals
TENNISSINGLES
Swing into tall intramural action by
registering for the intramural Tennis Singles
tournament Sign up n room 105 B Sept 9 10
Memorial Gym For more m'ormation caU
757 6387 Participate rather tnan spectate
IFC
The first IFC meeting of the semester will
be Tuesday Aug 28fh at 5 p m m room 221
Attendance is important to discuss final
details of ECU'S first IFC leadership con
ference
NC. STATE LEGISLATURE
The North Carolina Student Legislature
will hold its first meeting Monday 26th at 7
p m m the MendenhaH Coffeehouse This
will be an important organisational meeting
and plans for the Sept IC at NCSU will be
discussed All interested students are invited
to attend it you have any questions please
call Glenn Perry at (919) 792 4036
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
The ECU chapter of the State Employees
Association of North Carolina Inc will be
conducting ,ts memberships drive Aug 15
Sept 30. 1985 Any fun me Ecu ernpl0yee
interested in 0in,ng should contact a
member of the ECU chapter They will be
wearing id badges during the membership
drive For more info call 756 3527 after 6
p m
LIBRARY SCIENCE
Students enrolled in LIBS 1000 fan
semester should be aware of the following
schedule of meeting dates Aug 26 Oct 9
sections 9 20, 42. 43 Aug 77 Oct 8. section 8
Aug 27 Oct 10. sections 1 7 �4 299 Aug 28
Oct 9 section 21 Oct 14 Dec 2 sections
31 41 4� 4? Oct 15 Dec 5 sections 22 30 45
48 49
PHI SIGMA PI
Ph, Sigma Pi back to school picnic Sat .
Aug 31st Meet at Elm Sf Parda'4pm For
more info call 752 0007
IMPROVE YOUR STUDY
SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study skills
'or greater success in college The following
mini course and workshops can help you
prepare for the added workloak of college or
help to mcrease your gpa When and
where All sessions will be held in 305 Wr.ght
Annex Sept 2 Time Management 3 5 p m
Sept 3 Mak.ng and Using Notes 3 5pm.
Sept 4. Efficient Reading 3 5pm Sept 5
Tes' Tak.ng Skills 3 5pm
GRAND OPENING
Of
Gordon's Oolf
& Shi Shop
� All Ladies Summer Clothing 50 off
� Men's IZOD Sport Shirts Rey $28.00 Now $17.95
- STUDENT SPECIALS -
Show ECU ID. A receive a special discount on used golf A ski
equipment.
Golf Balls $16.95 a dozen
$19.95 for balata balls
Uith Purchase of I doz. golf balls you will receive a free handful
of golf tees
NEW LOCATION 264 Bpass (Beside McDonalds)
756-1003
3K
WELCOME ECU STUDENTS
catholic newman center
east Carolina university
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919)752-4216
(at The foot of College Hill)
SunTv Lhlcc,r'tUal 3nd SOC'al needs " the Ecu campus
SUNDAYMASS 11 30 a.mBiology Lecture Hall rm ,03)
900 p m �Newman Center
Baptist Student
Union
BEACH BLAST
Open House
EVERYONE
WELCOME!
Thursday August 29th
FREE ADMISSION!
Volleyball Starts at 4 p.m.
Food Served at 5:30 p.m.
Baptist Student Center is located at 511 E. Tenth St Beside
Wendy's
ATTIC I The Rebel
m m I X � East Carolina's Literary and Arts Maaazine
THUR
is now accepting applications for
the following positions:
fri Nantucket
(With HARBOUR)
sat Diamonds
SUN
Maxx
Warrior
itaf Editor
Poetry Editor
Prose Editor
Art Director
Applications may be obtained in the Media
Board Office, The Rebel Office, and the Art
Building Office and should be turned in to
the Media Board Secretary (Publications
Bldg) no later than Friday Sept. 6, 500 p.m.
CORECSOFTBALL
Diamonds are everybody be�t tr,ena
with intramural! Bg,ster tor co r� so�t
ball in room 105 B Memorial Gm Sept 9 10
Take tne f,r�t coi� titie ot trie semester
Participate rather than spe. tate
FLAG FOOTBALL
Anyone interest m signing up (or m
tramural Flag Football should regter n
room 105 B Momorrai Gym Sept 2 3 Br.ng
team's IO Social Security number Make this
tne best season ever'
WANTED
Talented student art-sts protoarapners
journalists who need experience and e�tra
money The Department ot mtran-iurai
Recreational Services needs your netp To
apply come by room 204 Memorial Gym Be
a part of one of the best intramural Pe' r�M
tional Services departments any
IMPROVING YOUR STUDY
SKILLS
teaming how to improve your stud. -
�or greater su'� ess .r. - ouege '�� � . ,
mini course and work slops a' r.eip you
prepare tor tre added workload ot ro' �
rirease your grade pomt average
vVhen and vVhere Aiisessorsw; o ' �
)0S vW.ght Anne. rvoraa� Sep 2 �
Management 3 u . v�,
,rlS a' � . N0tes s 5p A
Sept 4 Efficient l�i ; ng 3 prr Thursday
�ept 4 iking Skills 3 u
ECU
('
Buy, Sell and Trade
through
Classifieds
Call 757-6366
FOOD
is our
SUBTECT
east Carolina
dining service
- COLLEGE HILL
DINING HALL
- MENDENHALL
SNACK. BAR
- BUFFET DINING
- GALLEY
- CATERING
georges
hair designers
For The Latest
In Contemporary
Hair Styling
FREE CONSULTATION
Klafsun Sun Tanning Beds
Open 8:30 a.m9:00 p.m.
The Plaza
756-6200
Sand Language
Partkipalt of i!h summer
lurt i amp lakt- un:
thankv In I i I .luring Ihci:
lo the Oultr Bank rhi
efforts of Dm
Urcnn: Barr Ht.tu i
Domn Henr assistant '
lor: Krunir tlnnald he
EckCft, Preslnri siarkv Marti
Plyer. trait tann. Albt-rJ
Jackson, trances Ridlr am-
ni (prum. all E I resident. J
� istirv the prityram was Ul
tessful. The tasi ar.diniai
salutes, all of si.u. Vc pAiif. fa
mure details.
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
756-3023 24 hrv
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The LSAT Exposed
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.
IV1 hflo;
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 29, 1985
IMPROVING YOUR STUDY
LS
. �, v
owing
Kje Of
�-��rage
-v ' ed in
A- � r'SMv
Buy, Sell and Trod
through
Classifieds
Coll 7576366
OD
our
ECT
I
I
i
axolina
service
ux. niJLL
G HALL
ENHALL
K. BAR
T DINING
"LIMY
ERING
I
rges
signers
e Latest
emporary
Styling
SULTATION
in Tanning Beds
.m9:00 p.m.
756-6200
i '�' . t �
ECU Begins New Teacher Exchange Program
H 1 r Burr.u
I I will inaugurate a teacher
exchange program with the
Peoples Repuhlu ol China next
nonth when Ian Calhoun a
history schofc?, begins ork at
Jinan I niversit) at a salary larger
than that ol the presideni of
i hina
She will he paid 500 yuan
($160-$200)amonth for teaching
survey courses in American
history in English to Chinese
foreign language students. She
also will get paid vacation.
university-provided housing and
grocery bill will he only about
SI a month.
she may gven be given chauf-
teured limousine service to and
i hei dormitory or "friend-
ship hotel" on the Jinan campus
Sand Language
Participates of ihe "summer Ven-
tures (amp take time out to say
thanks to ECl during their visit
to the Outer Banks. Through the
efforts of Director Connie
YArenn: Barr Henett and
Ioreen Henr, assistant direc-
tors, Reggie McDonald, Ben
Kckert. Preston Starks, Marly
Plyer, Traeey Mann, Alberta
Jackson, Frances Ridley and Jen-
ni Grum, all ECU residence ad-
visors, the program was suc-
cessful. The Fast Carolinian
salutes all of you. See page 1 for
more details.
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
( omptete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville BKd
BEAT the LSAT!
Trick l�! WO'k
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in Guangzhou (formei l
Canton) Her teaching assign
ment is for one yeai
"The Chinese people respond
verv favorably to Western
teachers sas Dr. Philip C .
Cheng, an ECU professoi of ac
counting, who negotiated teacher
exchange agreements with
Chinese universities during a trip
to his homeland in lav
Dr. Robert Gowen, professoi
of Asian history, asked lis
Calhoun last Spring if she would
be interested in teaching in China
for a year.
In turn, Miss Calhoun submit-
ted her resume, transcripts and
letters of recommendation which
Cheng took to China. On May
22, which happened to be her bir-
thday, she received an invitation
from Dr. Tan Shilan, chairman
o' foreign languages at Jinan,
and she accepted.
One of her letters of recom-
mendation was from Dr John
M. Howell, ECU chancellor, who
is a long time friend of the
Calhouns. Jan's father, Walter
Calhoun, is also and ECU pro-
fessor of history.
"Jan is the ideal person to in-
itiate ECU's exchange program
with China Gowen said. "Her
excellent educational background
in Chinese culture and American
history, plus her great personali-
ty, make her exceptionally well
prepared to pioneer this new ven-
ture
Miss Calhoun received a
bachclc degree with a major in
history at ECU in 1981. Her
courses included Gowen's Asian
History and History of Modern
Japan. Ironically, she says, she
did not take Ciowen's course on
the history of modern China.
Gowen added that "we are
looking closely at Japanese
universities for future ex-
changes" in addition to other
Chinese institutions.
As for salary, it may be modest
by U.S. standards but quite ade-
quate because of the much lower
cost of living in China. It was
Cheng who first mentioned to
Miss Calhoun that her salary of
500 yuan was more than the
salary paid to the president of
China.
"But that is without the
perks Cheng laughed.
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�te Eaat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
roM Norton, omiitaw,
JAY STONE, MmrngmgEm
HAROI D Joi NER. v� ToM LuVENDER, �� ,� ���,
DANII 1 1M r, k� ANTHONY MaRF.N. �,
Rick Mccorma John Pt:TERSONfc
SCOT! COOPER, o BlI MlTCHELIw
Shannon SHOS 1 � . ,w DhBB(, STEVENS, v�,
DE( hani, E Johnson. � r� Andrfw Joym.r (
ugusi 29, is�hs
Opinion
Page 4
Writer Hurt
Prayers Requested
Mike Hamer is one of the
highest, most vital human beings
that I have ever known. He is one
of those truly remarkable people
who never seem to have a bad word
to say about anybody and he has
tirelessly dedicated himself to
humanitarian efforts such as the
fight against world hunger and
poverty. At times I have been awed
by his indominatable affability and
his patience for dealing with peo-
ple. Yet, 1 feel privileged to know
him and count him among mv
friends.
Mike has been a contributing
writer to The East Carolinian for a
number of years, has played in area
bands such as The Rutabaga
Brothers and The Lemon Sisters
and has taught English through the
graduate department here at ECU.
Last spring he took time off from
the paper and graduate school to go
down to Nicaragua and work with
civilians in areas that are under
almost constant attack from the
"contras" supported by the Reagan
administration. Mike's letters to
friends told of contra attacks upon
Nicaraguan villages in which
civilians and health care workers,
rather than soldiers, were killed
and he implored those of us staying
here to work for an end to contra
funding from the United States.
When his stint with the Witness for
Peace organization that had arrang-
ed for his stay in Nicaragua ended
Mike came back to Greenville anx-
ious to share his experiences with
the people here and to work for
peace in Central America.
Tragically, however, he was
struck down by an accident that
threatens to leave him paralyzed
when he stopped off to go swimm-
ing on his way back from Ocracoke
Island. Mike's sixth vertabra was
crushed when he dove into shallow-
water off the end of a pier at
Whichard's beach in Washington,
North Carolina. Presently he is
considered to be in serious condi-
tion at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. It will be a number of
days before doctors will know how
extensive the damage to his spinal
cord is.
In the meantime, Mike is fighting
to regain the full use of his body
with the same irrepressibly buoyant
spirit and courage that have come
to characterize him among those
who know him. His friends are sup-
porting him in this in every way that
they can. As a lot, they are not the
kind of people who believe in sub-
mission to impersonal grey realities.
Their attitudes are best summed up
by one of Mike's roommates who
professes a belief in the healing
powers of the mind and in
recoveries which defy the expecta-
tions of the medical profession. She
has been working with Mike doing
therapeutic touch and creative
visualization exercises which she
and Mike both believe can unlock
well-springs of healing energy
within people.
Life does not always seem to be
fair. Certainly the accident that has
befallen Mike seems unfair to me
and those who know him.
Something terrible and senseless
has happened to someone who is a
true humanitarian. To note this is
not to profess a disbelief in a higher
order of intelligence, but simply to
observe that if such an intelligence
does exist, then it does not appear
to be taking care of good people,
punishing bad people and otherwise
authoring the scripts for our lives.
Where is cosmic justice then? It is
in our own hands. And so, however
you send healing energy to those
you care for � through prayer or
meditation � we ask you to do so
for Mike Hamer. He is a uniquely
decent and caring person who
deserves the best.
Committee Formed To Censor Lyrics
Censorship In Rock Music
By TERENCE MORAN
Ihr Nf� KrpublW
'Good Golly Miss Molly l ittle
Richard howled with glee. It was 1959.
and the self-proclaimed 'Queen tit Rock-
n-RolT was hellaciously flinging a truth
at America: 'When you're rockin' and
rollin1 You can't hear your mama call!1
Pop music's first sexually ambiguous
superstar wasn't singing about dancing
with Molly at the sock-hop, and this was
no secret to outraged PTA's, church
groups, and high school principals
across the country. I he burned his
records, but song after song went gold.
Mama lost that round, and nearly every
one since
Now a neu wave ol concern over the
attitudes espoused in rock music is
gathering strength, triggered by the
raunchiness of today's pop stings and
the blatant sexuality ol accompanying
videos. - group calling itself the
Parent's Music Resource (enter has set
up shop in posh offices in downtown
Washington, D.C its mission 'to get
the music world to clean up its act
1 ast year, the national PTA sent let-
ters to 2 record companies asking ihat
rock music be clearly labeled for sexual
content or profanity, but its plea was ig-
nored. What make.s.the PMRC different
is its well-connected leadership. Mary
Elizabeth 'Iipper' Gore (wife of Sen.
Albert Gore, I) - lenn). Susan Baker
(wife of the treasury secretary), and Pam
Howar (wife of a Washington
construction-firm magnate) are the high-
profile officers of the fledgling group.
Money does not seem to be a problem.
Though it was founded just a little
over three months ago. the PMRC has
already received a lot o attention.
Sewsweek, The Washington Post, U.S.
e d World Report, and National
Public Radio have featured the group,
and Phil Donahue pegged it for one o
his on-the-air debates. In June, the
Justice Department's new commission
on pornography heard PMRC testimony
on 'porn rock and a special presenta-
tion documenting the transgressions of
pop singers has been pitched to influen-
tial senators fearing the worst �
there's talk ol congressional hearing
the tall - the president if the Nati
Association ol Broadcasters alerted - �
station-group owners to the high-
powered lobbyin � rhro .
potent combination of prestige. .
and cash, 'tie new group . ��
members have listened with ex-
cru attention
scene, and are shocked at what thy
heard Mosl ol the big 1 I the past
year oi so have b utinized by
1'Mki and denounced. "The pervasive
theme in I op -M) musk
m s Ms Howai
Sex sells in America, a . Ker-
tising m is gi a n evei �
in pushing ars, cosmetics, jean
cjuor to adults, pop musk has he-
ed further past the fringes pec-
tability tot its rebellious thrills Kids'
natural anti authoritarianism is goinj
drive them to the frontiers of sexual fan-
tasy in a society where mast aspect ui
the dirty deed have been appropriated bv
racy advertising and titillating TV
cheesecakery.
I he PMRC is asking that record com-
panies prominently display all lyrics,
unobscured b design, on the record
sleeves. I'hev want a national systen
ratings, preferably administered bv the
record industry itself but if not, then
perhaps through the courts or Congress,
rhey want to regulate album covers,
putting randier ones in seperate sections
of music stores, or behind the counter.
They want radio stations to change pro-
gramming policies, banning some songs
deemed by community groups as too
sleav. airing others only late at night.
What effect would these policies
have Some kids, undoubtedly, would
tbly be tei
ic theii
might get raun
R or X
musicia
Ma'
sensai
I
: '

