The East Carolinian, August 26, 1985






Howell Announces Retirement
.1
ti!
Chancellor John i
tnnounccd at the Fall
� Convocation last week
he plans to retire no later
lune K, IMS"
W7 is long wav into the
e Howell said in a per-
note injected near the close
is annual convocation ad-
"But 1 do not feel that mv
uncement of retirement is
ature "
said his intended retirement
has not been a secret at an
m appointment" and
�uncement now clears
a tor a deliberate search
11. a scholarly political
ofessoi and veteran
it. administrator, will
hancelloi of ECl to;
rs and his retirement will
rareei ol 30 vears during
W
which he has served successively
as pi ofessoi, chairman, dean ot
an - and sciences, dean of the
graduate school, provost, vice
chancellor tor academic affairs
and chancellor.
He vvas appointed interim
chancellor in January, 1982, and
four months later was nominated
bv a search committee to succeed
Dr. Thomas B Brewer, who had
resigned.
c Ralph Kinsev Jr. of
Charlotte, chairman ot the ECU
board of trustees, said he expects
to begin forming a selection com
mittee during earlv 1986 to
nominate a successor to Dr.
Howell.
"We have more than ample
time to do an effective job
Kinsev said. I he trustees chair-
man appeared on the same con-
vocation platform as Howell at
the convocation in Mendenhall
Student Center.
"The committee will consist ol
members who represent the
bioad interests of the Universitv
community, including the faculty
and staff, student bodv, alumni
and general community Kinsev
said. He indicated that a public
hearing is likelv to solicit ideas
and recommendations from the
community.
In addressing the faculty,
Howell said "I have written
President (William) Fndav that 1
will be 65 vears old in January of
198" and that I want to retire
after that date. I have told him
that the exact date can be set once
m successor has been selected,
but that I would not want it to be
later than June 30. 198
"1 added a pledge to assist him
and the ECU Board ot Trustees
in assUrmg a smooth transition
Howell said his announcement
of retirement "in no wav means
ihat I will be retired or retiring
between now and then. 1 intend
to (unction until my salary ends
and earn it. I have left jobs
betoie - a staggering number at
ECU.
"I do not have a record of go
ing into semi-retirement before
the last dav ot work he said.
Kinsev said the universitv com-
munity feels "endeared to Dr.
Howell and our first lady,
Gladys.
"Their achievements foi I asl
Carolina are unsurpassed for the
past 28 vears he said. "One of
the most privileged experiences of
my lite has been the opportunity,
lo know them and serve them as
thev have led this Universitv
Ill will be undergoing the
chancellor search process for the
third time since I)t. 1 eo W.
See SEARCH, Page 13
ECl Chancellor John M. Howell announced at
faculty convocation that he would retire in two v
last week's
ears.
She
innual
(Earnltntan
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 60 No. 1
Monday August 26, 1985
dreenville. VC
40 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Dowdy Challenge Gives Area
Chance To Support Fund
V �
Moiin' In
TONY RUMPLE
ECU Swv Bur
For some reason life is a little more difficult for fresh
belongings b themselves. ECl freshmen Kim Bailev .
thev cam the.r belongings to their dorm room. Both Kim anTshei aPe fro
men. Hside from having to move all their
and Sherri Strickland have their hands full as
m Durham.
Bv r 1 lXBI JH PM,i
staff Writrr
" 1 Ins is going to be the biggest
and best telefund ever said
ECl 's nnual diving 1
Directoi . indv Kittrell.
I he Annual Giv ing I elefui
I C I 's annual program desig
to solict monetary support for the
I niversity. I he money raised
u .�- to various campus pro-
ms, c�nging m sv holai I ,
w emergency student loans.
Kitrell recruits students from
varums campus organizations as
well as the residence halls. "Any
organization is welcome to come
and participate said Kitrell.
Previously, the telefund travel-
ed to different regions of the state
to solicit funds. The national tele-
fund will consolidate these
regions, making one large region
and one large national telefund.
I he telefund is expected to last
eight weeks begining Sept 23 and
ending Nov 23, with a week oft
for fall break
I his veat's telefund will
idded incentive with an alum-
nus" recent gift ol S100.000
Kitrell is calling this resent gift
the "Dowdv Challenge after its
: Ronald Dowdy
Ihe "Dowdy Challenge" is
designed to encourage alumni to
make more contributions this
year. Dowdy has agreed to match
every new and increase donation
dollar for dollar. He has set no
limit on 'he amount of the dona-
tion. Kittrell said.
"It's nice io know that so-
meone really, believes in EC 1
Kitrell hopes to enlist more
help this vear with the telefund.
Students that help with the tele-
fund will receive a meal each
night they help. Prizes will be
awarded nightly for the person
who gets the top donation There
will also be a grand prize at the
end ol the telefund
Sororities and fraternities that
participate will receive points
towards the Challelor'sup. and
residence halls will receive points
towards "Dorm of the Yeai "
"Helping with the telefund can
even help someone land a job
Kitrell said. "One former LCI
student got a job selling tingles to
a radio station because of his ex-
perience with the telefund
Faculty Convocation Kicks Off ECU's 76th Academic Year
jan its -6th academic
week with a traditional
ECU be
vear last
faculty convocation on Wednes-
day, new programs in place and
construction set to start on a huge
SI 1 million classroom building in
mid-campus.
A system of on line, com-
puterized registration put into ef-
fect last spring is expected to
reduce, but not eliminate entire-
ly, the numbers of students and
long lines involved in pre-
semester registration and drop
procedures Thursday and
add
i ridav
I Diversity officials predic
cautiously that ECU's fail enroll
mem will be about the same
as
�asl vears, whicn was a record
13,827 students on campus.
"We look down the road verv
optimistically said Angelo
Volpe, vice chancellor for
academic affairs in a recent inter-
v lew.
"We are in a constantly im-
proving mode both in quality ol
students and quality ot faculty
Volpe said. "There are so many
things about this University that
are gaining favorable attention,
that have gone beyond the boun-
daries tif this campus, beyond
even North Carolina and the
country, that we are verv op-
timistic about this vear and the
future he said.
The freshman class includes
seven outstanding young men
and women selected as the first
recipients of the University's
prestigious, privately-financed
University Scholars aw aids
The University Scholars pro-
gram was developed during the
past vear to attract increasing
numbers of highly-qualified
students with proven leadership
potential to ECU. Ihe awards
provide full tuition and fees
scholarships and are renewable
for four vears of undergraduate
studv.
The fall semester marks tie
beginning of a full-fledged
undergraduate degree program in
communications. The BA degree
in journalism will be offered
through the English department
and the BS in broadcasting
Hot Summer News
through Theatre Arts.
Two new deans have been
named in academic administra-
tion. Dr. Judith Rollins, formerly
of Kansas State University,
becomes dean of the School of
Home Economics and Dr. Maria
J. O'Neil, from Salve Regina
College, will become associate
dean and director of Social Work
in the School of Allied Health
and Social Work.
Volpe noted that the work ot
several faculty members has
received "national recognition
among them Dr. Kathryn Kolasa
of the School of Home
Economics who has been award-
ed a national Kellogg Foundation
fellowship and Dr. Trenton
Davis, chairman of the depart-
ment of environmental health,
who received the highest national
award of the association for en-
vironmental health for technical
excellence and service.
He said the work of Dr. Stan
Riggs of the Geology department
in organizing and directing inter-
national conferences on
phophontes has been widely ac-
claimed A phosphorites con-
ference on the campus last Mav
brought scientists from 42 coun-
tries to ECU to studv methods ol
mining phosphates and making
the mineral available for use as
fertilizer in food-scarce,
underdeveloped nations of the
world.
Drs. Charles Coble and Par-
malee Hawk, the dean and
clinical professor respectively of
the School ol Education, received
the distinguished research award
from the national association of
teacher educators for their
research on measurement of in-
field teacher certification effec-
tiveness
Ten degree programs have
been made available for the first
time for non-traditional students
attending night classes in the
University College of the Divi-
sion of Continuing Education,
Volpe said.
"A sign of our maturity is our
service Volpe said. "Through
Continuing Education, the In-
stitute for Caostal and Marine
Resources, Rural Education In-
stitute, the BB&T Center for
B HAROLDJOYNER
New r4lfm
If you were one ol the luckv
ones who didn't have to attend
summer school and were able to
spend your vacation on the
beach, you may have lost contact
with what went on in the world of
news.
Aside from rock singer
Madonna posing nude, you mav
also not be aware that Presidem
Reagan has (or had � it's still
debatable) cancer. On campus,
the SGA sponsored a successful
program for new students and
ECU's Assistant Athletic Direc-
tor Pam Holt left to pursue a
career up North.
ECU Board of Trustee member
C. Ralph Kinsey was once again
re-elected as Chairman. Newly
appointed members Sandra Babb
of Raleigh, Thomas Bennent,
William Dansey and Max Joyner,
all of Greenville and all are
graduates of ECU.
In a- survey by the Office of
Student Life, 1984 graduates
were more satisfied with different
aspects of college life than 1979
graduates.
Three areas of the campus �
student publications, food service
and student government were all
at the top of the list for the 1984
grads.
Aside from the New Student
Initiation to Campus Organiza-
tion program sponsored by the
SGA, ECU was also host to 104
state high school students par-
ticipating in the Summer Ven-
tures in Science and Math.
Funded by the state legislature.
Summer Ventures provided
enriching and stimulating pro-
grams for students interested in
the fields of math and science.
Greenville police arrested two
ECU students near Jams Dorm
and later charged them with ex-
tortion on July 17. According to
Greenville police, the two
students tried to extort $400 from
See MADONNA, Page 6
Plan Early Job Search
They 're Back
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lab
Yes, It's true. The long, lonely days of Greenville are now over as
thousands of students have recently made their transitJoa to college
life- we're glad you're back.
By DOUG ROBKRSON
siaff Wrllrr
"Now is the time for all seniors
to register with ihe Career Plann-
ing and Placement Center said
Director Furnev James.
"Most people procrastinate,
but seniors should come see us as
early in the semester before they
miss valuable job opportunities.
"We try to get student thinking
about a career sooner, and we
want students to find a job that
will satisfy them personally and
financially he said.
A lot of students may not
realize the wide variety of jobs
available to them, James said.
"When you tell someone there's
a job available with an insurance
company, they think about in-
surance salesmen. But, Nation-
wide (Insurance Company) has
more people working in manag-
ment positions than in sales
For students unsure of what
career path to take, the Career
Planning office offers a com-
puterized system, enabling
students to explore different oc-
cupational options and to make
educational plans according!)
Use of the computerized system is
available to students at no
charge, James said.
By registering with the Center.
a student is able to attend resume
and job search workshops. A
listing of the dates and times of
these workshops are periodically
published in The East Carolinian.
Registrants also receive a mon-
thly listing of job openings. This
list also contains information on
visiting recruiters and gives
students an opportunity to sign
up for interviews.
James said about 1,200 seniors
and 40 alumni use the Center's
services each year. "We find that
about 70 to 75 percent of those
who use our services find jobs
each year
The Career Planning and
Placement Center is located in
Bloxton House, between
Mendenhall Student Center and
Greene Dorm.
V
T

.





I HI M k
� IS
t .1 s 1 2b. I vh
Announcements
NURSING STUDENTS


WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHERS
. . �
Sepi
IMPROVE YOUR STUDY
SKILLS
� � ur �tudy skins
� ge T he following
S . an help ,ou
o kioak of ci
.oo' v ti a When and
I � ' ' I in 30i Wright
IFC
� � . � �
-
� �
PHI SIGMA PI
CIRCLE K
SGA
� -1 ' " � a 3S m Sept s
st Tal � � s p m
N C STATE LEGISLATURE
Si lent Legit ature
. Monday ?�tf rti I
' .in Coffeehouse th s
� ' manual mal meet
epl i It NCSU wi
'� �� I s'uiients are nvited
� � have any quest.ons please
� �' � v '9j 4036
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
��'s.h if f Nortt ii
. � . .
� , �
� '� ' � � . a : .
a . �� . - en : .
" � � � � � ��
LIBRARY SCIENCE
PIRATE WALK
����-��� � � � � �
'�'��'� -
J- 4' t B sect
-
. �
TALENTED STUDENTS
photograph
. v.
Sri � , �� .
44 . .
� ' ' � � 4
- '
INTRAMURAL
REPRESENTATIVE
MEETING
EPISCOPAL FELLOWSHIP
� t . .
� ' '� H � � ���� lay A . . -��
it st Pa .copal
TEAM PUTT PUTT
' " � �� fit will
Registraf I I . A � , - . � . ,
room 105 B Men � ill FOR I
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
' - ' � ince I
� � .
N . B
' � ' ' . � � �� �
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
CO-REC SOFTBALL
�Some HurU
Area B
Kv H m
fc K'w3&
word of advice to all nen students: know where your possessions an- a. all times lso do no, te.
TJelZ"l7r 'e" y�U ' hbra" 'S �' WOrSe' 'ht ha,hrm �"� �� lu o.r

'� v.
�'�' � ' - � v.
RAFT TRIP
TENNIS SINGLES
Di
an error in ;
' page 4. Rue a
NO TICE
;� ' mtAssocianon-sD
Uebat ls mcorreci Please consul th S
ACROSS
� �� at
Me i
en
Sire East (Earoliman
DOWN
�T-
.�t-
kii � �� �
� � � i �
Kri
nswers on Page 9
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
Crab L
and
tabitt
Sweel lent �i.f-k.in rab l t
FRIDAY Shrimp and Chablis 9 95
fried, boiled and hr 1
SATURDAY Beef and Burgundy jq 95
I he ,if � - -� pnn - rib!
Including a SeU ! Breakfast. Lunch
Mond.v.rnd.v and Dinner U Will! lease I 1 en
Sunday
in Most Dis riminatins Palate.
Saturday
Sunday
Ramada Inn
K) I Greenville Blvd.
(�reenville, N( 27834
� , . 752-2790
Operated by Piaza Hptei Mgmt, inc
Buffet
All You Care
To Eat
11:50-2:00
New Fall Fashions Like NeverBefore
SwImwMr by:
Get Wet
Oooh
Cant Wait
Menden
Monc
Frida
9at
: Sun:
BB&T Otters ECU Conv
BE
reinior mat 10n comae: J
AlvmMuchellor Mastei
1errBovesin Room
inorCall757-6967 or
Your Ban
mm
t-mmmmtm.?
California. He's also a IWitk 10
Conference diving champion
"What made me enroO in Array
ROTC? I aarted thinking about my
future. I cam dive the restof
MH I my life. And to be a champ
� in business, you Ve got 10 be a leader and
a manager. r
"ROTChas given me a real taseWwnat its
like to be a leader, to be the man in charge.
Handling that kind of nspepsibijity is pre-
paring me to be a leader in life
"At first, I thought that ROTC aainingwould
get in the way of my other activities on campus.
But it's helped me excel in all areas of school The con-
centration, self-confidence and discipline I've devel-
- v �� ��my
athletic and other extracwricubr
activities, as well as my studies.
"I can use my ROTC training
ivhetever I go. whatever I do"
Ifyoutc thinking about
" your future, think about
enrolling in Army ROTC.
you need no matter what the competition
Mil HO PC.
YOU CAN BE.
Iht f'i�I
- -





I Ml AS!AKOl INI AN AUGUS1 26. 19853
�as ECU Photo Lad
Mso, do not lei
I luck in your
ifnfan
s
J
rTl
T7

i
wgiVeyau the edge
the competitim
JL
5omg &mr5 HaVe Free Checking
Area Banks Offer Services To ECU Students
B HAKOl.DJOYNhR
It you're tired of hiding your
mone. in an old dirt sock, area
Greenville banks are definitely
something you should check out
finally settling in your
classes.
While man) services are of-
fered by the following banks, u
might pay to check out the ones
otter free checking. f you
large sums of money, a lot
banks will go to the extra trou-
ble u offer interest on your ac-
quite a difference from
- your money collect dust.
lso, because this is only a par-
king ol the banks and the
� king and savings services
they otter, you may want to con
tact each bank for more detailed
ni orm�ition
Kl Mudenl Bank The
1I Student Bank, located on
the first floor of Mendenhall stu-
dent center, offers then services
to students and faculty only. The
bank will cash up to Si25 ot
checks during a seven-day work-
ing period. No two-party checks
can be cashed (unless it's a
I niversity payroll check). valid
student ID activity card is
necessary before any check can
be cashed. Also, make sure you
have your driver's license on
hand in cas" further identifica-
tion is necessary.
It you have some exi ney
that you're not ready to spend
vet. the Student Bank will hold it
for you in then "withdrawal
fund The accounts are non-
interest bearing.
I elephone bill- may also be
paid at the bank
Branch Banking and I rust Co.
The convenient i
automated teller machine at youi
disposal ri campus is one of the
tree servic red by BB& I .
ig a chet li
prov ide

if you re :
ing account,
ou
BB&
free Pira:
sonalized checks cost $8.15 or
more per 200) and there is no
checking account service charge
for your BB& I checking account
as long as you keep a minimum
daily balance of $400 daily
or$5(K) in savings. You'll also
stay away from charges if you
keep an average monthly balance
of SI.(MX) in your checking ac-
count There will be a fee of
$7.50 a month if any of the abov e
conditions are not met.
Checking Plus is another ser-
vice offered by BB&T. For $3.00
a month, you can get free checks,
discounts at all Greenville
theatres, travel and amusement
park discounts and $10,(MX) ac-
cidental death insurance. Call the
bank for more details.
BB&T, your money can
earn interest from the day of
deposit to the day of withdrawal
at a rate compounded daily and
paid monthly.
First American Federal Savings
and loan Association Open
Monday through Thursday from
a.m to 5 p m. and Friday from
s a.m to fi p.m First American
pays 5 1 4 interest on checking
accounts with a balance of SUM)
or more. lo avoid a service
charge ot S4 the minimum must
be maintained.
I o open a passbook sav mgs ac-
count, .i $100 'ii i mm urn deposit is
required Money market and cer-
ates of deposit are also
av ailable.
Automated teller machines are
ailable. but a spokesman
saui plans are being finalized in
initiating a system with Relav in
t )ctobei or November.
First Citizens Banking and
I rust lull time students can
receive tree checking by opening
a $50 account with first Citizens.
Students can also become
members of the Banclub foi
S4 75 a month. With this service,
there will be no required
minimum balance I he cost ot
printing personalized checks can
be avoided if you're a member of
the club, and in addition, you can
obtain no-fee traveler's checks or
money orders.
Savings accounts pay 5 I, per-
cent daily with a minimum of
$50, but you can only make three
withdrawals per month without
penalty.
There are two Relay automated
teller machines and two branches
in Greenville.
First Federal Savings and Loan
� There are two First Federal
locations in Greenville and one
automated teller machine.
Checking account customers
can deposit $300 and receive free
checking. If the $300-plus
balance is maintained, interest
will be paid. However, if the
balance falls below the minimum,
interest will not be paid, but
checking services are still free.
Regular savings accounts are
available, with an opening
balance of SUM).
Home Federal Savings and
loan � Home federal offers in-
terest bearing checking accounts
with a $500 minimum. The cost
of 2(X) checks are S7.01 per
month and that includes a free
wallet register and personalized
checks.
A SI00 minimum is needed to
open a savings account and pays
5 1 2 interest with no penalty for
withdrawls.
1 here ate two locations in
Greenville and hours of service
are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondav
through Thursdav and 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. on 1 ridav.
North Carolina National Bank
NCNB has four locations in
Greenville, as well as automated
teller machines.
Actual conditions tor opening
a checking or savings account
were not avaiable at this writing.
but they may be reached at
5K-341 for more information.
People's Bank While there
V
WWW
Mendenhall Student Center
v


Monday � Thursday8:30 a.m. � n p.m.
Frlday8:30 � 12 midnight
Saturday12 noon � 12 midnight
Sunday1 p.m. � 11 p.m.
VVVVVQVVVQVV&VVVVVVVVVVVVVv'yVVV
BB&T Offers ECU Convenience PLUS.
BB&T
- FREE 24 HOUR BANKING
You'll receive your 24 hour card when you open your checking or savings account. Syitin
�PiUS
Your Bank At ECU Mendenhall
FREE PIRATE CHECKS
Just for ECU - Your FIRST PIRATE CHECKS ARE FREE, with your new BB&T checking account
OTHER GREENVILLE LOCATIONS
Arlington Blvd 3rd & Greene Streets,Stantonsburg Road
752-6889 Member FDIC
is only one People's Bank in
Greenville, plans are being made
to build two more in the near
future. Cards are also being
distributed to customers for ser-
vice with any Relay automated
teller machine.
The ONE Account is an in-
terest bearing checking account
that offers free services upon
receipt of $500 or more. Certain
charges are applied when the
balance falls below the minimum
and the bank can provide you
with additional information.
The regular checking account
is available at $8 a month. This
includes cost of checks, S10.000
accidental life insurance and no-
fee traveler's checks.
Six hundred dollars is required
to open a regular savings ac-
count.
Planter's National Bank and
Trust Co. � Four Planter's
Banks are located in Greenville,
as well as automated teller
machines.
No service charge checking is
available with a minimum
balance of $500 in checking or
$400 in savings. Service charges
are added if the balance falls
below the minimum, along with a
nomimal fee for each item.
North State Savings and loan
-� With one automatic teller
machine (Funds Machine) and
two Greenville branch locations.
North State offers a variety of
checking services.
To avoid a $3 monthly service
charge, a $300 minimum is re-
quired to open a regular checking
account.
In the Funds Checking Ac-
count, a $2,(XX) balance is re-
quired, but 6 3 4 interest is paid.
A regular savings account re-
quires a minimum of $100 and it
pays 6.18 percent. Hours of
operation are s a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mondav through Thursdav and 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays.
Wachovia Bank and Trust �
I here are five offices in Green
ville and five Ieller II automated
teller machines, one of them be-
ing at Mendenhall Student
Center.
No service charge checking is
obtained by opening a savings ac-
count of $400 or more.
Regardless of the balance of your
checking account, no tees will be
charged There is a $3 main-
tanence fee if the savings account
balance falls below the minimum.
Overdraft protection is offered
upon request. It you write a
check for more than what is in
your account, a $1 charge will
save you the embarrassment ot
having a returned check plus any
service charge fees by
automatically transferring your
savings to checking.
Area banks are definitely
something to check out during
your settling in your new dorm
room. If you're looking for a
great place to put your money, all
Greenville tellers will be glad to
help you. Most of the banks'
hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Thursday and 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. on Fridays.
With a u t o m a t e d teller
machines, some bank5 are con-
nected with the Relay or Cirrus
The bank you choose can give
your more details.
�It
















Photographer
Wanted
The East Carolinian is
looking for an energetic Person
with good photography skills. If
interested call 757-6366.

















�������������������V
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
Movie: "The Cotton Club"
7, 9:30 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
I.Ds Made
2:30 p.m6:30 p.m. Multi-Purpose Rm.
August 29, 30, 31
August 28
Tickets On Sale At Central
Ticket Office:
Theatre Production: "Cotton Patch Gospel"
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
September 10
Dinner Theatre: "Last of the Red Hot Lovers'
6:30 p.m. Aud. 244
September 20, 21
Madrigal Dinners
7:00 p.m. Multi-purpose Rm.SC
Trips: New York
Hawaii
December 4,5,6,& 7
Nov. 27-Dec. 1
Dec. 31-Jan. 7
- - ���� - .
m





HI EAS1RQ IN1AJN t G
I si 26. ls8
�i?e iEafit aiarnltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. �"t-mi
J Y STONfc, tfaniimrjuui
HAROI I) JOYNER. v t()V1 r rvtnPQ ,
I I'M LI VfcNDfcR, )ir�� o .wiumf
DANI1 I 1 M Rf K. FtmatKB a ANTHONY MARTIN. �� v,��aff,
Rick Mccormac, � John Peterson, o,
SlC,0t,K BUI MlRHHlta,v
Shannon Short. di-bhu Stevens.
DeChanile Johnson. , Andrew Joyner.vi
JERRY
FALWELLANP HIS IMMORAL MINORITV
I SIS
Opinion
Page 4
Marijuana
New Laws Throwback
Over the summer the North
Carolina General Assembly took a
bold regressive leap back into the
Middle Ages. Thanks to a bill which
easil) slithered through both
bouses, a defendant convicted of
possessing less than a half-ounce of
marijuana goes straight to jail for
30 days and pays a $100 fine. The about chemicals used and stored by
jail term cannot be suspended e- local businesses. The version of the
cept in first offense cases. Anyone law that was passed was. in effect.
convicted of holding more than a pro-industry and it pre-empted local
half-ounce, but less than 1.5 ounces
repeal the Hardison Amendment,
which prevents the state from adop-
ting environmental standards
stricter than those adopted bv the
federal government. In addition it
passed a watered-down right-to-
know law, designed to give workers
and the public access to information
Oy86"�W�V't'lt0lOr7fl
Trade Deficit Not Serious
Japanese Tac
Doomed
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
I Ik S Krpublk
can face up to two years and a fine,
while anyone who is picked up with
more than 1.5 ounces can be charg-
ed with a felon v.
It is eviocnt thai we are no longer
living ii the 1960s when radicalized
youth maae the legalization of mari-
juana a central plank of their
political platform. And it is not the
polic of this paper to condone the
use ot any drug that is a proven
health hazard. Nevertheless, the
passage of this new law, which con-
travenes an earlier law passed dur-
ing the Hunt administration
decriminalizing marijuana, is vet
another example of the kind of
moral hypocrisy that seems to
abound in government these days.
The same legislature which stiffened
pot penalties, presumably to protect
the health of potential users, gave
no support whatsoever to an at-
tempt bv environmentalists to
In all of social science, the one law
that comes closest to being scientific in
ordinances such as Durham's more
stringent right-to-know law.
i .i , , . . mai mines emscsi u) uemiz scientific in
In the final analysis, then, it must the sense of having perfect predictive
ne concluded that the moralizing at- value is the economic doctrine of free
titude which the state has exhibited trade: A nation always benefits
in this case is an affront to common economicaIlv from allowing its citizens
sense. As ex-President Jimmv t0 Purchase forei8n Roods without
rwt, j r'CM"c,H Jimmv restrictions, and this is true whether
Carter reasoned when he introduced foreign nations reciprocate or not
a federal decriminaJization bill to Economists arc in rare unanimity
Congress, the penalty for the use of abouI thls- excepi tor a tew .ranks and
a restricted substance should not do
more harm to a person than the use
of the substance itself. It is doubtful
would harm the United States as much them. In return r ars Al
as anyone. Some industries beg lor tern- that d . od for ultimately
porary relief, arguing the) need time to buy Is and services from Amei
adjust. But one taste ol this drug in-
variably turns them into addicts, as the
auto and steel industries have
demonstrated.
So the trouble boils down to coolies
s there u
Japane Uar
surpluses I jarSi m
which case � they
spend the in whi the
D-1
thai
anyone could have said it more and editoria
hired guns. The legitimate exceptions to
this law are barelv worth mentioning
and almost never arise in real life.
Yet no one believes it. Oh, columnists
writers usually put tree
eloquently. The stiffer the penalties
are for marijuana possession the
more the stigma of conviction will
haunt its users in advancing their
careers and their educations.
Moreover, such a move toward doUar-an-hour coolie labor. If they did!
troglodyte ideas of justice will only e d soon change our tune
make criminals of otherwise law-
abiding citizens, thus diminishing
respect for the law in general. Is this
any way to run an advanced civiliza-
trade right up there with teenage, sobrie-
ty and support for ihe arts as deities
worth of regulai genuflection. But
that's only because the South Koreans
haven't yet found a way to manufacture
high-minded opinions b the yard using
So pending that ominous develop-
ment, this is a good moment to restate
the holv writ.
and cheating. It's feared that cheap problem is
foriegn workers will drag us down to Senatoi !
their level. But a nation can't get richer author of a ma bill, s
b excluding the produ we need
labor. And it can't get poorer b letting to come to gi
them in. Quite the opposite When an cantilis
American does a job that some foi . trading stem Bui hy
is willing to do for a dollar, he's only ad- lapanese arc ma
ding a dollar of value to the economy, accum . ds
I hat's true no matter what he actually mercantilist 1
gets paid. If it's $15 an hour, he's impos- ISth century w
ingaSU tax on other American If he's with accumu i . s
a steelworker or an auto worker, most ol mistake We onlv be
those other
he is
Americans are poorer than
The easiest wa to grasp the
fallacy here is to imagine that we shut
our borders to all foreign goods and ser-
vices and started paving ourselves Si ,000 sani
N w that' i bil ersimplified v,
� the lapanese decide to spend their
hoard, we will find ourselves working
supply them with goods and services and
getting nothing in return except our own
tattered dollars hack ff won't he pica
tion
On Trees And Things
Our current trade problems have been
blamed on four factors. First, the over-
valued dollar. Second, tough but
legitimate foreign competition. Third,
cheap foreign labor. And fourth
outright cheating: foreign trade barriers
and export subsidies.
Most people recognize that the first
two factors are not good reasons for
protectionism. The overvalued dollar is
I like trees. Alot of other people What if Greenville had been plann-
do too judging from the remarks ed as a college town from its incep- our own fault, of course, caused bv
iave been circulating around tion and it had been built around massive government borrowing, and is a
campus as a result of the hatchet job the college? What if all of the Prob,em that seems to be solving itself,
thai the university ordered done in buildine that was done here had l lkew!se- protectionism against
preparation for its new building, been carried on with that in mind? fTT f�rCTco"ipctiti?n �a�
c with a tnHn�c f.r �rc� n u L llilu- tor international trade paralvsis, which
witn a tondness lor green Perhaps then there would be room
growing things have been refering to for both buildings and trees as well
this action as 'arboricide I can't as a number of other amenities that
thai melodramatic about it would enhance the environment
myself, though I am the first to con- here. There might even be a better
cede that all those tree stumps do in- mass transit system connecting
spire a kind of mute anguish in me Greenville with points east, west,
when I'm forced to walk through north, and south. Yet, such specula-
thorn. Yet, progress must go on. tion is idle because for now chaos
Things have got to be done and rules the dav and trees find
there's no time for sitting around themselves laving horizontal,
chewing the fat about bushes and
an hour. Would we all be rich Hardlv
Now, cheating, let us suppose the
worst of the Japanese 1 et's suppose
they're so determined to sell more than
they buy that they purposely underprice
their own goods and pull every trick in
the book to keep our goods out. Or let's
suppose that thev're genetically pro-
grammed to work like beavers ft) hours
a week and never spend any money. Is
that unfair to us'7 Should we cracl
down'1
It's hard to see why What Japan's
$40 billion annual trade surplus with the
United States means is that they are sup-
plying us $40 billion more of goods and
services this year man we are supplying
But note the irony. If that unpleasant
day ever arrives, we will be running a
le surplus and thev will be runnii
deficit. That is, America will be in
precisely the position the Japanese ar
tod?.y, a position we accuse then-
acheiving as pan of some devious mer-
cantilist pl �
Clearly, if we're determined to g
tough with the Japanese on trade issues,
we should do precisely the reverse
what everybody is suggesting. Instead of
demanding that they change their hal
'nee. we should demand 'hat they
pursue their mercantilist policy
definitely Let's force them to keep sen-
ding us $40 billion of free automobiles.
camaras and VC'Rs every vear, until I
CI v
Peace Corps
DEVELOPMENT
FORUM
dan lelions - no.
Out university is growing. It is on
the move and virtually everyone
says that is good. That is, after all,
how they pay the bills, upgrade their
services and facilities and get a
name for themselves.
Thirty years ago no one could
have foreseen that ECTC would
grow to be as big as it is today. That
is why the university has taken to
buying up old houses on the edge of
campus and cutting down trees in
the center of campus. In fact, the
arboretum was just barely spared.
Thirty years ago folks thought
ECTC would always be a teacher's
college and that's why they didn't
acquire enough land for the school
to grow on. They were, of course,
wrong. But we should not be too
hard on the people who decided
ECTC's fate thirty years ago. Thirty
years from now students and ad-
ministrators will be laughing at our
delusions.
The problem here is that there ap-
pears to be a profound lack of plan-
ning involved in these matters. No
one really has decided how big ECU
will grow to be or in what direction
it will grow. The school is just grow-
ing because growth pays dividends.
LIVE AID - BA ND A ID - H E ARE
THE WORLD - USA FOR AFRICA - all
are familiar words that bring to mind the
human tragedy of drought and famine
that has plagued the peoples of
developing countries that most Americans
had never heard of one year ago. There
is a new awareness in America, an
awareness that each of us can make a
difference. The Yuppie mentality of our
more recent past is giving way to a
resurgence of compassion and concern
about how we can best help our brothers
and sisters of the world face the complex
human problems that have confronted
humanity through out the ages. The
Peace Corps, a United States government
agency, has been a partner in that effort
for twenty-five years.
Peace Corps has purposely chosen to
launch its 25th Anniversary with a
column targeted to universities, colleges
and high schools all over the United
States. It was on such a campus that the
idea of a peace corps first received
national attention. Almost 25 years ago,
then-presidential candidate John F.
Kennedy tossed out an impromptu
challenge to thousands of University of
r Michigan students: How many of you
II who are going to be doctors are willing
sj to spend your days in Ghana? To his
astonishment a petition signed by more
than 800 students affirming their interest
reached him just two days later.
YVV. Since that time more than 120,000
Jjr Americans have served in the Peace
Corps in more than ninety countries
around the globe. There are now 6,000
Peace Corps volunteers serving in 60
countries, more than half of whom are in
one way or another involved in
agriculture and agricultural-related
projects. For example, in countries
around the world.
� Forestry volunteers work to curb
receding forests by establishing fruit tree
nurseries and village woodlots for future
firewood.
� Energy volunteers introduce designs
for more fuel efficient stoves.
� Engineering volunteers build portable
water systems which supply the essential
water for cooking and gardening.
� Health volunteers teach family
nutrition and basic sanitation practices as
well as combat infant dehydration with
locally-made formulas.
Individual volunteers can proudly point
to their accomplishments as catalysts for
self-help projects. Michael Shean 27,
completed a remarkable task of surveying
the soil of one million acres of terrain in
Nepal; he recently extended his two-year
assignment for another year to oversee
one million dollars' worth of projects
which will triple the amount of available
farmland
Lynn Blalock, 63. enhanced the quality
of native sheep in Barbados through
better animal nutrition, which improved
the diet of the Caribbean people,
increased the income of farmers, and
decreased costly meat imports.
These brief examples are intended to
highlight the work of Peace Corps
volunteers in the area of food
production. Their efforts and that of
their host country co-workers are helping
to create a foundation of hope and
promise for a future free of hunger,
disease, poverty, and illiteracy together
these collective contributions of people-
helping-people in the remote corners ol
the world demonstrates more than anv
other measurement the caring and
compassion that can be shared when one
is given the opportunity to offer one's
time and talent.
Peace Corps volunteers receive
extensive skill, language, and cross
cultural training and are provided
medical care, transportation, and student
loan determents. Additionally thev are
paid a monthly living allowance and a
readjustment sum of approximately
$4,500 upon completion of service"
This is the first of nine columns which
will focus on international organizations
concerned with development, particularly
Jood production. For more information
on the Peace Corps, call 800-424-8S80
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.

So
Wv M. V l()y
During
the post-V.
tha
tion, n
a measure
many tl

rcspon: �
cleai
-
M .
te�hi
beside al I
in V
wa
the �



1












.
Th ird
Bv JMr�s NORIH
Er Bol. �
SI,000 You rea
the S itl S -
hear
earning abo
figun

nothing
s
Aug.
he hop
plura

He may we!
preponderai ;
represe; ted
vements a
.� those
leader
tion; Serg Ra
Nicarag
the
years as
Prize w
Marque, and H
widow
All
unusua
Radomiro I
Democ
1970 Chilean eU
quivei. the de
human
Nobel Peac ;
C a p r i le s, a
million
blasted Ca
ing, '1 would ever g
to discuss the deb
The conference was
ed. Speaker
12-minute presentations
attentive audience in the new t
tion Palace Fidel Castro kept !
mise to be present for everv spec
the five days the gathering
Luis Ignacio da Siiva. the B
union leader who is populai
Lula, summarized the sense of I
vention: 'Without being the l
radical or adventurist. 1 would sa
companeros here that the Third
War has already started It is
war, but no less sinister This
crushing Brazil, Latin Amen





NORITV
IH� i m , AKo, N
AN
oomed
vx
a
hey
) ! exas,
ner-
:he
the
-ed

helping
. ither
iple-
ers of
� in

I when one
s
ISS
led
tnd student
nally, they are
nice and a
' approximately
� service.
nine olumns which
national organizations
elopment, particularly
For more information
rps, tali 800-424-85 HO.
Forum Rules
Union welcomes letters
ng all points of view. Mail or
m by our office in the Publica-
ns Building, across from the en-
� net Library.
Other Opinion
THF I AS IARM INI AN
Al (,LST26, 1985
By MY STONE
Socially Responsible Investment
During the late 1960's. a; the height of
the post-World War H dissident movemen
thai captured the allegiance of a genera-
tion, making money was looked upon with
a measure of disdain. In the minds of
main the American economy was so rite
with corporate criminals and socially, ir-
responsible businesses that it was virtually
impossible to make a buck and still have a
siear conscience. The conventional wisdom
which prevailed among the social rebels ol
the 60 s was that the establishment was rot-
ten to the core because it had produced
McCarthyism, institutionalized racism a
technology that pillaged nature, poverty
beside affluence, and an ill-conceived war
in ietnam which was the very symbol of
the decadence of the established order It
was. therefore, far nobler to drop out or
the system than to join it and become a cog
he wheel of a machine that was only
.apable of spreading miser) and injustice.
malism, the new dissidents charged.
was incapable of reconciling itself with any
value other than profit.
Yet, while the majority ol Americans
might hae secretly agreed with much oi
what activists were saying the spectei of
1 astern European style statism made them
ful oi what the alternative to
Capitalism might be. Moreover, it was a
time of relative affluence and many could
see no compelling reason for change. Fai
better to suffer the evils of an admittedly
an free market place than to have the
government running the local hardware
re and hamburger stand.
Upon realizing the need to
rkable and coherent alternatives to both
Soviet style socialism and 20th century
capitalism the activists from the I960
came to a recognition that social change
would not occur overnight. C onsequently,
thev slowly began to be assimilated within
the system that thev had struggled against
tor so long. A iarge number of them,
however, resisted actually joining the
system. Some became a pan of the holis
health and human potential movement-
which are very slowlv transforming ideas
about health care and wellness, others
ried more stridently political movements
and sought to devise alternative ap
proaches to social transformation and still
hers concerned themselves with
economics or went into business.
Some of these people began to work to
restructure the marketplace itself by runn-
ing electoral campaigns and calling for a
democratization o( economic and
workplace decision-making. Others fought
to force universities, unions, and city and
state governments to divest themselves of
then holdings in corporations doing
business in South Africa or. in some cases,
with the defense department. Still others
worked to shut down the nuclear power in-
dustry and change the economic priorities
of the country's largest utility companies.
Through all of these battles a new
awareness began to emerge among a few
ex sixties radicals and religious leaders: it
was not enough simply to identify
unethical corporate behavior and fight
against it. It was necessary to define what
good corporate behavior was and to devise
alternative ways of dealing with money so
that investors might make a positive social
. ontribution.
As a consequence of this recognition the
militant attitudes, which regarded making
money with an ambivileni cynicism,
loosened somewhat and the movement for
socially responsible investment was born.
lodav, though the net total of socially
screened investments has quadrupled since
19K1 and will continue to quadruple in
even shorter periods of time for years to
come, the entire sum of all of this nation's
socially screened assets probably comes to
less than one percent of the country's
available investment capital. The ethical
investment movement is at best, then, a
guerilla campaign. Nevertheless, it is a
movement that has, in the past fifteen
years, redirected billions of investment
dollars away from the dark and venal side
ol corporate America and toward areas
that adress real human needs such as: con-
sumer co-ops, inner-city redevelopment,
alternative energy, small businesses, family
farms, worker-owned companies, as well
as corporations with enlightened policies
toward their employees, "heir products and
the environment
lodav there are scores o socially
responsible investment firms which
specialize in applying ethical criteria to the
business ol making money. Different firms
have different guidelines for determining
where thev will or will not invest. Firm
like the Calvert Social Investment Fund
tend to focus more on avoiding in-
vestments in corporations which violate
their definition of social responsibility
than on making more risky investments in
companies with an explicit commitment to
social responsibility. The Calvert Fund,
which had the highest yielding money
market fund in the country in 1983, con-
siders a firm's performance regarding
issues such as labor relations, the enviion-
ment, South Africa, nuclear enrgy,
weapons, and what the prospectus calls
'commitment to human goals' in determin-
ing whether or not it will invest in the firm.
Simultaneously it claims to actively seek
out companies that:
1) Deliver safe products and services in
ways that sustain the environment.
2) Negotiate fairly with workers, provide
opportunities for women, disadvantaged
minorities, and others for whom equal op-
portunity has been denied.
3) Are managed with participation
throughout the organization in defining
and achieving objectives.
4) Foster awareness of a commitment to
human goals such as creativity, productivi-
ty, self-respect, and responsibility.
Other firms specializing in ethical in-
vestments make additional requirements
on business besides the ones enforced by
Calvert. Working Assets, an investment
company based in San Francisco, for ex-
ample, informs its clients that it will not in-
vest overseas nor will it finance mergers
and acquisitions between companies and
other such unproductive activities which
do not produce jobs or goods for
Americans. Working Assets says that it
specifically seeks out solar and small
business investment opportunities, but on-
ly in a way that entails minimal risk to its
investors. It doesn't, for example, invest in
solar and other small businesses, but in-
stead buys the guarenteed portion of Small
Business Administration loans. This
guarenteed portion (usually 90 percent of
the original loan) is backed by the U.S.
Treasury. Working Asset's return rate so
far has been running about five tenths of a
percent above the money market average.
Perhaps Co-op America is the firm with
the nui st explicit commitment to
facilitating social transformation through
the alternative investment strategy. It
states as us goal: 'to link socially responsi-
ble businesses and consumers m a national
Third World Debt
B JAMES NORTH
Every Bolivian man, woman and child
owes world financial institutions nearly
Si.000. You reach this figure by dividing
the South American country's popula-
tion into its total debt. Some years ago,
workers in the Bolivian tin industry - the
heart of the nation's economy - were
earning about one dollar a day. Even if
that figure has now doubled, or even
tripled, it would still take a miner with a
family of five more than eight vear-
over his share in the national debt - pro-
vided the family spent their income on
nothing else.
It is exactly this sort of absurdity that
prompted Fidel Castro to call a
hemisphere-wide conference on the debt
crisis here during the first week in
August. In his opening remarks, he said
he hoped for the broadest, mast
pluralistic meeting in the history of
Latin America.
He may well have succeeded. A
preponderance of the 1,200 delegates
represented leftist and center-left
movements across Latin America.
Among those present were: Michael
Manley, leader of the Jamaican opposi-
tion; Sergio Ramirez, representing the
Nicaraguan �overnment; Liber Seregm,
the Uruguayan leftist who served ten
years as a political prisoner; the Nobel
Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia
Marquez; and Hortensia Bussi, the
widow of Chilean President Salvador
Allende. But there were more than a tew
unusual visitors to Cuba. They included:
Radomiro Tomic, the Christian
Democrat who lost to Allende in the
1970 Chilean elections; Adolfo Perez Es-
quivel, the deeply religious Argentine
human rights activist who holds the
Nobel Peace Prize; and Miguel Angel
Capriles, a colorful Venezuelan
millionaire whose newspapers have long
blasted Castro bur who told the gather-
ing, T would even go to hell, or heaven'
to discuss the debt crisis.
The conference was very well organiz-
ed. Speaker after speaker gave
12-minute presentations to a generally
attentive audience in the new Conven-
tion Palace. Fidel Castro kept his pro-
mise to be present for every speech over
the five days the gathering lasted.
Luis Ignacio da Silva, the Brazilian
union leader who is popularly known as
Lula, summarized the sense of the con-
vention: 'Without being the least bit
radical or adventurist, I would say to the
companeros here that the Third World
War has already started. It is a silent
war, but no less sinister. Thi- war is
crushing Brazil, Latin America and
practically the entire Third World In-
stead ol soldiers, children die; instead of
millions wounded, there are millions ol
unemployed; instead ol the destruction
ol bridges, there is the destruction of
'ories, schools, hospitals and entire
economies
Lula's observations are supported bv
tacts. By the end of this year, the World
Bank estimates the Third Wold will owe
a total ol $710 billion, up from $135
billion in 1974. (Using other criteria, the
Bank says the debt could be as large as
S970 billion.) Latin America's share in
this staggering figure is more than one-
halt. By way of perspective, U.S.
foreign aid, a sum many Americans
regard as large, will total only about $12
billion this year.
Fidel Castro's thesis was that the debt
cannot and should not be paid. The first
part of his argument received an impor-
tant boost on the eve of the conference,
when newly-inaugurated Peruvian Presi-
dent Alan Garcia announced that his
country would devote only 10 percent of
its export earnings over the next year to
repaying its S14 billion debt. To repay
the S3.7 billion it owes this year would
have been impossible; Peru's total ex-
ports will bring in only $3.1 billion.
The second part of Castro's argu-
ment, that repaying the debt would be
unjust, also won varying degrees of ap-
proval from the other speakers. Bolivian
Minister of Planning Fredy Justiniano
said, to loud applause, 'We will not con-
tinue paying if to do so we have to take
bread from the mouths of those who did
not contract the debt in the first place
Much of the immense sum was lent to
countries that were ruled by repressive
dictatorships, like Brazil, Chile and
Argentina, or by bumbling, corrupt
governments, like Mexico. During the
70's, conservative Americans like Milton
Friedman pointed to economic growth
spurts in some of these nations as free-
market miracles that would undercut
support for the left in the Third World.
Now that the apparent advances of that
era have been obliterated like sand-
castles after high tide, the Friedmanites
are more judiciously keeping their
thoughts to themselves.
Perhaps the only bright side to the
debt crisis was that it helped to discredit
some of the military dictatorships and
helped lead to the restoration of political
democracy in places like Argentina,
Brazil and Uruguay.
But if the crisis continues, these
democracies are threatened. The Inter-
national Monetary Fund, denounced by
nearly every speaker at the conference,
nearly always imposes severe austerity
measures on the debtor nations in return
for approving further loans to them or
guarenteeing their credit-worthiness.
These measures include wage freezes,
cuts in social spending and subsidies for
basic necessities. The IMF, which is con-
trolled by conservative bankers from the
United States and Western Europe, also
requires the Third World nations to
reduce their tariffs, as a stimulus to free-
market competition and efficiency. In
fact, the flood of imports tends to
destroy local industries and increase
unemployment. Radomiro Tomic, the
Chilean Christian Democrat, likened the
IMF's exhortations to economic com-
petition to 'the lion asking the lamb to
compete, or the shark asking the seal
No democratic government can im-
pose such harsh measures for long
without having to turn to repression.
Speakers from nations like the
Dominican Republic described what
have come to be called 'IMF riots in the
streets Perez Esquivel, the Nobel Peace
laureate, warned, 'Human rights,
foreign debt and democracy are pro-
foundly interrelated He went on to
recommend that Latin America go
before the World Court and argue that
the efforts to collect the debt are a viola-
tion of human rights.
The very fact that the debt crisis is so
serious, and afflicts so many nations, is
paradoxically a source of potential
strength. If one country defaults or
declares a moratorium on repayment,
the international financial community
could orchestrate an economic
blockade. But if several nations act
together, particularly if they include the
larger debtors, then it is the banks that
have the problem.
Fidel Castro will not be able to lead a
revolt of the debtors. At the very least,
though, Cuba has furnished the more
moderate governments with a bargain-
ing ploy as they confront the IMF and
the banks. They can use Castro's posi-
tion of total intrasigence, as well as the
internal pressure from their own people,
as they argue for greatly relaxed terms of
repayment.
The legacy of the Havana conference
will be an increased sense of hemispheric
unity rather than any concrete action.
As the Venezuelan press lord Miguel
Angel Capriles explained (he told the
delighted audience he was speaking as
'an entrepreneur and a bourgeois
capitalist'), Cuba had at least acted.
'When the history of this period is writ-
ten Capriles said in his rapid-fire
Venezuelan accent, it will come to be
recognized that, while other countries
wasted time, Fidel Castro brought 1,200
of us here to confront what may well be
the greatest problem of this century
accomplish its ends by supporting the
development of socially and ecologically
concerned businesses and cooperatives,
and stimulating the development of new
responsible producers of needed goods and
services. The firm's revolving loan fund
will be used for this purpose as will the
development of the network of pro-
gressive minded consumers and businesses
which it hopes to put into contact with one
another through the publication of its
catalogues offering members discounts on
merchandise, alternative job oppor-
tunities, educational programs, and
literature. Co-op America, then, is really
the only major ethical investment firm
which limits its inves'ments to businesses
with an explicit commitment to social
responsibility. Consequently, it shuns in-
vestments in traditional companies that
Calvert or Working Assets are likely to in-
vest in such as Apple Computer or
People's Fxpress.
Portfolio managers for many of the
country's larger socially sensitive accounts
note that the ethical criteria that their firms
emplov automatically rule out about a
third of the country's major corporations.
But the vast majority, they say, fall into a
gray area. Examples of companies which
operate in the gray zone, according to
Steve Moody (a portfolio manager for
U.S. Trust's social accounts) is Howard
Paper, the country's leading manufacturer
of recycled paper. The product that it
manufactures scores high among en-
vironmentalists because it preserves scarce
resources - trees. Vet. Howard Paper has
also had labor problem- and has refused to
meet some pollution control requirements
These considerations have consigned the
company to an ambivileni status in the
minds of most ethical investors. The same
can be said of Magma Power, whose
development of geothermai power has
made it one o the best utility buys ol the
past decade. Simultaneously, however, the
Sierra Club has been critical of the power
company for environmental reasons. Port-
folio managers for ethical investment com-
panies such as Calvert and Working
Assets, therefore, evaluate each company
on a ase bv case basis. In each of the par-
ticular cases mentioned above the com-
panies involved decided to maintain their
investments for the present. Co-op
-menca, however, avoids making such
decisions bv refusing to invest in ques-
nable companies altogethei
What the new trend toward socially
responsible investment represents, in
general terms, is an attempt to force the
marketplace to respond to values other
than profit. It is an attempt to go beyond
ad-hoc consumer boycotts and divestment
protests and to establish a comprehensive
criteria which can inject values like con-
cern for community, the environment, and
a commitment to democracy into a
decision-making process that has previous-
ly considered profit to be the dominant, if
not the only value which it cherishes. To
do this is, in some sense, to create a non-
market market - that is. a market in which
profit is not the sole determinant of market
decisions, but is still something which is
considered since products must compete. It
is to humanize the American marketplace.
Of course, pursuing an ethical investment
strategy is only one approach to acheiving
this end and it is not even particular the
most effective approach. Perhaps its' real
value as a strategy lies in the fact that it
provides a model for how businesses and
lending institutions can incorporate ethical
considerations into economic decision-
making. The Calvert Fund has alreadv
served this purpose in relation to the South
African divestment movement. Divestment
proponents quickly pointed out to univer-
sity officials who claimed that divestment
would result in a loss of revenue for the
university that the Calvert Fund has
scrupulously avoided investments in South
Africa since its inception. In 1983,however
its money market fund enjoyed the highest
rate of return in the nation.
In this sense the ethical investment
movement certainly has a role to plav and
its continued growth can only lend addi-
tional strength to the other" movements
that are seeking to humanize our economy.
REASANS
constructive
ehgagbment
taceaeaessesaeaimtamseUi
��





