The East Carolinian, July 10, 1985







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(Eutalinmn
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 Nor8 Pages
Wednesday, July 10, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
J B Humbert - ECU Phofo Lab
In Search Of
EC I students suffering from the record-breaking temperatures
Hill probablv look for a cool place to get awav from the heat. These
two students have found their southern comfort in the J.Y. Jovner
I ibrar and at the same time, were able to catch up on studying.
Hazardous Waste
Findings Debated
RALEIGH (UPI) �
Legislators and lobbyists who
favor tough right-to-know
legislation on access to hazardous
substance information say it may
be better to forgo passing a weak
bill this year and let local officials
create their own laws.
Last month, the House passed
legislation sponsored by Rep.
Harry Payne, D-New Hanover.
But the Senate last week approv-
ed a weaker proposal, which for-
bids local governments from
creating regulations more strict
than state laws. Payne says he
will urge the House, possibly to-
day, to not agree to Senate
changes to his bill.
Payne and environmental and
labor lobbyists claim the Senate
bill, with its preemption clause,
could hurt their cause more than
help it in getting information
about hazardous substances at
plants to fire-fighters, doctors
and citizens. State officials say
workers are covered under North
Carolina OSHA regulations.
"I believe that preemption is a
good idea when there is a per-
vasive state effort Payne said
Monday. "Everybody's got to
play with good rules before it is a
good idea
Payne said he has sent to 10
North Carolina cities copies of
his bill, the Senate proposal and a
legislative study commission
report, which argues for tougher
right-to-know legislation than
any of the measures approved
this session. Payne said he urged
local officials that if a conference
Producer
(In the July 3 issue, The East
Carolinian inadvertantly failed to
credit The New Republic and
United Press Syndicate for the
Doonesbury comic strip. We
regret the error.)
ANAHEIM, Calif. (UPI) �
The producer of the anti-
abortion movie The Silent
Scream says he agrees with
several points raised in a series of
"Doonesbury" comic strips
satirizing the film.
Donald S. Smith, the movie's
executive proddcer, on Friday
committee, which likely will be
appointed to work out dif-
ferences in the House and Senate
versions, cannot agree to a com-
promise, they should adopt strict
local right-to-know ordinance.
The cities are Raleigh,
Charlotte, Asheville, Gastonia,
Winston-Salem, Greensboro,
Wilmington, Fayetteville,
Jacksonville and High Point.
Durham is one of the cities in
North Carolina with a local right-
to-know ordinance.
Payne said that if legislators
wait until next summer to clear
up differences in the two pro-
posals and the cities adopt right-
to-know ordinances, "it would
create a better climate for the
bill
Christopher Scott, president of
the state AFL-CIO, reaffirmed
his stand today that local or-
dinances would do more for the
state than the Senate proposal.
Scott has said if the conference
committee adopted the Senate
proposal, he would urge
legislators not to support the
measure.
Scott and Payne said the pro-
blem of resolving right-to-know
legislation will fall on the
shoulders of business lobbyists.
"In the event we cannot
resolve our differences in com-
mittee, the bill will be left hang-
ing Payne said.
"Some kind of right-to-know
is not right-to-know he said.
"Preemption is the $64 question.
We want $64 worth of a good bill
to justify that price
Future Scientists Starting Early
First-Year Camp Successful
By BRETT MORRIS
Staff Wilier
A math and science scholarship
program for high school students
is being offered at ECU this sum-
mer in cooperation with the
University of North Carolina.
"Summer Ventures in Science
and Math" is in its first year and
was made possible by funds pro-
vided by the state legislature.
According to Floyd Mattheis,
chairman of Science Education
and director of Science-Math
Education at ECU, the program
was designed to provide enrich-
tj ment and stimulation for high
school students who are in-
terested in the fields of math and
science.
The curriculum consists of
math and science courses and
several other related topics such
as: electronic microscopy, com-
puter techniques in the
laboratory and field study in
geology and archaeology.
Students are required to attend
six hours of classroom instruc-
tion a day in courses that best suit
their interests, except for those
who are enrolled in the program
in ECU's School of Medicine.
The field study courses include
a canoe trip near Manteo and ar-
chaeology and geology field trips.
Approximately 1,500 high
school juniors and seniors
throughout the state applied for
admission into the program, but
only 600 were accepted. Those at-
tending ECU total 104 and the re-
mainder of the the students are
enrolled in similiar programs at
other state universities.
Mattheis said he has been ex-
tremely impressed with the facul-
ty members who have been in-
volved in the program. College
professors, along with graduate
assistants and local high school
teachers, have been providing the
training for this specific group of
students.
At the completion of the pro-
gram on July 26, students will
have a chance to present reports
and research projects that they
have been conducting within their
chosen program. A parent's da
will also be held July 26, he said.
Mattheis stated that this pro-
gram will have long term effects
for the ECU campus community
and also by distributing a part of
the University throughout the
state. Students will be "getting
some advantageous exposure to
programs that they would other-
wise not find in their high school
curriculums Mattheis said.
The program has also benefits
students who will be striving for
future achievement in science and
mathematics in order to provide a
service to the state.
History Professor Adds To Work
ECU News Bureau
The North Carolina Farmers'
Alliance: A Political History,
1887-1893 has been published as
the sixth volume in the East
Carolina Publications in History
series at ECU. Written by history
professor emeritus Lala Carr
Steelman, the monograph covers
the emergence of the grass roots
farmers' organization through its
political division which created
the Populist party in North
Carolina.
Dr. Fred Ragan, chairman of
the ECU Department of History,
says in the preface that the pro-
blems North Carolina farmers ex-
perienced in the late 1800's "are
hauntingly familiar themes even
to the casual observer of current
affairs The North Carolina
Farmers' Alliance was formed to
act on the grievances of poor
market prices and expensive
credit.
In concluding her work, Dr.
Steelman said, "The Farmers'
Alliance left its impact on Tar
Heel society. Its nonpolitical
achievements were noteworthy, if
not spectacular. The order pro-
vided a vehicle for social inter-
course among rural folk. It
dispensed charity to brothers and
sisters in financial or emotional
distress. It stimulated an educa-
tional awakening among farmers
and intensified their desire for
enlightenment
"In the realm of politics the
Alliance had real significance. As
a liberalizing force in the life of
the state, it provided an outlet for
minority groups to articulate
their grievances and exert more
influence than formerlyThe
order secured passage of laws to
regulate railroads, promote
education. strengthen
eleemosynary institutions, con-
serve natural resources, and
reform the judicial system.
"The Alliancefor a time con-
trolled the Democratic party. In
challenging bosses and political
machines it promoted a
democratization of the political
process
Dr. Steelman joined the East
Carolina faculty in 1955 and
taught history until her retire-
ment in 1984. She received the
A.B. degree from Georgia Col-
lege, Milledgeville, Ga her
M.A. and Ph.D. were earned at
the University of North Carolina
in Chapel Hill. She is married to
Dr. Joseph F. Steelman, also a
retired history professor.
Dr. Steelman's primary subject
area has been United States
history and particularly the
populist and progressive eras
from 1890 through 1920. She has
authored a number of articles
and essays in the North Carolina
Historical Review and in ECU's
Publications in History series.
The series began in the early
1960s. Previous volumes in the
series include Essays in American
History (1964), Essays in
Southern Biography (1965).
Studies in the Historv of the
South, 1875-1922 (1966), As
Bismark Fell: The Restive Mind
of the German Military (1976),
and Of Tar Heel Towns, Ship-
builders, Reconstructionists and
Alliancemen (1981).
Nationwide Alcohol Studies Compared
By HAROLD JOYNER
Nw� Editor
(This is Part II of an article
dealing with alcohol use on cam-
puses across America. Part I of
the article revealed results from a
nationwide survey of universitv
administrators concerning
policies and regulations of
alcohol use. Part II will deal with
alcohol use at ECU and the con-
trovery of whether a higher age
of consumming alcohol will solve
the problem of preventing
alcohol-related problems.)
ECU has not had a major
survey on alcohol use since 1980,
according to Jerry Lotterhos,
director of ECU Alcoholism
Training Program and faculty
adviser to the Campus Alcohol
Drug Program. In that survey, he
said, patterns of alcohol use at
ECU were examined and recom-
mendations were made as to
students should do to make them
more aware of responsible drink-
ing and treatment.
Lotterhos said CADP, a
volunteer student program frund-
ed by the SGA, was one of the
primary projects evolving from
the 1980 survey. "CADP serves
two roles Lotterhos said. "One
is a counseling service for
students who want a short term
confidential interview about their
drinking. The other role of
CADP is educating students
about responsible drinking
The philosophy of CADP is
basically a concept of responsible
behavior � not a group pro-
moting abstinence, Lotterhos
said.