i
.
c seei blues and R
& B explicitness hue
aneJ up, while stealing the
sounds and inflection; v
audience. "The Lady is a Iramp" and
rWT Ot� rr" coufd he nrFc rf FV?nc�.
songs, except that Prince would describe
"it" in the first verse, t ole Porter have
been more clever than Pi but his
essage wa ious.
it's one o the reasons he was
populai, ti
In 1963 the federalommunications
Commission ran an exhaustive, month-
g investigation ol "1 ouie louse "
The Kingsmen's sultry gem was banned
from the airwaves in Indiana and
elsewhere because people were convinc-
ed they heard an obscenity buried in
Jack Ely's suggestive mumbling. After
playing it backward and forward I 78
4 and 33 rpm. the FCC came to a con-
clusion: "The sting is unintelligible at
any speed It sold 8 million copies
Intervention, Nuclear War; Exploring Deadly Connections
By TOM CANEL
: d. - f D
Nuclear weapons don't have to ex-
plode to be used. Randall Forsberg
(founder of the nuclear freeze move-
ment) points out that the very possession
of nuclear weapons can intimidate other
nations. The superpowers are well aware
of this. Both the United States and the
Soviet Union are increasingly refining
their nuclear arsenals to make them
more useful for intimidating smaller na-
tions.
The rise of the Pershing and Cruise
missiles, the Trident submarine, the
Stealth bomber and the MX missile, as
well as the Soviet SS-20 missile and
Backfire bomber, demonstrate the rush
by the superpowers to develop weapons
capable of inflicting controlled damage
� destroying cities or military targets in
a highly selective fashion. These new-
generation weapons provide both super-
powers with a much broader range of
options than the simple choice of a con-
ventional land invasion or a full-scale
nuclear assault. The development of
these medium-scale nuclear weapons
makes the threat of using nuclear
weapons in Third World conflicts far
more credible.
The last thirty years provide many in-
stances of nuclear weapons being used in
this way. According to Noam Chomsky,
between November 1946 and October
1973, U.S. strategic forces were involved
in 19 incidents. He cites two examples:
� In February 1947, bombers of the
Strategic Air Command armed with
nuclear weapons were sent to Uruguay
in a show of force.
� In May 1954, nuclear-armed
bombers were sent to Nicaragua as part
of American back-up for a coup in
Guatemala.
Superpower politics arc based on
force and the threat of force. The use of
nuclear weapons is invaluable as a
threatening device. Military threat and
military intervention are linchpins of the
politics of domination.
The potential for nuclear weapons to
be used for power projection purposes is
not limited to the threat of a direct use
of force. In a more subtle way, nuclear
weapons serve to deter other super-
powers, particularly the Soviet Union,
from intervening in a Third World con-
flict or from escalating its current level
of involvement. Each superpower strives
for escalation dominance � a situation
where at some level in the escalation lad-
der one superpower can force the other
either to escalate to full nuclear war or
to back down. The development of the
Cruise, MX and Trident missiles allows
the United States to have a broader
menu of options between full scale ther-
monuclear war and simple conventional
invasion.The goal of these weapons is
primarily to persuade the Soviet Union
not to interfere in U.S. military
machinations, for fear that the United
States will escalate the conflict to a level
where it enjoys a clear superiority over
the Soviet Union.
This syndrome is more subtle than the
direct threat of the use of nuclear
weapons in a Third World conflict, or of
a direct battlefield escalation from con-
ventional to nuclear war in a central
theater like Europe. It functions in the
more esoteric realm of the relationship
between military force and politics. It
operates at the level of assumptions,
perceptions and anticipation, not direct
cause and effect. Either the reality or the
perception of escalation dominance at
any level affects the overall political
behavior of the other superpower.
Almost every new weapons system is
justified by giving us or denying the
Soviets escalation dominance. These
weapons need never be used to have a
profound impact on superpower
political, economic and military-
behavior in the Third World.
The deadly connection is not merelv
military � it is deeply and profoundly
political. Reagan's increasing interven-
tion in Central America and his escala-
tion of the nuclear arms race reflect a
single unified policy � the restoration
of U.S. prerogative throughout the
world.
The true motivation of U.S. policy in
Central America is not securing vital
strategic regions for the U.S The Cen-
tral American isthmus has virtually no
strategic value to the United States, and
the governments of almost any political
persuasion would be willing to come to
terms with the largest military power in
the hemisphere. The motivation is not
just the desire to engage in an ideological
conflict against a perceived communist
threat. The U.S. seems quite capable of
overlooking the ideological disposition
of the Khmer Rouge in Kampuchea as it
aids its war against Vietnam. And it is
not merely securing low-wage regions
for the sake of corporate profits. Wage
levels in Central America are comfor-
tably low for foreign investors, to be
sure, but direct U.S. corporate invest-
ment in El Salvador is negligible, and
many private investors are doing quite
well in Marxist Angola.
The true motivation is the drive by the
U.S. to maintain and extend its
hegemony � to insure that states in the
region are subservient to the United
States. The U.S. drive to extend its
power into the region has an economic,
strategic, and ideological component,
but it is greater than all of these things.
The bottom line is not corporate profits,
strategic necessity or ideological purity,
but maximizing the power of the U.S.
government to project its power. This
dynamic fuels U.S. policy in Central
America, Asia, Africa and the Middle
East. The U.S. wants to control events
throughout the world, and this leads in-
evitably to a set of economic, military
and diplomatic policies that defend the
status quo and oppose movements of na-
tional liberation and self-determination.
Nuclear weapons enhance the ability
of the U.S. to control events, especially
if they are highly sophisticated and selec-
tive counterforce weapons. By deterring
the Soviet Union from increasing its role
in Third World conflicts, these weapons
make it easier for the U.S. to project its
power throughout the world, even into
areas where the actual use of nuclear
weapons is totally inconceivable.
The political aspect of nuclear
weapons is quite clear in Western
Europe. Nuclear weapons are accom-
panied by a sacrifice of national
sovereignty. The fingers on the button in
Europe are American, not European.
The people of the European nations that
are the recipients of the Cruise and Per-
shing missiles were never consulted. The
European peace movement is ver cogni-
zant of the extent to which their own
movement is a movement for self-
determination. This leads them to iden-
tify with the movements in Central
America as another struggle for national
autonomy against ine United States.
The United States is not alone in
following this strategy. The SS-20's in
Eastern Europe serve to chill potential
dissent there just as much as the Cruise
and Pershings undermine democracy in
Britain, West Germany, Holland and
Italy. The crushing of the independent
trade union Solidarity and the invasion
of Afghanistan represent two strands of
one foreign policy � domination ol
their region ol the world and projecting
as much power in the rest of the world as
possible. They strive for escalation
dominance (or at least to deny the U.S.
escalation dominance) for the same
reasons we do. In at least one instance,
the Soviet Union was forced to back
down because the United states had
escalation dominance: the Cuban missile
crisis. Soviet moves to refine its arsenal
and expand its menu of nuclear and in-
terventionist options mirror I S policy.
It would be simplistic to think that we
can remove one aspect of this militarism
without removing the other. To secure a
lasting advance for peace, the underlv-
mg structures of militarism must be
challenged, both nuclear escalation and
conventional military intervention have
to be v.opposed.
Reagan's reign further complicates
this choice as progressives are forced in-
to defensive struggles. Much of the ef-
fort of the peace movement must go into
minimizing the damage that Reagan can
inflict and not towards rallying support
tor a genuinely humanistic foreign
policy. With Reagan's finger on the
nuclear button and his heel on Central
America, defensive struggles are
necessary. To wage these struggles effec-
tively, as broad a movement as possible
must be built.
American politics in this period, with
the exception of the electoral realm, will
revolve around single issues. Thus, pro-
gressives must work within single issue
campaigns while also doing educational
work around the connections between
issues. They must always integrate a
preoccupation with the realities of todav
with an anticipation of the possibilities
of tomorrow.
Councils
N
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� � '
t H
Ar
and
DATE: Septel
PLACE; Men!
TIME: 9 a.m
Special
Matting Ava

DATE:
PLACE:
Soring Include All
$1

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y
I HI I M K 1N i l SI 2V. I
98! 5
ATS WAS
SHAMS
:wo
k Music
rock
t-tt'
ip and
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onnections
� d in-
al v.e
iitarism
M
mderly-
nusl be
ion and
n hae
lorced in-
� the ef-
:meni must go into
ar Reagan can
j upporl
humanistic foreign
- iga gei the
is heel on Central
defensive struggles are
ige these struggles effee -
id a movement as possible
lilt.
politics in this period, with
the electoral realm, will
: and single issues. Thus, pro-
�� must work within single issue
paigns while also doing educational
l around the connections between
es They must always integrate a
preoccupation with the realities of today
h an anticipation of the possibilities
omorrow,
Councils Plan More Activities
The advisor) councils of rural
education agencies al universities
n opposite ends of the state have
begun planning join! activities.
Proposals forthcoming from a
eting in Culiowhee, N.C last
�eek include publication of a
wide education atlas, a series
inferences around the state
elemental and secondary
school officials to talk with com-
nit colleges about ways to
� eel hot to provide services
areas, a statewide con-
� on rural education and a
nmei school leadership pro-
gram for average students.
Public school personnel and
business and industry represen-
tatives who serve on the advisory
councils for the Rural Education
Institute at ECU and the Office
ol Rural Education at Western
Carolina University attended the
Aug. 9 meeting.
Others attending included
members of the staffs of the
agencies, Dr. Lee Monroe, chief
education consultant to Gov.
James Martin and other guests
Officials said the purpose o
the joint meeting was to establish
primary goals for both rural
education centers. The councils
agreed to consider the proposals
and will meet in the fall of next
year on the ECU campus.
I he Rural Education Institute
at EC! was established in 1VH2
with a giant from the . Smith
Reynolds Foundation to the E I
School of Education. In 19H4, the
General Assembly provided
tunds for continuation of the
ECU institute and established the
center at Western Carolina
University.
Dr. Roy H. Forbes i directoi
of the Rural Education Institute
and Dr. William Clauss is direc-
tor o' the Office for Rural
Education at WCl
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4th ANNUAL
EXHIBIT ANDSALE
Art Prints, Laser Prints
and Contemporary Photo Art
DATE: September 3-6, 1985
PLACE: Mendenhall Student Center
TIME: 9 a.m5 p.m.
Special Features: Rock Star Photos
Movie Star Photos
Wildlife Prints
Buttons
Matting Available, Silver and Wood Frames
L vi �vl i X" -X" lf X -X' "X "X X' -X X" X L X" ��X' -X X sX vX -vX ��? -sX' �f X X- vX -X" X X �X' X
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DATE:
Tims. S�pt. 3
W�d. Sept. 4
Thurs S�pt. 5
TIME:
PLACE" Studtit Supply Store
Saving Includa All Quality Rings
if
HERFF JONES
Division ol Carnmtion Company
$10.00 OFF
a
Welcome Back ECU
Appreciation Special
At
a
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Exercisefor Todavs Womar
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WELCOME
On the Circle"
Atlantic Beach, A.C
�i:
Labor Day Weekend Bash
Thursday Aug. 29
"Thirsty Thursday"
Z103 night wPaul Franklin
Penny Draft All Night
Friday Aug. 30
Wet T-Shirt Contest
$100 1st Prize
$25 for all ECU Lady Contestants with valid ID
Penny Draft Ali Night
Sat. & Sun.
Chairman of the Board
Deck Parties
Sat. Sun. & Mon.
1-6 pm wCharlie Byrd Rock 93
&&:&&SJi
X��xxi�w
I
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IMEASTCAROLINIAN AUGUST
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YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
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indents and W� We W to tell �� d jftr,is
Welcome Student minules of o cQrner of Thir�
.m tike lo tak . ��iv located at � jft�ntown L�ree�
t0n Si n 2 blocks from Ed d
Streets oni suPermarket, teaiu and
tnfamb �ne "ne's lowest meat P�:
. o hometown �� rreenvitte ,v , ;tems. l w .
oU money. thome awa i
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� fuU in� ot p"rty SUPP . overtoil's e�r
I-�
Come see wn
day.
Sincerely yours
permarket, Inc.
Overton s ?�v
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oupon �o rece.� �
out 10 Disco
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or more food order
Prtcw rfferttir i�r� (-11-45
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6 pk-12 oz can5
$1.99
Limit 2 six-packs
Mid
Prtc� rrfectivr Him . �-I5
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 31, 1985
CABANA
CHEESE PUFFS
Popcorn or Potato Chips
6 oz. Bag & Up
Buy One at $1.39
& Get One
FREE
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BARTLESJAYMES
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FRITO LAY
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4 pack
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Triple Brand Soft Drinks
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Cold Power Detergent
42 oz. box
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On all food orders over $10.00 Present
coupon to casher for 10 discount on
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Expires 8-31-85
Name
ID No
Camp
B H lBF IH PAC1
Rea
I!