I HI EASTC ROI INIAN
M l si 26, is8
Madonna, Baseball Fans Strike Out In Summer
C oniinued From Page l
the manager ol Chico's Mexican
restaurant.
h students were released on
oond, pending a coun date
Eighteen lawsuits against the
owners ol Village Green Apart-
ments have been settled out of
court, a Greenville attorney said
I he suns were filed in connec-
tion with the March 1W explo
�on ai Village Green pan
ments, which killed one person.
an ECl student - and in-
jured ai least a doen more
A bright blue and white draw-
ing showing a scar belt comint
together will he used on
Phamplets, bumper stickers and
Pledge cards as a part of the
state s campaign to urge
travellers to buckle up their
seatbealts, which will become
mandaton law on Oct. l.
The General Assembly approv-
ed the la earlier this year, but
$25 violations won't go into ef-
fect until Dec. 31, 1986 No
driver's license or insurance
points will be given for a viola-
tion.
Termed as one of the biggest
events in rock history since
Woodstock, the 16-hour Live Aid
concert generated millions of
dollars for the African Reliel
Hind. Watched by more than 90
million people via satelite, the Ju-
lv concert featured such stars as
David Bowie, Tina Turner Mick
I agger and Phil Collins
Coke are it? After some
reshuffling in Coca-Cola Co
marketing stragedy, Classic Coke
was brought back to the store's
shelves, causing more contusion
o the new generation.
Either way, whether you think
an cola is it, the Coca-Cola Co.
has introduced a new line of
slothes with the logo and colors
oi the cola giant. Under the
design of Murjani International
Ltd the New York Company
that made the Gloria Vanderbilt
label a hit - the latest Coke
fashions were put on the market
in early August.
However, North Carolina tex-
tile workers weren't impressed
with the clothes mainly
because they found out the
garments were made oversees.
And the public waits to see how
Coke's management explains this
"error
Public awareness about the
often-deadl) quired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome was in-
creased after Hollywood movie-
star Rock Hudson was hospitali
ed in early August for the treat-
ment of the disease.
Charities are popping up all
over the country to raise monev
fbi a cure for AIDS � all
dedicated to eradicating it
forever. Currently, there is no
cure for AIDS, which primarily
affects homosexuals, intravenous
drug users and hemophiliacs.
Baseball fans weren't the only
ones struck out during a short
baseball strike in August
Madonna fans had the chance to
less-than-flattering photos ol the
nude rock-star in her younger
days as a "starving artist
But, the heat was on between
Penthouse and Playboy as both
rushed early editions of their
September issues to the
newsstands.
Two major airline crashes,
one near Dallas and the other a
Japan Air Lines Jet - almost a
week a part, left hundreds of
passengers dead.
I he Delta Air I mes flight
191, left 133 people dead, crashed
near a .Dallas runway as a result
of a wind sheer an abrupt
change ol wind direction and
speed.
Only tour people survived the
Aug. 12 Japan Air I mes disaster,
killing 520 people. I he uimbo jet
cashed into a mountain 70 miles
northwest oi Iokvo
In other news. Hurricane Dan-
ny roared across Louisana's mai
shy coast in mid-August, spinn
mg off tornados, causing f
floods and keeping thousands of
people from theii homes �
jobs.
s News
With gusts ol wmds ol i
than yo mph. the 1
I iovernoi declared .i state
emergency and as many a
residences went tor days Ait)
power
In Durban, South '�
apartheid and ethnic ;
continue and leader- deba
they are going to :
In July, wild tires s
throughout the state
ma and Florida, da
thousands ol acres la
Ohio native and ECl
sociologist Dr Ke r
Wilson was eh
Faculty Senate. Wilson succ�
Dr. James LeR
philosophy pr
J. Y. Joyner Library
Monday-Thursday
Saturday8a.m9p.m.
Sunday. 9a.m8p.m.
1 p.m. � 12 midnight
� Extended hours arc scheduled lor exam periods
� I Ibran users should cheek The East Carolinian
and or the doors ol ihe libra� t'oi chances
cCcC�-�" , . , .
J
AT BARRE, LTD.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
Supplies for dance classes
Leotards Tights
Aerobic Wear
Costume Accessories
Stage Makeup
EL TORO
BARBER St STYLE SHOP
Professional Hair Cutting & Styling
JOHNNY WEATHINGT
Phone 752 33 -
Located 4crou tnm Higha Patrol S
S&leffs UNLIMITED
A Nail Boutique
Now anyone can have
beautiful nails
Bring this coupon to receive
$10.00 off a new set of nail tips
Hours
10:00 6:00 AA-F
10:00-5:00 Sat
422 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919) 756-6670
CUBBIES
ANNOUNCES
Daily Dinner Specials
Old Fashioned Hamburgers. Cheeseburgers, Hot
Qogs, Philadelphia Style Cheese Steak, Shrimp
Burgers. Shrimp Salad Sandwich
2 ft or Dogs for SI. 00
Serving Until 2:30 a.m.
Daily Happy Hours
Hamburger and French Fries SI.00
I ongnecks, 32 oz. Cups Draft, Wine Coolers
A"h with Air Conditioning!
Call for an app.
355 5449
RIVER BLUFF
Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments'
ksMlull M.ui ii-cmcni and Maintenance
. IWdrtMHH Iou�houses& I Bedroom Garden Apar.mcnis
KiuhciA Icaiure Dishwashers & Disposals
HilK Carpeted
�Av
A Complete Meal On A Bun'


FREE DELIVERY



























' Hun wd ChMM
Z Bologna and Chut
3 Hm SaiMti md Chana
Salami Cftaui ma Ptoparoni
S- ChMu TUr.tt and Ham
5 Rout Bart �id Chtai
' Chana. Piopifooi ,nfl Hm
8- Chmi Siiini and Cippiaia
9 Ham Chaata and Cippicali
I a TurktY and Cttni
II Turn Mtft and Chtm
12 All Chaata Provoiona
Amoncan ino Swat I
II Stum Chant, Pippvom wd Htm
14 Ram Staf Turta and Chaata
5 Ham Bologna and Chaata
6 Cornad Bad and Chana
W Cappicoia and Chant
II Bologna. Htm Chaaaa tnd Ctppicoia
19 SUPER SPECIAL Salami Bologm
Chana Turtair Ctppicoia Mam
and Prpparoni
?0 Puirami on Rye and Chttae
2 RuDan on Rye with Cornad Baal
Switi Chaata Muaiard & Stuarkraui
22 Dalian Maatball lin siuttl
22 Italian Sauaaga with pappara ln iautt
?4 Chana Slut
Z5 Chant Stut and Muthroomi
?e Hot Do;
21 ChtlSilidlanuca. lomaio ham lurtay
chana pappvt pictiai egg crackartl
28 Italian tiprwi ti,�t. ,d
maatdaiia in ttuiti
( urner oj 5th d Evans St.
Hours. 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 a m
7 Days a Week
Phone: 752-6497
le siuuent newspaper of YasTCarolina L7liiverst'
offers you the latest in:
Sports
Performing Arts
Features
Campus and National News
Theatre
Guest lectures
and a host of other happenings at East Carolin;
University. For only $25.00 your parents mav recievH
this paper at home for a full vear. Let them knovvi
what's going on at ECU.
Don V miss this opportunity
Make check payable to (() subscribe flOW
THE HAST CAROLINIAN
East Carolina Universit)
Old South Buiiding
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Name:
Hmate I .uinUrv I acihtics
I .tri:e Ptt�
.�hlc IV. Included
Hmaie M.iL�nies
� t -Mtvunc.il h� Shopptng Comers & Restaurants
� I I Hus Service
Dim lions, li.ih sireel J-ixleiuion to Rjver Bluff Road
Vex I to Ki.erjpie Shopping (enter.
PHONE 758-4015
Pamlico
Address:
Cit StateZip:
Phont
Graduating Class:
No. 1-19 Sandwtch mclud Itlluca. tomato, onion, oil. Wneg orwg.no
tail and pepper
S.nOwcho av.H.b(. on whlle wnea, � bread
�������
1st ANNUAL
SUB EATING CONTEST
FRIDAY, AUG. 30,4:00
TTKA vs. STUDENT GOVERNMENT
COME JOIN THE FUN, ENJOY YOUR FAVORITE
BEVERAGES
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ASK ABOUT OUR SUB CLUB 4 OUR 8 M PARTY SUB
-f�� DELIVERY- SAV�
�wfc"atlo3 MONEY
OAILY A
WEEKEND SPECIALSI
215 � 4th ST . CORNER OF 4th a REAO�
GREENVILLE





















Precision
Haircutting
for Men and Women
Melody Furci
Tina Furci
Beth Long
Keep an eye out
for our coupons
758-6190 201 E. 5th St.
Discover the Sounds
and Outer Banks of
Eastern North Carolina!
Learn to sail or cruise while living aboard a
beautiful Morgan Sailing yacht.
Special Labor Day H eekend Charters
Pamlico Sailing School
105 Heron Bay
Washington, N.C. 27889
or call 946-6319
A
L
v
Alumni C
B M IZABETH PAi
i
Facult
Private M
Available
I
tuUC3

� epi
i �
gran
ps

I
-
!he n
1
Professor
Begins
45th Year
it

Maguerite
hei 46i
memb I c
Kinse lr .
fessoi Perr) �
faculty in Januj
unrank
She has beer
French and sered a chaii
the department ol 1 v
Languages and Literature
a number of years
"Her vouthful look dec
the facts in
said. Mrs Per ' a seen
much progress and man
milestones crossed drmg her
man years here '
Professor Perry returned
last seek after spending
several weeks of summer vaca-
tion in Pans. She was out jog-
ging the day prior to convoca-
tion .
-�





s News I Alumni Center Helps Current Students
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1985
nds ol more
1 ousiana
w a state ot
11 I) as 20,000
days Mthout
1
Africa, anti-
ethnic protests
debate what
1lo nexi
� Id tires spread
ate v! Califor-
da, damaging and.
And ECl
Kenneth R.
1 hair the
son succeeds
I eRo Smith, a
TORO
Styling
�nth Sf
:7834
LIMITED 1
iue
o receive
h of noil tips
I BLUFF
ible Luxury Apartments
tl and Maintenance
& 1 Bedrotvm Garden Apartments
shers & Disposals
r Comers & Restaurants
t KU-nsion in River Bluff Road
rjtale Shopping Center.
JE 758-4015
9
I
the Sounds
er Banks of
rth Carolina!
e while living aboard a
ling yacht.
Weekend Charters
failing School
leron Bay
n, N.C. 27889
946-6319
By ELIZABETH PAGE
According to the ECU Alumni
� enter, students are "alumni in
residence
According to Assistant Direc-
tor ol Alumn. Affairs Page
Aman. students are only students
tor tour or five years, but they
are alumn. for the rest of their
lives "We want graduates to
maintain contact with ECU as
their lives change said Aman.
The best time to begin those ties
is while they are still students, she
said.
"We want students to know
about the services and relation-
ships available to them through
the Alumni Association said
Aman ECU would train the
students to be alumni.
Students get new jobs and
often times move away to an
unknown region. The Alumni
Center is trying to make an "ex-
tended family" that would be
very beneficial to the young
alumni.
Through the Alumni Associa-
tion and alumni chapter involve-
ment, today's students can
graduate with ready contacts
from the Alumni Association,
which in many instances can ease
the situation of being far away in
a new job.
According to Aman, many
graduates have a hard time com-
ing back to campus for alumni
functions. Aman's goal is to
make students more aware of the
Alumni Association and its ser-
vices, which would in turn make
young alumni more aware of
these functions.
The ECU Ambassadors, a stu-
dent group of official University
representatives, provides a
natural liason between the
students and alumni. Sponsored
by the Office of Institutional Ad-
vancement, Ambassadors work
closely with the Alumni Associa-
tion hosting special functions on
campus for the chancellor,
visting lecturers and artists, or
prospective students. Am-
bassadors also conduct campus
tours, speak on recruiting trips
with the Admissions Office and
call alumni during the Annual
Giving telefund. They also help
keep alumni up with the happen-
ings on the campus and with the
students.
Ultimately Aman hopes to pro-
vide more programs linking cur-
rent students with alumni.
Aman's main objective is to keep
ECU people in touch. "We simp-
ly want to connect students and
alumni to maximize benefits for
everyone Aman added.
"Anyone who moves to a new
place needs a contact. In our fast-
paced world, people are looking
for a common ground. What bet-
ter shared experience is there to
build upon than the same alma
mater? said Aman.
Faculty Meet
1 eadership Development, the
Center tor Applied Technology,
ihe Regional Development In-
stitute and others, we have
tremendous outreach programs
He said ECU's 996 full time
faculty produced 59 books and
monographs last year for a 28 per
cent increase and contributed 400
articles and chapters to the
literature for a 10 per cent in-
crease. New or renewed grants
for research at the university
reach $7 million a year, Volpe
said.
Bids for contracts for construc-
tion of the major new general
classroom building are to be
opened Tuesday with work to
begin on the mid-campus site in
about a month. For the next two
years, this construction of a
three-story, 162,700 square foot
structure will be the major
building project on campus.
The building itself will be the
first new construction on the
main campus in more than 10
years, but in the meantime the
ECU School of Medicine com-
plex has been developed in west
Greenville.
Historic Wright Auditorium is
to be closed for a final phase of a
complete renovation to provide
the university with a first-class,
modern concert hall. A complete
renovation of Cotten Hall, one of
the campus's original residence
halls, was completed last week in
time.
TONY �UMLE � ECU Ntwi 6ur��u
hv � r!n!nnl.?te,r' StUdentS are 'A,umnl ln Residence. Go
by the Center today for more details.
THANKS!
Private Men's Care
Available At Center!
Men's health care is provided
by the Student Health Center.
The maie health program consists
o education and the prevention,
diagnosis and treatment of health
problems. All services are con-
idefmaf.
Educational programs offered
to male students cover a variety
of men's health issues including
contraception, self-testicle ex-
amination and sexually transmit-
ted diseases. Other topics are of-
fered on demand. These pro-
grams are available to dormitory
students and other campus
groups. A contraception class is
held twice a week at the Student
Health Center Wednesdays at 2
p.m. for females and males.
One of the main goals of the
Student Health Center is for all
male students to learn how to do
a simple three minute, monthly
self-testicle examination. Cancer
of the testes � the male
reproductive glands � is one of
the most common cancers in men
15-34 years of age. It accounts
for 12 percent of all cancer deaths
in this age group. If discovered in
the early stages, testicular cancer
can be treated promptly and ef-
fectively.
It's important for all males to
take the time to learn the basic
facts about this type of cancer �
it's symptoms, treatments and
what one can do to get the help
you need when it counts.
Brochures and other informa-
tion about men's health are also
available at the health center,in-
cluding topics such as eating
disorders, diet and nutrition,
cancer, high blood pressure, sex-
ual dysfunctions, depression and
alcohol and drugs.
Tests for sexually transmitted
diseases, herpes and the evalua-
tion of other men's health pro-
blems are also available. Pro-
phylactics may also be obtained
for a minimal fee through the
Pharmacy.
More information about the
men's health program may be ob-
tained by calling 757-6841 or by
stopping by the Student Health
Center.
We at allje iEaat (UarDlfnian would like
to express our appreciation to the numerous mer-
chants who participated in our Welcome Back
issue.
We also encourage our readers to patronize
these businesses that support East Carolina Univer-
sity.
Professor
Begins
45th Year
Thg Chairman of ECU's
Board of Trustees noted at the
faculty convocation held last
week that one professor has
neld her post for 45 of the in-
stitutioi 's " academic years.
"It is heart warming for me
to know that when spring
semester begins in January,
Maguerite Perry will be enter-
ing her 46th year as a faculty
member said C. Ralph
Kinsey Jr of Charlotte. Pro-
fessor Perry joined the ECU
faculty in January, 1940, as an
unranked instructor.
She has been professor of
French and served as chair of
the department of Foreign
Languages and Literature for
a number of years.
"Her youthful looks deceive
the facts in this case Kinsey
said. "Mrs. Perry has seen
much progress and many
milestones crossed during her
many years here
Professor Perry returned
last week after spending
several weeks of summer vaca-
tion in Paris. She was out jog-
ging the day prior to convoca-
tion. �
ibu know the best place to get pizza at L a.m.
Here's the best place to get the cash to buy it.
hlh r U' locations ionium nt
to Fjist Carolina I 'nit rsity
Mendenhal Student Center
Campus
Pitt Plaza
Highway 264 Bypass
University
802 E. 10th Street
Wachovia Teller LL
FREE FLYING DISC
when you open a Wachovia
checking or Statement Savings account.t
fWkile supplies last
You can bank at Wachovia
Teller II any time of the
day, any day of the week. All
you need is your Wachovia
Banking Card.
With a Teller II nearby � and more
than 130 statewide � chances are you'll
find one wherever you go. And you can
also use your Wachovia Banking Card at
more than 7,000 locations wherever you see
" va Relay or CIRRUS" symbol.
Jo get your Wachovia Banking Card, simplv
open a Wachovia checking or Statement Savings
' account. Come by any Wachovia office. Find
out how convenient all your banking can be
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
� � Mile





USD A Choice
10-12 Lbs. Average
Sliced
FREE
FOOD LION
USDA
CHOICE
� � Lb
S� Farms Grade A
Whole
Fryers


FtW U �H bt cftn lab Pay n,
��" 2 mS for four sb,
COMCHMACt
ff l
ftrms
We reserve the
Bright to limit
Jig quantities

"looking Lean"
-

Lb
t Or Beef

�t
Franks
I
1
I
r
Seedless
;

California
t
V
Nectarines
Or Plums
Wise Bonus Buvs!
Greenville N C
Croewl�Y
Cheez Doodles
Foil Ba� R��iar
Potato Chips
Foil Baa fti
Potato Chips
no, 1.59
6 2.09
15 Oi
209
P�g of 6 12 0: Cans
Meister
Brau
16 Or
I 000 IttendClii.try Ceiitr
Pfeiffer
Dressings
A
Bounty
Towels .M
���
ii
3 lb 8
VT
2 Onions
nvr
Creewtlle N C
3 Liter Golden CHablii Red Burgundv Red Claret
RedCfcijriti tfhfeCliaMii Rh.ne WHHt Saut�rne
j � NeerarV Rote
Almaden
Wine
2 Liter Diet Pepn Pept, Free D.et Pepc free
�It'
ueneeee
� Ox 4X Off
Cheer
Hefer9en(j
6800 EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
��





IHl fcAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 185
�I'
Colleges Convincing Trustees To Divest
H
I
nkki ad food thru
September 1 1985
� opt Labor Day Monday
IMS for your shopping
soiwtiNOfiet

Lb
� fcrf
In January, Edward
nnings, presideni of the
53,000 student Ohio State
"� was emphatic:
State would not sell its
in companies that do
;ss m segregationist South
While apartheid � South
laws ot racial segrega-
was "appalling Jenn-
explained at the time that
would buy and sell stocks
"the best possible in-
not b judging a com-
ity's racial policies.
H less than six months later,
igs com meed OSU's
to sell about $3.3 million
of interests in firms with
African operations, plus
5 million over the next
I happened in the interim
the political and
nds are changing in
lege boardrooms,
more schools are ben-
demands to sell
we ei indirect, in
v-
sin
iartl
illd
as! spring, when
leid protests erupted
imated 60 campuses.
New Mexico univer-
d plans to
si re in certain
S t a i
' w n,
the
State University of New York
system, Washington, Illinois and
Minnesota officials have promis-
ed to sell all or part of their in-
terests in the companies.
The American Committee on
Africa, which has organized
many campus anti-apartheid ac-
tivities, calculates American col-
leges sold � or promised to sell
� some $57 million in South
African stocks during the first six
months of 1985.
At Ohio State, the change
came after a series of campus
protests, a petition drive and a
student group that made com-
mon cause with a union of OSU
workers.
In January, students held a
press conference in front of Jenn-
ings' office. In February, OSl
track star George Nicholas
galvanized part of the student
body by kneeling during the play-
ing of the national anthem at a
track meet, and then refusing to
run for OSL; until it divested
itself of its interests in South
Africa.
"It got people thinking
Nicholas explains. "(Then) we
had to do a lot of education.
Some didn't think the university
should take a political stand by
divesting, or were worried their
tuition would go up if South
African holdings verc
withdrawn
Nicholas then formed Students
United Against Apartheid.
Yet only about 50 students ac-
tually joined.
"We were disappointed by
that Nicholas recalls
But Nicholas hooked the tiny
group up with the campus
chapter of the Communications
Workers of America. The 2500
members of CWA were
negotiating a new contract with
the trustees, and rapidly agreed
to make divestiture a labor issue
in the negotiations.
Critics called the alliance a
marriage of convenience to heat
up lukewarm campus reaction to
both groups' demands.
Union members trained
students in civil disobedience tac-
tics, offered to pay legal fees if
students were arrested, helped
circulate a divestiture petition
that some 27(X) students eventual-
ly signed and printed anti-
apartheid fivers and posters.
In turn, SUAA members
picketed in support of the union's
position.
The protest that was burning
across main campusses in the
spring finally made it to OSl in
May, when nearly 4(X) students
and workers disrupted a trustees'
meeting by hanging on a room
divider, chanting and pursuing
trustees as they hurried from the
scene under police protect urn.
Police arested one union
member.
Jennings and the trustees
changed their minds soon
thereafter.
A week later, the trustees sign-
ed a new union contract. At its
next meeting, on June 7th, the
board agreed to divestiture by a
6-3 vote.
Nicholas thinks the trustees
simply read the handwriting on
the wall.
"I think they figured that in a
few years they'll be forced to
divest (by a state law) anyway,
and that time might not be as
economically beneficial (as sell-
ing now) Nicholas speculates.
"Without the union, I don't
think it would have happened
says Stephanie Gussler, a
sophomore communications ma-
jor. "(It) had the financial
resources, the numbers, the
negotiating and legal expertise. It
was essential
No trustees are willing to say
the union pressure changed their
mind, though a few concede stu-
dent pressure played a role.
"Basically, we (the trustees)
were surprised by the student
protests asserts Trustee Joe
Teas ford.
"Campuses are remarkably
placid these days he explains.
"To me, it was most refreshing
that students were interested in
something
Teasford thinks most trustees
changed their minds because Jen-
nings changed his.
In introducing the proposal to
sell the stocks, Jennings called
apartheid "morally, socially and
economically bankrupt and
said OSU should not associate
with it, regardless of the profit
lost on the investments sold
Teasford add, that "we were
satisfied that divestment over
time would cause no economic
loss. In fact, recent studies show
that universities that divest over
time have made a profit
��������������������������
I
nsers to Crossword Puzzle
WELCOME BACK STUDENT SPECIALS
S�
w
4
� Kentucky Nuggefs Combo
9 piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
Lg. Drink $2.89
�2 Piece Lunch Combo
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Biscuit
1 Mashed Potatoes wGravy
Knttudof frid Ckuhn
Specials Good Thru Sept 30th
at Greenville Stores Only
$1.89
Locations
600 W Greenville Blvd 7S6 6434
2905 E 5th St 752 5184




204 E. 5th ST.
JW& cofidg
758 1427
OPEN MON- SAT 10-9
WELCOME BACK TO GREENVILLE!
ALBUMS & CASSETTES ON SALE THIS WEEK!
$5.99
$6.99
SUZANNE VEGA
JOHN CAFFERTY &
BEAVER BROWN BAND
BOY MEETS GIRL
MOTLEY CRUE
HEART
SUPERTRAMP
SADE
CHEAP TRICK
BOB DYLAN
DIRE STRAITS
STING
JEFF BECK
NIGHT RANGER
DAN FOGELBERG
JIMMY BUFFET
$8.99
BILLY JOEL
'Greatest hits
2 LP set)
� Plus Many More Albums and Tapes On Sale!
� Sony HF90 2Pak on Sale $2.99!
� TDK SA90 2Pak on Sale $5.99!
WE ARE YOUR HEADQUARTERS FOR:
� Record & Tape Care Accessories
� Recording Tape From TDK, Maxell, and Sony
� Posters, Banners, Wallhang.ngs, Bumper Stickers
We Buv & Sell Used Albums








t
LOOK FOR OUR MONEY-SAVING COUPONS IN �
UBE'S COUPON BOOK AND THE AD-VICE I
T
Go Pirates � Beat N.C. State!
� ����������-�����������-��
fa
� 'II

'

EE
kwilU NC
09
hpv ftte Diet Ptptt Frt�
psi
ola
4

4

STOP SHOP
Western Union
'WW
Your one stop party store
213 E. 5th Street
Beside Beef N Shakes
752-6366
Budweiser 12 oz. Cans
Lite Beer from Miller 12 oz Cans
Eagle Brand Crispy Cut Chips
Eagle Brand Nacho Cantina
6-Pak
6-Pak
���.
Complete Line of Kegs � Call and Reserve Yours Today
Large line of Beer (Import & Domestic) and Wine, Coolers, Flasks,
Huggers, and Grocery Items.
We send and receive Western Union money orders and telegrams.���"�i
- -r j- -
� Ml '
� T





HI
The UBE COUPON BOOK can
The UBE COUPON BOOK has 86 coupons from the
finest merchants in Greenville. It can save you
hundreds of dollars on your fall purchases It's
available exclusively at the UNIVERSITY BOOK
EXCHANGE. Pick yours up when you buy your
textbooks. But best of all. ,
Save
L
25"6Z
tr
ion � c
if h
o
w,
fc

UBE





igmw
1


?S2 -
06�

om the
you
it's
BOOK
your
! til i M AkOI IMAN Al (.1 SI 26. 1V8
11
Save You H
w
33
rosgiljaessa
slock& Key Shoppe�J"
Complex Friendly Service r
ndreds of Dollars
This Fall!
"
Sam
6,

Vfi
C

?,
-
S ,
poi7i T ONE
i?
Oi

TTrrnrni
o.
V,
�,
e

i
M59
V
pr. Kin9'i
4
fjtj
twhere ElselnEaJ
This
RESERVE NOW
1 OFF HOMECOMING CORSAGE
I
n v
cc o
pX
S

o
��i
ATURDAY, ni
SAT
MIAMI FLA GAME
???�
&
vjj
1
s
iv�
a

ipP
.
es
D
Co
up
oo
j ,
�tfJ
���
v
c&
NlC
.
'9g ' t
'


4
& E;f
J ro
Q7
'
Ifc&Zst
S4te
IUS7()(
&?
5
Off
p.
U
Otv
Gf
'J
V
'oo

�A
S2
Offr
G
'AN

3 v �: �V

CQ
v;
. 0 �

302S.
I2p
SrfK
cVa
rice
fS
IV
rt
oa
'�?,
fifi

4fe
V.

$�

5?
,
�:
U.5.E.
The
UBE COUPON BOOK
is
FREE!
U.B.Ei
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Downtown�Across from the girl's dorms
'





i2
1 HI i M.xkol NJAN
U
H Ms A imvhK
lents who walk to das
hind Raul Building ma'
receive a rude awakening
!t "enchanted forest"
gone.
I he area was
make wa foi a i i.oili
square fool class r.
building, the largesi ,
W
is onh 90,000 square I
pi iations
ipproved I
s-s by North
Valors and th
Rawl Surprise I ServiPP
JWYER date for the buildinc has h�.n -7m 1 V- - �
date tor the building has beei
foi ��� i all of 1987
I ow bids about m 5
were received last
contra,
tag ol
ig at $10 to $11
hree
: be North
me.
. �
existing
' tving
the
ter Offers
ECU Minority Organizations Pursue Goals, Plan Events Pregnancy
i
H' complet
B fMKOI.I)JOM-K
Students interested m pro
moting academic justice to E l
assisting in community ac
tivities, should consider joining
one ol the campus' mam service
organizations.
V- a member of ECU's Stu
dent Union, freshmen will tuh.
the doors ol entertainment open
immediately. You'll have a sa in
what dims will be presented at
Mendenhall or help plan tot the
annual majoi concert commit
lins past spring, II enjoyed
music ol the Kinks, James
Brown and the corned ol la
Lenno Watch tor upcoming
membership drives in September
In add
ma) find they want t me a
member ot the Minors'
ommittee, which has sp
programs such as International
Week, Jewish and Black r
Festivals, and other pi .
geared towards minority
awareness.
Eric Hughes, 1st vice presid
S,avic Researcher, Education Prof Win Awards
ol the I
Huj
Dr. Maria B. Malby, professo
� '�� and Germai
Slavn studies
Patri, ia I nders
fntarv education fa ult i
f ECU's 1985
sv' teaching e,
ds
;e S i ierald Arnold ol
x A c Appeals, presid
ai
nvocatio
l' v lay. 1 ,i,
. $5 �
Malbv ot the horeign
I
R
md Di
�ived �
v s lav s
auard. Both awards are membei ol Phi Beta Kappa
alumni
presented annually to recipients
�sen by the 1(1 I ea�, hing I I
fectivenessommittee.
A native ol Zagreb,
Yugoslavia, Dr. Malby received
an B degree in German from
Florida State University, a
mastei "s degree in Russiai
Harvard and the PhD in Sla
St ild
ii Harva
Pi
Delta Phi and the authoi ol many
Slavic studies research papers and
articles, she ha membei
the II faculty since 1970
Di ; pro.
k'w education,
School ol Fdu( atii ned the
ECU facult � She is a
spec
read and iCs to
eleinentarv school discipline.
She is a native otlarksdale,
Miss and has undergraduate
and master's degrees from I
State University and the doc
ite in education from the 1 n
I Georgia, she
the elementary schools
Mississippi and was
faculty of Iowa Wesleyan i
before coming to E( I
Welcome
Back
Students
NEWS
WRITERS
NEEDED
you e responsible and willing to put
in a lot of effort, the East Carolinian
nants you. Stop by the Publications
Bldg. across from Joyner Library and
fill out an application.
�iE East to0ltman
Serving tht r community since 1925
,
mplover
BRING IN COUPONS
AND SA VEU
Oil Filter
& Lube
es Up To
5 Qt .�
� I� � � � � MMM �
Your Choice
Brake Special
Light Trucks I
ii : Zors
Coupon Expires 9-15-85
COUPON
WINTERIZE NOW
Flush and refill radiator with 2
quarts of anti freeze. Check all
houses & belts.
Also includes
Sofety
Inspection
Coupon Expires 9-15-85

Coupon Expires 9-15-85
j 4 Cylinder
S! Engine Tune-Up!
� Electronic
$2Q88
Electronic
Ignition
Includes
Engine
Analysis
cyl 34.88!
8 cyl 39.88,
- - 7 JT.OO-
mm w wa Coupon Expires 9-15-85 �
PLEASE CALL FOJt APP0INTM
GO OP WEAR
TIRE CENTER!
ww
Downtown
752-4417
West End
756-9371
TV Best Prices in Town
Open 8 a.m. to MidnigK 7 Days A Week
�inc Located Next to the East 1 Oth St. Pizza Hut
IU h. 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 752 5222
"H you have to do your own laundry, do .t m style at the Wash 3

Lowe's Has
A Complete
Line Of
Home Decor
Products
Come See
And Save!
Save S20! Teak
Finish Bookcase
$4Q99
� 30" wide. 72" high and
12" deep
� Three adjustable shelves
� Comes ready to assemble
� Regular $69.9996020
f
lr
8"x 8"x 16
Concrete Bk
1 x 12. -3
Ponderosa Pine
Shelving
55
2x2
4x4
Plywood
14 " 12 "
990 s2 9tr?9?
3.99 Jj.99 7.99
799 10.99 14.99
t �it pom t
17 Cu. Ft.
Refrigerator
�Perfect for home of ,
shelf for large bottles. R,
$8999
fAMamcAMl
Louie
CHARGE IT!
Use Your Credit At Lowes Your Local Store Address
mm��2 OUf $1,00� 'n8,am Cred" T� Qu� Apanr0000
Store Hours, moFri 8am. til 8 p m . Sa, 8 a m
B H R()I h l

the
SGA Plan
B I l )
Get the
Hord out
in the
nnouncements
n The Fas: c arolinlan
Seet Caroline Wel
ay
�aY
BHHP1





1
Welcor
Back
Stydt

Week
�0'
oV?
k
ise
I tiff mi f i i it t
:u. Ft
fngerator
S8999
OWES
Your Local Store Address
Phone 000-0000
lualified Applicants
? sat 8 a.m. til 5 p.m.
I HI I AM K

13
Center Offers 24-hour Counseling
Pregnancy Center Helps Women In Need, Advice
B HAKOl DJOWKR
It's not evcrytime a pregnant
woman in always jubliant ovei
the news thai the stork is coming.
sometimes she mav have mixed
ings about having the baby oi
he is simply not in the position
to have a child at a particular
time in her life.
new centei in Greenville oi
free, confidential guidance to
omen who are pregnant. Under
d rection ol Vicki Williams,
v arotina Crisis Pregnancy
( entei is one of 170 non-profit
crisis centei s in the I' S
self-governing organization
by a local hoard, Williams said
Centei also provides free
gency testing, 24 hour help
line on a one-time basis or
long-term counseling � tor preg-
nant women.
"We can provide efenals to
the pregnant woman on where to
receive proper pre nuai health
care or other services such as
transportation, living accomoda-
tions or maternity clothes
Williams said.
It a women doesn't think she
wants to have a child, the Centei
can provide information on abor
uon or otn.r alternatives,
Williams sai
"Each case is handled dif-
ferently and we provide the
guidance in letting the woman
decide what she wants to do. We
are here lo listen and offer ad-
vice We want to make sure the
pregnant woman doesn't make a
decision through indecision
The Center currently has 10-12 Pre8na
volunteers that lend support to supply
nt women. Volunteers to
housing, transportation or
to teach pre-natal birthing classes
are needed now, Williams said.
Persons wanting to be
counselors will go through an in-
tense training period in dealing
with such problems. After they
begin work. Williams said the
counselors will continue to go
through monthly reviews
"We want lo help women in
any wav we can during their
pregnancy. We're also here foi
the father andor other tatmlv
members, of the hild it he needs
counseling Williams said.
The Center is located in the I ee
Building at 111 F. 3rd St Green-
ville. The number to call tor
24-hour, tree, confidential
counseling is 757-0003.
Search Will
Begin For
Chancellor
Continued from Page 1
Jenkins retired in 1978, Kinsey
said. "To me, this means that
the communications, mutual
respect and sharing of con-
cerns and interests within the
University family have been
time tested and exercised �
creating a deep sense of trust
and understanding. We will be
reaching for new horizons
together
He said he expects the selec-
tion committee to be
established in Januaary or
February and that Howell and
president Friday will be invited
to meet with the group to
share ideas, advice and
guidance.
President Friday himself
will retire m Julv 1986.
SGA Plans For 1985 Year
Bv LISA nWYKR
Stiff Wrllrt
Students old and new can look
forward to new and revamped
services ottered bv the Student
Government Association in-
cluding carpet foi dorm students,
Parents Day and programming
new information into the
I reasui.
()ne ol the new� set � ices ol
�d bv the SGA is carpet tor
dorm students, sold at reduced
prices bv Wholesale Carpets 11,
Brown sai
ceeds will j
EC I Pirat
(hi the �
Pai
may get
and regi
office.
Due t
Walk
w eekend
S , A
a S
el sale pro-
ards funding the
iervice.
September
te hosting
i; crested
booklet
the SGA
New
Student Initiation to Campus
Organizations program held this
summer. Brown said September
1 1 has been set aside foi another
NSICO meeting.
I he program otters new
students various information
about campus organizations, and
also gives them a chance to meet
with campus groups. Location
the Septembei meeting will be
in front of the Student Supply
Store. Brown said.
More up-to-date budget finan-
cing records of campus organiza-
tions has kept SGA Treasurer
Tony Braswell busy in the past
weeks. Braswell and Robert Wai
ten are putting the final touches
ol a program tor the new SGA
computer system installed last
spring. Braswell said the financial
package will keep all student
groups' spending in a more f i
mal and accurate manner
Other services offered by the
SGA include National Student
Savings c ards, which offered dis-
counts at various Greenville
stores. Brown said the cards
would be distributed in mid-
September.
or those wishing to become
involved m SGA activities
without going through an elec-
tion process may do so through
the Student Government
Freshmen Aide Program. Brown
explained that any student may
volunteer or be appointed to cer-
tain activities offered by the
SGA Information may be picked
up in the SGA office or .a
5rS611 cm. 218 for more
details.
"Any student who comes by
the SCiA office can have a place
in student government
activities Brow n said.
FALL ID SCHEDULE
August 2S $:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
September 42:30p.m. to 3:30p.m.
September 112:30p.m. to 3:30p.m.
September 132:30p.m. to 4:30p.m.
September IS2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m
September 252:30p.m. to 3:30 p.m
September 272:30p.m. to 4:30p.m
r
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
id The East Carolinian
uHttf
THE
HEADHUNTER
MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
RIVERGATE SHOPPI NG CENTER
A complete line of Roffler & Sebring Products
HOURS
MONFri. 8:00to6:00
Sat. 8:00 to 12:00
9' 9 "2 3855
Sweet Carolines Welcomes All ECU Students Back to Greenville
I r, i
P ultn
v ,
:AY
SunJu
1 i.(tt
:AV
&&
.WELT
CAROLINES
f 1
i





14
I HI t AS! AKOi sJAN
Al t.l SI 26tti
Education Department Informs IRS On Loan Defaulters
(CPS) � In its latest effort to
dramatize how tough it's getting,
the Education department last
week said it would sic the Internal
Revenue Service on current and
former students who don't repay
their student loans
The department says defaulters
won'l get their 1985 or 1986 tax
refunds until they repay their
loans.
Department officials predict
the agreement with the IRS will
recoup $50 million to $250
million in past due financial
repayments next year.
Thev hope to corral almost 80
percent of the scofflaws.
The department has publicized
ambitious recovery programs
etore, including ongoing media
events like impounding
defaulters' cars and temporarily
kicking some schools out of
financial aid programs.
This time, officials add, the
recovered money probably won't
go directly back into student aid.
In all, current and former
students still owe anywhere from
$1 billion to $5 billion, according
to various estimates.
"This is the largest single ef-
fort in terms of money to be
returned to the U.S. Treasury
contends Dick Hastings, the
department's director of debt col-
lection and management
assistance services.
"About 82 percent o the
defaulters on our data base get
income tax refunds he claims.
Hastings plans to mail final
r
Yamaha puts the finishing
ar - touch on
winning
$1�50
$1700
: � ��� " v . - .1-
P a. v S.
lake i �
� �i �
' �'� ; a � tat
" i �
� � .� � �
Stan's Cycle Centet, Inc.
YAMAHA
Built for the fun of it
� Liu's.Orieiitals
Sale
H all Hangings, Laterns,
Unique gifts and Decorations
for your room.
Hours Jig Mnn Fr. 71 c -
nfr ;?-r 'W Shopping Cento- 752 l75t
payment notices to about one
million defaulters this month,
giving them iwo months to pay
up or lose their 1985 refunds.
State agencies will threaten to
withhold 1986 refunds from
another million defaulters.
"We've agreed to accept 2.3
million referrals from the Educa-
tion Department, accounting for
$31 billion in debts affirms
IRS spokesman Steve Pyrek.
"We'll take a tape from ED
with defaulters' names to match
with our tape of people getting
refunds he explains.
During (he two-year program,
the IRS can withhold defaulters'
returns until all loan obligations
are paid.
For example, if a defaulter ex-
pects a $500 1985 refund and
owes $1,000, the IRS will
withhold refunds in 198 and
1986
'We'll send ihe money
wherever the ED wants, and send
the defaulter a note saying where
the money went Pyrek reports
"It's not only not likely the
money will go back into student
aid funding, but it's most definite
it will go to the U.S. Treasury
Hastings says. "That, after all, is
where student aid comes from
To get it back in 1982, federal
attorneys in Philadelphia im-
pounded the cars of 17 area
detaulters as collateral against
their overdue loan payments.
That same year, then �ED
Secretary Terrel Bell temporarily
withheld student aid funds from
400 schools with default rates
over 25 percent
l asi year, Congress authorized
ED officials to hire private
lawyers to collect past due ac
counts, and reported defaulters
to private credit rating agencies.
"Ihe credit agency program
was extremely successful
Hastings notes. "It has doubled
the amount collected since
1981
Some states let schools
withhold defaulters' college
transcripts. A Kansas bill would
have prevented defaulters'
children from getting slate finan-
cial aid.
Despite the high rum-payment
rate, a spring, 1985 study bv the
Highter Education Services Cor
poration suggests most defaulters
are unemployed or ignorant of
repayment schedules
Most want to repay the debts
but are financially unable, the
study says.
"There's a phone number on
the top of ihe final notice ED'
Hastings counters. "We can
work out arrangement tor partial
payment if the defaulter can't
pay it all at once
"We're not the easiest guys on
the block to get along with he
admits, "but you certainly can
work with us
"We hope that the people
(who) aren't being responsible
will realie they've got to repa
adds Dallas Martin, executive
director of the American
Association (,f Student Financial
Aid Administrators.
?!?' 50 �?d.�exh:�"9h The East Carolinian
Classifieds. Call 757-6366 for more information.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES
Youth Soccer Coaches work part time, 10 12 hours
weekly, beginning Monday, September 9th Hours are
normally 3:30-7:30 pm, Monday thru Friday, with oc
casional Saturdays Salary rate $3.46hr. Knowledge
of soccer skills and the ability to coach young people,
ages 9 15 needed. Contact: Greenville Recreation and
Parks Dept at 752 4137 (ext. 262). Deadline for
plications is Tuesday, September 3rd.
ap
� Books - Posters fi"3�ii
'The B,
FalJj
Bv DAMN MAI h
.
cjui k
SlOli
day
flit!
foui
Bride
Bea
of Ma
iea. .
Di.
the Bridt
Sheik-� !r.
Its Hi
attemj
ma
ed I
to at tail
doe
jov al
Cl' . .
at) a
H
'Heart'
THE PROMOTE
f
r
- -
J
&
i
MONDAY:
TUESDAY:
Welcomes All E. C. U. Students Back
MEXICAN MADNESS
Free Nacho Bar 10 p.mMIDNITE
MARGARITA'S $1.99
LADIE'S NIGHT 5-9 p.m.
All Ladies Will Receive a Carnation
Wine Special $1.67
10 O'clock Munch: 10 p.m. 'til Midnite
New Improved Food Bar Featuring
"Sheet Pan Pizza"
WEDNESDAY: ALL YOU CAN EAT
PASTA . . . $5.95
THURSDAY: COLLEGE NITE
$3.50 PITCHERS
Mugs 75C
Wine Special $1.67
Includes Salad and Tea
DARRYL'S DELIVERS - CALL 757-1973
800 E. 10th Street
752-1907
HOURS:
Mon-Thurs
11:00 a.m12:00 p.m.
Fri-Sat
11:00 a.ml.OO p.m.
Sun
11:00 a.mH:Oop.m
in
Heart will aPpt.ar jn Ralegh i,
Opennintj for Heart hj h -
ECU Prl
Student
Bv l)MH M U HYH

A �� Di Rutl
and Deai bb
Carolii
nisi Di
will -v
Appeal
Style s�
man.
feature Or Mc
fessional
from readers
ot topics
ships, sexuaJitv
health.
In addittoi
titude and a plea
Dr. Ma am moi
valuable experiei c
�f clinica
psychology, to a ;
hopes will serve � Cl
students
Dr. McCammon -
primarv goals
will be "to inform stud
especially when it comes to se
uality related questions
"Sometimes pev p
lack information
tinued "Maybe rn much
now as it used to be, but even
now I know there arc
People who don't have so!

Mfti

I





faulters
iNe, the
on
1 p
lartial
-
i � " he
can
i , epa.
MUFFLER
rif r i
�MS!
Street
N.C 27834
7676
a ana I ea
Mon-Thurs
11:00 a.m12:00 p.m
Fri-Sat
11:00 a.m1:00 p.m.
Sun
11:00 a.m11:00 p.m.
Hit I ASIAko INIan
Lifestyles
M (.1 SI 26, ivx Page
' The Bride'
Falling Short Of Movie Magie
B DANIEL Ml RLR
tralurr Editor
Svnonymous with the name
Frankenstein are visions of
en-skinned Boris Karloff
bolts protruding from his
k, as he brings chaos to a
Romanian ullage. I hose vi-
, perhaps the fathei of to
lay's hack and-slash hoi
s, are contrary to what's
nd in Columbia Pictures The
Bride, staring Sting and Jennifer
ils; the latest interperatation
� Mar) Shelley's Frankenstein
icy
DirectO! 1 ranc Roddam takes
I he Bride (actualh a sequel to
lley's Frankenstein) beyond
ts Hollywood-horror roots in an
empt to capture a bit o1 the
gic with which Shell) bestow-
her classic novel.
I ven though The Brute is close
attaining such a result, it
-n't neccessarih make tor en-
� able moviegoing. Aftei an ex-
ng and provocative openning
minutes, the picture slows to
almost unbearable pace.
Roddam's film is not so much
a horror film as it is a fairy tale,
complete with happy ending. In
it. a young Baron Von Frankens-
tein (Stmg) makes his second at-
tempt at creating life from
lifeiessness. His first, a scared,
simple-minded, short-tempered
behemouth (Clancy Brown), is
The Bride
I hr Bndf �
-
. Bi
I �.
less than perfect.
I he Baron plans tor his second
creation, a female counterpart, to
mate with the creature, later
known as Victor. Unfortunately
for Victor and luckl) for the
Baton the product of the experi-
ment is Jennifei Beals, christened
Eva for the first woman.
The beautiful Eva screams in
terror at first sight ol ictor, sen-
ding turn in a rage that destroys
the tower laborator.
Victor escapes into the coun-
tryside and the Baron begins
teaching Eva about her new life,
as a story of love, desire and
obsession begin.
While on the road, Victor is
befriended by a plucky dwarf
named Rinaldo (David Rap-
paport) who finagles the two of
them jobs with a small circus.
Together these two misfits form
an unbreakable bond of friend-
ship.
Meanwhile, the Baron begins
to teach Eva, molding her into a
new and independent woman.
T he story reaches its climax when
Eva refuses to love the Baron in
return, and Victor comes home to
his bride.
Roddam's direction is superb,
his character development inspir-
ing. His choice of locations in
southwestern France adds a
wonderful romantic flavor to the
film.
With the help of Director of
Photograph) Stephen Burrum,
Roddam produces something of a
cinematic masterpiece. In fact, if
audiences can bear with the film's
See BEALS, Page 17
Sting, as Baron Von Frankenstein, becomes enraged when Fa, played by Jennifer Beals. refuses
to loe him in Columbia Pictures, latest release. 'The Bride
'Heart' Of Rock'n'roll To Play Dorton Arena
PROMOTER
PRE SENTS
Heart will appear in Raleigh's Dorton Arena on Aug. 31 at 8 p.m.
Openning for Heart will be Shooting Star.
Snce their inception in ls)"6.
the popular rock group
Heart has sold over fifteen
million albums worldwide. Their
string of hits, which include such
classic rockers as "Crazy On
You "Magic Man "Bar-
racuda and "Dog and Butterf-
ly have provided the sound-
track to the lives ol many a fan
and. almost ten years since the
release ol Dreamhoat Annie,
Hear: remain one ol America's
best-loved bands.
Heart, their debut I P tor
Capitol and ninth IP overall,
proves to be a special event, in-
corporating the full range of the
band's potential as unleashed bv
celebrated producer Ron (Led
Zeppelin, Who, Survivor)
Nevison.
I ed bv Ann Wilson, one of
rock's most valued vocalists.
Heart features the guitar and
keyboards of Nancy Wilson,
guitarist Howard 1 ewesc, bassist
Mark Andes and drummer Den-
ny Carmassi. There are few
bands that can rock as hard, or
deliver a ballad just as powerful-
ly.
Even from their beginnings on
the bar circuit of the Pacific Noi
thwest, Hear: built a reputation
on versatility and original songs,
with influences from 1 ed Zep-
pelin to 1 ennon and McC artney.
Their first album, Dreamhoat
Annie, contained two instant
classics, "Crav On You" and
"Magic Man
I he I P als k an impor-
tant blow � k 'n' roll in a
disco-oriented I of music.
One ol the most powerful del
in music history, the album sold
six million pies and continues
to be a stead) seller
At the time of Heart's debut in
1976, the sight ol a successful
rock unit fronted bv two stunning
sisters was somewhat new to the
music world. The fact that Ann
and Nancv Wilson also composed
their own songs was ground
breaking.
While the media was still figur-
ing out which sister was which,
Heart were already finishing then
multi-platinum second album.
Tittle Queen The album yielded
two more hits, "Barracuda" and
"Kick It Out The string would
continue with "Heartless" and
"Without You from their third
platinum album, faxazine
Dog and Butterfly followed,
gomg platinum as well and ma �
ing the entrance ol Hear: col-
laborator Sue Ennis on the hits
"Dot And Butterfly" and
"Straight On 1 he band-
produced effort Behe I e Strange
came next and contained some of
the group's hardest rocking stan-
dards � "Even It Up "Behe
Le Strange "Rockin' Heaven
Down" and "RaisedIn
Heart's next album was the in-
novative Private Audition. I he
critical!) acclaimed I P contained
rockers like "Citv's Burning" as
well as the progressive "The
Situation
Heart has experienced several
personnel changes over the years.
In 1982 the group's best line-up
was completed with the arrival of
drummer Dennv Carmassi and
bassist Mark Andes.
Carmassi was a highly-
respected talent who honed his
original style in groups like Mon-
trose and Gamma. His skills are
noted by fans and fellow musi-
cians across the globe. Andes.
himself a world-class talent, was
an original member of the groups
Spirit. Jo Jo Gunne and Firefall.
This is the line-up thai powered
group � the 80's.
As much as the Wilson sisters
share the spotlight. Heart is a
ip. Never is it more obvious
than on stage. Throughout their
career, few bands have held down
such a longstanding relationship
with concert audiences.
The Wilson sisters and lead-
Howard Leese have
always that their live
performances advanced their
recorded hits to new heights. The
addition of Carmassi and Andes
took their concerts even further.
In 1983 the band released Pas-
sionworks, an album that
featured the hit songs and videos
"How Can I Refuse" and
"Allies As always, it was the
work of a group not content to
rest on it's mainstram laurels.
The trend continues with the
group's ninth album, their first
for Capitol Records. The music
and title � Heart � is as direct
and unyielding as the Rebecca
Blake photo that adorns the
cover.
See HEART. Page 19
ECU Professor To Begin
Student Advice Column
B DANIEL MALRER
V ruturro T d.lor
Fillowing in the footsteps
f Dr Ruth. Ann Landers
and Dear Abby. is The Fast
( a:oilman's own advice colum-
nist Dr. Susan McCammon,
with "Sound Advice
(Appearing in each Tuesday's
Style section of The East Caroli-
nian, "Sound Advice" will
feature Dr. McCammon's pro-
fessional response to letters
from readers concerning a range
of topics including relation-
ships, sexuality and mental
health.
In addition to a positive at-
titude and a pleasant demeanor.
Dr. McCammon brings
valuable experience in the field
of clinical communitive
psychology to a column she
hopes will serve to inform ECU
students.
Dr. McCammon said one the
primary goals of the column
will be "to inform students,
especially when it comes to sex-
uality related questions.
"Sometimes people simply
lack information she con-
tinued. "Maybe not as much
now as it used to be, but even
now I know there are a lot of
people who don't have solid in-
formation about sexuality and
other things that are related to
mental health
Dr. McCammon, however,
doesn't believe in the practice of
therapv through the mail. Like
all responsible advice columns.
McCammon
"Sound Advice" offers just
that, advice. Its purpose is to in-
form and direct students so they
may find their own solutions or
find professionals who are in a
position to help. Dr. McCam-
mon is leery of therapy over the
phone, by mail or over the radio
because such a therapist can
never know all the facts.
Having received her Ph.D. at
the University of South
Carolina � Columbia, Dr. Mc-
Cammon conducted her intern-
ship at Vanderbilt University
before coming to ECU in 1981.
She is currently doing research
on how people cope with
traumatic events, and has serv-
ed as a consultant to the Pitt
County Mental Health Center
during the development of their
Tornado Response Project.
This summer Dr. McCam-
mon saw the publication of an
article in Annals of Emergency
Medicine reporting the reac-
tions of rescue workers respon-
ding to the Village Green crisis,
which she co-wrote with Dr.
Thomas Durham and Dr.
Jackson Allison Jr.
This fail she begins her fourth
semester teaching a psychology
of sexual behavior class.
Readers interested in writing
to Dr. McCammon should mail
their letters to Sound Advice in
care of The East Carolinian,
Features Dept Old South
Building, East Carolina Univer-
sity, Greenville, NC
27834-4353. All names will be
held strictly confidential.
Unfortunately, Dr. McCam-
mon's many obligations pro-
hibit her from making personal
replies.
Musical Scheduled Sept. 10
New York's hit musical, Cot-
ton Patch Gospel, will be
performed Tuesday. Sept. 10 in
Hendrix Theatre at 8 p.m. under
the sponsorship of the ECU Stu-
dent Union Minority Arts Com-
mittee.
Cotton Patch Gospel is one of
the best family entertainments
that has come to eastern North
Carolina in yearc. Two in-
separable ingredients have been
combined to make the show the
great success that it is.
One is the last complete works
of songwriter Harry Chapin. His
finger-snapping, toe-tapping
music and the wonderful multi-
character acting of Dan
Delafield, star of the National
Tour, have been given rave
reviews by theatre critics from
around the country. These, and
the familiar story of Jesus set in
modern America, are a hard
combination to beat.
The show has the endorsement
of all major denominations of the
church. Both Catholic and Pro-
testant groups have hailed this
literal adaption of Southern Bap-
tist theologian Dr. Clarence Jor-
dan's Cotton Patch Version of
Matthew and John into a
wonderful stage presentation.
The show has been performed
before record breaking crowds of
theatergoers in Dallas, Altanta,
New York and other cities on this
tour and before the annual
meeting of the Gospel Music
Association, the General
Assembly of the Christian
Church (Disciples of Christ),
Christian Life Commission of the
Southern Baptist Convention and
the Christian Educators Conven-
tion among others.
It was nominated for an Emm)
Award as a NBC-TV Special call-
ed "Harry Chapin's Cotton
Patch That show won a Wilbur
Award from the Religious Public
Relations Council. The stage ver-
sion will be adapted for the
screen next year.
This humorous, yet always
relevant, retelling of the Book of
Matthew is performed by a group
of expert actors and musicians.
I he music is performed by a
"bluegrass configuration" of
banjo, guitar, fiddle and bass.
The actors play many roles
with Dan Delafield. who was
recently in the long-running New
York production of Funtasticks,
starring in the role of Matthew
the Narrator. He tells the story of
Jesus in a very literal adaptation
and modern language adaption,
with a slightly southern accent.
The book is always reverent of
See MUSICAL, Page 17
Harry Chapin
' �





16
IHhlASVRQLIN1AN UGUS1 26. 198
Doonesbury
Fair85 Movie Schedule
DATE
TITLE
TIME RATING
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
JP1 I't
FINISHED'
f Z WHA1�
(
r
Aug. 22-24Terminator
Aug. 29-MThe Cotton Club
Sept. 4Seven Year Itch;
Some 1ike If Hot
Sept. 5-7The Sure Thing
Sept. 6-7Nightmare on Elm Stree
Sept. 11Network;
Being There
Sept. 12-4Mrs. Soffel
Sept. 19-21Beverly Hills Cop
Sept. 25Dr. hivago
Sept. 26-28A Passage to India
Oct. 2The Cods Must Be Crazy
Oct. 3-SPlaces in the Heart
Oct. 9Red Beard
Oct. 11-12H itness
Oct. 16la Traviata
Oct. 23Jules and Jim;
Small Change
Oct. 25-26Dune
Oct. JONosferatu the I'ampyre
Oct. 31 - o. 2The Killing Fields
Nov. 1-2Motel Hell
Nov. 7-9Chostbusters
Nov. 13A Nos Amours
ov. 14American Orafitti
Nov. 15-16The Breakfast Club
Nov. 21-23imadeus
Dec. 4The Dresser;
The Bostonians
Dec. 6-7Rear H indow;
ertigo
Dec. o-7W oodstock
Dec. 11The Spirit of the Beehive
Dec. 12-14Return of the Jedi
7:00, 9:00
7:00. 9:30
7:00
9:00
7:00. 9:00
11:00
7:00
9:30
7:00, 9:00
7:00, 9:00
8:00
6:30. 9.30
8:00
7:00, 9:00
8:00
7:00, 9:00
8:00
7:00
9.00
7:00. 9:30
8:00
7:00. 9:30
Midnight
7:00, 9:00
8:00
7:00, 9:00
7:00, 9:00
6:30. 9:15
7:00
9:30
7:00
9:30
11:30
8:00
7:00, 930
R
R
NR
PC
PC-13
R
R
PC
PC
R
PC
PC
PC
PC
NR
R
C
PC
PC
PC-13
PC
R
R
Pi,
R
PC
R
Pi,
Pi,
R
Pi,
Pi,
R
R
Pi,
�'� � � HNISH5P' �
� � VTOHY
'
r ' , ����'�
1. . �'
� ��'� ���A-
��
IRON, �� ��� v. �.
tm-xi : � -
" -� �� - y
Is
� � M
��� �. � � � MMM
M . � �
- -r : v
( ' H
,4 -� iAK&l
OKAvMiKt mists m '���- �
�iOR 501DON7MN1 ��, 1
�'�� ANYTHING AT FIRST
j UWmSTi . � ��.� ��
N OKAY 7
OtA'
c
'�s
W
v
m

V; iou � � NO: Z5AV 4N)
i
rA

. i T- w
WORl �� - '

V ��:� . �
� � . �
�.��
���. i �
�, .
r.
'�
'A
5C
yj

-o
� �,�.�
0
1 " "i
�� i
r,t.s �
Friday Sports Hour
4:30-7:00
Monday ight I
: g : i
. mm h '�. �
A MITSUBISHI
Presenting
World's Best Hot Dog
ce Cold Beverages
Big Screen TV
Satellite - Stereo
Sports - Worldwide
We Play ALL the Games
unfden
11 e Support the Pirates
Pool: A Game for
l-udies and Gentlemen
The Old 420 Club
� ' ' R.
Detach ad at
I xptres -
-It is a newspaper's duty to print the news and raise hell. " - William I. Story
Classifieds
H e wum to he your niithi spot
every night
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted to
share 3 bedroom house 125$ per
month ana : 2 utilities Call 757 3528
home or 756 8500 work Ask for
Wendy
BRODYS FOR MEN: Has a position
open for part time salesperson
Sales experience and understanding
of men's fashion is preferred Flexi
ble schedule. Better than minimum
wage pay Apply to Mrs Daniels,
Brody's, The Plaza Mon. Fri. 2 5
p.m
PHOTOGRAPHER: Needed im
mediately for the East Carolinian.
Come by the office or call 757 636S
PERFECT Need to earn extra
money, but you haven't got extra
time? Well this is the perfect job for
you We need tele marketing agents
for our new, conviently located of
fice m downtown Greenville Even
ing hours flexible to your schedule,
yet leaving you time for fun! Salary
plus bonuses For interview call
Donna at 758 5595 between 2-7 p.m.
SUPERMARKET EMPLOYEES
NEEDED: Part time openings for
cashiers, produce & stock clerks
available Must have previous
supermarket experience & good
references. We are willing to work
around reasonable school schedule
Call Charles Overton or Cathy
Kilpatrick for interview 752 5025.
WANTED: Responsible
salesperson some sales experience.
Pay negotiable. Apply in person bet
ween 5306:00 MonFri Gordon's
Golf & Ski Shop. 200 E. Greenville
Blvd 756 1003
SOCCER: Part time soccer coaches
needed, afternoon hours. Call Pitt
County Community Schools at
752 2934, Ext. 276 or 267.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES. Work
part time, 10-20 hours weekly, begin
ning Monday, Sept. 9th. Hours are
normally 3:30-7:30 p.m. Mon. Fri.
with occasional Saturdays. Salary
rate S3.46 per hr. Knowledge of soc
cer skills and the ability to coach
young people, ages 9 15 needed.
Contact Greenville Recreation and
Parks Dept at 752 4137 (ext 262
Deadling for applications is Tues
Sept 3rd
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Non smoker $175 per month utilities
included Call 752 1642
HELP WANTED: Students in
terested in security guard work who
are 18 years of age or older, able to
satisfactorily complete a Criminal
Record Check, have ery depen
dable transportation, willing to work
weekends and holidays and nights,
contact Major Tony Catapano at
758 2174
PERSONALS
PERSONAL: Male prisoner on
death row at the Arizona State
Prison would like to correspond with
anyone interested in writing to a
man on Death Row. I'm thirty seven
years old and have no family. I'll
answer all questions that you ask
and every letter Please feel free to
ask me anything that you are
curious about and talk about
whatever you want to. If you could
please send stamps they would be a
very big help because I am not
allowed to get out of my cell to work
to earn money to buy them. If in
terested write to: Robert Moorman,
Box B 31293, Florence, AZ 85232
SALE
FOR SALE: Motobecane Nomade If
21 inch. $150 Call 753 3685 ask for
David.
FOR SALE: D.P. weightlifting
machine. Capable of 30 exercises. 110
lbs. of weight, padded bench. Used
one month. $140 758 3583 after 5:30.
CAR FOR SALE: '80 Honda Civic
white, 5 speed, great car for student.
Call 758 4917 or 757 6053 Ask for
Stuart $2,900 Neg.
UNUSUAL INSTRUMENTS:
Original design Dulcimer, I owner,
S150 Herdi Gerdi (Spanish style)
$250 Price is negotiable Call Marc
for more info 752 5507
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Two units
for sale efficiency 8th floor, one
bedroom 4th floor Units completely
furnishec, carpeted, air conditioned,
and include kitchen appliances
Please call (aay) 201 532 7993 (after
5 p.m.) 201 4310768, or write Mr.
Celidonio, 99 Wilson Ave Freehold
NJ, 07728.
FOR SALE: Waterbed for sale
Waveless mattress 756 8257 after 5
p m
FOR SALE: Commodore, VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
lOystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette, Programmer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An
thony at 757 6366 or 752 7346
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, 5 cubic
ft good condition, perfect for
dorms, asking $150. Call Keith at
355 6212 or 752 2853
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates
Call Janice a 355 7233 after 5:30.
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
Becky Latham 752 5998 (8 a.m. 5
p m.) 17 years experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters
NEED TYPING?: Letters,
resumes, term papers, etc. Call
Karen at 752 0498.
FOR RENT: Room for rent with
Christian couple. 752 7212.
WHY PAY RENT: Stop making
your landlord rich! Buy a new
mobile home for less than you pro
bablv pay now. Call 756 0333.
THE MIDDLEMAN: Apartment
listing Roommate Referral Service.
210 E. 4th St. Suite 2 across from Sub
Station II. Let us help you find the
apartment or roommate you're look
ing for. Call 830 1069
East Carolina Party Center
� I Lotanche Street
Downtown Greenville
758-4591
Doors Open: DST 9:00-2:00a.m. Est. 8:30-1:00 a.m.
MONDAY- CLOSED-Open for private dorm socia.s and specia.
MondaVS, i.e. first week of each semester
always different & always fun
? WEDNESDAY- DRAFT NITE-S1.00 admission for ladies S 50
for guys and 10c draft & 10c draft all nite ($1 00 yr adm ?
THURSOAV- COLLEGEN.TE-SLOO admission for ECU student
fr.day- ENDoPETEATYarar
admissinfora ECU students wK.ag
CAT11D� Fnda n'te 00 adm.&85ccans all nite
SATURDAY- Best in Dance Music-$1.00 admission ECU students
SUNDAY-LAD.ES NITE-For ,5 years our favor?r
the weekend. Free admisson �IKWfflg
85c specials all nite.
"BRING YOUR FRIENDS & COME EARLY
N.C. State law prohibits persons under 19 to ourchA �
Persons under 19 required to wear a wr stband?h . a,ohoc beverages
Alternative beverages are provided Wh"e �n " Premises
� Exludes 1st Wednesday of each semester.
Save Lives-Don-t Drive- Walk Downtown
Or Ride The SGA Bus
Musical
Delivers Fun,
Faith
( onlinurd from Punt J�
Jesus �
per
on
Sat :
pre
thca'
dire
adap:c :
the orig i
C'hapin. a
tor
this �
Co-a
tured al
ing i
day'v a .
suitable I
This na
will per: rn
disco mi
' -
EC (
dep-
pub.
.
Beals, Sting
Stand Out In
'The Bride'
ontmutd rr.im I'ut 15
he finch
.�
Si


-1
creator Bea
she .
Ab
formana
The
The Bruit
Iran,
l K1
a f
J
��- :





A
f

SA)

fi
the dames
'OOi
j Cat nen
He Old 420 Club
00 a.m.
and special
- of eac mester.
� from
esday is
I & i Aays fun.
?or ladies, SI.50
SI.00 18 yr. adm.)
ECU students
-ecial 85c all nite.
7.30 p.no Free
ans85call day
& 85c cans ail nite.
on ECU students
S2.00 18 yr. adm.).
favonte way to wrap up
I 18 r adm.). Watchfor
85c specials all nite.
EARLY
coholic beverages
r the premises
Downtown
Musical
Delivers Fun,
Faith
( ontinued Krom Pajje 15
i, as God and Man, hut
tps a! times critical or as
eviewei said "sharply
a of people.
1 his buoyant and jubiliani
presentation ol faith and
� excitement has been
;ted b Russell Irew, who
ted the book and directed
riginal Nov. York hit. Tom
�in, ho was musical direc-
" the original, also directs
� tout
1 om Kc has cap-
italitj and start I-
, ance of i he ston foi to-
day's audiences. I he show is
ible for all ages and groups,
uional touring company
form tor one night only .
student and group
j scounts are available, with
prices at Si 50 foi ECU
at d guest. $2.50 tor
Theatre A rts Series To Host Ballet
P he ja strut reuie. Ain't
� Misbehavin , winner of the
coveted Tony Award for Best
Musical of the 1978 Season, will
be one of four presentations on
the 1985-1986 Theatre Arts Series
ai ECU. The Department ol
I niversity Unions1 Theatre Arts
Committee will also be presenting
the Louisville Ballet. The
�ikhemedians, and a production
from the National Theatre of the
Deaf. The shows will be held in
McGinnis Theatre of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center at 8:15 p.m.
Beginning the season on Oct.
17, 1985, will be the Louisville
Ballet. Founded in 1952 as a civic
ballet, the Louisville Ballet has
slowly grown in stature to
become what 7he ew York
Times has called "theatrical
magic
With a large repertoire of
classic and original works by such
noted choreographers as Balan-
chine, Taras, and Iudor, the
company performs to more than
60,000 people per year. The
Louisville Ballet also holds the
distinction of being the only
regional company with which
Mikhail Baryshnikov has danced.
They are one of the South
finest ballet companies and can
boast of a long list of distinguish-
ed guest artists and
choreographers that no other
regional company has approx-
I C I
f ac u 11 staff an d
idents, S2 50 foi groups of
� � re, and 4 50 for the
at the door
Beats, Sting
Stand Out In
The Bride'
( ontinued From Pajje 15
p tee, The Bride is
is fine
;
fine pe
ince .in ant bul ai
Bai or �: 1 � ankens-
His p � boi �
inderlying intens
.
Both Beals arid Brown are ex-
i 'urn

Beals' performance is
. ind believable as
v- ve a pet
I: "
between he and
k a is simph
unbeatable
The Bndt . � an admir ible at
tempt � par: ol R Ian
do y's Frankenstein
:e However it is not quite
moviegoers are at
� It is in no wa a
flop, but wl � � ike two

imated.
The Alehemedians, comprised
of Bob Berky, Fred Garbo, and
Michael Moschen, will be next
win their performance Oct. 30,
i9K5. The three are clowns,
mimes, dancers, and jugglers,
often at the same time and never
at rest
The Alehemedians, with a
repertoire that runs from circus
tomfoolery to twirling with fire,
show each performer to his best
advantage. Berky is a burlesque
clown, with a gift for spon-
taneous audience participation
numbers. Garbo is a solitary
sketch artist whose specialty is
the art of mime which he skillful-
ly demonstrates in a series of
mind-boggling images.
Moschen's primary talent is jug-
gling, which in his hands becomes
a balletic art.
The combination ol the three
proves trial The Alehemedians is
a truly foolproof virtuotic pro-
duction for every member of the
family. It is no small wonder that
The Alehemedians won the 1983
Obie and Villager Awards.
Ain't Misbehavin' is a celebra-
tion of the life and good times of
one of the 1930 most beloved
clowns and jazzmen, Thomas
"Fats" Waller. Raucous, joyful,
and sometimes bluesey, five
"regulars" of a lowdown Harlem
nightclub dance and flirt from
table to table, singing over
twenty-five songs either written
or made famous bv Waller.
Scheduled for Jan. 15, 1986,
this will be the most rousing per-
formance seen anywhere this
season and for many to come. It
truly is an award-winning show.
The National Theatre of the
Deaf is, without a doubt,
America's most remarkable
theatre, and they will be perform-
ing March 27, 'l986. This com-
pany has toured and gained ap-
plause from all fifty states and
twenty-three countries, and has
won a Tony Award for Theatrical
Excellence.
By combining spoken English
with sign language. The National
Theatre of the Deaf created a new
dual language theatre form. The
visual imagery in sign language,
when magnified for the stage, ha
the effect of also magnifying the
spoken work.
The English language suddenly
expands to include the visible
shapes of the words and ideas be-
ing expressed by the actors. This
second, visible voice is seen as it
blends with the NTD's spoken,
audible voice.
Season tickets for the
1985-1986 Theatre Arts Series
may be obtained by contacting
the Central Ticket Office ot
Mendenhall Student Center,
757-6611. ext. 266. Monday-
Friday, 11 a.m6 p.m. Ticket
prices are Si5 for ECU Students
and Guest, $21 for Youth (age 14
and under), and S30 for ECU
Facultv Staff and the Public.
1 he Louisville Ballet is onl one of the mans shows the theatre Arts Series has to offer.
T ho
THF -ci ne AEROBIC
R Workshop
WefWORKSHOP
Icome Back Student Special
fer $15 for 1 Month � Sat lua 31 $50 for The Semester
Unlimited Usage 23 classes a week to choose from!
Aalk.ng distance from campus 417 Evans
Vust Br.na .n Coupon to Receive Discount Downtown 752 1608
ABORTIONS IP
TO 12th WEEK
OK PREGNANCY
S195 -h' ��� � � m 13 ' 18 Aeeks at addi
tional cosi Pregnancy lest. Birtl .and
err, Pregnancy t ur.se!ing For further
all x; "�ifoil I N
I 800-532-5384) between 9 A.M anj � P M
AeekJa1
RELEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 WMt Morgan St
RoUigh, NC
V
no oru " �
MINI DILI ifA�
3� (?�lr 35)9 fomft
a a a
eg� ff�B a(fe (SfijsU0
rtoW
serving OLD FASHIONED BISCUITS,
HOMEMADE SANDWICHES,
HOT DOGS, DESSERTS,
SUBS & SALADS
Drop by after your night-on-the-toun at
ffrafei
Chest
YOUR CONVENIENCE STORE
call 756-6641 for
all your party needs.
Located at the intersection of Greenville Blvd. & Charles St. (By the Plaza)
OPEN 24 HOURS
NIGHTCLUB
Welcome Back To The Place To Meet
BEAU'S of course
Thursday:
SHAG NITE, Don Bunn, Judy Bazemore teach
shag lessons from 7:30-10:30. Floor is open for
the Best in Beach Music at 10:30. Members &
Guest FREE ALL NITE.
Friday:
ULTIMATE WEEKEND THROWDOWN. Doors
open at 8:00. $1.00 Tallboys. 50C Draft All
Nite Long for everybody. Daddy Cool plays the
best in Dance, Disco & Funk. All 18 yr. olds
welcome.
Wednesday:
All new LADIES ZOO. Ladies Only 8-10. Guys
admitted at 10. 25C Wine & Draft All Nite. All
18 yr. olds welcome. Music: Dance, Disco &
Funk by Daddy Cool.
Saturday:
ruuy.
Steve Hardy's ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY.
Doors open at 8:00 p.m. Dance to Top 40 &
Beach.
Call 756-6401 For Full Information
Membership Special Thru Sept. 30,1985
$2.00 New $1.00 Renewal
BEAU'S is a private club for members A Guests ah abc Permits
GUESTS ARE WELCOME
LOCATED IN THE CAROLINA EAST CENTER OFF HWY 11
NEAR PLITT THEATRE
'
jjji
t





18
'Ml I AS I t AKOl IMA
Al t.l SI 26. IS�f
Filmmaker Returns Home After 20 Years �wjJ
B JAY & ELLIOTT KRA ETZ
lairraatktnal Pboio r
17 ioever expected to find
?? L)ennis Hopper, the
counter-culture actor-filmmaker
oi the '60s whose film Easy Rider
polarized an entire generation
sith its "do your own thing"
message, starring as an ex-hippie
high school teacher in
Touchstone Films' fan-
tasy adventure tv Science Pro-
ject!
"Ifs something 1 never
thought would happen he com-
mented recently. "But the role
ottered me an opportunity to
return to filmmaking in Los
Angeles Before My Science Pro-
ject, 1 hadn't worked on a
Hollywood sound stage in over
20 years.
"It was fun and I had a great
time he said. wanted the
part I play an ex-hippie science
teacher who gets caught in a
space-time warp and come out
dressed as Billy, m character
from Easy Rider, It's a real gag,
I'm right out Oi the '60s.
spouting the same 'Hell no, 1
oY go '(lower power' and I
even get carted off to jail. It was,
well, son of deja vu
At age 49. Hopper can look
back at the not- too- distant pas:
when his offscreen, wild behavior
had given him a reputation as a
radical. Yet, at the same time, he
was oted best foreign actor of
1970 b the French Academy oi
Cinema for his performance in
Easy Rider had an exhibition of
his photographic art at the
prestigious Corcoran Gallery oi
An in Washington, D.C and was
a confrere or Louis Malie. Her-
man Kahn, Bruno Bettelheim.
Paul Desmond and Robert Ar-
drey at a special summit meeting
to plot a prediction of the future.
"The only good artist is a dead
artist he told us during a 1978
interview. "Making things is
agony. I hate to make movies.
But I've got to do it. It justifies
my existence. If I couldn't I'd
destroy myself
Born on May 17. 1936, in
Dodge City, Kansas where his
father was a railway postal clerk
and his mother a farm girl. Hop-
per was raised by his grand-
parents on a farm during the war
years while his mother worked in
Kansas City and his father served
overseas in the the U.S. Army.
"I advocate the 'method'
school of acting Hopper said in
1981 following the release oi
King of the Mountain. "It's bet-
ter than not having any method. 1
feel more secure in at least know-
ing what I'm doing than not
knowing. Before the creation oi
the Actors Studio we never had a
method
When he was 13, the Hopper
family moved to San Diego. The
summer vacation oi 1951 found
him in Pasadena working as a fry
cook in a cafe so that he could
spend the remainder of his wak
ing hours at the Pasadena
Plavhouse painting flats, making
props and soaking up the wonder
and magic oi the theatre.
"1 actually ran away from
home that summer to do it he
said recently. "It was my start in
the business
The following summer he
became an apprentice at the 1 a
JoIIa Playhouse and wa the
juvenile lead in one play. Follow-
ing his graduation from high
school in 19M. Hopper was
awarded an acting scholarship at
the Globe Theatre Playhouse in
San Diego There he appeared in
the National Shakespeare
Festival's productions of Twelfth
Mght and The Merchant of
Venice.
Encouraged by the reception
he received he next tackled
Hollywood. Months of
discouragement followed until he
finally got a walk-on role in a
television series, then a ten-line
part in another series and finally
a featured role as an epileptic in a
segment of "Medic
When he was 19, Warner
Brothers took notice of him and
he became one of their contract
players. His first major role was
in Rebel Without a Cause which
starred James Dean. The two
young actors became fast, close
friends.
"I learned a lot from Dean
Hopper said. "He taught me that
you have to be dedicated to
yourself. That you've got to learn
how to do something and not
show it
Next, came Giant, again with
Dean. Following Dean's untimely
death. Hopper obtained a release
from his film contract and moved
to New York where he became a
member of Tee Strasberg's Ac-
tors Studio. In 1957. he returned
to California and joined the cast
oi From Here to Texas.
Almost immediately he began
to have problems with the film's
autocratic director, Henry
Hathaway. The sounds from
their battles echoed throughout
the hallowed halls of the
Hollywood studio and created
headlines in the gossip columns,
later Hopper discovered that the
word wa- out that he was "un-
controllable
1 r seven years it seemed as
though the major studio doors
were closed to him and he
couldn't seem to get an accep-
table role. It was during this dark
period that he called upon his
skill as a photographer and went
to work for Vogue and Harper's
Bazaar In spite of the problems
Hathaway had with Hopper he
respected the actor's creativity
and in 1964 he cast him in The
Sons of Katie Elder and later, in
True Grit.
His other film credits include
Night Tide, The Trip, The
American Friend, Tracks, Mad
Dog Morgan, Apocalypse Sow,
Out of the Blue, and Reborn. He
made his directional debut with
Easy Rider, written by he and
Peter Fonda in which both star-
red. Later, Hopper wrote, pro-
duced and directed The Last
Movie, which became the first
American film to win the best
picture award at the Venice Film
Festival.
"Tike Easy Rider, The Last
Movie has no snpt Hopper ex-
plained during the '78 interview.
'I simply hired a cast that includ-
ed some of the most conspicuous
individuals in Hollywood, among
them Peter Fonda, Dean
Stockwell, Jim Mitchum, Russ
Tamblyn, John Phillip Law and
Michelle Phillips of the Mamas
and the Papas.
"I hired myself as leading
man. and united everybody to a
location 14,(XX) feet above sea
level in the backlands of Peru, a
country where all the major drugs
� cocaine, speed, heroin,
hallucinogens � are restricted
but can in fact be easi! attained.
I got all those cats together down
there and we had the wildest
scene in the history of movies.
"But Universal Pictures refus-
ed to release it in the U.S he
continued. "They couldn't quite
understand the 'last Movie's'
message � a storv about
Dennis
America and how it's destroving
itself
During the past two years, he
has had featured roles in Franas
Ford Coppola's Rumble Fish,
Sam Peckinpah's The Osterman
Weekend and Robert Altman's
OX. andStiggs No longer 'he ir-
repressible bad boy, Hopper,
who has been clean of drugs and
drink for the past 18 months,
says he doens't look back on the
past.
"I don't really think too much
about it he said "I was against
the war, various things. But that
war is over, life has gone on you
know, it's a waste oi time
think about it
Hopper
During tl
ing, Hopper made
I os ngelt
standing I
New Me.xic
"Pc
stav the rev; oi 'he I �-
they j it H
per said ol raos in 1983 -p
driven some people
Revet he Je
movc i � I ngeles
tud I
with the country a
come back
excitement, the dosei
film business, the mu
art work. Plus all my I
in I os ngeles and Sew �
Read The Classifieds
SGA
Transit Schedule
PURPLE SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
SpeightOn the Hour
Univ. Cond5 after hour
Cannon Court6 after hour
Eastbrook7 after hour
Rier Bluff10 after hour
Kings Rove15 after hour
Village Greene 18 after hour
Memorial Gym20 after hour
Mendenhall23 after hour
sPeight on half hour
Univ. Cond25 till hour
Cannon Court 24 till hour
Eastbrook23 till hour
R,r Bluff20 till hour
Kings Row15 till hour
Village Greene12 till hour
Memorial Gym10 till hour
Mendenhall7 till hour
BROWN SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
SPeia-hton the hour
Oak and 1st St3 after hour
ElmStreet 5 after hour
Willow & Woodlawn 8 after hour
A very & Holly10 after hour
5th & Elizabeth15 after hour
Mendenhall20 after hour
Speight on half hour
Oak and 1st St27 till hour
ElmStreet25 till hour
Willow & Woodlawn22 till hour
Avery& Holly20 till hour
5th & Elizabeth 15 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hour
GOLD SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
Mingeson the hour
Allied Health3 after hour
�Greenville Square5aft
�Pitt Plaza6 after hour
"Hargett Drug10 after h .
Mendenhall20afl our
10th and College Hill25 after hour
College Hill26 after hour
Mingeson half hour
Allied Health 27 till hour
�Greenville Square25 till hour
�Pitt Plaza24 till hour
'Hargett Drug20 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hour
10th and College Hil5 till hour
College Hill 4 till hour
�Bus schedule includes sh .
tween the hours of 5:30 p.m
"Bus schedule includes Hargett Drugs only betw
the hours of 730 a.m. 5 30 p m v f
NIGHT TRANSIT
Friday and Saturday Nights
10:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m.
SCHEDULE HOURLY
Home FederalO the Hour
College Hill6 after he .
Cannon Court 12 after hour
Eastbrook14 after hour
River Bluff19 after hour
Kings Row26 after h
Village Greene30 after houf
'Departure for last round will be at 15 minutes
the hour
No beverages or food may be consumed on the bus
000000000000000t
RIDE THE BUS
No gas to buy
No wear and tear
on your car
No worry with traffic
No parking problems
Relax . . . Ride the
SGA Transit
rrr�
Continued From h-uut 15
from the-
intention a to mal
album hkc
this record
challenging
us said
band is
and surpassed
Added Na
thought tl a
put us in ou
that we wcr.
COUld r . �
and play a
This albun
vha' we
Wi t h pi I
the hell
Choir To
H Mlkr I I I)VM( K
T
cond -r
dancing . .
Aug �
105
student ����
tion .
The (
studei
� ' i �
'on i ping 1
musk and n
the twenty-mem
In tne pa
Show Cho
cam r i
Carolina 5 ,
performed I
"La
saiJ I .
dai
the
Read
Fres
AOSo
U
:a�-S
SS
5
A2$
FUDGE BROWNIE
. m �





0 Years
HI I AM H1 IMAN
�M i,l si 2ft 1983
19
Heart Returns On New Lable

fcjrtniW
'&
( ontinued From Page 15
From the er beginning, the
ttion was to make a Heart
in like no other. Making
record has been a verv
enging experience tor all of
is -aid Ann Wilson, "but this
hand is so powerful that it met
and surpassed thai challenge
Added Nancy: "I've always
Light that the one thing that
us in our own category was
we were unpredictable. We
d rock as hard as any band,
d play a ballad just as well.
- album shows full range ot
ai we can do
w ith producer Ron Nevison at
helm, Heart recorded more
than twenty tracks over a period
of several months. Those songs
were pared down to ten tracks
and the result is their most consis-
tent album yet. Songs like "Shell
Shock" and "If Looks Could
Kill" expand on the group's hard
rock base.
Other tracks like "Never" and
"These Dreams" bring a timely
sophistication not yet heard
before on a Heart album. Ann's
vocals have never sounded better
and Nancy is reaching advanced
plateaus as a lead-guitarisi on
songs like "The Wolf" and
"What He Don't Know
The songwriting has also been
bolstered bv two new collabora-
tions with Holly Knight ("Better
Be Good To Me "Love Is A
Battlefield "The Warrior")
who helped co-open the cuts
"Never" and "All Eyes
Heart sets the stage for a new
era of Heart music for a group
that has maintained their success
and their following throughout a
decade of changes. They've done
it simply and with a style all their
own.
Heart appears in concert Satur
day, Aug. 31 in Raleigh's Dorton
Arena at 8 p.m. Opening for
Heart will be Shooting Star.
Tickets are available at Apple
Records and the Pirate's Chest in
Greenville.
Choir To Hold Auditions
B M1KF.1 I DW1CK
M�ff W nirr
The ECl Jazz and Show
Choir is preparing tor its se-
nd smash season of singing and
cing. Auditions w,ii! be held
j 26 and 2" at 6 p.m. in room
5 in the School oi Music. Any
.den; who is interested in audi-
loning should prepare a vocal
in a jazz or pop style.
Choir is open to all
lents in addition to music ma-
�rs Choir Director Lddie Lup-
. hoping tor a nice mix of
t and non-music majors in
�j twenty-member croup.
will be able to be a bit more selec-
tive because the previous year
was so successful. Hopefully, 1
will be able to select a group as
dedicated as last year's
As for the purpose ol this
year's Choir, it will be a little dif-
ferent from last year's, according
to Lupton. "The University saw
us and saw how important we are
to the University. The Alumni of-
fice will use us to put on shows in
different Alumni chapters,
because the Choir is an excellent
instrument of public relations for
ECU
i :(. l Jazz and
performed on
In tne ,

. am pus, appeared on the
u ilina 1 odav Show, and has
rformed tor the Kiwanis.
isl yeai we were successful
� ! upton, "because there were
twenty dedicated singers and
cers. Thev wanted to make
Choir a success and tor the
:r ; continue. This year 1

i
i
.�.
.�.

if


.



)
)

j
i




i
:
i

t

The .la and Show Choir is holding auditions on Aug. 26 and 2? at
6 p.m. in room 105 in the School of Music.
Read The Classifieds
iCHEDCJLE
0 p.m
DEPARTS
Fresh Way Food Sto
810 East 10th Street
Net to the Post Office
fsV
HAMBURGERS
25 -f oo
Sf&fa
ii
DE THE BUS
10 gas to bu
vear and tear
our car
orry with traffic
arking problems
3x . . . Ride the
SGA Transit
FREE!
FUDGE BROWNIE WITH PURCHASE OF DRINK OR SANDWICH
PRICES GOOD THRU 9-2-85
Long hours, low pay,
hard work, great company.
The East Carolinian 757-6366
�� - ��. m - :� � � -
the
RUSH
lB & now,
4 i
-
A I -

SIGN-UP
August 26 in IMS
� t
-� X
in M
��
i


'
:













:




:

CONVOCATION
Thursday, ugust 29, I9S.1
RISH
s ptemht 1
I : P. 1
East Carolina
a good idea
DATE:
Tues. Sept. 3
Wed. Sept. 4
Thurs Sept. 5
TIME:
pi AQ�- Student Supply Store
Saving Include All Quality Rings
HERFF JONES
Division of Carnation Company
$10.00 OFF
i





20
I HI EAST -Kil INIAN
M i .1 SI 26, ls�i�
t)
Til Death Do You Part' Rare In Hollywood
H()l VWOOD(UPI) With
almost half of American mar-
riages ending in divorce courts,
the odds against movie-TV stai
wedlock are ghasti)
Whatever the built-in domestic
hardships inherent m marriage,
they are alarming!) exacerbated
il one or both parties are pei
formers.
What wife, tot instance, would
01 experience a rise m blood
essure as she watched her bus
and make love to another
woman on a movie screen What
sband would not feel a wrench
jealous) if his wife were on
cation with a male sex symbol
tor three months'
here is a tendenc) for stars to
fall in love with other stars on
cations, Among the best ex-
ples was the Steve Mc-
een h MacGraw romance in
ihe Getaway, which got them
h into marriage and out of
other marriages. They, too, even-
tually were divorced.
How does the spouse of a
superstar react when he or she is
shunted aside at social events
while the performer is swarmed
over by admirers?
And in the case of married
stars, what happens when one
partner's career is soaring and the
other's is in the pits? What price
does a couple pay when they are
separated for months on end at
different ends of the globe in pur-
suit o their careers?
These are only the easy ques-
tions. There are tough ones like
who has first dibs on the family
make-up mirror every morning
betore work And what if the
spouse isn't included on the cover
of People magazine? We're talk-
ing tragedy here.
Marital longevity is not
unknown in Hollywood but il is
uncommon when you think that
Zsa Zsa Gabor, Elizabeth Taylor
and Lana Turner alone wore
holes in the aisle carpets of un-
counted chapels.
There are, however, some
lasting marriages among the
celestial creatures of tube and
screen.
Many good Hollywood mar-
riages involve couples who work
and travel together constantly.
Others seem to thrive when the
partners spend long periods of
time apart.
The scrutiny of goldfish bowl
lives sometimes helps, sometimes
hinders star marriages. Bob and
Dolores Hope, and Paul and
Joanne Newman, seem to thrive
in the limelight. Robert and
Arlene Alada and Robert and
Lora Redford avoid it.
Perhaps the most illuminating
tact of Hollywood marriages is
that not a single superstar actress
in recent memory has enjoyed a
lengthy marriage. Not one.
Among actor-actress marriages
probably none has survived
longer that the Newmans. They
have chalked up 26 years of
more-or-less wedded bliss. Her
ballet interests and his car racing
are safety valves.
Robert apparently is a good
solid name for married guys in
show business. A flock of them,
including Hope, Young, Preston
and Redford have rung up some
impressive runs.
Robert and Betty Young rank
among record-setting Hollywood
marriages with 51 years of living
under the same roof.
Bob Hope probably holds the
record for longest marriage ol a
superstar. The comedian and
Dolores tied the knot a half-
century ago. The fact that Bob is
on the road solo more than six
months a year, gives them
breathing space, too. Robert
Preston and his wife, Catherine,
have been married for 45 years.
Hanging right in there in the
marital longevity derby are
Charlton and Lydia Heston who
recently celebrated their 40th year
of connubial bliss.
Also in the 40-year category
are John Forsythe and wite Julie
IJoyd and Dorothy Bridges are
working on their 45th year ol one
of Hollywood's happiest mat-
ches.
Eddie and Margo Albert will
celebrate their 40th anniversary
next year.
Jimmy Stewart, a cage)
bachelor until well into his 30s.
married his Gloria 35 years ago
Kirk and Anne Douglas recent
ly celebrated thur 30th anniver
sary. Robert and Rosemary Stack
are moving right along rhey've
been married 28 years.
Gregory and Veroniquc Peck
have been married 2K vears And
it won't be long before Larrv
Hagman and his wife Maj
celebrate their 30th Richard and
Penni (renna have surpassed the
25-year mark, as have Mike and
Marilouonnors, Alan and
Arlene Alda and Robert and Lola
Redford.
Among the stormi - public
and private marriages that has
managed to endure is thai l I
and Felicia Lemmon who have
tallied 22 vears of Mr and Mrs
Still newlyweds bv most stan-
dard- are Cliff Robertson and
Dina Merrill Both I their
own careers arid oft find
themselves in differei
the countr)
I he Hollywood divorca
mav be lower than it w
I oda) perfomers plav h use
together more
ing it
statistics.

'Falcon Crest' Star Proves Life Imitates Art
HOI 1 WOOD il I'll I lie
� s' imes im an w hen a
ass ui the
:haracteristics of a role oi
omes absorbed in an element
a script.
Paul Newman plunged
mobih . iftei stai
Winning in which he played a
e Jner
In the case of 1 aura Johnson,
e as the wealth) T.
?rd in the television scries
1 alcon c re ibstantialh
luenced the acti fest) le
Unt
imetime �
nson, 26, I
ught . . � 11
id enjoyed a few
i he
I ast season, : owevei.
'I alcon C res writers had ierrv
u) an interest in a
thoroughbred, and Johnson has
been horsing around ever since.
Now much of her daily life is
scheduled around her four-legged
acquisition.
" I he script called for me, as
lerrv, to ride the horse in a cou-
ple ol scenes Johnson said. "I
wanted to look believable in the
saddle dnd 1 didn't want the pro
ducers to use a double.
"So. -even months ago 1 went
to a stable and found a trainer
who could teadi me to ride com-
rtabl) and convincingly in au
I nglish saddle. I wanted to learn
-age and some of the intricate
and formal moves ol a good
: idei
Rial was the beginning of the
end. or the beginning of the
beginning of a new way of life for
the actress. It also signaled
changes in the life of her new hus-
band, actor Harrv Hamlm.
Johnson quickl) became more
obsessed with horses than the ex-
traordinarih wealthv Terry in the
-how .
I ike Terry, Johnson bought a
thoroughbred � to ride, not to
race � and has dihgenlty worked
at becoming one of the best
horsewomen among Hollywood
actresses.
"I am still taking lesson- four
hours a day Johnson said the
other dav, sacrificing a lunch
hour awav from the corral.
"And my horse. Godsend, is
an absolute wonder. He's a little
long in the tooth at 16, but he's a
huge chestnut, 1" hands high
He's a hunter-jumper who does
dressage, too. Mv life hasn't been
the same since I bought him
almost tour months ago
During rhe "Falcon Crest"
hiatus, and on those davs when
she is not working, Johnson
reports to the I os Angeles
Equestrian Center stables at 8:30
a.m six davs a week, to work
with Godsend.
"I groom him, saddle him and
walk him tor about 30 minutes
SALE PRICES
ALL THE TIME
Matresses Complete Set Full $37 50
Bed Frames (I4) OB
Living Room Suits $1 55
2 Pieces
Chest of Drawers
NEW
NEW
Bunk Beds
(perfect for dorm room)
& UP
JAMIE'S FURNITURE
NEW & USED
Rt. 8 Box 459
736-6027
Johnson said. "Then 1 enjoy a
good hour's ride, then walk him
another 20 minutes. After that 1
groom and teed him. It takes
time and patience.
"There's no denying that I've
become obsessed with riding and
my horse. You can't ride well
unless you are obsessed. So far
I've been content with learning
dressage but I plan to start jump-
ing him soon
How will Johnson find time to
ride Godsend once she begins
working on her CBS-TV series
again?
"I'll have to get up real earl)
every morning, before dawn, or
get to the stables after work late
at night she -aid cheerfully.
"But I only work in the series
about two davs a week because
we have such a large cast and so
many storv lines
And how does husband
Hamlm feel about his bride-
devoting so much time to a
horse?
"Harry encourages me because
he knows how much 1 lov
ride she answered.
"I spend a lot more tune with
Harry than I do with Godsend
Harrv and I attend the same ac
ting class We plaved one scene
together. It wasn't a good idea
was a screaming, fighting scene
and when we rehearsed at home
the neighbors were ready I
the police
"I've worked in various I
hows and some movies, but I've
never become as absorbed r
character as 1 have Terrv. I .here's
always some actoi transference
ol character th.it works both
ways
't an't realh sepa
yoursell from the role, espeaalh
in a long-running set
'I alconrest' 1 � � started out
� ker who gradual!)
aj me rich and
table I wor �
Ierrv more like rm
� ime.
v hen she fell in love . i
I transferred
Harr ike il
wor �
"On the otl
her interest in I
had an impa ny life
couldn't be hapi
Read The Classifieds
Nitelifer
Thursday Night is College Night
I ' ituring 25C It ifl � � �� A
m Rock �
tunes during all band breal-
Thursday. August 29. The Spontanes
will I e playing Top A I � md
oldie favorites
Free Rides on the Liberty Ride
Just call 758-5570 We II pick
and rake you home FREE
Great Entertainment Every Night
I ver nig! I Wedi esday thi igl iturd
a. �� . � . �. �
Thursday College Nite

Be a TW's Nitelifer every nih?1
8 30 .
COUPON
$100
flte!
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Cover Charge
7i� Good any night 'hrough 9 JO 85 lElAV I
� � � � � informat � . ��
Eastern NC s Largest Entertainment Center
A Private Club . All ABC Permits
A
W �
I
il
i





Pepsi Boasts Carolina Roots
' Ht TCARQLINIAN AUGUST 26, 1985 21
C'olfnians have a proud
ieritagc and, justifiably,
u ,a claim to a number ot
significant world contributions.
Foi example. North Carolina
.a In th to the airplane, was the
first state to deelare in-
dependence from Great Britain,
and was the site of this nation's
first discover) ot gold and silver.
South Carolina, the first state
lo export cotton, also had the
first tue plantation, and the first
Chambei of Commerce What's
more, the War Between the States
began with a single shot in
Charleston.
But these sister states share one
bit of heritage that now cover
the globe, heritage that pleases
the taste buds and quenches the
thirst ot millions of people
throughout the world even day.
Pepsi c ola.
Pepsi was created in New Bern,
North Carolina in 1898. The taste
first known as "Brad's Drink
was concocted by New Bern
pharmacist Caleb Bradham. The
coveted cola proved extremelv
popular in the Carolinas, and the
roots o the product are as strong
as ever.
Iodav, the 18 Pepsi-Cola bot-
tlers that market Pepsi-Cola here
in the Carolinas rank with the na-
tions' oldest and most successful
bottlers.
"We are verv proud thai Pepsi
was born m the Carolinas said
Carl Brown of Wilmington,
founding chairman of Carolina
Pepsi-Cola Bottlers. "Caroli-
nians consume the highest pet
capita volume of soft dunks in
America, and Pepsi is the leading
soft drink in the Carolinas
Currently, the IS Carolina
Pepsi-Cola bottlers are touting
Pepsi birthplace with Pepsi
1 shuts proclaiming "I'm A
Born Winner" and "The Taste
Born In The Carolinas The
limited edition T-shirts are
available exclusively in the
Carolinas.
bach of the high-quality shirts
sports a "Crafted With Pride In
The Carolinas" sticker and are
products of the Carolinas' textile
industry.
"Many people don't know that
Pepsi was born in the
Carolinas explained Frank
Avent of Florence, current chair-
man of the Carolina Pepsi-Cola
Bottlers.
"We are quite proud of this
and want all Carolinians to know
it The fact that Pepsi was born
here in the Carolinas and is con-
sumed worldwide is a lot to be
proud of.
-�� �wan imm
w,
Pepsi-C ola Recalls .fsarolma Heritage with a new sales pitch. Pepsi: Pride of thearolinas.
Sculptured
Nails
Call BecKy Myers
Jackie Meeker-
Pat B. Dunn
Cathy Swain
756-8025
214 East Arlington Blvd
Behind the Links
Hair
Styling
HOME COOKED FOOD
Monthly Meal Plan
20 plates for $50
Semester Meal Plan
100 plates for $250
Call for more information about
meal plans
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.2Splus tax & beverage.
ol
With This Ad
$5.00 Off Membership
(1 Coupon per Customer)
Offer expires Sp� 15
11" M.
GTYM
FITNESS COMPLEX
Located on the Evans Street Mall
(across the street from the Elbo)
OF
GREENVILLE
(Formerv Jobbims Gym)
SPECIAL STUDENT
RATES
SEMESTER $70
(4 months)
YEARLY $150
MONTHLY $25
NAUTILUS EQUIPMENT
SUNTANA TANNING BED
AEROBIC CLASSES
Men & Ladies showers & locker rooms
5,000 sq. ft. of workout space
10,000 lbs. of weight
Air Condition all the time
ALL NEW!
GOLD'S GYM AEROBIC CLASSES
$20.00 monthly
$60.00 Semester
�Qualified Aerobic Instructors
�1400 sq. ft. of Workout Space
NO CONTRACTS
NO INITIATION FEE
Gold's honors all current Jobbies memberships
��������������
Coming Aug.29
Mr. Olympia
Lee Haney
With This Ad
$5.00 Off Membership
(1 Coupon per Customer)
Offer expires Sept. 15
With This Ad
$5.00 Off Membership
(I Coupon per Customer)
Oftw expires 5pt. 13
Hours
M-F
Sat. & Sun.
10:00 AM. - 8:00 P M
2:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM - 8 PM
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TODAY 758-4359
A Licensee Of GOLD'S QYM ENT INC.
I
t
, -��- �-�� s . .
- -
' �
M





22
I f ' � XK.U ISias G s :6 mi
EnJoy Our Third Year Anniversary Specials
Pizza
Transit
Authority
Pizza
Transit
Authority,
FREE DELIVERY
anywhere in our
service zone!
Menu
PH?P,77aH Smd" 'J irk �' Our,esn �uce ,s made w,th romano
cheese and " PP ��� th 100 zzarella Double sauce s free
Toppings
fPePPerw�� ! " � R,n Creen Olives Double Crust
rOUndBt'el I'r'y ' � On.onC.rdes Italtan Sauc,
r'Vr" W � K ' � Do��e h, Mepeno Pepper,
(. anadtan nai
e,UXe : ��" usag greer peppers, onions and mushrooms
' ' � " i � I � � '4
Pia liti
��� K' md I � - � gree i pepper � - i - dives
GREENVILLE
757-1955
HOURS:
11:00 AM - 2:00 AM
NOW OPEN TIL 2:00 AM
EVERY NIGHT!
2 for 1 Pick-up Special
No Coupon Ne essary.
Buy any Pizza, Get One FREE
Coke. Diet Coke,
Niello Yello, or Sprite 50
1 6 (). 1 wist Cap
rhis store in Icpendentls owned b Rogers f oods, In
P.O. Ho 4216, Greenville, V( . 27834
Buy One Get One Free
Bin .un large p.a vMth 2 o, �� . ,
& Rel another large pizza with ,
"1m" PP ngsfree! Save - '
more1
Pizza
Transit
Authority
FREEDEUVERY
.
' ItTei ei rev �
' ��
757-1955,
Save $3.00!
( rder an Ijrv pizza
and save $3.00!
Pizza
Transit
Auttorify
FREE DELIVERY
L
-���757-1955
Buy Two and Try Two
Order any 4 or more toppings
and get 2 toppings free.
Pizza
Transit
Authority
FREE DELIVERY
( ,o,
L
r�
With this ,MU(�,n On discount r p,Zza
� ' expires Dei ember l5
Wildcard-pick-a-coupon
757-1955.
Pizza
Save $2.00 on Any Pizza!
.Order any size p77 large
or small and save $2 (W)
Plzza
Transit
AuthqHt
FREE DELIVERY
Good only with this coupon One discount per pizza
Otter expires December Jl. 1985
757-1955!
Order
or more loppings double one o� them free
Ordei 4 toppings gel 2 ol them tree.
SlOOofl small r $2 00 oft large 2 topping pua
j der 2 or mri. toppings and add one more lopp,� Iree
Doublehees please on aw pi,j
Transit
Authority
FREE DELIVERY
Good only with this coupon One discount per p1a
Offer expires December H, 1985
757-1955
FREE COKES!
Order any small pizza and receive 2 Cokes
Diet Cokes, Mello Yello or Sprite free! Order
any large pizza & receive 4 Cokes, Diet
C okes, Mello Yello or Sprites free!
Pizza
Transit
Authority
FRIIDCirVERY
Good only with this coupon One d.scoun. per p�za
Otter expires December 31, 1985.
757-1955
Playhous
s
- - i
HJT�
lO
t
H
c
Daily
t
J Take-0
"Greem
GOURMET1
COFFEE
SHOP
. e
frier � th
I �
are I
Gifts
� Dolls and Doll C
Cloisonne Beads
� Cloisonne Earrini
Cloisonne BroceM
Cloisonne Belts
Wall Hangings
� Picture Frames
.
,1





ials
Pizza
Transit
Authority
NVILLE
1955
URS:
- 2:00 AM
M TIL 2:00 AM
NIGHT!
K-up Special
One FREE
Sprite SO
TK.
I
Pizza
Transit
Authority
'RHDfUVIRY
57-1955
Pizza
Transit
Authority
fmi Of irvf mr
57-1955
IHF I AM (. AROl ISIAN
�M GUST 26, I985
23
Playhouse Holds 'Peter Pan' Audition
n K i n s
Ml'
and dancing audi
" the Easi Carolina
I layhouse production ol the
famous musical version ol Sir
lames Barrie's fantasj Peter Pan
are scheduled tor Mondaj and
rucsday, Sepi 2 and 3 in the
Messick rheatre Arts center
I he auditions will begin at 7:30
m each evening in Room 206
Peter Pan was jusl reeentK
�duced in Greenville h the
I ast arolina Summer rheatre, a
�fessional company o1 125
members who come from across
the country and are in residence
,n 'he ECU campous foi 7
eeks.
I his production will be cast
m ECl students, faculty,
staff and community residents.
There are 40 roles open tot
casting b Director I dgai
'ssin who commented. "We
a variety ol roles available
foi the show We want to en
throughout the area to
audition
Hoys between the ages of 10
and 16. older boys and men who
can smg are needed. Auditioning
singers should prepare a song of
their choice which shows off their
voice to the best advantage and
bring then music. An accom-
panist will be provided � no
"a-capella" singing will be per-
(Jiited
Dancers should also sing and
bring rehearsal clothes, shoes and
will be given standard routines bv
the choreogrpaher. Mavis Rav.
Peter Pan will be the first pro-
duction of the ECU Playhouse
season and will be performed in
McGinnis Theatre, Wednesday
through Saturday, Oct. 9-12 at
8:15 p.m with a special matinee
set for 2:15 p.m. on Saturday
Oct. 12. Tickets to the produc-
tion will become available on
Oct. 2.
Utot K
&Ar
Summer It almost over but we
ttill have plenty of COOL cottons
for the hot months to come
New arrivals and cutwork
envenings out on me town
for
New Laurel Burch earrings and ac-
cessories
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women
116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Door to Book Barn 757-3944
K
Chinese Restaurant
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Featunng the Largest Var.ety of Ch.nese Dishes in Greenville
Announcing Our New
Daily Luncheon Buffet
11:30 "til 2:30
�2 Kmds Or
�5 Entree.
appetizers
-i & Soup included
$3 75
ALL YOU
TAN EAT
�. i
Persnr,
lei j Frp
Children unoer
Also Serv.ng Our Regular Lanvnwn Menu And Daily Specials
A v to 1 P M
A M to ' ' 00 P M
� M
sd
,�
Take-Outs Welcom
Tree House Is Open
For Lunch
� With The Tree House Hot
Luncheon Buffet featuring;
Roast Beef, Lasagna & Corn Beef
with several vegetables of the week
On Special This Week for $2.99
Regularly $3.50
Also Come Enjoy Our 50 Item Salad Bar
ALL YOU CAN EAT
This Week �'ECUStudent ID SI.99
Located on the corner of 5th and Cotanche Street
treet Greenville NC 27834
JBi
Telephone 919) 752-3411
' 'Greenville 9s newest and most innovative offering to snoppers
��
GOURMET
COFFEE
SHOP
Cookware
Store
Bargain
Barrel
Enjoy your Gourmet cooking
with beautiful high quality
cookware. We also carry Sushi kits,
bamboo Steamer and Wok.
Great place to meet your
friends, relax with a cup of Gourmet
Coffee and a variety of muffins that
are baked fresh daily.
Gifts
� Dolls and Doll Cases
� Cloisonne Beads
� Cloisonne Earrings
� Cloisonne Bracelets
� Cloisonne Belts
� Wall Hangings
� Picture Frames
Looking for a bargain � come
to The Bargain Barrel
See such items as.
� Antiques
� 4 place setting of dishes for only
$9.99
� Teddy Bear rugs for only $5.00
� And much much more
Cook
School
We offer Chinese, Japanese
Cooking and Sushi Course. Please
come by and visit us.
4
Siu foul
$MfyHL

Caterers
For your tailgating pleasures try
our tailgate box lunches. Have a
Simpley Elegant feast on us!
Call Today.
Our varied selections of
gourmet foods, herbs and spices,
bulk grains, aromatic tea, fresh
roasted bean coffees and wonderful-
ly delectible chocolates are sure to
please your taste buds.
A
" r - '�� f ' � jr "
v v
1 ���,
,1