In the national survey, college
administrator's prefered a
minimum drinking age of 21 or
above and 46 percent said they
believed a higher drinking age
will decrease the frequencey of
students drinking.
Lotterhos said he thought that
drinking alcohol is a long-term
cultural and personal behavior.
He also said people who drink
usually form their attitudes about
alcohol use around the age of 13.
At ECU, the number of
students who drop out of school
due to alcohol related reasons is
very low, said Ronald Speier,
associate dean of students. He
said he felt that the raising of the
drinking age to 21 will only en-
courage the student to find more
creative ways of drinking, such as
in the confines of his dorm room.
"A whole set of problems will
come about with the new drink-
ing age Speier said. "I think
the leaders of this campus will
have to become more creative in
giving students other social
outlets" when the new age goes in
effect.
Recently, North Carolina pass-
ed one of the strictest laws for
driving while impaired in the na-
tion. Lotterhos said that while
the law is very serious, it may not
be strict enough. "I do think,
though, that more education is
necessary for the driver convivc-
ted of a DWI. We (society)
definitely fail when it comes to
informing people about how to
drink responsibly
Of all the campuses surveyed,
almost all reported that their
campus offers some type of help
to the student who may think he
has a drinking problem. ECU of-
fers help through CADP and the
Counseling Center. But, what
about new students coming to
ECU.
Through the Office of Student
Services, Speier said a chapter of
Boosting Alcohol Consciousness
Concerning the Health of Univer-
sity Students program was form-
ed to spread information about
alcohol use. "We have to treat
students like adults he said,
"and make them more repsonsi-
ble. We also try to offer other
choices to drinking � practical
suggestions Speier said the
choice for a student to drink or
not to drink is more practical
than forbidding him to consume
any alcohol.
Fraternities, dorms, religious
groups have access to BAC-
CHUS, Speier said.
While there is no Univeristy
control of off-campus parties, an
effort is being made by the Inter-
fraternity Council to make frater-
nity parties more responsible.
Speier said. "There is always go-
ing to be parties, but alcohol,
education activities have only
recently become a part of the
fraternity experience
The National chapters are also
coming down harder on local
fraternities concerning rushes
and emphasis is being place on
restoring fraternities back to
what they originally set out to do
� having a brotherhood.
"Fraternities have rea'ized that
rushes bring on 'professional
rushers' and that bothers me
Speier said. I think once they get
alcohol away from rushes, a
potential member will see the real
reasons to join a fraternity. And
then it will have a place in a social
setting Speier said that once in-
itiation takes place, perhaps a
party can be given to the new
members.
Keeping with the trend of other
campuses, Alcohol Awareness
month is observed in January
One week in October is set aside
for informing ECU student about
Alcohol and drugs, Lotterhos
said.
Despite the constant "party"
image that ECU may have once
held, campus programs and
surveys will definitely keep cam-
pus leaders on their toes and find
other social outlets for students
until they reach a legal drinking
age.
With
hailed the decision by Universal
Press Syndicate to allow publica-
tion of the comic strips, which
were withheld for fear newspaper
editors would object to them.
"While we don't agree with
everything Garry Trudeau in-
jected into the 'Doonesbury'
strips on The Silent Scream, we
do agree that American citizens
have the right to judge for
themselves whether satirical
material is suitable for their con-
sumption Smith said in a press
release.
Smith called the decision a
validation of First Amendment
rights of free speech and freedom
of the press and told UPI Friday
that he agreed with some of the
points raised in the comic strips.
Jake Morrissey, associate
editor of Universal Press Syn-
dicate, Fairway, Kan said he
could understand how producers
of the anti-abortion film might
interpret the strips from their
own viewpoint and said he was
pleased by Smith's statement.
"That can be one of the in-
teresting sidelights of satire, that
it can be interpreted in such a
variety of ways Morrissey said.
Smith, who has his own adver-
tising agency, said he formed
American Portrait Films of
Anaheim in 1980 to make films
for the pro-life cause.
"I wouldn't actually call it a
sideline, although my basic
business is advertising he said.
"I've been in advertising for 20
years
Morrissey said the syndicate
decided in late May or early June
to withhold the series of six daily
strips on the anti-abortion movie.
He said it had been feared some
of the 835 newspapers that
subscribe to "Doonesbury"
would object to the subject mat-
ter.
Trudeau, author of the often
controversial comic strip, allow-
ed the series to be published in
The New Republic magazine,
with Universal's blessing, Mor-
rissey said. After that, Universal
bowed to subscribers' requests in
mid-June and allowed them to
publish the series if they wished.
In The Silent Scream, a New
York obstetrician and
gynecologist, Dr. Bernard N.
Nathanson, describes and ex-
plains of a 12-week-old unborn
child being aborted by the suction
method.
WEUOMZm SK�HrSO&WlT: 7HBPREQUEL"

W.mmM
1
A taste of Trudeau's controversy
T
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 10, 1985
Professor Receives Prestigious National Award
ECU News Bureau
An East Carolina University
professor has become a recipient
of the highest honor and award
given annually by the National
Environmental Health Associa-
tion.
Dr. Trenton G. Davis, a pro-
fessor of environmental health
and an assistant to the Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
at ECU, was awarded the Walter
S. Mangold Award at the
Association's meeting last week
in Las Vegas. The award is the
highest honor given by the
NEHA and recognizes a reci-
pient's professionalism, dedica-
tion and technical excellence in
the field of environmental health.
Davis was nominated for the
award by the North Carolina
Public Health Association's En-
vironmental Health Section.
A native of Greenville, Tenn
Davis joined the ECU faculty in
1972 as chairman of the new
department of environmental
health in the School of Allied
Health and Social Work. Under
his leadership the department
received full accreditation from
the National Accreditation Coun-
cil for Environmental Health
Curricula in 1974. It was reac-
credited in 1981 and also received
accreditation for a graduate pro-
gram leading to a master's degree
in environmental health.
In addition Davis serves as the
editorial director of the Fournal
of Environmental Health and
was president of the National En-
vironmental Health Association
in 1982. He was appointed
Special Assistant to the Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
at ECU in 1984.
"I'm honored that the state
organization nominated me for
this award Davis said. "If it
had ended there it would have
been a big honor (to be
nominated) he said.
The award is named in honor
of the late Walter S. Mangold,
and environmental health pro-
fessor at the University of
California, Berkley. Mangold
developed the name "sanitarian"
to describe those who work in
waste management and en-
vironmental control facilities and
helped establish the field as a pro-
fession and science.
Davis earned his bachelor of
science degree (cum laude) from
East Tennessee State University
in 1966, a Master of Public-
Health from Tulane University in
1967, and a Doctorate in Public
Health from the University of
Oklahoma in 1972. He worked
for five years as a Sanitarian with
the Greene County Health
Department in Greenville, Tenn.
and for three years on the faculty
at East Tennessee State Universi-
ty.
He is the son of Mr. B. O.
Davis of Route 4, Chuckey, TN.
He is a graduate of Lee High
School in Albany, Georgia.
NOTES
BINGO ICE CREAM PARTY
The StvJ�n� union Retreat,or COflwr, �
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Ty on Tu�s July Utri �t 7 p rr ,
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EXAMHELP
Trie ECU Counsel.n) Cen'e-
help in preparing tor 1'na. e�ai
p m in 302 fcr,ght Anne on July
yynich will be cowered nciude I me n a .
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30 Off
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20 Off all
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Offer good through
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to egislators' State Lottery Debate Continues
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(Bitt iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
JOHN PETERSON, General Manager
Jennifer Jendrasiak, ������ mwr
Harold Joyner, v� a Tom Luvender, a, ���
Daniel Maurer, ,�,� &, Anthony Martin, �, m
Rick Mccormac, spw John Peterson, MMrw
Bill Mitchell. (w�m Bill Dawson, �u
Debbie Stevens, � DeChanile Johnson, r,
July 10, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Sports
No Pay For Play
A College Football Association
proposal to provide college
athletes with $600 a year for "in-
cidental expenses" is something
that should not, under any cir-
cumstances, be considered by
schools.
At this point, many college
athletic programs have only
tenuous ties with the schools'
academic programs. Paying so-
meone to attend school and com-
pete as an athlete would sever these
ties.
Even if it's often not true, as
V many schools exploit the athletes,
they temper this with the
reassurance that they are, in fact,
getting an education. Are they?
Often they end up with not enough
time to study, or not enough
reason or encouragement.
To pay these athletes takes away
the pretense of their being there for
an education. It would tend to
make them more of the profes-
sional persuasion. Furthermore, it
sets a dangerous precedent.
Many people complain that
athletes just expect to have things
given to them because of their
Library (
athletic prowess, be it money,
fame or merchandise. Paying
athletes for participation in college
athletics will only serve to support
this assumption.