I
Local fc Out of
� Hardback
Paper
� Gree
Fi
� M
G
Greenville Square
$3.50
9m
Presc

me
Valid Through 9 1 1 85
� I
� Prev
� 5
� So
hai
.j
Pale
The Plaza
Open 8:30 a.m.
9:00 p.m.
j K





NG
RNER
AND
VIS ST.
LTY
y
Summit
j n "
arvis
H AUGUST 31, 1985
FRITO LA
RUFFLES
712 oi. bag
Prtra rff�n�� thrc S 5ll�
Campus Crime News
is Coupon-S
DISCOUNT
?rs over $10.00 Present
for 10o discount on
pon not valid in conjunc-
M offer or discount.
Bv Kl IZABKTH PA(,K
Sl.ff Wr1t�
Drug and DW1 arrests topped
the crime reports this week, with
several students arrested with
simple possesion, according to
the Department of Public Safety.
Aug. 20 � Theft o' an Apple
Computer from the History An-
nex. James Archibald Campbell
was found in possesion o drug
paraphernalia while being held in
protective custody in the Pitt
Count) jail.
Aug. 21 � Mark 1 ouis I ayloi
and lames Howard Boyle were
banned from campus atter being
found unescorted in Clement
Dorm. It. Stan Kitrell reported
the theft of a golf cart belonging
to the lntramurals Department as
well as the breaking and entering
ol the Intramural storage shed.
John Wayne Scott and Mark
finest Richardson of
Washington were banned from
campus for tampering with a blue
light.
Aug. 22 � Matthew Scott Diggs
of Richmond. Ya. was found
with a substance which appeared
to be marijuana and possesion of
paraphenalia.
Aug. 23 � Susan Foy Phillips
tit 1 exington, NC. was charged
with a DWI.
Aug. 24 � George Columbus
Parkei of Greenville was charged
with trespass and simple posse-
sion of marijuana. Otis Clark
Trett III o Kinston was charged
with a DWI and a stop sign viola-
tion.
Aug. 25 � Anthony W'oolard
and Monica Johnson were charg-
ed with visitation violation.
Salvatore Anelto of Greenville
was charged with a DWI, stop
sign violation and having an ex-
pired registration. William Lyons
of W hi takers, NC was severed a
warrant for communicating
threats A breaking and entering
and larceny was reported at
Joynei librarv.
Read The Classifieds
�:
Local & Out of Town Newspapers
Hardback &
Paperback Books
� Greeting Cards
For All Occasions
!
8
:
i!
I!
i
j
� Magazines
available at
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center Open 7 days a week 9:30-9.30
$3.50
llneed &ioul� JaJon
Present this coupon to receive one free visit ancj
$3.50 off of the regular price of a one month
membership
$3.50
Reg. Price
Less Coupon
Volid Through 9 11 85
' -1v . Tentkartt ' ?t �� ���
$23.50
3.50
$20.00
?:
� No Initiation Fee
� Charter Memberships $80 4 Months
� Previous Charter Memberships � No Change
� Suntans $2.50 Visit - 5 Visits for $10.00
� Sauna
JQ � Exercise Equipment � MC & VISA Accepted
Hours
Mon Thur9 9
Fr, 9-7:30
Sat 9 Noon
Red Oak Plaza
Phone 756-2820
$3.50
D
georges
hair designers
The Plaza
Open 8:30 a.m.
9:00 p.m.
Pale isn'� your color.
You know you look and feel better when
you re tan. And heres the easiest,
most sensible way to be tan all year
long. KLAFSUN OVA Sun Systems
are designed for quick, even, comfort
able suntanning.The kind of tanning
you can have confidence in.
756-6200
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 29, 1985
- - - - - - -r -m r -rf- -r - "m�na�i,d�ii ,j�I t� , �ii J� &
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY'S
STUDENT UNION
NEEDS CHAIRPERSONS
FOR THE
FORUM AND TRAVEL
COMMITTEES
The Forum Committee provides lectures, debates, sym-
posiums, and other related programs. A lecture featuring
Larry Linville on AAASH, Major Frank Burns, and
more has been scheduled for November.
The Travel Committee sponsors such trips as New York,
Hawaii, and Bahamas Cruises along with the Travel Adven-
ture Film Series.
Applications for these positions or for committee member-
ships on the Student Union's Twelve committees are available
at the Student Union Office (Room 234 - Mendenhall Student
Center). For more inforniation contact the Student Union Of-
fice at 757-6611, ext. 210.
MORE ADVENTURE THAN
A BUND DA
anyou pis' irself
� down a cliff? C
y shooting the rapid'V
crossing i river using i
a rope and your ow n rw �
hands'
You 11 have a chance
to d i all this and more in
ArmvROTC
Adventure training like
s help you de flop
iny of the qualities y �
need a- an Army office!
Qualities like self-
confidence Stamina And
the ability to perform
under pressure
If you'd like to find
out more, make a date
to see Captain Alvin
Mitchell or Master
Sergeant Terry Boyles
in Room 324 Erwin or
call 757-6967 or 6974.
ARMYROTC
BEAU YOU CAN
ssssssssssssssss
the
RUSH
mm
a good idea
I
SIGN-UP
August 26 - 30, 1985
10 AM - 3 PM Outside the Lobby Bookstore and
Croatan
4 P.M - 6 PM: Tyler, Slay. Gotten. Jams. Greene.
Glement and Fletcher Halls
CONVOCATION
Thursday, August 29. 1985
4 PM: Mendenhall Student Genter
RUSH
September 2 - 7, 1985
Fall Formal Rush 1985
I East Carolina University
t �

mmmmmjmm

�� -





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 29. 1985
The Fraternity
Experience is
!
Sigma Nu
WHEN YOU JOIN EAST
CAROLINA'S GREEK SYSTEM, YOU
GET A LOT A BENEFITS, SUCH AS:
A scholarship program
�through friendly encouragement and planned activities,
vou can realize your academic potential.
A community service program
�by helping others less fortunate, you will develop the
qualities that build character.
A social program
�by exposing you to various social situations, you will
learn how to conduct your self in any social encounter
in the future.
A leadership program
�the hierarchy of the fraternity and the Inter-Fraternity
Council both provide the opportunity to excel as a leader,
as well as numerous opportunities in Student Government
An intramural sports program
�through organized competition, you will learn the meaning
of unity and sportsmanship.
The most important benefit of all is
�the building and developing of friendships that will last longer
than your college career.
Zeta Beta Tau
3nt,
(Lmuiril
Delta Sigma Phi
Theta Chi
t�a
GO GREEK
dcrsWP ECU RUSH, SEPTE
aesir
Phi Kappa Tau
2nd
5th
6
,
Kappa Alpha
i$
�o
Bus Services Pro vided Fi
College Hill9-1 p.m.

ID'S Will Be Checked
ft
4.
Pi Kappa Phi
Intramurals
$$$&
v
IFC officers pictured left Vtark Simon j
Kevin Greaney-Exec.V.P Jol -dm Pi
RUSH LOCATIONS






HE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 29,1983 9
3i�r
LtttCtl
Beta Theta Pi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Lambda Chi Alpha
A sense of belonging
GO GREEK
Pi Kappa Alpha
RUSH, SEPTEMBER
�xirig
2nd
5th
us Services Provided From
College Hill 9-1 p.m.
Community
Involvement
?n?�� Tau KaPa EPsi,on
Sigma Tau Gamma
ID'S Will Be Checked
Scholarship
m-
Ae

"l
�&
Sigma Phi Epsilon
fy
fX
wV
Kappa Sigma
Sig-Ep Volleyball
" � - ired left ro right
ireane P . John
n-Sec, Todd Patton-Pres,
- P . Dwavne Wiseman-Tres.
RUSH LOCATIONS
1. lpha Sigma Phi
422 W. 5th St.
2. Beta Theta Pi
757-0351
3. Delta Sigma Phi
510 E. 10th St.
4. Kappa Alpha
500 E. 5th St.
5. Kappa Sigma
700 E. 10th St.
6. Lambda Chi Alpha
500 Elizabeth St.
7. Phi Kappa Tau
409 Elizabeth St.
8. Pi Kappa Alpha
The Attic
9. Pi Kappa Phi
803 Hooker Road
10. Sigma Nu
1301 Cotanche St.
11. Sigma Phi Epsilon
505 E. 5th St.
12. Sigma Tau Gamma
508 W. 5th St.
13. Theta Chi
752-6635, 752-0874
14. Tau Kappa Epsilon
951 E. 10th St.
15. Zeta Beta Tau
Mendenhall Student Cente:
Sig Tau Tug-a-war
I m