24
HI 1AMAKOI INI AN
M CIST 26. 1S�8
Pitt County Fair Offers Top Entertainment
T he Pitt County- American
A Legion Agricultural Fair
will start its 66th season on Mon-
day, Sept. 30, 1985. Plans have
been underway since November
of 1984 to make the 1985 Fair the
largest and finest fair to be found
in North Carolina east of
Raleigh. The fair will run
' through Saturday night, Oct. 5.
The finest exhibits in the area
are expected to be viewed at the
fair with emphasis on
Agriculture, Education, Science,
Services and livestock. Sam Win-
chester, Veteran Fair Manager
for the Pitt County Fair stated
that some exhibit space had been
reserved as early as June for the
event that attracted upwards to
65,000 people in 1984.
On the Midway, the huge
Amusements of America will
return this year with over 40
rides, shows and many other at-
tractions having just completed
The Pitt Countv Fair begins its 66th season Sept. �.
SP0RTSW0RL0
P.O Box 8068
Greenville, V - �
Welcome's ECU Students
every tues. night
College Night
Skate for $1.00 with ECU ID
from 7:00 until 10:00
104 E. Red Banks Rd.
(Behind Shoney's)
756 6000
engagements with some of the
biggest fairs on the east coast in-
cluding Greensboro, Charlotte,
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, the
Vermont State Fair and heading
to the Georgia State Fair.
Owned by the five Vivona
Brothers this organization ranks
at the very top in carnival
organizations across America
and has grown steadily since its
founding in the late forties. It has
the industry's top reputation for
safe clean family outdoor enter-
tainment. This is expected to be
the largest midway east of
Raleigh.
No fair can outrank the Pitt
County Fair in the free attrac-
tions that it offers its patrons.
The fair's 18 building Village of
Yesteryear was the idea of Con-
ner Eagles of Greenville, and is
considered to be the finest exam-
ple of a typical farming village to
be found anywhere that depicts
life as it was lived in the latter
part of the 19th Centurv. This at
traction is open all during fair
week and is free.
On Wednesday and Thursday
nights at 6 p.m. will be Jake
Plumstead and Tonnv Petersons
Hell Drivers Auto Thrill Show
This event is also free ot charge
� which is not the situation at
many fairs, including the North
Carolina State lair, v.here the
show will be the latter pan ot Oc-
tober. This event will be in the
Grandstand area.
The Grandstand will be the
scene of Band Night on Tuesday,
Oct. 1 at 7:30 p.m as area
school bands give their perfor
mances. This is a "first" tor the
fair, and it is planned that this
will become an annual event.
Band Booster clubs in the Pit:
and surrounding area are current-
ly selling tickets tor armbands tot
$7.00, which entitles a holder to
. i


X
CAROLINA
CRISIS PREGNANCY
CENTER
111 EastThirdSt.
(The Lee Building)
Greenville, North Carolina
unlimited rides on the midway
I he band concerts are of course
free also
Another free '�first" this year
is theommerford & Sons
and Circus Menagane coming to
Greenville direct from the
I astern States Imposition in
Massachusetts Patrons can view
and pet as well as teed unique and
tamed animals with a si
trge tor elephant and p
rides.
I he 1910arouse! Organ will
again be belting out its earn
music at the midway entra
with a rest area in front all week
Seldom seen now, these org
premded music tor fairgrounds
all across America until the eark
1950's. This midway nosta
should appeal not only ti -
but to adults as well, produced b '
an organ that was there.
1 he Piti I o inty lair � Sept.
30 thru ' ci 5, 198
free pregnancy test confidential counsel in
All services and referrals are free of charge
for information or appointment, call:
757-0003
A 24-Hour Helpline
FOOD
is our
SUBTECT
SGA

i
Welcome Back
Students
NEW MANAGEMENT
Come m and meet us"
Al & Audrey McDaniel
at
Our Maytag Equipped
SOUTHPARK HOME
STYLE LAUNDRY
H5 Red Banks Road
Behind the RAMADA INN
264 By Pass Greenv,le Tel 355-5023
75 Wash 25C25Min. Dry
Watch for FREE DA Y
would like to
welcome everyone back to
ECU and also welcome
new students. Have a
Great Year!
SGA Office
228Mendenhall
757-6611

east Carolina
dining service
- COLLEGE HILL
DINING HALL
- MENDENHALL
SNACK BAR
- BUFFET DINING
- GALLEY
- CATERING
vSs.�s -A
Aspiring young conservatives,
tired of the

liberal bias"
ot tne
campgs . media?
make vourseivesneara!
Tile E?st Carolinian needs a col-
H�?t�t$wr,Je a weekly "From
the Right" colymn.
5p�iJ2)i-storE mlhe Ea$t Caroli-
nian office Monday or Wednes-
2?X2�e�noon or ca" 757-6366 for
more info.
Now, receive a summer bonus
from Foto Express
Now Open
BUFFET
DINING ROOM
a FREE extra set of prints.
For a limited time at Futo Express
you'll get an extra set of color
prints free with every disc or roll
of color print film you bring to us
for processing.
' That's right! You'll receive two
sets of color prints for tne price of
one. So take advantage of this
special offer and share your
memories with family and friends.
Carolina University
Dining Services
p�OOlCTS8'r
Kodak
Polo
tKpfc�?
"The Specialists"
10th & Cotonchc Stre�t
Beiid Hardee's
n ! 758-7767
Over 30 locations in the Carolina and Virginia
The Buffet Dining Room at
Mendenhall Student Center opens
on Monday, August 26 at 11:00.
The hours will be 11:00 until 200
Monday through Friday. Along
with the daily salad bar, build-your-
own-sandwiches, and soup specials,
items also featured are a potato bar
on Mondays, Wednesdays, and
Fridays and quiche on Tuesdays
and Thursdays.
Soloi
s
r-g �
( H
plj'
Incl
. i �

pj
30 �A
Ray Ban Sungii
s�
R i .279 1
BIFOCALS4ti
20i
�S, 1 � �
"OSCCCCCOCCCOSCOCCOOCX.
Jf elcome h
NEW & USED
Rctraad !��
17.00 k UP
SERVICE
Complex 5 P
$14.88
Foi
hunmenj
JfflClAL NORTH CAHOU
Wf SERVICE H
KFGood
IE CENTER
' 'Con
Cogging
7561
320 West
'
HMHi
�!





ainment
midway
l course
5 eai
oming to
om the
in
"A
and
3 MlUil
ill
will
itrance
ee k
gans
Linds
e earl
k
op;
OD
our
ECT
Mi -

1�
AiXLo
a service
(ILL
g hall
ENHALL
BAR
ET DINING
.TERING
-CS
w Open
JFFET
G ROOM
I niversity
ling Services
!l
Dining Room at
tudent Center opens
August 26 at 11:00.
I be 11:00 until 2:00,
3ugh Friday. Along
salad bar, build-your-
les, and soup specials,
tured are a potato bar
, Wednesdays, and
quiche on Tuesdays
:vs.
Soloists Open Artists Series
T
'e Dcpartmeni of Uiiiversi
Unions' rtists Series
has announced
i otinittec nas announced
plans tor the 198s isw, reason.
Included in the Artists Series tor
the year are the Concerto Soloists
Philadelphia, rhe Bach ria
-��-� � Pianist Jean Phillippe
. ollard, and violinist Viktoria
Mullova
Foi the 1985-1986 season, all
programs will be hold in Hendrix
rheatre ol Mendenhall Student
Centei due to the final ren
of Wright uditorium. Ml
performance times will be 8 p.m
rhe season will commence on
24 with the performance ol
Concerto Soloists ol
Philadelphia. I his nK- chambei
orchestra, modeled aftei those ol
Bach and Mozart, has an exten-
repertoire ol Baroque and
( lassical music through to 2
century composers
1 ach sear, the) premiere
works b i ontemporai i
merican composers. Mar
Mostovo is the musk din
and conductor ol the
He is regarded as an authontx
performan
Baroque and Classical
tones.
Jeai Phillipe c
ing Dec 1985, I a a
d of a
He has . �; s
awards, made ai
numbei ol record
siveh around the world, and
compa ' grea
pianists as Josel Hofmann,
Sergei Rachmaninoff, Vladimii
Horowitz, and Sviatoslas
Richtei He is termed, "the e
traordinary 1 rench pianists
I he Bach Ana Group will pei
form Jan. 2 1986. I he Group,
founded in 1946, has toured
throughout the world and, in ad-
dition to its performances, holds
Master classes, Festivals, and In-
stitutes for young artists and the
public.
Bach's ana music is challeng-
. to both the vocalists and in
a lists with severe
si k demands, while at the
�one time requiring highk
developed ensemble skills. The
Bach Ana Group has a refined
technique ol balancing divergent
ce and instrumental capacities
and therebv unlocking the magic
ol Bad
iolii is; V iktoria Mullova will
Jose the 1985 1986 Artists Series
n March
�'�" M � : s a re
fron et I nion
' .i bei ome
Her playing is
� ique and Rifted
S � med with mans
mpl
tie violinist evei
ich as �
� Symp!
LOOK GOOD
When Your Friends
See You Back at School
30-60 off
Ail Eyeglass Frames wpurchase of Rx Lenses
Ray Ban Sunglasses. . . 30 off
.APGE
I Group of Frames
s,es
Rj r or � 4 � �ve
27
95
BIFOCALS
46
95
Mils
-Ay x
FACETED
POLISHED EDGES
Reg S40 Now
s25
20
Senior Citizen
Discount
Sale Ends Sept 15.1985
1 Discount Per Eyeglass
C
��L
VUE
V7S4
pucians
� R
E �XAMINA1
Welcome Back Students!
new & USED
Retread Tlrea
$7.00 4 UP
SERVICE
Comptet Pom�
Brake Safety
Check ZZs
,niM,i�J4 ��
and V J,C '�� 1
$itSL
1cooOH
� �,��� $29.95
Vlignment ,)
All size
tires
available
DffICIAI NORIH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION STATiCN
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
ISPGoodrich
SbTNRE CENTER
SATURDAY
� 00 A M 1.00PM
OPENMON FRI
I 00�M S30PM
' 'Consider us your cars '
j� Home Away From Home " Vt
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Blvd
?oooooooeoooooooooooooooooooooco�sooco50ococooococ
Vikloria Mullova
Back-To-School "u
Co'orful
Adjustable
Scissor Lamps
Savings
Cotton Duck
Flip
Chairs
Milk Crates
Stackable Storage
3.99
$10 Value
Shop Nightly In 9�rhe Plaza
�aleigh�Dufham�GreensDoro�Wilson�Greenvilie�Wiirningion�Fayetieville
ex
wnftf
THREE DELICIOUS FLAVORS
�" "� ' � � � � . f its ond invite
H.R. Tankard Dist. Co. Washington, N.C.
27889
946-2154
IMI bASTt -Ho NK
AUGUST 26 '��
25
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Avc
We Buv Gold & Silver
INSTANT GASH LOANS
I All Transactions Confidential
752-0322 '
ATTIC
THURS
!��q I it, b��ii
FRI
SAT &
sun Sidewinder
GRAND OPENING
of
Cordon's Golf
& Shi Shop
� : idies Summer Clothing 50� off
� Men s IZOD Sport Shirts Re. S2H.(H) Now$17.95
� STUDENT SPECIALS �
s �' �' i special a , �
ni
Goll Balls $16.95 a dozen
$19.95 for balata balls
H ith Pun hasi iozgolfba i indfu
ogolj
F I (HAT ION 264 Bpass (Beside McDonalds)
756-1003
V.A. Merrill's
1
Vfck1' SPECIALLY PRICED.
PORTABLE AND LIGHTWEIGHT
�St X 4 J
Microwave Oven
� 35 rnmute lime- with - . � I g
�2 i�jp' eve - ' Hility
CuO
�Attractive ig i
� i year limited ar.i �.
M xJei Ri
just lOy
95
HxrtpjcrLriJr
STARTS AS A VALUE
. . STAYS A VALUE!
V.A. MERRITT & SONS
207 Evans Street
Downtown Greenville
752-3736
"Serving Pitt County for over 50 Years"
Easy Financing�Factory Trained Servicemen
m 4 � "
i





26
HI EAS C Roi IMAS
Al i.l SI 26. 1S�8
String Quartet To Kickoff Chamber Festival
T c 1985 1986 Chamber
estival, co-sponsored bv
- Department of University
1 nions and the ECU School of
Music, will consist of five
cnamber music ensembles, each
to be hold at 8 p.m in Hendnx
i iicaire.
rhe performances include I he
Concord String Quartet. 1 h-
Folger Consort, The Rogeri I no.
soprano I ucy Chelton and
flutists Carol Wincenc. and An
Die Musik.
rhe Concord String Quartet
gins the season Oct. 10 with a
performance that will continue
the reputation Ihe e York
limes has given them as "one of
the best American string
quartets The tour musicians
ng together separate skills and
qualities to form a fusion which
is at once brilliant, loving and
soulfull.
rhe Concord String Quartet is
attuned; whether the romp or
sigh together, then split-second
timing with melodies and
rhythms and full ripeness of their
sound have earned them a place
in the first rank of chamber
music groups.
On Nov. 20, The Folger Con
soil will bring their unique
Renaissance sound to the series.
This ensemble of professional
musicians, in residence at the
Folger Shakespeare Library, has
a fundamental goal to provide to
the rapidly widening early music
audience performances which
combine a strong basis in scholar-
ship with a vivid sense of the
vitality and universal appeal of
Medieval and Renaissance music.
Ihe Folger Consort is most suc-
cessful at this as thev have
garnered reviews nationwide ac-
claiming their performances.
The Rogeri I no was formed in
1976 and since that time, thev
have met with extraordinary
critical and public acclaim at
campuses and in major cities
throughout the United States.
Following the rrio's New York
debut. The en York Times
wrote of the Rogeri I no that it
"demonstrated its technical
fluency, m usicality and
liveliness
Based in New York City, the
Trio was in residence at Vale
University where it presented,
with the Tokyo String Quartet,
the complete Brahms chamber
music cycle. Their performance
date is Feb. 19, 1986.
Lucy Shelton, a soprano
vocalist, and Carol Wincenc,
flutist, will be combining their
unique talents for a performance
on March 3. 1986. I ucy Shelton
is a remarkably versatile per
former who is distinguished as
the only artist to have received
'he Naumberg Award twice. She
has performed with main sym-
phony orchestras across the
country, and Shelton tours and
records extensively as well.
Carol Wincenc has established
a reputation as one of toda
foremost flutists, like her
counterpart in this duo, Wincenc
tours and records frequently and
finds time for other collabora-
tions with such luminaries as
Jean-Pierre Rampal, Fmanuel
A, Idly Ameling and Eliot Fisk.
She won the 1978 Naumberg
flute competition, and her first
solo album was cited bv Stereo
Review as a "Recording ol
Special Merit
An Die Musik will conclude the
Chamber Festival on March 19,
1986. They are an internationally
celebrated chamber music enscm
ble and have been acclaimed foi
their superb artistry throughout
the United States and Europe
Comprised of five superlative
artists, dedicated to chamber
music and performing an annual
concert series in New Vorl
1976, Ar, Die Musik ha I
featured bv distinguished S�
( enters, and Festivals act
United States his perfi
will continue their ranking
foremost oi world cla
music ensemble
t hambei f estival
Series Season ticket
available from the Centra ' �
Office. Morid.r. I
a.n ' , telcphoi "
266, begini
' Greenville s Finest Bakery for over 63 years
Presbyterian Campus Christian
Life
invites you toernoy
FREE ICE CREAM
at the Methodist Student Center
501 East 5th Street
(Across from Garrett Dorm)
Wed. � August 28th 1985
7:00-9:00 p.m.
Informal attire preferred

mm,� ,15 Dickin, AvMM
. DOWNTOWN
f Family Owned & Operated Bf Within Walking distance from Girls'
Dorm y Baked Fresh Daily
v'Pies
chocolate � lemon � apple � peach � French apple � sweet potatoe � lemon custard �
berry � coconut custard � pecan
v c akes
Carrotspice � butternut � chocolate � caramel � p.neapple � rum . banana � german
H Pastries
dough for chicken pastry � donuts � cream puffs � cookies � fudge �
rcmnamon buns .
H Decorated cakes for all occasions.
ge � maripan (seasonal) �
�������
��������������������
I
� Complete professional Eye
Examinations
� specializing m Contact
lenses - All Types
� Eye Glasses
� ECU Student & Faculty discount
on materials
Conveniently located in University
Professional Center 608 E 10th
Street
REMNANT-RIOT
MonFri. 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9.00 am12 Noon
1009 Dickinson Ave. Greenville 758-0057
mtrrecMf
g All Budqet Watchers' Rente- New ,
At A r �
� el So '����,
WALLPAPER 4 TH�
eds' & Sludents ou Can h.ivp
Of The Regular Sq i rard Pnces Mou F,n � ovv ese ' �s And Ren
�ostF,oml-amousMakersNoOoubtAl t It. Quality fl End a-
'�
ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE
� s
University Optomerric
Eye Clinic
Dr. Dennis O'Neal
758-4600
Hours 9 a m. to 5 p m Monday-Friday
Evening Hours Available By Appointment
Mg&& 50 OFF
Process 6 Print
T- m ; 10. 126 5bmm or Use color print Aim
13 �C pa pi � reg 27� � 49 lev -Marge , reg �2 98
BcampU �x; nog $94 HOW $4.73 f
Unut one roll pei i n
Jilotbty&lLd
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
-l
48 88
48 88
�J8 88
a 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
: - - -
46 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
-r
48 88
48 86
18 S
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
46 86
48 88
48 86

48 88
48 88
43 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
46 88
4e 88
48 68
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 88
48 68
48 88
48 88
mg�?
20 OFF
Reprints
; th thl l
126. 3 � . r i � � -�
Juat 29c each reg !
FHA
APPROVED
CARPET
Back To College
48 88
48 88
ONLY
IZl
;4.95
DESCRIPTION
Sq Yd
Hurry To
The
REMNANT-ROT
� -i 1 w: !
r tpirrv �M
cPhotbWyilct
50 OFF
Color Enlargements
" VIA. E 149 00SEDESCRIPTION
� 149 00
9 0C
190 00� � i
� 169 00
129 00
VALUE SAlE
Sv'F
D�S a PI
VALUE SALE
'��
lain
i ��: A' a Locati
87 re 251
a 10 reg501
11x14 �. t IS
�ow �i as
�ow ta so
ltOW M 7S
- etftl es ti "�; urnd I.1
Ffc
Carolina East Mall 756-6078
(North entrance - Near Belks)
Open MonSot 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

i

V,

� �
��� - i
221 00
129 00
159 00
260 00
129 00
159 00
169 00
159 00
129 00
169 00
� 107 00
� 229 00
� 159 00
119 95
� 159 00
� � 159 00
� 199 95
�- � 199 CO
� 149 00
320 00
� - � 107 95
� 169 00
" 139 00
�1 � 190 00
WOC 189 45
�179 00
,129 00 '�� 159 00 - � 139 00
i � 139 00 . 129 00
'���-� � 129 00
- � '99 00 � 319 00 � 249 00
2800I 95 00 � 180 00
- � 129 00 169 99
�� �� � 199 00
� - , .�- 6750 275 00
M i � - -� � 169 00
� ��� � 139 00,
� � 180 00
!� � PlusfMO 149 00
��� � 199 00
. � 139 00
�SOi � 149 00
� 135 00- - ,
A'� 139 20 1
WOO 109 00 1. (
�� 259 00 1 iu -
� '�� 289 00 1�. i�
- � 114 00 1
-� ' ' ��(! .�1 j 280 00 1� - i
- � � � 186 95 Ii
"� � 166 99 1 . �
M
-


- ' N.
� - �
-
'�'
" rt"
M.LVV . ,

Sijf
Sale
Ends
Sat
Aug. 31
12
Prime
Cushion
PAPER
1 Hour Photo Lab

i. -
u . �

� - .

wtrrocL'
1009 Dickinson Ave. Greenville 758-0057 VISAvTASTERCARD
��
Baker
Bj k h i
.


atfaB


a.
ron Baktr -4J� ramhies
running bacW rusht-d tor !2i v�rd-
Pirate O
.( . stare
rter-Finle v
w �
V. fn


.
-
firing line
Wl K s �
Reed was
pie
by

V Kramer �i
vVesi Fui
I
mark. I i&sing
game, ieas d
Joe M( �ho finished
He
� a
the
scnoo
nd all
CASH OR CHECK
leading
formei �
Evans, M k M
IsLtm.
an. wh
in rushing
yards, will be the Mane:
running back pos tion He
became only the thud t
back in N c Statt
for over 200 diA in a game.
ting 20 yards on 27cai a
season's 31-22 win tvei I C I
This vear contest will be the
16th meeting between the
schools with all the gamev b





Festival
V 1 �rk since
as heen
k .� Series,
ss the
mance
� n the
imbet
��
will be
eket
ay, i i
7
hft
'kinson Avenue ;
OVI()W
ui
d
nan
t �
VWYL WALLPAPER & TILE
SALE
)T
Sale
Ends
Sat .
Auq 31
12"
Prime
Cushion
89c
rd
i F
"9 00
-�

i'9 0O
84 00
� '4 00
�39 00
'99 00
� '9 00
'49 00
169 00
'63 00
'65 00
'59 00
� '9 00
149 00
129 00
�29 00
'69 00
121 00
225 00
'39 00
139 00
119 00
153 00
109 00
i cq no
� HI- t AS1AROl INIAN
Sports
M dl si 26 Ivx'
Baker's Pirates Prepare For Difficult Slate
B RICK McCORMAC
t sponi tdltor
With the ECU football team
embarking on their 1985-86 cam-
paign, lust-seat coach Art Baker
is trying to prepare his team for
the school's toughest season ever.
With Baker and si new assis-
coaches the Pirates hope to
tpture the form that drove
m to an 8-3 record and a
fop 20 ranking in the Associated
Press Poll and a No. 17 rating in
the Sports Illustrated Poll.
Baker will lead the Pirates in
1985 after playing a major role in
ECU'S successful 1983 season
That year saw Baker in the role oi
associate head coach and offen-
sive coordinator. However, 1985
will mark the third time Baker
has been a head coach on the col-
legiate level. His previous stops
were at Furman and The Citadel.
In 1984, the personable Baker

; i
� �
Ion Baker 43t rambles for vardage against N.C. State. The senior
running back rushed for 120 yards against the Wolfpack last season
served as assistant head coach
and quarterback coach for
Florida State's Bobbv Bowden.
Baker inherits a voting squad
in 198s, as 30 lettermen were lost
from last year s 2-9 club.
"I've always liked a
challenge Baker said "lavbe
thai goes along with being short
(standing at 5-8), but I believe the
way you accomplish things thai
yotl couldn't otherwise, is
through togetherness relation-
ships you develop in a family
type situation
Baker advocates in option of-
fense and a strong defense, but
said that team unity is the kev in-
gredient in making this a suc-
cessful vear for his Pirates.
"Whether we win or lose is go-
ing to depend on the values we
gam by being a close football
team ECU'S rookie coach em
phasized. "You become a good
football team when people Mar:
giving up theii individuality.
With the schedule we have, that's
our only chance to accomplish
something good and worthwile
this vear
Forty one lettermen return
from last year's squad, including
a number ol people on each side
oi the ball who started at some
point during the iss4 campaign.
But inexperience looms in two
critical areas - wide receiver and
the interioi defensive line
"It just means we have a much
harder task Bake: said o his
receiver dilemma "In order to
e .i quality passing game you
receivers, and
have thai It's going I taki
while to develop, because ai
present time we don't have
speed, abihtv, experience or
talent to really threaten pe
with the passing game
Defensi1 ely. the Pirates
just as inexperienced at the tackle
md n �s -� lai d positions 1 eon
Hail and David Plum are the
players with any experience at
tackle, and talent is thin after
h a v e q u a
we simplv d
Pirate Opponents Profiled
N.C. State
Carter-Finley Stadium
hen E I to Raleigh
Sepi 7 i �pen the season
at � val State,
the s will be facing a
Wolfpack squad with an inex-
perienced quarterback at the
heln
terback Erik Kramer is
d as first team on the
preseason depth char; and is the
leading candidate to take over the
I the Wolfpack attack. A
slender 6-1. 191 pounder from
Pierce Junior College in Califor-
nia, he moved ahead o junior
Scott Wilson and senior Bob
Guidise in spring practice. While
at Pierce JC, Kramer completed
144 ol 254 passe- foi 2,481 yards
and 21 touchdowns, leading his
team to a 10-1 record.
"Erik performed much better
than we had expected during the
spring NX . State head coach
Tom Reed said. "He can throw
on the move and ha a quick
release, and his decision making
has been prettv good. He must
now pass the test of being on the
firing line "
While Kramer is the number
one signal caller coming out of
spring practice. Reed was also
pleased with the progress shown
by Wilson, a 6 junior.
However, Reed anticipates both
Wilson and Kramer will be
challenged by John Heinle, who
starred at Golden West Junior
College last season, setting new
marks for most yards passing in a
game, season and career.
Although the Wolfpack lost
Joe Mclntosh. who finished as
the school's second all-time
leading rusher, proven per-
formers still remain in Vince
Evans, Mike Miller and Ricky
Isom.
Evans, who led the Wolfpack
in rushing last season with 883
yards, will be the starter at the
running back position. He
became only the third running
back in N.C. State history to rush
for over 200 yards in a game, net-
ting 201 yards on 27 carries in last
season's 31-22 win over ECU.
This year's contest will be the
16th meeting between the two
schools with all the games being
played at suite's Carter-Finley
Stadium. The Wolfpack hold- an
11-4 advantage in the series with
the last Pit, e win com � I 983
bv a 22-16 margn
SH Texas State
Ficklen Stadium
ECU will play host to
Southwest Texas State the on-
ly non-Division I-A school on the
PirateC '85 schedule - on Sept.
14 in the ECU home opener.
The Bobcats, o the Gulf Star
Conference, are in their second
vear of playing Division l-AA,
after being a Division 11 power.
Southwest Texas State made
the adjustment in their initial
year o Division l-AA, compiling
a 7-4 overall record, but were a
ing 2-3 in league play
A- Southwest rexas State
enters the upcoming campaij
O'Hara is entertaining thoughts
ol an excellent season.
Right tackle Charlie Vatterott
and left tackle Kevin Mueth both
started last yeai foi the Bobcats,
along w ith guard loe (ihrisl and
center Mitch Davidson.
Quarterback David Longhof-
fer returns as well. After earning
the starting job in the fourth
game o the season, 1 onghoffei
passed foi 1,613 yards and seven
touchdowns, while leading the
Bobcats with 1,968 yards total of-
fense.
Joining 1 onghoffer in the
back field will be senior Eric Co-
ble and junior Rene Gonzalez.
Coble, a starter last year who
rushed foi 470 yards despite be-
that.
At noseguard, Mednck Ram-
bow saw action in a reserve roll
last year, but he struggled
through spring drills because ol
an appendectomy. However, in
juries could hamper TCI at
noseguard because depth is a ma-
)or problem at this position.
Although weak in two areas,
the Pirates have experience and
talent returning at the other areas
� it importance
On the defensive side ol the
line, the linebackers and secern
darv should prove to be a strong
point for the Bucs. The lineback-
ing core returns seniors Robert
Washington and Steve Jacobs,
juniors Bubba Waters and I arrv
Beri) with added help tor
sophomores Bruce Simpson and
John Brut.
Although the Pirates look to
have more talent then they did a
vear ago, it is uncertain how the
team will react to their extremely
difficult schedule. On the road,
the Pirates travel to Perm State,
North C aroiina State, Auburn,
LSU, Southern Mississippi and
Southwestern I ouisiana Visiting
Greenville in 1985 will be South
Carolina, 1983-national cham-
pion Miami-Florida, Tulsa, Tem-
ple and Southwest Texas State
No major changes are expected
from Baker and his new staff
either offensively or defensively
I he Pirates will once again run
the Cption-1 or "Freeze Optior
offense and 5-2 defense iti
down linemen and tw
linebackers). It ECU do
anything differently in 1985, u
will come via the air as Baker has
hopes o' throwing the ball more,
despite an inexperienced receiv-
ing corps and uncertainty at
quarterback.
last year's starting signal
caller Darrell Speed was moved
down to the second team after
Ron Jones displayed more pro-
mise during sprint drills
Offensively, the line is an-
chored by All-America candidate
I im Dumas, who should clear the
path for fourth-year starter Tony
Baker at tailback.
The Pirates had their first full-
scale scrimmage of the year last
Wednesday, and Baker was not
surprised at the results.
"It was a good scrimmmage
it was typical of a first-night
scrimmage he said. "We made
tar too many mistakes though. If
you make that many mistakes
you arc going to beat yourself.
and that's what we are going to
try and eliminate � beating
ourselves If an opponent beats
us that's another thing "
Still, Baker was pleased with
much of what he saw during the
scrimmage, especially the play ol
the defense.
"There were some good things
out there People flying around
and going to the ball on
defense the head coach said "I
was impressed with our first-team
defense. I thought they did a
good job, and we had some good
performances from some of our
iltensive players.
Among the bright spots for the
Pirate offense was a 64-yard pass
completion from Darrel Speed to
Chris McLawhorn. Senior kicker
Jeff Heath added two Field goals
in the scrimmage.
While FCC coach Baker was
not disheartened by the tact that
the defense seemed to be ahead of
the offense, he does feel the of-
fense needs to get better
"I was a little more pleased
with the way we threw the ball
Baker said, "But we still have a
long way to go
U will open the season on
sept. 7 in Carter-Finley Stadium
against N.C. State
Fssra Ialiaferro (23, shown here making a lackle against the Seminoles of Florida State last year, will help
the defense in stopping opponent ground attacks.
ing hobbled bv injuries,
sui gei on his foo in the11
season and should be 100 percent
by the time the season starts
I he receiving positions are
both manned bv experienced
veterans as the starters at both
flanker and split end return to
provide the sparks for the Bobcat
aerial attack.
Flanker Tony Woodley lias led
the team in receptions each o the
past two seasons, hauling in 19
passes last year for a 1 C5 average
per catch.
Split end Wayne Coffey led the
team in average gam per catch
last season, with 24.5 yards per
reception on 10 catches.
Coach O'Hara is looking for
improvement in his team's offen-
sive play this season and feels
that more consistency is what is
most needed.
ECU-State Tickets
Tickets for the EC1 -N.C.
State game to be played on Sept.
in Raleigh will be on sale for
two davs only, on Monday, Sept.
26, and Tuesday Sept 2 at the
Minges Coliseum Ticket Office.
Tickets will cost Si3, with a
two ticket maximum for each stu-
dent. Students must have a valid
ECU Identification card as well
as an activity card. The ticket of-
fice will be open from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. on both daw.
First-year ECU coach Art Baker gets his team fired up.
Penn State
Beaver Stadium
Penn State head coach Joe
Paterno returns 46 lettermen for
this his twentieth year at the helm
of the Nittany Lions, with
talented performers returning to
both sides of the ball.
Leading the way on offense
will be junior tailback D.J.
Dozier. The Virginia native rush-
ed for 691 yards and four
touchdowns last season, despite
being hampered by numerous in-
juries. Dozier will again be joined
in the Penn State backfield by
fullback Steve Smith, who rushed
for 398 yards and five
touchdowns last year.
The Nittany Lion running at-
tack will be counted on to relieve
some of the pressure on first year
starting quarterback John Shaf-
fer. Shaffer is the leading can-
didate to run the Nittany Lion at-
tack, as he completed 40 of
passing attempts in limited action
a year ago. Shaffer will need to
improve on his interception to
touchdown ratio, as last year he
threw seven interceptions to only
one touchdown pass
xpenenced piayers return at
the receiving positions, and
should also help the new Nittany
Lion quarterback. Split end Herb
Bellamy returns after catching 16
passes last season for a 19.1 per
catch average. The receiving
corps are further bolstered by the
return oi two veteran tight ends.
Dean DiMidio caught caught 11
balls last season, averaging 17
yards a catch. Brian Sil ering
also returns after hauling in eight
passes last season.
Three offensive lineman will
have to be replaced, but one of
those spots is expected to be filled
by former defensive tackle Todd
Moules. Also on the offensive
line will be senior center Keith
Radecic, who was a reserve last
fall before he was injured.
Penn State's offense scored 20
points or less in seven games last
year, but it was the defense that
caused the Nittany Lions to lose
three of their final four games.
The Lions surrendered 44 points
to Notre Dame and 31 to Pitt-
sburgh in two of the season-
ending lossses.
Nine starters return on defense
for Penn State, with safetv Ray
Isom leading a veteran secon-
dary. Isom had 82 tackle1 - tops
on the team last year .nu is one
of three returning starters in the
defensive backfield. Michael Zor-
dich, the hero back returns after
being named all-East last season.
The Lions will have to fill a
vacancy at one cornerback posi-
tion but senior Lance Hamilton
does return at the other corner
Hamilton was the third-leading
tackier on the team last season
with 74 stops.
Senior Shane Conlan returns to
lead an experienced group of
linebackers. He was the second-
leading tackier last season with 7
tackles while also garnering five
quarterback sacks. Senior Rogers
Alexander will step in at one
linebacker spot while fellow
senior Don Graham will fill the
other.
Defensive ends Bob White and
Don Ginnetti along with tackle
Mike Russo are all experienced
returners along the frontline.
Punter John Bruno also
returns for the Nittany Lions
after averaging 41.4 vards a kick
last season. Massimo Manca is
expected to handle the place kick-
ing duties, replacing the
graduated Nick Gancitano.
This year marks the first
meeting between the Nittany
Lions and the Pirates, as ECU
will travel to the state of Penn-
sylvania for the fourth year in a
row.
empie
Ficklen Stadium
With his team coming off a
winning season (6-5), Temple
coach Bruce Anans is going to be
hard pressed to repeat last year's
number of wins.
The Owls, who were 4-7 in
Arians first year, will be talented,
but they also will face a difficult
See HURRICANES, Page 2
H OR CHECK
V
I





28
I Mi
1 li K( INIAN
M ' il M 26. !H
Hurricanes Com
i
i
i
i
i
i
1



4
I
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
I
4
4
4
4
4
I

I
i
t

Continued from Page 27
schedule.
In the first tour weeks ol the
season. Temple will pla road
games at Boston College, Penn
State and ECU I hen onij home
game during that span will be
against defending national cham-
pion Brigham Young.
All-east running back Paul
Palmer will return, aftei leading
Icmple in rushing last veai with
�S5 yards.
while the quarterbacking posi-
tion is suspect, the Owls will have
one of the biggest offensive hues
in the school's history.
I ast year's quarterback I ee
Salt, who threw twice as man)
interceptions as he did
touchdowns last season, will have
to have a better year foi the Owls
to have a winning season.
Icmple ranked 2!si nationally
last year in total defense, but the
will have to replace some key pei
sonnel. Safety Anthony Young,
who led last vear's team in in-
terceptions with five, will have to
be replaced, but a talented group
of linebackers remain.
Ail-American linebacker "odd
Bowles, who led the team
tackles List year, along with Keith
Armstrong and Bob Pilkauskas
make the team deep at
linebacke;
Miami-(FLA)
Ficklen Stadium
The Miami Hurricanes will
come to Greenville this season I
the second time in the school's
history. However, one kev ingre-
dient to their success will be miss
mg.
Bernic Kosar, the quarterback
who guided Miami to a national
championship two short years
ago, decided to forgo a final year
ol eligibly at Miami, to play in
the Ml
Taking over for the all
everything Kosar will be junior
Vinny restaverde. The 6-5 New
York native completed 17 of 34
attempts last season in rather
limited action.
restaverde's inexperience may
be soothed somewhat by the
returning depth in the rest ot the
backfield. Melvin Bratton returns
to halfback while Alonzo
Highsmith will play fullback.
Highsmith was well on his way to
a thousand yard season last year,
when a knee injury sustained
against Maryland put him out for
the season. Highsmith ended the
rcai with �)6 yards rushing and
m. touchdowns in only nine
games.
Bratton come on after
Highsmith's injury, rushing tot
I34 yards and tour touchdowns
in Miami's memorable loss to
Boston College last year.
While Miami does return ex-
perienced performers in the
backtield, they are not so for-
tunate in the wide receive; posi
tion.
Gone are last year's starters
Eddie Brown and Sranlcv
Shakespeare, and it will be up to
lomore Brian Blades and
�man Michael Irvin to fill the
holes ar spin end and flankei
respectiv eh.
Graduation also decimated the
ranks in the offensive line as onl
one starter will return for the
Hurricanes in tackle Paul Ber-
tucelli.
Tight end Willie Smith is a pro-
ven performer - a second team
All America selection last year. It
is a good bet he will break the all
time receiving iecord for a tight
end at Miami before his career
ends.
The Hurricane attack will cer-
tainly miss Kosar, Brown,
Shakespeare and a veteran front
wall, so it figures to be up to the
ground game and a much malign-
ed defense to spark the team,
last year's defense caved in,
allowing 123 points in three
season ending losses to
Maryland, Boston College and
UCLA.
I he defense does return eight
starter" however, so there is some
talent returning to try and build
on. lackles Derwin Jones and
Kevin lagan will head up the
front wall, lagan is an All-
America candidate who ranked
first in sacks last year while also
leading all down linemen in
tackles with 51.
A defensive backfield that
wielded to a blitzkrieg oi enemy
air fire last year, will lie looking
to make amends tor last vear's
performance.
Free safety Darrel 1 ullington is
the leader ol the secondary. He
had live interceptions lasi year to
lead the team, and finished up
with 85 tackles, the second
highest total on the club. Starting
cornerback lolbert Bam. returns,
but the othei corner position will
be manned by inexperienced
lomore Bernie Blades.
The place kicking will be solid
Ficklen
as sophomore Greg Cox returns.
Cox led the team in scoring last
year with 82 points � a new
school record for points by a
kicker in a season.
ECU will be looking for their
first wm ever over the Hur-
ricanes, as the Pirates are wmiess
in three meetings.
J
SW Louisiana
Cajun Field
A lot of veterans return as 42
letterman, including 15 starters.
However, there are still questions
to be answered as the University
ol Southwest Louisiana prepares
tor the 1985 campaign.
The Cajuns go into the 1985
season with seven starters return-
ing on defense, six starters on of
tense and both kicking specialists
coinir" back.
See RAGIV, Page 29
Ragin'


The Jeff Heath 3i kicking Kame ill be a major weapon
RINGGOLD TOWER:
At The Campus'East Carolina Univ,
SAj t v O.HTKI UH11
� ' � '� f 7 ri
! ' ' ' �� Down t.
' - S A
i .
" �� " ' W . -r s
' ' - � � �
WARC PROPERTY E-
?�i
9'9 756 B1
STUDENT
SUPPLY STORE
PERSONA
Do ou neel
profession
� Cleaning don
� Pain-free restol
Robertarili
I rmersit Pro
608 t. 10th -
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by
East Carolina University

Ba ft
Dinn
One Stop Shopping For:
art supplies
bulletin board ideas
calculators
gift items
greek items
greeting cards
jerseys
leisure reading paperbacks
official ECU class rings
rainwear
room accessories
school supplies
shorts
sundries
sweatshirts and pants
t-shirts
textbooks
and . . .
much more
Used Book Savings Inventory
Shop Early & Save
Save 25 of book costs when
you buy used books!
We have the largest inventory of
used books in this area.
Shop early and save!
(.ourmel Seafood in a ti
Full Service
walking di
River bluff 4
Sightly
New menu com
Daih Lunch & Di
Rivergaie Shopping P
3101 E. 10th S
I'horu' 757-1 757
Watch for announcement in
the Sept. 3 issue of the East Caroli-
nian for information concerning
our new computer sales depart-
ment.
We accept Visa and Master Charge Bank Cards
Fall "Rush" Hours
Aug. 26-29
8:30 a.m7:00 p.m.
Steinbeck's
Two Kmi
Carolina Kasi M
The Si
100
Button Dol
ranoMrr�i Mall
Formal Wear





IHl t AM AkOl ISIAN
GL'STK m
29
Ragin' Cajuns Play Host To Pirate Gridders
&
( ontinued from page 2H
1 Robertson's team
'� eii last live games
at 6 5
ity linebackers, led
-� iin along Mth a
i ive secondary and a
ited running hacks
.test ques
luartei back,
people who
i
tmpbell is
only
. om
le I ajuns,
d vete

H major weapon.
4f()
WERS
but �as the team's leading rushei
two years ago when he scampered
foi 739 yards. Jackson only needs
42 yards to become I SI
careei rushing leadei
I he ol fensive line looks to be
strong, although last year's
leadei Chris Boudreaux
graduated. The fust unit starting
five should average 255 pounds
pei man, with tout seniors in the
group. I he leadei on the front
wall should be senior centei Dan
in Alexander, who was moved to
centei from tackle.
Heading up the defense will be
linebackers Steve Spinella and
chns lacob.s Spinella has led the
Ragin' Cajuns in tackles cash ol
the past two seasons 13 1 stops
last year), while Jacobs was se
cond on the team last yeai with
si tackles.
I he deter.su e secondary also
looks i be in good hands as three
static, s return this year, lunioi
Elton Slater returns to handle one
oi the cornerback spots aftei
making 2 tackles last season.
Mt hough there are seseral
familial faces around, the defen
sive front is in need ol some
rebuilding since both defensive
ends and stalwart defensive
tackle Charles "Gator" Bennett
have graduated
However two starters o return
as tackle kevm Sorice and
noseguard Scots Sible come hack
for then senioi seasons
I he kicking game should be
sound, as sophomore kickei
Patrick Broussard and senioi
puntei letiv Falgout are hack.
Falgout, w ho averaged 39.6 yards
per kick in his first three games
last year aftei a 40.3 average in
1983, vvas injured earlv in the
1984 season with a broken leg. It
tullv healed, Falgout should do a
good job with the punting shores.
Broussard had an erratic
freshman yeai in handling all the
( ajun placements, hitting onlv 10
ol 22 field goal attempts, hut he
did make all 2 of his extra point
attempts and should onlv gel bet-
ter a he gains more experience
South C arolina
Ficklen Stadium
South Carolina head coav I
Morris in ' as made a name foi
self bv impro ii ball
i � am at eer skhool he's
been associated with. "Sow he will
nv to keep his Gamecock foot-
ball team at the lottv heights they
achieved last season.
In his second vear ai South
( arolina, Morrison led his squad
to i lo 2 record - the best mark
ever achieved at Columbia, S.C.
The Gamecocks were on the
verge ol becoming the No. 1
Linked team in the nation, before
tailing to Navy in the next to last
game ol the regular season
Morrison returns 51 lettermen,
but graduation hit both the ol
tensive and defensive lines hard
Heading this year's offensive
front will be sophomore tackles
l)ru Minis and Buddy Quarles
a pair ol 290 pounders. Two-yeai
letterman Rav Carpenter will
man one guard spot while David
Poinsett occupies the other l'i
viding much needed experience
on the front wall will be senioi
centei I eonard Burton.
Heading the list ol returnees
are last year's quarterbacks Allan
Mitchell and Mike Hold Hold
was the relief specialist in 1984,
as the junior col leg transfer
ne ofl the bench to lead the
five wins for the
(iamecocks
i
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
� Cleaning done by the doctor
� Pain-tree restorative dentistry
Robertargill
I niversit Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenvile, NC
758-4927
WELCOME ECU STUDENTS
Stop in our downtown offices and introduce yourself
We look forward to professionally handling all your
travel needs
Ask about student travel
ski trips cruises holiday reservations
Our 1 4th vear serving ECU students and faculty
T);(
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC
319 Cotanche Street
Greenville, N C. 27834
Phone 757-0234
iry
osts when
ventory of
t in
laroli-
(rning
(part-
r.
a0.�60
Dinner Specials U h" H
� All Frames
The
pPTICAL
�ourmet Seafood in a fine dining atmosphere
t
Full Service Bar within
walking distance of
River bluff 4 p.m1 a.m.
Sightly
In Stock
I MUSI Dr
N NSEb
discou N � jood " " ��' -i �
! SOFT
CONTACTS
I � VrVfpair
I
tised spec ials
COUPON EXPiRES SEP'
I Ol PON rrMKISM.PI. 2"?. 1V85
1985 I w'lh coupon onlv
ew menu coming soon
Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials,
MonThurs. 5-10 FriSat. 5-11
Lunch Served MonFri. 11-2
Rivergate Shopping Plaza
3101 E. lOih Si.
Phone TT-1 T7
-i-
SUNGLASSES 30a'o OFF
1 ifh ihis coupon i
sk about our 2(1 Senior inen u e l"n �rr�nKe an ee exam for ou on
Ak About Our
20 Senior The
( itUfnk Discount ,
PALACE
P OPTICAL
703 Grvvnvtllr Blvd lAtionhomPlti CUn Sm 1 t KA Kralry
(�ryM H�nlt, Utn�cJ QptH.Hi)()p�ri S� jl) � m lo6pm Mon
Phone
756-4204
s


!T Jtembecfe,a
f MOTS SHOP
Steinbeck's Men's Shop
Two Fine Stores
Carolina East Mall � Downtown
The SERO
100 All Cotton
Button Down Collar
$29.00
Special
Natural Elegance!
ham Street Mall
formal Vear
752-7076
For the person ho loves the classics, this
Sero shin otters a true blending oi craft-
smanship, meticulous tailoring and excep
nonal materials The soft, natural fibers
��breathe" with you ,ind adapt to an
temperature for nil-season comfort
C arolina r ast Mall
Big & Tall ttopt.
756-6286
ECU - LET PIZZA HUT
DELIVER TO YOU
Fresh, Hot and Always Fast
Delivery Area: AH ECU Dorms
Cyprus Gardens Cannon Ct. Kings Row
College View Eastbroofc River Bluff
Cherry St. Forest Manor Village Green
VilMn Acres Tar River Estates Greenmill Run
l'ia tint keserves The Righl To Limit Delivery Area.
HOI RS: Sun. Thurs. 5:00-1:00, FriSat. 5:00-2:00
752-4445
East 10th St.
Greenville
Seniors rhomas Dendy and
Kent Hagood both return to the
Gamecock back field, aftei com-
bining tor 1,185 yards rushing
and 12 touchdowns last ear.
Senior spin end Eric Poole
returns to lead the receiving corps
after catching ten passes last
season tor an astronomical 2.1
yard average last tall
Much of last sear's success can
be attributed to the tact th.i! 25
seniors starred for the garnet and
black last season. On defense, the
secondary looks strong but the
rest ol the unit is an unknown
quanity.
Six regulars return to the "tire
ant" defense, with halt of those
returnees manning positions in
the secondary.
Senior Tom Guyton will lead
the defense from his end position
as he is the only senior on the
starting unit. rwo-year letterman
Willie Mcintee will fill the other
end position.
1 eadmg the lit I i kers m11 be
sophomorearl Hill, vho was
named to the fre hman All-
America team la I ea on Junior
Danny Miller and n ore-
Sam laylor will handle the duties
at the other lineha � lots
although neither has had
game experience
I he kicking II be an
the Game � uld not
worry both the
punter and kid rn from
last year's 10-2 squad lunioi
placekickei Scott Haglei hit eight
of 13 field goal was
perfect on all 4 ;
touchdow n ai I empi I om
O'O mnoi retui mdle the
punting dui � iftei
40.4 yard; kick in.
South arol : �
Greenville this year tor the first
time m the ton
5TH STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
W E REPAIR TOYOTA, HONDA. U
HAT. PORSCHr . VOLVO, DATSI V
LOTUS, MERCEDES, BMW AI DI
ND OTHERS
DIAL
758-1534
1007 E. 5TH
GREENVILLE
$�
v i � r� v��.�
s
We're All Natural
r�
L
0gmmtmmgg
It -
The Plaza
Greenville
756-3302
Checkthe
Bottom Line.
it comes down to this: the Kaypro 1 keeps
the high cost of computers in check.
The Kypro I is a complete wordprocessor and in-
cludes the ever popular Wordstar software
packages, reliable printer and all the cables and
disks to get you computing fast
The Kaypro I has two disk drives (400K each) to
create and store documents
The Kaypro l allows instant hookup of a vanen
of peripheral devices from printers to plotters to
Winchester hard drives for later expansions Check
ourary
It Out'
Check it out1
t $995
Open M-Th 10-8 � FriSat. 11-5
2007 S. Evans St Greenville 355-6687

11

X





M)
Ml I

l .
�- X
.
I � k
APVFPTISFD item POllCv
f they ,invrtiseci items is reouiren to D� readi .
ibM fo� s,vf in each Krogpr s.i� nn except .v
� 'ir.tiiy noted in this ,ia if we do run out o' .in item
. Mill otter you your choice of a comp.ir.ihif item
available reflecting the same savings or a ram
in " vuth h win entitle you to purchase the advertiy �
�� in at the .icivernsed price witnm 10 o.iys Limit ow
manufacturer s coupon per item
welcome
ATTENTION!
REGISTER NOW FOR
Free Pirate
Football Tickets
Kroger will give away 2 pairs of tickets
for each of the 5 Home Games. REGISTER EVERY WEEK!
Totino's Pizza
o
Wine Cooler
s339
Hotdog Sauce
$
Large Eggs
Luncheon Meats
99
All Meat
Wieners
SAVE
$178
BUY ONE
ET ONE
I
Smoked Sausage
$
f99
LYFP
Pork Spare Ribs
88
Mars,
J- Way
ONE-STOP SHOPPING
GE PRO 22D
Dial Power
Pro Dryer
. .
Scientific
Calculator
NJdVt
Colgate
Pump
s-19
Suave
Shampoo
s09
Suave
FOR SOF1 JKIN
Suave $
Lotion
�J09
Ba
St
I
Red Ji
Nectarir
49
Scot Tow
5
Whol
Milk
BOOKSTORE SI
��
FIR:
E
GLO





"NSl
K() VUCiI SI 2
C7I
49
ie Cooler
339
arge Eggs
65
e Cream
29
PPING
uave
otion
Colgate
Pump
'119
Suave
Shampoo
109
s-09
it� ms and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Aliquot l 198S
ents
y
w.
s
i
Red Jim
Nectarines
o
?
L S
v-

ROUNDTHECLOCK
RENTALS
Honeydew Melons

Ms!
Scot TowelsHot Dog Buns
Vl'cteo Movie
Centals
Mo Club Feeslj
5 24 Ho"r Service
Whole
Ruffles
Potato
Over 650 titles
Beta & VHS
INCLUDING.
,R,d0,�" 'C.ty Heal
�Cotton Club
Pol
"ct lead
Orrty
ONLY
'Rtol,h(.N(,rris
AND MANY MORE
DAY
RENTAL
'OTh
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
PLAYER RENTAL
pf
6f
0

oger
600 GREENVILLE BLVD
ONLY
PER DAY
BOOKSTORE SPECIALS
a
FIRST AMONG
EQUALS"
"FIERCE
EDEN"
"THE
GLORY GAME"
BY JANET DAILEY
$
(Ddiaitcssctu
s 1 s:
F POTATO
4R . . A
8-Pc. Fried
Chicken
$
499
�v
�2
o-
1295
Kaiser Rolls
BUY ONE
GET ONE
CHOCO. Ml HI!
I
Sugar
Cookies. .
V w
rill
I





S V.
32
'HI I M i AKOIIMAN i G si 26. 3
Imagine that you are a top
swimmer. You are an individual
with valuable marketable skills
that can essentially buy you an
education at a good university.
Why would you want to pick a
school (and swimming program)
like the one in Greenville, N.C
On the surface this seems like a
tough question, but talented high
school swimmers have been and
are finding themselves drawn to
ECU.
Their talent, combined with
sweat and dedication, have led to
a program that in good and
steadily improving "Our strong
recruiting during the last tour
vears is really starting to pav off
now ECU head coach Rick
Kobe said. "For the first time we
have a really solid veteran team
Solid is right. While most
teams hope for three or font
good returning seniors, the Pirate
men will field five.
"Seniors Kaut, Pittelli,
Hawkins, Cook and
Robaczewski will help give us the
depth and experience we'll need
to achieve our goals Kobe said.
Goals form the crux of Coach
Kobe's philosophy. "Nothing
with substance can ever be
achieved without a truly defined
goal Kobe continued.
His goals for the Pirates this
season are threefold: to have a
winning season, to win the Col-
onial Athletic Conference Cham-
pionships, and to qualify a swim-
mer or swimmers for the NCAA
The rapidh improving Pirate Swim team, is hoping to have qualifiers for the na
tionals this vear.
championships.
Kobe has also utilized goals in
recruiting, "lour years ago we
were basicalh trying to build an
entire team he said. "Now we
can use our recruiting dollars to
pick and choose swimmers who
arc good in our weaker areas
While lacking the large
recruiting budget- that some pro-
grams receive, ECU has ma
qualities that make it attrac i,
potential swimmers
The last two years have seen an
exceptional amount of incoming
talent at ECU. For instance
Bruce Brockschmidt, one of this
season's freshmen, led the men's
team, barely missing qualifying
for the nationals.
Although most of ECU's talent
comes from the Mid-Atlantic and
Florida areas, there are also peo-
ple on the team from throughout
the country, as well as other na-
tions. Due of Peru's best, Chema
I arranaga, made great contribu-
tions to the team during his vears
at E I
ECU has been drawing
talented swimmers and Kobe
makes it a point to get everything
out ol their ability. "We have no
right to be as fast as we are
Kobe said. What he means is that
the Pnates have exceeded
everyone's expectations in terms
of performance.
ECU's success over the past
two seasons if reflected in a 34-17
combined dual meet record
despite a modest budget i
parison with mam o
who are swimming rx�����
Pirates also had 2 qualil �
the nationals, whih
varsitv and 15 freshman
over this same period
While winning is I
ol every coach, Kobe find
other aspects
regarding rhe
ween the coa
make his dutie
thwhile.
"I really enjo
the team
course ever da) th
problem fot
ing the kids wit
is really sat;
my team are
fun to be around.
" That kind
through the tough
added, "but th
watching then � .
meets after
season
I I has an attractive campus
and many of its academic pro-
grams are highly rated nationally
In addition, the swimming pro-
gram has a good national reputa-
tion.
However, according to Kobe
what many recruits seem to like
about ECl is its people. "Once
recruits come and spend time
th the team, they usually like
ell that thev decide
is so

Welcome Back ECU"
Appreciation Special
At
the body shoppe

Exercise for Todav A man
Call or come : . I � a free workout
1530E� 14th Street
3 Mo. 57.w
(Reg. $72)
Bring in this ad for extra week with the om
ID. required). ' who,i sestet for 3 month f�
758-7564
1 Mo. $21.�
(Reg $28)
" �
The Plaza
Deli
7 -v
w Mfc
The Plaa Mai!
Greenville, N C
756 4024
The Plaza Deli
located ai I Hi PI
The Sew Concept In Deli's
We Otter:
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade and Orangade
Dailv specials Orders h Go
New Sandwiches
Pm M abbil and i si h hi
Visit Europe and Never 1 eave I be Deli
Good Music Good limes
I0AM-9PM 756-4024
Are H i Hu ing
Fun Yet?
Presents
5th Annual
"On the Lake"
'I i House
B I' : . Denial
Doug Clark & The Hot Nuts
Wednesday
August 28th, 1985
Vi
r or More i
'
8:00 - until
752-5149 or 77-l!W)
REMEMBER
WRDUW6.fMM
HASH
THF AMERICAN WA1
I Hi v-
SJ?m Program A ttracts Talented Individuals I Golde
swimmer V.in �� or, tol HMm jmmmmmtmmmmm- r, , w � ,
Southern Mississipp
Roberts Stadium
Tl
Sot.
pr- .
I Me
starters
Dejamettc
Lasi
Dq
ton

bacl
n
Enroll
Now Fot
Only
is our
CHAR
cast Carolina
iniaq service
ROILED CHICKEN
1 i � kU la W fc
14 Chicken
12 Chicken
Corn-on-the-Cob
Turkey or Roast Beef Sandwich
Beef-K-Bob
Carrot Cake
Beer, Wine, Wine Coolers
Rice, Stir Fry Veg.
Rice, Stir Fry Veg.
wPot Sal.
$2.25
$3.35
75C
$2.35
$2.99
EAT IN
or
TAKE OUT
Corner of 10th St & ChoHw Blvd
Op�n7Doys- 11 AM to 11PM
Phone:830-1530
� Aerobics
� Certified Aen
� Nutrition Ins'
By Licenl
� Social EventsI
Nights,
Call Lyn
Or Jim
Today
756-7







k m ii
VlJGUSl 26, 198!
33
ividuak
Golden Eagles Seek Renewal
Sou them V Ussissippi
Roberts Stadium
rhc misfortunes ol the
Southern Mississippi football
last yeai were nearh
al to those of ECl 1 he
lolden I agles entered the season
a 8 yeai in 1983 with I
1 ik . � eai motto
a have ' tppropriate last
. on hit-
' . 1 at this could be
Hattiesburg.
I ho Golden 1 agles lost 10
:ers, including tailback Sam
ette, defensive
I Byrd and
(iolden
:d the
")
&

q
� M.
rhree starting offensive
linemen return to the Southern
Miss lineup with 6-7, 275-pound
tackle Benny Draughn as the
mam anchor. I eft guard Chris
Haag and centei Ken Bentley,
both seniors, started last season.
I wo sophomores are expected to
till vacant line positions Kick
Slatei should start at one tackle
spot, while Hm Mailman will be
one o the guards.
Southern Miss averaged just 17
points a game las! yeai offensive
ly, and were especially anemic in
the first and fourth quarters �
when they scored just 68 points in
22 total quarters of pla
A veteran secondary will lead
the way for the Golden Eagle
dcensejStronii sal el 1 i.n Smith
enters his junior year with ex-
cellent credentials. He secured
105 total tackles last fall to lead
all defensive backs and his three
interceptions also led the defense
in that department. Senior cor-
nerbacks James Harris and Bobo
Cooper keep their starting posi-
tions and will provide a calming
influence on an otherwise young
defense.
Nose guard Tracy Oakley led
the Golden I agles in sacks last
year with five, and had a total of
68 tackles. He is the team's top
returning tackier, and should be
helped by fellow returning
starters Kip Smith and Greg
Dampeer at defensive tackle and
end respectively.
Placekicker Rex Banks hit all
18 PAT tries last year, while also
connecting on 16 of 23 field goal
attempts last year. However, the
punting duties are still up for
grabs with the spot yet to be
decided between a freshman or a
walk-on.
Auburn
Jordan-Hare Stadium
Former ECU coach Pat Dye
will try to continue his winning
ways at Auburn and from the
looks of things the Tigers will be
a power.
Dye coached the Pirates from
1974-79, posting a 48-18-1 record
along with a trip to the In-
See TIGERS, Page 35
Save-
A-Buck
ON THE BEST
STEAK AND
SALAD IN
TOWN
$ 1.00 OFF
STEAK HOUSE
Greenville, NC 27834
The Episcopal Student Fellowship
invites you to
A service of Holy Eucharist
5:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 28th
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th Street
The Rev. L.P. Houston, Celebrant
Jim Sims, Guitarist, Composer will be guest
artist for our service. Supper and first meeting
will follow the service. Any questions � Call
752-3482.
0NS0LIDATED
HEATRES
'Adults s2 oo
5:30
CHILDREN 1
ANYTIME J
BUCCANEER MOVIES
� 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
GHOST-
BUSTERS
X
7h
THFY'RE BACK FROM THf Gf? AVI
AND RfADY TO PARTY!
�ERETURN?$f
LIVING DEAD
e nighr of your
oo
FRIGHT
'NIGHTS
"SEX
FRI-SAT
LATE SHOW
Op�n 11 00 p A r
�UTS?