In actuality, many college (or
high school) athletes don't make it
big. The competition is fierce and
the numbers succumbing to in-
juries significant. What these
athletes need, more than anything
else, is something to rely upon if
athletics won't pay off for them.
Instead of supplying the players
with money while in school, they
should be supplied with a better
education. The important thing is
that they get the college education,
not that they are athletes.
Athletic ability should be looked
upon as a ticket to a college educa-
tion, not as a ticket to the possibili-
ty of a future monetary payoff.
Pay for the athletes' tuition, pay
for their books, but don't sub-
sidize them because they are
athletes.
Athletes don't need money as
much as they need alternative
skills, a way to hedge against the
all too likely possibility of a failure
to make a lucrative career out of
athletics.
Recent Hostage Crisis Proves
Reagan Tougher Than Carter
Shouldn't Be Charge Cards
It seems like with almost
everything comes with a tax or sur-
charge attached to it. However, at
least one of the pleasures of life is
more or less free, the library.
Generally, upon presenting pro-
of of residency, an individual can
receive a library card free of charge
and continue using it free, unless
of course, they incur fines.
Now someone is out to ruin it. A
non-library-loving senator is
presenting a bill to Congress which
would institute a small fee for each
book checked out. This fee would
be paid to the book's author as a
royalty fee.
For some people, the library is
the only source of free entertain-
ment. For others, the idea that
books are free for the borrowing is
an incentive to read.
As society grows less reading-
oriented and more TV-oriented.
people need more encouragement
to read, not less. Children,
especially, can now take advantage
of free books. What parent wants
to hunt up spare change so a kid
can go to the library?
Then there is the interesting
question of what to do about
royalties for some books, bibles
for instance. Do you pay royalties
to a different church each time or
do you just put the money in a
trust fund for God?
Some of the best things in life
are free. That's certainly true of
libraries now, and hopefully in the
future.
sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
A Thought
It is a newspaper's duty to print
the news and raise hell.
William F. Story
Doonesbury
Now that the hostage crisis has pass-
ed, let's take a few minutes and reflect
upon it from a restrospective position.
After it happened, what did the govern-
ment want to achieve and how was our
national interest best served? Let's also
take a look at how the American people
and some special groups acted and
reacted.
First, some things are self-evident.
Hijacking and terrorism are crimes
against humanity and should never be
condoned or justified by civilized peo-
ple anywhere. No matter how wronged
a group of people may feel, to inflict
terror, captivity or death upon persons
who had no direct control or influence
on the real or imagined wrong cannot
be justified by any rational religion or
philosophy. It does not even fulfill
some of mankind's baser motivations
such as revenge, since the terror is not
directed towards thos directly responsi-
ble for the "wrong" and therefore
should not appease a vengeful appetite.
Our national interest, as expressed by
the Reagan administration, was first
not to negotiate with the terrorists. This
is extremely important, since to do so
would place millions of Americans in
jeopardy as potential hostages. To give
in to the demands of terrorists would
create a situation where anyone with an
ax to grind could grab a plane load of
Americans and get the U.S. to do his
bidding. Since we are a world power,
this could come from anyplace, any
country, anywhere. Secondly, we
wanted our citizens returned as soon as
possible, unharmed. No deals, and the
hostages returned. Reagan did this in 17
not 444 days. Since Israel holds the ma-
jority of the Shiites, it appears as if this
was accomplished without meeting the
demands of the hijackers or even the
demand envisioned by Nabih Berri
when he proposed that the 750 or so
Shiites and 40 Americans be
transported to a neutral county and ex-
changed. Most TV newsmen rated
Reagan as the net loser for his efforts.
Speaking of newsmen. How many of
you were watching as ABC became the
Amal Broadcasting Company? I
couldn't believe it as I watched
American newsmen being used like
pawns in an Arab chess game. Some
seemed to think they were personally
negotiating the release of the captives.
One would interview Nabih, giving him
as much time as he wanted, then
reiterate his comments and say
something like "We have now heard the
demands. It would seem that all
Washington has to do is to ask Israel to
release their illegally held Shiitres and
the hostages will be returned. So far
there has been no response from the
White House They made it sound like
Reagan was holding things up after they
had it all worked out. To them Reagan
really blew it when he talked tough dur-
ing "delicate negotiations By golly he
got them back without humbling the
country by kowtowing to terrorists.
Nabih was talking tough at first, even
threatening to hand the hostages back
to the hijackers unless the U.S. gave a
quick response to his demands. You
might remember that at the President's
press conference he evaded most
specific questions except one. He was
asked, "If Nabih Berri turned the
hostages back to the hijackers, would
he hold Berri responsible?" His
response was a considered almost
whispered "Yes He could have said
"Make my day The response was the
same. No more talk from Berri about
turning the hostages anywhere but
loose.
The Right Word
Kirk Shelley
Since Israel had announced it would
free the Shiite prisoners before the hi-
jacking transpired, it's hard to see how
the hijackers achieved anything more
than lots of TV time and a delay in the
release of the Shiites.
On a more local level, two ECU pro-
fessors were interviewed by the Daily
Reflector. Among other bits of wisdom
espoused was the fact that th hiiackina
was not an act of terrorism, just an or-
dinary hijacking. Many people who fly
regularly scheduled airlines feel a bit
apprehensive about flying. Insurance
companies sell lots of policies, good for
one flight, by vending machines in air-
ports. Now consider flying at 20,000
feet or so with a guy running up and
down the aisle with a hand grenade,
sans pin, shouting in a language you
don't understand. Maybe we should
redefine terrorism. Perhaps only one
American beaten, shot dead and
dumped on the tarmac doesn't make it
an act of terrorism. MAybe you need 10
or at least two to make it really terrify-
ing. Maybe we should just thank God
and President Reagan that the hostages
are back.
The press developed an adversary
relationship with the government that
probably started during Vietnam. Prior
to that time, few, if any, newsmen wre
actually disloyal to the country. Look
at them now. For heaven's sake, most
of them are not completely stupid.
Most went to college and some learned
some things beyond "Hairspray 101"
for anchormen. Most profess to being
loyal Americans. Then why in the world
wouldn't they rejoice that the hostages
were returned without capitulation to
terrorist demands. Instead they would
report rumors, innuendo, supposition,
or anything they could find or fabricate
to indicate that a deal was made and the
release of the hostages was Inked to the
Israeli's release of the Shiite prisoners. I
think that most could see that even if
this were so, it certainly would not be in
the best interest of the United States to
play up such a story. If potential ter-
rorists believe the hijackers won, the
newsmen would just be encouraging
further acts of terrorism. Why not just
report the news? The President says we
got the hostages back with no deals.
Israel still held the Shiites when the
American hostages were released. Israel
says no deal was made. Nabih says he
has an agreement. Let everyone make
up their own minds. Most networks
listed the terrorists as winners in the ex-
change since their demands were met.
Campus Forum
To the East Carolina and Greenville
community:
I want to thank you all for 11
wonderful years of association with
East Carolina University and this com-
munity. It will always remain a source
of great pride to have been affiliated
with the growth and national acclaim
this university and athletic department
has experienced.
I appreciate your continuous sup-
port of me and our program, and 1
look forward to hearing glowing
reports of your success in the future
Pam Holt
Assistant Athletic Director
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
TlRST OF ALL, LBT MB SAY HOW
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By DANIEL
And
ANDREW J
Traditionallv
has been a spr
Now, the East Cai
Theatre has brougl
to the hottest seascj
with their product!
This off-bea
musical corned
Sybille Pearsc
Richard Maltbv,
three couples
of impending
process it ble-
ties, frustrate i
accompany ha
is at once :
penetrating bo j
The outcome
Theatre's prodi. 1
is stil! under de
erstwhile theatre
Maurer and Andrew
caugh: up a
in the Olde T
Monday �
where they couid
discussing the matti
ing $1.30 tequila u
I'll tell you nc -
Daniel, -a:
Arlenewhat's � I
Maureen Ke: j
Thank you, kinc
and scholar.
Sun
The East (
Theatre will jo
time to the early da1
chez Trace whe
Broadway musical
ber Bridegroom
through Saturda.
&l-Kin. m McGii
Based on the nove
name by Eudora
Robber Bridegroom
dance folk-tale ab .
looking gentleman
plete with countrv
dancing, fiddles. bi
what one Nev. York
called "a rousing
for comic adventure!
The action take
square dance in a
Rodney. Mississipl
owner of the barn
days when the first
down the "big mud
violin is heard.
I L
(Editor's Sote:
cumstances be
the Sightclubs
Hotspots will not
week's issue, but m
week.)
On Cami
Dirty Harry will j
when it is pre!