V





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AI OUST 29, 198?
WASHINGTON, D.C. (UPI)
� There's a big deadline coming
for many colleges, and most of
them, as they count the number
of freshmen who have agreed to
enroll this fall, now admit they're
probably not going to meet it.
Colleges in five states �
Arkansas, Florida, Georgia,
North Carolina and Oklahoma
� have to make "substantial
progress" toward enrolling more
black students by next December
If they don't, the Education
Department's Office of Civil
Rights can stop giving them
federal funds.
Eight more states � Delaware.
Missouri, South Carolina,
Virginia, West Virginia, Ken-
tucky, Pennsylvania and Texas
� will have deadlines they agreed
to years ago sometime between
next December and the spring of
1988.
Educators in those states also
are unsure they'll be able to fulfill
those agreements.
"Speaking for (the University
of Oklahoma), the Norman cam-
pus will not meet its (desegrega-
tion) goals, and this seems to be
reflective of the rest of the state
says Walter Mason. Oklahoma's
affirmative action officer
"We haven't met our enroll-
ment goal adds Cynthia Moten
of the Arkansas Department of
Higher Education. "We haven't
increased our overall pool ol
black students. We've just moved
them around from traditionally-
black to traditional!v-white col-
lates
A recent American Association
of State Colleges and Universities
study found that, while the
number of black high school
graduates grew from 1975 to
1982. the percentage enrolling in
college dropped from 31.5 per-
cent to 28 percent.
The states' problem sterns
from a 1970 lawsuit filed by the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People's
Legal Defense Fund.
The suit asked the federal
government to help force states
to undo the last vestiges of
segregation in their schools and
colleges.
If the states refused, or didn't
meet the government's desegrega-
tion schedule, the government
could cut off the laggard colleges'
federal funds.
In an early 1970s ruling, a
federal court ordered the Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare � the Education
Department's forerunner � to
demand desegregation plans
from six states, and then extend-
ed the order to other states accus-
ed of running segregated public
education systems.
Since then, the NAACP Legal
Defense Fund has forced the
government to make states adopt
ever more stringent integration
plans.
States had to outline how they
planned to attract black students
and faculty to predominantly-
white colleges.
"Most plans were approved by
HEW in 1975 says Joe Hagy,
Oklahoma Regents state planning
coordinator. But in 1977, the
NAACP again sued, and a court
threw out all the state desegrega-
tion plans as inadequate.
Legal Defense Fund
spokesmen, who closely monitor
the states' progress, say the
government's lax enforcement of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 re-
quires them to keep suing.
"Right now we're in the first
full year of accepted plans says
James Turner, a Legal Defense
Fund attorney. "Goals have been
met in some areas and particular
colleges. Most of the goals are
very conservative. I'd be very sur-
prised if any of the plans are
unrealistic
But while devising the plans
may be difficult, state education
administrators say implementing
them is even harder.
Many blacks still prefer to at-
tend traditionally-black schools,
and view white institutions as
racist, regardless of what affir-
Meet Black Enrollment Quotas
vfcnfp-i
Semi-Annual
Sale
25 Off
Sat. Aug. 31-Thur. Sept. 5
50 Off
Fri. Sept. 6-Wed. Sept. 11
75 Off
Thurs. Sept. 12-Tues. Sept. 17
Spring & Summer Merchandise
Selected Jewelery & Accessories
Some Fall & Winter Merchandise
(Ask for details on our Frequent Buyer Club)
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Woman
lHE.StkSt. MnJtt lMM-Ji
Next Door to Book Bars 757-34
mative action programs the white
schools have.
"The segregation problems
have been carried over from a lot
of years the Legal Defense
Fund's Turner admits, "the
perception that some of these col-
leges are racist has some basis
"Most blacks are unhappy
here says Sharri Warnsby,
former president of the Legion of
Black Collegians at the Universi-
ty of Missouri at Columbia.
"I don't think any (black per-
son) would come here if they had
any sense Warnsby told The
Maneater, a Missouri student
paper. "Everything is geared
toward the majority, and the ma-
jority is white
Hagy adds Oklahoma still
fights a racist reputation, pro-
pagated by discriminatory legisla
tion only recently removed from
the state books.
"But one of the big problems
we're very concerned about is the
decline in the black student
population says Wayne Echols
of Alabama's Commission on
High Education. "It's had par-
ticularly in a state like Alabama,
which continues to lag behind the
rest of the U.S. in the number of
adults with college degrees
"We don't know how we'll ap-
proach the problem of recruit-
ment of students or faculty he
adds.
But Washington believes that
colleges can do better, despite a
seeming shortage of willing black
students.
The declining black student
population "is probably a com-
plaint of the higher education
system from long before the
desegregation plan says OCR
public liaison Thomasina Rogers.
"I haven't seen the studies, and
I'm not sure whether private or
public college black enrollment is
declining
Meanwhile, the December
deadline approaches as states
show only mixed progress toward
integration.
"Right now there's a state ef-
fort to increase college going and
(particularly) black college
going Arkansas's Moten ex-
plains.
But the black student pool re-
mains static, and the number of
black faculty increases onl) ;
portionately with white faculty
she notes.
Maryland, a state included in
the lawsuit but still negotiating a
desegregation plan with the
Education Department, needs to
increase black enrollment b)
much as 50 percent on some tarn
puses
8"x816"
CONCRETE BLOCK
OV EACH
lx'2, no.3
WPSHELVING BOARD
ONLY
A7
LINEAR FOOT
YOUR
COMPLETE SOURCE
FOR
HARDWARE
AND
BUILDING MATERIALS
752 2106
cams
EMMS
lumber Co, Int
01 W 14th ST. GREENVILLE. N C
MASTERCARD & VISA ACCEPTED
� BRICK . LUMBER
� WINDOWS & DOORS
� HARDWARE � PAINT
� ROOFING MATERIALS
� SIDING � MILLWORK
� FLOOR MATERIALS
Academic Calendar
Fall 1985
AAon. Aug. 26 .Classes Begin, Drop-Add, Late Registration
Wed. Aug. 28Last Day for Drop-Add, Late Registration
Fn. Oct. 4. Last Day to withdraw from school or to withdraw
AAon. Oct. 21 �Tues. Oct 22 c � �
r rfTnaH�� Be9i�7n,B;r
Sat. Dec.7Classes Resume at 8 a.m.
Mon. Dec. 9 ' c,asses End
Wed. Dec. 10 Reading Day
Tues. Dec 17 Exams Begin
Exams Close
�Dates tor early registration will be announced later.
Now Open
BUFFET
PINING ROOM
East
Carolina University
Dining Service
sJ.
2 For 1
Special
�121 Greenville Bua
Phone 756-082
(Pizza Only)
Buy One Pia at Regular Price and Get Another
of Same Value or Less FREE! Not Good with
an other Specials. Offer expires July 31, 1986
jt�


The Buffet Dining Room at
Mendenhall Student Center opens
on Monday, August 26 at 11:00.
The hours will be 11:00 until 2:00,
Monday through Friday. Along
with the daily salad bar, build-your-
own-sandwiches, and soup specials,
items also featured are a potato bar
on Mondays, Wednesdays, and
Fridays and quiche on Tuesdays
and Thursdays.
WijfiCl&on
eg Trice $3 35)
EXPIRES JULY 31 1986

Not Good Wfth other Lasagne Specials

I

LASAQNE
JUS�taf�tf
Beefburger
Stroganoff
JUST $1.99
-To Go $2.29�
With this Coupon
(Regular Price $3.35
EXPIRES JULY 31 1986
Not Good with other Stroganoff Specials
PEPPIS PIZZA DEN, 421 Greenville Blvd.


SMALL SPAGHETTI PEPPI
JUST'S 1.99. I
To Go tU9-
Witri tfii Coupon
(GdgMJor Price $3 35)
Not Good .l6ther Spagh.tti p.pp, Sp.ci-Ii
EXPIRES JULY 31 1985

�HI SI Hd
Nantucket will rotk tfa
album Njmluckei IV
Televis,
HOI LYWi
Eer I"
life
characte
Eacl �
must face ai
wars. tiny,
squabbi;
series hoggii ,
tracting
Will a.
denly find
runaway new
opp
'Dallas1" W
hold oui
episode0
Only one prime :
dured 20 years
A very few survive .
"M-A-S-H" ran I I
die ii
ones
syndicated
produce
-V the 198
on the
regu
battles Sin
which �
for the pasi
Starting
detecme
disastrous d
Sound
Foil
� Dr. Ru
and Dear Abby,
Carolinian
nist, Dr. Susan Mc a
with "Sound :
Appeal -
Style se.
man,
ire Dt M. .
ona! respoi
from readers concernii s
ol topics including
ships, sexualitv,
Scienc
l PI - With
ceptioi; of the
Wells and J.R.R
science fiction and fa
have often been loot I
those who are not fans as a minor
genre, available to its readers on-
ly in paperback No more.
Science "vtion readers now can
find more and more titles
available in hardcover. Del Rev,
Tor. Blue Jay. SAL Books" Daw
and Bantam's Spectra are lines
exclusively devoted to science fic-
tion and fantasy Berklev will
begin its ace hardcovers next
year. Other major publishers also
occasionally polish the genre.
"There are really three things
that prompt a hardcover line
said Beth Meacham, senior editor
at Tor and head of the science fic-
tion division.
"You have to have an extraor-
dinary writer with an extraor-
dinary book that will get you
good reviews, a writer who
� i � �� i






Quotas
���

2 For 1
Special
fl Only)
Another
- th
'
�r
���

W f Mqppon f- ir , s 35
Her Lasagne Specials



�' " this Coup
Jar Price S !
' EXPItl
ler Stroganoff Specials
, 421 Greenville Blvd.


GHETTI PEPPI
$1.99
o 2.29 -is Coupon
Pr.ce $3.35
Spaghetti Peppi Specials�
1 )1 1985�

UH f s XNOI IMAN
Entertainment
AUGUST 29, 1985 Page 1!
Critics Rip Cimino Film;
Star Stands Behind Director
Nantucket
Nantucket will rock the Attic this Friday night at 9:30 p.m. They will feature several cuts from their new
album 'Nantucket l
Television
Battle Of The Networks
HOI 1 YW OOI) (UPI)
i verv IV sei
Each yeai �
must � the N
wars, time slo
squabbles and the
series :
traci ng atl
W i
denlv find itself assailed by a
runaway newcomei like "
bv SI ' V
es en
joke
lecade.
Mam
iy 5i w oe mo
14 D � '
"Dallas?" W'il
hold � $100
episode ;
Only one prim
dured 20
A very few sur
"M-A-S-H ve
die in a ma
ones las: six
syndicated reruns thai
As the 1985 86 eas �n
on the hi n ng the
regulars g � for the ratings
battles is "Sii & Sim n
which ha- c : top 10 ratings
the past three years.
arting its fifth year, the
detective dran a survived a
disastrous debut season and v.as
almost canceled in its second year
for low ratings. A publicity coup
helped. Since the change, it has
more than held its own against
"Cheers' and other sitcoms
thrown against it.
What has set "Simon &
Simon" apart from other detec-
tive shows are the leading roles,
'hers Rick and A.J. Simon,
who lead entirely different
lifestyles. Older brother Rick
(Gerald McRaney) is a laid-back
eccentric. A.J. (Jameson Parker)
is a yuppie straight arrow.
"he contrasts and contentions
between them provide an extra
dimension to the standard TV
detective show .
'last ear we became
dangerously close to being
homogenous said McRaney as
he prepared to play Rick for a
fifth year. "It's vital that we keep
the characters distinct and in con-
flict.
"It's easy to forget something
like the sibling rivalry, but it's
necessary to keep fighting a
tendenc) to let down on a series,
"In our first couple of years we
had more humor in the stories,
and we're getting back to more of
that this year. I'm writing a script
myself for the coming season.
Sound Advice
Following in the footsteps
of Dr. Ruth, Ann L anders
and Dear Abby. is The East
Carolinian's own advice colum-
nist. Dr. Susan McCammon.
with "Sound Advice
Appearing in each Tuesday's
Style section of The East Caroli-
nian, "Sound Advice" will
feature Dr. McCammon's pro-
tessional response to letters
from readers concerning a range
ot topics including relation-
ships, sexuality, and mental
health.
Readers interested in writing
to Dr. McCammon should mail
their letters to Sound Advice in
care of The East Carolinian,
Features Dept Old South
Building, East Carolina Univer-
sity, Greenville, NX
27834-435V All names will be
held strictly confidential.
Unfortunately, Dr. McCam-
mon's many obligations pro-
hibit her from making personal
renlies.
"I'd like to see the show go at
least two more years. 1 still get
pumped up when I drive through
the gates to work every day. As
Orson Welles once said about ac-
tingA little boy never had a
finer toy It's the only business
where you don't have to grow up.
"I or me, this series is perfect.
It gives me a chance to play an
off-the-wall character involved in
drama, action, romance and
slapstick
McRaney said the series' brief
history has been as exciting as
some of the 88 shows it has pro-
duced.
"We are now regularly in the
top 10 he said. "The first year
we were in the bottom 10. We
suffered pre-emptions for
religious crusades and sports
shows. And, of course, we were
opposite 'Happy Days At times
we were not available to 60 per-
cent o the viewers.
"This season we are going
back to basics, putting A.J. and
Rick into conflict. And their
mother, Celia (played by Mary
Carver), will be seen more often
to mediate the sibling rivalry.
"In the last year or so we made
the mistake of letting the clothes
wear the man, almost caricatures
of the yuppie and the cowboy. At
the end of last season Jameson
and I sat down and analyzed
what we did all year and how we
could improve the show.
"At the beginning of produc-
tion this iummer we met with the
producers with the same thing in
mind � how to make 'Simon &
Simon' better than it was the
previous year.
"Nobody involved in a hit
series can afford to take anything
for granted. Actors, writers, pro-
ducers and directors have to be
fully involved in making the best
show possible every week as time
and budget will allow.
NEW YORK (UPI) - Mickey
Rourke is waging a war of words
against critics who have lam-
basted his latest movie, Year of
the Dragon, and he's doing it
with the same vigor his character
displays in stomping out organiz-
ed crime in the film.
Rourke, the street-wise actor
who starred in Diner and The
Pope of Greenwich Village, said
the reviews � many of which rip
the film but still recommend see-
ing it � are a personal assault on
director Michael Cimino.
Year of the Dragon is Cimino's
first film since Heaven's Gate,
the box-office disaster five years
ago that led to the demise of
United Artists.
It is a violent epic about the
battle waged against the
Chinatown mafia by one cop,
played by Rourke, with the
single-mindedness of a combat
soldier.
Rourke's campaign meets
resistance from both the under-
world and his superiors on the
force, and ends in a showdown
between his character and a
ruthless young mob chief, played
by John Lone (Iceman), on a
bridge outside Manhattan.
The film has been attacked by
critics both for its depiction of
Asians and for what they con-
sider excesses bv Cimino.
Rourke, usually reticent to give
interviews, believes critics are
"hell-bent on putting Michael
Cimino down" by riddling ti.eir
reviews of the film with sarcastic
innuendo and references to the
failure of Heaven's Gate.
In the absence of a public
rebuttal from Cimino, "I feel the
responsibility of just supporting
the film, supporting Mike, and
letting the public know that these
critics are all full of it Rourke
said. "If you put all of them on a
scale, the needle wouldn't
move
The film also has sparked pro-
tests among Asian-Americans.
Los Angeles City Councilman
Mike Woo last week called on the
movie industry to seek advice
from Asians to avoid the
stereotypes of Year of the
Dragon, which he said depicts
Chinese men "as vicious, cold-
blooded killers, while the women
are portrayed as exotic sex ob-
jects. Chinatown is presented as a
filthy, corrupt, crime-ridden
slum
Rourke said Year of the
Dragon employed more Asian ac-
tors than any film in years, the
Asians who worked in it "loved it
and all support it" and "the fact
of the matter is it's a film about
racism
Rourke, 30, savs this in a room
on the top floor of a Central Park
hotel that he calls home when he
is in New York. He and his wife,
actress Debra Feuer, also have a
home in West Los Angeles near
Rourke's friend, Leonard Ter-
mo, who plays his partner in the
film.
(Some of the smaller parts in
the film were played by waiters
Rourke has befriended at the
hotel. One of them visiting
Rourke's room, Joey Chin, said
acting "was a lot of fun" but "I
don't know if I want to do it
again Asked about the film's
depiction of Asians, he said,
"Someone was going to make a
movie about this sooner or
later)
Although set in New York's
Chinatown, most of the movie
was shot on elaborate sets in
Wilmington, N.C where
Rourke spent 10 weeks doing
what he said were the most
physically and emotionally
demanding scenes of his career.
He had prepared for the part
by spending three months accom-
panying a Los Angeles County
homicide detective, Stanley
White, on his rounds. Rourke's
character was later named after
White.
"We went out on about 30
See FILM Page 12
Wo Lookin' Back'
Ex-Doobie Goes Solo
By WARREN BAKER
For a while there,
McDonald's visibility on
other people's records rivaled
Phil Collins' drumming and
producing. McDonald's voice
could be heard singing
alongside the likes of Kenny
Loggins and Amy Holland, and
he squeezed in a few duets bet-
ween various projects. With the
breakup of the Doobie Brothers
behind him, McDonald had a
big hit with his first solo album,
and every other song on the
radio seemed to have him
crooning or playing keyboards
in the background.
Then he decided to lay low. It
was a case of overexposure.
If you happen to stop by your
favorite record shop, you may
spot his latest album, o
Lookin' Back, lying in a stack
of new releases.
Let me make a friendly sug-
gestion before you leap into
your wallet and pull out the
cash. Go home and take out all
of those dust-covered Doobie
Brothers albums, starting with
Takin' it to the Streets and en-
ding with McDonald's first
album. Toss them up on the
turntable and skip the cuts com-
posed by Tom Johnston and
other fellow Doobies.
Did you hear that? Listen for
the semi-melodic, semi-moody
keyboards that ramble in and
out of your headphones. Can
you hear that unique voice that
randomly stitches the music and
the lyrics together in a pattern
as untraceable as a
psychopathic killer's rampage?
Well, if you enjoyed what
you heard, reach back in your
wallet and pay the smiling
cashier.
Michael McDonald hasn't
changed. One listen to o
lookin' Back will convice the
discriminating listener that
McDonald couldn't resist on
looking back at how he started
his lucrative track record.
On the outset, the album
starts on an upbeat note with
the title song. Kenny Loggins
and Ed San ford helped pen the
song, and I can almost hear
Loggins telling McDonald,
"Put a harder edge on it; be
See MCDONALD Page 13
Ex-Doobie Michael McDonald goes solo with No Lookin' Back
Science Fiction Gains Respect, New Readers
UPI � With the possible ex-
ception of the works o H.G.
Wells and J.R.R. Tolkein,
science fiction and fantasy novels
have often been looked on by
those who are not fans as a minor
genre, available to its readers on-
ly in paperback. No more.
Science fiction readers now can
find more and more titles
available in hardcover. Del Rev,
Tor, Blue Jay, NAL Books' Daw
and Bantam's Spectra are lines
exclusively devoted to science fic-
tion and fantasy. Berkley will
begin its ace hardcovers next
year. Other major publishers also
occasionally publish the genre.
"There are really three things
that prompt a hardcover line
said Beth Meacham, senior editor
at Tor and head of the science fic-
tion division.
"You have to have an extraor-
dinary writer with an extraor-
dinary book that will get you
good reviews, a writer who
already has been published in
hardcover and a writer with a suf-
ficiently broad-based following
in the mass market readership
Meacham said.
Tor books began its hardcover
line with two titles at the end of
1984, and is publishing 15 this
year � about 20 percent of its
total � including Ben Bova's
Privateer.
Peter Heck, editor of Xignals,
a science fiction newsletter
distributed by Walden Books,
said he feels the boom in hard-
cover science fiction sales is
because "there are those of us,
like myself, who first started
reading science fiction in high
school and can now afford to pay
for what we like to read in hard
cover
Xignals, a bi-monthly newslet-
ter, also goes out to The Other
World Club, whose members can
obtain science fiction and fantasy
novels at a discount. Begun two
years ago, the club now has
250,000 members.
Heck and others also feel
books fail to get the review atten-
tion they deserve until and unless
the writer is published in hard-
cover.
'Mainstream literature
had always been judged
by its best. Science Fic-
tion has been judged by
its worst.M
� Peter Heck,
Editor
"Paperbacks frequently don't
get reviewed said Heck.
"Mainstream (literature) has
always been judged by its best.
Science fiction has been judged
by its worst said Judy Lynn del
Rey, probably the most respected
science fiction publisher. She was
the one who saw the potential in
the movie Star Wars and snapped
up the book tie-in rights for
Ballantine Books. "There are on-
ly a few thousand science fiction
readers who will buy a book in
hardcover, but the exposure that
it gives for the paperback is more
than worth it said del Rey. She
and her editor-husband, Lester,
have been responsible for many
science fiction and fantasy best-
sellers through the Del Rey im-
print, which began in 1977.
Before the mid-1970's a science
fiction or fantasy title on the New
York Times best-seller list would
have been unheard of. That too
has changed.
Witness Isaac Asimov's Foun-
dation's Edge, and Robots of
Dawn, Terry Brooks' Sword of
Shawara, Frank Herbert's latest
Dune books, Robert Heinlein's
Job. And it continues.
Heck feels a lot of the growing
popularity of science fiction has
had to do with the Star Trek
series, the movie Star Wars and
the book tie-ins.
"Those were entry level books
that readied the reader for more
sophisticated books, although the
Star Trek books have gotten
more sophisticated lately" he
said.
"A lot of good writers also
began writing Star Trek books
and gone on to win (the science
fiction w riting) Hugq and Nebula
awards Heck said, mentioning
names such as Greg Bear and Joe
Haldeman.
Said Tor's Meachan, "There
are writers who are writing
science fiction who could be
writing anything they want to
sucessfully, but who are choosing
this genre
It is also more profitable for a
writer to negotiate with a single
publishing house for both hard-
cover and paperback rights.
"If we publish both, the
author gets full royalties for the
paperback edition Meacham
said. "If we publish the hard-
cover and someone else puts out
the paperback edition, the author
has to split the royalties with the
paperback publisher. "
The publisher also is better off
in that it already will have a pro-
perty that it can market in paper-
back rather than buv it separate-
ly-
Whether or not there is a suffi-
cient market to sustain the ap-
pearance of half a dozen hard-
cover lines is yet to be seen.
"There are perhaps a dozen
writers who can be relied on to
write books that will sell about
25,000 copies in hardcover said
Heck.
"But this period (of sudden in-
crease in science Fiction and fan-
tasy hardcovers) will be the test
of the depth of the market
JMM �





2
Hit I M v K( I , .
M v.i M 29, lv�8
Film Star Blasts
Cimino Critics
Continued From Page 11
homicides moments aftei they
happened� Rourke said "In
the beginning, it as ver hard
because you're not used to seeing
death all around
Rourke said he learned thai
police need a detachment from
their work that his film charactei
does not possess he is unable
to let go ot his assignment to
break the mob in Chinatown.
Foi mam eais. Rourkc's
careei w.ik not marked by such
sure-fired determination Born in
Schenectady, V , his family
moved to Miami when he was ci
child He returned to New York
at the age ot 18, without a credit
name, to become an actor.
W orking odd jobs and living in
a Greenwich Village hotel, he suf-
fered "a lot of rejection, and a
certain amount of anger started
surface He said it took ears
tor him to learn "to get better in
stead ol getting angry
Rourke moved to 1 os Angeles
in 1978, landed three small roles
television movies and then was
cast as an arsonist m Body Heat
Admiring his work in that him,
director-screenwriter Barry
Levinson cast him in Diner and
Rourke was on his way
A small part in Heaven's dale
and starring roles in Francis
Copola's Rumhlefish, which
Rourke counts as one of his
favorite performances, and The
Pope of (.rennich Mage follow
ed
Rourke has completed another
controversial film, Sine and a
Half Weeks, about a sado-
masochistic K-vc affair, thai has
not been released.
As his stature as an actot has
grown, Rourke said he has realiz-
ed he has a responsibility not only
for his role, but tor the success ol
the film.
"It's gotten to the point wl
with each protect it's a harder
decision to be made because I'm
not just doing a role anym
I'm not nisi a hired hand
Rourke said. "I have to be con-
cerned with the outcome ol the
mo ie as a w hole. "
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The responsibilities of the members of the Board of
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 29, 1985
13
McDonald 'Lookin 'Back'
103 EAST BROOK RD
7587570
"V
NEEDED
nhail student
n Iht student
he Board of
A ice Presi-
s ��
Continued From Page 11
.e. Mike On the drums,
leff "Toto-just-ain't-enough"
Porcaro lays out a heavy
kbcat while McDonald, on
keyboards, and Willie Weeks, on
ass, indulge themselves in
dramatic chords.
For the first song on the
in. the title track sets high ex-
tations for the rest of the disc.
1 he second song, "Bad
nes shines with McDonald's
sill for incorporating a typical
lues rhythm with the hard edge
' a rock'n'roll beat. Joe Walsh
k;es a cameo slide guitar ap-
earance, and for the most part.
song works with all of its
lements creating a real gem. As
c song fades away, it's downhill
for the rest of the album.
The rest of the album consists
f lovesick lyrics compounded by
olid drumming with an almost
hid bass line underlining
urnful keyboards. Have you
�vcr taken a VaJium?
T ost in Paradise "(I'll be
our) Angel and "Any Foolish
i hing" are your basic love songs:
ones dealing with loss of love.
love consolation, don't want to
lose your love, real love, super-
ficial love and love is a four-letter
wordad infinitum. "By Heart"
could have been a Doobie song if
the band had decided to stick
together. The song comes com-
plete with a Phil Collins horn sec-
tion played on synthesizer.
Relief comes in the form of,
yes, another love song. "Our
Love" moves casually along the
groove not unlike a walk across
the beach on a cool summer even-
ing. McDonald tossed in a good
dose of synthesizers with a
generous portion of bluesy vocals
and created a nice and easy Latin-
flavored tune. "Our Love"
receives the Oasis Award for be-
ing the only semblance of life in
an almost lifeless album.
No Lookin' Back ends the
same way it starts. "Don't Let
Me Down" makes a feeble at-
tempt at being a rocker, just like
the title track, but the song,
unlike the album opener, fails
with its glossy production.
There's a hard edge to "Down
but there's no flavor, sort of like
eating unflavored Jello.
Ted Templeman, producer for
Van Halen, Bonnie Raitt and the
Doobies, succeeds at times,
maybe because McDonald
wanted to co-produce.
Everything sounds too clean; the
production leaning towards syn-
thesized lifelessness.
McDonald holds a monopoly
on vocals. Backing vocals consist
of dubs, overdubbing and more
dubbing, and the listener is left
wanting another voice to pop up
in the chorus
Yes, at one time, Michael
McDonald was a prince of the
airwaves. Right now, unfor-
tunately, Phil Collins need not
worry about abandoning his cur-
rent throne. McDonald never
made it to the castle.
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14
HEEAS f AKotisiAN AUGUST 29,1M3
Emmy A wards On The Way
TKV UliR
MINI 1)1 1.1
($5� ttoor Jli)$ Gxsatt
a a a
1 h�- ttii begins its back to
school weekend with the
boogie rock of the Skip
( astro Hand Ihen Friday
night it's the good old
rock'n'roll of Nantucket.
Saturday night Diamonds
will be playing their varie-
?I rock 'n 'roll styles,
and finally on Sunday
t, the Attic presents
Maw Warrior and their
tnd ol heavy metal. All
ws start 4:30 p.m.
( orrigans continues its popular
1 adies Night Wednesday
the croud pleasing
of 1 ahnn and 1 of-
! he show starts at 10
I he loft presents the pianist
I vocalist Doug Jarvey
day night. Then, on
I ' iday and Saturday
t, the I oft presents
contemporary music
I om Femes.
Hi's Nitefife starts its weekend
he :op 40 sounds of
Spontanes. The Spon-
es will begin their show
) p.m On Friday
itrope will per-
i its brand of Top 40.
�p rounding out the
weekend is Breeze Satur-
ght. Breeze plays the
in beach music, and
� will start at 9:30 p.m.
I he rreehouse presents Bruce
and of con-
rary country music
I lesday night along
pular I adies
Sit
Premiums starts the weekend
m u s k ' '� Not
Then on
I . hoi
� Blark. On
Premiums
NEW YORK (UPI) - People
have been complaining about the
Emmy awards for years, but now
the Academy of televison Arts
and Sciences is doing something
about it.
It has turned the telecast over
to the Broadway pros who stage
the Tonys.
That's the team of producer
Alexander Cohen and his writer-
wife, Hildy Parks, who also put
on The Mght of 100 Stars, parts 1
and 2.
"1 think it's going to be dif-
ferent Cohen said in an inter-
view. "Hildy has a very sound
approach to it. We're turning the
Emmy awards into a music show
� wall-to-wall music using the
themes of television.
"It is extraordinary how many
themes of television have hit the
charts, how much hit music there
is and how familiar it is
This year's Emmy show, to air
Sept. 22, 9-11 p.m on ABC, is
not Cohen's first attempt. He
produced what he calls ��the Jim-
my Carter show" for the Emmys
in 1978.
"We were preempted b Carter
and Sadat and Begin, coming
from the White House Cohen
said. "Our format that year was
to show the global impact of
television. President Carter made
our point for us
Cohen said that this year's
show will have no celebrity host.
"One of the things music-
allows you to do is give it a
natural flow he said. "There
are people you will recognize
throughout the evening, but we
do not think it necesary to in-
troduce Mary Tyler Moore to the
television audience.
"What is interesting about that
audience is they really know their
stars. They live with them every
night of the week. A Broadway
play can run successfully for a
season and be seen by a couple of
hundred thousand people. The
average television audience for a
prime time show is more than 25
million. You are dealing with a
different animal than the
Tonys
Hildy Parks explained the
mechanics of the show she has
written.
"We are celebrating the themes
of the series on television that
have surrounded us for the last 40
years she said. "1 think music
is a stimulant to memory second
to none
Awards will be handed out in
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� comedy, drama, variety,
limited series � rather than hav-
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directing.
The show will open with a
pretaped medley of TV themes,
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"We will start with what pro-
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Among the stars will be Mary
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Mario Thomas, Lome Greene,
Isabel San ford, Tom Wopat.
I inda Lavin, Michael I.earned
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IHI I AM AKOI INIAN
ECU Defensive Coordinator
Optimistic About Campaign
Sports
M dl SI 2v ls�s
Bv sconOOPLR
( Spi� I n
1985 86 Pirate defense
returns 21 players from last year,
e losing 17 to graduation.
W th a brand new defensive stafl
first yeai head coach it
ECU hopes to establish
defense like thai ol 1981
fensi
rdinatoi Don
ol 2 s� last year,
were directed
- �, y optimistit. al
tense and believes success is
;� ound the cornel.
kids have
�� on the personable
- - sa d "1 hey have a strong
Instead ol rolling over.
going to fighi back.
re fighters
a � ecoi d
� ai dships
ird the Pirate defense ol a
ago oach Powers felt this
the defense 'takes it on the
n
V heti you have a bad year, it
mattei w h Powei s e
: ' ou don really have
si outlook and it reflects on
fense
phomores John W illiamson
Kmi Gillia urn al
defensive end positions.
Gilliard siaried in six games and
Williamson started once, hut
both saw much exposure in '84.
Senior Willie Mack also returns
to the rush-end position after
missing List year's campaign.
Sophomore Vinson Smith should
hold the duties of drop end, while
freshmen Willie Powell and Ken
raylot will provide more sup
port.
1 he tackle positions are a hit
more open as jusl one starter
returns. I his being sophomore
1 con Hall who will play on the
left side. Also, it looks as if last
year's starter Joe Grinage will be
able to perform after all. Grinage
experienced some problems last
spring, but is back and ready to
play, freshman Walter Bryant
and Ojah Vasser will back up
Hall.
Junioi David Plum is believed
to be the startet at the right side
(tackle). Plum started a few
games and saw a good deal of ac-
tion in "84 Freshman Rodney
Glovei and junior William Jen-
nette should also see some action
on the right side Jennette injured
his shoulder and missed all of the
"84 season It Jennette can add
his talents here, the Pirates would
be a lot tougher in the trenches.
In the middle, sophomore
noseguard Meldrick Rainbow
returns. Despite being injured
late in the year, last season. Rain-
bow did see much playing time.
The coaches are very happy with
his play, but depth may be a pro-
blem at this spot. Redshirt
freshman Shannon Boling is the
only other replacement currently.
The linebacking core should
provide ECU with a solid foun-
dation on defense. Seniors Steve
Jacobs and Robert Washington,
juniors Bubba Waters and Larry
Berry and sophomores John Britt
and Bruce Simpson all saw a
great deal of action a year ago.
Seniors Jacobs and Washington
are listed as starters as all will see
plenty of action.
Coach Powers feels that the
seniors are doing a fine job and
lhat they should take charge and
try to direct the team.
"We've got good leadership
Powers said. "All of our seniors
are doing a good job � that's a
senior function. We're challeng-
ing our seniors to have their best
year ever
In order for the Pirates to be successful, they will have to gang tackle with their swarminK defens, y
open the season Sept. 7 in Raleigh against N.C.State.
Another strong spot for the
Pirates is the defensive secon-
dary. Junior strong safety Gary
London returns. London started
at the safety spot the past two
years. He will be teamed with
senior free safety Vernard Wvnn.
Behind Wynn will be sophomore
Ellis Dillahunt. Sophomore
Essray Taliaferro was moved
from the end spot to strong safe-
ty, where he will be backing up
London.
Kevin Walker and Keith Lord
return to take control ol the cot
nerback positions Walker will
watch the left side for the third
straight year, as Ford will man
the right side. Lord started at the
free safety spot a vear ago and
was moved to the corner spot to
make room for Stefon dams
(who was a third-round draft
pick of the Oakland Raiders)
Lhe two corners combined tor six
interceptions last vear Redshirt
freshman I ewis w ilson
senior let! I urner will provide
:he depth al
In ordei I
successful,
1(1 must estal
attitude ! I i
team efl
w rli togethet
Fwo a i
one f �
turnovei
Powi
ng,
one .
I will
, r� i ,VMU s-imn jcii turnci win provide one a' a '
E�R Offense Improving; Will Throw More