StOftt 1130
NO PASSES
gTx)
America's
Newest
Pom
ocnpfloofL
THE
Basic Concepts
of Staying in Shape
Special Student Rates
yj(
r
)
)
ICKEN
t
& . J
EAT IN
or
TAKE OUT
i Charles Blvd
Doys - 11 AM to 11 Pm
Phone: 830 1530
Enroll
Now For
Only
per month
No Contracts!
No Initiation Fee!
Enjoy Our Newly Renovated
FULL FA CILITY Co-Ed Club
� Aerobics
� Certified Aerobics Instructors
� Nutrition Instruction
By Licensed Nutritionist
� Social Events � Parties, Movie
Nights, Monday Night Footbal
Two Weight Rooms
Free Weights and Dynacam Machines
Private Dressing Rooms & Showers
Health Seminars by Leading Local
Professionals
� Steam Room
� Sauna
� Hot Mineral Whirlpool
� Theraputic Massage
Available
Call Lynn
Or Jim
Today Initial visit Free! THE
The Best Deal At The Best Club In
Town!
756-7991
iJAjIL
MEMBER!
SOUTHP ARK SHOPPING CENTER 1.1 .t .A.
&
A.H.A.
GREENVILLE, NC
��:

.
I :k � - -





34
rHbfcASIAROI NIn
�U OUST 26, ls8
�UK ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
2 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211 JAR VIS ST.
CORNER
3rd AND
JAR VIS ST
Inc.
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET,
KERR DRUGS
UNIVERSITY ECONO WASH
WELCOME BACK SUTDENTS AND FACULTY
. husv no�. but �e
. .hv' We know jou �� u ; ,���, Over-
Welcome Stuoe mlnotes�� - corner ofTh r iUe.
-�W E e onveMenUy oc�ud . �, downUw� �
ton's- We �rc . ks from t oa
sWmps. no ���"� � lfromhome-
on mone. e awa from ,
l0 Uhe von �o make ���� �� J,K�
r 100 discount. v�c
jourW oti and ice.
tification. our favorite beverages.
c�
day.
Sincerely yours
L J�nkln$
AftC�nftr
�r
4UfiL-
Overton
p.s.
�s Supermarket.
Oon t f out �nn
ine coupon to
receive your
tOo Discount
PEPSI COLA BUSCHBEER
2 LITER BOTTLE ST
PRICES EFFECTIVF THROUGH SAT! RDAY A,�nCT 28
99�
Limit two with $10.00
or more food order
Met. rftertlt ikni W�� �,
Limit 2 six-packs
OVERTON'S BREAD
Fresh Daily
Long Loaf
Hamburger or Hot Dog Buns
8 it. pkg.
j��rus
.AYMtS
BARTLES JAYMESrr
RARTLESjAYMES
Wine Cooler
FRITO LAYl
RUFFLES
7l2 oz. bag
I
Clip This Coupon
Triple Brand Soft Drinks
2 Liter Bottle
2S1.M
With this coupon and $10.00 or more food
order. Without coupon each 69$ � Limit 2
per customer. Expires 8-28-85.
Clip This Coupon-
Cold Power Detergent
42 oz. box
99
With this coupon and $i0.00 or more food
order. Without coupon $1.79. Limit one per
customer. Expires 8-28-85.
Clip This Coupon1
ECU 10 DISCOUNT
On .11 foe mtm 0VCT
��& �w of"r or �-� -
Name
ID No.
Tigers
oniinuxl train
dependence H
to coach at v .
before lakinj
joh
Since Dye
I9H1 his
games while l�
"oh inn . ,� � �
Dye's record
better .is ubui
favorite
Southea: u
have even I
nationa I an
I he Sfxirrmf ,�
Spnrrs

will he a
I eadui the �a ,
senior h
contcndei I
I �
In I
Jackson has
wnd' an $72
yard a
I at kson
Auburn backl
starlet i
mar; the
ul
wishbi
I-forma
yards lasi ��:
yards . �� � .
V . � . .
Washing
season s
asi sea
1.202 .
more H
only
while throw � .
tions Redsl
and red
V alder: are
Pair u
hain
Palei
The Plaza
Open 8:30 am
9:00 p.m.





NG
RNER
AND
VIS ST
TY
Summit
Jarvis


-i 28
RITO LAY!
RUFFLES
bay
DISCOUNT
over $10.00 Present
for lOo discount on
n not valid in conjunc-
�ffer or discount. Kx-
Tigers Look Strong
IHI I AM AKOI INKS . I (.1 SI 2fr IVM
5
1 ontiniifd from Page 3
dependence Bowl fve lefl ECU
10 coach at Wyoming 101 a yeai
before taking ovci the Auburn
10b
Since Dye started at uburn in
1981 tus teams have �.n m
games while losing onl u, foi a
'OS winning percentage
Dye's record should onl goi
bettet as uburn is the preseason
favorite in the rugged
Siutheastern Conference, and
have even been picked to win the
national championship b both
I he portmg Sews and Inside
Sports
nchoring uburn's attack
vmII bo a veteran 1 igei offense
i eading the wa will be standout
senioi Bo Jackson a leading
lontendet lot the l85 Heisman
1 roph
In his three years at Aubui n,
lackson has rushed foi 2.517
vards on )?2 canies foi a 6 S
vaid aeiage nei cai 1
lackson is oined 111 the
Xuburn backfield b returning
starlet 1 ommie gee gee will
man the fullback position as
�Xuburn has abandoned the
w ishbone in fa 01 ol t he
I formation We gamed 4Vi
vards iasi season, averaging fixe
vards a carry.
v quarterback, erratu I'ai
ashington returns foi his senioi
season Washington started even
came last season, throwing '01
1.202 yards and rushing foi 1S(S
However, he completed
lou ' ouchdovv n passes.
le throwing nine intercep
tions Redshirl junioi Jefl Burgei
redshirt freshman Bobbv
alden are the back ups
1 he receiving corps will be in
pood shape as both Freddv,
Weygand and liev Gainous
return. Weygand caught 12
passes last veai and averaged 24 s
vards a reception Gainous nabb
ed I 5 passes last yeai
I wo seniors will man the ligh
tend position as Jefl Parks and
Ron Middleton teamed up foi ll
receptions last yeai
Steve Wallace, who was in
mied Iasi year, and all SEC selec-
tion Jefl I ot return to anchoi the
Ko Jackson
offensive line Ben lamburello
iet urns al center and Yann
Cowarl will stari at guard this
season, after being moved from
center in the spring.
Auburn returns 19 lettermen
on defense, but just six of those
started last fall on a unit that Dye
was not totally pleased with.
"We have a lot of it's on
defense, but I don't mind having
its as long as we have some
answers Dye said. "I don't
mmd having questions as long as
the answers are there. If you have
questions without the answers be-
ing there, then you have pro
blems "
I wo people that Dye is coun-
ting on the answer some of the
questions are on the defensive
hue Nose guard Harold Hallman
recorded 130 tackles last season,
while tackle Gerald Williams col-
lected 123 stops.
Junioi Ben McCurdy returns
to luad the linebacker spot after
making 85 tackles last fall. Ed
wortl Phillips, formerly a defen-
sive lineman is expected to get the
nod at the other linebackmg spot.
�Xubuin's secondary returns
three starters m the secondarv
with both cornerbacks returning.
Kevin Porter and Jonathon
Robinson return along with
strong safety Arthur Johnson,
lohnson was the leading tackier
among all of the defensive backs
last season, and is evtremlv
talented .11 forcing on run plays.
I he free safet) position is up
foi grabs with lorn Powell. John
Dobbs And Keith Grenn, and all
could posiblv get playing time.
Puntei I ewis Colbert returns
Set II lA. Page 3ft
New Schwinn Sprint
breaks through. $I4995
fully assembled and ready to ride
Earth Cruiser
B1CYC1 KPOSl, inc.
53(K otanche St.
Greenville, INC 27854
M 1 jl H VI9)757-3ol6
5$ PEUGEOT
10 discount on all accessories
with purchase of bicycle
georges
hair designers
The Plaza
Open 8:30 a.m.
9:00 p.m.
Pale isn't your color.
You kn w you k K k end feel bettor when
you re tan. And here's the easiest,
most sensible way to be tan all year
long KLAF SUM OVA Sun Systems
are designed for quick, even, comfort
able suntanning. The kind of tanning
you can have confidence in.
756-6200
Get Your
PIRATE
PRIDE
'85
Tickets Today
Call the Sigma Nu House
758-7640
Or Get Your Tickets In
Front Of
The Student Store
All Tickets$1.00
Bond's
Come By And See Why Bond's
Is Your 1 Sporting (,uods Store
218 Arlington Blvd
Greenville 756-6001
A
SPORTING GOODS
Back To Shcool Summer Clearance
SALE!
Greek Jerseys
� $10.95 Plain
� Si2.95 Single Color Letters
� S14.95 Double Color Letters
Pocketed Running Shorts
Russell Coaches Shorts
Reg. $10.95
Now $6.95
$14.95
Ashai Canvas Tennis Shoes Reg. $24.95 Now $19.95
Heavy Hands � Hand Held Weights Reg. $19.95 Now $14.95
Topsider Shoes All Styles 10 to 407o Off
All Tennis Rackets 20 Off
We Have a Large Selection of Athletic
Shoes � Values to $62.95 Now Only $15.00 Pair
Drop By and See
Why Bond's is
East Carolina's
NO. 1 Sporting
Goods Store
-� , . ; . . v . ' ' I f.
A





36
rHF I ASI C'ARoi IMAS
mm 26, ih
Jifea Gets New Coach
( ontinued from Page 35
tor his third season as Tiger
punter after averaging 40 yards a
kick. The place kicking chores
are up for grabs among Chris
Knapp and John Ellis, two walk-
ons, and Chris Johnson a
freshman.
Although there are some ques-
tion marks on this year's Tiger
squad. Dye is optimistic about his
team's chances
"We're going into our fifth
sear at Auburn and I'm very ex-
cited about this year Dye said.
"This football team has a lot of
potential, but you know what
potential is ' that's all it is until it
produces "
season's rVIVC Newcomer of the
Year Gordon Brown Brown,
who averaged 6.3 yards per carrv
rushed tor 995 yards and six
touchdowns while finishing as the
team's third leading receiver
1 he defensive outlook isn't as
optimistic, since just six regulars
return. The secondary has several
holes to fill, while the outside
linebackers are untested. The line
is anchored b two AJ1-MVC
selections. Joe Di.xon, the team's
leading sacker is scheduled to
Mart at nose guard, while Kevin
Lilly returns at tackle.
rulsa has an exceptional kick-
ing game. Senior Jason Staurov-
sky handles the placement duties,
while quarterback Stephenson
doubles as the team's punter.
Staurovsky connected on 16 of 24
field-goal attempts and 27 of 28
extra-point tries last season.
T���TTT-TI111111
art j( coetcro hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET1
GREENVILLE. NLC. 27834
752-0688
Your One Stop Store
For Everything Creative
linn in
m
m
ulsa
Ficklen Stadium
After a very successful stint as
both athletic director and head
football coach at the University
of Tulsa, John Cooper finally
decided it was time for a change.
So when the Arizona State head
coaching job opened up, he
jumped at the opportunity �
leaving Tulsa without a head
coach at a very late date.
The offensive minded mentor
should enjoy his stay at Tulsa.
The team has nine starters back
on offense, with plenty of depth
also available.
A battle for the starting
quarterback position is shaping
up between a pair of juniors.
Steve Gage, the 1983 Missouri
alley Conference Newcomer of
the Year, suffered a broken jaw
last year against Oklahoma State
earlv las; season, opening up the
quanerbacking position to Richie"
Stephenson. The 5-11 Stephenson
never relinquished the starting
role even when Gage returned
one month later. Stephenson
completed 70 of 138 attempts foi
1.134 yards d-r.A sev en
touchdowns, while Gage hit on
24 of 55 aerials for 319 ards and
two scores.
Bask to lead the (iolden Hur-
ricane ground attack is lasr
JB

Brad Thomas (57) tamed the starting position at riht Kuard with an
exceptional spring practice. I h�mas �as named the team's most im-
proved offensive player during spring drills.
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
PET
VILLAGE
We Carry A Complete
Line of Dog, Cat, and
Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and
financing is available
511 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 756-9222
We Offer a Complete Line of
Camera Supplies and Equipment.
Photofinishing by Eastman Kodak
48 Hour Kodak Slide Service
24 Hour Kodacolor Service
by Colorcraft
Nikon and Canon Cameras
Lenses, and Accessories
A Complete Line of Kodo-
Film, Equipment and Supplies
Kodak, Agfa, and llford. Photo Papers
We Offer the Best Selection of
Art Supplies in the East
Supplies for the Student
Amateur, and Professional
Graphic Supplies by Letraset,
Zipatone, Tacrype, Alvin,
Decadry, E-Z Letter, and many more.
Custom Framing
Drafting Supplies
Largest Selection of Mat Board
Artist Boards and Artist Papers In the East
Ready Made Frames and Framing Supplies
Framed and Unframed Posters and Prints
Expert,
has sij
a r e I a
teari
the B .
Mr
ma; �
led ��
Mik. B'
:
this 5
( �
��
Lassale.
Because quiet
elegance is
his style.
�� remarkably thin profile u
deliberate!) simple design .
richness is in the gleam oi gold
tone In that Lassak perfection
of finish that can't be matched
In the luxury of commanding the
highest quart performance A
girt par excellence par elegance
Lassale I he heritage is obvious
Video Caj
V
$24.95 LJ
Low R
For Members
No
Of
$5.00
$5.00 O





SMALL SPACl
JUST
Not Good ��


� � ?
Get down to business fasten
With the BA-35.
( Beefburger
. Stroganoff
JUST $1.99
Floyd G. Robinson's Jewelers
Evans Street Mall
758-2452
Seiko Time Corp 1985
" 'hi res i �ne thing ! usiness
students have always needed
this is u m arfordahlt
ness-i inented i iK nut, i
I he fexas Instrument
BA-5, the Student Businev
Am ilysl
Its huih m husiness
formulas h r you p, it. rm
11 mpln ,iul rinanc i .
accounting and statistic il
fun rions the ones th it
usuall require a lot of rime professors helj
and ,i stack o reference hooks, ro help �� i -
like present and future value ol calculator and
Hi. uhrii ins, im�ri i �
i i u
i �
1 , , " - leni
spend les i
ind mi r nn .
keysrt ke ral
i mam

To Go S2 2 9
Not Good with oth si
PEPPI S PIZZA DEN 42



1 ne i ak ulati r is j
the k k i.jr
' hook that follou m
business v, iurs - 1
nuiysc Cin - pn
. Texas
Instruments
reating
ind sen ices 1 �
'i
LASAGNE
JUST $1.99

To Go S2 29
Not Good with other J





mm Ham
421 . � � .

Bus One Pia at Regular P,
of Same Value or Less FRLI
an other Specials Offe' e

I






hop
3TREET
11 11
IHfcf AS I CAROI IMAS
AUGUST !fe, 19M
31
eative
Line of
juipment
3 QI
)to Papers
lection of
w tclSt
Experienced Veterans To Lead Pirate Team
C I eoli COacfl Rnh MflmlL- I��v n�� �� c m . . j . .
ECU golf coacft Bob Hdmick
as signed six goiters to letters-
t intent. Included among the six
are two members of the North
( arolina state championship
earn and a transfer student from
he Big light.
Mike Nadau and John Chap-
nan, both of Raleigh Millbrook,
led then squad to the team title as
'�'
more.
Mike Bradle
nished in the top five in-
duall) at the state high school
irnament. Chapman also cap-
d lirsi place in the North
e Golf Championship earliei
is summer
Chris Winkel, a native of
vlgoona, la . comes to E( I
the Universit ol Arkansas.
tgl Winkel is a transfer, he
be .1 freshn . ibilitv wise
ill be eligible to pla in the
Jeff Davis of Sycamore, 111
Pat King of Doylestown, Pa
and Jon Decker of Black Moun-
tain, N.C. round out the list of
incoming players.
ECU coach Helmick is pleased
with his incoming freshmen and
feels some will make an im-
mediate contribution to the team.
"1 think John Chapman,
Michael Nadau and Chris Winkel
will all be excellent additions to
our team he said. "All of them
could possibly see action in the
fall next year
Helmick is excited about the
prospects for the upcoming
season with the freshmen signees
providing depth to go with some
talented holdovers.
All-ECAC South performer
Mark Arcilesi returns along with
Mike Bradley, the team's MVP
the past two seasons, and Paul
Steelman. Arcilesi, Bradley and
Steelman will all be juniors with
two years of eligibility remainig.
Other returning golfers include
sophomores David McKenie and
Cris Rilev. along with Kelly
Stimart.
The Pirates will play in four
tournaments in the fall which will
include some of the regions top
golfing schools
ECU will compete in the
MacGregor Golf Classic in
Pickens, SC; the John Ryan
Memorial Golf Tournament
hosted by Duke University, the
Wolfpack Collegiate Invitational
and the UNC-Wilmington fall

1 K r
m J�
Invitational.
"I'm looking forward to get-
ting into our fall schedule
Helmick said. "We'll try to get in
as much practice time as possible
and experiment with the line-ups,
getting everybody some tourna-
ment experience
Helmick says his team has the
ability to have a good season and
is expecting good things from his
squad.
"We'll be as talented as we've
ever been, but you can't place
talent on the scoreboard he
said. "You must produce " which
is where we've failed in the past "
One ke area tor the Pirates
this fall is that they will have
some talented upperclassmc
lead the way for the incoming
freshmen.
"We tun e t hree strong
elements returning from last
vear's team ' and the will h
to carry us he continued, "f he-
remaining three spots will be
determined by how everybody
plays when they come in
Paul Steelman is one of three juniors expected to lead the Pirate golfer,
this fail.
3K
WELCOME ECU STUDENTS
catholic newman center
east Carolina university
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919)752 4216
fat the foot of College Hilli
Serving the spiritual and social needs of the ECU campus
SUNDAY"ASS 11 30 a m - Biology Lecture Ha i rn 103 -
9 00 p m Newman Center
Irs in the East
itng Supplies
rs and Prints
Video Cassette Movie Rentals
VHS & BETA
$24.95 Lifetime Membership
'tides first two overnight rentals)
Low Rental Rates
For Members and Nonmembers
No deposit required wfh
proper identification.
Rivergate Shopping Center
3101 E 10th St 758 5166
Next to Winn Dixie
Mon Thurs & Sat 10 30 AAA 7 30 PM
Fri 10 30 AM 9 00 PM
COUPON
- SB
$5.00
Video Search
Rivergate Shopping Center
S5.0O
$5.00 OFF
Membership
iness faster.
IA-35.
Texas
Instruments



SMALL SPAGHETTI PEPPI
JUST $1.99



With this Coupon
Regular Price S3 35

Not Good with other Spaghetti Peppi Specials



V Barnes Diamond Gallery
1 1 I) . Il V 4 .11
$3 Pin Plata Mall
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
(919)756 6696
yizJA



it






Beefburger
Stroganoff
JUST $1.99
-To Go S2.29-
With this coupon
Regular Price $3 35
EXPIRES JULY 31 1986
Not Good with other Stroganoff Specials
PEPPI S PIZZA DEN. 421 Greenville Blvd.

it


it



LASAGNE
JUST $1.99
�To Co S2.29�
Not Good with other Lasagne Specials

With this Coupon
(Regular Price $3.35) �
EXPIRES JULY 31. 1986




2 For 1 I
Special

(Pizza Only)
Buy One Pia at Regular Price and Get Another
of Same Value or Less FREE! Not Good with
any other Specials. Offer expires July 31, 1986.

R'
121 GreenviPe B
Our selection of diamonds for him or her would please anyone.
Stop by soon and let our knowledgeable sales staff assist you in
your purchase.
Ladies I .01 Round
Brilliant Cut Diamond
iVS2 ifity Witl . I Color In M Korat Whit Gold Or Yellow Gold
Reg $8950 00
SaleS5500�0
Ladies 14 Karat
Yellow Gold Or White Gold
Diamond Insert
30 Carat Total Weight
Reg $950.00
Sale$550��
tL
Ladies 1 Carat Marquise Shape
Diamond Ring
Total Weight I Carat In 14 Ka-al Yellow Gold
Reg $1665.00
$
Sale
1050
00

Gent's Diamond
Cluster
In 14 Karat Yellow Or White Gold
Solid Back. Heavyweight Beautiful
Diamonds
Reg $2675 00
Gent's Diamond
Gent's 3
Diamond Ring
Cluster
In 14 Karat Yellow Gold With Nugget
Design Sides 50 Carat Total Weight 14 Kardt Yell� Gold Wl,n Solid 34
Closed Back Total Weight 1 Carat
Reg $2040 00 Re9 $335000
Sale
$
1399
00
$
Sale
1275
00
$
Sale
1799
00
Back to School Special
Ladies C. Link bracelet in 14 Carat Yellow Gold
Regular $45.00 now only
$12.99
Ears Pierced Free
You pay only $2.99 for the Earrings
harm shargi vIsA AMPRICAN rkPRTSs
jBarnes

And Diamond Gallery
Hour 10 9 Mun Sat Closed Sunday
GREENVILLE KIHSTOH& JACKSONVILLE
h





38
Hl I VST( R() iman n4s i'
Pirates End Regular Season In LSU Bayou
hrs?iiu.r,11 s, sjve fronI will �, defensive end
be the final opponeni foi 1I
this season, as the Pirates wil
travel to Baton Rouge to haul
the figers where I si owns a inebackii
and he will be expected to provide
veteran leadership. All merica
Kail Wilson. I he hefty 6 5, 255
s -95-15 record foi a 721 winn
ing percentage.
Second yeai head coach Bill
rnsbarget did nothing to hurt
that winning percentage in his in-
itial season at the helm of the
1 SI football program. I he
I igers went 5 1 al home and
finished up 8-2 1 in . ulai
season as the earned a posi
season trip to the Sugai Bowl.
' s N- . k.i in
Sugai Bout, hui nevertheless it
was quite a turn around foi a
team thai weir winless in
Southeastern t onference the yeai
before. Getting back to the Sugai
Bowl will be a difficult task
rnsbargei and his Bei
I igei s. as there are some hol
till
1 SI will be �
the entire offensive line as .
one oar rer returns I
(6-4, 248) will pro
with some
the
the other corner position
m b� ESTiTJirSSK!? rT4r?s 5fS�5SS,Si
howi�a�pda'�ul S,t ��r 'VJr; n,remel de
positions and is being counted on
to play up to his vast potential
1 eading the wa on the defen
Welcome Back Students
But.
�' irmi
Smitl m
tackle Ka B .
step in w here Sn
Nachi Mberj
Mela
centei and i .
respeci vel
ha e plei � f it ii
The rigei
bad �
I Gai
returning startei
sive side - '
bona
Heisman I
R . �
i H
mmi V �tlTllllllSE MIMA"
Tr, TO WALL PRICE
�.ei �
oacii i ikjeu
,n a tree boat m
otor and trailer.
Wina"e mielslt Floating
sailboat, or Coke �b , in y0ur
Sulrules'and entry forms.
703 GREt
HVILLE BOULtMRD
G?
OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN SUNDAYS 8f
w 10
PM
HELLMANN S
U.S. -1
Bat
rt vs v
�r I r neon
mayonnaise white Potatoes Ground Beef
MARKET FRESH
I SI -
betore his
Wicker sham l
5 lbs. or
more
HUNT'S
ii as
bai ���' ' James become
i SI
wide n gra
ker Randy Mage tun
Magee teej
as d 19.5 yard pei
catch las; season.
Defensiveh. the 1 ij,
hae ai resting
young, yet expei
Seven starters return foi i
sbarger, with six of those
either being soj
juniors.
Inside linel � awn B . �
is the onh senior �- -
Ketchup
30c
32 oz.
btl.
�' Nf " � � A �
68
C
ZESTY
Yellow Onions
0
SAVE
69
�r
���� i
RECONDITIONED &
NEW TELEPHONES
MINIWALL
jM U-TOUCH
AT imJk Recond
r (5? S36.93
New
$53.25
WAREHOUSE PRICES
JANE PARKER
HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog Buns
3
bag
lb.
59
lb.
GROUNDFRES-
US DA. CHOICE
T-Bone Steak
WAREHOUSE PRICES
COBLE
5 SAVE
2, 34cor
4 .

3.100
3 Pkgs. f
Ice Cream
SAVE
50c
09
TRENDLINE
WALL
.IMIT THREE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 OC OR MORE PURCHASE
IRAPE am OR
Grape Jelly 1
l EMON LIME -ORANGE -FRUIT PUNCH ��
Gatorade j2b� 9C
HEINZ
5 oi
btl
14 Ol
pkg
96c
-53
PAIR'S
107 Trade St �756 2291
Mon-Fn
8 30-5 30
Saturday
8 30 12 30
57 Sauce
FRUIT 4 FIBER
Post Cereal
KRAFT DINNERS
Macaroni &
Cheese �,snr. -
i, CM 2 f pkgs
EIGHT O CLOCK �- "
Instant Coffee �
LO CAL SWEETNER
Equal Packets
HARVEST BLFND- VINE YARD BL END � APPi GRAPf
Welch Orchard �ar
SAVE ON
Gain Detergent p- 209
NEWBORN (66 CT.) � LARGE (33 CT� MEDIUM (48 CT i
EXTRA ABSORBENT (40 CT) 8U1
' NT
kRAF t SHARP
Cheddar Cheese
12 gal.
ctn.
99
WAREHOUSE PRICES
U.S.DA CHOICE
Cubed Steak
8 oz
pkg
SPRt�C
Blue Ribbon
nny DELKJH1
Citrus Punch
TEXAS STYLE BUTTER Fl AVOR
A&P Biscuits
FROZEN
3
pkg
lb
64 01
cm
2
6 oz
cans
-59
J39kjj
-J09Ky
39cMQ
PRODUCE SPECIALS
REGULAR-LIGHT
ctn of
6
12 oz
cans
TAYLOR
6 oz
100 cl
pkg
SAVE
4
Totino's
Pizza
BANQUET
Cream Pie
APPLE�BLACKBERRY�STRAWBERRY
Pet Cobbler
BANQUET
Fried Chicken
SENECA FROZEN
Apple Juice
n ot
Dtg
14 oi
pkg
6 oi
pkg
2oi
3kg
can
Budweiser Beer
249
California Cellars
299
GENERAL MERCHANDISE SPECIALS
10 . x 8 WIDE RULE
5 HOLE
Filler
Paper
DELI SPECIALS
sheets
Huggies
Diapers
X'M
swt
A0C
W c Vour
f .� Choice
8
62
PACKERS LABEL
Frozen
Potatoes
LONGACRE
t- fe 990
Turkey Bologna
QUALITY
Boiled Ham
lb
99c
297
m
Ca
Su
��'��"

B
WEP
BUY
A
w.
B
COIN
�� i





Bayou
-
13
ypStORfc
KITH
M&NT MOSJ
nd Beef
88c
lie 5I63K
978
b.
CHOICE
bed Steak
IiiTTm
98

Iweiser Beer
249
Ifornia Cellars
299
IIDE RULE
ir
59
C
DELI SPECIALS
Bologna
Ham
lb
99c
297
IHf i ASfAKOI.I.MAN AUGUST 26, 1985
1985 ECL
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
bept.
Sept
Sept.
Sepi
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov
No
Dec.
14
21
28
S
12
5
16
at N.C. Stale
S rEXAS STATE
at Penn State
rEMPi i
Ml AM Id I )(Homecoming)
at Southwestern Louisiana
SOUTH CAROI 1NA
at Southern Mississippi
at Auburn
III SA (Shrine Dav)
at I SI
7:00 pm
7:00 pm
1:30 pm
7:00 pm
2:00 pm
4:00 pm CT
1:30 pm
6:00 pm CT
1:00 pm CT
1:30 pm
7:00 pm CT
L
Catch Pirate Pride!
Support The Pirates
WE
BUY & SELL
WE PAY CASH ON THE SPOT
BUY USED AND ANTIQUES
AND SAVE
FURNITURE
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
TV'SANDSTEREOS
APPLIANCES
(Large 8. Small)
SILVER, GOLD
& Collector Coins
WATCHES, CAMERAS,
BINOCULARS, ETC.
COIN AND RING MAN
DOWNTOWN
�fiU
jrs
v&�&
PEELER'S
SPORTS AND TROPHY
"DOWNTOWN
GREEK JERSEYS
SHORT SLEEVE JACKETS
ONLY $10.95
DOUBLE LETTERS$1.50ea.
SINGLE LETTERS75
-LETTERS FOR SHORTS-
2" SEW-ON GREEK LETTERS
$1.00ea.
2" IRON-ON GREEK LETTERS
.50 ea.
ORDER ALL YOUR FOOTBALL, BASKETBALL
SOFTBALL JERSEYS, HATS, ECT FROM
EAST CAROLINA'S NO. 1 SPORTING GOODS STORE
"PEELER'S SPORTS AND TROPHY"
210-212 EAST 5TH STREET
GREENVILLE, NC
(919)758-3996
THISCARDENTITLES
�STUDENTS ATHLETE TO A
i 10 DISCOUNT
FOR ATHLETIC SHOES






40
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUS1 26
l85
OUR BIGGEST "USEDM
TEXTBOOK INVENTORY
EVER!
IENCE
i
The University Book Exchange
Downtown Greenville
is Your
Complete College Store
Used Textbooks
New Textbooks
ECU Sportswear
Plain Sportswear
Greeting Cards
Cliff & Monarch Notes
School Supplies
Stationery
Computer Supplies
SHOP EARLY FOR BIGGEST
SELECTION OF USED
TEXTBOOKS!
Dorm Supplies
Posters
Reference Books
Calendars
Art Supplies
Photofinishing
Photo Supplies
Graphic Supplies
Cameras
Open Tonight
Tueday and Wednesday
til 9:00 PM
U.B.Ei
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.





ILMMrW
W1WW
ugiM 1985
lf� Paul's
New Era Beginning Under Baker
ECU tool bail has officially entered
a new era under the direction of first-
head coach Art Hake:
With six new assistants and one ol
the toughest schedules in the nation,
the Pirates hope to recapture the
ton: tha drove them to an 8-3 rei
rop 2o ranking during the 1983
season
Baker will lead the Pirates it: 1985
majot role in EC L"s
successful 1983 season I ha' yeai saw
Bake in the role ol associate head
id ai d �ffensive coordinator, hut
985 will mai k tl
een a
tte level His
third time Bakei
i � �n Mi
ie v itadel
� u it pi i
ti ida N'
Bake-
1985, a 3 le
and i ?� 1
� assista
� back c tat h
ate's Bobby Bowden
rits a young squad in
ttei men were lost from
last year's 2-9 club.
I've always liked a challenge
Bak� "Maybe thai goes along
with being short (5-8), but 1 believe
the was you accomplish things that
sou couldn't otherwise is through
togetherness relationships you
develop in a family-type situation
Baker advocates an option offense
and a strong defense, but said that
team unity is the key ingredient in
making this a successful year for his
ites.
"Whether we win or lose is going
to depend on the values we gain by
being a close football team EC I "�
rookie coach emphasized. "You
become a good football team when
people start giving up then in-
dividuality. With the schedule we
have, that's our only chance to ac
compiish something good and wor-
thwile this year
Forty-one lettermen return from
last year's squad, including a number
o people on each side of the ball who
started at some point during the 1984
campaign. But inexperience looms in
two critical areas � wide receiver and
the interior defensive line.
"It just means we have a much
harder task Baker said of his
receiver dilemma. "In order to have a
quality passing game you have got to
have quality receivers, and we simplv
don't have that. It's going to take a
while to develop, because al the pre
sent time we don't have the speed,
ability, experience or talent to really
threaten people with the passing
game
Defensively, the Pirates are just as
inexperienced at the tackle
noseguard positions. 1 eon Hall
David Plum are the only players with
Closing in on the Record
Senior running back Tony Baker picks up tough yardage against Florida State.
The High Point native needs 1,017 yards to overtake Carlester Grumpier and
become ECl"s all-time leading rusher.
anv experience a! tackle, and
thin after that
noseguard, Medrick Rainbow
saw action in a reserve roll la
but he struggled thi ipring drills
because ol an appendectomy. Depth
;s also a majoi problem at tl
Although weak in two area the
ive experience and
returning at th ate
oi importance.
( it fensix ely . 'Me Sine i
Ml mei
who should cleai I
vca- startei I ony Bak � ick.
n the defensive s.de �' the I
trie linebackers and secondary she
be able k up the pieces in I
event that the defensive front does
improve ovei tl
L'aM'ii
Although the Pirates
more talent then they did a yeai ago,
n is uncertain how the team will re
to thier extremely difficult schedule.
On the road, the Pirates 'ravel to
Penn Slate, North Carolina S;
Auburn, 1ST. Southern Mississ
and Southwestern I ouisiana V
Greenville in 1985 will be S -
Carolina, 198.1 national champion
Miami-Florida, Tulsa, Temple
Southwest Texas State
No majoi changes arc expected
from Baker and his new statt either
offensively or defensively. The
Pirates will once again run the
Option I or "Freeze Option" offense
and 5-2 defense. It Tel does
anything differently in 1985, it will
come via the air as Baker has hopes ol
throwing the ball more despite an in-
experienced receiving corps and
uncertainty at quarterback
last year's starting signal callei
Darrell Speed was moved down to the
second team after Ron Jones
displayed more pomise during sprint
drills.
Although many questions remain
about the 1985 edition of the ECl
football team, n safe to sav the
Pirates will fare better than ' :m year's
dismal 2 9 record.





THl- PIRAM: PIGSKIN PREVIEW
AUGUST 1985
ICMXIW
Randy Mews Rick McCormac
Editors & Publishers
The Pirate Pigskin Preview was made available to the
public by Randy Mews and Rick McCormac As Co-
Publishers and Co-Editors, they were entirely responsible
tor all phases of production and all advertising sales
wh.ch led to the success of this publication
WMrrVv cruurrentlV employed as associate producer at
WNCTTV Channel 9, while McCormac serves as Co-
Sports Editor of The East Carolinian Both are students at
tL.U and expect to graduate in December of 1986
Dedication
aJS Publ,cati�n IS dedicated to ECU Associate
Athletic Director Bob Helmick, whose assistance in gain-
ing university cooperation made this venture a success
As he has done so many times ,n the past, Helmick gave
ot himself for the express purpose of helping someone
else. The editors of this periodical salute Bob Helm.ck -
a man of great character and a true friend.
Special Thanks
ECU nth.tetPl5Skin ' WOU'd l,ke f� QlS� th�nk
ECU athletic department for sponsoring our publication
Special thanks go to Associate Athletic Director Dave
Han and assistant Lee Workman as well as Sports Infor-
SffSLFSX Aob Gennareass,stant Rob Wi1 -
and the.r staffs. As a result of the.r help, distribution
channels were cleared on campus, thus ensuring max
Popu"at!on�SUre �f tKe f00tba teQm '� 'he
Varsity Barber Shop
& Hair styling
� Regular Haircut$5.50
� Layer Haircut$5.75
� Haircut & Style$10.00
No Appointments Necessary
Weekdays 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday 7:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Located in downtown Greenville (Across from UBE)
Baker Glad To Be At ECU
Art Baker faces a tough
challenge against the likes of
Auburn, Penn State. LSU
Miami and South Carolina as
he enters his first season as
head coach of the East
Carolina University football
team.
Baker replaced Ed Emory in
December of last year, a man
whom Baker served under in
1983 when he was associate
head coach for the Pirates.
The Pirates "freeze option"
offense with Bakei calling
the plays � ranked 16th in the
nation in rushing offense in
1983. averaging 239.4 yards
per game. As a unit. ECU
averaged 349.5 yards of total
offense.
Baker's initial stav at ECU
was brief however. In 1984 he
left to accept the assistant
head coaching position at
Florida State under Bobby
Bow den.
Baker was on the road in
Atlanta when ECU athletic
director Ken Karr approached
him about the vacancy at ECU
1 which Baker accepted.
"Greenville has been one ol
the favorite places I've lived
and the East Carolina people
are some of the finest Eve
been around Baker said.
"I'm just really excited about
coming back here. Eve always
felt the Lord has a plan for all
of us. and this is His plan for
me
Baker accepted the head
coaching job at ECU knowing
that the Pirates would have
one of the most difficult
schedules in college football
ECU faces Penn State.
Auburn, LSU, South Carolina
Art Baker
and Miami-Florida on the rug-
ged 1985 schedule, and some
people wondered how he could
give up the security of one of
the best assistant coaching
positions in football.
"A lot of my coaching col-
leagues thought 1 was off mv
rocker to leave what I think
was one of the better assistant
coaching jobs in the country
he said. Baker also said the
ECU job was one of the few
coaching jobs he would have
considered.
Baker, who has 25 years of
intercollegiate coaching ex
perience. brings with him a
career head coaching record oi
57-48-5 after stints in
Southern Conference
man (1973-77) and Jh-
(1978-82), where he had i
r losing seasons in
The first-year coacl
1 can do well this -
it will take a total tea
for the Pirates to do so.
'I've always liked
lallenge he said
things that you cou
wise, is through together!
� relationships you d
a family-style atmosphere :
Although Hake: a
be as successful as possible
the gridiron, he realizes I
plaers must also be
in the classroom.
"I think all football c i
are aware that we ar�
fired because ot the numbei I
wins or losses he sai .
know I'm going to be judj
whether b the administration,
the athletic director oi
alumni. Yet, to satisfy m
being, 1 could not,
k back and
didn't do everything I :
see that m players gel
education
Baker sums up his coaching
philosoph) b) saying that he
tries to "treat every player like
1 would want someone to treat
mv sons
Saturday Sports Spectacular
Greg Kerr Brian Bailey
�Z?P'fe,h,9Wights of the ECU Pirates
t�l?T S�3St Conference football
Saturday from 11:15 p.m. to 11:45 pm on
NewsCenter 9
WNCT-TV
Baker, Di
Quarterback:
i
1 q �
ga:
rushing �
pa
touch
-
jhrnen '
Hoitzclaw combii
�ng nuc;
Tailba.k
name here. The Hi.
natne en:
all to himself �
with Jimmy Walden the
�"v Bak come
tCL - number nine all-
her with his 513 j
ar ago. Behind Bake-
capable bodies ,R
Paige and George Frank
Art Baker is looking
from th.s position. espec
Baker, who rushed for 137
the spring game in r
ony
sprint
fullback: nother position
nappy with. Sophomore
Simpson emerged from the
ECL's No. fullbacl
The Brooklyn, NY, nativ,
�x) yards and scored tw��
team with Tony Baker
Pirates an excellent one-two i
the backfield. Behind Simpson are
host of back such as redsh;
treshman Tim James and sei
by Clair. who will lend d

ECU Spo,
We have

5

i
InTh
W
s
Downtown
758-2616
fesaaoaoEK
VViVvxvVMAv

���i





mil
ECU
jlar
Baker, Dumas Lead Freeze Option Attack
Quarterback:

� �
lac kit
i
-
iiian
Re eh ers:
S
Offensive Analysis
11
I ailhack
i
,
11 I
-
Fullback:
v �
� -

Bob

Be is will t ;�
time a md nd S

hman rim On , ,t- nui
li en
games lasi season 1 he k
be the return ol Dun
1

I(l
and

Mel aw,
M I
Benedi � figure in rigl
( filter:
-
I

Ron Jones gained the starting quarterback position from Darrel Speed durin,
xpnnK practice. Jones started on two occasions last Near.
1 ight 1 ml: Senior
9 HA

�" - �
He caught )
I We have the best selection
ECU Sportswear
In The
Downtown
758-2616
world U.B.E
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
XVXl
Av





HI PIRATF PIGSKIN PR vil w
M (Jl SI 1985
�e!ackers A"d Secondary Look Strong
ihows although sophomore Nh-dr T" HdlJ "urn, again, is Washing � a
phomore Medrick
Rainbow returns. Gone is last year's
cartel Chris Sania Cruz, but Ram
bOM d,d see a loi o( action before be
ing injured late in the season. Behind
Rainbow, who was limited in the spr
due to an appendectomy, depth is
a Problem Onlv redshin freshman
Shannon Bolmg is listed below Rain
ECU at N.t
hh renenee as redshirt freshman
Rodnes Glovei and ��,�� William
Jennette are the backups. I he
development of Jennette is a kev here
as he sat out the 1984 season with a
"�Moulder injury.
bou
coming out of tlie spring.
I nd: yeai ago this was a question
mark position, but entering 1985 ii is
one ot the strengths for the Pirates
H'Kk are sophomores Ron Gilliai I
' six games a vea
hhn Williamson
once
Defensive Analysis
linebacker: Might possible
ngesi position tor the Pirate
he like- ol
a n d k (
senn i'
,tu a playing
!

