The East Carolinian, July 24, 1985






�he
(Earalmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 NoT �7
Wednesday, July 24, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Teacher Shortage
May Stunt Gains
Painting Scholarship
Tony Humpi, ECU News Bur.�u
KC I Chancellor John Howell, left, discusses plans for the Edward
Reep Scholarship in Painting in the School of Art with retiring pro-
fessor Edward Reep. Art School Dean Edward Irvine and pro-
fessor Ra Elmore. The $500 scholarship has been established at
LCL to honor Reep, who is retiring after 15 years as artist-in-
residence and professor of painting. The award will be given each
year to a sophomore majoring in painting, and who maintains a 3.0
overall grade point average. Reep, an exhibiting painter since 1939
had exibitions of his works in the U.S C anada, Mexico, Italy and
Great Britain.
(UPI) � Officials say a loom-
ing teacher shortage threatens re-
cent gains made in North
Carolina's public schools, and
the crisis could delay implemen-
tation of the state's new basic
education plan.
"It's obvious that we're head-
ed for a crisis said Jay Robin-
son, superintendent of the
Mecklenburg County Public
Schools. "This has to be the
highest priority in education
Officials say the shortage is
already being felt in certain hard-
to-staff fields, such as math,
physical sciences, foreign
languages and some vocational
fields.
Other areas like English and
special education may be next in
line, education officials say.
"In spite of everything we do,
we're going to have a terrible
teacher shortage by 1990 said
Robinson.
Officials blame a number of
factors for the problem, in-
cluding:
� The opening of other career
alternatives to women and
minorities who had previously
been the backbone of the teacher
corps.
Education reforms that
have reduced class size and raised
standards for teachers entering
the profession.
� Increased recruiting of
North Carolina teachers by out-
of-state school systems.
Craig Phillips, state
superintendent of public instruc-
tion, said the shortage could slow
implementation of the eight-year,
$627 million basic education plan
passed by the General Assembly
this year.
A cornerstone of the plan is
reducing class size, and it calls for
hiring more than 10,000 addi-
tional public school teachers dur-
ing the next eight years. Phillips
said he hopes the state's renewed
committment to education, in-
cluding higher pay, will help turn
around the shortage.
"Our hope is that we can at-
tract, fairly quickly, with the
changing image of the profes-
sion, more people into the profes-
sion Phillips said. "It is going
to be tough. But if we're willing
to roll up our sleeves, we can turn
it around
Other education experts are
less optimistic. They say the shor-
tage could mean a return to larger
class size and less qualified
teachers.
"There will be teachers in front
of every classroom, but they may
be people with less ability to per-
form that job said Ronald Bird
of Meredith College, a former
research director for the
Southeastern Regional Council
for Educational Improvement.
Survey Reveals '84 Graduates Pleased With ECU Services
B HAROLD JOYNER
N�wi I-din.
W84 ECU graduates revealed
in a survey that they are more
satisfied with different aspects of
college life than 1979 graduates
were.
The Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life con-
ducted the survey of students
who were enrolled in the Fall of
1980 and graduated in May of
1984.
Citing three areas of the cam-
pus � student publications, food
service and student government,
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer said, "I'm pleasant-
ly surprised by the three that real-
lv improved. Pleased is a better
word than surprised. We have
put a lot of effort into helping
these areas improve their
quality
Meyer said food services on
campus received low ratings by
the 1979 graduates, which he
agreed. "It was bad � linoleum
floors, butter on the ceilings, old
tables � it just wasn't a nice
place to be in he said.
Renovation of the cafeteria
was sought and Meyer said the
success of the improvements
showed up the most in the in-
crease of voluntary meal plans �
from about 500 students in 1980
to 2,200 in the Fall of 1985.
Meyer said he has worked
equally hard with the students to
ensure that their publications are
of top quality and that the SGA
becomes "the kind of student
government that really serves the
students without the early back-
biting politics that have been so
persistent in the late '70s
Student satisfaction in Student
Health Services was low, Meyer
said. Many of the changes did not
occur until 1985, long after the
the '84 graduates had left.
One of the biggest im-
provements the SHC did was to
initiate a cold clinic last fall.
"That cold clinic served 5,000
students, which meant 5,000
fewer students had to see a doc-
tor The Center also hired two
new doctors, helping to decrease
waiting times, he said.
The survey also showed that
students were dissatisfied with
services offered by the financial
aid office. "Since President
Reagan has been in office, we
have had more difficulty in that
area he said. "We get blamed
for the fact that the federal
government does not give us the
material necessary to grant finan-
cial aid in time to do it for the fall
semester. This has been consis-
tent for the last three or four
years. Students can't get answers
from the financial aid office.
They keep calling and it creates a
frustration about the whole
system of financial aid. I'm sure
that was part of the apparent pro-
blem there
Students were satisfied with
services offered by the library,
yet feelings towards computer
services were more negative. But
improvements were not made un-
til this past spring when on-line
registration began, and the '84
graduates did not get to par-
ticipate in that, Meyer said.
Residence hall life seemed to
please the students more than
they did in 1979, the survey said.
And almost all the students
surveyed agreed that the SGA
Transit System was satisfactory,
though the question was never
asked to the '79 graduates.
Other results of the survey
showed an increase of satisfac-
tion in fraternity and sorority
life, but there was a decrease in
off-campus living in general.
Religious life on campus also
decreased, but the general feeling
towards student union activities
increased.
Graduates of 1984 were also
impressed with ECU's Freshmen
Orientation program, as well as
Personal Counseling Services.
Academic performance also
pleased the '84 graduates.
The general satisfaction of the
campus, Meyer sums up "is a
tribute to all the students and
staff who have worked to im-
prove the services and environ-
ment at ECU
Colleges May Lose Federal Money
WASHINGTON, D.C. (UPI)
� There's a big deadline coming
for many colleges, and most of
them, as they count the number
of freshmen who have agreed to
enroll this fall, now admit they're
probably not going to meet it.
Colleges in five states �
Arkansas, Florida, Georgia,
North Carolina and Oklahoma
� have to make "substantial
progress" toward enrolling more
black students by next December.
If they don't, the Education
Department's Office of Civil
Rights can stop giving them
federal funds.
Eight more states � Delaware,
Missouri, South Carolina,
Virginia, West Virginia, Ken-
tucky, Pennsylvania and Texas
� will have deadlines they agreed
to years ago sometime between
next December and the spring of
1988.
Educators in those states also
are unsure they'll be able to fulfill
those agreements.
"Speaking for (the University
of Oklahoma), the Norman cam-
pus will not meet its (desegrega-
tion) goals, and this seems to be
reflective of the rest of the state
says Walter Mason, Oklahoma's
affirmative action officer.
"We haven't met our enroll-
ment goal adds Cynthia Moten
of the Arkansas Department of
Higher Education. "We haven't
increased our overall pool of
black students. We've just moved
them around from traditionally-
May
black to traditionally-white col-
leges
Colleges are losing their battles
to integrate primarily because
fewer black students are opting to
go to college at all, ad-
ministrators say.
A recent American Association
of State Colleges and Universities
study found that, while the
number of black high school
graduates grew from 1975 to
1982, the percentage enrolling in
college dropped from 31.5 per-
cent to 28 percent.
The states' problem stems
from a 1970 lawsuit filed by the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People's
Legal Defense Fund.
The suit asked the federal
government to help force states
to undo the last vestiges of
segregation in their schools and
colleges.
If the states refused, or didn't
meet the government's desegrega-
tion schedule, the government
could cut off the laggard colleges'
federal funds.
In an early 1970s ruling, a
federal court ordered the Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare � the Education
Department's forerunner � to
demand desegregation plans
from six states, and then extend-
ed the order to other states accus-
ed of running segregated public
education systems.
Since then, the NAACP Legal
Defense Fund has forced the
government to make states adopt
ever more stringent integration
plans.
States had to outline how they
planned to attract black students
and faculty to predominantly-
white colleges.
"Most plans were approved by
HEW in 1975 says Joe Hagy,
Oklahoma Regents state planning
coordinator. But in 1977, the
NAACP again sued, and a court
threw out all the state desegrega-
tion plans as inadequate.
Legal Defense Fund
spokesmen, who closely monitor
the states' progress, say the
government's lax enforcement of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 re-
quires them to keep suing.