Bal
� f i r i
OS 5
.�. � ei
eet
111 w
t i turn ol s
ned receivers have helped
ECU improve offensively
Entering fall practice,
�phomore quarterback Ron
��� as listed as No. 1 on
with junioi Dai .
' � the bad
However, Speed ;an
fall workouts a . two
i unning neck and neck for the
starting position.
Whichevei one wins that spot,
EC! coach r Bakei said a deci-
sion will definitely have to be
le soon
" I' would he nice to have the
tck position clearly
established by now Baker said.
"Ron Jones was ahead at the end
ce, but Darryl
speed looked the best in the first
mmage. We will decide (on a
ter). We're not going to be
playing musical chairs
While neither quarterback has
passed as well as Baker would
- . he is pleased with their im-
in reading defensive
erages.
Ihe quarterbacks will be
helped by the improvement
show by the receivers, an area
was lacking during spring
tha
drills.
The receiving corps have been
bosltered by the return of Amos
Adams, Chris Mel aw horn and
Brent Holbrook. Also LLarry
Howard and Teffin Benedict,
who are both freshmen, have
shown promise at the wideou;
position.
Baket savs the return of these
players, some of whom were out
due to academics, shows the ef-
fort these players have put forth.
"We've had some people
who've come back (after
academic problems) and are go-
ing to help us the first-year
ECU coach said. "They worked
hard lo become eligible again and
that shows that they can do it
With Tony Baker returning to
pace the Pirate rushing attack,
along with a solid offensive line.
ECU should be able to move the
football on the ground.
"We hope to be an outstanding
rushing team Baker said, but
my experience at Florida State
has shown me that you have to be
able to throw it" you are to be
good on offense and we've spent
a lot of time on our passing
game
Below is a position by position
analysis of the offense:
Quarterback: A more solid posi-
tion than a year ago. Junior Dar-
rel Speed, who started seven
games, and sophomore Ron
Jones, who started two games,
are back to run the Pirates'
Option-1 offense. Speed started
the majority of the 1984 season
but Jones emerged from spring as
the No.l quarterback entering
the fall. The position has since
opened up with Speed and Jones
both in the running for the star-
ting nod.
Jones, who saw action in seven
games, passed for 5" yards,
while rushing for 101. Speed,
who saw action in 10 of the
Pirates' 11 games, completed 61
of 132 passes for 795 yards and
six touchdowns. Add to Speed
and Jones redshirt freshman
Todd Abrams and incoming
freshmen Brad Walsh and Berke
Holtzclaw, and ECU has a strong
nucleus at quarterback.
Tailback: Senior Tonv Baker is
the name here, lhe High Point.
NX, native enters 98! h the
position all to himself after
ing the spot with Jimmy W alder.
the last three season Baker
comes into 1985 as E I 's v si
all-time leading rusher will
513 vards o; a yeat ago Behind
Baker are some capable bodies in
sophomores lerrv Paige
George Franklin. v
Baker is looking tor big things
from this poition, especially from
Baker, who rushed tor 137 vards
in EC L"s annual spring game in
April.
rullhack: Another position
Baker is happy with. Sophomore
Anthony Simpson emerged fi
the spring as ECI 's No. 1
fullback with his impressive
showing in the annual spring
game. The Brooklyn, NY, native
rushed for 60 yards and scored
twice and will team with Ionv
Baker to give he Pirates an ex-
cellent one-two punch in the
back field. Behind Simpson are a
host of backs, such as redshirt
freshman Tim James and senior
Bobby C'lair, who will lend
depth.
Receivers: The glaring sore spot
on the offensive side of the ball in
the spring. Only one proven per-
former returns, that being junior
Amos Adams. Adams played in
all 11 games for ECU in 1984 and
started five at split end after his
brother Stefon was moved to free
safety. After Adams, trouble sets
in
Bal.


I ' i:
' i md W
Brent H
! ey and
Chris McLawl .
upon for 1 Mel awhon
only mem1
game. Incoming freshmei H
How ird ol Mian i Fla a
fin Benedk 11e,
Ha look fo fieurc- in nuht mj
I ackle 1 his :
ds will mior
Urn Dui ide and
Brady on tl umas, who
was bothei I 98 I with
hamsti us.
enjoyed a s .has
trimmed d
ing form Brady did nor see much
playing time in 1984 bu
ed coaches during the spring.
Behind Dumas will he Rob
lexander, wh derable
playing tune a yea md n-
dv Schebal. Behind Brady s thin,
with redshii mar: ! im (n
listed as number 'vs and set
Cireg Sokolohorsky, who played
in a majority ol the Pirates' 1984
games, is listed number three
Sokolohorsky did miss the spring
as an academic casual
See 1)1 MAS, Pae 20
Heath Returns For Senior Season
Bv I()V BROWN
With the most prolific field
il kicker in East Carolina's
�rv returning for the '85 cam
paign, that aspect of the Pirate
kicking game should prove to be
one of the most reliable scoring
threats tor ECU this vear, accor-
ding to assistant head coach Mike
' (am
Record-setting senior Jeff
Heath, who also kicks e:ra
points, is now poised for a run at
'fie all time scoring mark tor
ECU this season Ihe Virginia
Beach, Va. native already holds
the Pirate career mark for field
goals with a total of 38, topping
Bill I amm's previous record of
26.
Heath, who currently ranks
third in scoring, needs only 12
points to move into second place
and 30 to top Carlester
Crumpler's 222 total. The ac-
curate kicker led the Pirates in
scoring for the third straight year
in 'H4 and has notched the top
three field goals in ECU's
history, with the longest a state
record 58-yarder in his freshman
year.
I ast year Heath kicked a
perfect 23 of 23 extra points while
notching 13 out of 16 three-point
attempts � and Coach O'Cain is
confident that type of perfor-
mance will continue this season.
It's the one area of the kicking
game for the Pirates that is a pro-
ven success.
"I feel we should be able to
�sore anytime we get to the 25
O'Cain said. "Heath has a very
strong leg and gets plenty of
distance. It's just a matter of ac-
curacy after that. He can hit from
50 yards or more, but with the
ball coming back to the line of
scrimmage on missed kicks, it
would depend on the situation
whether we tried anything around
35 yards or more
Heath, an industrial
technology major, is not chasing
personal records, though. "I'm
just working as part of the team
to improve our record he said
yesterday after a hard day of
practice.
"I would like to improve my
consistency and hit all attempts
inside the 40 this year he add-
ed. "Stuart Ward has done a
great job of snapping for me and
has been a great help to me
Heath has a new holder this year
in the person of Tony Smith, but
so far the combination has been
operating smoothly, according to
Heath.
While the field goal and extra
point unit is basically set for the
season, the other areas of the
kicking game remain a question
mark. With ace return man
Henry Williams now in the
USFL, untested newcomers will
be called upon to fill the kick-off
and punt return slots.
Wide receiver Tony Smith is
currently slated to return punts,
with defensive back Jeff Turner
set to back him up if needed.
Smith did get some game ex-
perience at this position last year
in the Southern Mississippi game
when Williams was injured.
After the decreased output
from kick-off and punt returns in
'84, the Pirate coaching staff is
putting a great deal of emphasis
on blocking techniques. Even
"��'X, pmt ,w'
with the elusive Williams last
year, the return yardage went
way down from the 31.1 yard
average and four touchdowns of
1983.
"The big difference last year
was the loss of four or five
veterans said assistant coach
Ken Matous. "W'e just didn't get
the key blocks we needed. We
hope to improve a great deal on
that this year
The punting situation s x
undecided, also, with two
freshmen battling for the starting
slot. Jeff Malyniak and Tim
Wolter both need to gain distance
and hang time, according to
Coach O'Cain. "They're getting
a little more distance he said,
"but they're both inconsistent.
I'm looking for more improve-
ment when they're not so leg-
weary, though
i
'� . . -� I
I