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terviewed by the Daily
g other bits of wisdom
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� terrorism, just an or-
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I about flying. Insurance
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flying at 20,000
th a guy running up and
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m. Perhaps only one
eaten, shot dead and
armac doesn't make it
: sm. MAybe you need 10
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we should just thank God
� Reagan that the hostages
pus Forum
Carolina and Greenville
ik you all for 11
years of association with
flma University and this corn-
am ays remain a source
ide to have been affiliated
i and national acclaim
I and athletic department
I ed.
p:iate your continuous sup-
ie and our program, and I
ird to hearing glowing
r success in the future.
Pam Holt
ant Athletic Director
or urn Rules
p Carolinian welcomes letters
all points of view. Mail or
by our office in the Publica-
ding, across from the en-
I ner Library,
loses of verification, all let-
include the name, major and
n, address, phone number
tre of the author(s).
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
JULY 10, 1985 Pan 5
Of Barrooms And 'Baby9
A Drunken Dichotomy Of A Play
By DANIEL MAURER
And
ANDREW JOYNER
Traditionally, making babies
has been a springtime sport.
Now, the East Carolina Summer
Theatre has brought parenthood
to the hottest season of the year
with their production of Baby.
This off-beat Broadway
musical comedy, written by
Sybille Pearson, David Shire and
Richard Maltby, Jr follows
three couples through the ordeal
of impending parenthood. In the
process it blends the uncertain-
ties, frustrations and hopes that
accompany having a child. Baby
is at once sparkling and
penetrating in its simple wisdom.
The outcome of the Summer
Theatre's production, however,
is still under debate by our two
erstwhile theatre critics, Daniel
Maurer and Andrew Joyner. We
caught up with this unlikely duo
in the Olde Towne Inn following
Monday night's performance,
where they could be overheard
discussing the matter while down-
ing $1.30 tequila shots.
I'll tell you right here and now,
Daniel, that bloody
Arlenewhat's her real name?
Maureen Kerrigan.
Thank you, kind sir. Rude goat
and scholar, v'are. Yeah,
Maureen Kerrigan sings like a
bird, no doubt about it what-
soever. Stole the show, she did.
Yeah, bartender, I'll have
another. Got any lemon?
Put out the fire, Andrew.
You'll burn the building down.
Yes, Daniel, m' boy, it looks
like Hell in that little glass,
doesn't it?
Speaking of Hell, it's the best
word I could use to describe
Maureen's singing. You could
drive a truck through her vibrato.
Well, perhaps not that bad, but it
does leave a lot to be desired �
like another singer. I must say,
though, her superb acting more
than made up for it.
Before you put out your drink,
I need a light � and a cigarette to
go with it.
But yes, I do concede that she
was one of the highlights of the
show.
Lights, y'say? God save us,
but it's dark in here. Anyway,
what character the woman had!
It makes me tremble to think
about it, really.
I totally agree, but it's pro-
bably your diseased liver that's
trembling. In any case, when you
talk about character, you have to
talk about Joey Pollock. That
man is simply outstanding. He
did a fantastic job as Arlene's
doting husband What's-his-
name.
Alan, it was. And for the first
time since the Cubs bombed out,
you're right.
He displayed more poise,
depth and professionalism than
did the rest of the cast.
Jesus Christ, call a doctor,
Daniel. You're giving me a cor-
onary by actually being right
twice in a row. Is there no end to
this?
None in sight, Andrew, none in
sight. But even though Pollock
shined brightest, I also liked John
Kaczynski as Danny, the college
student, musician and father-to-
be. His vo;oe may have been
miscast � .he's just not a rock
singer � but he was great as the
hopeful and ambitious rookie
dad.
Actually, O Great One, con-
sidering his performance, I think
he'd be better as Tinkerbelie in
Peter Pan.
No, no, I think the boy did a
fine job. You just can't stand
anyone who doesn't sing like Rod
Stewart or yourself.
never laid claim to being a
singer, Daniel.
And you never should.
Damn you and your cat � who
sings better than you do.
Andrew, I don't own a cat.
Barkeep, another tequila,
please.
As for John, it whaddunt his
voice, bu' rather 'is boyish charm
that made 'is overall performance
ah, ah, appealin Yeah, that's it,
appealin He was 'specially good
in the "Fatherhood Blues"
routine. He was hysterical dress-
ed as a punk rocker.
John Kaczynski and Sean McGuirk (from left to right) in the "Fatherhood Blues" routine from Bab
Yeah, mate, but didn 't 'is 'air
clash with the set a bit?
Yeah, I s'pose. The sets were
quite effective � when 'e wasn't
on the stage with 'is makeshift
Mohawk.
I liked the way the set pieces
were lit and how they moved
from place to place for each scene
� sorta like that wall is doin'
right now.
Yeah, but what I liked even
more was the chemistry between
Kerrigan and Pollock. They were
great together, sorta like Bartles
and Jaymes.
Yeah, and you know who else?
Tracy Donohue an' Sean
McGuirk as Pam an' Nick, the
childless, but determined couple.
Hell, come to think of it, all the
couples worked well together.
That's probably what saved this
production.
Well, I wouldn 't go that damn-
ed far, Wild Man of the
publishing industry. Tell me,
why're the bars tools taller than I
am now?
That's because you're on the
floor, Andrew. Please get up;
you're making a spectacle of
yourself, really. Besides, it's get-
ting late; we have a review to
write. Oh, by the way, was it a
good show?
No, but people suould go see if
anyway; it'll keep them off the
streets � and out of damn bars,
too.
Don't be so hard on the Sum-
mer Theatre, I thought they did
an urn .ah. admirable no,
wunnerful job � for a play about
rug rats, that is. Hell, I'd go see it
just for Joey Pollock.
wonder if he'll buy us a drink
if we give him a good review?
We can only hope.
Summer Theatre Produces 'Bridegroom'
The East Carolina Summer
Theatre will journey back in
time to the early days of the Nat-
chez Trace when it presents the
Broadway musical hit The Rob-
ber Bridegroom, Monday
through Saturday, July 15-20, at
fcl� jx.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
Based on the novel of the same
name by Eudora Welty, The
Robber Bridegroom is a song and
dance folk-tale about a tall good-
looking gentleman bandit, com-
plete with country reels, square
dancing, Fiddles, banjos and with
what one New York theatre critic
called "a rousing southern flare
for comic adventure
The action takes place at a
square dance in a large barn in
Rodney, Mississippi. As the
owner of the barn describes the
days when the first settlers came
down the "big muddy a lonely
violin is heard, then another,
then a banjo, until all the
characters and the country-fiddle
orchestra swarm onto the stage
from all directions. The dancer-
singers portray the story of the
robber bridegroom, a romantic
Figure in local legends who steals
for adventure. It seems this
dashing bandit has two identities.
Some know him as a solid citizen.
A few know him as a young
outlaw whose proudest boast is
that he steals with style, whether
he's after a rich man's purse or a
pretty girl's love.
As the action progresses, the
bandit falls in love with a rich
planter's daughter and they
become involved in a classic case
of mistaken identities. In the best
tradition of fantasy, there are a
number of storybook characters,
including a wicked stepmother, a
magical raven and a severed head
that talks.
The Robber Bridegromn was
written by Alfred Utary, and the
music, arranged for guitar, fid-
dle, mandolin, bass and banjo,
was composed by Robert
Waldman.
Directing and choreographing
wifT be "Judith Haskell, whose
regional theatre credits include
directing for the Seattle Reper-
tory Theatre, Syracuse Stage, the
Cleveland Playhouse (where she
won the Cleveland Critic's Circle
"Best Director" Award), and the
Alabama Shakespeare Festival.
Playing the role of Jamie
Lockart, the gentleman bandit,
will be Sean McGuirk. a New
York-based actor who, with this
production, will be making his
third appearance in The Robber
Bridegroom. Mr. McGuirk has
performed leading roles in
numerous musicals throughout
the US, and his television credits-
include "Ryan's Hope "Search
for Tomorrow and "As the
World Turns
Originally produced on Broad-
way by John Houseman's The
Acting Company, The Robber
Bridegroom won rave reviews
from the New York critics;
among them, Clive Barns of the
New York Times, who pronounc-
ed the show "sparkling, unusual
and an immeasurably in-
vigorating musical
Tickets are still available for all
performances, Monday through
Saturday (July 15-20 at 8:15
p.m.), and may be purchased at
McGinnis Theatre in Greenville,
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets, Monday through Satur-
day, 10 a.m. until 8:15 p.m or
may be reserved bv calling in
Greenville 757-6390
HOTSPOTS
New Comedy Zone Comes On Strong
(Editor's Note: Due to cir-
cumstances beyond our control
the Nightclubs section of
Hotspots will not appear in this
week's issue, but will return next
week.)