"Right now we're in the first
full year of accepted plans says
James Turner, a Legal Defense
Fund attorney. "Goals have been
met in some areas and particular
colleges. Most of the goals are
very conservative. I'd be very sur-
prised if any of the plans are
unrealistic
But while devising the plans
may be difficult, state education
administrators say implementing
them is even harder.
Many blacks still prefer to at-
tend traditionally-black schools,
and view white institutions as
racist, regardless of what affir-
mative action programs the white
schools have.
"The segregation problems
have been carried over from a lot
of years the Legal Defense
Fund's Turner admits, "the
perception that some of these col-
leges are racist has some basis
"Most blacks are unhappy
here says Sharri Warnsby,
former president of the Legion of
Black Collegians at the Universi-
ty of Missouri at Columbia.
"I don't think any (black per-
son) would come here if they had
any sense Warnsby told The
Maneater, a Missouri student
paper. "Everything is geared
toward the majority, and the ma-
jority is white
Hagy adds Oklahoma still
fights a racist reputation, pro-
pagated by discriminatory legisla-
tion only recently removed from
the state books.
"But one of the big problems
we're very concerned about is the
decline in the black student
population says Wayne Echols
of Alabama's Commission on
High Education. "It's bad par-
ticularly in a state like Alabama,
which continues to lag behind the
rest of the U.S. in the number of
adults with college degrees
"We don't know how we'll ap-
proach the problem of recruit-
ment of students or faculty he
adds.
But Washington believes that
colleges can do better, despite a
seeming shortage of willing black
students.
The declining black student
population "is probably a com-
plaint of the higher education
system from long before.
? Double Trouble
Oaly one more day left of summer school ,od the Tacatftoa finally
negins. A word of advice: be sure to find a cool place to relax dar-
ing intercession. Don't resort to putting yourself oat oa a ledge.





THE I M CAROLINIAN
JULY 24, 1985
:UX,X-XX"X'X-XX-Xv-VXX-
Hot, Humid Days Can Cause Sunstroke, Cramps I HELP
As much as we all enjoy the
warm weather, � if not,
remember last January when
temperatures dropped below zero
there are some precautions
you should take to avoid heat
cramps, heat exhaustion and heat
stroke (sunstroke).
According to the Student
Health Center, heat cramps are
sudden muscle pains caused by
excessive loss of salt in perspira-
tion during strenuous exercise in
hot weathei.
1 o present heat cramps, the
S1K suggests that fluids such as
Gatorade or Hawaiian Punch
(mix one can with one teaspoon
of salt) should be consummed
frequently. One should im-
mediate!) rest And drink salty
fluids should heat cramps occur.
Heat exhaustion is caused bv
ibilitv of the body to ade-
NOTES
STATE GOVERNMENT
POSITIONS
nen and n I n rP encouraged to
CO OP pt � state go. n
� '935 Needed are students
� Sm and accounting with
� ese Dos.t.ons in Raleigh
�n contact Co operative
'
WRITERS
� pay nard worK, great
' id out how you
� ,nest medium
MOVIE
- i at 2 p.m 'he College of Arts and
I a view ng ot a 30
' - wan entitled. Song Of
andsrape Dr Rosma Ch.a ot'the
Dei r. v� oe presenting the film
h has no speaking in il oepicts
an anj nas a musical
. u-ng Chinese Com
�he new Joyner
The public is in
quately supply the blood vessels
with enough fluids to produce
perspiration needed for cooling
and meeting other vital tissue re-
quirements.
One usually sees heat exhaus-
tion after vigorous exercise in hot
weather. Symptoms will include
faintness, weakness, headache
and sometimes nausea and
vomiting. The skin is pale, moist
and body temperature is normal
or below normal. The best treat-
ment is prevention for heat
cramps and decreasing physical
activity during hot weather.
Emergency treatment consists
of lowering the persons's head
below the rest of his body, plac-
ing him in a cool spot or room,
drinking fluids that contain salt
and several hours of rest.
Heat stroke, better known as
sunstroke, is a serious condition
in which excessive body heat is re-
tained and it requires prompt
emergency treatment. It is caused
by a failure of the perspiration
regulating mechanism. The per-
son undergoing vigorous exercise
in intense heat may perspire pro-
fusely for sometime and then
become dehydrated and fail to
perspire enough to maintain body
temperature. The skin is dry, hot
and flushed and the person can
quickly become confused, dizzy,
faint or even lose consciousness.
Sunstroke is a medical
emergency � without treatment,
100 percent of those victims will
probably die. If prompt and
vigorous treatment is provided,
almost as many will survive.
Treatment should start by
moving the person to shade,
preferably a cool room and call-
ing their physician andor rescue
squad at once. Try to check the
person's temperature if possible,
then attempt to reduce body
temperature � a bathtub with
cold water and massaging the
skin vigorously will bring more
blood to the surface for cooling.
Spraying the body with a
garden hose and fanning is often
effective. Ice should be placed on
the head and if the person is alert,
offer fluids.
If the elevated temperature is
allowed to continue, serious per-
manent brain and nervous system
damage can occur. A
temperature of 105 degrees
Fahrenheit or more requires
treatment, which should be con-
tinued until he cools off to about
102 degrees. Someone experienc-
ing heatstroke should be
monitored for several hours,
because the condition is so
severe.
A person recovering from
heatstroke can have faulty heat
regulation for days, months,
years and the rest of his life.
Remember, have fun in the
sun, but rest, drink a lot of fluids
and don't overheat. Contact the
Student Health Service if you
would like more information
about heat related problems.
Please note that operating
hours for the Student Health
Center during intersession will be
posted on the front door. Pa-
tients will be seen on an emergen
cy basis only, and there will be a
full-time physician on hand to
assist. Students musf show proof
that they were either enrolled in
second session summer school or
intend to be enrolled in the fall
before the Center's services can
be offered.
WANTED
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Writers
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Call
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B ' 3C ru" out C n it�m
ECU Biotechnologists Receive Grant
.THEEAST C ARQUNiAN JULY 24, 1985
ECU News Bureru
RiJil .N�rth Carolina
Biotechnology Cente: has award-
ed three researchers at ECU
grants totaling $30,500 for their
Proposed projects in
biotechnology. The researchers
! Dr. Charles E. Bland,
uepartment of Biology; Dr. Gor-
don L. Jendrasiak, Department
OJ Physics; and Dr. Carolyn S.
Stegiicfe, Department of
Microbiology. The awards are a
part of the NCBC's annual Com-
petitive Small Grants Program
for North Carolina university
and industrial scientists involved
in biotechnology research.
One of the most innovative
proposals was submitted by Dr.
Bland, professor and chairman
of the biology department. Bland
received $20,000 for his proposal.
"Development of Techniques for
Utilization of Peanut Hulls and
Other Agricultural Wastes for the
Culture of Commercially Impor-
tant Mushrooms With produc-
tion of peanut hulls in North
Carolina exceeding 133 million
pounds a year, Bland proposes to
use this abundant agricultural
waste product as a fertilizer for
production of mushrooms. There
has been a sharp increase in con-
sumer demand for a variety of
mushrooms including the "highly
prized" and high priced oyster
mushroom, straw mushroom,
and Enoke mushroom. Bland's
proposed testing facilities will be
built in vacant tobacco
warehouses.
Couple Granted Extra Credit
The other ECU proposals that
received NCBC grants proposed
studies in gene expression and im-
munology. Steglich will be at-
tempting to produce biologically
important molecules in mam-
malian cells. Jendrasiak will be
experimenting with encapsulating
antiinflammatory agents into
liposomes for the purpose of
evaluating an innovative method
treatment. These studies, like
many of the projects funded by
this NCBC program, are involved
in conducting basic research in-
vestigations necessary for the
future development of
biotechnology techniques.
Of the eighty-nine proposals
submitted, the North Carolina
Biotechnology Center funded a
total of 32 projects. Institutions
funded included Duke Universi-
ty, ECU, NC A&T, North
Carolina State University, the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Wake Forest
UniversityBowman Gray,
Research Triangle Institute, and
Greer Laboratories.
The North Carolina
Biotechnology Center's Com-
petitive Small Grants Program
provides seed money for universi-
ty and industrial scientists or
engineers conducting investiga-
tions or educational programs in
biotechnology. Grant awards
range from $3,000 to $20,000.