Yeoman Disciplinarian
f HI I ASIAKOl IMA.N
AUGUST 29, 1985
17
HOUSTON (I PI)oach
Bill Yeoman arrived at the
I diversity oi Houston m 2
with a strong faith in God, a
military discipline learned al
West Point and a ready sense ol
humor
He needed all three, plus a
dash oi pioneet spirit, to withs
A the rigors of building the
Cougars into a majoi football
im.
Once hung in effigy and heckl-
d as the coach of "Cougar
High Yeoman is now dean of
ve college football coaches.
nd he has some strong ideas
about the way college athletics
should be conducted.
Paying player . for example, is
taboo
"What we've got to do is get
back to where a youngstei goes to
school in the fall and spring and
works in the summer Yeoman
aid. "He works in the summer
e can make his ow n money . It
-ou've got a youngstei over in the
dorm with no money in his
pocket. 1 suggest he gel ofl his
' and get a job he said dur-
a recent inten iew
"We've taken away from these
kids the opportunity to have
warm, comfortable feeling inside
youi stomach when you know
you've actually accomplished
something
Yeoman finetuned his lessons
in discipline early on as a player
and graduate assistant at the I S,
Military Academy under Col.
Red Blaik. If he seems to carry a
hickory stick, it's tempered with
the humor he learned as an assis
tant to Duffy Daugherty at
Michigan Stale
"1 sometimes get impatient
when things aren't done right
Yeoman said. "I remembei once
veiling at one of my kids that he
was acting like a two-year-old.
Then I realized that he was two
years old
In the Southwest Conference.
only former Texas coach Darrell
Royal with 10 champions has
taken more teams to the Cotton
Bowl than Yeoman, who is tied at
four with Arkansas' Frank
Broyles, who guided the Razor-
backs tot 20 seasons.
Yeoman's career record of 155
victories is the fourth best among
active coaches.
He and Kentucky's Jerry
C'laiborne each have 23 ears as
head coaches, but Yeoman's have
all been at Houston, giving him
the longest tenure of an active
coach at one school.
"People have wondered why
we've been able to have some
degree ot success; it's because ot
the continuity of the thing he
said.
Yeoman says football itsell
hasn't changed much since his
plavmg days, just the athletes.
The youngsters have changed
in that they don't get at home
what they used to get Yeoman
said " The needs for what it takes
to play college football haven't
changed. What they come in
with, has
Yet for all his accomplishments
at Houston, Yeoman still is battl-
ing the role of the underdog in
the intensely recruited Southwest
Conference.
"The information that some of
our friends, and I use the term
loosely, spread about the univer-
sity is so misrepresentativc it's
unbelievable Yeoman said.
"They just swing in any direction
talking about the educational
situation here
But he doesn't worry about it
anymore, he says, preferring to
leave such matters to someone
higher up. He even thinks there
could be a divine hand in
Houston's frequent visits to the
Cotton Bowl.
"If you don't believe in pro-
vidence, you've got a serious pro-
blem in explaining the season last
vear said Yeoman, whose 7-4
team wrapped up a surprising
Cotton Bowl berth on the final
day of the season.
"It's not a mystery to me he
said. "He runs things anyway
and I'm just real glad he decided
to let us go
ECU Football Notes
1984 NATIONAL RANKINGS: Four o ECU's 1985 opponents finished the 1984 season ranked among
the nation's Top 20 college football teams while all four made post-season bowl appearances. Below are the
earns and their respective finishes in the final AP and I PI polls:
SOUTH CAROI INA: 10-2. 11th AP. 13th I'PI (Gatoi Bowl)
U BURN: 9-4, 14th AP and I PI (1 iberty Bowl)
I SU: 8-3-1, 15th AP, 16th UP1 (Sugar Bowl)
MIAMI-FLORIDA: 8 v I8tl P. unranked in I PI (Fiesta Bowl)
1985 PRK-SKASON RANKINGS: -s many as five teams on ECU's 1985 schedule appear in a pre-season
fop 20 poll. The teams and polls thev appear in are as follows:
AUBURN Sporting News (j ). Inside Sports (1), Klein Report (8), Football Action (3). Athlon (3), Sport
(8), Street & Smith's (3)
SOUTH CAROI i sporting News (H), Spot' (13), Klein Report (3). Athlon (19).
MIAMI-FLORIDA: Klein Report (13), Sport (20).
1 SU: Sporting News (6), Klein Report (4). Football Action (7), Athlon (9).
PFNN STATI Sporting News (15), Football Action (15), Athlon (18). Street & Smith's (14).
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730 GREENVILLE BLV0
GBIfNVIU.I N.C.
�c i tAfaesr me �os
W4 'ftUC
-Mf PLA.ZA ACROSS �OW r WAS'
ANEW
LOOK
FOR YOU!
The Crow's Nest has created a new,
improved atmosphere for your din-
ing pleasure!
Complete Breakfast, Lunch,
and Dinner Meals
24 Hours A Day
Enjoy the Game Room and
Large Screen T.V.
Great Food
Reasonable Prices
(Now Available � Backgammon, Checkers,
Chess and Chinese Checkers)
We can't offer
the World
Corner of 10th and Charles Blvd.
Phone 758 2446
but we can offer
you a good start!
Pi Kappa Phi
Come visit the Pi Kappa Phi brothers by the lake
Monday, September 2, for a lake Party!
Tuesday. September 3, for a Hawaiian Luau!
and
Wednesday. September 4. it's M.A.S.H. Night!
?ALL PARTIES START AT 9:00
For a ride call
752-3094
- -
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i THF EAST CARPI iniianj
WANTED
BROOY'S FOR MEN: Has a posi
tion open for part time salesperson.
Sales experience and understanding
of men's fashion is preferred. Flexi
ble schedule. Better than minimum
wage pay. Apply to Mrs. Daniels,
Brody's The Plaza. Monday-Friday
2pm 5pm.
WANTED: Experienced
Bartenders. Call 758 5570.
TELEMARKETING-POSIT ION
AVAILABLE: With nation's largest
retail company. Salary and bonuses
Permanent part time. Afternoon
and evening hours available. Call
355 7108 for appointment.
HELP WANTED: Student in.
terested in security guard work who
are 18 years of age or older, able to
satisfactorily complete a Criminal
Record Check, have very depen-
dalbe transportation, willing and
able to work weekends and holidays
and nights, contact Major Catapano
at 758-2174.
PARTTIME SOCCER COACHES:
Needed afternoon hours. Call Pitt
County Community Schools at
752 2934, Ext. 276 or 267.
PERFECT: Need to earn extra
money, but you haven't got extra
t.rne Well this is the perfect job for
you. We need Tele marketing agents
for our new, conviently located of
fice in downtown Greenville. Even
mg hours flexible ot your schedule
yet leaving you time for fun! Salary
plus bonuses. For interview call
Donna at 758-5595 between 2 00pm
and 7.00pm.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: Work
part-time, 10-20 hours weekly, begin
ning Monday, September 9th Hours
are normally 3:30 7 30pm Monday
thru Friday with occasional Satur
days. Salary rate $3.46 an hour
Knowledge of soccer skills and the
ability to coach young people, ages
9-15 needed. Contact: Greenville
Recreation and Parks Dept at
752 4l37(ext.262) Deadline tor ap
plications is Tuesday, September
3rd.
ROOMMATE WANTED �
FEMALE: Have 2 bedroom Apart
ment, � bath, will have private
bedroom. Will need bedroom fur-
niture. Will pay if interested, of
$285 rent plus 4 utilities. Nonsmoker
If interested call Cleo at 758-4298 or
come by apartment Eastbrook 103
G.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Non smoker. $175 month, utilities in-
cluded. Call 752 1642.
WANTED: Female roommated to
share 3 bedroom house. $125 month
and � utilities. Call 757 3528 home or
756-8500-work. Ask for Wendy
NEEDED: Roommate, neat and
clean. $145 deposit, $145 month
utilities. Call Bill 752-4171.
1 OR 2 FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: For 2 bedroom apart
ment. Tar River Estates. Call after
3.00pm 758 6767.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share condo in Rollinwood with one
other. Furnished, plus microwave,
washer and dryer, fireplace, pool
Brand new. Near hospital. Own
bedroom and bath $225. Call Brift
7584290.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Wilson
Acres 3 bedrooms � one third
utilities. Rent $125. Good location
Good neighbors. Both business ma
jors. Call Jacque or Tony or leave
message. 757 0551.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To stay in
nice 3 bedroom apartment at
Eastbrook. $110 a month plus one
third utilities. Call 758-0364 for
details. After 7:00pm. Please keep
trying.
WANTED: Grad. student or serious
student to share expenses in two
bedroom house $40 a month and one
third utilities. 752-5979
PERSONALS
WELCOME BACK: Sigma Nu Little
Sisters! Get psyched for the party
today. Our first meeting will be this
Sunday at 8:00pm . Love, Marian.
SIGMA NU BROTHERS: Welcome
back! We're ready for a great party
and a great rush I Love, your little
sisters.
ZBT: Welcome Back! Brotherhood
at 7:00 Thursday same place. Little
Sister meeting 7:00 Thursday
Mendenhall Room 244. Pool party at
Mark's on Saturday 7:00.
AOTT: Welcome back sisters and
pledges, get psyched for a rockin
semester!
NEWSPAPERS: The East Caroli-
nian has many old newspapers to
donate to any needy organization.
Call 757 6366.
AUGUST 29, 1985
SAILBOAT CHARTERS: Day Sail
on Pamlico River. $20 per person for
all day charter. Coast Guard llcens
ed Captain. Groups of up to 6 Call
Capt. Greg Smith at 1 975 3300 after
6:00pm.
ROAD TRIPS UNLIMITED: Is
back! Tickets wili soon be available
at Apple Records for the Crosby,
Stills and Nash concert in
Greensboro, Sept. 18. ONe price
pays for concert ticket and the round
trip bus ride. Don't miss it!
CROSBY, STILLS AND NASH
FANS: Get your tickets at Apple
Records to see the legendary band
Play all your favorites in Grensboro,
Sept. 18. Price includes concert
ticket and round trip by bus Be
there!
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5:30.
th!r?$�NfR:0nD�athRow
at the Arizona State Proson would
like to correspond with anyone in
ZVl in writing to a man on
Death Row. I'm thirty seven years
o d and have no family. ' answer
?lLTeHonthat y0U a$k and �rV
letter. Please feel free to ask me
anything that you are curious about
and talk about whatever you want
to. If you could please send stamps
they would be a very big help
Because I am not allowed to get out
of my cell to work to earn money to
buy them, if interested, write to
Robert Moorman, Box B 31293
Florence, AZ 85232.
WRITER'S BLOCK CURED: Send
.52.00 for catalog of over 16,000
topics, to assist your writing efforts
and help you beat Writer's Block
For info. call toll free
1 800 621 5745(ln Illinois, call
Authors' Research, Rm 600, 407
South, Dearborn, Chicago, II. 60605
THE MIDDLEMAN: Apartment
�� i"fl "�?mr"�te Referral Service.
C K � IT Street SU'te 2 aCr0" fr0m
Sub Station 11. Let us help you find
the apartment or roommate you're
looking for. Call 830 1069
NEED TYP,NO: Letters
?fromVJrm Papers' etc C�"
Karen at 752-0498.
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
f� Vi, ham - 7�5W8 (8am
5pm) 17 yrs. experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters.
RINGOOLD TOWERS: Two units
for sale. Efficiency 8th floor, one
bedroom 4th floor, units completely
furnished, carpeted, air conditioned,
and include kitchen appliances.
Please call (day) 201 532 7993 (after
5pm) 2014310768, or write Mr.
Celidonio, 99 Wilson Ave Freehold,
NJ 07728.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted:
Responsible Party to assume small
monthly payments on spinet console
Piano. Can be seen locally,
write: (include phone number)
Credit Manager, P.O. Box 520,
Beckemeyer, 11 62219.
SALE
ROOM FOR RENT
couple. 752 7212.
With Chn'stian
FOR sale: 1977 Toyota Corolla
Dependabel Good on gas. 758 9921.
POR SALE: 5 cubic ft
refngerator,perfect for dorm Why
rent; buy now, sale later. $125. Call
Rich at 752 0225 or 758 5595
CAR FOR SALE: '80 Honda Civic -
white, 5 speed, great car for student
Call 7584917 or 757 6053 Ask for
Stuart $2900 neg.
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC 20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorder player
joystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette,Programer's Aid
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An
thony at 757 6366 or 752 7346
WATERBED FOR SALE: Super
Single, heater, liner full floation
bookcase headboard. Asking $225
Call 756 8447 after 4.00pm
FOR SALE: Sears portable Ken
more washer $50 758 9095
FOR SALE: 27"Free spirit 10 speed
bicycle, $80. Call 758 6971 after
8:00pm.
FOR SALE: Bicycle Motobelane
Nomade II 21 inch $150. Call 753 3685
ask for David
Grant
To L
Minneapolis (UP!) Orl
fathers take kids on fishing t
offer sage advice of life's ups
downs thai their parents
fell them, and sneak little
treats
Comfort and stability ai,
much a part 0i a grandfatf
traits a. MVer hair and
Hush Puppies. All
trademarl Minnesota Vil
head coad ram
v' tggling through!
uTl - 'he orJ
the h,y the MI frarj(
,he ' Vikings
!ookint' -r a hug
v 5fi back as the
mgs coach, ending an 11
retiremeni
hole in northern 1 m
had called h quits in Deceml
4 afte. r h season
playofi appearances. i ;
Division championship q
'� ntlein 1969 and three n
owns with Minnesota.
Vikings owner Max Wmtl
who once signed Grant to p
basketball in the NBA with
Minneapolis Lakers, was abl
coax the Old Trapper out
woods in January The front
fice then uprighted Gran'
feeder at the team's headquar
m Eden prane and smil
because all was right aga.
Onl George Halas has m
more pro football games asL
head coach than Gram, who h
283 regular and post-season v
tories- 122 as coach of the W
nipeg Blue Bomber, in 'he Car
dian Football League frq
1957-1966 and 161 as'head mi
with the Viking from I9619J
Halas had ?26 victories.
But Halas probably did n
have to deal with Mich problej
children a. Grant must
face. Not only does he have
soothe the players, hoping
recover from last veai
demoralizing season, but al
guide several players anxious i
come back from much publicize
field troubles.
Grant's abi!it as a guidii
light is most apparent to Vikinj
general manager Mike I vnn, wl
recently mailed the coach a pai
ting of the Statue of Liberty
The inscription, "Give
your tired, your po it hue
died masses yearning to be
The wretched refuse 0! J
teeming shore, send these.
homeless, tempest-tossed,
me is the new symbol for thj
Vikings, Lynn said
The statue arrived the sam)
day the Vikings acquired n
rights to former Oakland Invade
receiver Anthony Carter, whi
hopes to leave the I'Sf and gaij
respect m the NFI Lynn coi
siders Carter as one of 'hi
"homeless
Among the tempe
seeking shelter are running bad
Chuck Muncie, a three-time PH
Bowler whom the San Dieg
Chargers traded because of
history of drug-related problemsl
Both running back Rickey YounJ
and defensive end Rand;
Hollow a were released lasl
season. Young flunked a unn
test with Miami because of drug
and Holloway has undergon(
treatment.
Defensive end Keith Millar�
was suspended by the Jackson
ville Bulls of the USFL for n
ing practices and because of 1
bad attitude Rookie wid
receiver George Buster Rhyme
was caught stealing a stereo from
another athlete and was suspend!
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Vc
7a.m8 a.m.
12 noon-1:30 p.m.
3:30-6:30 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
MlngeaPooi
8p.m9:30�.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
M-Th
Friday
Sat Sun.
9 a.m8 p.m.
9a.m5:30p.m.
1 p.m5p.m
3p.m7p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
M-T 2 p.m. -6 p. m
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3p.m5:30p.m.
aMoun. l p.m5 p.m.