On Campus
Dirty Harry will make your day
when it is presented by the
Student Union Films Com-
mittee tonight, July 10 at 7
p.m. in Hendrix. A box-
office sensation Dirty
Harry was the most suc-
cessful manhunt Film of the
'70s. From its chilling open-
ing, in which a beautiful
young swimmer is
murdered by the film's
psychotic villain, to the
mesmerizing Final confron-
tation between Detective
Harry Callahan (Clint
Eastwood) and the killer.
Admission is free to all with
current ECU IDs, but only
ECU students may bring a
guest.
The Phantoms are returning to
ECU after a highly suc-
cessful, well-received per-
formance Spring Semester
for a concert Thursday, Ju-
ly 11 at 9 p.m. on the Snack
Bar Patio at M�nd�nhall.
Presented by the atuuent
Union Special Concerts
Committee, the concert is
free to all, so don't miss
their great sound! Rainsite
is Hendrix Theatre.
The Graduate, one of the greatest
critical successes of ail time,
rocketed Duttin Hoffman
to stardom. He portrays an
inexperienced college
graduate who returns home
to his affluent, insensitive
parents, has an affair with
his parents' neurotic,
alcoholic neighbor (Anne
Bancroft), and ends up fall-
ing in love with her
daughter (Katherine Ross).
Presented by the Student
Union Films Committee,
this Film is a commentary
on American values, the
generation gap, and late
'60s youth. Admission to
the Monday, July 15 7 p.m.
show in Hendrix is free to
all with current ECU IDs,
but only ECU students may
bring a guest.
A BingoIce Cream Party is
scheduled for 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, July 16 in
Mendenhall's Multi-
purpose Room. Sponsored
by the Student Union
Recreation Committee, the
party features a minimum
of three different flavors of
great! cold! ice cream! and
eight fabulous prizes for the
winners of the different
Bingo games. Admission is
free for all with current
ECU IDs, but only ECU
students may bring a guest.
Hotspots is a listing of enterain-
ment available to the University
community. Any local nightclub
or University sponsored
organization interested in being a
part of Hotspots can do so by
contacting the Features Depart-
ment of The East Carolinian Sub-
missions to Hotspots will be
printed only if space allows.
By MIKE LUDWICK
Sutl Writer
The Comedy Zone at TW's
Nightlife is bringing good
talent to the Greenville area every
Tuesday night.
The Comedy Zone is the first
of its kind in Greenville and is
starting to become quite popular.
According to Kathy Bissette, who
is the manager of TW's, "The
Comedy Zone is catching on, and
Jane Karam
we are starting to get some
regulars here
When asked about the future
for the Comedy Zone,Bissette
said that she was going to wait
until this fall before making any
major decisions about expanding
or changing the format of the
Comedy Zone. This is because
Bissette wants to get the reaction
from the ECU students this fall
before making any decisions.
This past Tuesday night two
excellent comedians came to
TW's. Jane Karam was the
featured comedian and Don
Ware was the headliner.
Karam was an enthusiastic and
energetic on-stage performer. She
worked well with the audience
and included them throughout
the act. Afterwards in an inter-
view Karam said that working
with the audience "breaks down
the barriers" between herself and
her audience.
Another aspect of her comedy
that was quite refreshing was her
comedy is clean. "Nobody is
respected more than a clean com-
edian. I set certain guidelines for
myself that I try to follow said
Karam. "The people that I
idolize Karam continued, "like
Johnathan Winters does the same
thing, so I thought I would do
that also In fact, Karam writes
her own material.
About writing comedy Karam
said, "You constantly have to be
paying attention to what is fun-
ny. More important, it has to be
funny to me, so I can come across
as sincere. It is important to
know the difference between
what is funny to me and what is
funny to you
Don Ware was the headliner at
TW's this past Tuesday night.
Ware was a forceful comedian.
He was spontaneous, had a
steady stream of one-liners, and
had the unique ability to create a
joke from the most mundane ob-
jects. Throughout the act Ware
involved the audience and had
them constantly laughing.
TW's Nightlife has brought,
and is bringing, superb talent to
the Greenville area. With such
comics as Jann Karam and Don
Ware, the Comedy Zone is a new
dimension to the entertainment
scene of Greenville that is a must
see. Your time and money will
not be wasted.
ttgm m i � ��
Don Ware, One of TW's Comedy Zone Comedians.
frfrdbrJuiftufyri inT
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THEJEASTCAROLINIAN
JULY 10, 1985
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HOME COOKED FOOD
Student Special
Free dessert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.2Splus tax & beverage.
5 Free Plates With Purchase of Meal Plan.
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM-8 PM
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Why The Crow's Nest?
The name Crow's Nest, derived from the top part
of a ship, was given to our restaurant to show pride
in East Carolina University. Seventeen years later,
the Crow's Nest still serves ECU complete Breakfast,
Lunch and Dinner meals, 24 Hours a Day.
t Come Visit this Pirate Tradition
J Soon!
Air Conditioned Big Screen T.V.
Game Room
Corner of 10th St. and Cotanche St.
758-2446
A LONE WARRIOR SEARCHING FOR HIS DESTINY TRIBE OF LOST CHILDREN WAITING FOR A HERO
IN A WORLD BATTLING TO SURVIVE, THEY FACE A WOMAN DETERMINED TO RULE
HOLD OUT FOR MAD MAX
THIS IS HIS GREATEST ADVENTURE
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JULY 10TH
THE EASTCARd INIAN
Sports
JULY 10, 1985 Page 7
ECU's Johnson Recipient of Honor;
Named To Third Team All-America
B TONY BROWN
VuiManl SporM
ECU'S Winfred Johnson has
just been named to the Collegiate
America third team All-America
squad ' the first Pirate to be so
honored since Ron Staggs in
1975.
This award is only the latest in
a long string of accomplishments
the Pirate pitcher designated hit-
ter first baseman has achieved
since arriving at ECU in 1983. As
a freshman and sophomore
lohnson had already started a
major assault on the Pirate
record books, but his perfor-
mance in '85 topped even that ef-
fort .
He set a new batting average
mark (with at least 97 at-bats) of
432, increased his own season
and career homer records with 22
and 51 respectively, as well as
ECU records for RBIs and total
bases.
Johnson also surpassed Todd
Evans' previous season-high 64
hits with 73 this year, while only
striking out 14 times in 46 games.
He added 11 two-baggers to his
roundtrippers, making a total of
33 extra-base hits for the season.
The proficient Pirate hitter's
1985 statistics placed him fourth
in the NCAA in homeruns and
RBIs, while his batting average
was good for the number 33 slot
within the NCAA.
In the process of setting these
offensive statistics, the junior
righthander pitched his wav to an
7-5 mark and posted a .975
fielding percentage at first base.
Johnson's play had already
resulted in his being honored as
The Daily Reflector's male player
of the year and one of the ECAC-
South players of the week. He
was the co-favorite to win con-
ference player of the year as well,
but was finally beaten out for the
honor by George Mason's Kevin
Burke.
"Winfred Johnson is one of
the best baseball players East
Carolina has ever had said
Pirate assistant coach Billy Best.
"He not only has power, but hits
for a consistently high average as
well
Best, who serves as the hitting
instructor for the team, feels
Johnson's strength is the ability
to hit all types of pitches. "He's
one of the best breaking-ball hit-
ters I've seen the assistant
coach said, "but he can hit
fastballs just as well
"One day the young man's go-
ing to make his mark in the
pros head coach Gary Overton
stated. "It may not happen right
away, but it will happen. Win
fred's simply a very good hitter.
He played excellently last year
and even better this season
Although Johnson wasn't
drafted by the pros this year, it is
a virtual certainty that continued
play of this caliber next season
will assure him of a high draft
pick in 1986.
Manwaring Concludes
Expects Even Tougher
Good Recruiting Year;
Schedule Next Season
By RICK McCORMAC
Sports I- dilur
ECU women's basketball
coach Emily Manwaring has
completed what she considers a
"great" recruiting year with the
signing o junior college transfer
I innette Tucker.
Tucker, a six oo power for-
ward from Roxbury Community
College in Boston, Mass averag-
ed 2" points, 25 rebounds and
three blocked shots a game last
- ;aon.
She was named junior college
All-America and first team all-
New England in the New England
Conference. Tucker chose ECU
over national champion Old
Dominion and Penn State.
"1 innette Tucker is an im-
mensely talented and experienced
player and makes this a great
recruiting year for us Manwar-
ing -aid "She is the athlete we
needed for an immediate con-
tribution on the inside and wuTBe
a major factor in accomplishing
our team goals of a top twenty
ranking and a berth in the
NCAA's
"1 innette (Tucker) is going to be
a power player Manwaring
continued. "She has offensive
abilities and also will be a domi-
nant rebounder in our con-
ference
Tucker, who has a 35-inch ver-
tical leap, will team with
sophomore forward Monique
Pompili to form possible "dual
dunkers" for the Lady Pirates
next season. Pompili has already
dunked since the season ended
and it is said that Tucker can also
dunk.