This special program is designed
specifically for North Carolina
scientists and priority is given to
new investigators, established
scientists embarking on new lines
NEW YORK (UPI) - - A cou-
ple held hostage on the TWA
jumbo jet hijacked last month to
Lebanon has asked for � and
will receive � thousands of miles
credit to their "frequent flyer"
plan, a TWA spokesman said
Saturday.
Dan Kemmnitz, TWA
manager of internal communica-
tions, said the airline has not
automatically granted the credit
to all passengers held hostage on
flight 847, which was hijacked
after it left Athens, Greece, for
Rome. But any "frequent flyer"
club member held hostage who
asks for the credit will receive it.
TWA Airlines Reward Hostages
Moslem extremists com-
mandeered the jet June 14, forc-
ing the pilot to criss-cross the
Middle East between Algiers and
Beirut, Lebanon, in the 17-day
seige covering thousands of air
miles. One passenger, a Navy
diver, was killed.
"We never considered it (giv-
ing credit) because we felt it
would be in poor taste because
it's a commercial program
Kemmnitz said.
"It was a terrible experience,
so it never occurred to us
But Arthur Toga, 33, of St.
Louis, requested the credit to his
frequent flyer program and it was
Sidewalk Study
Tony Rumple �
ECU News Bureau
While many students take to the silent halls of a library to study,
senior art student Mike Tyler sets up shop on an ECU sidewalk!
f��
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Conveniently located in University
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University Optometric
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Dr. Dennis O'Neal
754600
Hours 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday
Evening Hours Available By Appointment
granted, Kemmnitz said. Toga
was held throughout the entire
17-day seige, but his wife Debbie,
who was pregnant with the cou-
ple's first child, was released
earlier.
Kemmnitz said he wasn't sure
of the exact number of miles the
Togas would be given in credit.
But it would include the flight
from Athens to Beirut and back
and forth three more times bet-
ween Beirut and Algiers, plus the
flight from Beirut to Frankfurt,
West Germany, and home.
He said it would amount to
"several thousand" miles.
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Toga is a research assistant
professor in neurology at the
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�ire iEaHt (Earflltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
John Peterson, omuMmm
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mm&Eim
H AROL D JOYNER, Srm Edta TOM LUVENDER, n,re�or of A
Daniei Maurer. itej, t:dllor Anthony Martin, b, Managfr
Rick Mccormac, sparae, John Peterson, emuManaxer
BlI I MlTCHEl I , Crcuian.n Manager BlLL DAWSON, Prod1km Manager
DtBBlE STE ENS. v. DeCHANII E JOHNSON, M Uchn.aan
Jul 24. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
-30-
Long before the advent of
newsroom computer terminals, -30-
was the writer's way of signaling
editors that a story was complete. In
East Carolinian tradition, -30- is the
outgoing managing editor's way of
terminating his reign, or sentence.
My two years of working for The
East Carolinian have taught me a
great deal about people and their
idiosyncracies, something that
could never have been learned in a
classroom. I've done more than my
share of complaining about working
here, but in the end it's been one of
the more valuable experiences in mv
life.
Probably the most persistent pro-
blem in running a campus
newspaper is student apathy. Con-
trary to what people with rose-
colored glasses say, a lot of students
are apathetic, but then so are a lot
of people in general. It can be
frustrating to work on a news story
and then see hardly anyone read it.
It can be more frustrating to be
unable to recruit writers on a 12,000
student campus. Essentially, what
you end up doing is ignoring the
apathetic students and concen-
trating on the few who are in-
terested. Not very altruistic, but
realistic.
On the other hand, there are a
number of people on this campus,
some of them students, who are ge-
nuinely dedicated to banishing the
EZL image forever. It won't be an
easy task, and ECU will never be a
Harvard, but it's very important for
this university that some people are
not satisfied with merely being ade-
quate. There's certainly room for
improvement, but as long as people
are persistent it will happen even-
tually.
As far as criticism is concerned,
The East Carolinian has often been
a favorite target of critics, ranging
from students to journalism pro-
fessors. My basic response is that if
you aren't helping to solve tVie pro-
blem you are part of it. If you must
criticize, do it constructively, better
yet, come up here and see what we
do. We always need writers, but
very rarely are approached by
anyone willing to commit time and
energy. A skeleton staff of students,
with classes to attend and
homework to do, produces this
paper twice a week. The newspaper
is a responsibility that they must
constantly deal with. You can skip a
class if you feel like it, but you can
hardly skip a production night.
Mistakes are made, after all, we are
here to learn, but many good things
are done too. The staff needs con-
structive criticism tempered by an
understanding of how much they
do, not remarks made in total ig-
norance.
Now for suggestions. SGA has
naturally had its ups and downs
over the years. Hopefully this year
will not be negative. David and
Chris, it's good to want to do
what's right for the student body, as
long as you keep their extremely
diverse interests and concepts of
right and wrong uppermost in your
minds. You should both remember
that we generally consider people in-
nocent until proven guilty. Also,
Chris, remember what happened to
Spiro Agnew.
And then there's the Media
Board. I don't dispute the concept
of the board, but I disagree with its
makeup. I really cannot see how be-
ing Panhellenic president, for exam-
ple, automatically qualifies an in-
dividual to make policy decisions
for campus mediums. A board ap-
pointed on the basis of their in-
terests and qualifications would be a
much better idea.
Finally, there are the thank yous.
First, I'd like to thank Bill Shires,
our advisor, for telling me when I
did a good job, not mentioning it
when I did a mediocre one, and
pointing out gently my glaring er-
rors. You've been extremely helpful
and patient and you've added great-
ly to the paper.
Then there is the administration.
College administrators are frequent-
ly portrayed as sitting in ivory
towers out of reach of the students.
I have not found that to be the case.
Chancellor Howell, thanks for
returning my calls in record time,
always answering my questions and
speaking slowly enough for me to
get it all down. Elmer Meyer and
Angelo Volpe, you've been more
than helpful, in addition to being in-
teresting and entertaining and pro-
viding Yankee accents for my
homesick ears.
There are two people who have
kept me humble, my father and Bill
Grossnickle, both of whom never
failed to mention the double enten-
dres in my headlines and the
naiveness of some of my assump-
tions, something I needed. You
both mentioned my good points
too, thanks.
Greg Rideout, my bete noire. I
didn't agree with your methods, but
I did learn about newswriting from
you. I will always respect your
knowledge of the field, and you are
good company in a hurricane.
There are two people I never
could have made it without � Mark
Barker and Betty Jo Norman. It's
no secret that I'm incapable of lay-
ing out copy in straight lines, and
without these two to do it for me,
the paper would have created
widespread seasickness. Thanks for
staying until 5 a.m laughing at my
jokes and putting up with my illegi-
ble handwriting.
Another behind-the-scenes per-
son who deserves applause is An-
thony Martin. Anthony gets the
details taken care of so other people
don't have to worry about them �
no small feat.
Harold, you've improved tremen-
dously and I think you're doing an
excellent job. Maintain your sanity
and sense of humor and you'll be
fine. Rick, Scott and Tony, I may
not always read the sports page, but
I still appreciate what you do.
Besides that, you've taught me
whole new modes of conversation.
Dan, you have excellent ideas and
you work hard. Keep working for
what you believe should be chang-
ed.
I'd also like to thank Debbie and
Doris for answering the phones,
taking complex messages and listen-
ing to me babble �
Bill D Petie, Tommy and the
rest of the crew. You have been ir-
ritating and funny, but I've enjoyed
working with you.
Finally, I'd like to thank two very
special people. Mom, who else
would save my clippings and send
them out to her friends? And who
else would have chocolate chip
cookies waiting for me at 2 a.m.?
Thanks. And Tom, thanks for
listening to me, cheering me up,
laughing at me and with me and,
most importantly, fixing me dinner
on production night. You're great.
Jay, good luck. You will pro-
bably need every skill you possess
and some you didn't even know you
had. The mythical keys that come
with the job have been lost over the
years, but I did clean the desk for
you.
J.J.
FtsmvH&SL�o-msmcMrvjC4,
Soviet Expansionism Improbable;
Military Intervention Unnecessary
In my last column I attempted to show
that large-scale Soviet intervention in the
Third World must be regarded as an
unlikely development in the forseeable
future. This is true, not only because of
the dismal results which the Soviets have
achieved in the past by relying upon the
militaristic approach to expanding their
influence in the Third World, but also
because economic trends in that country
are against increasing military outlays.
In addition, there is of course, the inex-
orable fact that the Soviets lack and will
continue to lack the military where-
withall to carry the day in any region far
from the USSR that the United States is
prepared to contest.
From The.eft
Jay Stone
For example, in commenting on the
power projection capabilities of the two
superpowers, Rajan Menem (author of
Soviet Foriegn Policy in the 1980s)
shows that the United States maintain
an advantage in all categories except air-
borne troops and merchant cargo
vessels. In the case of long-range
transport aircraft, not only is the"Soviet
fleet considerably smaller, but its
payload is only 56 percent that of the
United States.
The Soviets have eight airborne divi-
sions compared with two for the United
States, and in recent years some have
been used for power projection in the
Third World; they were placd on alert
when Brezhnev threatened to resort to
military intervention in the Middle East
on October 24, 1973, and were also used
as a spearhead to secure vital positions
and set the stage for the entry of Soviet
ground forces into Afghanistan in
December 1979. In comparison, to
American airborne divisions, which
possess organic logistics and support,
Soviet airborne troops are dependent for
these functions on regular army units.
This is a drawback that diminishes their
utility, except for operations in areas
close to the USSR such as Europe and
the Northern Tier countries stretching
from Turkey to Afghanistan. By con-
trast, American forces are better suited
for power projection over great
distances.
In addition, Soviet amphibious ships
are decidedly inferior to their American
counterparts because they are, on the
whole, lighter, slower, and carry far
fewer helicopters than American ships.
Moreover, the Soviet fleet would be ex-
tremely vulnerable if it had to operate
outside the range of shore-based aircraft
because of the disadvantage which the
Soviets have in aircraft carriers. They
have only two while the United States
has thirteen.
Indeed, the writings of the com-
mander in chief of the Soviet navy, Ad-
miral SergeiGorshkov, suggest that
Third World power projection is not
stressed in Soviet naval doctrine. While
Gorshkov's book, The Sea Power of the
State, reveals a strong interest in the role
of the American navy in local wars of
imperialism, in this work and earlier
essays, the major missions of the Soviet
navy were defined as deterrence,
strategic strikes in the event of nuclear
war, countering enemy aircraft carriers,
and the advancement of state interests
during peacetime through port visits and
the maintenance of a permanent
presence in various areas. Power projec-
tion in the Third World, then, is not a
high priority on the Soviet agenda.
The real areas of vital concern to the
Soviets are related to their obsessive
preoccupation with perceived threats to
their national defense and their status as
a super-power. Clearly, one such area is
the U.SSoviet strategic balance, which
commands the lion's share of Soviet
resources. Two related areas are the
European theater and what is veiwed as
a looming threat across the 4,000-mile
Sino-Soviet border.
That the Soviet Union does not place
a great deal of emphasis upon Third
World power projection, however, ap-
pears to have escaped detection by
military strategists in the U.S The
United States is currently the largest sup-
plier of arms and other forms of military
assistance to the rest of the world.
Moreover,the creation of special combat
units such as the Special Forces and the
Rapid Deployment Force for waging
counter-insurgency warfare illustrates
the fact that the American government
sees insurgent revolutionary movements
as the greatest threat to U.S. interests in
the Third World.
"Our preoccupation with
the Soviet military threat has
prevented us from recogniz-
ing the role that poverty
plays in causing social
unrest. As a result, we find
ourselves pursuing military
solutions to problems that
are primarily economic in
origin. '
Of course, the outlook which gave rise
to these policies had its beginnings in the
past when the Soviets were, indeed,
more aggressive about trying to expand
their influence both in Europe and the
Third World. History, however, has
shown that the Soviet commitments in
under-developed regions have been
niether sustained nor deep and that the
threat of large-scale Soviet expansionism
is illusory. During the 1970s the Soviets
were thrown out of Egypt and Somalia
without a fight. They are presently bogg-
ed down in a protracted war � in
Afghanistan and the Solidarity
resistance movement in Poland has
become an underground institution.
Yet, if the Soviets are losing the hearts
and minds of Third Worlders the U.S. is
faring only slightly better. Our preoc-
cupation with the Soviet military threat
has prevented us from recognizing the
role that poverty plays in causing social
unrest. As a result, we Find ourselves
pursuing military solutions to problems
Doonesbury
that are primarily economic in origin
The U.S. supplies the miluarv needs
of other countries in three basic �
cash sales of military equipmerr
and loans, and training program
military personnel. American arm
porations can sell some weapons and
components directly to foreign govern-
ments or foreign Firms, however, n
large sales of sophisticated equipr
like aircraft or missiles, are hand
through the government's For .
Military Sales program (FMS). Between
1950 and 1982 FMS sales totaled more
than $116 billion worldwide. D
commercial arms sales by private com-
panies added another $14 billion, accor-
ding to the U.S. Defense Department
Until the late 1970s, the United States
also poured considerable surm into
outright military grants to foreign coun-
tries, about $55 billion between 1950 and
1982. Economic realities, however. hae
caused a shift in policy. Outright
military assistance has been increasingly
replaced, partly by cash sales of
weapons and partly by loans offered at
very favorable rates enabling foreign
governments to buy American militarv
equipment. Finally, the United States
has trained more than half a million
foreign military personnel since 1950
under the International Military Educa-
tion and Training Program (1MET), an
enterprise that has cost more than $2
billion.
Yet the most troubling thing about
these figures is that American arms sales
and military assistance have helped sup-
port some of the world's most repressive
governments. According to the Center
for Defense Information,the United
States has been a key supplier of arm- to
28 out of 41 military-dominated govern-
ments around the world with records of
severe human rights violations. In the
late 1970s, some halting steps were taken
by the American government to restrict
arms sales to the worst human-rights of-
fenders. But many of these restrictions
have been lifted under the Reagan ad-
ministration.
Of course,this policy has been under-
taken in the name of anti-Communism
and during the time of the Korean war
when China had just come under Com
munist rule and Joseph Stalin was using
the North Koreans as proxies to pursue
expansion in East Asia it was somewhat
more justified than it is now or will be in
the future. For now and in the future, is
I have already shown, the biggest threat
to U.S. influence in the Third World is
likely to arise, not from military aggres
sion on the part of the Soviets or even
their proxies, but from povertv and
tyranny which have so frequentlv shown
themselves to be the seedbeds of Com
munist movements in the past. The
United States, then, should clearlv
rethink its foreign policy with an eye to
making it more appropriate to contem
porary realities. We must offer the Third
World a path to democracy and pro-
psperity. Yet, we cannot accomplish this
end while simultaneously maintaining
grossly inflated levels of military spen-
ding. We must make a choice about
which option we will pursue in the Third
World sometime in the near future.
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
MIKE, WHO
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THE EAST CAROUNIAN
Lifestyles
JULY 24, 1985 Page 5
TW's
Music
By MIKE LUDWICK
Staff Writer
Local night owls will have a
true taste of the music in-
dustry when the Super Grit
Cowboy Band tapes its live
music video and records a live
album Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday nights at TW's
Nighlife here in Greenville.
On Wednesday night the
Super Grit Cowboy Band, with
the help of WNCT-TV, will
tape a live music video. Then on
Friday and Saturday night, they
will record their live album.
Richard Fox of the Chapel
Hill-based Location Recording
Services will record the audio
tracks for both the music video
and the album. According to
Police Drummer Films Video
NEW YORK (UPI) - Stewart
peland, the sole American in
he platinum-selling rock group
:he Police, isn't interested in
aming fans, magazine covers,
ping flashbulbs, or making
millions. In fact, he's puzzled bv
01.
1 auyers, doctors and interior
decorators, you can understand
why society rewards them for
uhat they do. But somebody who
bangs things in rhythm, it's a lit-
tle bit harder to work out the
lank blond said.
�land's musing on his hap-
p predicament, rising from the
son of a CIA agent stationed in
Beiru: to become a wealthy
drummer in one of the world's
most popular rock bands, led him
to the subject of surprisingly the
study of rhythm.
"Rhythm and music are very
!mr in subtle ways he
said.
His fascination with how-
rhythms coincide, not just in
music but in the pumping of an
engine piston or the pulse of an
electrical current, is the focus of
Copeland's latest project, a film
called The Rhythmatist in which
he stars.
Shot in Africa, often with
tribes never before exposed to
Western culture, the home video
is intended to be a "video LP
with a plot so loose and music
and pictures so interesting that it
can be played over and over like a
record.
A soundtrack for The
Rhythmatist is soon to be releas-
ed, along with a music video and
a single. The heavily percussive
music for the film is, to say the
least, unusual.
"It's in a foreign language for
a start Copeland said. "And
there's no recognizable connec-
tion with the mainstream of
modern music, which was the
whole point. I wasn't out to do
the mainstream, modern music in
Africa. I was out there to do new
stuff
The Police have always forged
their own path, thanks in large
part to Copeland, who conceived
of a rock V roll band "that
would be a three-piece unit that
you could fit in a taxi and would
be independent of everything
Its simplicity, and reggae-
flavored rock music, made the
band an unusual component of
the punk-New Wave movement
in the late '70s.
The Police shunned the in-
dustry's "dinosaurs turning
down opportunitites to open for
big acts like Alice Cooper, and
refused record company ex-
travagances until they themselves
could afford them. They didn't
have to wait long.
Their first album yielded a top
40 hit, "Roxanne in 1979, and
each of the four albums since
then has been even more suc-
cessful. Their last LP, 1983 s
Synchronicity, produced four top
20 hits, including the stunning
chart-topper, "Every Breath You
Take
Copeland immodestly con-
siders the Police the world's best
rock group, but said all three
members of the band know
they're capable of making "an
LP that's average. It's very possi-
ble and we're concerned that it
doesn't happen. It's real impor-
tant to us to really be good
Although he is an American
citizen, shortly after his birth
Copeland's family moved to
Beirut, where his CIA-employed
father was stationed. He was 18
before he set foot on American
soil again to study at Berkeley
and he now lives in London.
His political leanings are con-
servative, which helps explain
why Sting's liberal viewpoints are
clearer on his solo album than on
any Police record. "He's got to
hone his arguments with me
Copeland said.
He said he will see a Sting con-
cert this summer and may even
organize some favorite musicians
for a tour of his own, although
"basically I'm spoiled. I like my
group
Sting: A Festival Melancholia
B WARREN BAKER
special lo Th� East Carolinian
According to most critics,
Sting's first solo album has
"een long overdue. To others,
The Dream of the Blue Turtles
proves that the charismatic voice
behind the Police should have
waited a little longer.
There are no intricate Andy
Summers guitar riffs cutting
trough the steady rhythm of
Stewart Copeland drum raps. In
fact, there is nothing on the
album that vaguely resembles a
Police tune except for the remake
of "Shadows in the Rain This
'ime it's a pseudo-frolicking
upbeat tune with a playful
keyboard accenting the familiar
lyrics. "Shadows" rounds out
;de one effectively since, up until
that point, side one has cranked
out slow � but well � musically
poetry.
As usual, his voice swims
within the beautiful orchestration
with a soft, yet piercing, suave
delivery � a form of crooning
that sets its own standards and
then breaks them. Even when he
sings off-key, you could swear
that the note could not be sung
any other feasible way. There is
no Springsteen gruffness or
Bryan Ferry trilling in his voice,
but his own special way carries
the weighty lyrics through the
songs dutifully and efficiently.
But there's something wrong
here. Sting has had a crisis of
conscience.
That's fine, one might think,
an artist is entitled to bare his
soul to the critics and the
worldevery once in a while.
Sting, however, pulls out all stops
and writes about a multitude of
problems,
crafted songs with ponderous For example, "Children's
SDDE0
s ' mi MiKfi
Ml((IK�
"tlHIMli,(IK tit ,�,
"fEe, d�f rh 'n-rfU?
Sting and the world are in a state of precarious balance.
Crusade" is a contrastcom-
parison between World War I
England and the country's cur-
rent problems with drug abusers.
It's the youth he sings about; the
senseless quick death in 1914 and
the senseless slow death in 1984
Soho. He dwells on the violence
of war ("Love Is The Seventh
Wave") and the possibility of the
US and Soviet Union realizing
that their children are depending
on a detente ("Russians").
Sting ushers in a new "No-
Nukes" theme song with the dark
and plodding "We Work the
Black Seam This foreboding
song talks about nuclear energy
with the characteristic wit Sting is
known for: "One day in a
nuclear agethey may understand
our rageThey build machines
they can't controland bury the
waste in great big holes
The big theme, love, is also
handled on three of the tracks.
"If You Love Somebody Set
Them Free one of the rare up-
tempo songs, is an essay on how
to keep love, and the moody
organ-laced "Consider Me
Gone" is a throwaway song deal-
ing with losing love. The last
track, "Fortress Around Your
Heart starts out in typical
"Blue Turtle" fashion with a
slow rhythm, but it later crescen-
dos with a good dose of
keyboards and heavy-handed
drumming on the chorus. The
lyrics come out smoothly over the
satisfying musicianship showing
Sting's penmanship is still in
great shape: "While the armies
all are sleepingbeneath the tat-
tered flag we'd madeI had to
stop for fear of walking on the
mines I'd laid
Mines, indeed.
Is there no relief? "Moon Over
Bourbon Street" and the in-
strumental title track offer dif-
ferent themes other than the
gosh-we've-got-some-problems
lyrics that encompass the rest of
the album.
"Moon" is based on a passage
from Anne Rice's novel Interview
With a Vampire. Sting thumps
slowly on his double bass while a
steady "tish tish tish" on the
cymbals create: an atmosphere
reminiscent of the 1920s. An oc-
cassional outburst from the sax-
ophone of Branford Marselis
caps everything off well with its
turn-of-the-century glee. Really
nice.
The title track adds needed life
to the vinyl with a much-too-
short jazz improvisation. Sting
lined up several of jazz's whiz
kids for the 10-track LP in-
cluding, Omar Hakim of
Weather Report (drums), Darryl
Davis of the Miles Davis Group
(bass) and one of the talented
sons from the Marselis clan,
Branford. Kenny Kirkland, a
veteran session man, also makes
an appearance with his made-to-
order dark keyboard ramblings
and occassional playful melodies.
"Dream the song, has so much
potential for a interesting jam
session, but the shortness of the
instrumental seems appropriately
cut off to make room for Sting's
melancholy digressions.
The Dream of the Blue Turtles,
the album, is a wonderful feat
musically. Pete Smith and Jim
Scott, the engineers, knew how to
handle the ethereal aspects of
Sting's music and transfer his
moodiness in to a well-recorded
album. The sounds are crisp and
clean, but
the music is moody to an
overwhelming degree.
According to Sting, he and the
world lie in a state of precarious
balance. One small shift and the
world goes boom. That worries
me. Then again, Sting's crisis of
conscience wories me. If he puts
out another album like this one,
he may have a mass suicide on his
hands.
Fox the state's only mobile
studio is being used for this pro-
duction.
The production of a live
music video and live album is a
first in Greenville. "This has
never been done before in
Greenville. To my knowledge
this is a first said Buzz Led-
ford, business manager for the
band.
Clyde Mattocks, the leader
and one of the founders of the
band said, "We want to use the
video to promote our album.
We can put this music video on
cable channels, and we can use
clips from the video to promote
our appearances
As for the release date of the
album and video, Mattocks
said, "I want to get them out by
Christmas. It's best to release a
new album sometime around
November
The as-yet-untitled LP, which
Mattocks plans to produce
himself, will appear on the
band's own record label,
Hoodswamp Records.
"We started in Greenville
said Mattocks when asked
about his choice of Greenville as
a shooting and recording loca-
tion. "This is our home ter-
ritory. We came here because
we will get the best audience
cooperation here. They will clap
and holler on cue Mattocks
said, "It's because of all the
support we've received here that
this is the audience we would
like to have in our video and
our album
HOTSPOTS
Nightclubs
The Attic begins the weekend
Wednesday with the high-
production rock of
Sidewinder. Diamond's
mainstream rock 'n' roll
will continue the weekend
on Thursday. And win-
ding up the Attic's hot
summer weekend on Fri-
day and Saturday nights is
Trezor Rex and their
brand of commercial
metal. Doors open at 9
p.m. The bands start at
9:30 p.m.
Corrigans continues its popular
Ladies Night Wednesday
with the keyboard music
of Carl Rosen. Doors
open at 8:30 pm.
The Loft presents Lahnn and
Loftin and their crowd-
pleasing music Friday
night, and Saturday night
the contemporary music
of Tom Jones will be at
the Loft. Both acts start at
9:30 pm.
Premuims and Greenville's own
Hot Rockin' Gray Band
starts the weekend on
Thursday with their new
original rock 'n' roll.
Then on Friday the Flat
Duojets and UV Prom are
at Premiums. Finally, on
Saturday Premiums
presents Foreign Bodies
with their original rock 'n'
roll. Each night doors
open at 5 p.m. and the
bands start at 10:30 p.m.
TW's Nightlife presents the
Super Grit Cowboy Band
on Wednesday, Friday,
and Saturday night. On
Wednesday night the
Super Grit Cowboy Band
will make a live music
video at TW's. The band
starts at 9:30 pm each
night. Also, every Tues-
day night TW's presents
the only comedy show in
eastern North Carolina �
The Comedy Zone. This
Tuesday John Penney and
Kodak will be the featured
comedians.
Hotspots is a listing of entertain-
ment available to the University
community. Any local nightclub
or University sponsored
organization interested in being a
part of Hotspots can do so by
contacting the Features Depart-
ment of The East Carolinian.
Submissions to Hotspots will be
printed only if space allows.
Star Wars?
Lighting Designer Gary Weathersbee is adjusting the laser used in the
Summer Theatre production of 'Peter Pan The laser will play the
part of Tinkerbdl in the play. The Production will run from July 24th
through the 27th and from the 29th to the 31st at the McGinnis
Theatre.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 24, 1985
50 CA
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SPREAP
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Liquidation Sale
Fine Quality Hand Knotted
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657o to 75 OFF
Repossessed by the Order of Secured Parties
From Several Stores Who Have Closed Down
Over 250 Pieces
Ah Sizes Large, Small
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At
SHERATON GREENVILLE
203 West Greenville Blvd.
264 By Pass
Greenville
WED JULY 24 from 10 AM to 8 PM
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BY BROOKS
The Plaza
Deli
Ai


9
The Plaza Mai!
Greenville. N.C
756-4024
The Plaza Deli
located at THE PLAZA
The New Concept In Deli's
We Offer:
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade and Orangade
Daily Specials Orders To Go
New Sandwiches
Pita Wabbit and English Knight
Visit Kurope and Never Leave The Deli
Good Music Good Times
10 AM-9 PM 756-4024
Are He Having
Fun Yet?

, HOME COOKED FOOD
Student Special
Free Dessert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.25 plus tax& beverage.
Sunday Special � Turkey and Dressing
10 Free Plates With Semester Meal Plan
Ba
B Rl( '
ECU head ij
Baker added
the Pirate I
now anxious!
of summer
be eligible to p
Teffin Bent
Sewell signed
intent, bnngm;
of freshmen rH
ECU's two n
ship
H
Sept.
Sept.14
Sept.21
Sept. !
Oct.
Oct.12 '
Oct.26
Nov.�
Nov.9
Nov.16
Dec.
Benedu-
wide recede- i
Jacksonville,
High School,
uide receiver
seasons Bene
passes for !
touchdowns di
season in helpn
an 8-3 record
state playof:
Benedict eai
mention a!
distnc: hon
ing pur
averaged ai:
jeturn in 1984
punts for
Sewell is a 5-1
running bao
and played
High School. Hj
among the top
the state, rushu
,and five touchc
fime starting
Wa
BOSTON (UP
kge basl
Vs illiamv spent
reported offer t
coaching reigns
University.
A Boston Co
said Williams
decision -
although
William Flynn A
the Wake F I
"I don: kno
been made.
(Wake Forest
permission :
I have nothing el
between him an
Wake Foresi
declined to coma
"We will not
fer Sports lnil
tor Ber �
suing no statemi
While William
say whether
made, he dis
Boston media
from North Cat
spoke with unj
and attended a
North Carolina
tion Mondav
Mo
RALEIGH.
Yesterday forme
State quarterbat
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Jerry Paul pop(
Moorman's raj
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Convicted on
man is servini
charges of breal
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in her sleep
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bid for a newf
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incompeter





iy
mrner. Rest up
lluva yearl
1
I HI I-AS I CAROI IN1AN
Sports
II I V 24. IVX
Baker Inks Two Recruits For Fall Campaign
B KICK Met ORMA(
Niii I44lur
( I head football coach Art
added two more recruits to
Piraie fold last week. He is
anxiously awaiting the end
imer school to see who will
gible to play in the fall
n Benedict and Robert
Mgned football letters ol
bringing the total number
reshmen recruits to 22, filling
's two remaining scholar-
Sewell played a major role in
Plant's district and conference
championship squad as the team
rolled to a 9-1 mark in 1984.
labeled a good blocker with
great speed, SewelPs best single-
game performance of 1984 came
against Past Bav High School
when he rushed for 150 yards. He
also dashed for a 65-yard
touchdown run in the district
championship game.
Coach Baker said both players
are quality recruits, who
1985 ECU
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
s
ept
14
21
28
ct.5
12
Oct.26
Nov
No.9
16
Dec7
at N.C. State
SV TEXAS STATE
at Penn State
TEMPLE
MIAMI(FL)(Homecoming)
at Southwestern I ouisiana
SOUTH CAROLINA
at Southern Mississippi
at Auburn
TULSA (Shrine Dav)
at LSI
7:00 pm
7:00 pm
1:30 pm
7:00 pm
2:00 pm
4:00 pm
:30 pm
CT
6:00 pm CT
1:00 pm CT
1:30 pm
7:00 pm CT
Benedict, a 5-11. 155, pound
eceiver comes to ECU from
ksonville, F!a. and Raines
School, where he played
ide receiver the past two
Benedict caught 17
es foi 516 yards and seven
uchdowns during his senior
on in helping Raines High to
- ; record and a spot in the
playoffs.
Benedict earned honorable
ntion all-conference and all -
honors while also return-
punts and kickoffs. He
�aged almost 27 yards a punt
.rn in 1984 and returned two
punts for touchdowns.
Sewell is a 5-10, a 205-pound
running back from Tampa, Fla
and p J one year for Plant
�ol. He was considered
. the top running backs in
the state, rushing for 800 yards
and five touchdowns in a part-
time stanine role for Plant.
wouldn't ordinarily have been
around this late in the season.
"They both have an oppor-
tunity to play as freshmen, and
are excellent athletes, but had lit-
tle problems (that kept them
from being heavily recruited)
he said. "Benedict was a small
receiver and didn't have the
academics until his second
semester, while Sewell moved to a
new school for his senior year
Benedict represents additional
talent at wide receiver, one of the
Pirates' weakest positions, while
Sewell is a talented addition to
the running back corps.
"Sewell is one of the best runn-
ing backs we've ever recruited
Baker said. "This spring he has
three times under 9.8 (seconds) in
the 100-yard dash
Baker feels the two recruits will
add some depth to next year's
.squad, but he is also hoping some
of this spring's academic
Wake Seeks Coach
BOSTON (UP1) � Boston Col-
basketball coach Gary
uns -pent Tuesday mulling a
rted offer to assume the head
kching reigns at Wake Forest
l niversity.
A Boston College spokesman
-aid Williams could make his
�ion by late Tuesday,
-ugh Athletic Director
am Flynn could not confirm
Wake Forest offer.
I don't know if an offer has
been made Flynn said, "I gave
Cike Forest AD) Gene Hooks
permission to speak to Williams.
I have nothing else to say. That is
between him and Wake Forest
Wake Forest officials also
lined to comment.
"We will not confirm any of-
' Sports Information Direc-
Bert Wodard said. "We're is-
g no statement
While Williams also refused to
a whether an offer had been
ide, he discussed the job with
Boston media upon his return
rn North Carolina, where he
poke with university officials
and attended a conference of the
rh Carolina Coaches Associa-
Mondav
Williams, 39, was impressed
with aspects ol the job, published
reports said. "They have the
resources that the Eastern schools
don't have. They can do things
the Fastern schools really can't
do Williams told the Boston
Herald. "That makes it tough.
"The interest (in basketball)
down there is just incredible he
said. "Basketball's number one,
that 's for sure
Wake Forest, a member of the
Atlantic Coast Conference, is
looking to fill the vacancy left by
Carl Tacv, who resigned abrubtly
last week after 13 years at the
school.
Williams has compiled a three-
year mark of 63-30 at the Big
East Conference school, with two
appearances in the NCAA final
16.
"Gary is an attractive young
coach and we like his style of
play Hooks told The Boston
tilobe. Hooks said at least six
coaches were being considered
for the job.
"I don't want to say a whole
lot about this right now said
Hooks.
casualties will return.
"I won't know until at least
Thursday who will be coming
back Baker said. "There are
four or five players who are really
close, and they could really make
a big difference in terms of
depth
Going into preseason drills
later in August, Baker foresees
the wide receiver and defensive
line positions being the weakest
areas on the team.
"The wide receiver position
and the defensive line positions
both need improvement Baker
said. "At wide receiver we have
two freshmen coming in and also
may switch a quarterback or run-
ning back to the position. 1 don't
see any freshmen coming in and
playing on the defensive line so
we'll just have to improve the
quality of play among the return-
ing players
Baker said the offensive line
looks good, barring injuries, and
he is also pleased with the way the
defensive end and linebacker
positions are shaping up.
Quarterback, a sore spot last
year, will be improved according
to the coach. "I feel good about
our quarterback situation
Baker said. "Ron Jones made
good progress in the spring, and
I'm very impressed with Brad
Walsh a freshman who is in
school this session
Baker is looking forward t(
upcoming season even though the
schedule includes visits to Penn
State, Auburn, I St and a trij
in state rival N State Am
the home opponents a nth
Carolina and Miami I
"We could
about the schedule I
time Bal iid B
got the schedule : ing
.von help change-
have to tighten our

time
ECU football coach Art Baker is expecting the offensive line to pro-
vide protection for (8) Ron Jones. Jones, a sophomore from Port-
smouth. a is one of the possible candidates for the starting quarter-
back job. Jones and the rest of the Pirate squad will open the lX
season on Sept. 7 in Raleigh against N.C. State. The Pirates will pla
their first home game Sept. 14 against South West fexas Matt
Players, Owners Seek To Avoid Strike
NEW YORK (UPI) Baseball
owners lowered their projections
of losses through 198S, bringing a
lukewarm response from the
players' union as the two sides
continue to try to beat an Aug. 6
deadline in their contract negotia-
tions.
The owners' bargaining group,
which has been trying to mitigate
union money demands by show-
ing a financial emergency in
major-league baseball originally
had projected operating losses in
1988, for example, at $155
million. That figure was lowered
to S86 million. Figures for the
years preceding 1988 also were
lowered.
Lee McPhail, president of the
owners' Player Relations Com-
mittee, said the projections were
reduced through some changes in
the way the estimates were
figured. The biggest difference,
he said, was a decision not to
declare player depreciation as an
operating expense when a team is
sold.
"I think this was a step in the
right direction ' McPhail said
after emerging from a one-and-a-
half hour bargaining session, the
second since the Major league
Players Association set the Aug.
6 strike deadline July 15. "At
least, we have narrowed the dif-
ferences between us
The revised figures came after
the union, during a session last
Thursday, presented an expert's
report that varied from manage-
ment figures.
"We're closer togethei on the
figures said Don Fehr, acting
executive director of the union,
"but 1 don't want to dwell on
those. We may never agree on the
numbers, but we still have to find
some agreement on a contract
The major issue of these
negotiations is a union demand
for a 1�3 cul of baseball's $1.1
billion network television con-
tract to be applied toward pla
pensions. 1 raditionallv base-
has turned over about 1�3 of its
TV money for pensions, but it
never has had a TV contracl
this sie before.
To show the union that it can-
not afford such a payment,
baseball's negotiators have been
trying to convince the union that
the game faces grave finan
straits.
"We can't make a specific pro
posal (on the pension issue) until
we know how the whole ol
baseball's financial problems will
be addressed MacPhail said
"We can't treat the pension
separatelv from the rest of the
situation
The two sides met informally
Mondav morning for about three
hours before their afternoon ses
sion at the union offices lh-
neetmj
at the sank j
However. lc
couldn't estin

since managemei
a proposal on the p
1 he las: concrete
sal was for a
try to help reduce team expt s
1 ha; proposal eve: drew
disapproval of (
Peter I. eberroth, �
as a propone
he couldn't k
salary cap
" I he issue ol a s ap -
still on the table MacP
sa d. "It's soiru
believe in. We I trying
roll back salai
He il eberroth) : no;
m favor of some ot the things the
clubs have on the table, .vao' h
noi m favor of some of the thi .
the union lias on the table "
Moorman Claims Drug Use Affected Lawyer
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI)
Yesterday former North Carolina
State quarterback Percy Moor-
man told a judge that his lawyer
Jerry Paul popped pills during
Moorman's rape trial and fell
asleep while a prosecutor cross-
examined the athlete.
"I was on the witness stand
and Mr. Paul had his head down
like this with his eyes closed
said the 19-year old former
quarterback, dropping his chin to
his chest. "I was scared. I was
real confused. I didn't know
what to do
Convicted on Feb. 19, Moor-
man is serving 12 years on
charges of breaking into a white
student's dorm room and raping
her in her sleep on Sept. 1, 1984.
Moorman, who is black, is basing
his bid for a new trial on grounds
that Paul took pills that rendered
him incompetent in the cour-
troom.
"He would usually go get a
Coke and take a pill with a
Coke Moorman said during a
hearing in Wake Superior Court
on Moorman's motion for a new
trial.
Questioned by prosecutor
William Hart, Moorman said he
saw Paul take pills once at the
courthouse and three times at the
Raleigh Motel where Paul and
family members stayed during
the seven-day trial.
Moorman's mother, Dorothy
Moorman, said Paul got so
groggy from pills at the motel
that he fell forward into a plate
of food.
"He just bent over in his
food Dorothy Moorman said.
"If he was a drinking person, I
would say he was drunk
Percy Moorman also testified
Paul told Angelo Barnes of
Wilson to jump up and interrupt
the trial.
"He said he wanted to display
the prejudice in the case Moor-
man said. "He wanted him to
stand up and protest out loud so
the media could see this and act
upon it
Barnes did disrupt the trial and
was arrested for contempt of
court.
Superior Court Judge James
Pou Bailey, who heard the
original case against Moorman,
testified Monday that Paul was
unusually moody during the trial,
sometimes seemed unattentive
and once appeared to fall asleep.
Bailey also questioned some of
Paul's trial tactics, including ex-
cusing only one potential juror
and calling a witness who con-
tradicted the lawyer's own open-
ing statement to the jury.
"I have known Mr. Paul for a
long time and the most unusual
thing about him is that he is
unusual Bailey testified.
Paul, subpeonaed as a state's
witness in the hearing but yet to
testify, denied falling asleep.
A drug expert "testified that
Paul behaved like a drug user by
bouncing from doctor to doctor
complaining of a migraine
headache and obtaining
painkillers, sleeping pills and
other medication during the
course of the trial.
"It's a pattern commonly seen
in people seeking drugs of
abuse said Dennis Moore,
director of a chemical dependen-
cy treatment center in Asheville,
when questioned by Moorman's
new lawyer, Roger Smith.
"The pattern of going to dif-
ferent facilities and getting dif-
ferent drugs added on top of one
another is a pattern of drug seek-
ing.
Moore said the quantity of the
drugs Paul obtained, combined
with drugs he was already taking
to prevent migraines, would be
enough to impair his mental
abilities by the end of the trial.
Three doctors took the stand to
testify they gave Paul medica-
tions during the trial that includ-
ed the painkillers Percodan,
Vicodin and Fiorinal, and
Dalmane, a sleeping pill.
Paul also got injections of
Demoral before and after the
trial and told nurses at Rex
Hospital that medications he
took every day included Tofranil,
an anti-depressant, and Librium,
an anti-anxiety drug similar to
Valium.
Questioned by Hart, all of the
witnesses said a patient with
recurring migraines could
develop a degree of tolerance to
the medications.
Paul said in an interview he has
been plagued by migraines since
age 11, and goes to the closest
facility available when a painful
headache strikes. He said he
always tells doctors to call his
New York doctor to verify the
treatment he gets to prevent
migraines but they rarelv do.
"You have to look for
something if you are going to
make a case of incompetent
representation Paul said of the
drug abuse charge. "It's just not
true
Percy Moorman also testified
that Paul once dug Moorman's
discarded prescription bottle con-
taining a pain pill out of a
wastebasket in a room, put the
pill in his mouth and said the bot-
tle could be used for evidence.
� k
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 24, 1985
WANTED
Summer Bums Top Good, Bad & Ugly
EARN EXTRA MONEY WHILE
ATTENDING CLASSES: Students
wanted to provide notetakingtutor
ing services for disabled students on
campus. For an application contact
Handicapped Student Services Of
fice, 212 Whichard, or Program for
Hearing Impaired Students,
Brewster A 114.
HELP WANTED: Paid positions
now open for news, features and
sports writers at THE EAST
CAROLINIAN. Apply early as
number of openings are limited. Call
757 6366 or stop by 2nd floor Publica
tions Bldg. to fill out an application.
HELP WANTED: Aerobics Instruc
tors for the fall Experience re
quired. Contact Cathy at 758 9584
photogragher NEEDED: Ex-
perienced photographer needed to
take black and white photos. Call
758 4844 for details.
FOR RENT: One bedroom unfur
nished with kitchen with appliances,
large den, utilites furnished, two
blocks from campus, male students.
Required deposit, $160 monthly.
Call:752 5778 after 5:30 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Profes
sional relocating to area. Is seeking
a graduate student or med student to
share 2 bedroom apartment. Please
contact by postcard or phone: Lou
Fillman, 1521 16th Ave, Apt. U, Bir
mingham, ALA. 35205.
Work (205)934-4407 or
home-(205) 930 0527.
ROOMS FOR RENT 2 room fur
nished apt. Call 752 7212 or 756-0174.
ROOM FOR RENT: Room for rent
with Christian couple. Call 752 7217.
ROOMS FOR RENT: 2 rooms
available for rent now Private, a.r-
conditioning, $125 per month plus 13
utilites, (gas, electricity, phone) re
quires 1 year lease. Call 752 8499 bet
ween 9.30-2.30 p.m. Excellent loca
tion The Blue House across street
from campus.
SITTER NEEDED: Young Lady to
sit for seven nights Aug.4 through
10. $100 for week. Call 752 7246.
WORK NEEDED: Will do odd jobs
at minimal cost. Really need
money! Can you help? Call 758 4370
or 757 6927 Ask for Ruben.
WANTED: Last name for Nancy.
Blue Eyes; I have something of
yours from the Sandbar Party. Jeff
� P.O. Box 1365, Morehead City
28557.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom duplex, 3
blocks from campus. Stove, refrig.
and carpet. $190 monthly, l yr. lease
and deposit. Call 752 5778.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
roommate wanted. Non-smoker.
$175 monthly, utilites included. Call
752 1642
COLLEGE REP WANTED:
Representative wanted to distribute
Time Inc. and other publications'
"student rate" subscription cards at
this campus. Good income; no sell
ing involved. For information and
application write to: Riverside
Marketing Services, 816 Orange
Drive, Silver Spring, Maryland
20901
PERSONALS
I STILL NEED A RIDE TO D.C.I If
you are headed toward the
Washington D.C or northern Va.
areas THIS WEEKEND, please give
me a call. I will have very little gear
and will help with gas. Call 757 0430
after 2 p.m. and ask for Betty Jo.
Also can be reached at 757 6366.
Leave name and number.
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
The time has come to say good-
bye to second summer session
and along with it the champions
of this session's intramural ac-
tivities. Upsets have plagued this
session's events as only one No. 1
picked player was able to over-
come the challenge from his op-
ponents.
Percy Edwards, who captured
the one-on-one basketball title,
stayed on top throughout regular
play and into tournament action.
SALE
FOR SALE: Fire-engine red tandem
bike, with foot brakes and headlight.
Greet for families. Price negotiable.
Call 757 0430.
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro-
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An
thony at 757-6366 or 752-0291.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom 2 full baths,
12 x 65 Peachtree Mobile Home.
Very good condition. Convenient to
ECU. $7500 or best offer. Call
443-1339.
�IKE FOR SALE:Mens 27" blue
Motobecane 10 Speed. Excellent con-
dition $100 Call 758-0781
In the finals he defeated Ling
Sirarman.
In co-rec volleyball action, a
major upset occurred as No. 1
ranked Good, Bad and Ugly
bowed to the talents of the Sum-
mer Bums in a see-saw battle for
the championship, each game
came down to the wire as the
best-of-three match wasn't settl-
ed until the third game. In the
end, Summer Bums scored the
upset and defeated the defending
spring and first session cham-
pions 15-12.
Stay awake for this one folks,
the PI Kapps, picked to follow
the Basebenders on the softball
diamonds, took the lead in the
league and walked away with a
second-session championship. A
three-way first place tie awaited
the Pi Kapps in Tuesday action
unless their bats could do the
talking.
And they did, as the fraternity
brothers � led by Captain David
Hawkins � scored a dozen runs
and defeated their opponents for
the championship. Harry Night &
the Days, Basebenders and Not
the Commandos all fell to the Pi
Kapps.
The only champion that re-
mains to be crowned is the IRS
tennis tournament winner. Still
fighting it out for the title are top
seed Tom Kiehl, Mike Ludwick,
Randy Meetre and Chris Heyde.
Kiehl will face Ludwick, while
the number two and three seeds,
Meetre and Heyde, hit the courts
for a chance at upsetting Kiehl �
if he can overcome Ludwick.
Results will be posted Thursday
in room 204 of Memorial Gym.
When fall rolls back into town,
check into the IRS schedule and
participate in your favorite activi
ty � there's plenty to choose
from. Aerobics, outdoor recrea
tion, aquarobics, flag football
and plenty of other special event
are your's for the asking.
Pick up a handy pocket calen-
dar and an IRS handbook so you
can be up-to-date on the latest
registration dates for our events.
It all begins with the annual bike
race in August
rni.
ass-si. JJ555 WITH
" m I TO WALL
OPEHSUHDWSa
TIL
CRISCO
Shortening

3
lb.
an
198
P&Q
Sandwich Bread
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
DEL MONTE
Tomato Catsup
'M
3100
24 oz. �
loaves �
LIMIT THREE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
CRISP N' TASTY
Jeno's Pizza
MARKET STYLE
Ground Beef
5 lbs. or more
Ground
f SfcMfc ' Fresh
t Daily
TV
lb.
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
BONELESS
Beef Rib Eye
t

'
Whole
i tf ; 9-12 ,b.
l. r
avg.
USD A
CHOICE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
DIET PEPSI � MTN. DEW
Pepsi Cola
WAREHOUSE PRICES
BEEF
WAREHOUSE PRICES
MORTON
vvM
SAVE
50
c z
.
2ltr.
btl.
09
A?
Pot Pies
3100
8 OZ. �
pkgs. �
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Cubed
Beef Steak
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BONELESS
Rib Eye
Steak
lb
398
KRAFT
30
Grape Jelly
DEL MONTE
Pineapple Juice
MT OLIVE SWEET
Salad Cubes
ITALIAN � FRENCH � 1000 ISLAND
Kraft Dressing
NORTHERN (
Bath t Wv
Tissue
PLAIN
Brawny Towels
ALL VARIETIES
French's Potatoes
CONTADINA
Tomato Paste
KELLOGG S
Froot Loops
REGULAR � LIGHT
Coors �j
Beer - WJ
2
jar
46 oz
can
12 oz
jar
'6oz
btl
SNOWCROP ORIGINAL
Five Alive
GREEN GIANT NIBBLERS
Com On The Cob
FROZEN
Morton Dinner
FROZEN
swt
ctn pi
6
12 oz
can
2
49
A&P Lemonade
FROZEN , �
A&P
Pizza
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Sealtest Dip
KRAFT
American Singles
HUNGRY JACK
Pillsbury Biscuits
IN QUARTERS
Shedds Spread
TAYLOR
California
Cellars
12 oz
can
6ct
11 oz
Phg
4
602.
cant
PRODUCE SPECIALS
WE'VE GONE PLUM CRAZY
GREEN � BLACK OR
Red
Plums
RED � WHITE � BLUE
Grape
Sale
r SAVE
r � '
lb.
79
99
GENERAL MERCHANDISE SPECIALS
50 OFF
Listerine Mouthwash
MENNEN
Speed Stick Deodorant
32 oz
btl
DELI SPECIALS
CORNED BEEF OR
V
3ttr
btl
5
49
Pastrami
MOT PEPPER
Cheese Loaf
EGG ft POTATO OH DUTCH
Potato Salad
2
sm 189
299
299
89





Title
The East Carolinian, July 24, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 24, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.417
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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