I
Washington, juniors I arr kf
Bubba aters, and sophomon I
Briti and Bruce Simpso all I
whom played last yeai Wa
the surprise ol the . � ased
the coaching stafl with his pil
� being switched from
bai k a year ,iv. lacobs, wh
f'oui games in 1984, and v.
listed as the si i
see playing tune in j
Secondary: gain, thi
ng area
�-4.
Ba �
tensive ,
Ciarv l.i tndoi
' i"
ted for I
.ernard �"�
Wolfp
T siresj m
jn
CU GOLF TEAM LEADERS
(let'ens swarms to ih h i j �
msioih, hall ,n a game againsl Souihwe- I ouisiai
EolLSchedule
MacGregor Golf Classic
John Ryan Viemoriai Tournament
H lipackollegiate Invitational
i C-HUmington Fall Invitational
I
i

Mike Brad.ely
rwo-Tme Team MVP
Paul Steelman
Academic AH-America Candidate All C w ,
" Selection
xv




i






'
oak Strong
1 HE PIRATE PIGSKIN PREVIEW
AUGUST 1985
kles
� JW. -
rong safet
starter and
ason 1 on
984 and ac
losses,
s on the
th senior
won the free
h( 1984
ntercepted one
med with the
i His Dillahuni
free safety.
game at left
npressed
omise al
e Behind
Essi a
lefensive
liaferro
and
the left
son
i n -
undei
Don
� V
-
'

EL t o I
I
,vi





Mark Ardfesi
Vtl- onterence Selection
1
ECU at N.C. State � September 7, 1985 � 7:00 p.m.
Wolfpack Tangles With Bucs In Opener
When ECU travels to Raleigh on
Sepl 7 to open the season aeainsi in-
state rival N.C State, the Pirates will
be facing a Wolfpack squad with an
inexperienced quarterback at the
helm.
Tim Espisito, the starting quarter-
N stale the "pas: two
season has completed Ins eligibi
Espisito, who completed almos
percent o! his passes last - asoi . will
enlaced ps one 1 hree ui
per �
k isline- is li
the preseas
candidate I
� the Wolfpacl itta
191 pounde fi �
lidice in sprii i i
Wh
!44 o 254 ,4�
2 i id
i 10
I '

� �

Ho
i.
�' :
- ' �� I .� (4,139);
; 'iniie!ion- (3
sea 200) - -
mosi ichdov r
seas (19) a � ?r (36).
Whichever quarterback gets he
starting nod will be helped In a
talen of running backs to
carr the ball.
lthough the Wolfpack lost Joe
Mclntosh, who finished as the
school's second all-time leading
rusher, proven performers abound as
Vince Evans, Mike Miller and Ricky
Isom all return for their senior
seasons.
Evans, who led the Wolfpack in
rushing last season with 883 yards,
will be the starter at the running back
position. He became only the third
running back in N.C State historv to
rush for over 200 yards in a game,
netting 201 yards on 27 carries in last
season's 31-22 win over ECU.
Miller, who plays both running
back and fullback, edged out last
year's starter Isom at the fullback
position in spring drills.
Opening the holes for the running
backs will be an experienced offensive
line returning four starters. Leading
the way is 6-5, 295 pound senior Joe
Millinichik. The powerful
Millinichik, who benches 550 pounds,
will be joined bv three time ieiterman
Larry Burnette at one guard and
center Johnny Smith, who also
started last year. Guard Ron Kosar is
the final returning starter, with Joev
Pope expected to fill the remaining
tackle posit
While the offensive line look-
strong, tight end could be a
troublesome spot as Ralph Britt gets
the starting nod. He is the only, retur-
ning lettermai
backs. Also, we're able to utilize our
personnel better, and 1 feel it's a little
easier for our defense to play
Vince Evan
Joe Milimchik
�� an � o �
� . Brother? cai
' p tsses wi
: .
-
ann Peebles.
� Miltoi K
v
Adleta, also a pair of sophs, will be
the back-ups
Three of the four hnebacking posi-
tions also look strong, with three
seniors penciled in for starting roles.
Mark Franklin and Don Herron will
man the outside positions and Pat
league will fill one of the inside pom
tion i
In the secondary senior si
lones, a two-year .tartei a- :on
back, remains He overca
nones in b md
banner yea
� ?s. two interceptions a
pie recover).
. recove

spot
Ml, :v twsei
wili man the safety p
made

I
I
-


il 5-2 �
tackle six ali i � the
sprii � tsitive results.
1 like abou con-
said Reed, "is thai now the
outside linebackers will be forcinj
the run rather than smaller defensive
kicker Mike Cofer
The interior of the defense will be
anchored b) tackles Re U instead
and Grad Harris, a pair o
sophomores. Steve Rankin and John

nice chools ���
all tl eing pla
sy 5 . m .
Wolfpack holds an I 1-4 advantage
the serie- with th win
coming in I9S3 b a 22-16
Precision
Haircutting
For Men & Women
Specializing in Color,
Cellophanes & Perms
Melody Furci � Tina Furci � Beth Long
201 E. 5th St.
758-6190
I
��





I HI PIRATE PIGSKIN PREVIEW
Al C,l SI ls85
SIV Texas State at ECU � September 14, 19S5 � 7:00 p.m.
Pirates Open Home Slate Against Bobcats
J will play host to Southwest bd,mMh,R,hKuK , . . . . �
E I will play host to Southwest
rexas State � the only non-Division
I-A school on the Pirates' '8
schedule � on Sept. 14 in the ECU
home opener.
The Bobcats, of the Gulf Star Con-
ference, are in their second year of
playing Division l-AA, after being a
Division II power.
Southwest Texas State made the
adjustment in their initial vear of
Division l-AA, compiling a 7-4
overall record, but were a disappoin-
ting 2-3 m league play.
Bobcat coach John O'Hara. who
a 16-6 record in two years at the
school, fell that the move up from
Divison l-AA did create some new
problems tor his team.
"Even Saturday, you are playing
unsl a good tootball team, because
the personnel and depth are better
O'Hara said. "The wear and rear on
' team is greater, because the pla
is more physical.
V Southwesi rexas State enters
- campaign, O'Hara is
an excellent
season.
"Based el retun
ur spnng drills, we ha i ns
optimistic, and u kly
hopes tor this :
he said. "I thmk n
tttitudeand have the desire to
have a better yeai than we did
ir
Among the reasons O'Hara feels
cam can have a better year is that
offensive linemen who started
last year return.
Right tackle Charlie Vatterott and
left tackle Kevin Mueth both started
last year tor the Bobcats, along with
guard Joe Christ and center Mitch
Da idson.
Quarterback Daid Longhoffer
returns as well. After earning the star-
ting job in the fourth game of the
season. Longhoffer passed for 1,613
yards and seven touchdowns, while
leading the Bobcats with 1.968 yards
total offense.
Joining longhoffer in the
backficld will be senior Eric Coble
and innior Rene Gonale. Coble, a
starter last year who rushed for 470
yards despite being hobbled by in-
juries, had surgery on his foot in the
off-season and should be 100 percent
by the time the season starts.
Eric Cobble
I'h
Mitch Davidson
receiving positions are both
inned experienced veterans as
the starters a; both Hanker and spin
end return to pro parks for
the Bobcat aerial attack.
flanker Fonj Woodle) has led the
team in receptions cash ol the past
two seasons, hauling in 19 passes last
linebacker Shawn Woods, the leading
defender on the team last year with
103 tackles. Woods is a unanimous
pre-season all-conference selection
and will be the leader for the s is
defense
Three of tour starters return for the
Bobcats m the defensive backfield,
with red shirt freshman Ben Jessie be-
ing the only newcomer in the secon-
dar. at cornerback.
Strong safety Jimmy Nelms and
tree safety Charles Sterling both
return to the back line of defense
along with cornerback Eugene
Rogers.
The key to the defensive perfor-
mance this season however may rest
in a player not even on the depth
chati in the spring. Defensive
lames Roberson injured his achilles
tendon in spring practice, but will
start - provided his injun heals
Roberson was called a "difference"
type player b O'Hara dnd will be
needed as only two starters return to
the defensive line
Arnold Baker returns at one : I
sive end spot, while tackle D
I aeke also started last sea
Lackey is a preseason all (,s(
while Baker was the third lea
tackier on the I
hits.
Die kicking came will he somewl
luestion mark even
punter Jerry Fife returns. .
kisker on hand ha
ne experience.
1 fe, who has punted eat I I I
;hrec previous
will prov;de some stability witl
career punting averat
� kei
ri to problei
. -nen S
State has the unenviable ta �
home
Ten.
wa-
if sesono. !�
home opener since
average
catch.
Split end Wayne Coffey led the
n in average gam per catch last
season, with 24.5 yards per reception
on 10 catches.
Coach O'Hara is looking for im-
provement m his team's offensive
play this season and feels that more
consistency is what is most needed.
"I hope our offense will be back
where it was m 1983. We weren't bad
last vear. but we were inconsistent
he said. "1 hope we get that con-
sistent this vear because we do have
more experience
On defense, the Bobcats return
eight starters, with the secondary and
linebackers being the strong points.
Heading the list of returners is
Linebacker Shawn Woods
PET VILLAGE
PET SHOP
511 Evans Sr.
Phone 756-9222
AEROBICS
4We specialize in it
The Aerobic Workshop
Downtown (,reenille
Lineman kein Muerth
Alterations Thrift Shop
429 Evans Street Mall
Ladies Dress Shoes .50 c
Ladies Jeans $1.00
Men's Dress Pants & Shirts .50 to Si.00
Children's Clothes .25C to .50c
Athletic Clothes $2.50
GROSS
THE late night place to
be seven nights a week
119 E. 5th St.
752-8711
Private Club For Members & Guests
All Night Drink Specials After
Every ECU Home Football Game
Sept. 14
THE SHAVETAIL BOBCAT
Sept. 28
THE HOOTLESS OUT
Oct. 5
Oc� 6 W,NDLESS HURRICANE
THE YELLOWBIRD
Nov. 16
THE DYING HURRICANE
oupon dood Foi SI
Off Grogs T Shirt
ECU at Penn Stc
Paterno's
Pei

a
I
h
i
jy
2
ez.
� n






:00 p.m.
IHt iMR.Ml- iK,Skl I'KI Ml W
At (.1 M I4H5
inst Bobcats
. anc defen-
tacklc David
season.
� S( pick,
' ird leading
� -�a: with 78
somewhat
� . en though
ls no field
� any real
ach of the
the Bobcats
� with his
rage, but a
kick-
x utl west Iexas
k of being
Although
asi season's
Si am, it
� r EC l in a
ECU at Penn State � September 21, 1985 � 1:30 p.m.
Paterno's Nittany Lions Seeking More Wins
Penn State head coach Joe Paterno
returns 46 lettermen for what is sure
to be an improved season over last
year's 6-5 campaign.
Leading the way on offense will be
junior tailback D.J. Dozier. The
Virginia native rushed for 691 yards
and four touchdowns last season,
despite being hampered by numerous
injuries. Paterno hopes that Dozier
will be able to avoid injuries and put
some numbers up comparable to his
freshman season when he rushed for
1,002 yards. Dozier will again be join-
ed in the Penn State backfield by
fullback Steve Smith who rushed for
398 yards and five touchdowns last
year.
The Nittany Lion running attack
will be counted on to relieve some of
the pressure on firs! year starting
quarterback John Shaffer. Shaffer is
the leading candidate to run the Nit-
tany Lion attack as he completed 40
of 96 passing attempts in limited ac-
tion a year ago. Shaffer will need to
improve on his interception to
touchdown ratio, as last year he
threw seven interceptions to only one
touchdown pass.
D J Dozier
Joe Paterno
Experienced players return at the
receiving positions, and should also
help the new Nittany Lion quarter-
back. Split end Herb Bellamy returns
after catching 16 passes last season
for a 19.1 per catch average. Last
year Penn State receivers caught only
six touchdown passes, with Bellamy
the team leader with two TD recep-
tions.
Erik Hamilton, the second leading
receiver on the team last year with 14
receptions, returns to man the flanker
position.
The receiving corps are further
bolstered by the return of two veteran
tight ends. Dean DiMidio caught
caught 11 balls last season, averaging
17 yards a catch. Brian Silvering also
returns after hauling in eight passes
last season.
Three offensive lineman will have
to be replaced, but one of those spots
is expected to be filled by former
defensive tackle Todd Monies. Join-
ing Moules up front will be juniors
Mitch F-rerotte and Chris Conlin at
the guard and tackle positions respec-
tively. Stephen Davis, Tom Wilk and
Steve Seebacher all will see action at
tackle, while Rob Smith and Mark
Sickler will vie for time at the other
guard position.
Penn State's offense scored 20
points or less in seven games last year,
but it was the defense that caused the
Nittany Lions to lose three of their
final four games. The Lions sur-
rendered 44 points to Notre Dame
and 31 to Pittsburgh in two of the
season-ending lossses.
Nine starters return on defense for
Penn State, with safety Ray Isom
leading a veteran secondary.
This year marks the first meeting
between the Nittany Lions and the
Pirates, although ECU has traveled
to the state of Pennsylvania in each of
the last four years.
M Ik.
nernan ktin Muerlh
ns Thrift Shop
' vall
Shoes .50 c
es leans $1.00
& shirts .50 to SI.00
( ; 5 to ,50c
iolhes S2.50
BACK TO SCHOOL
M
:m
I
a
SCHWINN
it
Bicycle Post
530 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N.C.
757-3616
Down East Cycles
207 E. 5th St.
Greenville, N.C.
757-1816
Call Toll Free
1-800-682-7050
-s
� EARTH CRUISER
� Hunter
� Diamond Back
� Redline
VISA'
ALL BIKES ASSEMBLED FREE
FREE 30-Day Check
Full Service Department
SKATEBOARDS
r

i
M
1





8
THE PIRATE PIPSI PREVIE W
AUGUST 1985
Temple at ECU � September 28, 1985 � 7:00p.m.
Pirates Seek Revenge On Improving Owls
es are high in the "Citv of include iwt� r n r� . �
Hopes are high in the "City of
Brotherly Love" after Temple coach
Bruce Arians led his team to a winn-
ing record last year. Although much
talent returns, the Owls will be hard
pressed to match last year's win total
of six.
Arians accepted the Temple job
two years ago, taking over for then
head coach Wayne Hardin. Arians
first year was a mediocre 4-7, but last
season he guided a team made up of
mostly the same plavers to a winning
record.
The major reason Temple mav not
win as many games this season as they
did last is the schedule. Four of their
first five games are on the road (in-
cluding a visit to Ficklen Stadium
Sept. 28), with the only home game
being against defending national
champion Brigham Young.
If the Owls are to rise to the top
against this tough schedule that also
includes Boston College, Penn State
West Virginia and Pittsburgh, an ex-
perienced offense will have to lead the
way.
Todd Bowles
John Rienstra
Nine starters return for the Temple
offense, with standout tailback Paul
Palmer leading the way. The all-East
running back churned out 8� yards
rushing last year, averaging 4.9 yards
per carry and scoring nine
touchdowns. Palmer came on strong
in the closing stages of the '84 season
and will be counted on to lead the
ground attack.
1 he quarterback position is filled
by junior Lee Saltz, who must cut
down on interceptions for the Owls
aerial attack to be successful. 1 asl
year, Saltz threw twice as many in-
terceptions (12) as touchdown passes
(six).
Wide receiver Willie Marshall
returns and will be the man that Saltz
will look to most often. Marshall,
who caught 22 passes for 503 vards
last year for a 22.9 yard per catch
average, will receive more attention
from enemy secondaries since last
year's other wideout, Russel Carter
has graduated Carter led the team in
receptions last year with 23. but will
have to be replaced along with the top
three tight ends from last year's
squad.
�X-ww.w,wlvw
Jeff Ward should hold down the
right end position along the defensive
front, while Chuck Kumrow
Ralph Jams will battle for playing
time at the left end spot ,v
tackles, Doug Davis should be at
slot, while Jimmy Moore. Rodnev
Walker and Mike Swanson will share
time at the other tackle position The
nose guard will either be B
Caen or Dave Candy.
Punter Kip Shenefelt and k
Jim Cooper are two importani
returnees from last year's team
Shenefelt averaged 39 3 ards per
kick in 53 attempts while Cooper is
back after making good on I l-of-17
field goal attempts last season
Temple became the first team to
defeat the Pirates at home �
Miami (Fla) beat the Pirates in �-
ECU will try to avenge las- seas
defeat, as the Owls will once ag
travel to Ficklen Stadium
A New Trend In Fast Food
Char-Broiled Chicken
Broiled Fish
Sandwiches � Salads
Never breaded Never fried
AND NEVER WILL!
Take-Out Available
Open seven days a week
(11 a.m. to 11 p.m.)
l" Corner of luih & Charles SI.
r � 830-1530 � "�
Downtown Greenville
521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
The Best Mexican Food
The Biggest Margaritas
Miami-Florida at EC
Hurricanes S
The Miami Hur
Ficklen Stadium
key ingredients tha
a football powei
Kosar.
Kosar. the quai
Miami to a na
two short years aj
his final vear of elig I
play in the NF1
Taking over f r K
junior Vinny I
New York native
attempts last season
action.
Testaverde's inexp
soothed somewha
depth in the rest
Melvin Bratton returr.
while Alono H j
fullback. Highsrrnth - .
way to a 1,00 .
until he sustain
Running Back Monzo Hiiihsmith
M1

f
i
Greenville Flower
blowers For All Oc
We ulre flowers ur
1027 S
i
i





THE PIRATE PIGSKIN PKEVIFU M GUST 1985
i � l
proving Owls
w n the
defensive
Kumrow
plaving
Vi the
be at one
� Moore, Rodney
inson 'Ail! share
ion. I he
be Brian
d kicker
important
ir's team.
per
. ooper is
II of-17
am to
n
tsi season's
taurant
Greenville
anche St.
)7 1666
Mexican Food
?st Margaritas
Miami-Florida at ECU � Octobers, 1985 � 2:00 p.m.
Hurricanes Seeking Replacement For Kosar
Miami Hnrnitiot ;n :i
Miami Hurricanes will invade
klen Stadium missing one of the
ingredients that made their team
football powerhouse �- Bernie
ar.
Kosar, the quarterback who guided
Miami to a national championship
short years ago, decided to forgo
rial Mar of eligibility at Miami to
:� in the NFI .
raking over for Kosar will he
r Vinny lesiaverde. The 6-5
New York native completed 17 of 34
mpts last season in rather limited
�n.
restaverde's inexperience may be
Mod somewhat by the returning
depth in the rest ol the backfield.
Melvin Bratton returns to halfback
while Alonzo Highsmith will play
back Highsmith was well on his
�sa to a 1,000-yard season last year
until he sustained a knee injury
Running Back Alonzo Highsmith
m
against Maryland that put him out
for the season. Highsmith ended the
year with 906 yards rushing and six
touchdowns in only nine games.
Bratton come on after Highsmith's
injury, rushing for 134 yards and four
touchdowns in Miami's memorable
loss to Boston College last year.
Junior Darryl Oliver will provide
depth at halfback while Eric Ham will
Willie Smith
Kevin Fagan
be the second-team tailback.
While Miami does return ex-
perienced performers in the
backfield, they are not so fortunate in
the wide receiver position.
Cone are last year's starters Eddie
Brown and Stanley Shakespeare. This
season it will be up to sophomore
Brian Blades and freshman Michael
Irvm to fill the holes at split end and
Hanker.
Graduation also decimated the
ranks in the offensive line as tackle
Paul Bertucetli returns as the only
starter from a year ago.
The Hurricane attack will certainly
miss Kosar and a veteran front wall,
so it figures to be up to the ground
game and a much maligned defense to
spark the team, last year's defense
caved in, allowing 123 points in three
season ending losses to Maryland,
Boston College and UC1 A
The defense does return eight
starters however, so there is some
talent to build on. Tackles Derwin
Jones and Kevin Fagan will head up
the front wall, lagan is an All-
America candidate who ranked first
in sacks last year while also leading all
down linemen in tackles with 51.
Bruce Fleming spearheads an active
linebacking corps. The hard-hitting
veteran led the Hurricanes in total
tackles last year with 111 and he
should get help from John McVeigh
the units third leading tackier. George
Mira Jr. and Daniel Stubbs will also
be granted long looks at the two va-
cant linebacking positions.
A defensive backfield that wielded
to a blitzkrieg of enemy air fire last
year will be looking to make amends
Greenville Flower Shop
Flowers For All Occasions
We wire flowers worldwide
S" vans
758-2774
Master CardVisa Welcome
for last year's performance.
Free safety Darrel Fullington is the
leader of the secondary. He had five
interceptions last year to lead the
team, and finished up with 85 tackles,
the second highest total on the club.
Cornerback Tolbert BJn returns to a
starting position, but the other corner
will be manned by inexperienced
sophomore Bernie Blades.
The place kicking will be solid as
sophomore Greg Cox returns. Cox
led the team in scoring last year with
82 points � a new school record for
points by a kicker in a season.
The punting chores will be handled
by either sophomore Jeff Feagles or
junior Steve Kadzin as last year's
kicker Rich Tuten has departed.
ECU will be looking to celebrate
their homecoming with a victory over
a hard-driving hurricane.
linebacker Bruce Fleming
BOOK TRADER
Used Books
Full I ine Comix
919 Dickinson Avenue
AEROBICS
The AEROBIC WORKSHOP
is pleased to announce the
following special:
1 Month of Unlimited � $15
Only I Coupon Per Person
Offer Expires Dec. 31, 1985
( 41! 7S7-I6&8 or conu by 417 Evaru St, (Downtown)





10
I HI I'IKMI I'U.SKIN I'KI V II tt
V t t . I M I Wc
ECU at SW Louisiana � October 12, 1985 � 5:00 p.m.
Ragin' Cajuns Return Talented Performers
A lot of veterans abound � 42
returning lettermen and starters in 15
different positions � but there are
still questions to be answered as the
University of Southwest Louisiana
prepares for the 1985 campaign.
The Cajuns go into the 1985 season
with seven starters returning on
defense, six starters on offense and
both kicking specialists coming back.
Coach Sam Robertson's team won
four of their last five games "last year
to finish at 6-5 and many of last
year's top performers remain.
lour quality linebackers, led bv
potential All-America Steve Spinella,
return along with a strong defensive
secondar) and a host of talented run-
ning backs and receivers.
On offense, the biggest question
k is a' quarterback, where both of
the people who had tilled the position
the past three years have
departed.
Soph re it ampbell is the
leading contender foi the stari
duties although lie only threw 20
, completing

ng bad I i s is rnu
a known quantity,
ra experienced veterans return
- including three ol last year's
ers.
lunior Dwane Williams returns
the Ragin' Cajuns after leading last
's squad with 460 yards rushing
and foui touchdowns.
Senioi rhomas Jackson also
returns with a chance at becoming the
school's all-time leading rusher. He
was slowed bv injuries last vear, net-
ting onlv 299 yards, but was the
team's leading rusher two years ago
when he scampered for "39 yards.
Jackson onlv needs 492 vards to
become I SI career rushing leader.
Providing depth in the back field
will be junior Karl Bernard and senior
Jerry Kier. Both o the starters
return at the wide receiver positions,
with seniors Welton Morgan and
Pierre Perkins providing experience
at that spot. Perkins led the team in
receiving last vear with 26 catches tor
508 vards, while Morgan had 17 grabs
for 266 vards.
hk
fc, Jfc
Carl Isaac
Clarence Glenn
year with 81 tackles.
Backing up those two will be
seniors Dave Brammel and Tim
Williams, who both had over 30
tackles last year in reserve roles.
The defensive secondary also looks
to be in good hands as three starters
return this vear. Junior Elton Slater
returns to handle one ol the corner-
back spots after making 2" tackles
las: season. Both starting safties are
also back as Clarence Glenn and
Steve Judice combine to give FJS1
some experience along the back wall
o the defense.
Although there are several familial
faces around, the defensive front is in
need of some rebuilding since botfi
defensive ends and stalwart defensive
tackle Charles "Gator" Bennett 1
graduated.
However two starters do return a
tackle Kevin Sorice and nosegu
Scott Sible come back tor their senior
seasons. Sible led the down linemen
last year with 2 tackles includ
three that were tor negative yard
At the other tackle position will be
loe Hebert, a sophomore, or Cl
Cannon, who is a redshiri man.
Ihe kicking game should be sound,
as sophomore kicker Pan
Broussard and senior punter I
1 algout are back 1 algout
averaged 39.6 vards per . �
first three games last vear after a 40
average in 1983, was injured ear
the 1984 season with a broken leg II
fully healed, Falgout should d
good job with the pun:
Broussard had an en il f'i
vear in handling all
placements �
tempts, but he :
sextrapoii

perience
1 tie offense looks to be strong,
although last year's leader Chris
Boudreaux graduated. The first unit
ting five should average 255
pounds per man. with foui seniors in
the group. The leadei on the from
wall should be senior center Damn
Alexander, who was moved to center
n tackle. Iiiree vear lettermai
ictor Sheppard returns to one tackle
position while Chris Morrow should
hold down the oilier Ihe starting
guards are slated to be Stuart
Chambliss and Jay Hebert.
Heading up the defense will be
linebackers Steve Spinella and Chris
Jacobs. Spinella has led the Ragin'
Cajuns in tackles each of the past two
seasons (131 stops iasr vear), while
Jacobs was second on the team last
Si
Tony Baker rumhles for yardage against Southwest Louisiana last vear aker
needs 1.017 ards to become ECU's all-time leading rusher.
5Hje East titantlinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
The Most Comprehensive
Coverage of ECU Football
In The World
SCOTT COOPER - CO-SPORTS EDITOR
RICK McCORMAC - CO�SPORTS EDITOR
TONY BROWN - ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
South Caroling at
Reliever Hold
Moi
him �
ball pr .
beer, i
keej
at th
�.easi
M
m M �
'� ide mil
-
-
M. ri

senioi
While ine.xj
tor on the
the offense
Heading the list
vear
chell and Mike H
relief specialist in 1984
college trai I
lead the te i
Gamecocks were e
AEROBICS
"ILL specialize in it
the Ktrobii Aorksti
Downtown (.rem-
?"16UX
I WELCOME BACK j
i!
Sat
Stop in&
See Our New
Fall Line
H e H elcome
Student Charge
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Com
and
Saturl
???????���?�??��������?
UUMXV�





I m i'ik l fi .skin I'kl if w
I'(11 S1
II
Performers
8Np
i :
hensive
��
ootball
i
� K
.Vofri Carolina at ECU � October 26, 1985 � 1:30 p.m.
Reliever Hold Leads Morrison's Gamecocks
foe
'a 111 I r
tball team
- �
d in i a in
ird B
:
-
I
Mil
Hold. H as the
84, is rl � �

' � e a i
: � � � uline
KROBICS
Hi; specialize in if'
��� n.hu VSorkvhop
- 'itin (.rrrriMllr
MIX
sidneqs
( arolina Fast Mall
WELCOME BACK
Stop In &
See Our New
Fall Line
HW ekome
Student Charges
???????
upon his entrance into the game.
Seniors rhomas Dend and Kent
Hagood botti return to the Gamecock
backfield aftei combining tor I, R5
ng and 12 toil : �wns last
e
defense from his end position H
the onl senior on the starting u
while two-year letterman Willie
Mclntee will till the other end posi
: ion.
Leading the linebackers will be
sophomore C arl Hill who was named
to the freshhman Mi-America team
season Danny Miller and
sophomore Sam lav lor will handle
the duties at the othei linebacl
-lots although neither id much
x experience.
The kicking game will be an area
the Gamecock not ha s
worry about a- the punter and
� er return from last year's 10 2
squad Junior placekicker S
Hagler hit eight oi 13 field .
tempts and was perfect on all 4C
point-after-touchdown attempts.
I om )'( onnor return
punting duties after aver 40 4
yards per k k last sea
Mitharolina �ill c �me I :
ville this yea t tin
tory rh I tri
�r the (iamecock
leave lly
Willjams-Brice Si
tunes m 1985.
V k( Hold
. '
I Eric I irns
pass
Mot
Much of la
-
-

loe Brooks

Morris. I ast
season Man1: was the I leading
interceptoi on the tea vith three,
whil, "eakmg i enemy pass-
Senior 11 �ny Guy ton will lead






i























?
i
Senior Ihomas Dendv returns to pace
the South (arolina ground attack
Saturday Sports Spectacular
Hosts � Greg Kerr & Brian Bailey
Producer � Randy Mews
Complete highlights of the ECU Pirates
and Atlantic Coast Conference football
Saturday from 11:15 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. on
NewsCenter 9
WNCT-TV
-�.vwvvvi





12
HE PIRATE PIGSKIN PREVIEW
MJGUS1 1985
ECU at Southern Mississippi � November 2, 1985 � 7:00 p.m.
Eagles Look To Rebound From Bad Year
he fortunes of the Southern Strong safety Tim Smith -M�X1 I Cal
sissippi football program las, vMr IS"?�? Z I� Sm,th enters hss
rhe fortunes of the Southern
Mississippi football program last yeai
were nearly identical to those of
ECU. rhe (olden Eagles entered the
season after a 8-3 year in 1983 with
high hopes, hut managed to on! win
four games last year.
' wait-till-next-yeai motto rna
appropriate last sea-
��.dilation hitting the Eagles
his could be another long yeai
have
but w
I .
Strong safety Tim Smith enters
junior year with excellent credentials
He secured 105 total tackles last fall
to lead all defensive backs and his
three interceptions also led the
defense in that departmeni Senior
cornerbacks lames Harris
- oopei keep their startinj
and uili provide a calminj
3n an otherwise young deft
Iden Eagles lost io starters,
ailback Sam Dejarnette!
stan fensive lineman Rich;
Byrd . Greg Hae
Hea c armond
two seasons at
�i
� hj thi
orth
"i. t
sses,
i � �
- .
Robi
��: , but �

I -

I h
nine

572 sards, rhe fullback :
ilh settled I
B wn wil
season after a
4 v' ast in '84.
IX
n with she :
n all returning. Junior
nabbed a team
his, with two ol those
goh ichdowns. Backup
"rcu v :ounted tor 17 catches
with an average of nearl I6yards. ;
split end. Chris McGee and Edward
Wilson are hack alter combining foi
:l reeptions last fall. Senior Robert
Stalling -turns at tight end after
making eight receptions last season.
Three starting offensive linemen
return to the Southern Miss lineup
with 6-7, 275-pound tackle Bennv
Draughn as the main anchor. Left
guard Chris Haag and center Ken
Bentley, both seniors, started last
season Two sophomores are ex-
pected to fill vacant line positions.
Rick Slater should start at one tackle
spot, while Tim Hallman will be one
ol the guards.
Southern Miss averaged just 17
points a game last year offensively
and were especially anemic in the first
and fourth quarters � when they
scored just 68 points in 22 total
quarters of play.
A veteran secondary will lead the
way for the Golden Eagle defense.
Robert Duckswortr Andrew Mott
omores Sidne C �
1

-
�pec-
B

JEar
WZMB
91.3
ECU's FM Alternativt
Playing tomorrow's hits today
SsSSsSSvSSsSSGSS
ECU ut Auburn �
Dye's Tiger
Dy
1974-79, :
all
B
Wyoi
I
Tulsa at It
Morton

J Hi !
Ladies A
,
203 EA!





1985 � 7:00 p.m.
FHE PIRATfc PIGSKIN PREVIEW
ora Bad Year
I
with
Uernative
's hits today
1
5&33&3&$$C ?3SS&&33$333&33&3&k
W A('OUST 198?
ECU at Auburn � ovember 9, 1985 � 2:00 p.m.
Dye's Tigers Preseason Pick To Win It All
hen R'l travels to AnhnmV ,� . . r V A JH
When 1 t'l travels to Auburn's
lordan-Harc Stadium it will mark the
irsl meeting between former ECU
coach Pal Dye and the Pirates.
Dye coached the Pirates from
974-79, posting a 48-18-1 record
along with a trip to the Independence
Bowl Dye left ECU to coach at
Wyoming tor a year before taking
the Auburn job.
e Dye started at Auburn in
�81 his teams have won 34 games
losing onl 14 (.708 winning
tge).
Dy record should onl) get better
the preseason favorite in
d Southeastern Conference
been picked to win the na-
mpionship by both The
Views and inside Sports.
nf Auburn's attack will be
i err offense. 1 eading the
standout senior Bo
eading contender foi
i leisman 1 rophy.
was injured in the se-
' - season lasi year
against Texas with a separated
shoulder, gained 475 yards after com-
ing back in November.
In his three years at Auburn,
Jackson has rushed for 2,517 yards
on 372 carries for a 6.8-vard average
per carry.
Bo Jackson
Pat Dve
V
At quarterback, erratic Pal
Washington returns tor his senior
season. Washington started ever)
game last season, throwing foi 1,202
yards and rushing for 186 more.
However, he completed only tour
i down passes, while thro wine
nine interceptions. Redshirt junior
Jeff Burger and redshirt freshman
Bobby Walden are the reserves.
Auburn returns 19 lettermen on
defense, but just six of those started
last fall on a unit that Dye was not
totally pleased with.
"We have a lot of ifs on defense,
but 1 don't mind having ifs as long as
we have some answers Dye said. "1
don't mind having questions as long
as the answers are there. If you have
questions without the answers being
there, then you have problems
Two people that Dye is counting on
to answer some of the questions are
on the defensive line. Nose guard
Harold Hallman recorded 130 tackles
last season, while tackle Gerald
Williams collected 123 stops. Gerald
Robinson returns at defensive end, but
is a question mark due to shoulder
surgerj during the oft season.
Junior Ben McCurdy returns to
head the linebacker spot alter making
85 tackles la i fall. 1 dward Phillips,
formerb defensive lineman is ex-
pected to get the nod at the other
linebaeking spot. Providing depth
will be sophomores Russ C arreker
and Roy Corhen.
Auburn's secondary returns three
starters in the secondary with both
cornerbacks returning. Kevin Porter
and Jonathon Robinson return along
with strong safety Arthur Johnson.
Johnson was the leading tackier
among all defensive backs last season
and is extremely talented at forcing
oppenents to resort to the run.
The free safety position is up foi
grabs between Tom Powell, John
Dobbs and Keith Grenn. all of whom
could get playing time.
Although there are some question
marks on this year's Tiger -quad. Dve
is optimistic about his team's
chances.
"We're going into our fifth year at
Auburn and I'm verv excited about
this year Dye said. "This football
team has a lot o potential, but you
know wfiat potential is � that's all it is
until il produces
- V � -V.WHIIV IIIIUUIU1 IS CJ.
lulsaat ECU � ovemberJ6, 1985 � 1:30 p.m
xMorton Replaces Cooper As Tulsa Coach
tin! as both
ootball
I niversit) ol I ulsa,
nalh decided it was
i change. So when the
State head coaching job
. t jumped at the oppoi
. � ing Fulsa without a
� late date.
25, the Golden Hur-
n Morton to take over
� tm. He had spent
Ni rth Texas State, with a
v mark during his stay,
1 tour consecutive
f. lyofi appearances
�ive minded mentor
his sta at I ulsa. The
c barters back on of-
h plentv of depth also
battlt for the starting quarter-
is shaping up between a
Steve Gage, the 1983
Missouri
Newcomer
bro ken jaw
ve;
e r e n c e
-uttered a
oust
Den Morton
Kevin Lilly
Oklahoma State earlv last season.
opening up the quarterbacking posi-
tion to Richie Stephenson. The 5-11
Stephenson never relinquished the
starting role even when Gage returned
one month later. Stephenson com-
pleted 70 of 138 attempts for 1.134
vards arid seven touchdowns, while
dage hit on 24 ol 5 aerials 'or 319
vards and two scores.
The defensive outlook isn't as op-
timistic, since just six regulars return.
The secondary has several holes to
fill, while the outside linebackers are
untested. I he line is anchored bv two
All-MVC selections, joe Dixon, the
team's leading sacker is scheduled to
start at nose guard, while Kevin Lillv
returns at tackle. Junior Chris Pike
been switched from second team
e guard to starting right tackle to
gel his 6-7, 28s pound frame into the
action.
Another all-MVC standout Xavier
Warren. ,s a fixture di inside
linebacker. The hard hitter led Tulsa
in tackles with 134 last season, senior
Jimmy Summers starts opposite War-
ren. Youth and inexperience will
hamper the outside linebackers as
Mike Williams and redshirt 'reshman
Dennis Bvrd are in the running tor
the left side spot. Sophomore Scott
Estes is 'he top prospect to man the
other linebackinu slot.
ARMY-NAVY STORE
BM M'M ks fs , ois SHOVELS
tUMMix Ks Mfss Mrs (Muss
HIK.l �s M BOOIv. K4INWF h I MtlW
fSAMH W MU IHMHs. WORKlOIHIs
Browsers Welcome
Ladies Apparel
203 East 5th Street
758-4061
SAVE on Sperry Top-Siders
l e C an
Coordinate
Your H ardrobe
With Good
Customer
Service
$49.90 (Regularly $62)
MOTS SHOP
Carolina East Mall, Greenville
Also visit our Big & Tall Department
��' -
Nil � I

I
i





14
I HI P1KXII PIGSKIN PKI VII W.
M GUS1 iss
ECU at LSI! � December 7, 1985 � 6:00 p.m.
Pirates Travel To LSU For Season Finale
Louisiana State Universitj will he
the final opponent tor ECU this
season when the Pirates travel to
Baton Rouge where the rigers own a
257-95-15 home record.
Second year head coach Bill Arn-
sbarger did nothing to hurt that winn-
ing percentage in his initial season at
the helm of the LSU football pro-
gram. The Tigers went 5-1 at home
and finished up 8-2-1 in the regular
season as they earned a post-season
trip to the Sugar Bowl.
I SU lost to Nebraska in the Sugar
Bowl, but nevertheless it was quite a
turnaround for a team that went
winless in the Southeastern Con-
ference the year before. Getting back
to the Sugar Bowl will be a difficult
task for Arnsbarger and his Bengal
Tigers as there are some holes to till.
1 SI will be forced to revamp the
entire offensive line as only one
starter returns. Curtis Core (6-4, 248)
will provide the Tigers with some
veteran leadership on the offensive
line.
But, replacing four of last year's
line performers including
all everything lance Smith will be
difficult. Ray Brock is expected to
Dalton Hilhard
Jefl Wickersham
step in where Smith left off at right
tackle and Nacho Albergamo and
Keith Melancon are slated to handle
the center and right guard positions
In keeping with Arnsbarger's theory
ol keeping off unnecessary bodv tat.
the Tigers' blocking wall will be quick
bu; not verv bulkv
As for quickness, M will have
plenty of it in the backfield. I"he
liters return their talented backfield
duo of Dalton Hilhard and (.arv
James ' two of five returning starters
on the offensive side of the ball
Hilhard is a bonafide All-America
and Heisman Irophv candidate. The
senior running back averaged 115 3
vards rushing per game las! season
while netting 1,268 total yards. The
versatile back also snared 24 recep-
tions, the second highest total on the
team. James finished second in
rushing with 426 yards Depth is
abundant with talented performers
like Craig Rathjen and Garland Jean
Batiste waiting in the wings.
The quarterback will once again be
Jeff Wickersham. The senior signal
caller is alreadv I Si's career passing
leader, even before his senior season
begins. Wickersham has thrown for
more than 2.fMX) yards in two seasons,
amassing 2.1 s 5 passing vards last
season Last eat's 57 pen err
pletion the ;
was no fluke as hi
percentage is 57.4
1 he i igei defense will ha
teresting mixture oi youi
pcrienced I ilent Seven si i
tor rnsbarger's defense witl
those players
sophomores or juniors.
Inside linebacker Shawn B �
the only senior listed as
the 1 SU depth chart and he ���
expected to provide veteran lea
ship. All-America candid
Brooks will man one
linebacking positions and is b
counted on to play up to his
tial.
Sophomore Ron 1 ewis wil
the placekicking chores after em
ing as an extremely accui
sidewinder last season when he hit
eight of his p, I attempts and
true on five ol seven field goal ti
STOP SHOP
� Western Union �
Your One Stop Party Store
Beer (Import & Domestic)
Wine � Kegs � Coolers
Ice � Cups � Flasks
Candy � Groceries � Chips
We send and receive Telegraphic Money Orders & Telegrams

Corner of 5th & Reodc
(Across From Beef & Shakes)
752-6366
ft
ft
I
Alphabets

m&
THk
be sev en nit
LALNDRC
-
Out
Oper
�ted V
2510 E. 10th Mreet
"If vou have t







THE PIRATE PIGSKT PREV It W
AUGUST 1985
:
f . i
th
r Season Finale
pletion
in in-
yel ex-
rturn
six of
b e i n g
Rurkn is
itarter on
he will be
ran leader-
ite Michael
the inside
being
poten-
handie
emerg-
curate
: hit all
nd was
OP

n
rty Store
estic)
lolers
sks
Chips
� Orders & Telegrams
Alphabetical ECU Football Roster

� �
ews
Bunn
JR
JR
JR
SR
FR
R
FR
SR
SR
SO
JR
FR
JR
JR
SR
SO
IB
WR
OT
OG
re
LB
NG
C
ss
OL
LB
OL
SE
FS
OT
FS
SE
DB
TB
SE
FLK
TE
TE
FB
NG
6-0
� '
6-3
6-4
5-10
6-3
6-0
� � �
6-2
� �
6-3
6-2

� �
6-3
5-10
5-10
5-1 1
5-11
6-0
6-2
6-3
5-10
5-10
202
196
261
261
176
240
236
250
205
268
I
240
210
202
i;
204
166
192
200
185
210
230
200
244
85
97
95
27
3
69
24
48
32
98
8
74
33
41
6b
38
87
RonGill.ard SO DE
Rodney Glover FR DT
Leon Hall SO DT
Charlie Harnman JR P
Jeff Heath SR pk
Paul Hoggara JR OG
Brent Holbrook SR WR
Steve Jacobs SR LB
Tim James FR FB
William Jennerte JR DT
Ron Jones SO QB
David Kramer SR OG
Scott Lewis SR TE
Theo Livingston SR OT
. London JR SS
Willie Mack SR DE
Matt McLaughlin pr TE
Mark Mr FR OL
JoeMohr. FR OG
JarroaMooov SO TB
TrniOrr FR OL
Terry Paige SO TB
JettPattor SR TE
6-3
6-6
6-5
6-0
6-0
6-1
5-11
6-3
5-10
6-5
5-11
6-3
5-11
6-6
I
6-0
6-3
6-5
6-3
5-10
6-2
5-10
6-1
238
236
255
170
190
257
190
229
225
272
186
281
218
215
206
264
245
212
255
192
221
Vincent Ford FR DT 6-4 225
Chris McLawhorn JR FLK 6-0 193
Sam Miller FR TB 5-10 180
50 David Ptum
84 Wilhe Powell
53 Mednck Rainbow
31 Anthony Simpson
49 Bruce Simpson
13 Tony Smith
44 Vmson Smith
73 Greg SokoiohorsKv
2 Darren Speed
22 Rosweil Streeter
61 Curtis Struyk
35 Essray Tahaterro
47 Ken Taylor
Greq Thomas
46 Jeff Turner
92 Ojah Vasser
37 Kevin Walker
55 Stuart Ward
58 Robel Washington
39 Bubba Waters
86 John Williamson
14 Lewis Wilson
10 Vernard Wynn
George Prebuia JR
Howard Sears FR
Craig White jR
JR
FR
SO
SO
so
so
so
SR
JR
FR
JR
SO
FR
jR
FR
SR
SR
SR
JR
SO
FR
SR
DT
DE
NG
FB
LB
WR
DE
OG
QB
DB
OL
SS
DE
OG
CB
DT
CB
C
LB
LB
DE
DB
FS
6-3
6-4
6-0
5-10
6-2
5-10
6-0
6-5
6-0
6-0
6-3
5-11
6-1
6-1
6-3
5-11
6-1
5-11
6-1
6-3
5-10
6-0
243
224
236
226
218
171
219
290
217
190
256
205
225
247
185
245
227
208
234
190
193
iftd&
THE late night place to
he seven nights a week
�y
ATTIC
LAUNDROMAT
Games
.screen "Cable" TV
: hers 1 8 Drvers
ae Patio
Fluff 6 Fold Service
Drv Cleaning Pick-Up
Ample Parking
Attendant On Duty
Cold Beverages
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight, 7 Days A Week
Located Next To The Pizza Hut
2510 E. 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 752-5222
vou have to do vour own laundrv. do it in style at the Wash Pub
209
E. 5th St.
752-7303
"Open To
The Puhlic"
Giant 15 Ft.
TV Screen
Washington
vs. Dallas
Mon. Sept. 9
Sept. 7
SIDEWINDER
Sept. 14 (Home Game)
PG-13
Sept. 21
ROBIN THOMPSON BAND
Sept. 28 (Home Game)
STORMZ
Oct. 5 (Homecoming)
AVALANCHE
Oct. 12
STRATUS
Oct. 26 (Home Game)
DIAMONDS
Nov. 2 & 9
TO BE ANNOUNCED
Nov. 16 (Home Game)
SIDEWINDER
t
mm
1
'f-

I





16
THE PIRATE PIGSKIN PREVIEW AUGUST 1985
1985 ECU Football Schedule
Date
Sept.7
Sept.14
Sept.21
Sept.28
Oct.5
Oct.12
Oct.26
Nov.2
Nov.9
Nov.16
Dec.7
Opponent
at N.C. State
SW TEXAS STATE
at Penn State
TEMPLE
MIAMI(FL)(Homecoming)
at Southwestern Louisiana
SOUTH CAROLINA
at Southern Mississippi
at Auburn
TULSA (Shrine Day)
at LSU
Time
7:00 pm
7:00 pm
1:30 pm
7:00 pm
2:00 pm
4:00 pm CT
1:30 pm
6:00 pm CT
1:00 pm CT
1:30 pm
7:00 pm CT
Numerical Roster
Jarrod Moody TB
Darren Speed QB
Jeff Heath. PK
Gary London. SS
Ron Jones. OB
Ron Eley SE
Vernard Wynn. FS
Barnet Easterlmg. FS
Tony Smith, WR
Lewis Wilson. DB
Don Gaylor. SE
Todd Abrams. QB
Ellis Diliahunt. FS
Keith Ford. DB
Roswwell Streeter. DB
Brent Holbrook. SE
Charlie Harnman P
Bobby Clair FB
Anthony Simpson. FB
Tim James FB
Scott Lewis, TE
Pat Bowens SS
Essray Taliaferro SS
Kevin Walker DB
Terry Paige TB
Bubba Waters. LB
George Franklin, TB �
Tony Baker. TB
Vinson Smith, DE
Jeff Turner DB
Ken Taylor, DE
Steve Jacobs, LB
Bruce Simpson LB
David Plum DT
Ken Bourgeois, C
Mednck Rainbow NG
John Britt, LB
Stuart Ward, C
Greg Thomas OG
Robert Washington LB
Curtis Struyk. OG
Rich Autry. OG
Joe Mohneaux. OG
Shawn B-ady. OT
Paul Hoggard. OG
Greg Sokolohorsky. OT
David Kramer OG
Robert Alexander OT
Tim Or. OT
Tim Dumas OT
Mark Minshew. OL
William Caner SE
Matt McLaughlin. TE
Mike Gamey. TE
Willie Powell. DE
Ron Gilliard DE
John Williamson DE
Jeff Pattern TE
Willie Fuller SE
Larry Berry. LB
0ah Vasser DT
Walter Bryant. DT
Leon Hall, DT
Shannon Bolmg, NG
Rodney Glover. DT
William Jennette DT
Stadium
Carter-Finley (45,600)
Ficklen (35,000)
Beaver (83,770)
Ficklen (35,000)
Ficklen (35,000)
Cajun Field (31,000)
Ficklen (35,000)
Roberts (33,000)
Jordan-Hare (72,169)
Ficklen (35,000)
Tiger (76,869)
Location
Raleigh, NC
Greenville, NC
University Park, PA
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Lafayette, LA
Greenville, NC
Hattiesburg, MS
Auburn, AL
Greenville, NC
Baton Rouge, LA
1985 Bowl Line-Up
DATE
BOWL
December 14California
December 21Cherry
December 21Independence
December 27Liberty
December 28Florida Citrus
December 28Sun
December 28Aloha
December 30Freedom
December 30Gator
December 31Peach
December 31"Holiday
December 31Bluebonnet
December 31All-American
January 1Fiesta
January 1�oCot1on
January 1Rose
January 1�' Sugar
January 1SOrange
SITE
Fresno Calif
Pontiac Mich
Shreveport. La.
Memphis, Tenn
Orlando. Fla
El Paso, Tex
Honolulu
Anaheim Calif
Jacksonville, Fla
Atlanta Ga
San Diego, Calif
Houston Tex
Birmingham, Ala
Tempe. Ariz.
Dallas. Tex
Pasadena, Calif
New Orleans. LA
Miami, Fla
BEAU'S
Night Club
Carolina East Centre
Highway 11, Greenville
756-6401
Welcome to Greenville! The place to meet "Beam of Course"
WEDNESDAY (open 8 pm)
Ladies' Zoo
Ladies admitted 8 10 pm
Guys admitted 10 until
THURSDAY (open 7:30 pm)
Come Shag with us
Featuring the best in Beach music
Shag lessons available (Thurs. only)
FRIDAY (open 8 pm)
ECU pre game party
Come meet your Pirate Cheerleaders
The best in Disco, Funk & Soul
SATURDAY (open 8 pm)
Dance the night away
Featuring the best in
Top 40 and Beach music
Memberships $2.00
Renewals $1.00
Until Sept. 30, 1985
We Serve Your Favorite Drinks
� All ABC Permits �
BEAU'S
A Privote Club For Members (Guests Welcome)
Call 756-6401
� Luncheons � Parties
� Special Occasions
I"
mwmmm
�I







East Carolina University
Student
Government
Association
Documents
Revised April, 1985
A
J
I
f' t





J IKKIMKV
s
Page 2
CONSTITUTION OF THK
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ASSOCIATION
PREAMBI E
se � oa - "r" " : rcsP�nsiblc "uden, self-government,
' b � UmT; �5 �rd ,kc a P�"1 fr�dom secure, to
I ; ls C fCt � �� th� ds we ordain a, d establish this
. .tu ion Jtuden. Government Association for the student
casi . aroiina I nn ei it
ARTICLE I: SUPREME STUDENT 1
SccttOB I.
This Constitution and ail laws th I ill be the supreme tudent law
Vetion 2. law
! enactments ol the Legislal i the irious
sets rshai! �
ARTICLE II: BILL OF RIGHTS
B
D
i under
ndivid
I speech,
to peacefully assemble, ai
I grievances,
her possessions aj
1
H
1
;
4.
Section l.
Student Government sso
antee the following i ghts t
A rhe i egislature shall make- no .
!ht the right ol the si
the government for a red
lei
and unreasonable sea

pose
ncampus
1 Ea
gulations ol , k
publicatioi
G Each��� � epresented
� � be fully md
estiy mformed ol
mShtectnTp ed, and the mSy whl
�night be changed I. Each student shall have the Men: in al tases o
Tn�llhel �f Conduct, to beorji,
in independent, fair, and impartial judiciary, drawn from and
T,nr' em b-J- Each student shall havheHghMo
ludicial due rroces including g
Due notice
A speedy hearing
An open hearing upon request
Representation bj student c unsel
Confrontation ol accused with accusers
Protection against sclf-incrimination
Presumption innocence until proven guilt)
Protection against cruel or unusual punishment
A record ol the heanna upon request
10. The right of appeal
K Nodent shall Pe placed in jeopardy more than once For the same ol
I Each student shall have the right to be exempt from suspension or exouJ
r dit mers;tv'excr ror ��" j
University debt, or violation ol a University regulation when such viola
-i onst.tutes a threa, to the general welfare of the Lntversnv cot
Each student shall have the right to initiate action within the reaular
!�KES�"vioUtion of rights �ed b
N. Each student shall enjoy all these nghts w�hou. discrimination by creed
race nattonal origin, or any other arbitrary or unreasonable
Section 2.
r'1C,ror o,aht,0n �' !� rightS sha!1 " hc � �� i" way nullify-
��� d,U �'her ri8htS PUSSeSSCd b ents. severalK
ARTICLE ID: LEGISLATURE
Section I.
Supreme Legislative power shall be vested in a Legislature .hi k h i. u
Section 2.
fandi�8 a, Eas, Ca,���a uSSR or VXZZ . 7Z
8.
9
M
set-lion 3.
Representation in the 1 egislature shall bt
A.Each residence hall ol not more than V.
representative to the 1 egislature, and eacl
students shall ele. t twi
B rhe total number ol day student rep � .
number of full time day studei
e hall si .
hall
Section 4
1
Section 5.
�.
dent Pro i emr r
Section 6.
There shall be a
-
Section 7.
I he 1 egi
st-il, .n 8.
I
:
I
2.1
special sess
1

1
H. t0 AVp

1 I
stitution.
Section 9.
rhe Legislatut
(2 V. vote
Section 10.
rhe Legislalture shall enact no laws wh h do
sveon f'V' and :l
section 12. Demex�, as directed b
TthatKci Universitysl
heshe deems necessary.
Section 13.
The Chancellor ol the l nivei
legislative action.
i

ARTICLE IV: EXECUTIVE
Section 1
Office ol President- neither ha l ,n ,k shaU ht' cU�ib,e ,or th
dance at fast (ti, f T�� 0 ln at!e
good standing and dism.TralT5- "
1. 10 make recommendations to the Legislature
power within tenorS �"�����
J" To " e'as SSJ J �f fhe �"��� body
notified a, least 24 ttl��� - �
Tojssue orders to executive comnu,t� anto requ.re reports from
" "ai ana" exnjrna,?"18 �f StUdenl btKi in a" matters, inter-
5�. To appoint chairpersons of all everm ,
10. To establish such bod.es sub dV.rv ' h T"1'1'
necessary and proZZI ?T
her duties. hc Performance ot his
11 To delegate the exercise of anv nf .k- u
v except the ; ?hef�ve enumerated powers and
- �. and the Power ,0 ;pfximLang �f � sla
12.lo perfoi � oullcs �lodeni U1 h Q
settion 2.
S� tion

� .
-
-
de-

Legisla-
Section 4
Thei
B N
Car
LI

4 1
section 5
The Esecut
:he follow .
!�� - ordinati
B To be responsible
the Student
C To app-
1
section 6.
There shall I
Pre
and Graduate da
Treasure-
A. No person e.xcep: a J
member of the f
and has 1
B. The Presidents of the see
duties:
1. To be a member of the I J
2.To be an ex-officio memDer
?.To perform all other duties as
C The Vice Presidents of the several
and duties:
1. To perform the duties a
his her absence or mcapa.
2. To succeed to the off
become vacant
3 To perform all other d
D. The Senior Class Secretarv -T-ei
and duties
1 To handle all secretarial mattJ
2 To manage the financia; 3 I
3 To assist the Senior Class P
by him her
Section 7. Vacancy
A.There shall be the following
I Should the otiice of Presider.t
on the Vice President
2.Should both offices of Preside!
the Treasurer, or in his her
assume said office until a Presi.
B.Should any other executive office
to fill the vacancy within three
Section t.
The President. Vice President, and Tr
mer school and assume ail dut
Government Association during
aaan
f





ileem
wers and
rgis iative
Section 2.
There shall be a Vice President of the Student Government Association to aic
the President in the performance of hisher duties.
A.The Vice President shall be elected in the manner prescribed for the Presi-
dent
B.No person shall be qualified for the office of Vice President who is not also
quahtied for the office of President.
(The Vice President shall enjoy the following powers and duties:
1. To perform the duties and exercise the powers o the President in the
event of the President's absence or incapacity.
2. To succeed to the office ot President should that office become va-
cant.
3. To perform all duties incident to such office
Section 3.
Financial authority shall be vested in a Treasurer of the Student Government
Association
A. The Treasurer shall be elected in the manner prescribed for the President.
B No person shall be qualified for the office of Treasurer who is not also
qualified for the office of President.
C. The Treasurer shall enjoy the following powers and duties:
1 To appoint the Financial Advisor to the Student Government Associa-
tion and to consult with him her on business matters of the Student
Government Association.
2. To be directlv responsible to the Legislature for all financial transac-
tions.
3. To affix his her signature to all requisitions issued by the Student
Fund Accounting Office.
4. To confer with the Student Fund Accounting Office accountant each
school day to transact necessary business.
5. To advise the Legislature on all financial matters for their considera-
tion.
6. To sign all valid requisitions for organizations sponsored bv the Stu-
dent Government Association
7. To keep an open record on all appropriation acts passed bv the
Legislature
8. To perform all duties incident to such office.
Section 4.
There shall be a Secretary of the Student Government Association.
A. The Secretary shall be elected in the manner prescribed for the President.
B.No person except a full-time student at East Carolina University who has
completed 16 semester hours of work shall be eligible for the office of
Secretary; neither shall anyone who is not in good standing at las;
Carolina University and does not maintain a 2.000 average
C.The Secretary shall enjoy the following powers and duties:
1. To take minutes of all Legislature sessions and to keep such minutes in
permanent form.
2. To handle official correspondence of the Legislature under the direc-
tion of the Speaker.
3. To make available to Legislators and Executive Officers copies of the
minutes of all Legislative sessions.
4. To perform all duties incident to uch office.
Section 5.
The Executive Council, which shall consist of the Executive officers of the
Student Government Association and the five class Presidents, shall en-
joy the following powers and duties:
A. To coordinate the action of its members.
B. To be responsible for employing and discharging full-time employees of
the Student Government Association.
C. To appoint, with the legislature's approval, all student members of all
Judicial boards except the residence hall councils.
Section 6.
There shall be class officers, elected by their respective classes, to consist of a
President and a Vice President for the Freshmen. Sophomore, Junior
and Graduate classes, and a President. Vice President, and Secretary-
Treasurer for the Senior class.
A. No person except a full-time student at East Carolina University who is a
member of the class from which heshe is elected, is in good standing,
and has a 2.000 average shall be eligible for class office.
B. The Presidents of the several classes shall enjoy the following powers and
duties:
l.To be a member of the Executive Council.
2.To be an cx-officio member of the Legislature.
3.To perform all other duties as delegated to himher by the Legislature.
C.The Vice Presidents of the several classes shall enjoy the following powers
and duties:
1. To perform the duties and execute the powers of the class President in
hisher absence or incapacity.
2. To succeed to the office of President of the class should that office
become vacant.
3. To perform all other duties as delegated by the Legislature.
D. The Senior Class Secretary-Treasurer shall enjoy the following powers
and duties:
1. To handle all secretarial matters pertaining to the Senior Class.
2. To manage the financial affairs of the Senior Class.
3. To assist the Senior Class President in whatever way deemed necessary
by himher.
Section 7. Vacancy
A.There shall be the following order of succession to the office of President.
1 Should the office of President become vacant, the office shall devolve
on the Vice President.
2.Should both offices of President and Vice President become vacant
the Treasurer, or in hisher absence the Speaker of the Legislature shall
assume said office until a President shall be elected.
B.Should any other executive office become vacant, there shall be an election
to fill the vacancy within three weeks of its occurrence
Section
The President, Vice President, and Treasurer shall be required to attend sum-
mer school and assume all duties for the operation of the Student
Government Association during summer school. They shall receive nor-
STUPENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS Page 3
t !u Tg lre SUmmer' and as an addlon- their tuition shall be
pa id by the Student Government Association. Exceptions to this rule can
only be made by the Review Board. Any officer desinng an exception
must file a formal request no later than 30 days before the end of Spring
Semester. K
ARTICLE V: JUDICIAL
Section I.
The supreme judicial power shall be vested in the Review Board.
Section 2.
The Review board shall be the board of final appeal from all boards
established under the authority of this Constitution. It shall have the
power to affirm, dismiss for violation of students' right, or refer back
for further deliberation, the decision of any lower board brought to it on
appi .1 The Review Board shall also have the final authoritv to interpret
this Constitution and the laws passed under its authority
Section 3.
The Review Board, sitting as a Board for the Redress of Grievances, shall
have exclusive jurisdiction over cases of a non-discriminatory nature
where a student is being or would be harmed by any on-campus student
organization. The Board shall have such power as is necessary to redress
grievances brought to its attention.
Section 4.
There shall be such residence hall councils as shall be established for the
maintenance of good order in the residence hall, provided that the
original jurisdiction of these boards does not extend beyond one or a
group of residence halls and that the decision of these boards may be ap-
pealed to a higher board.
Section 5.
The following all-campus boards are hereby established. The Honor Board
and the Academic Honor Board. These boards shall have such powers,
duties and original appellate jurisdiction as the Legislature shall from
time to time grant to them, including the power to interpret the Constitu-
tion and laws of the Student Government Association as it pertains to
disciplinary matters.
Section 6.
The Legislature may establish such other all-campus boards as it deems
necessary and proper for the orderly administration of student justice.
Section .
Final appeal from the decision of the Review Board shall be to the Chancellor
of the University.
Section 8.
No person except a full-time student, faculty member or administrative of-
ficial at East Carolina University shall be a member of anv judicial board
or council; neither shall any student be eligible who is" serving on the
Legislature or the Executive Council, docs not maintain a 2 000 average
or is not in good standing at East Carolina University
Section 9.
There shall be an Attorney General who snail be the coordinator of the
judicial system.
A.There shall be a selection committee composed of the Chairman of the
Review Board and the Honor Board, the incumbent Attorney General
and two administrators appointed by the Chancellor of the University
which shall select two names and submit them to the President of the Stu-
dent Government Association. He she shall choose one of the people
submitted to serve as Attorney General, subject to the approval of the
Legislature. The Attorney General shall take office by April 20
B The Attorney General shall enjoy thr following powers and duties
1. Heshe shall appoint and assist ,n the training of hisher staff which
shall be composed of men and women.
2. He, she shall review all cases and complaints and shall determine the pro-
per board to hear the case.
3. In all questions or constitutional interpretations and procedures, heshe
shall issue advisory opinions which shall stand unless questioned before
tne Review Board.
4. Heshe shall be responsible for the publication of and compliance with
fhe udiSr"01 mCOnSistCnt with this Constitution, for the operation of
ARTICLE VI: RECALL
Section I.
The power to recall any elected official shall be vested in the constituency of
that official, which shall be defined as that body of students who are
qualified to vote for that official. Officials shall be recalled in the follow-
ing manner:
A. A petition to recall cither the President, Vice President. Secretary or
Treasurer of the Student Government Association must contain the
signatures of at least 15 percent of the entire student body
B. A Legislator may be recalled by a petition which contains the signatures of
at least 15 percent of those students eligible to vote in hisher constituen-
cy.
C. A class officer may be recalled by a petition containing the signatures of at
least 15 percent of the students in that class which elected himher.
Sectfoa 2.
S t�K,ihaU t!?111 to th Attorney General, who shall have
tm (10) school days to determine validity of said petition Ifheshe
declares the peutions valid, the Student GovemrnentAssociation PrS
dent shall djrect the Elections Committee to hold an dectSn !n SSk
Ujejncumbem may be a candidate. The incumbent shall remam in office
Pending the outcome of the election.
��
��

���
MM





ARTICLE VII: INITIATIVE
The student body shall have the power to initiate any act within the power of
the Legislature, provided that 10 percent of the student body shall sign a
petition calling for the consideration of a bill which they shall submit in
writing with the petition to the President. The President shall, if heshe is
notified by the Attorney General that the petition is in good order within
the limitations of this Constitution, provide that a referendum be con-
ducted on the bill in not less than eleven (11) nor more than sixteen (16)
school days after heshe receives petition on the bill.
Public notices of such referendum shall be given not less than four (4) days
before it shall take place. A majority of the votes cast at the referendum
shall be sufficient to pass the bill. This article shall not apply to constitu-
tional amendments and appropriation bills.
ARTICLE VIII: OATH OF OFFICE
Section I.
All Student Government Association executive, judicial and legislative
members shall take the following oath:
'1� hereby pledge myself to uphold the Constitution of the
Student Government Association of East Carolina University, to promote
the highest ideals of honor, and to execute to the best of my ability the
duties of my office
Section 2.
Any member of any constitutionally established j idicial body who has
previously taken the Oath, shall be empowered to administer it.
ARTICLE IX: AMENDMENT PROCEDURE
Section I.
All the amendments to this Constitution must be proposed by one of the
following methods:
A. By a vote of two-thirds (23) of the membership of the Legislature on
three readings.
B By a petition presented in writing to the President earning the signature of
15 percent of the membership of the student bodv
Section 2.
All proposed amendments to this Constitution must be reviewed before
voting by the Attorney General to insure consistency in both form and
content.
Section 3.
All proposed amendments to this Constitution must be adequately publicized
at least one week prior to the date on which a vote is taken bv the student
body.
Section 4.
Proposed amendments to this Constitution shall be adopted by a two-thirds
2 3) vote of the students y oting on the amendment provided that at least
20 percent ot the student body votes.
Section 5.
All changes to th.s Constitution shall be incorporated as chronologically
enumerated Amendments thereto.
Section 6.
Within 24 hours after the polls are closed, the President must sign the amend-
ment into the Constitution if it is ratified
Section 7.
After complying with Sections 1-6, all amendments shall become effective
immediately unless otherwise specified.
Page 4
II.
BY-LAWS OF THE
STUDENT LEGISLATURE OF
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
TITLE I: ORDER OF BUSINESS
Rule 1.
Convening Hour - The Legislature shall convene at the hour fixed by the
preceding meeting. In the event the Legislature adjourns the preceding
meeting without having fixed an hour for convening, the Legislature shall
convene on the following Monday at 5 p m
Rule 2.
Opening the Session - The Speaker shall, upon order being obtained, have
the sessions of the Legislature opened with a moment of silence
Rule 3.
Convening in Absence of Speaker - In the absence of the Speaker the
Chairperson of the Rules and Judiciary Committee shall be Speaker pro'tcm-
pore and shall perform all duties of the Speaker until such time as the
Speaker may assume the Chair
Rule 4.
Quorum �
(a) A quorum consists of a majority of all the qualified members of the Stu
dent Legislature.
(b) When a lesser number than a quorum convenes, the members may sit as a
body politic, but no business can be concluded in the name of the Stu
dent Legislature.
Rule 5.
Approval of Minutes � After the moment of silence, and upon the presence
of a quorum, the Speaker shall ask for additions or corrections to the printed
minutes. Upon hearing objections and after concluding additions and dele
tions, the Speaker shall approve the minutes without the necessity of a vote of
the Legislature.
Rule 6.
Order of Business � After approval of the minutes, the order of business
shall be as follows:
(a) Reports of the standing committees
(b) Reports of select committees
(c) Correspondence
(d) Questions and Privileges
(e) Introduction of Bills, Petitions, and Resolutions
(f) Unfinished business of previous meetings
(g) Bills. Resolutions, Memorials, Messages, and other papers on the calen
dar in their numerical order.
(h) Notices and Announcements
Rule 7.
Duties and Powers of the Speaker � The Speaker shall have general direction
of the floor of the Legislature and shall be authorized to take such action as is
necessary to maintain order. In case of any disturbance or disorderly con
duct in the gallery or hall, the speaker shall have the power to order the same
cleared.
Rule 8.
Substitution for the Speaker � The Speaker shall have the right to call on the
Speaker pro tempore to perform the duties of the Chair, but substitution
shall not extend beyond one meeting.
Rule 9.
Limitation of Debate - No member shall speak more than once in the affir-
mative on the main motion until all other members who wish to speak haye
done so. Speeches shall be limited to no longer than five minutes for the first
speech (first affirmative and first negative debate,) and two minutes for each
speech thereafter, unless allowed to lengthen time alloted bv the affirmative
vote of the majority of the legislature (not to exceed ten minutes) Three corn
Plete rounds of debate must be completed before previous question may be
called.
Rule 10.
General Decorum �
(a) The Speaker shall preserve order and decorum
b) SSded �f SPCCCh Sha" bC �bSerVed and PCrS�nal renection �refuil
TITLE II: MOTIONS
Rule 11.
Motion Generally �
U) mewr,nnoand �r rCS�;utl�n submitted to the Legislature shall be reduced
to writing in proper form and on a proper motion sheet
llTsTlT T b !hC SCl or rcad ' Speer �
wnhdrawn Ufn !� P058"800 �f thc Legislature, bu.it mas be
withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except ,n the case of a mo
t.or, to reconsider, wh.ch motion, when made by a member hall nVtbe
withdrawn without the leave of the Legislature '
the Sadker " mUS' be �dc ,mm�el after being recognized by
TITLE III: VOTING
Rule 12.
Rule 13.
TITLE IV: COMMITTEES
Rule 15.
Committees Generaliv �
(a) 5L55?SLXtTaa?!hc Spkcr-unl- �
(b) Any member may excuse himherself from serving on any committee if
they are a member of two standing committees
ofVuTnel'r ChaUpCrSOn shaJ1 det"m- orum for the transaction
(dA majority of committee members shall be present for the quorum.
Appointment of Standing Committee -
(1) Rules and Judiciary
(2) Screening and Appointments
(3) Appropriations
(4) Student Welfare
Rule 17.
Standing,mmittee Met
(a) Standing committees and subct
furnished with suitable meet
scnedule h the Student C en
(b) The chairperson or other :
the meeting places of the
disturbance or disorder
and proper conduct of I egisla
or individuals, the chairman o
exclude from the se
Legislative busine
all persons not memb
(c) t pon affirmative yote of a maj
mittee or subcommittee, execi
are elation of the apt
(d) Procedure in the
mittee determines ap-
Till r V: HANd
Rule 18.
Reference toommti
Each bill, resolution, or :
tion be referred
propnate.
Rule 19.
tntroductior
(a) Every bill shall be introd i
permission of the Speake
(b) Any member introduc
the substance of same and th
Rule 20.
Papers Addressed to the Legisic
Petitions. Memorials, and other
presented by the Speaker
be verbally made by the in
papers shall not be deba - I
unless the Legislature
Rule 21.
Introduction I H.
(a) Prior to any resolution or �
be sent to the Secretary here
same to be a
Legislature
(b) Numbering
(No following) i r
as I R
(c) Wheneyer a bill is in!
copies accompanying same as
submifed without the re .
returned to the introduce: I
number stamped up- .1
Rule 22.
Duplication of Bills �
The Speaker shall so designat:
be made of an introduced bill Pi
shall have one copy put upoi
other copies in their office
committee to which 'he -
Rule 23.
Report by Committee �
All bills and resolutions shai
red, with such recommendat:
(a) Favorable Report When a 1
tion that it be passed, the
ib)Report without Prejudice hej
judice, the bill shali be placed
(c) Unfavorable Reports Wrier a
mendations that it not Se passej
the bill shall be placed on the
td)Minoru Reports When a I
mendation that it noi be passJ
report signed bs � -ne-fj
who ere present and vot -
-he question before I egis
report" If the minority reporj
shall be placed on the J
minontv report fails ador
ed on the unfavorab
Rule 24.
Removing Billfr �
A bill ma be removed from thr
by two-thirds sote A motion
is not debatable, but the member mj
and concise statement no:
reasons for 'he motion
Rule IS.
Reports on Approprtai
All committees, other tl
favorabf) reporting ans bill whichj
same in the report, and the said bill
Appropriations tor a report betore
report from the Committee on r.
sufficient tunc i
t
mmm
V t
.1





s
ICC, and upon the presence
, corrections to the printed
� Iditions and dele
essity of a vote of
rdci of business
- on the- calen-
cr.il direction
u tion as is
tisorderl) con
dei the same
n the
ubstitution
� e a �
speak have
'or the first
. 'or each
i ti ve
rec corn-
may be
lt)N
ker ot
ia be
i mo-
on of
ed b
li: ()11M,
titution ot
mined b
�x she
te In all other
n.er mav
;iKer vote
'MM2J i Kfs
�sherwise
.rnittee if
msaction
. . rum
point the follow-
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION OCUMENTS
Rule 17.
Standing Committee Meetings �
(a) Standing committees and subcommittees of standing committees shall be
furnished with suitable meeting places, if desired, pursuant to the
schedule with the Student Center Information Office.
(b) The chairperson or other presiding officer shall have general direction of
the meeting places of the committee or subcommittee and in case of any
disturbance or disorderly conduct therein, or if the peace, good order
and proper conduct of I egislative business is hindered by any individual
or individuals, the chairman or presiding officer shall have the power to
exclude from the session any individual or individuals so hindering
Legislative business; or if necessary to order the meeting places cleared of
all persons not members of the committees or subcommittee.
(c) Upon affirmative vote of a majority of the members of any standing com-
mittee or subcommittee, executive sessions may be held, provided they
are not in violation of the appropriate North Carolina Statute.
(d) Procedure in the committee shall be governed by the rules which the com-
mittee determines applicable for the committee.
TITLE V: HANDLING OF BUSINESS
Rule 18.
Reference to Committee �
Each bill, resolution, or other matters shall immediately upon its introduc-
tion be referred by the Speaker to such committee as heshe deems ap-
propriate.
Rule 19.
Introduction of Bills and Resolutions �
(a) Every bill shall be introduced in regular order of business, except upon
permission of the Speaker or on report of a committee.
(b) Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall briefly state in the title
the substance of same and the title shall not be amended.
Rule 30.
Papers Addressed to the Legislature �
Petitions, Memorials, and other papers addressed to the Legislature shall be
presented by the Speaker, and a brief statement of the contents thereof may
be verbally made by the introducer before reference to a committee, but such
papers shall not be debated or decided on the day of their first being read,
unless the Legislature shall direct otherwise.
Rule 21.
Introduction of Bills, Copies Required �
(a) Prior to any resolution or bill introduction, a duplicate copy thereof shall
be sent to the Secretary where the bill is duplicated and shall cause the
same to be available at all times to any member of the Student
Legislature.
(b) Numbering of I egislature Bills shall be designated as L.B.
(No. following). A resolution shall be designated
as L.R. (No. following).
(c) Whenever a bill is introduced, it shall be in such form and have such
copies accompanying same as designated by the Speaker, and any bill
submitted without the required number of copies shall be immediately
returned to the introducer. The Secretary shall stamp the copies with the
number stamped upon the original bill.
Rule 22.
Duplication of Bills �
The Speaker shall so designate to the Secretary the number of duplications to
be made of an introduced bill. Prior to the convening hour, the Secretary
shall have one copy put upon the desk of each member and shall retain the
other copies in their office. A sufficient number of copies for the use of the
committee to which the bill is referred shall be made available.
Page 5
an tee shall be chairperson, and
a designate a co-chairperson and
Rule 23.
Report by Committee �
All bills and resolutions shall be reported from the committee to which refer-
red, with such recommendations as the committee may desire to make,
(a) Favorable Report: When a committee reports a bill with the recommenda
tion that it be passed, the bill shall be placed on the favorable calendar.
(b)Report without Prejudice: When a committee reports a bill without pre-
judice, the bill shall be placed on the favorable calendar,
(c) Unfavorable Reports: When a committee reports a bill with the recom-
mendations that it not be passed, and no minority report accompanies it,
the bill shall be placed on the unfavorable calendar.
d)Minority Reports: When a bill is reported by a committee with a recom-
mendation that it not be passed, but it is accompanied by a minority
report signed by at least one-fourth of the members of the committee
who were present and voting when the bill was considered in committee,
the question before Legislature shall be: "The adoption of the Minority
report If the minority report is adopted by a majority vote, the bill
shall be placed on the favorable calendar for consideration. If the
minority report fails adoption by the majority vote, the bill shall be plac-
ed on the unfavorable calendar
Rule 24.
Removing Bill from Unfavorable Calendar �
A bill may be removed from the unfavorable calendar upon motion carried
by two-thirds vote. A motion to remove a bill from the unfavorable calendar
is not debatable, but the member may before making the motion make a brief
and concise statement not to be more than three minutes in length of the
reasons for the motion.
Rule 25.
Reports on Appropriation Bills �
All committees, other than the Committee on Appropriations, when
favorably reporting any bill which carries an appropriations, shall indicate
same in the report, and the said bill shall also be referred to the Committee on
Appropriations for a report before being acted upon by the Legislature. The
report from the Committee on Appropriation shall indicate that there are
sufficient funds in the Treasury for the Appropriation.
Rule 26.
Recall of Bill from Committee �
When a bill has been introduced and referred to a committee and, if after
thirteen days, the committee has failed to report thereon, then the introducer
of the Bill or some member designated by himher, on motion supported by a
vote of two-thirds (23) of the members present and voting, recall the same
from the committee to the floor of the Legislature for consideration and such
action thereon as a majority of the members present may direct.
Rule 27.
Calendar �
The Secretary shall keep a separate calendar of the bills and shall number
them in the order in which tney are introduced, and all bills shall be disposed
of in the order they stand upon the calendar
Rule 28.
Effects of Defeated Bill �
After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass the second reading, the con-
tents of such bill or the principal provisions of its subject matter shall not be
embodied in any other measure. Upon the point of order being raised and
sustained by the Chair, such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall
not be taken therefrom except by a two-thirds (23) vote.
Rule 29.
Amendments and Riders �
No amendment or rider to a bill before the Legislative shall be in good order
under such rider or amendment is germane to the bill under consideration
Rule 30.
Appropriations Guidelines �
The following appropriations guidelines shall be strictly adhered to by the
Legislature, with the understanding that all student groups are educational
(a) No group(s) which advocate violation of federal, state or local laws shall
be funded.
(b) No partisan, political or social action groups or activities shall be funded
(c) No religious groups or activities shall be funded.
(d) Organizations and departments requesting money shculd first make full
use of all money-producing opportunities.
(e) The Student Government Association shall not make allocations to
groups to use exclusively for the personal benefit of their members
(f) Duplication of activities should be avoided.
(g) Student activity fees shall not be used for social events with no educa
tional or service value,
(h) Careful consideration will be used in determining funding for awards,
because activities are more important than awards.
TITLE VI: LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS
AND EMPLOYEES
Rule 31.
General Admittance to Room �
No person, except members, officers and employees of the Student
Legislature and advisors, shall be permitted on the floor of the Legislature
during its meetings unless permitted by the Speaker or provided by the Con-
stitution of the Student Government Association, but shall remain in the area
designated for visitors by the Speaker.
Rule 32.
Extending Courtesies �
(a) Courtesies of the floor shall only be extended by the Speaker.
(b) If there is any objection from any member of the Legislature to a non-
member speaking, then the non-legislator cannot speak unless by a ma-
jority vote of the Legislature.
TITLE VII: GENERAL RULES
Rule 33.
Selection of Secretary Pro Tempore �
(a) The Secretary shall have the power to appoint a Secretary Pro Tempore
with the approval of the majority of the Legislature. The Secretary Pro
Tempore shall be a member of the Legislature and shall be appointed no
later than the second session of the newly-elected Legislature. The
Secretary Pro Tempore shall enjoy the following powers and duties:
1. To perform the duties and exercise the powers of the office of
Secretary, excluding those powers of the Executive Council, in the even;
of the Secretary's absence or incapacity.
2. To perform those duties delegated by the Secretary.
Rule 34.
A ttendance of Members �
(a) No member or officer of the Legislature shall be absent from the service
of the Legislature without leave, unless from sickness or disability.
(b) Written excuses must be turned in to the Speaker or the Secretary prior to
or within 24 hours after a meeting of the Student Legislature.
(c) Upon three (3) unexcused absences (per semester) from regularly schedul-
ed meetings, the Speaker may remove any member from membership in
the Legislature. In addition, ar;y member removed by the Speaker shall
also be suspended for one year from the date of suspension from holding
any appointed or elected office in the Student Government Association
(d) The Speaker may also remove any member of the Legislature for: Four
unexcused committee meetings per semester; six unexcused early leaves
(explanation); absenteeism from six Legislature meetings per semester or
four consecutive Legislature meetings,
(c) The departure from any two Legislature meetings with "just reason"
before these meetings have been legally adjourned will be considered an
infraction of the same magnitude as an unexcused absence from anyone
of the Legislative meetins. Four unexcused early leaves equal two unex-
cused absences. The Speaker of the Legislature decides on "just reason
��





y
Ul1:�ENT government ciation DogaffiNTO
Documents to be signed by the Speaker �
All acts, resolutions, correspondence and official copies of the I esislature
absence. ' " Speaker �r presidin � S
Rule 36.
Placement of Material on Members' Desks �
(a PZZZ �Ken ,han CmberS �f thc Legislature. officers or staff advisor
thereof shall not place or cause to be placed any materials on member?
ed shaT. htrVh ' aPPr0tthC Speaker Any rin,ed ma,e"al so p ac-
ed shall bear the name of the originator
(b) There shall be no printing or reproducing of papers that are not legislative
in essence without approval of the Speaker egis.auve
(e) The departure from any two Legislature meetings with "just reason"
Sion of ZUngS h3Ve bee lega"y adj�Urned W1" be deeraed an
nfrau on of the same magnitude as an unexcused absence from anvone
of the Legislative meetings. Four unexcused earlv leaves equal two unex
reason" ' The SpMker �f the UgisIaturc 2E �
Rule 35.
Documents to be signed by the Speaker �
Min a,CIS' n0110"5' COrresP�dence and official copies of the I egislature
Minutes shall be signed by the Speaker or presiding officer ,n thelpSe"
Rule 36.
Placement of Material on Members' Desks �
U) "thS �hhen than e,nbe" �f the le8'slatu officers or staff advisor
the eof shall not place or cause to be placed any materials on members'
ed shall be'rL' f �J Sk" A" pnnted mater'al " E-
eci shall bear the name of the originator
b) meereJna11 hC,K� Pnming �r reProdn �t Papers that are not legislative
in essence without approval of the Speaker
Rule 37.
Procedure of the Rules �
���&Sff- ' eg,S,atUre " EaSt C� L� shaH
3) 2KK �f lhC SlUdem G�Vernmen! Association of East Carolina
,b UmleTsHv0' ,hC S'Udent GmernmenI Association of Fast Carolina
(C) Roberts Rules of Order � I atest edition.
HI.
Judicial Rules
and Procedures
3
4
5
b
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
CONTENTS
PPMd Policies Coverning the Judicial System
Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Offenses forSents
Academi. Integrity Violations
Offenses Against the Judiciary
Penalties
Remedies
Het ords
Notification
'ompliance
Ejec tion
Administrative Procedures
Procedures foi judicial Records
Members oi the Judiciary
Residence Life and Government
Open House Visitation Pobcy
au?jftsasi?B3�
Current Universir Policy on Illicit Drue
SSSSSSiSSSS
KeK.stra.H.nof Stnd�, (�r�anuatu ' ll rK0TOI�
TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
Page 6
be used for The Code of
The following terms and definitions shal
t-onduct
A Sfc'rf ,c,all enroiied ,n ,he acad� �� -
STmorT 3SSeS��yed b Car0"na l "�" - ��
Test - Any written or oral examination of a student bv an instructor on
b7etsrrt?oerd " " b �" S�
l' T D��n'l for a specified period of time "
zpgzzstfzszr �"i ���-
uSTIii!? Z A1y a0ttOn b a number of �dents. participants in a
SSSStT' �r '� 0ff-al ��n of a ���
Dtsmissd Dismissal from enrollment at the University for two year,
B
I)
E
EAS1 A HOI ISA UMVERSI l
CRKENWIM MiKIIH 4MMJV4 SPtM
H RISDft
r� Student Judu ml Si, r�m � ,
' ��l i rMfi; Jrr r,) �
establishes the esuntials of p, .
tstud t I .
�s �"��" fem�m�(
Asf�� ordmator, Mft. stud, .
thuhandbook mdfarn lfu,thth, , .
procedur, i (am especially � v ,
'� ' paying r its i � �
7.
R, �. s . .
I1
( hancellor
Vice Chancellor
for
Student Life
S.R.A ppt
Dl F PRO(
:
V
1: PK1N( ip.
(.0rRNIN( I
ee:


mi�mm
-�
f





S

&C& 7
Hearing5 R.A.
B-ardAppeal
Boiird
RfMjcnce
Board ofHall Judicial
InquireHouseouncil Board
JURISDICTION OF CAMPUS JUDICIAL BOARDS
Vice Chancellor for Student Life � All judicial findings are subject to
review K the N ice C hancellor for Student I ife. Final appeals from the Vice
Chancellor foi Student 1 ife shall go to the c hancellor
Review Board ih Review Board shall have original jurisdiction in all
cases involving constitutional questions in the interpretation and application
ol the SGA c (institution. Ihe Review Hoard shall have appellate jurisdiction
:l othei cases which originate before anv board of the Judiciary, except
the Academic Integrit -
Honor Board mot Hoard has original jurisdiction in cases ol
other violations of the t ode of Conduct and disciplinary
tenses.
Academic Integrit) Board - Ihe cademic Integrity Boa:d shall have
iton �vei ' the H de. The
Academic Integrity Board shall have appellate jurisdiction ii
faculty member elects to hear the case.
Board of Inquiry � 1 ti � Inquiry, at the ice C hancellor I
ginal investij n alleged cas
� .
Residence Hall Houseouncil Board � I he Residence Mall House C oi
Residence Hall R
. i or in the residence halls, rhese Boa
. isdiction lations of rules and regulati is pa
( House ouncil Boards. Ihev have the authority to refer any i
he Honor Board tor proper disposition.
Intramural-Recreation Services Advisory Council � The Intramu
Recreation Set rices Ad isory Council has original jurisdiction of all cases of
disruptive and disorderly behavior relating to programs or services conducted
under the auspices of the Department of Intramural-Recreation Services
This council also authority to refer anv violation to the Honor Board
or Hearings Board foi p: position.
S.R.A. Appeal Board � The S.R.A. Appeal Board has appellate
diciton on all appeals from violations of Residence Hall rules and House
Council Board action.
STI'DENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION PQCTMKNTS Page 7
Honor Code
The heart of E.C.Us Judicial System is the Honor Code. This code states:
You are on your honor not to cheat, steal or he.
DUE PROCESS AND CODE OE CONDUCT
FOR ALL STUDENTS
I asl (. arolina University recognizes the rights oi all students as responsible
members ol society and citizens ol the United States oi America, as well as
the right to respect and consideration to the Constitutionally guaranteed
doms of speech, assembly and association. The University further
gnizes the rights oi all students within the institution to freedom of in-
quiry, and to the reasonable use of, the services and facilties ol the University
which are intended foi their education.
In the interest oi maintaing order on the campus and guaranteeing the
broadest range ol treedom to each member oi the community, some rules
have been established by the students and other members of the University
community acting in concert. These rules limit some activities and proscribe
certain behavior which is harmful to the orderly operation of the institution
and the pursuit of its legitimate goals. All students are held to be informed oi
these rules, which are printed in the Student Government Association
Documents Handbook.
II anv student is accused of a violation of any of these rules, he. she has the
right to a speedy and fair hearing before an appropriate hearing board. Ap-
propriate due process safeguards have been built into the procedures which
govern each of these boards so that no permanent or recorded penalty shall
be meted out until the accused student shall have a fair chance to be heard.
Appropriate appeals are allowed from the decisions of these boards.
.All judicial findings are subject to review by the Chancellor of East
Carolina University and he she shall have the final authority to sustain,
change or reverse any findings.
I: PRINCIPLES AND POLICIES
GOVERNING THE JUDICIAL SYSTEM
A. lntructor and Classroom Control � The instructor has the ultimate con-
trol over classroom behavior and can dismiss from the classroom any
student engaged in disruptive conduct. The instructor should, in the
event such action is necessary, immediately report the incident to the
Head of the Department or Dean of the School and the Associate Dean
of Students. "Except for the risk to the physical and emotional well-
being of a student, faculty member or the University, the status of the ac-
cused student will not change, pending disciplinary action on the
reported incident
(.
B. Traffic and Parking Regulations � The student is responsible for com-
pliance with the rules and regulations governing the registration and use
ol motor vehicles as printed in the campus Traffic Regulations. This
booklet may be obtained from the Director of Public Safety. Students
should familiarize themselves with these regulations
C. Solicitations � Solicitation, selling, merchandising, posting, and
distribution oi posters, and or handbills or similar activities on
I University-controlled property is prohibited Exceptions shall be apj
ed bv the Vice Chancellor for Student Life, his designated representative,
or the Committee on Canvassing and Solicitation.
I). Use of Amplifying Lquipment � The use of amplifying equipment, in-
cluding sound tracks, on University property requires permission of the
Vicehancelloi tor Student 1 ife or his designated representative.
E. Distribution of Literature on C ampus � Distribution oi commer
literature n leaflets bv organization chartered bv the Student
Government Association or bv individual students, or people not
�sith the University is not pern
buildings located on University-controlled property withoul
Vice Chancellor tor Student Life, or his . . presentai
.re and materials foi distribution on Univi
perty mu ain: writings which are libelou:
tie or I
F. Identification Card � The I.I), card is the pi
rendered ;ver
sity in the per; irman
LD. in his her p be treated as a non-stud
Security � In order to n oi stud
nd regulai
Eastarolina University : pecial foi
ficers.
H. CheckashingStudents must be aware of the penalties d in giv-
ing the University a bad check. The Cashier's office, Student Bank,
Feteria ana Student Supply Store all charge a fee for returnee
Students should also recognize and realize that the L'nive- erves
the right of a disciplinary hearing in repeated or flag
taining to returned checks.
1. Double Penalties � In situations where the misconduct violates the law
and University conduct regulations, the University ordinarily shall seek
to exercise its jurisdiction so as to avoid dual punishment for the same
act. This is true in all but very serious breaches of the iaw. When prompt
public prosecution is anticipated or is underway, the University shall not
exercise its jurisdiction until public officials have disposed of the case,
unless exceptional circumstances compel otherwise.
II. CODE OF CONDI CT AND DISCIPLINARY
OFFENSES FOR STUDENTS
Anv student whose conduct, on or off campus, becomes unsatisfactory in
the judgment ot University officials in the light of the foregoing statements
or policies will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. Disciplinary ac-
tion can be initiated by campus police, students, staff, faculty or ad-
ministrative personnel. Unwarranted changes shall not be subjec
disciplinary action.
A studenf shall refrain from:
A Knowingly publishing or circulating false information which is damaging
to any member of the University community (slander, lying or libel)
B. Using abusive, obscene, vulgar, loud, or disruptive language or conduct
directed toward and offensive to a member of or a visitor to the Universi-
'v community.
C. Using any University or privately rented telephone in
1. Avoiding the payment of tolls or long distance calls.
2 Using the telephone to make harassing, intimidating, nuisance or
obscene phone calls.
D. Harrassing, abusing or threatening another by means other than the use or
threatened use of physical force.
E. Endangering, injuring or threatening to injure the person or propertv of
another
F. Entering residence halls, buildings, classrooms, or other University pro
perties, or student properties (i.e. automobiles, lockers, or residences)
without authorization.
G. Vandalizing, destroying maliciously, damaging, or misusing public or
private properties including library materials.
H. Stealing or attempting to steal, aiding or abetting, receiving stolen proper-
ty, selling stolen propety, or embezzling the property of another person,
the University, or associated units.
1. Book Selling � When a student resells a book to an individual or to
the Student Supply Store, that student is held responsible if the book
which is being resold is stolen property. If and when a student buys a
book from another student, it is the purchaser's or seller's responsibility
to be able to identify the student involved. If the student buying the book
will not or cannot identify the seller, the student buying the book will be
held responsible. The student who sells a book to another student should
always have hisher LD. number in the book.
2. In addition to penalties given by the Honor Board, a student con-
victed of stealing or knowingly possessing stolen goods shall make im-
mediate and complete restitution.
I. Disruptive and disorderly conduct as outlined in University Policy and
Procedure concerning disruptive and disorderly conduct.
J. Illegally manufacturing, selling, using or possessing narcotics, bar-
biturates, amphetamines, marijuana, sedatives, tranquilizers,
hallucinogens, andor other known drugs and or chemicals. A student
shall also refrain from buying, selling, possessing or using any kind of
drug paraphernalia or counterfeit drugs.
I
MS







STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
Be ngintoxicated in pubhc, displaying or driving under the influence or
legally possessing or using, alcoholic beverages or liquors. When a stu-
JudVnV C" t0ihC JUdiCiary �flCe �n a" alcohol-related incident that
destnld �T t0 aUend thC A1C0h0' Woshop. Th.s Workshop I
designed to increase awareness of the role alcohol plaved in the incident
and m,n,m,ze the probability of reoccurrence. Within a two week Sod
d iaUP tmg thK W�rksh�P- lh �"den, wifl go for a follow-up
dividual session with a counselor.
L. To refuse to comply with any lawful order of a clearly indentifiable
University official acting in the performance of hisher dm iefthn
orcement of University Policy. Residence staff members are con s dered
University officials when acting in an official capacitv
shv off,ciar eSem hJShCr ID' Card WhC" reqUCSted '� d� S� by a Univer-
O Gambim11"8 " harassmcm of East Caroli� Students
P Fmogn' aIHenn dLe-fraudin M ming documents, charge cards or
sr nvUmversuy with thc �-� d�
ArdrhmeLC,any V'�Ti B ,he,Honor Cod- Wch consists of the following:
assKtanre nrTh ,aCU glVi"g " " �f an "Authorized aid or
assistance or the actual giving or receiving of anv unfair advantage on
any form of academic work. 8
r;nPia,giarfni Copying the language, structure, ideas, andor
thoughts of another and passing same as one's original work
wnrfnoSIfCatlHn SlatCment of an' truth, either verballv or ,n
writing, regarding any circumstances relative to academic work'
nncttCTPfS Af �n tOWards thc commi-�ion of any act wheich would
constitute an academic v,olat,on as herein (that is cheating, plagiarism
andor falsification) shall be deemed to be a violation of the Honor Code"
and may be punishable to the same extent as if the attempted act had
been completed or consummated
T. Possessing or using firearms, fireworks, explosives or illegal weapons on
University-controlled or -owned property
U. Withholding, with knowledge, information from thc University
V. Obstructing justice by hindering or impeding a duly authorized function
of any judicial body, council, or Board
U Violation of city ordinances, State or Federal laws
X. Failing to repay, in full, any S.G.A. loan within the allotted time period.
Page 8
Q.
R.
S.
III. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY VIOLATIONS
trffl -Academ,ca�v ����, ,he Hl)nor Cod,
aVSdtnT At,emptl an �� �h "f completed would constitute
r mi �, ry� ,megnty V1�latl0n as defined em. institute
Mudent Observation of Suspected violation a � a .
D. Organization and Procedures -
2. Primary Interview
a. Notification. A student whn u v.i;� j
academically the Honor Code XlTte info� dof h T it?"
faculty member who identified he viola fion Sh tne,chaLge by the
will be called to an interview , 1, ' Subsequently, the student
b. Composition. The studen' and thc facuhv mmk
have a non-participating observer at the ta�nr��TneX � tKh
shall be the Chairperson of the DtpannJT
Assistant Dean of the College or School The sh!rf�.� , a" �r
dent or faculty member as heshe �s'ires lS n may,sf,ect a slu'
observe the procedures impartial "an To be prepaTo'St'f 1�
sruny to respond and presem -ssis!
dismiss c.tr
or some port.on thereof or take other appropS e fcS HeShe Tn
d. Referral to Academic Integrity Board. After completion of the
primary interview and on the basis of the evidence presented, if the facul-
ty member is of the opinion that a failing grade in the coursers) is made
quate disciplinary action, the faculty member may refer the entire case to
the Academic Integrity Board for appropriate action. In each case a new
hearing will be conducted by the Academic Integrity Board without
regard to the findings made or any disciplinary action taken during the
primary interview.
e. Appeals.
(1 i The student mav appeal the decision of :he primal
view to the Academic Integrity Board if:
(a.) The student believes the penalty too severe
(b.) The student contests the decision oi the fa
member on the basis of the evidence presented.
(2.) Tne appeal must be submitted to the Office oi the
Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student Services within five
class days after notification of the decision by :he faculty member
(3.) Iniversitv Academic Integrity Board
a. Composition.
(1.) Four faculty members and four alternates elected for three
ear staggered terms by the Faculty Senate
(2.) Three students and four alternates nominated bv the SOA
Executive Council and elected by the S.G.A. Legislature. Thee studeni,
shall serve for a vear and may be reelected for one additional year
(3.) A quorum shall consist of four faculty members and 'luce
students.
(4) The Chairperson, elected for one-vear term shall be a
and 1 �f B�ard' dected �mb � � -t,re Board
and may be reelected.
(5 The Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student
b oh i . 7TJ admin'rat.ve officer of the Board
or n.l JUriSdk,l�n- ThC Acadcmic Intr1 shall have
TJuf ,UntClT �VCr 3Cademic V1�Iafions � thc H�" Code if "he
faculty member elects to refer the case after the primary interview.
c. Appellate Jurisdiction. The Academic Integrity Board shall have
d. Procedures.
(1) The Associate Dean of Students and Director of Sr, rW
STofi Ch,a,rSOn- �ft e Pa" � � o o
a mee ,ng of the Academic Integrity Board within ten class days after an
appeal by a student. The faculty member, the student wunesse, and the
independent non-part,c,Pat,ng obs.rver(s), shall be SJ�
m k J�u thC StUdem m thc coursc must b submitted the X
member shall record a grade of incomplete, pending a deon b" the
(2) Those present at the hearing shall be-
3) .CnetssdsC.n,� Wh� ,hC nght l0 accompanied bv
b) Pan,IdCbvVwmber- Wh� ha the n8ht to b ����-
panieu dv witnesses.
lemtv' nr"Par,1C,patmg H Present at
me primary interview.
!d'4n 0,her I"�" called bv the Chairperson
Defender Att0ney and the StudenI P�c
(3) Should the student or the faculty member fail to ann�r
without prior approval of the administrative officer the A , Im ,
tegritv Board shall proceed with an absentia hearing "
(4) The Academic Integrity Board will follow the hearing oro
cedures established for the University Honor Board" '
(5) A majority of the Board shall decide the issue rhc
Chairperson shall vote onlv� in the case of a tie
e. Actions by the Board
vi-u (1) Evdence insufficient to sustain chanre or eh.�.
the student'and SfiaSSST ChmTpmon m con�tation wh
Board z:
mend to the tJ m�' or recom-
the course(s) or J�f"Wi�Bt TC a failin� rad for
one year. Pr�bati�n for a riod of time not to exceed
(c) Impose suspension or dismissal from the University
Board may be �b?4?SSSC?�h'
Vice Chancellor for Student Life and the ?� Ch.ne M ? L'f Tht
Affatr, ,haU io� review ,nt SJaaS5� 2�'
submit , Sumrv4,Ro'Pirp�ro;eed?�CademiCh B�
SCA . ?iSlatu,e: therchanr o"rS nd'n't 'SZvt
Chancellor for Academic Affairs. hc Vlce
IV
om.w (,is
otempt
bsrn!
H Perjurv
fnal b
Pre

Violation of .


violatio-
PrNAI

jut
referred foi
Scene:
A. Written repi
B. Fine of not le
Sc-
it shai:
manner acce
equivak
C. Volunta- �
assigned ;5 '��� .
mence
per
assignment
D. Tak .
E. ProK
exJ

Dc.
Sectioa ; � RetjMmt.
A. Written rq
B. Fine
C. Re:r
D. S
VI. REMEDH
The foll . rd:ev -
jurisdici
A. Restitution to the
B. Order to the offender
tions.
MI RFC OR!
Violations, per,
Associate De
ing under the
released to outside source
record.
Mil. VHIrU
dire, d
the ;
col:
wopriatc
suspa
permanent acaden
��� �'
�� �
���
f





IV. OFFENSES AGAINST THE JUDICIARY

DENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
IX. COMPLIANCE
Page 9
' ree
e Board
� Si idem
tie Board
ail have
de if the
ew
.ill have
:ne
,
ind the
led i ;es-
eeting.
i ult
"v !he
ippeai




dent

tgi � B
on of

nustain ihirvr nr rhinux
indthe faculty
must be
UtatM with
�upp the charge or charges. The
ember; or recom-
e a failing grade for
time not to exceed
� ersity.
g wit ember of the
.e It
� evidence to the Board
yiththe findings
Penaitie-
r f or A ademic
'he Vice
Any duly authorized member of a Judicial Board, including the Chairman
may bring the charge of contempt or perjury before the Board. This charge
may result from any of the following actions by a student or students
A.Contempt - Students are forbidden to disobev or disrupt anv Judicial
Board proceedings, to refuse to answer a Judicial summons, to violate
anv mandamus or injunctive order received by any Judicial Board, or to
tai! to honor a normal request of the Chairperson
B Perjury- Any student who tells a deliberate falsehood during anv Judicial
Board hearing or any administrative hearing of the Student Government
Association shall be considered to have perjured himself herself
inal b Absentia -Any student who refuses to appear at anv Judicial
rrenminary. without just casue, or who fails to appear at the'regularly
scheduled time of the hearing shall be tried in absentia. The student in ques-
tion shall be sent a registered letter, return receipt requested, outlining the
charges, rights of the student, and date, time and place of the hearing This
constitutes procedural due process and if the student refuses to appear an
absentia hearing shall take place.
Violation of Procedures � Any student or recognized body of the Student
Government Assoication who shall violate a bill of the SGA Legislature not
considered a disciplinary offense as defined in number H, nor considered
grounds for impeachment, shall be in violation of procedures. Procedural
violations shall not result in any disciplinary action bv any Judicial Board
but may result in a mandamus proceeding, a violation of which is contemn'
V. PENALTIES
The following penalties may be imposed in all cases arising under the
jurisdiction of the Univeristy Judicial System. In some cases a student may be
referred for counseling.
Section 1. (Individual Student)
A. Written reprimand.
B. Fine of not less that $10.UU nor more than $250.00 payable to the Judicial
Service Fund, unless the defendant and the assessor of the penalty agree that
it shall be payable in whole or in part by community service performed in a
manner acceptable to the assessor of the penalty with one hour of service
equivalent to the minimum wage.
C. Voluntary work under supervision with an alternative penalty may also be
assessed. The maximum number of voluntary work hours which may be
assigned is 75. Work assisgned a student by the Honor Board shall com-
mence in one week, and shall be completed within 30-40 days of the
penalty. The student shall contact the Associate Dean of Students for
assignment.
D. Taking of activity card for a specified period of time.
E. Probation � an official notification to the student compelling him her to
exhibit good conduct during the probationary period. Any further viola-
tions during the probationary period will be referred to the Associate
Dean of Students and may result in a more serious disciplinary action.
Terms of probation shall be for a designated period of time not to exceed
one year.
In addition, probation mav include:
1. In cases of misconduct in connection with L'niversity or facilities, the
student may be prohibited from further use of the facilities involved
other than those used in his her course work or studv.
2. In cases of misconduct in connection with University owned or
perated housing, the student may be ordered to vacate housing.
F. Suspension from the University for the stated period not to exceed one
year, or indefinitely with the right to petition the Hearing Board a! anv
time for readmission.
G. Dismissal from the University for a period of two years. Student must
petition the Honor Board for readmission.
Section 2 (Registered Organizations of Members of the ECU Community)
A. Written reprimand.
B. Fine of not less than $25.00 nor more than $500.00 payable to the Univer-
sity.
C. Restriction of privileges for a stated period not to exceed one year.
D. Suspension of privileges for a stated period not to exceed one year.
VI. REMEDIES
The following remedies may be imposed in all cases arising under the
jurisdiction of the of the University Judicial System.
A. Restitution to the victim of the violation.
B. Order to the offender to perform or to cease and desist from stated ac-
tions.
VII. RECORDS
Violations, penalties, and remedies shall be recorded in the Office of the
Associate Dean of Students andor Director of Public Safety in all cases aris-
ing under the University Judicial System. Copies of such records shall not be
released to outside sources without written consent of the subject of such
record.
VIII. NOTIFICATION
All notifications of violations, penalties, and remedies shall be sent as
directed by the Judicial Board to the University officials necessary to make
the penalties and remedies effective and to other persons who might provide
counseling assistance to the offender. For purposes of residence credit, the
appropriate University officials shall be notified of penalties involving
suspension or dismissal, but such notification shall not become a part of the
permanent academic record of the offender.
For noncompliance with penalties or remedies, the offender shall be
suspended until heshe has complied.
X. EJECTION
For conduct adversely affecting public order, offenders may be ejected
from the L'niversity campus or property, or any part thereof, by the
Chancellor of the University or his designated representative.
XI: ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES
A.General Information � Penalties by a Judicial Board become matters of
record. Until the affected student has been reinstated or until a particular
penalty no longer applies, such students shall be considered to be under
probationary status.
All disciplinary action becomes effective upon the date of Board action
unless otherwise specifically designated. Students dismissed by recom-
mendation of the proper board follow the same withdrawal procedure as
other students.
A student accused of academic dishonesty during the final examination
period shall be permitted to take all examinations that come prior to the
completion of his'her final examination. He'She will be prevented from
taking the remaining tests. No credit will be issued for such courses.
Any student who leaves or withdraws from the University and seeks read-
mission while disciplinary action is pending must secure a clearance from
the Office of Associate Dean of Students before being readmitted in
good standing.
In addition to penalties given by the Honor Board, a student convicted of
stealing or knowingly possessing stolen goods shall make immediate
and complete restitution.
B. Sanction without Hearing � When the Associate Dean of Students or Stu-
dent Attorney General, after investigation into an alleged violation of the
Code of Conduct, believes a student has committed a disciplinary of-
fense, he'she shall counsel with such student and may outline
disciplinary punishment or treatment. If after so counseling with the
Associate Dean of Students or Student Attorney General, the student
wishes to have a hearing, the Associate Dean of Students shall forward
the reports and evidence concerning the alleged disciplinary violation to
the Attorney General, who shall be responsible for appropriately ad-
ministering the case through the Stulent Governement Judiciary. From
that point on, the Associate Dean of Students is concerncned with the
keeping of records and aiding the student to comply with the punishment
decreed bv the Board.
GENERAL SUMMARY
The foregoing rules should give you an adequate picture of your position
within the University community. However, you should also realize that
commission of acts which violate laws as well as the rules and standards of
the University mav legally result in steps against you by an appropriate court
and by the L'niversity as well. (This is not a violation of the legal prohibition
against "double jeopardy) For example, students convicted for possession
or sale of drugs in a court of law (for on or off-campus violations) face the
possibility of suspension from the Unversity as well as appropriate legal
penalties
The following paragraphs summarize some of the areas in which Universi-
ty rules and state laws coincide and in which students may have to answer to
both forums for their behavior.
Under North Carolina law, a student may be convicted of a criminal of-
fense for instigating, aiding, or participating in a riot or for entering a
building for the purpose of destroying records or other property.
To carry a concealed weapon or display firearms in public areas or areas
adjacent thereto is prohibited by state law.
Students should know that the sale, possession or transportation into this
state of many types of fireworks is a violation of state law. Those fireworks
which are permitted may not be discharged in the vicinity of a public school.
North Carolina law prohibits mischievous interference with a fire alarm
box or misuse of fire equipment. Any person who aids or causes the burning
of a school building or other public property may be convicted of the crime
of arson.
The use of indecent language, harassment, or false statements over the
telephone; the malicious damage of utility equipment; or the intentional
avoidance of payment of bills for telecommun -ations services are all viola-
tions of state law.
It is unlawful for any person to manufacture, possess, have under his con-
trol, sell, administer or dispense any narcotic, stimulant, depressant, or
hallucinogenic drug except as authorized by a licensed physician.
XII: PROCEDURES FOR JUDICIAL BOARDS
PRELIMINARY CONFERENCE
At this conference, which must take place at least 72 hours before the hear-
ing, the Attorney General or hisher agent shall inform the accused student
of these facts:
A. The composition of the Board which shall hear hisher case;
B. The charge against him her;
C. Possible penalties involved;
D. His Her right to an assigned counsel or an counsel of hisher own choos-
ing from the students under the jurisdiction of the Board in which
hisher case shall be heard;
E. HisHer right to mandatory summoning of material witnesses and pro-
curement of evidence;

tmmmmm

f






STTI)r NT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION IKK I MINTS
F His Her right to summon as many as two character w
G His Her right to a separate hearing upon request
His It riffi !n ;eqUf VeaS�nahiC P�stP�n�"�' his he, hearing;
is Her nghl to face his her accuser upon request; and
Her nghl to be presented with the court procedures, organization
Pane 10
and any other pertinent informal
ion.
RIGHTS OF THE ACCUSED
A I he presumption of innocence until gu
a, ihe nghi to face -he accusei (il requested)
Hie rightof timely notice of hearing
tnan 2 ' to the hearinj
G. rhengh.
ft �
I No
i. I .
Hr ARIV, PROCEDURES FOR
LNIVERSIH HONOR BOARD
A he chail session 'o ordei and reminds all persons involve
hearing of the honor .ode He She questions respondent 01 resi I
uo fhfsTearing � �' yOIU duc Pr0CCSS rights in r
Url T�u? nCg1,1U- thC Chariman tructs the Attorney (,e�erai to
read the rights to the respondent.
After the Attorney General reads the rights, the Chairman again isks the
respondent it he she understands his her rights
D. The Chair asks the accused if he she challenges the ol
member of the Board If so, the accused musl state the reason(s) The
Board will meet in execut.se session to consider the challenge ,d deter-
mine whether or not the member should hear the case
1 Ihe Atu.rnes General reads the charges and specifications to the
charge) from the modem report Chairman asks tor the respondent's
plea to each charge
F' 7ArrneV Cneral Presems !hc Facts and which substantiate
G Witnesses in support of the charges are presented. Both sides have at this
tune, the right to cross-examine any and all witnesses and to examine am
aid all documents before being received in evidence No member ol the
Matt, faculty, or administration oi last Carolina University mas be call-
ed as an epen witness.
H. 1 he Public Defender presents the facts and ev idence which sup ,
cused. ' "vo
I. Wii n support ot the accused are presented Both sides have il i
cross-examine any and all witnesses at
and all document . n evidence v member ol
� faculty, oi administration of Ea
ed witness
Ihe ttorney General shall mal
rhe Puhlk Defender shall make a ig statei
lhc Bvi �- deliberati Ked session
rhe B"i: tnnounce its d � approni
tion(s) taken. ' '
B.
C.
J.
K
1
M
JUDICIAL APPEALS PROCEDURE
A A student found guilty of a violation mav request an appeal tor oik
following reasons:
1. Insufficient proof oi guilt.
2. Violation of student right.
v,vri J"dlCial acon inappropriate fW the circumstances ot the violation
MI h: Requests tor reconsideration based on new evidence are not grounds
tor action by an appellate body, but should be directed to the judicial bodv oi
ong.nal jurisdiction. The judicial body of original jurisdiction will re-open a
case at the request of the accused only if significant new evidence is not
available for presentation at the original hearing is to be presented Whenever
possible, the same judicial membership shall serve when a case is re-opened
B. Appeals are to be submitted to the Associate Dean of Students' Office for
delivery to the Chairperson of the appropriate appellate bodv or person
An appeal must be requested in writing within 48 hours after'the judicial
decision of the judicial body of original jurisdiction has been announced
to the accused. Subsequent appeals, which are permitted only in cases
resulting in a recommendation of suspension or dismissal, must be sub-
mitted to the Associate Dean of Students1 Office within 24 hours after an
appellate body has announced its decision to the accused. Time limits do
not include weekends or University holidays.
The specific reason(s) for the appeal and detailed explanation of the reason(s)
must accompany the initial request for appeal. If a subsequent appeal(s) is re-
quested, the accused may request action on any and all reasons listed in the
initial appeal; however, new reasons will not be considered after the initial
appeal has been completed.
Appellate bodies mav uphold, reduce, or dismiss charj
reverse verdicts, or uphold, alter or d . determined
b a lower judicial or appellate bods. If an appellate etermines
thai a ludiciaJ action should be altered, h mav reduce
the term of the judicial action or it mav asign a more appropriate jud
m providing the substitution action does constitute a level
bation or separation from the University which is n i
gned bv the judicial bods I
letermines
n �
6
D ! hearing is grained tl
md representative
XIII: Ml MBFRSOI I HI II )( R
Rr lr BOARD AND HONOR BOARD
G
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY BOARD
. term.sha
S Vl e T; "T thC SGA E' Ve oundj � toed
�ure, shall serve for a ,d may be re-elected for
ATTORNEY GENERAL
rhe Attorney General works m conjunction with the Associate Deal
lents on matters relating to the judicial svstem He She is to be comp
ly free and objective in rendering all decisions and services with re8ards to the
-trmmst.at.on. faculty, and students. Those who seek this L
ssreened bv the Selection Committee composed if administrative faculty
and s uden, represen.ives Two names are then forwarded to the Preside,
h SGA who with the approval ol the I egislafure. chooses one to be V
torney General (Note: This appointment is for one academu ear i
nms from the first day of Fai �
turn period.) nu
The duties oi the Attorney General include the follow .
B Coordination of ihe judicial svstem
C. Safeguard oi the procedural and substantive due pro.es
D Rule or: constitutional questions
I When formal charges are tiled, only the Attorney General has the .
o dismiss them.
1 Cn?J" member,
absent ' '
members, fron
he prelimin
I States his her names and
e charges against
' Notil ridani ot the
� pC 'he heannt:
1 Reads to rtu.
2 Presei � Board all reles
3 Recommends to the cl
absence of a witness or any othe
Y agree to table the case.
PUBLIC DEFENDER
for the purpose of insuring a completely fair and unbiased presentation of
his case, the Associate Dean oi Students shall appoint Public Defended
become well acquainted w�h the appropriate Board procedure and t r ��
conscent.ous service to he defendants dt all times. Their job is to b �� e
in their beliefs and to insure the defendant a fair, impartial and unhased
,hapnh.T rwSSt:aa,e �ean �f StUdentS reserv� !he .o'repLe anv -
he Public Defenders if the majority oi the board members so I s,re
,ia nf PTnlmenl lS'0r " ")� � runs from tki
pZoi: SemeSter Un Pnd �' !he "� �-
The duties of the Public Defender include the following
A. lntemew with the accused at prelim.nar conference
1. State hisher name and duties.
2. Explain the charges and the procedures oi the hearing
3 Go over the rights oi the accused as guaranteeo. in the st.uW ,
sti.ution and the procedures of the court involved
4. Assure the defendant that the Board is ava.lable to ass,s, the defen
Sty" r" aHr bremberin8 a! an t,mes�-55:
B Duties at the hearing.
1 Make sure the defendant's side of the case is presented completels
2. Make sure the student's constitutional rights are guaranteed in i
Dutie
JOIN! H Dl(
The �
Speaker
board
emc
mer I
anc
Men
Th� '�
B ��
f ' �
f) I -�
mei
Ins
Mem
year, �
RrMrW BOXRDPR
-
i
B. The S
� �
c h
Gene
ten bi "
E. At
r D
( -V

on
H. Act

Refei i �
i .
tion of the K
6
be J -
1 A r�
In the appea
ril
oi dr.c lin
3
4
j
below,
I: RrMDf V r I III WQ
East (
residence ha.
arc coed, male a:
places to live; howev b
residents be cons dera
I iving in the :e-
Student signs the
and University becomes -
the contract can resu
reserves the rij
one's acceptance
ing contravt
There are also other at all res j
(1) the State of North Carolina - the owner
therebv making therr ate laws,
safety standards that musl be maintains
regulations have been carefully conside
them
All residents are held responsible fo
realize that as mature adults, thes mus
rights of others The following condi
State of North Carolina and arc applicable
1 Possession, use ir sa e of illicit drugs
2. Theft, possession, or the receivin e