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'ent
sk for
20
lyei
"
I I
will be
jrant Returns
To Lead Vikes
Minneapolis ,1 PI) Grand
"hers take kids on fishing trips,
� idvice of life's ups and
theii parents won
' rieak little sweet
ats
tabilit arc as
' a grandfather's
and worn
VII are
w or si in
� in hie.
. -
in l! mi
' hine
'v � Ml seasons, !2
I �� rural
one
NF1 1969 a NF
A
Vikings owner Max Winter,
who once signed Grant to pla
basketball in the NBA
Minneapolis 1 akei � to
coax the Old I t of the
in Jat
� " �� iprighted
� a won
games as a
h
the Win
man
"
i

Gi i g uiding
Vikings
v' � a ho
' � pain-
1" I.ibet
-
ming
I, I
I


;id Invadei
irter, who
gain
: i ! i
� the
Vi tossed
. back
I ,1
i .
1 a
I problei
Young
F u � .
leased last
' inked a urine
t drugs
undergone
Millard
: h th kson-
he l M 1 foi miss-
and : fa
i ei (� tei Khmes
reo from
� � athlete and was suspend-
SW1MMIN(, POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W F 7a.m8a.m.
Ml 12 noon-l:30p.m.
Ml 3:3O-6:30p.m.
Sat 1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M W 1 8 p.m9:30p.m.
Sun 1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
9a.m8 p.m.
9a.m5:30p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges
3 p.m7 p.m.
M-Th
Friday
Sat Sun
M F
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th I0a.m12noon
M-Th 2p.m6p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30p.m.
SatSun 1 p.m5 p.m.
ed tor the 182 season at
(Iklahaoma.
"We have some players who
are coming ofl of injuries We
have other players coming back
from an illness, a disease Grant
said "As fat as football is con-
cerned, we look at the situations
in similai fashion. c an this
playei c me back from an in
jury?an this playei come ba� k
Iness'
"We feel there are players who
might he able to succeed here in
Minnesota because ol more
supervision. I he have agreed to
certain things supervision
m oider to be pan ol the
team
s ho bettei to watt h over the
players than grand fatherly
(irant.
I hese pla ei s deser v e a
i hance. I here wouldn't b
i nth e foi going through ti
ment if there was nothing
there as lai as a careei wa con
cerned aftei you hav
treated (. Irani said.
IHt t AS!AROUNIAN
AUGUST 2V, 1985
19
30 to 60
OFF
All Frames
In Stock
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
pon with order
Nscount Not good with ����

SOFT
CONTACTS
59.00
AT BARRE, LTD.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
Supplies for dance classes
Leotards Tights
Aerobic Wear
Costume Accessories
Stage Makeup
Hours
10:00 6:0OMF
10:00 5:00 Sat
422 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919) 756 6670
pair
COUPON EXPIRES
SEPT 27, 1985
SUNGLASSES 307o OFF with coupon only
Ask Bboul -ur in vnior Itlens Hf "�" �rr�ngf an rf txam for you on
lt�i, ,h i�m( das
qf
The
OPTICAL
Phone
756 4204
PALACE
n7
703 (,i�nv1ll� Blvd A. imilmn Pm PLja ��i To tRA R��ltyi
f�rv, M lUrrli Ucen�ed Odii. i��Oprn t 30 � m to 6 p m Mon F 11
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
� Cleaning done by the doctor
� Pain-free restorative dentistry
. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenvile, NC
758-4927
KA
BEAT
TATE PARTY
In Color
and Diamonds
o
Sunday
September 1st, 1985


o
t

4:00 � until
KA House

Ot �
Free Bus Service from College Hill and
Mendenhall Student Center beginning at 3:30 p.m.
90
MUSIC
PL AYID THI AMI IMCAN WAY-
Remember. . .
Drinking &. Driving
Don't Mix
:�!����, : Q' 73245 CG
I I ft
'





!0
HI l AM i. -Kol 1M S
Ml.l M N S�8
0�
I he Depai tin cut of
Intramural Recreational Services
would like to welcome ECU back
to school Foi all the faculty,
stafl and students unfamiliar
vMth our program, and even those
who've been participating with us
over the years, here's a rundown
ol all the activities and services
available to you from out depart
ment.
Intramural Sports ith
close to 2ti activities available in
the tall months alone, the in-
tramural sports area otters a
comprehensive program in team,
individual and co recreational
sports both traditional and uni-
que in nature Oui program
begins with flag toot bail registra
tion Sept 2-3, and winds up with
a variet ol spoils throughout the
remaindei of the fall semester.
1 lag Football Sept 2 1
I ennis Singles Sepl 9-10
1 earn Putt-Put; Sept. 9-10
v o-Rec Softball Sept. 9-10
: onBasket ball Sept 16-17
I ennis Doubles Sepl 16-P
1 rack & Field Meei Sepi lf iv
Vlmosi Anything (ioes Sepl
10-Oci
1 oi a closei ok at k tobei 's,
November's and December's .k
hit ram u
ces pocket
n deadlines,
information
. reation,
and aerobic
Recreat iona S
idai Registratic
clinics and
concerning - i
outdoor recreation
.ire included in
years pocket pack
r� Club Progi !
ise interested -time,
instruci aa and recreational ac
� a somewhat
nature, trie sporl club progran
I
clubs are curre � �
V cry. fi
ball, rugb)
women's
handbal
ira
ke
i,
Dumas Leads
Offensive
Line Charge
( untinued from Pan? 1ft.
he return
his 1983 playing
lining mjurv free as
aid be a problem.
Guard Senior David Kramer, a
the defensive line
a yeai ago, ai d mior Greg
rhoi holddowntl og
spots,
I homas, listed a i ci tei
entering the 1984 a kei
e a he played .enter, guard
and some tackle a -ear ago.
Thoi yed an excep-
tional sprint a awarded
the most improved offensive
piaver award bv the coaching
staff. He will line up on the right
side. Kramer, listed as a defensive
tackle entering the 1984 season,
was moved to offensive guard six
games into 19K4 and performed
admirably. Kramer ended the
eason starting five of the
Pirates" final six games
Behind those two are are quali-
ty people in Rich Autry, who
started most of the 1VK4 season
betore injuring his shoulder. Cur-
tis Stvurk, Paul Hoggard and Joe
Molineaux also will provide
depth.
Center The Pirates enter 1985
with unproven talent here. Senior
Stuart Ward will hold down the
No. 1 spot after spending the last
two seasons in a backup role.
Ward worked hard during the
spring and improved a great deal
in the eyes of the coaching staff.
Behind Ward, however, ex-
perience is slim
With Greg Thomas moved to
guard, unior Ken Bourgeois will
back up Ward. Bourgeois, a
juior college All-amenca in 1983,
missed the entire 1984 season
recovering from knee surgery and
is untested. The same holds true
for number three center Rich
McMahan, who was moved from
tackle during the spring.
Tight hnd Senior Scott lewis is
back after starting three of the
Pirates final five games at tight
end m 1984. Behind lewis is
junior college transfer Mike
Gainey and senior Jeff Patton.
Patton, however was injured ear-
ly in fall workouts and freshman
David C arr has shown much pro
mtse.
star on the sporl club scene, oi
want to start a club ot youi own,
come bv room 105 Memorial
Gym and talk with the sport club
director, Vanessa Higdon,
Physical 1 itness Program
1 he Intramural-Recreational Set
vr�.es fitness program is designed
to meet the individual fitness
needs ot all faculty, stafl and
students. Programs such as the
Pepsi Physical 1 itness Program,
Swim and Stay Fit and en
Challenge provide sell directed
exercise in swimming, jogging,
aerobics, biking, walking and
pushing (wheelchairs).
Perhaps one ol the most
populai areas in the- physical
fitness program are classes held
in tonmg, aquarobics md
aerobics. Drop in
aerobics began Monday (yestei
da) First ses;
students and faculty variety ol
classes arid ins
available tor von to
lo sign up, drop '
Memorial Gym fron v 00
I p.m daily
Informal Recrea V
.ramming for 1 BIG ex
am, rel: . rations by
recreal the IRS in an
a Basket I
volleyba
� t few ol tht ; i
i o v )'�!� � �
tion hours in
Minaes C . a
vivm aKo
hou
i
and weiel �
youi enjoyment lo find out
more about the informal recrea
tion facilities and then hours oi
operation, pick up a handy
po kel calendar or call 757 6387.
( Outdoor Recreation I he
program is designed to meet the
needs ol all you outdoorsy types
who pretei to tackle the
wilderness or face the challenge
ol an outdoor adventure. Each
smemestet the outdoor recreation
center, located in room I 1
Memorial Com. offei adventure
trips to various scenic locations
across the East (oast Upcoming
in September is the Whitewater
rafting trip. I he registration
deadline is Sept. 12 and the trip
will take place Sept 20, 21, 22
neat Vshev ille, Northarolina.
Besides coordinating outdoor
adventures, the outdoor recrea
centei pi ovules ,i com
prehensive listing ol national,
local and state recreation oppor
tunities plus an entire resource
room filled with outdoot inl
mation Room 1 1 Memorial
Gym is the site for youi next out
door adventure.
I he Depart men t ol
Intramural-Recreational Serv ices
has something tor everyone
II theii recreational dreams.
Be a paiI ol us.ome bv room
Memorial (iym foi more
formal ur
We wish you a
i semester and hope tl it

Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
'n fhr KwiarollnJan
WELCOME BACK STUDENT SPECIALS
Afi
w
cv�
� Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentuck Fries
Lg Drink $2.89
� 2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscuit
l Mashed Potatoes wGravy
fatudi, Fried �kue�
$1.89
Specals Good Thru Sept 30th
at Greenville Stores On!
Locations
600 W Gree' . TS6 M3
2V05 E 5th St IVi S184
Pamlico Sailing School

Discover the Sounds
and Outer Banks of
Eastern North Carolina!
Learn to sail or cruise while living aboard a
beautiful Morgan sailing yacht.
Special Labor Day Weekend Charters
Pamlico Sailing School
105 Heron Bay
Washington, N.C. 27889
or call 946-6319
.v�v�v�.v��v.

CLEARANCE
MAJOR MARKDOWNS
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FEATURED TITLES BY:
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SAVINGS UP TO 50
ONSANYO&TOSHIBA
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ALSO, SUPER SAVINGS ON HOT NEW RELEASES!
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THE MOTELS
Shock
CASSETTE OR LP
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THE PLAZA CAROLINA EAST MALL
ViSA-
MostorCon
Mondav
Tuesday
Wednesday





ENT SPECiA'

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I

Oil A
NAI
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ES!
I1301I1SN03II
VSA
M35trCord





22
I HI S1 c ARl i iN
Al l.l SI :v 1983
Pirate Grid Notes
I0H4 NATIONAL RANKINGS: Four of ECU's 1985 opponents
finished the W84 season ranked among the nation's Top 20 college
football teams while all four made post-season bowl appearances.
Below are the teams and their respective finishes in the final AP and
I l'l polls
sol m CAROI INA: 10-2, 11th AP. 13th UP1 (Gator Bowl)
l HI RN: 9-4, 14th AP and UPI (Liberty Bowl)
LSU: 8-3-1, 15th AP, 16th UPI (Sugar Bowl)
MIAMI! I ORIDA: 8-5, 18th AP. unranked in UPI (Fiesta Bowl)
WINNINGEST TEAMS The Pirates will face seven teams in 1985
who rank among the NCAA's winningest 45 teams in Division I-A
football over the last ten years. Thev are:
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
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SI95 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
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RELIK.H WOMIN'S
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RoUigh NC
10. Penn State (85-21-1) .700
23 I"ulsa (70-39-1) .641
14. I SI (644-4) H2
Southern Mississippi (63-46-2) .577
6 South Carolina (64-47-1) .576
19 uburn (61-47-3) .563
4 Miami-Florida (61-49-0) .555
- 28th among the nation's top 45 winningest teams with its
� a .605 winning percentage. The above seven also have com-
; in 27 howl games over the course of the past 10 vears.
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 29, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.419
Location of Original
University Archives
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57735
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
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