Tucker joins five other Lady
Pirate newcomers in
Manwanng's initial recruiting
season. Tucker, 55" guard
Delphine Mabry and 5'10" for-
ward Cathy Ellis will all be
juniors next year.
Mabry was a starter during
the 1983-84 season, averaging
10.4 ppg. She played a major role
in leading the Lady Pirates to the
championship of the first ECAC
South women's tournament.
Pam Williams, a 58' guard
along with 6'1" center Rose
Miller and 62' center Gretta
O'Neal will all be freshmen next
season.
Williams, who was a 'cammate
o Alma Bethea at Goldsboro
High School averaged 15.7 ppg
and 8.7 rebounds in her senior
season.
Miller, a 6'1" center from
New berry High School earned
3-A all-state and all-star honors.
She averaged 20.7 ppg and 16.4
rebounds as she set a school
record for most rebounds in a
season and game with 362 and 26
respectively.
Manwaring feels that the good
results she has had in recruiting is
due in part to the success her
team had on the court last year in
winning both the conference
regular season and tournament
championships.
"I think our successful year
was a real attractive reason for
people to come here she said.
"Players want to go to schools
that are not only successful on
the court, but academically suc-
cessful as well
Manwaring is especially proud
of the fact that she had four
players make the Honor Roll (3.0
grade point average) and two
more make the Dean's List (3.5
and above).
"We have a full time staff
handling academic advising for
athletes she said, "and they do
an excellent job of advising and
monitoring the progress of our
basketball players
Senior forward Annette
Phillips and Therese Durkin both
made the Dean's List, while Chris
O'Connor, Crystal Grier, Shelley
Ridgway and Lorrainne Foster all
made the Honor Roll.
The Lady Pirates will open the
season on Nov. 22-23 in the Ten-
nessee Tech Tournament in
Cookeville, Tenn. The University
of Georgia and Tennessee join
ECU and Tennessee Tech in the
four-team tournament.
Georgia was the runner-up in
the NCAA tournament while
Tennessee Tech and Tennessee
were both NCAA participants
last year.
In addition, the Lady Pirates
will travel to Norfolk, Va to
take on the defending national
champion Old Dominion.
Coach Manwaring likes the
idea of playing the big name
schools and feels the schedule can
only benefit her team.
"One of our goals will be to
defend our regular season and
tournament championships she
said. "With the type of schedule
we play, if we do well we'll get
some national notice
Winfred Johnson became the first Pirate baseball player to earn all-
America status since 1975 with his outstanding play this past season.
Johnson also was named to the all ECAC South team.
ECU women's basketball coach Emily Manwaring (far left), has a laugh at her basketbaMmp! Manw
can afford to smile after finishing up an outstanding recruiting year by signing Linnette Tucker.
Pirate Golf Recruits Look Impressive;
Should Make Important Contribution
Mark Arcilesi, an all-conference performer returns for the Pirates.
By RICK McCORMAC
Sports Mtof
ECU golf coach Bob Helmick
has signed six golfers to letters-
of-intent. Included among the six
are two members of the North
Carolina state championship
team and a transfer student from
the Big Eight.
Mike Nadau and John Chap-
man, both of Raleigh Millbrook,
led their squad to the team title as
both finished in the top five in-
dividually at the state high school
tournament. Chapman also cap-
tured first place in the North
State Golf Championship earlier
this summer.
Chris Winkel, a native of
Algoona, la comes to ECU
from the University of Arkansas.
Although Winkel is a transfer, he
will be a freshman eligibility wise
and will be eligible to play in the
fall.
Jeff Davis of Sycamore, 111
Pat King of Doylestown Pa,
and Jon Decker of Black Moun-
tain, N.C. round out the list of
incoming players.
ECU coach Helmick is pleased
with his incoming freshmen and
feels some will make an im-
mediate contribution to the team.
"I think John Chapman,
Michael Nadau and Chris Winkel
will all be excellent additions to
our team he said. "All of them
could possibly see action in the
fall next year
Helmick is excited about the
prospects for the upcoming
season with the freshmen signees
providing depth to go with some
talented holdovers.
All-ECAC South performer
Mark Arcilesi returns along with
Mike Bradley, the team's MVP
the past two seasons, and Paul
Steelman. Arcilesi, Bradley and
Steelman will all be juniors with
two years of eligibility remaining.
Other returning golfers include
sophomores David McKenzie and
Chris Riley, along with Kelly
Stimart.
The Pirates will play in four
tournaments in the fall which will
include some of the regions top
golfing schools.
ECU will compete in the
MacGregor Golf Classic in
Pickens, SC; the John Ryan
Memorial Golf Tburnament
hosted by Duke University, the
Wolfpack Collegiate Invitational
and the UNC-Wilmington Fall
Invitational.
"I'm looking forward to get-
ting into our fall schedule
Helmick said. "We'll try to get in
as much practice time as possible
and experiment with the line-ups.
getting everybody some tourna-
ment experience
Helmick says his team has the
ability to have a good season and
is expecting good things from his
squad.
"We'll be as talented as we've
ever been, but you can't place
talent on the scoreboard he
said. "You must produce�which
is where we've failed in the past
One key area for the Pirates
this fall is that they will have
some talented upperclassmen to
lead the way for the incoming
freshmen.
"We have three strong
elements returning from last
year's team� and they will haved
to carry us he continued. "The
remaining three spots will be
determined by how everybody
plays when they come in
Pirate Tankers Stronger With Proven Vet s
By DAVID McGUINNESS
St�ff Wrilw
Imagine that you are a top
swimmer. You are an individual
with valuable marketable skills
that can essentially buy you an
education at a good university.
Why would you want to pick a
school (and swimming program)
like the one in Greenvile, N.C?
On the surface this seems like a
tough question, but talented high
school swimmers have been and
are finding themselves drawn to
ECU.
Their talent combined with
sweat and dedication, have led to
a program that is good and
steadily improving. "Our strong
recruiting during the last four
years is really starting to pay off
now ECU head coach Rick
Kobe said. "For the first time we
have a really solid veteran team
Solid is right. While most
teams hope for three or four
good returning seniors, the Pirate
men will field five.
"Seniors Kaut, Pittelli,
Hawkins, Cook and
Robaczewski will help give us the
depth and experience we'll need
to achieve our goals Kobe said.
Goals form the crux of Coach
Kobe's philosophy. "Nothing
with substance can ever be
achieved without a truly defined
goal Kobe continued.
His goals for the Pirates this
season are threefold: to have a
winning season, to win the Col-
onial Athletic Conference Cham-
pionships, and to qualify a swim-
mer or swimmers for the NCAA
championships.
Kobe has also utilized goals in
recruiting. "Four years ago we
were basically trying to build an
entire team he said. "Now we
can use our recruiting dollars to
pick and choose swimmers who
are good in our weaker areas
While lacking the large
recruiting budgets that some pro-
grams receive, ECU has many
qualities that make it attractive to
potential swimmers.
ECU has an attractive campus
and many of its academic pro-
grams are highly rated nationally.
In addition, the swimming pro-
gram has a good national reputa-
tion.
However, according to Kobe
what many recruits seem to like
about ECU is its people. "Once
recruits come and spend time
with the team, they usually like
the kids so well that they decide
to attend he said.
The last two years have seen an
exceptional amount of incoming
talent at ECU. For instance
Bruce Brockschmidt, one of this
season's freshmen, led the men's
team, barely missing qualifying
for the nationals.
"This year's freshmen will
almost completely replace our
lost seniors Kobe said. "Our
only weak spots will be in the
backstroke and diving
Although most of ECU's talent
comes from the Mid-Atlantic and
Florida areas, there are also peo-
ple on the team from throughout
the country, as well as other na-
tions. One of Peru's best, Chema
Larranaga, made great contribu-
tions to the team during his years
at ECU.
ECU has been drawing
talented swimmers and Kobe
makes it a point to get everything
out of their ability. "We have no
right to be as fast as we are
Kobe said. What he means is that
the Pirates have exceeded
everyone's expectations in terms
of performance.
See SWIMMING, Page 8
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57-6366
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JULY 10TH
I HI EAS1 i ROI INIAN
Sports
JL 1 10, lvx Page
ECC's Johnson Recipient of Honor;
Named To Third Team All-America
Bv 1()N BROUN
ECU's infred lohnson has
usi been named to the Collegiate
merica thud team All-America
lad ' the first Pirate to be so
red since Ron Staggs in
1975.
- award is only the latest in
oi accomplishments
U hei designated hit-
first baseman has achieved
ng at ECU in N83. As
Freshman and sophomore
had already started a
sault on the Pirate
- 5, but his perfor-
N topped even that ef-
Wi: new batting average
U least 9" at bats) of
.432, increased his own season
and careei homer records with 22
and 51 respectively, as well as
1(1 records for RBIs and total
bases.
Johnson also surpassed Todd
Evans' previous season-high 64
hits with 73 this year, while only
striking out 14 times in 46 games.
He added 11 two-baggers to his
roundtrippers, making a total of
33 extra-base hits for the season.
1 he proficient Pirate hitter's
1985 statistics placed him fourth
in the NCAA in homeruns and
RBIs, while his batting average
was good for the number 33 slot
withm the NCAA.
In the process o( setting these
offensive statistics, the junior
righthander pitched his way to an
7-5 mark and posted a .975
fielding percentage at first base.
Johnson's play had already
resulted in his being honored as
The Daily Reflector's male player
of the year and one of the ECAC-
South players of the week. He
was the co-favorite to win con-
ference player of the year as well,
but was finally beaten out for the
honor by George Mason's Kevin
Burke.
"Winfred Johnson is one of
the best baseball players East
Carolina has ever had said
Pirate assistant coach Billy Best.
"He not only has power, but hits
for a consistently high average as
well
Best, who serves as the hitting
instructor for the team, feels
Johnson's strength is the ability
to hit all types of pitches. "He's
one of the best breaking-ball hit-
ters I've seen the assistant
coach said, "but he can hit
fastballs just as well
"One day the young man's go-
ing to make his mark in the
pros head coach Gary Overton
stated. "It may not happen right
away, but it will happen. Win
fred's simply a very good hitter.
He played excellently last year
and even better this season
Although Johnson wasn't
drafted by the pros this year, it is
a virtual certainty that continued
play of this caliber next season
will assure him of a high draft
pick in 1986.
Manwaring Concludes
Expects Even Tougher
Good Recruiting Year;
Schedule Next Season
B Rl( K Mc ORM-U
I . I w omen's basketl
i mily Manwaring has
i - . nsiders a
yeai with
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nette Tuet er.
t six 1 o p ' ei I oi
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eded con-
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mplishi
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1 i Manwaring
ffensive
I als ill be a domi-
in our con-
has a 35-inch v er-
will team with
: a ai d Monique
Pompili to torm possible "dual
dunkers" for the I ad Pirates
next season. Pompili has already
dunked since the season ended
and it is said that Fucker can also
dunk.
I ticker joins five other Lad)
Pirate ne w comers i n
Manwaring's initial recruiting
season. Tucker, 55" guard
Delphine Mabry and 5'10" ten-
ward C at by Ellis will all be
juniors next yeai.
Mabry was a starter during
the 1983-84 season, averaging
10.4 ppg She played a major role
eading the 1 ad Pirates to the
ionship of the first ECAC
ith women's tournament.
Pam illiams, a 5'8" guard
th 6' 1" centei Rose
M llei And 6'2" center Gretta
I Neal will all be freshmen next
on.
V illiams, who was a teammate
Alma Bethea at Goldsboro
High School averaged 15.7 ppg
and 8.7 rebounds in her senior
i on.
Miller, a 6'1" center from
Newberry High School earned
; all-state and all-star honors.
She averaged 20 ppg and 16.4
rebounds as she set a school
record tor most rebounds in a
season and game with 362 and 26
respectively.
Manwaring feels that the good
results she has had in recruiting is
due in part to the success her
team had on the court last year in
winning both the conference
regular season and tournament
championships.
"1 think our successful year
was a real attractive reason for
people to come here she said.
"Players want to go to schools
that are not only successful on
the court, but academically suc-
cessful as well
Manwaring is especially proud
of the fact that she had four
players make the Honor Roll (3.0
grade point average) and two
more make the Dean's List (3.5
and above).
"We have a full time staff
handling academic advising for
athletes she said, "and they do
an excellent job o advising and
monitoring the progress of our
basketball players
Senior forward Annette
Phillips and Therese Durkin both
made the Dean's List, while Chris
O'Connor, Crystal drier, Shelley
Ridgway and Lorrainne Foster all
made the Honor Roll.
The Lady Pirates will open the
season on Nov. 22-23 in the Ten-
nessee Tech Tournament in
Cookeville, Tenn. The University
o Georgia and Tennessee join
ECU and Tennessee Tech in the
four-team tournament.
Georgia was the runner-up in
the NCAA tournament while
Tennessee Tech and Tennessee
were both NCAA participants
last year.
In addition, the Lady Pirates
will travel to Norfolk, Va to
take on the defending national
champion Old Dominion.
Coach Manwaring likes the
idea of playing the big name
schools and feels the schedule can
only benefit her team.
"One of our goals will be to
defend our regular season and
tournament championships she
said. "With the type o' schedule
we play, if we do well we'll get
some national notice
Winfred Johnson became the first Pirate baseball plaver to earn all-
America status since 1975 with his outstanding pa this past season.
Johnson also was named to the all ECAC uith team.
J I HUMBERT ICU �M�o lot,
ECU women's basketball coach Emily Manuring (far left), has a laugh at her basketball camp Manwarin"
can afford to smile after finishing up an outstanding recruiting year by signing I innette I inker.
Pirate Golf Recruits Look Impressive;
Should Make Important Contribution
Mark Arcilesi, an all-conference performer returns for the Pirates.
By RICK McCORMAC
Sporti Editor
ECU golf coach Bob Helmick
has signed six golfers to letters-
of-intent. Included among the six
are two members of the North
Carolina state championship
team and a transfer student from
the Big Eight.
Mike Nadau and John Chap-
man, both of Raleigh Millbrook,
led their squad to the team title as
both finished in the top five in-
dividually at the state high school
tournament. Chapman also cap-
tured first place in the North
State Golf Championship earlier
this summer.
Chris Winkel, a native of
Algoona, la comes to ECU
from the University of Arkansas.
Although Winkel is a transfer, he
will be a freshman eligibility wise
and will be eligible to play in the
fall.
Jeff Davis of Sycamore, 111
Pat King of Doylestown Pa,
and Jon Decker of Black Moun-
tain, N.C. round out the list of
incoming players.
ECU coach Helmick is pleased
with his incoming freshmen and
feels some will make an im-
mediate contribution to the team.
"I think John Chapman,
Michael Nadau and Chris Winkel
will all be excellent additions to
our team he said. "AH of them
could possibly see action in the
fall next year
Helmick is excited about the
prospects for the upcoming
season with the freshmen signees
providing depth to go with some
talented holdovers.
All-ECAC South performer
Mark Arcilesi returns along with
Mike Bradley, the team's MVP
the past two seasons, and Paul
Steelman. Arcilesi, Bradley and
Steelman will all be juniors with
two years of eligibility remaining.
Other returning golfers include
sophomores David Mckenzie and
Chris Riley, along wrth Kelly
Stimart.
The Pirates will play in four
tournaments in the fall which will
include some of the regions top
golfing schools.
ECU will compete in the
MacGregor Golf Classic in
Pickens, SC; the John Ryan
Memorial Golf Tburnament
hosted by Duke University, the
Wolfpack Collegiate Invitational
and the UNC-Wilmington Fall
Invitational.
"I'm looking forward to get-
ting into our fall schedule
Helmick said. "We'll try to get in
as much practice time as possible
and experiment with the line-ups.
getting evervbodv some tourna-
ment experience
Helmick says his team has the
ability to have a good season and
is expecting good things from his
squad.
"We'll be as talented as we've
ever been, but you can't place
talent on the scoreboard he
said. "You must produce�which
is where we've failed in the past
One key area for the Pirates
this fall is that they will have
some talented upperclassmen to
lead the wav for the incoming
freshmen.
"We have three strong
elements returning from last
year's team� and they will haved
to carry us he continued. "The
remaining three spots will be
determined by how everybody
plays when they come in
Pirate Tankers Stronger With Proven Vets
Bv DAVID McGUINNESS
Staff Writr
Imagine that you are a top
swimmer. You are an individual
with valuable marketable skills
that can essentially buy you an
education at a good university.
Why would you want to pick a
school (and swimming program)
like the one in Greenvile, N.C?
On the surface this seems like a
tough question, but talented high
school swimmers have been and
are finding themselves drawn to
ECU.
Their talent, combined with
sweat and dedication, have led to
a program that is good and
steadily improving. "Our strong
recruiting during the last four
years is really starting to pay off
now ECU head coach Rick
Kobe said. "For the first time we
have a really solid veteran team
Solid is right. While most
teams hope for three or four
good returning seniors, the Pirate
men will field five.
"Seniors Kaut, Pittelli,
Hawkins, Cook and
Robaczewski will help give us the
depth and experience we'll need
to achieve our goals Kobe said.
Goals form the crux of Coach
Kobe's philosophy. "Nothing
with substance can ever be
achieved without a truly defined
goal Kobe continued.
His goals for the Pirates this
season are threefold: to have a
winning season, to win the Col-
onial Athletic Conference Cham-
pionships, and to qualify a swim-
mer or swimmers for the NCAA
championships.
Kobe has also utilized goals in
recruiting. "Four years ago we
were basically trying to build an
entire team he said. "Now we
can use our recruiting dollars to
pick and choose swimmers who
are good in our weaker areas
While lacking the large
recruiting budgets that some pro-
grams receive, ECU has many
qualities that make it attractive to
potential swimmers.
ECU has an attractive campus
and many of its academic pro-
grams are highly rated nationally.
In addition, the swimming pro-
gram has a good national reputa-
tion.
However, according to Kobe
what many recruits seem to like
about ECU is its people. "Once
recruits come and spend time
with the team, they usually like
the kids so well that they decide
to attend he said.
The last two years have seen an
exceptional amount of incoming
talent at ECU. For instance
Bruce Brockschmidt, one of this
season's freshmen, led the men's
team, barely missing qualifying
for the nationals.
"This year's freshmen will
almost completely replace our
lost seniors Kobe said. "Our
only weak spots will be in the
backstroke and diving
Although most of ECU's talent
comes from the Mid-Atlantic and
Florida areas, there are also peo-
ple on the team from throughout
the country, as well as other na-
tions. One of Peru's best, Chema
Larranaga, made great contribu-
tions to the team during his years
at ECU.
ECU has been drawing
talented swimmers and Kobe
makes it a point to get everything
out of their ability. "We have no
right to be as fast as we are
Kobe said. What he means is that
the Pirates have exceeded
everyone's expectations in terms
of performance.
See SWIMMING. Page g
i
� .





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 10, 1985
Intramurals
ByJENNETTEROTH
Suff Writer
With two and a half weeks left
in second summer session, the in-
tramural action continues to get
as hot as July's sultry weather.
In recent IRS putt-putt action,
10 contestants hit the mini-slopes
of Greenville's putt-putt golf
course for what ended in some
steamy competition! A mere six
strokes divided the first, second
and third place finishers.
James Russo ended the event
Swimming
Program
Successful
Continued From Page 7
ECU'S success over the past
two seasons is reflected in a 34-17
combined dual meet record,
despite a modest budget in com-
parison with man1 opponents
who are swimming powers. The
Pirates also had 25 qualifiers for
the nationals, while setting 18
varsity and 15 freshman records
over this same period.
While winning is the main goal
of every coach, Kobe finds many
other aspects of the job equally
rewarding. The comraderie bet-
ween the coach and staff helps
make his duties seem really wor-
thwhile.
"I really enjoy just being with
the team Kobe said. "Of
course every day there's a new
problem for someone, but help-
ing the kids with those problems
is really satisfying. The people on
my team are bright, funny and
fun to be around.
'That kind of reward gets you
through the tough times Kobe
added, "but there's nothing like
watching them kick ass at the big
meets after working hard all
season
M-W-F
M-F
M-F
Sat.
Sun.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
7 a.m8 a.m.
12 noon-1:30 p.m.
Minges Pool
4 p.m7: p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9a.m7 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5: p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
T-Th 10a.m12noon
T-Th i p.m4 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 11 p.m7: p.m.
Friday n p.m5: p.m.
SatSun. l p.m4 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 11 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 11 a.m5: p.m.
Sat Sun. l p.m4p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
M-F 1:30p.m5 p.m.
TTh 2 p.m4 p.m.
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
M-Fl 1:30 a.m3 p.m. (in person)
M-F 12 noon-3 p.m. (phone in)
� Operational hours adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
with an overall 76, capturing
third place honors. Ling
Sriraman waJked away second
with a 74, while David Howell
took the championship trophy by
shooting a spectacular 70 overall.
It seems as though July
volleyballers are on the real
beaches of North Carolina as on-
ly two squads will compete in this
session's co-rec competition on
'Tyler Beach But who could
have asked for two better spiking
powers in last session's first and
-i ������in i-
SALE
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An
thony at 757-6366 or 752-0291.
' � �"�� ��"
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE: All typing needs.
Call 758-8241 Of 758 5488.
second place finishers, GOOD,
BAD & UGLY and SUMMER
BUMS. GOOD, BAD & UGLY
will be going for their third
straight title with spring semester
and first session victories already
under their belts. On the
otherhand, the SUMMER BUMS
are going for the upset and
should give the GOOD, BAD &
UGL La run for their money. All
the co-rec action begins this
week.
More than just the volleyball
�r,r.r,wj,j�MM,MmffAW�
courts will sizIe with stars as IRS
one-on-one basketball begins
tonight. Six hoopsters have
entered the tournament to date.
Sneaker Sam has been seen
scouting the competition and has
chosen Percy Edwards as this ses-
sion's top hopeful. But off the
putt-putt links and on to the
court sinks Ling Sriraman, who
ranks third in the competition.
No doubt, Sneaker Sam will stay
abreast of the action until the
crowning of this session's cham-
pion.
Don't forget to sign up for the
seasonal softball finale. Register
in room 204 of Memorial Civm or
call 757-6387 this week.
You can still ride the open
range of Greenville � just pre-
register with the IRS and head
out to Jarman's Stables on
highway 43 for a full hour oi
horseback riding. With your ad-
vance registration the cost of the
affair is reduced from $8.00 to
$5.00, including transportation
& Ugly
on the intramural shuttle to Jar-
man's � as long as four more
cow pokes are willing to
Register in room 204 Memorial
Gym.
I istcn to tins weeks Tennis
e I alkshow I hurs ar ; :
and 5 30 i 91 I WZMB
for the latest in intramui
lion. Your hostess, Stephanie
I uke will keep you up to d itc
all the fun and cxcitemei
summei
:
zzzzzzmzEzzzzzzzm22zzzzzE2mzszzmz
v 7 THROUGH SAT JUI
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DOMINO OR A&P
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5 lb.
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98
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0PEH SUNDAYS 8
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49 oz
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MARKET STYLE
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Bat
WALDO
$� ?y 0 fer �
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DIET COKE-SPRITE-TAB
Coca Cola
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2ltr.
btl.
109
71CB
4 lbs. or
mop
lb
88
GROUND FRESH DAILY
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED WESTERN
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Round Steak
M
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SAVE y � pull Cut
i4i Boneless
I LB
lb.
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WAREHOUSE PRICES
REGULAR OR THIN
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RAGU
TRADITIONAL
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WAREHOUSE PRICES
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED WESTERN
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
IUIuaIIakV C�UXA lHAUmUNAL U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Mueller s Spaghetti Spaghetti Sauce T-Bone Steak
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20c
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1 lb.
Pkg.
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FRENCHS
Mustard
INSTANT
French Potatoes
IDAHO SPUDS
French's Potatoes
MUELLERS
Elbow Macaroni
SAVE ON
Success
Rice
LEMON-LIME � ORANGE � FRUIT PUNCH
Gatorade Drink
OUR OWN FAMILY
Tea Bags
PQ
Tea Bags
FRENCHS
Worcestershire Sauce
t SAVE
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69
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SAVE
24 oz
jar
13 75oz
pkg
16 oz
pkg
1 lb
pg
69� 20
99015
1
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KRAFT
SAVE
30c
32 oz.
jar
59
Squeeze Parkay
P&Q IMITATION
Cheese Slices
1Q MINI PACK
20c Dannon Yogurt
�gf" . DEANS FRENCH OR GREEN
09c lO0 Onion Dip
1 lb
pkg
12 oz
pkg
17 6oz
pkg
8 oz
ctn
FROZEN
14 OZ
Pkg
32 oz
btl.
24 ct
109 Torino's
Pizza
TiV 55? PET DEEP DISH
79c20c Pie Shells
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10
FROZEN
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100 ct
pkg
15 oz
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1-flQ CREAM
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1W30C Handi Whip
11 oz
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pkg
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PRODUCE SPECIALS
CALIFORNIA
RED OR WHITE
Seedless
Grapes
DELICIOUS
Fresh S
Blueberries
Health & Beauty Aids Specials
NOXZEMA
Skin Cream
BLUE
Alka Seltzer
2 5oz
size
26 ct
pkg
99c
189
DELI SPECIALS
Natural
Light
WINE

39 Paul
�t Masson
SAVE
20 i
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1.5 ttr
btl
3
99
BUY A LB. OF
Boiled
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 10, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 10, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.415
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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