��i





X
�R B
R1)
.f Sr R VI
v
BI.1C illrrNDIR

:
mteed
C. Duties after the hearing.
1 Explain, if necessary, the disposition, the penalty, and the right to ap-
peal to a higher board.
2. If he she so desires, go with the student to hisher conference with the
Associate Dean for Student Life the following morning.
JOINT JUDICIAL BOARD
The purpose of the Joint Judicial Board is to periodically review the state
of the judiciary and recommend changes to the Student legislature The
Speaker of the I egislature shall refer all bills touching on the judiciary to this
board for its recommendations unless such bills shall be needed in an
emergency and are certified as such by the President of the Student Governe-
ment Association, the Attorney General, the Associate Dean of Students
and the Associate Dean and Director of Residence Life.
Membership of the Joint Judicial Board shall be as follows:
A The Attorney General, ex officio, as chairperson.
B Associate Dean of Students, and Associate Dean and Director of
Residence life, ex officio.
C. Two faculty members appointed by Vice Chancellor for Student Life.
D. Two student members appointed by the President of the Student Govern-
ment Association.
1 Two student legislators appointed by the speaker.
Insofar as possible, it is recommended that in exercising their appointive
power, the proper officials attempt to provide equal male and female
residence hall and day student representation.
Members of all the Judicial bodies shall be appointed for one academic
vear, except that members of the Academic Integrity Board mav be re-
elected.
REVIEW BOARD PROCEDl'RF
The following procedures will be followed bv all persons appearing before
the Review Board.
A The Review Board shall have original jurisdiction in all cases involving
constitutional questions m the interpretation and application of the SGA
Constitution. In such cases the Review Board will follow the hearing pro-
cedures established for the University Honor Board.
H The Review Board shall have appellate jurisdiction in all other cases which
originate before any board of the SGA Judiciary except the Academic In-
tegrity Board
( In all appeai ,ases. the respondent will be represented bv student counsel
ol his her choice. The University will be represented bv the Student Attorney
Creneral or a member of his her staff.
D, In cases involving appeals of decisions made bv the Honor Board, no writ-
ten briefs will be presented.
I At the scheduled hearing each side will be allowed thirty minutes for oral
argument Oral arguments will be limited to the issue set forth in the written
briefs filed with the Review Board. No new evidence will be considered on ap-
peal.
F. During oral arguments, board members may ask questions of the parties.
(i After each party has rested the case, and all relevant questions have been
asked by board members, deliberations will be made by the Board in closed
session.
H. Action by the Review Board:
1 Affirm the findings decision of the Hearing Board.
2. Amend the original decision.
3. Refer back for further deliberation on a specifically defined question.
4. Order a new hearing.
5. Any case involving new evidence discovered subsequent to hearing
below, the case will be referred back for further consideration in the discre-
tion of the Review Board.
6. Any case involving violation of a student's constitutional rights may
be dismissed.
I A record of proceedings will be kept for each Review Board case.
In the appeal of all judicial cases involving a property right or action, a
record of the proceedings will be made and will be forwarded to the proper
authority of appellate review. Appellate review in all cases will be on the basis
of and limited to the written record of the proceedings below.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
Page I
XIV: RESIDENCE LIFE AND GOVERNMENT
East Carolina University accommodates over 5,500 students in its
residence halls, and they usually operate at or near maximum capacity. There
are coed, male and female residence halls. These are stimulating and pleasant
places to live; however, it is imperative in these crowded conditions that all
residents be considerate of the rights and needs of each other.
Living in the residence halls is a privilege granted by the University. Once a
student signs the uniform housing contract the relationship between student
and University becomes a contractual one. Failure to adhere to the terms of
the contract can result in termination of the contract. The University also
reserves the right to give priorities in living area assignments based upon
one's acceptance of and compliance with the provisions of the uniform hous-
ing contract.
There are also other factors that all residents and their guests must realize:
(1) the State of North Carolina is the owner and landlord of residence halls,
thereby making them subject to State laws, (2) there are certain health and
safety standards that must be maintained. (3) all housing and House Council
regulations have been carefully considered and have specific reasons behind
them.
All residents are held responsible for the residence hall rules and should
realize that as mature adults, they must respect these and not infringe on the
rights of others. The following conditions are made illegal by laws of the
State of North Carolina and are applicable to the residence halls:
1. Possession, use, or sale of illicit drugs.
2. Theft, possession, or the receiving of stolen property.
Vandalism by defacing, damaging, altering, or destroying State property.
Arson by willfully starting fires in or about the buildings.
Possession andor use of firearms.
Intoxication, displaying, or possessing alcoholic beverages in public areas.
Trespassing.
8. Gambling or conducting lotteries.
9. Willfully setting false fire alarms or tampering with the alarm system or ex-
tinguishing equipment.
10. Pnysical or verbal abuse.
The above are representive, but in no way totally inclusive, of the State
laws which apply to people living in residence hails. However, residents are
subject to all State statutes.
If legal action does not occur for violations of State laws, offenders will
appear before the House Council Board to be settled there or referred to
another judicial body with in the University.
Regulations for the health and safety of the residents are:
1. Maintain safe electrical conditions by not overloading circuits with more
than 100 watts at a time.
2. Keep no pets, other than fish.
3. Keep the halls, stairs, and fire exits empty of any blocking items such as
trunks, boxes, tables and bicycles.
4. Leave doors completely closed that have been officially locked for the
night.
5. Place trash and garbage in designated receptacles only.
6. Use proper procedure for entering or leaving the building.
7. Throwing anything out the windows.
Violators of the above regulations will be subject to House Council Board
judicial action, which may include referral to the Associate Dean of
Students.
There are also other established regulations which are necessary for the
crowded living situations in the residence halls. In order to provide an at-
mosphere that is conducive to rest or study at all times it is necessary that
residents show proper consideration for each other These include: (1)
keep down excessive noise due to loud stereos, skateboards, yelling, par-
tying or general boisterous conduct, (2) attend all mandatory hall or
house meetings and responding to calls or messages because necessary
information is being dispensed, (3) have overnight guest of the same sex
only on Friday and Saturday nights because the residence halls are too
crowded to accommodate guests on other nights and (4) show respect for
and cooperation with the other residents, the House Council Board, staff
members, and the Administration.
The individual House Council Board may establish regulation, with ap-
proval, which pertain only to that residence hall.
The House Council Boards are composed of the elected officers and hall
representatives, the Student and professional staffs serve as advisors, but
not voting members of the councils.
The House Council boards are responsible for judicial matters, except
visitation violations, regarding residence hall living.
Penalties which may be imposed by the House Council Boards are (1) war-
nings, (2) reprimand, (3) fine, (4) probation, (5) recommended removal
from residence halls. Violations may also be referred to the University
Honor Board.
XV: OPEN HOUSE VISITATION POLICY
I. General
Subject to the follwong provisions and limitations, each Residence Hall
may establish its own regulations and policies pertaining to informal
social activities and study dates in which members of the opposite sex are
entertained by residents.
A. The hours of visitation shall not exceed:
12 Noon to 1 a.m. Sunday through Thursday
12 Noon to 2 p.m. Friday through Saturday
B. No student is allowed to have a guest of the opposite sex in his her room
over the objection of the roommate. No male or female under the age of 18 is
allowed to participate in the visitation program.
C.Escorted males may use any entrance or exit for women residence halls un-
til 8 p.m. After 8 p m they must use front door only.
D. Members of each residence hall � cooperatively and individually � must
agree to conduct themselves in a manner publicly defensible for members
of the University community and residents of University housing and to
be responsible for assuming that such conduct prevails in the residence
halls.
E. This policy and any rules adopted by an individual residence hall shall be
posted conspicuously within the hall. Copies of all individual hall
policies shall be furnished to the Department of Residence Life.
F. This policy does not supersede other University policies.
II. Procedures
A. At the beginning of Fall semester or the Summer term each residence hall
will vote on its hours for visitation within the guidelines. Also, the House
Council Board will establish its own regulations and policies.
B. A petition, signed by one-tenth of the members of a residence hall, shall at
any time cause a reisdence hall to call an official house meeting to recon-
sider the Open House policies.
C. If there are instances of violating � by a section, floor or entire residence
hall � the offending parties may be penalized by suspension of visitation
privileges for a peiod of time decided upon by the Associate Dean and
Director of Residence Life.
D. At any time, for due cause, the program in any residence hall, or any part
thereof, may be terminated by the Associate Dean and Director of
Residence Life.
E. All unescorted males found in the women's residence halls are subject to
Judicial action. This does not include the lobby during the hours between
8 a.m. and 1 a.m.
F. All women found loitering unescorted inside or on balconies of the men's
residence halls are subject to Judicial action. This does not include any
1

mm
MM





STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
Sfixrsrr,ocatcd ,n the basemcms dunng h�urs �
3. Any male student found in the residence hall room of a female student or
a female student ound in the room of a male student between the hour
Student 2 n00nVWi11 reP�rtcd to thc Assoicate Dean o
Students for a violation of the visitation policy
Any non-student found in a residence hall room of a student of the oo-
pos, e sex between the hours of 1 a.m. and 12 noon wiil be banned fi�
epor? 1, ' �f Car�,ina UniVCrS,ty Thc student �houW
reported to the Assi iate Dean of Students.
I. I he penalty for a visitation violation will vary from a written reorimand
or i rrk loDss �i ld pnvi,egc' probaii�n- �" �SS
or removal from Residence Hall. The deciding factor in applying these
pcnalities ,s the severity of the violation, and the degree of mVolvemem
Page 12
H
c
�YlPOLICIES REGARDING THE POSSESSION AND
CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ON THE
CAMPUS OF EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
A. Introduction
The possession and consumption of alcoholic b verages on the University
campus shall be restricted to Residence Halls, Mendcnhall Student Center
and other sites specifically approved by the Chancellor or b Designee
i l;n,1VCuSy POhaCS concernin8 �he possession and consumption of
alcoholic beverages do not contravene Federal, State or Municipal law regar-
ding their purchase, possession or consumption
1. The North Carolina Alcoholic Beverage Control Laws make it unlawful
for any person under nineteen (19) years of age to purchase, possess or
consume; or for anyone to aid or abet such a person in purchasing
possessing, and consuming any alcoholic beverage (General Statute
I Os -oj
2. Persons who are nineteen (19) years of age or older may purchase possess
or consume alcoholic beverages containing less than fourteen per cent'
,i �ft alcono1 b volumc becr and fortified wines). (General Statute
J8A-35)
3. Persons who are twenty-one (21) years of age or older may puchase
ransport. and consume alcoholic beverages7on.ain.ng moT.han fo"r'
sZuTa-T' of a,coho1 by volumc (spin,uous K �J5L
4. It is unlawful for anyone to aid or abet a person under twenty-one (21)
years of age ,n purchasing, possession, or consuming alcohol beverage
?�?e�itZ: z!oun� -cem (,4) �f b �
5. Under no circumstances may any type of alcoholic beverages be sold bv
rSiSS0 �" ' -S dthe Un.versT
6 IHHnltn!aWfUl l�r any PCrSOn t0 drink aJoholic beverages or to offer a
drink to another person, or persons, whether accepted or not on a�v
public road or street, parking lot. sidewalk, or other publicly owned or
aTJZ r W,thVhC Cjty �f GWnViC- G��� Ord,nan�Z358
and 360, General Statute 18A-3CM5))
General policies regarding the possession and consumption of alcoholic
beverages on the campus of East Carolina University �onoiic
Lc.?uJfZ?rSd Un�ni�. win� shall be served. Consumption of beer
Sns .9 v2.r fWmCS at h:n,VCrsit aPPr�vcd functions ,s limited to per-
sons 19 years of age or older, with proof of age required There shallbe
an adequate "check" system at all events where alcohoUc beveri� �
served. Evcn though an organization ch at the dSr
is still necessary to have a system which allows the server to fdenUfyThose"
who may be served alcoholic beverages 'oenuiy tnose
ctroraUon'onT:T SSf �,d by "� "Won or
corporation on the Unv.versity campus. All alcoholic beverages shall be
purchased by the sponsoring organization. There ThT bf no
gimmicks" to collect any monies, before, dunng. or afteT he socS
aTnho,andJ,Udem aCt,ViVy fees shaiJ not � used for the pruchaTof
alcohohc beverages. Only alcoholic beverages served by the sp3r,n
organization will be permitted at any type of activity exceTS nners
pus where alcohol is served is l.nhZ sponsored evenl on cam-
pa.d and shall �o, ,?� �ao one'who .ZZsIZZ ? �
served and may be asked To leave U"Ct,0n' they wU1 not
D. Possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages in residence halls
1. Approved social functions.
a. Alcoholic beverages (beer and unfortified wines) will be allowed
only at scheduled functions sponsored by recognized campus organiza-
tions and only within the confines of that function with regard to time
and place of consumption. These fractions shall be held in designated
areas, in and aroand the residence halls as approved by the Associate
Dean and Director of Residence life or herhis representative.
b. All requests to serve alcoholic beverages at a social function shall
be forwarded to the Associate Dean and Director of Residence Life or
representative three days before the scheduled event.
c. The sponsoring organization shall assume ALL responsibilty for
serving alcoholic beverages, behavior, and housekeeping. Failure to
adhere to the above policy shall result in appropriate disciplinary action
andor a fine to pay for cleaning up the area. Examples of unacceptable
behavior are: intoxication; loud, vulgar, or obscene language and
disorderly conduct.
d. All alcoholic beverages shall be purchased by the sponsoring
organization. There shall be no "gimmicks" to collect anv monies
before, during, or after thc social event.
c. Any sponsoring organization which allows behavior as described
in letter c. is also subject to disciplinary action by the appropriate judicial
council, andor the administration.
f. At all social functions where alcoholic beverages are served
supervisory personnel, as decided upon by the Associate Dean and Direc-
tor of Residence Life, shall be present.
g. At all social functions where alcoholic beverages are served, non-
alcoholic beverages and food must also be served,
h. At all social functions where alcoholic beverages are served, only
students of East Carolina University, and their bona fide guests shall be
admitted. There shall be an adequate "check" system at all events where
alcoholic beverages are served. Even though an organization has a check-
in system at the door, it is still necessary to have a system which allows
the server to identify those who may be served alcoholic beverages
i. All social functions will be held subject to the following:
(1) Not more than two per month at night on ondays through
Thursdays.
(2) Friday. Saturday, and Sunday night daring the month.
2. Residence Hall Rooms
a. All possession and consumption of alcoholic coverages shall be in the
privacy of the residence hall rooms.
b. Public display, profanity, obscenity, intoxication and disorderlv con-
duct are a few examples of violations of the drinking policy
C 5 PV?!r "rt no1 Prm,Med in � residence halU except in
designated areas. K
E" Pd�enTce0nnterd CUmumption of ��holic beverages in Mendenhall Stu-
Crater" and Unf�rficd wmcs ma � "� � Mendenhall Student
sor Jh�h?llCVCragCS Wl11 a"�ed �nly aI sch�lu��� functions spon-
� registered campus organizations and only within the confines oHhat
function with regard to time and place of consumption
will � 2.nri-?t,C2h�iC bevcra� by 'he sponsoring organization
ster ?n f ' tyPC �f aC,1Vlt XCCpt dinncrs sP��red b
registered University organizations. Ind.v.duals attending such dinners
may bring unfortified wine. umners
nn ir p0ns�nn� organizations are responsible to restrict the consump-
tion of alcohohc verages to persons nineteen (19) years of age or oWe?
c. Permission for such functions must be obtained from the
Associate Dean Student Activities. Requests for permission must be
Et�5? �Z WCCk c" adVanCC and durin ,he re �f.ce hou of
the Assoicate Dean - Student Activities.
Reservations must be made with the University Central Rescrva-
�.ons Office ,n Mendenhall Student Center at least one week in advance
e. Anytime alcoholic beverages are served at a function, the spon-
soring organization shall also prov.de non-alcoholic beverages Tnd
snacks or food
3 TiLTrUTT �f f and WinC ,S restr,c!ed to the Multi-Purpose
Room, Coffeehouse and Auditorium 244. W.ne may be served ,n the Art
Gallery on special occasions, approved by the Director No alcoholic
r ,traCSiI,ayr consurned und" 'he circumstances in any other areas
of the student Center. Alcoholic beverages may be used on as comple
Sea) Pr�gramS- "CVCr 3S ,nC main fcature e.g. beer blasts are pro-
4 �fflC,TS f�f f.P0"50" organization shall be responsible for the enforce-
ment of all University polices and regulations. Failure to comply with
"Son rand regula,ions may resuh in a susp� s
a The faculty advisor of a student organization or a Student Center
staff member, approved by the Student Center director, must be inT
StudXw8. 3ny tUnC"0n WhCre a,C�h0ilC bCVCr3g� � �Z Z the
b. It is implicit in these rules that the officers of the sponsoring orKaniza
t.on insure adequate safeguards for compliance with Federal State a"
Municipal ordinances and laws and all rules of the Universt v
fC �?rU? T" Sf d,SOrdery eon�uct in any manner may subject the of
fender to disciplinary action andor arrest by law enfoJcemem person
This policy guideline was recommended hv the University Alcohol Drue
,980 COmmUee and apProved b l" Chancellor's staff ApS7f
XVII: CURRENT UNIVERSITY POLICY ON
ILLICIT DRUGS 1,C1UIN
the pursuit of academ.c excellence and will To be toiwtedCSL! a"d
who will cooperate fully with local. State and ftS?2rt5 ivers.ty,
forcement of the law. CdCral autho�'es m thc en-
The fundamental concern and resrionsibilitv of fh- 11�-
tne abuser of drugs is constructive SSZSSSSSXi
posed by la, the Unwersity wtU promote
courage medical consultation i, order
wilactnrm h through formal d
abuse in those instances here these mea
where psychiatric or medical considers
by :he Health Services for diai
INTFJlPRfTAIKiv
iHTig l s The Ass
apprehended m the impr
Drug Abuse
1 Perstar
fiiiated
hisher roommate or
anxieties among stucc
' all kesiaence Ha
2 1 he l niversit) .a:
Enforceement Agetu
Drujj PowessK.n and or Iransfer
:rar
of 5
possession and or transfei
the op'
tion
Students whi are d"r
time (up
XVIII: I MVKRMI. poi K
( ONCERNING DIri p
expresssion, pea
peaceable a
thai
ce
me-
� Iefiniti.�n of Disruptive ondu
be
I

venii .
and evv:e -
cam
B Disorderlv Conduct
mur.it,
presence an
University auth -
ail be subject I
bearing before tht
Hoard. The degree i
determine :he ap
made by the Via
S idei
C Responsihilitv of the icehanceli
! The Vice Chance
all have a
n B The Via
shall the evidence, a"
Chancel
2. The Vice
ma) recommend
thecoui
B
D Responsibitv of the Nice Chancellor ;ir
Chance S
ail step1- which he she det
Carolina I rn
enforced He shall u
proper hearing il a
In ca t these d
upon the Associate Dear.
or member of the Fa I
not preclude the I n��
anv offense under this o- an I
bv law to Jo so, or if anv ee col
sity ps'ilicv on off-campus conduct are
f No Amnestv So adn I
employee of :he Univen "� shall have a
make anv promise as to prosecution
Slate or Federal, or be�ore anv I
Trustee comm'ttee to an) jJent char
Section I of this nolicv
�n
asaa
'�'�"�
f





es of that function with regard to time
I hese functions shall be held in designated
residence halls as approved h the Associate
lesidence I iff or her his representative.
�r alcoholic beverages at a social function shall
ks Hiate IVan and Director of Residence Life or
the scheduled event.
issumc Al I responsibilty for
and housekeeping Failure to
app ipriate disciplinary action
uunples of unacceptable
tbscenc language; and
sponsoring
anv monies,
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
posed by law. the University will promote a program of education and en-
Psge 13
.
ws behaK" as described
i the appropriate judicial
ic beverages are served.
he Associate Dean and Direc-
"eserages arc served, non-
e served.
averages are sercd. only
he:r bona fide guests shall be
eck" system at all events where
gh an organization has a check-
necess ae a system which allows
� . e -ervrd alcoholic beverages
al n ondays through
. and Sunday nights during the month.
. beverages shall be in the
ixication and disorderly con-
he drinking policy
permitted in the residence halls excepi in
iges in Mendenhali 5
ierved in Mendenhali Student
a scheduled fuiiction
�nl within the c� es ol that
ace ot consumption.
e porganization
except dim nsored by
attending such dinners
I 1 S)l VMfv .
ump-
oi permission must be
ing the regular office hours of
�ersitv C entrai Reserva-
� east one week in advance
� -erved at a function, the spon-
k non-alcoholic beverages and
� restricted to the Multi-Purpose
litorium 2-U Wine may be served in the Art
he Direcl - S alcoholic
�stances ii her areas
iges may be used only, as comple-
te g beer Masts are pro-
.ponsible for the enforece-
itions. Failure mplj with
of reset-
on or a Student Center
� fare " r. must be in at-
beverages are served in the
' the p �ring orgamza-
i e ith Federal, State and
' the University
.inner may subject the �
aw enforcement person-
hancet
hoi i)ru
if) April IS,
rVf I MVF.KSir POLIO ON
II IK II DKI GS
amphetamines, barbituates
incompatible with personal welfare and
id will not be -olerated by the Universit)
I State jr�� Federal authorities in the en-
� respons � the Universit) relative to
- rehabtlitat on W,th,n -he limitations im
courage medical consultation in order to meet this responsibility. However, it
wil act fiamy through through formal disciplinary procedures to control drug
abuse in those instances where these measures prove insufficient. In cases
where psychiatric or medical consideration is essential, action will be taken
by the Health Services for diagnosis and treatment
INTERPRETATIONS OF THE POLICY
Dni H" H ThC Axsociate Dcan of Students will counsel students who are
apprehended in the improper use of drugs with no evidence of possession
Drug Abase
1 Persistant drug use by a student in University owned, operated, or af-
filiated living units which adversely affects the living conditions of
hisher roommate or roommates or nearby neighbors or which generates
anxieties among students in the living unit constitutes cause for removal
from all Residence Hall living units.
2. The University cannot prevent Federal, State, or local officials of Law
Enforcement Agencies from their investigation and prosecution of drug
law violators.
Drug Possession andor Transfer � Evidence of illicit possession andor
transfer of drugs will be transmitted to civil authorities. The Associate Dean
of Students shall handle all cases wehre students are found to be involved in
possession andor transfer of drugs The Associate Dean of Students also has
the option of referring the case to ;he University Honor Board for disposi
tion
Students who are arrested for drug violations will be allowed a reasonable
time (up to 90 days) before disciplinary action is taken.
XVIII: UNIVERSITY POLICY AND PROCEDURE
CONCERNING DISRUPTIVE CONDUCT
East Carolina University has long honored the right of free discussion and
cxprcsssion. peaceful picketing and demostrations, the right to petition and
peaceable assembly. That these rights are a part of the fabric of the institu-
tion is not questioned. They must remain secure. It is equally clear, however,
that in a community of learning, willful disruption of the educational pro-
cess, destruction of property, and interference with the rights of other
members of the community cannot be tolerated.
A.Definition of Disruptive Conduct � Any student, who willfully, by use of
violence, force coercion, threat intimidation or fear, obstructs, disrupts
or attempts to obstruct or disrupt the normal operations or functions of
the Lniversity, or who advises, procures, or incites others to do so, shall
be subject to suspension or expulsion from the University. The follow-
ing, while not intended to be exclusive, illustrate the offenses encompass-
ed herein: occupation of any University building or part thereof with in-
tent to deprive others of its use; blocking the entrance or exit of any
I niversjty building or corridor or room therein; setting fire to or by any
other means substantially damaging any University premises; except as
necessars for law enforcement, any display of or attempt to threaten or
to use firearms, explosives or other weapons for the purpose of intimida-
tion, in any University building or on the campus; prevention of the con-
vening, continuation or orderly conduct of any University class or activi-
ty or of any lawful meeting or assembly in any University building or on
the campus; inciting or organizing attempts to prevent attendance at
classes; and except with permission of the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life, blocking normal pedestrial or vehicular traffic on the University
campus.
B Disorderly Conduct � For the protection and convenience of all the com-
munity. University regulations prohibit disorderly conduct. Students
participating in any unauthorized mass demonstrations, or whose
presence and or actions constitute or abet a general disturbance, or who
fail promptly to obey an order to disperse given to a group by any
University authority or by any duly constituted law enforcement officer,
shall be subject to suspension or expulsion from the University, pending
a hearing before the University Hearing Board or University Honor
Board. The degree of involvement and seriousness of the offense shall
determine the appropriate hearing board. This determiniation shall be
made by the Vice Chancellor for Student Life or Associate Dean of
Students.
C. Responsibility of the Vice Chancellor for Student Life �
1. The Vice Chancellor for Student Life andor hisher representatives,
shall have a duty to identify persons who violate the provisions of Sec-
tion B. The Vice Chancellor andor hisher representative, shall mar-
shall the evidence, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Life shall report
it to the Chancellor in writing.
2. The Vice Chancellor for Student Life andor hisher representatives
may recommend to the Chancellor that injunctivc relief be sought from
the courts to prevent reoccurrence, continuance, or recurrence of a viola-
tion of Section B.
D Responsibity of the Vice Chancellor for Student Life � When it appears
that there is a violation of Section B, it shall be the duty of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life, and heshe is fully authorized to act, to take
all steps which heshe deems advisable to protect the best interest of East
Carolina University, and to see that its rules, regulations and policies are
enforced. He shall insure that any person or persons found guilty after a
proper hearing shall be disciplined in such manner as may be warranted.
In carrying out these duties, the Vice Chancellor for Student Life may call
upon the Associate Dean of Students, any member of the administration
or member of the Faculty. Conviction in any State or Federal court shall
not preclude the University from exercising its disciplinary authority in
any offense under this or any other section of this policy if it is required
by law to do so, or if any of the three conditions described in the Univer-
sity policy on off-campus conduct are present.
E No Amnesty � No administrative official, faculty member, student or
employee of the University shall have authority to grant amnesty or to
make any promise as to prosecution or non-prosecution in any court.
State or Federal, or before any student, faculty, administrative, or
Trustee committee to any student charged with or suspected violating
Section I of this policv.
F Delegation of Authority and Dm Process � It shall be the duty of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life to exercise full authority in the regulation of
student conduct and in the matters of student discipline al the University.
In the discharge of this duty, delegation of each authority may be made
by the Vice Chancellor for Student Life to faculty committees and to ad
ministrative or to other officers of the institution, or to agencies of stu-
dent government, in such manner and to such extent as may be deemed
necessary and expedient by the Vice Chancellor for Student Life; provid
ed, that in the discharge of this duty it shall be the duty of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life to secure for every student the right of due
process and fair hearing, the presumption of innocence until found guil-
ty, the right to know the evidence and to face witnesses testifying against
himher and to have counsel in hisher own defense as may be allowable
as approved by the Vice Chancellor for Student Life.
G. Firearms and Other Weapons Prohibited � The possession of bowie
knives, dirks, daggars, loaded canes, sword canes, machetes, pistols,
rifles, repeating rifles, shotguns, pump guns or other firearms or ex-
plosives upon the University campus, or in any University owned or
operated facility, unless explicitly permitted by the Vice Chancellor for
Student Life or hisher designated representative in writing, is forbid-
den Violation of this prohibition consititutes grounds for suspension
from the University.
H Chemicals Used for Disruptive Purposes � The possession, threat to use
or use of any explosive, inflammatory or disabling chemical for disrup-
tive purposes is expressly forbidden. Violation of this prohibition con-
stitutes grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University.
PROCEDURES TO IMPLEMENT POLICY
ON DISRUPTION
To implement the University policy on disruptive conduct, the following
procedures shall be adhered to:
A. The Vice Chancellor for Student Life shall establish a Board of Inquiry
consisting of not fewer than three nor more than six members of the
University community. To this board, the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life shall appoint at least one faculty member, one student, and if
available one person with legal training. The appointments shall be made
annually at the opening of the academic year for a twelve-month term.
The Vice Chancellor for Student Life shall designate one member of the
University Hearings Board to serve as its chairperson. No member of the
Board of Inquiry established under Paragraph A. above, shall be ap-
pointed to the University Hearings Board.
B. Vacancies on the Board of Inquiry and on the University Hearings Board
shall be filled by appointment of the Vice Chancellor for Student Life.
C. In case of disruptive action, the Vice Chancellor for Student Life shall
determine whether there is evidence sufficient
to warrant charging any individual in the institutiton with violation of the
University policy on disruptive conduct as defined in Section I in the Policy
on Disruptive Conduct. In making this determination, the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life may, at his her discretion, seek assistance from the Board of
Inquiry constituted as provided in Paragraph A, above.
D. If the Vice Chancellor for Student Life seeks the assistance of the Board
of Inquiry, it shall be convened by its chairperson at the request of the
Vice Chancellor for Student Life, when convened, it shall be the duty of
the Board:
1. To proceed without delay to investigate allegations of disruptive con-
duct;
2. To advise the Vice Chancellor for Student I ife in writing whether
there is sufficient evidence to warrant charging anv person with violation
of the University policy on disruptive conduct.
E. Upon receiving the report from the Board of Inquiry, the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life shall determine whether it appears that there has been a
violation of the University policy on disruptive conduct requiring
disciplinary action. If it appears to the Vice Chancellor for Student Uife
that such a violation has occurred, he shall direct the Associate Dean of
Students to proceed as follows:
I. To give notice by personal service or registered mail, return receipt re-
quested, to each person charged stating:
(a) The specific violations of the University policy on disruption
with which the accused person is charged, together with a summary of
the facts on which the charge is based
(b) That at a designated time and place, the accused person will be
given a hearing on the charge by the University Hearings Board provided
for in Paragraph B, above.
XIX: EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES FOR
GRIEVANCES INVOLVING SEX DISCRIMINATION
AND OTHER EQUAL OPPORTUNITY COMPLAINTS
PREAMBLE
East Carolina University is committed to equality of educational oppor-
tunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or employees
based on race, color national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap.
Moreover, East Carolina University is open to people of all races and actively
seeks to promote racial integration by recruiting and enrolling a larger
number of black students.
In accord with Sections 901 and 902 of Title IX of the Education Amend-
ments Act of 1972, as implemented by Section 86.8 (a) (b) of the Regulations
published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the
following procedures have been established to provide prompt and equitable
resolution of student and employee complaints involving sex discrimination.
���
' f
I





STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS PaKe 14
A. INFORMAL GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE
1. Informal Grievance Procedure Prerequisite �
Most student grievances based on sex discrimination as well as other above
listed equal opportunity factors can and should be resolved in an infoi
mal manner. Therefore, the student must seek resolution of his her
grievance in accordance with the Informal Grievance Procedure in "2"
as a prerequisite to the jurisdiction of a hearing committee to hear the
complaint as set forth in "B" below.
It is University policy that any student who requests or has need for the ser
vices of an interpreter because of impaired hearing shall be provided the
serM.es of an interpreter for all administrative proceedings hearings
and conferences related to any grievances or disciplinary actions
2. Steps in Informal Grievance Procedure
(a) Discussion with Associate Dean of Students
(1) If any student alleges a grievance based on sex discrimination or
any of the equal opportunity factors shown in Preamble above an im-
mediate appointment should be made with any Associate Dean of
Students. These officials are in offices on the second floor of Whichard
Building and the student may make an appointment with anv one of the
said Associate Deans of choice.
(2) At the time of making the appointment, the student should state
expressly the need to discuss a sex discrimination grievance or other
equal opportunity grievance.
(3) The Associate Dean will set an appointment date and discuss the
grievance with the student as soon as possible but in anv event within
three school days after the request.
(4) The grievance should be discussed freelv and in an informal and
relaxed manner with the Associate Dean. Witnesses or other individuals
who may assist in resolving the grievance should be consulted at the re-
quest ot the student or the Associate Dean.
(5) 1 he student will be advised of the corrective action and or deci-
sion of the Associate Dean as soon as possible but not later than three
school days subsequent to the date of the conference
3. Appeal to the Associate Director of Fqual Opportunity Programs (Title IX
Compliance Officer)
(a) If the grievance is not resolved to the satisfaction of the student bv
the Associate Dean of Students, the student has the right to appeal to the
Associate Director oi Equal Opportunity Programs, Room 214 Wright
Annex. The appeal must be made to the Associate Director within two
working days subsequent to the decision of the Associate Dean
(b) The Associate Director of Fqual Opportunity Programs will review
the case in its entirety, interviewing anv and all witnesses deemed
necessary, including where deemed appropriate, a conference involving
all parties with the grievance and prior decisions made in an effort to
resolve the grievance.
(c) The Associate Director will render his her opinion within five work-
ing days after receipt of the appeal. The decision of the Associate Direc-
tor will be final and will termimate the student's rights pursuant to the in-
formal grievance procedure.
(d) If the decision and or corrective action taken bv the Associate Direc-
tor ,s not satisfactory, the student has a r.ght to request a formal hearing
of the grievance by a Grievance Committee in accordance with the pro-
cedure in B
FORMAL GRIEVANCE PROCFDlRF
1. The Hearing Committee - A hearing committee composed of anvone
from the Faculty, Staff, or student bodv of the Universitv will be ap-
pointed in each case involving an allegation of discrimination against the
student on the basis of sex discrimination or other equal opportunity fac-
tor. The composition of the committee will be formed according to the
following diagram:
The aggrieved student will select the first member of the committee The
Vice Chancellor for Student Life or other member of the Administration
will select the second member. However, anv official of the Administra-
tion against whom the allegations of discrimination have been made will
not select the second member. The two members selected will then agree
upon the selection of a third member who will become the chair
GRIEVANT
2. Steps in Formal Grievance Procedure
(a) Hearing Request From Student and Selection of First Committee
Member
(1) The formal procedure requires the request for a hearing bv the
student to be in writing. The letter will set torth the nature of the
grievance including the names of individuals involved in the complaint
I he letter will aist. nominate, by name, the first member of the hearing
committee.
(2) If necessary, the student may obtain the assistance of the Stu-
dent Attorney General in drafting the letter of request. The letter should
be submitted to the Vice Chancellor for Student I ife
(b)Selection of Second Committee Member
(1)1 pon receipt of the letter of request from the student, the Vice
( hancellor for Student 1 ife will take appropriate action to nominate a
second member to the committee.
(c(Selection of Third Committee Member
The first two members of the hearing committee will mutuallv agree upon a
third member of the committee who will act as chair
k. (Hearing
(1) The Committee thus formed should complete hearing of the
grievance within fifteen days after being formed where possible. Rarelv
should it be necessary to extend this time. The request for an extension of
time should be made to and approved by the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life at his her discretion.
(2) The Committee will comply with all the rules for a due process
hearing set forth elsewhere in the ECU Student Handbook.
(3) The Committee will maintain a complete record of the hearing
by tape recording or other method as deemed appropriate bv the Com-
mittee,
(e) Committee Findings
(l)The Committee will summarize its factual findings, its conclu-
sions and make recommendations in writing as to its decision and or cot
rective action recommended
(2) The summary findings and recommendations will be forwarded
to the ice Chancellor for Student Life within three working davs subse-
quent to the conclusion of the hearing.
It)Action B The Vice (hancellor for Student Life
(1) The Vice Chancellor for Student Life will act upon the recom-
mendations and findings of the Committee initiating anv corrective ac
turn deemed appropriate to resolve the grievance.
(2) The entire record of the hearing and the action taken bv the
Committee will be retained on file for a period of one vear subsequent to
the hearing.
(g(Appeal To The Chancellor
(1) If the action taken by the Vice Chancellor for Student L ife is not
satisfactory to the student, he she may appeal the case to the Chancellor
within three school days subsequent to the decision by the Vice
Chancellor in Section f. Action by the Chancellor is final and will ex-
haust the administrative efforts of the student
XX: REGISTRATION OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
All student organizations are expected to register with the Office of the
V ice C hancellor for Student Life, 204 Whichard, in order to reserve and use
I niversity facilities tor meetings and events and to be listed in the Student
Organization Directory. Such organizations must also have an up-to-date
constitution on file, and must comply with the provision of Title IX of
Education Amendments Acts of 1972.
GROUP CONDUCT OFFENSES
1. University societies, clubs, organizations and groups are subject to the
same standards of conduct, both on and off the campus, as are in-
dividuals in the academic community.
2. The commission of any of the offenses listed under the Code of Conduct
and Disciplinary offenses for students by such groups or the knowing
failure of any organized group to exercise preventive measures relative to
violation of the code by their members shall constitute a group offense
Revocation or restriction of charter, fine, probation, suspension
disciplinary probation or lesser sanctions may result from the commis-
sion of a group conduct offense.
ADMINISTRATION
3.
"&-4� ���$�,
PHO
Office o
Office o
Student
Office oi
Academi
Office o
Residenc
Office o
Students
Office ofl
Presiden
COMMITTEE FINDINGS
Office of
Director
Unions
TTTTTTTTTTTTT'il
I

tmm
mmm
'��
t' r





s
) IHH I Ml NIs
Page 14
STIDKNT (.OVFRNMKNT ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
Page 15
VI em hi-
n ot srsl I omrniiti't'
S

ipon a
n oi
lorn
a
nani fhu
.
by the Vice
- � and will ex-
NOfNli DfM ORGANIZATIONS
204 md use
� - Student
;p-to-date
MHi OFFENSES
I
i
:
such g - the knv nj
. preeniie measures reiat;e to
stilute a ense
hartei fine, proba pension,
e ommis-
jffens
"RATION

PHONE LISTINGS
Office of the Chancellor
757-6212
Office of the Vice Chancellor for
Student Life757-6541
Office of the Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs757-6241
Office of the Associate Dean for
Residence Life757-6771
Office of the Associate Dean of
Students757-6824
Office of the SGA
President757-6611, ext 218
Office of the Associate Dean and
Director of University
Unions757-6611, ext 211


in 11 hi.�.
����






ffSBfafagme.
- �� � , ��� ��
s
tN
W
MhK
Homecoming
ai southwestern Louisiana
SOUTH CAROLINA
at Southern Mississippi
at Auburn
TULSA (Shrine Day)
atLSU
STA I f
�Op m
Op.m
I K)p m
!0 p m
2:00 p. m
4-00 p.m. CDT
1:30p.m.
6:00p.m. CST
1:00p.m. CST
1:30p.m.
7:00p.m. CST

.
"
C-MfisF-





FR�� MOVI�S RT H�NDRIX TH�fiTR�
8 22-24
8 29-31
94
9 5-7
9 6-7
9 11
9 12-14
9 19-21
9 25
9 26-28
102
10 3-5
109
10 11-12
10 16
10 23
10 25-26
10 30
1031-11
11 1-2
11 7-9
11 13
11 14
11 15-16
11 21-23
124
12 6-7
12 6-7
12 11
12 12-14
Terminator
The Cotton Club
Seven Year Itch
Some Like It Hot
The Sure Thing
Nightmare on Elm Street
Network
Being There
Mrs.Soffel
Beverly Hills Cop
Dr. Zhivago
A Passage to India
The Gods Must Be Crazy
Places In The Heart
Red Beard
Witness
LaTraviata
Jules and Jim
Small Change
Dune
NosferatutheVampyre
The Killing Fields
Motel Hell
Ghostbusters
A Nos Amours
American Gratitti
The Breakfast Club
Amadeus
The Dresser
TheBostonians
Rear Window
Vertigo
Woodstock
The Spirit of the Beehive
Return of the Jedi
7:00 & 9:00
7:00 & 9:30
7:00
9:00
7:00 & 9:00
11.00
7:00
9:30
7:00 & 9:00
7:00 & 9:00
8.00
6:30 & 9:30
8:00
7:00 & 9.00
8:00
7:00 & 9.00
8.00
7:00
9.00
7:00 & 9:30
8:00
7:00 & 9:30
12:00M
7:00 & 9
8
7:
7:
6:
00 & 9
00 & 9
i:30&9
7
9
7
9
11
8
7:00 & 9
00
00
00
00
15
00
30
00
30
30
00
30
PIRflT� FOOTBALL SCH�DUL�
at N. C.State
SW TEXAS STATE
at Penn State
TEMPLE
MIAMI (FL) Homecoming
at Southwestern Louisiana
SOUTH CAROLINA
at Southern Mississippi
at Auburn
TULSA (Shrine Day)
atLSU
7
7
1
7
2
4
1
6
0C
CO
30
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
00p.m.
00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
30 p.m.
00p.m.
00 p.m.
:30 p.m.
7:00p.m. CST
CDT
CST
CST
�MMRMOHWKMHHpO





Crows Nest
Restaurant
One Free Soft Drink.
Tea or Coffee
Crow's Nest
Restaurant
All the French Toast or Pancakes
You Can Eat For 99c
.
S
SEMESTER RATES S70
MONTHLY RATES $25

GYM
FOR INFO CAL I '58 4355
BUCK SAMACO STATION
c1

J&PK'
DR R. TED WATSON
elephone 756-4780

'

1000 s of Movies
For Sale or Rent
In VHS or Beta
ill
7h� tiiw: Ccui
NAUTILUS &
TCENTER
East Caroi
insurance Agency Inc
Bring This Ad in For A FREE
Trial in Both Aerobics &
Weight Training
OVERTON'S
Discount on
Dcery Purchase
.�.
KWIK-STITCH
tNx v
TYPESET RESUMES
, �� 'this
��Dires November 30 i9b3
$ FREE Dry Cleaning $
v
GREENVILLE ATHLETIC CLUB
Your Fitness Headquarters
10 OFF STUDENT
SEMESTER MEMBERSHIP
6-9175
Open 7 Days a Week
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
VILLAGE
f
y
PET SHOP
Void November 30. 1985
$ FREE Dry Cleaning $
VIDEO SEARCH
Rivergate Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd. & 10th St
Phone 758-5166
511 EVANS ST
GREENVILLE. N C 27834
PHONE 756-9222
Vdirnt urn-
-VrM-i. a

"
- 11
I Invites von to a night
I
of live music on us.
FfiLL S�M�ST�R
1985
S�PT�MB�ft
8
15
22
29
13
20
27
10
17
24
8
15
22
29
$1.00 off ECU
SPORTSWARE
WITH THIS COUPON
U.B.E
" Ml
O
16
miymnwin
10
17
23
30
24
11
W�b�UL
18
12
13

14
THE
LATE NIGHT
PLACE
TO BE
f "
Pf V.fl ' i IL.
IIIHIIMIIIIIIIIIITTTTHTTTWWTTmTTWT.vvl�T
19
20
21
26
27
28
- � A Refi
�'� " Duality I
Any I
ISel '
COX FLORAL SERVICE. !NC
5TH STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
Gleaner
"World
leaner 01Id
THE
OCTOB�R
T , ' ' i m
14
21
15
twJSHWi w
10
11
12
22
23
FALL BREAK
28
29
:�iy��.mH.w nmit i 11
17
24
31
Finest in Foreign Car Repair
758-1534
iwte. stm
GREENVILLE
18
25

19
GUI'S S�RVIC� C�NT�R
W�lCOM�
�CU STUD�NTS
2900 East 10th Street
Greenville North Carolina 27834
(919) 752-5050
T
26
NOVMB�R
10 OFF
Any Purchase
�Jh'
�mmmr j nwmr I satuhpw
1
EAST CAROLINA PARTY CENTER
Pre-registration for Spring Semester
11
18
25
12
13
19
26
20
14
21
27
15
16
22
23

Gr rpnvillp N (
Chicken&Biscuits
STUDENT SPECIAL $2
No initiation fee� No contrac
10�o
Discount
lilZADS UP
318 S Evans St Man
Docket 5
Music v
PAS
STRINGS
ACCESSORIES
GUI'ARS
AMP S
DRUM
752-1159
222 E
GREEN
GO FOR THE BEST .
GO FOR THE CHEST .
' ftrafes Chcsf
m
BRING IN THIS COUPON
fjji ' j &GET2HOTDOGSFORS' C
FREE CHICKEN BISCUIT
BUY C Nl �� KEN I
FRIES 5 Ml I �
CHICKEN BISCUIT
ABSOLUTELY FREE
28
Thank.
29
30
D�C�M6�R
�' mm
10
16
17
�pHHDBBB
6 17
11
18
f ��m i,
23
30
24
31
12
COLONIALGULF SERVICES PLAZA GULF
2704 E. 10th St 758-1060 �J 264 Bypass 756-7616
�- laV 757-3271 J N � s H 155-6145
24 HOUR WRECKER & ROAD SEP.
FREE CAR IVASH WITH FILL UP
General Auto Repairs � Brake Service � Tune Ups � Lubrii
Wash & Wax � Tires � Air Conditioner Service � �'�
Alan Adams Owr
13
14

752-1233
CURRY
COPY
CENTER OF GREENVILLE
19
25
20
26
27
DOWNTOWN ON THE MALL
sm m si Ml PACKA
21
S1 00 OFF ADMISSION PRICE
with presentation of this coupon
28
�DROP OFF SERVICES-
OOP Off Clothe
foi Wash Dr I
Fold Service
DRY CLEANING
WASH & DRY
Harbin Highlander Center
2804 E. 10th Street
752-3737
TV. Snacks. Quiet Atmosphere
'�





d7501f6f4ef9db6cc1fa3600cb6b4a93 00057734.0001.tif
78c3399957dea03329aecad5ac8f8e51 00057734.0002.tif
61f0a2963901b8ee356edb3d777c8912 00057734.0003.tif
3d472fa13f826054842baa2d87a3ba7a 00057734.0004.tif
50c86cb5537cff2fed9b2adb2bfa4e1e 00057734.0005.tif
c164f0ae1c8392ff8345a347d263f55b 00057734.0006.tif
e2a089307b60453bddfc1632a3ed0f0c 00057734.0007.tif
0757519b35fed624ee91ea1c11e8532c 00057734.0008.tif
3d05201c8a211167765cf68f88dc98dc 00057734.0009.tif
b56555558451b8f2a44d76de7a75c214 00057734.0010.tif
61b56a49614c164dd1f7b0b19af53615 00057734.0011.tif
29fa809b8638f37bd9054bc329bccde0 00057734.0012.tif
2391a3ce16af799db3372c2a11c947ec 00057734.0013.tif
b17dfe45be1cead01e7c0396ee2c4009 00057734.0014.tif
63ff8eff3b102b5bb1520d835b4dd1f3 00057734.0015.tif
533ff3a168efe4d3aeda9b396e827650 00057734.0016.tif
071fb0e63753d29d1b8adc59146fe432 00057734.0017.tif
8ed9c292a190930cc6d9664c5ffc98ff 00057734.0018.tif
feeaeaa9104437c9f11bac240a00caae 00057734.0019.tif
a106bb30dfe4f12209ff330cb0eaff37 00057734.0020.tif
3902325121f18715582b7ba67c70ba46 00057734.0021.tif
e3f05c4168c4574964d5bf11e7b42136 00057734.0022.tif
602c01247d927e773befd41ab5d710db 00057734.0023.tif
d495daa3399bcac19b74c7e2b37349f6 00057734.0024.tif
442a56eab4a7d0f08be118977fca9ef0 00057734.0025.tif
bdcfda0b8b378cf18772789a3c58af68 00057734.0026.tif
7e9b7044f068d9adcdf1636fa9ad9329 00057734.0027.tif
f5bca11268520677985d5c1cb39a60c8 00057734.0028.tif
8d16d2bc315d38ac673f812638654d4c 00057734.0029.tif
581c9500423edd3b44f9482c08dd6ce9 00057734.0030.tif
f6cb891ccaf2dc45fd13b1fba056167a 00057734.0031.tif
188371e05124dd9d7279f73cc7d9ab19 00057734.0032.tif
8b10d3fc427a95373d9052d067a20070 00057734.0033.tif
08b4da567cfc77153972f6427102f210 00057734.0034.tif
0770fe874e1af4a9e8314b51f7d51e2d 00057734.0035.tif
4f13a2a240a086f5cd6eb354df6590b4 00057734.0036.tif
60caf7515c66fb19169bef12b600531c 00057734.0037.tif
acf86f128d2fdf7f439548c3f5d84dcc 00057734.0038.tif
10aa91f543861f2aeef6f5148e5e08d9 00057734.0039.tif
c74131c0247cd691e0b069b752d45868 00057734.0040.tif
f2c68cef6d85d6c6fec524108397e6f9 00057734.0041.tif
b4fe09ca53db6d476aed000a44abbda8 00057734.0042.tif
3b4dff65bb366b533023a9ef4e4077f6 00057734.0043.tif
99b999f689da80d0735611c69993cd2f 00057734.0044.tif
25883726391d21833d2df839289c7edd 00057734.0045.tif
a9ac95b5efd194dcd6a40d2457bd7439 00057734.0046.tif
eb9e5d5809e0a7616b34d51e07021fc7 00057734.0047.tif
93a2b6a6f6156a212b5c4ff6e7b29739 00057734.0048.tif
7002842edcb39a10297be447eb6bcdce 00057734.0049.tif
6d6717ecdf36db89806cd4359cc8400a 00057734.0050.tif
f136a126c691b410c5e40a1fbc763c19 00057734.0051.tif
4ef832968b62d9dc080a09585a725de2 00057734.0052.tif
7c1a1f783754b8b63be2278ca5f07440 00057734.0053.tif
d7bd868c08e9516fde6e0c7b91d6f567 00057734.0054.tif
a7067d1713b8a9e48facc1c0b3614043 00057734.0055.tif
1cbc30dceced4df67a58794200d48459 00057734.0056.tif
3d31333b11b315c6f00c48d9555fd219 00057734.0057.tif
f583d2fa4c6051094677f68652997fc2 00057734.0058.tif
94b9e46dc0043c6bb1780c07a35cac4e 00057734.0059.tif
8edf9d807aaaa300251dd591920fb968 00057734.0060.tif
9f1655d57875849db03540f5357f122f 00057734.0061.tif
0ad22828eabd5d7fcfc04b9a9406c23d 00057734.0062.tif
76b59ed5fe1f16eed0c5b7e3cf39cfbb 00057734.0063.tif
266c39789aef2db3489e0861c0863ffe 00057734.0064.tif
295f667494f658cfae284931c62be8b0 00057734.0065.tif
bbcf3612f4fc3d785ee8498e7473f507 00057734.0066.tif
84e806cc680b87091200ffd39cc36e60 00057734.0067.tif
85e94adedbb5006767a1b9e87e58cd67 00057734.0068.tif
9d3877748309833f76a826bd3981a0ed 00057734.0069.tif
ec1c577f3344795d2b8dcd331dda3580 00057734.0070.tif
1f06db1296cd75e804ff513a86f18f1f 00057734.0071.tif
82b8ab489ee2f45bde131926b7d4169d 00057734.0072.tif
695e7429135a1d5cdf3041c172def7aa 00057734.0073.tif
a245d09b0dee6f8822fcbf1383db738f 00057734.0074.tif





Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.418
Location of Original
University Archives

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy