The East Carolinian, June 26, 1985






f
Bht
GLmalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 Nopy 63
Wednesday, June 26, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
( imitation 5,000
Survey Reveals Favorable Alcohol Trends
National Alcohol Use
The following are results from the College Alcohol Survey, a national
survey oj college administrators about alcohol abuse on their cam-
puses. All figures are in percentages and include responses from 330
I allege and universities.
Incidents oi alcohol-related problems on campus:
1979
1982
1985
7
39
54
20
38
42
28
42
30
Beliefs about the effects o( raising the legal drinking age to
21:
Increase Decrease No Effect
Abusive dnnkine25
Drunk driving27
Private party drinking6
I se of marijuana2s
Use oi false ID's77
35
52
12
3
7
40
21
21
72
16
By HAROLDJOYNER
( o-Nnn t.dilor
(This is part of a two-part
series of articles dealing with the
use of alcohol on college campus'
across the nation. Part II will
deal with ECU policies and
trends seen over the past six
years.)
The 1985 results of a College
Alcohol Survey were recently
released, as well as a comparison
with surveys conducted in 1979
and 1982, which showed that
there is a strong trend for colleges
and universities to take responsi-
ble action in the form of policies
to establish a compatible environ-
ment to the responsible use versus
abuse of alcohol.
A representative sample of 330
colleges and universities from
each of the 50 states and the
District of Columbia were
selected to participate in the
survey in 1979, with follow-ups
occurring in 1982 and 1985, the
report said. The survey was com-
pleted by various college ad-
ministrators.
Suicide Among College-Age
Students Continues to Rise
B RANDY MEWS
Americans committed suicide
once every 20 minutes between
1970-80, according to report just
released b the National Center
for Disease Control.
The third leading cause of
death among teenagers and
young adults, suicide claimed
over 287 O ves during the
1970s, and is becoming an ever
increasing problem among
universities nationwide.
At ECU, a student has taken
life in each of the last two
years. Both of those acts were
committed off of campus and in
towns other than Greenville.
However, suicide still remains an
imminent threat on and around
the ECU campus.
"We get approximately 10
serious suicide cases a year, plus a
whole bunch of other people who
have thought about it at one time
or another said Wilbert Ball,
director of ECU's counseling
center. Ball termed serious cases
as those who have actually
"acted out" an attempt on their
life, citing such examples as wrist
slashing and overdosing on pills.
"We haven't had a person
commit suicide on-campus since
Christmas break eight or nine
ears ago, but we still realize that
it is a serious problem said
Gene McAbee, an ECU crime
prevention officer. "We get calls
from friends, R.As (dorm resi-
dent advisors) who detect suicidal
tendencies and even the people
who are thinking about killing
themselves
"Young people today are
under a great deal of stress ac-
cording to Ball. "Often times, ex-
pectations are too great for cer-
tain individuals, creating suicide
as an alternative for those who
aren't coping with life
Ball said those who don't cope
usually suffer from isolation,
which he classifies as the leading
cause of suicide. "People who
constantly feel alone and socially
left out pose the biggest threat
Ball slated.
The NCDC reported that males
had a markedly higher rate of
suicide than females, and the gap
continued to widen between
1970-80, the last year for which
statistics were available.
Suicide is a serious health pro-
blem the CDC said. "Accor-
ding to national vital statistics,
almost 27,000 persons took their
own lives in 1980, making it the
tenth leading cause of death for
that ear.
"Almost 75 percent of suicides
occured among males the
report continued, "while the rate
increased for males and decreas-
ed for females
The report also noted whites
are twice as likely to commit
suicide as other racial groups.
"White males consistently had
the highest suicide rates accor-
ding to the report. "Blacky and
other males had the second
highest rate, followed by white
females and finally black and
other females
In terms of absolute numbers
in 1980, 70 percent of all suicides
were among white males.
The report also noted the
dramatic rise in suicides among
young people between 1970-80,
where the rate increased 50 per-
cent for those between the ages of
15-24.
The most commonly used
method of suicide in the United
States is that of firearms, which
increased from 50 percent in 1970
to 57.3 percent by 1980.
Geographically, suicides in
1980 ranged from a low of 7.4 per
100,000 population in New Jersy
to a high of 22.9 per 100,000 in
Nevada. That mirrored regional
differences, where suicide rates
are lowest in the Northeast and
highest in the West.
Jive Talkin'
J.B. Humbert � ECU Phot Lab
Some of the members of the Class of 1989 listen attentively to Sue Steinman, president of the Circle K Club,
as she tells them the about the pros of becoming active in the ECU club. Many other campus organizations
are participating in the New Student Initiation to Campus Organizations program, sponsored by the SGA,
offering the incoming freshmen a chance to become aquainted with ECU life. The orientation seminar will
run through the middle of July, and viewing times may be obtained by calling the SGA office.
The largest increase of cam-
puses allowing the drinking of
beer on campus was between
1982 and 1985 � meaning that 78
percent of the campuses allow
beer consumption on campus,
whether it be in residence halls or
outdoors.
Also, in 1985, 69 percent of the
nation's campuses said they
allowed hard liquor to be drunk
on campus. Most campuses
allowed drinking in residence hall
rooms, but limited the activity
outside and in the residence hall
rooms. At ECU, only beer and
unfortified wines are allowed to
be consumed, but only under cer-
tain conditions.
The report also said that 86
percent of the universities re-
quired that non-alcoholic
beverages be served at public
functions at which alcohol is
served. Seventy-one percent
reported that food is another re-
quirement at such functions.
ECU is one of those schools that
require alternative beverages and
the serving of food, according to
the Office of Student life's
policy on alcohol consumption
The advertising of alcohol
through campus newspapers is
allowed at 96 percent of the
schools, but only 27 percent
allowed flyers in dining areas.
ECU's policy on advertising
states that, "In keeping with our
overall campus goal of pro-
moting the responsible use of
alcohol, this policy promotes a
responsible approach to alcohol
advertising as done in relation to
campus activities. Guidelines set
forth by student life said that
"drinking should not be
glamorized nor should it be
"the central focus of any event
In addition, all alcoholic
beverage advertisers have to sub-
mit their communication
materials to the appropriate
University agency prior to public
release for approval.
In response to whether a
minimum drinking age of 21
would help alcohol related pro-
blems, 55 percent of the schools
prefered a minimum drinking age
of 21 or above and 46 percent
thought the 2i-year old age limit
would decrease the frequency of
student drinking. Also, "the
higher age was favored because
student's academic progress
would be more successful as well
as reducing the amount of
students dropping out oi school.
Currently, North Caroiir
minimum drinking age for b
and wine is 19 and for liquor, 21.
However, in Sept. 1986, the
minimium age will be 21 for beer,
wine and liquor.
Approximately one-fourth ol
the administrators surveyed said
the higher drinking age ma lead
to a higher use of marijuana and
other drugs. However, the ma
jority of those surveyed said thev
felt the minimum age would no;
have any effect on the use ol
drugs.
Finally, the majority of cam-
puses said they felt the minimum
drinking age of 21 does cause a
higher incidence of student drink-
ing in private parties and the use
of false ID's to purchase alcohol
li
Students walking to the
Jenkins Fine Arts
Building will now have a
brand new walkway-
sculpture, via a $5,000
grant by the N.C. Art
Council and National
Endowment for the Arts.
According to Dr. Art
Haney, associate pro-
fessor in the School of
Art, the sculpture was
designed by Andrea
Blum of New York,
N.Y. He said three pro-
posals were considered,
before accepting Blum's
design. She ineorported
the location of the
sculpture, as well as con-
sidering how it would
benefit the students,
Haney said.
J.8. Humbert � ECU Photo Lab
New Club Offers Discipline
Bv BRETT MORRIS
Staff Writer
Dead bodies and autopsies are
not the only topics that the ECU
Forensic Club deals with. The
Forensic Club is a student
organization that was formed in
Feb. 1985 and took the place of
the former Debate Union.
Janet Schrieber, director of the
Forensic Club said, "It is essen-
tial for this University to have an
organization such as this to par-
ticipate in debate activities
The Forensic Club is an inter-
disciplinary organization and
anyone who is interested can
become involved.
The SGA funded money to the
club in March, which was enough
for the club to participate in one
tournament at a Pennsylvania
school. Thirty three schools, in-
cluding St. John's and Penn
State, participated in the tourna-
ment. "We didn't do that bad for
never having competed before
Schrieber said.
A tournament consists of
various types of debates in which
there are several rounds of com-
petition. The issues revolve
around topics such as U.S.
policies at home and abroad and
current political and economic
events that are pertinent to the
United States.
There are individual events
that consist of impromptu, ex-
traneous and informative
speeches. These events may in-
volve giving oral interpretations
of prose, poetry, and drama. "It
takes tremendous discipline
Schreiber said.
The Forensic Club is hoping to
participate in four tournaments
during the 1985-86 school year,
Schrieber said. In addition, the
club has to participate in two
tournaments in order to qualify
for the national tournament.
The club is currently trying to
obtain appropriations from the
SGA in order to find mono
travel expenses and entry fees for
tournaments. "We need u-r
enough money (from SGA
fund our expenses in two tour-
naments so that se may attei
national event Schrieber aid.
Other universities thoroughout
the nation fund these organize
tionas large sums of money.
which makes them more c
petitive in the tournaments.
Schrieber stated that the club
may not debate in the fall of 198!
in order to gain experience
watching other members debate
The organization has alrc.
received interest from incoming
freshmen and Schrieber is look
ing forward to the Forensic Club
as being a substantial organiza-
tion on campus. "It's a great waj
to enrich the University and i- a
public relations tool to h
establish the name of East
Carolina University Schrieber
said.
Motorists Join Protest Of Hostages
ATLANTA (UPI) �
Americans were urged to drive
with their headlights on in a cam-
paign that began last Friday in an
effort to vent their frustrations in
a nationwide protest aimed at
Moslem terrorists holding U.S.
hostages in Beirut.
The idea was hatched by two
Atlanta broadcasters as a way for
Americans to "vent their frustra-
tions over the incident.
Broadcasters across the nation
asked motorists to burn their
headlights, day and night, until
the passengers aboard the hijack-
ed TWA jet are released.
"I felt very strongly that we
should do something said Russ
Minshew, chief meteorologist at
radio and television station WSB
in Atlanta, who came up with the
idea. "We're frustrated � I've
never felt anything like this.
"But we're united and we're
proud of our country and we
want everybody in the world to
know that. If every single car and
truck in this country had its
headlights on, the rest of the
world would know about it.
That's the whole idea he said.
Minshew and talk-show host
Bob Mohan put the idea before
listeners to WSB, a 50,000-watt
AM station that reaches more
than 30 states east of the Rocky
Mountains, and the response was
favorable.
Several cars were seen driving
down Peachtree Street in Atlanta
with their headlights burning
Thursday and the pair decided to
try for a national demostration.
Minshew and Mornr then con-
tacted broadcasnr c rriends
across the nation � from New
York to Orlando to New Orleans
to Cleveland to Denver to San
Diego � to spread the word.
Citizens' band and ham radio
operators also joined in the ef-
fort.
In Houston, Richard Sangster,
news anchor at radio station
KPRC, described listener
response as "unbelievable
"The response we've been get-
ting from the callers has been
tremendous Sangster said.
"Fve been in TV and radio
since I was a teenager, and I've
never felt the kind of sincerity
and excitement coming across
those telephone lines said Min-
shew, 40. "I thought we'd get
somebody to call and say it's a
dumb idea, but we haven't heard
anybody say that
����

' �c � � � �� fC '





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 26, 1985
Tinted Sunglasses Could Cause Driving Hazard
Are you looking at the world
through rose-colored sunglasses?
If so, you may not see the next
traffic light you encounter. Other
brightly tinted sunglasses such as
red, yellow, bright orange, blue
and purpl- can also interfere with
the wearer's perception of basic
traffic light colors.
If you are considering buying a
new pair of sunglasses, there are
several tips to keep in mind:
� 1 cnses should be large enough
to shield most angles of vision
(above, below and both sides).
Media Head Appointed
The nomination of John Peter-
son as interim General Manager
of The Fast Carolinian was ap-
proved yesterday at an ECU
media board meeting.
Peterson, who has served as
the paper's credit manager since
January, will temporarily take
the place of Tom Norton who
elected not to attend the second
session of summer school.
Also at yesterday's meeting,
the Media Board approved a pro
posal by WZMB-FM to attempt
the publication of a calender for
the 1985-86 school year. The suc-
cess of the calender is contingent
upon enlisting advertisers to
sponsor the publication, thus
enabling WZMB to pay the prin-
ting COsts.
"We're going to try to get a
sponsor for each month said
WZMB General Manager Kate
Abbott. "Each calender page
would also have an accompany -
ing picture of a local rock band
Other action taken at the
meeting included.
� Changing the name oi the
Freshmen Register to the New
Student Review.
� The announcement that the
Buccaneer, ECU'S yearbook, will
distribute the 1984-85 yearbooks
at the beginning oi the fall
semester.
EasTCtroIina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave.
We Buy God & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
e ri& Atl Transactions Confidential 4- 3
Hours: 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m. Mon-Sat
1
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults$2005Tii �&.q
BUCCANEER MOVIES
k 756-3307 � Greenville Squere Shopping Center
Playing
Now
2:00-4.30-7.00-9:15
COCOON
00 3:00 5.00-7:00 9:00
MILLIONS
PG
Starts Friday
CLINT EASTWOOD
12:30-2:45 F5:00-7:15-9:30iR
M�yiBi Now 1:00-3:00-5:00 7:00-9:00
Life Force
� "�
I I' iilimMmiiiimiim
RIVER BLUFF
Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments"
Your Choice of a Microwave Oven or 13"
Color TV If You Sign A 12 Month's Lease.
Limited Time Only Offer For New
Residents Only. Present Residents Not Eligi-
ble For Offer.
� Professional Management and Maintenance
� 2 Bedroom Townhouses & 1 Bedroom Garden Apartment,
� Kitchens Feature Dishwashers & Disposals
� Fully Carpeted
� Private Laundry Facilities
� Large Pool
� Cable T.V. Included
� Private Balconies
� Convenient To Shopping Centers & Restaurants
� ECU Bus Service
� Security Deposits Negotiable
Oireclions: 10th Street Extension To Riser Bluff Road
Next To Rivei-gate Shopping (enter.
PHONE 758-4015
Eyeglass Frame Sale
60 OFF
All
Frames
In Stock
(with purchase of RX Lenses)
1fOA ALL NON-PRESCRIPTION
OU O off SUNGLASSES.B&i
included Bring in this ad for discount
Sale Enos June 28,1985 (NoOther Discounts Valid)
�L Rayban
plicians
CALL US FOR AN
EYE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
OF YOUR CHOICE
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Phone 752-1446
Other Locations In Kinst
Open MonFri. 9 AM til 5:30 PM
Beecher Kirkley Dispensing Opticiai
otdsboro & Wilson
Prescription sunglasses are bet-
ter than clip-ons for those who
wear glasses.
� Sunglasses protect contact lens
wearers from excess light, dirt,
dust and wind.
� Sunglasses are beneficial for
people who have had cataract
surgery and are more sensitive to
bright light.
Evaluate the quality of non-
prescription sunglass lenses by:
� Examining the glasses in and
against light for scratches,
streaks, bubbles, blurs or other
flaws.
�Hold the glasses at half an arm's
length. Focus on an object with
strong vertical and horizontal
lines.
� Move the glasses slowly up,
down and sideways. If the lines
waver, that indicates a lens
distortion, which are not harm-
ful, but can cause the eyes to
work harder resulting in squin-
ting, blinking, tearing, slight
headaches, nausea and dizziness.
For more information about
sunglasses contact the ECU Stu-
dent Health Service or send a
self-addressed, stamped,
business-sized envelope to: Na-
tional Society to Prevent Blind-
ness, 1033 Wade Avenue, Suite
208, Raleigh, N.C. 27605.
NOTES
FORUM
A pud'C (OfofTi on Terrorism anc
Religious Fundamentalists mW be neic
June 26 at � 00 PM a fne Metnodist Stuoen-
Center S01 E 5tr S' . across from Gar
Dorm Tnere .n De a pannei disc jssior arc
time tor Questions
AMBASSADORS
There will oe a mee' 10 ,h s irjca,
room 247 VSC
IIK
PI KAPPA PHI
Present
WH H DRAFTNITE
Wednesday, June 26, 1985
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-2:00 A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
$1.00 18 yrs.
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
Presents
SUMMER COLLEGE NITE
Thursday, June 27, 1985 9:00-2:00 a.m.
Admission $1.00 Guys & 18 yrs. Free for Ladies
'Hen ember. Drinking and
Driving don't Mix"
5C DRAFT WHILE IT LASTS
60 CANS TIL MIDNIGHT
85 TIL CLOSE
com' "�
- � -�. - -
'� � JM TO r- - -
items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
June 29 1985
PREMIUM OR UGHT
Coors
tOQU
vooti
-I
9
489
LONG BURNING
Kroger
Charcoal
-Ev; ve
FRL ' PUNCH OR
Orange
Gatorade
�J09
KROGER 2cc LOWFAT
SKIM OR HOMOGENIZED
)
990 Whole
SUN COUNTRY ORIGINAL
ORANGE OR TROPICAL
Wine M 12
Cooler 4 n�rb
KEEBLER HONEY GRAHAMS OR
Cinnamon
Crisp
$29
M Ik . cm
99c
ASSOR'tT VARIETIES
BiG VALUE
Sandwich
TASTY
PIZZA
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Jeno's
Pizza . pk?
89
NABISCO UNSAITED OR
REGULAR
Premium
Saltines
16 Oz
Box
INCLUDES 2 VEGETABLES
AND A ROLL
BBQ Chicken
SOUTH CAROLINA
Sweet Ripe
Peaches
WISE PUFFED OR
Crunchy
Doodles 8b�
$-19
Dinner
V'2
Chicken
ADVERTISED ITEM POtlCY
Earn of these advertised items is
reauired to oe readily avanaoie
'or sale in etch Kroger Sav on e�
cept as specifically noted m tnis
ad i� we do run out of in item we
win offer you your cnoice of
comparable Item wnen avaliaeie
reflecting tne same savings or a
ralncneck wmen win entitle you
ro ourcnase tne advertised item
� tne advertised price witmn jo
days Only one vendor coupon
win oe accepted per item

Go Krogering
G
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
J
DOUBLE
MFCS
a COUPONS
FOR EVERY $10 PURCHASE
N.C.
KAI EIGH a A
ttnbution-
will financt-
fund for p
General -
tion that
ment from a H
L'nder lh
could check
1 neon
m.
contrit .
re-
"I thinl -
an
Re
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Taj


Rese
:
a
no - .
� .
dui ,
the E
His.
Re- :
Ea
refullv
the
area oi
The
archae gica
cor. d
according
ECL pi 1
Park Sen .
ducted a new
National Sea
here to anno
the three-rr -
The
the beach is a J
aspect of ma
which usua
underwater.
Archaeoh g
counts of wrt
beac es
times l
i timt
"uncoerir
archaeo 1
form a
veleej b
nu
shores an
newspapei
essek
Poring
photograr.
clipp " -
rs ha1 c
beache-
Nearly intac
uncoerec.
amples j
CKner Al:
in 1S"S and w j- n
ting sands
Cape Hatiera-
1963 i
the ship's name
tern. and th
schooner Laura A
wrecked in 1921
Barnes' batterec I
covered on Boche Isi
Laura A Ba'nes �a
ed from the beach
seen on display at C
ECU
Recog
Summaries
reported by an
chemist and his sorj
American Chemical
pearcd in the cur
Chemical and Engd
A section entitlj
Briefs from Miami
eludes informal
research results pre
Myron Caspar o
chemistry- depart tn
son, DuPont r
Jonathan Caspar,
research reports aj
abstracted in the joi
more than 2,000 pr
ACS meeting in Mi
�� - 4f ���� -mr -
wtnHi'





MOTES
FORUM
forum oo Terrorism and
idamentaiists win be held
:e at 8 00 PV a' ?ne Methodist Student
B r � SI a, ross from Garrert
� te a pannei discussion and
AMBASSADORS
eet tg W s Thursday ir
THF EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 26. 1985
� .M.
$1.00 18 NTS,
TE
mite
M
les
3 ers
on
d Prices
thru Sat
1985
t .
(ZED
Gal
990
ASSORTED VARIETIES
BiG VALUE
Sandwich
Cookies
$
109
� � -
CrunChv
cheez
doodles
4'
Xulrl
cheel xes I
8 Oz
Bag
$119
UBLE
MFG'S
UPONS
WE WILL DOUBLE 5
TO 50 FACE VALUE)
V $10 PURCHASE'
��� del ad a hi itsrt
N.C. Taxpayers May Have Choice In Abortion Funding
RALEIGH (UP1) � Voluntarv wnnlH 1 .0. nnu. c � �
RALEIGH (UPI) Voluntary
contributions, not tax dollars
will finance the state abortion
fund for poor women if the
General Assembly passes legisla-
tion that has won a solid endorse-
ment from a House committee.
Under the proposal, citizens
could check a box on their state
income tax forms if they want to
make a donation to the fund or
contribute part or all of any
refunds due them.
"I think we should get in the
situation that those who favor
abortion should contribute to it
and state funds aren't used said
Rep. Richard Wright,
D-Columbus, the bill's sponsor
Taxpayers would start making
check-offs on their tax forms
next year and contributions
would replace tax dollars in the
fund in the 1986-87 fiscal year
under the plan.
"There's no way to know how
much funds will be generated by
a check-off said Wright.
Wright's bill would put a
$750,000 cap on the funds that
could be contributed to the abor-
tion fund � a little more than
half of the amount budgeted for
the abortion fund above $750,000
would go to other state social
programs.
"Those who believe in abor-
tion have the chance to pay for
it Wright said. "Those who do
not like abortion may not like the
bill because it recognizes a state
abortion fund, but they have to
be satisfied to know no ap-
propriation is made to the fund
from the General Assembly.
Fund supporters said Thursday
the public may surprise Wright,
who originally planned to allow
only $1 contributions from each
taxpayer.
"We're talking a couple of
million dollars said Rep. Dan
Blue, D-Wake, who has fought to
keep the fund in the budget this
year. "We'd probably get a $3
million to $4 million contribu-
tion
Margaret McCreary,
spokeswoman of the National
Organization for Women, said
she doubts Wright's bill will pass
both Houses. She said 60-70 per-
cent of the public favors a
woman's right to abortion on de-
mand.
t's a real bad precedent to
expand in essence the taxpayers'
laundry list of what they want
their money to be spent for, and
what they don't she said.
Blue said the House, even if it
passes the bill, might raise the
$750,000 limit on it that the com-
mittee approved despite an at-
tempt by Rep. Frank Ballance,
D-Warren, to raise the ceiling
almost to this year's funding
level.
"When was the last time
$750,000 was sufficient funds to
take care of abortions?" Ballance
asked.
"The concept is what is impor-
tant � the figure could be
debated Wright said.
Abortion fund supporters said
the program can never pay for all
the abortions needed every year.
They said this year's $1,374,500
ran out last week.
This week, the legislature's
joint Appropriations Committee
decided to budget $924,500 for
the abortion fund, giving up a
third of the proposed money in a
compromise move to save the
program from elimination. Op-
ponents wanted to cut $1 million
dollars from the fund, leaving
only enough money for abortions
for rape and incest victims,
women in danger from their
pregnancies, minors and women
carrying defective fetuses.
Under Wright's bills, the costs
of administering the abortion
fund � which would stay under
the control of the Department of
Human Resources � also would
be paid by contributions.
SLEEPING BAGS
MOOS MESS KITS Cant�Ens FATIGUB
�?� �NW�Afi T SHIRTS ENAA-H.WAW
MSHtS WORK CLOTHES 2100 EFFERENT tEMS
Browsers Welcome
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S. Evans
r llt au,lllUMS I1CCUCU every year.
Researchers Identify Ships Along Coast
The

OmCAL III PALACE

If
At least 29 times during the
past 40 years, the ghostly remains
of wrecked vessels have appeared
and disappeared in the shifting
JEI ��.��. HtteraS,Na- States NavV nboat lost dun
tional Seashore's legendary
"Graveyard of the Atlantic ac-
cording to a survey which has
now been completed.
Ten of the wrecks strewn along
50 miles of windswept beach,
dunes and sea oats were studied
during the survey conducted by
the ECU program in Maritime
History and Underwater
Research.
Each battered fragment was
carefully analyzed to determine
the type of ship, its age, what
area of the hull the piece came
from and, if possible, the identity
of the lost vessel.
The survey was the first major
archaeological examination of
shipwreck sites on the beach to be
conducted in the United States,
according to spokesmen for the
ECU program and the National
Park Service. The officials con-
ducted a news conference at the
National Seashore headquarters
here to announce completion of
the three-month survey.
The study of shipwreck sites on
the beach is a relatively recent
aspect of maritime archaeology,
which usually is conducted
underwater.
Archaeologists studying ac-
counts of wreck sites found on
beaches have learned that many
times the remains of ships which
wrecked on the beach have sur-
vived time, surf, and periodic
"uncovering" and are valuable
archaeological repositories of in-
formation. To test theories about
beached shipwrecked sites, Cape chaeologically
Hatteras National Seashore was wrecks,
selected because of the great
number of vessels lost off its
shores and frequent references in
newspaper clippings and local
histories to the skeletons of
vessels in the park's sands.
Poring over old accounts,
photographs, faded newspaper
clippings and the reports of other
archaeologists, the survey team
learned that not only pieces of
ships have been exposed on the
beaches of the Outer Banks.
Nearly intact vessels have been
uncovered, the most famous ex-
amples being the two-mated
schooner Altoon, which wrecked
in 1878 and was revealed by shif-
ting sands on the beach near the
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse in
1963 with its decks in place and
the ship's name carved on the
stern, and the four-masted
schooner Laura A. Barnes, which
wrecked in 1921. Laura A.
Barnes' battered bones were un-
covered on Bodie Island in 1955.
Laura A. Barnes was later remov-
ed from the beach and can be
seen on display at Coquina Beach
ECU Prof
Recognized
Summaries of research
reported by an ECU faculty
chemist and his son at the recent
American Chemical Society, ap-
peared in the current issue of
Chemical and Engineering News.
A section entitled "Meeting
Briefs from Miami Beach" in-
cludes information about
research results presented by Dr.
Myron Caspar of the ECU
chemistry department and his
son, DuPont research chemist
Jonathan Caspar. The Caspars'
research reports are among 20
abstracted in the journal from the
more than 2,000 presented at the
ACS meeting in Miami Beach.
on Bodie Island. Other near in
tact vessels exposed through the
years include a small vessel ex-
plored by National Park Service
archaeologists in 1939 which ap-
pears to have been a United
ng
the War of 1812. Most of the
pieces of ships examined during
the survey came from the gulls of
schooners or small ships of other
rigs. Two vessels were identified
as the remains of the four-masted
schooners G.A. Kohler and
Margaret Spencer. Margaret
Spencer's remains were un-
covered on Pea Island last winter
by hurricane Josephine near the
site where the schooner went
aground and was lost on Mav 18
1925.
G.A. Kohler's battered hull,
long a feature on the beach of
Hatteras Island near the town of
Avon, was again disclosed by
hurricane Josephine and the iden-
titiy of the ship was confirmed by
the archaeological survey team.
A third vessel, a steamship whose
machinery protrudes from the
surf near Rodanthe on Hatteras
Island, seems to be the S.S.
Pocahontas, a horse and troop
transport lost during the Civil
War on January 18, 1862 as
Federal troops moved to invade
and seize the Confederate-held
Outer Banks. Future ar-
chaeological work will explore
this wreck and establish its identi-
ty, officials said.
The survey of Cape Hatteras
National Seashore was part of an
on-going program of maritime
archaeological research con-
ducted by the National Park Ser-
vice in national parks throughout
the country to identify and pro-
tect historically and ar-
important ship-
The survey was led by National
Park Service historian James
Delgado of San Francisco's
Golden Gate National Recreation
Area. Delgado has studied beach-
ed shipwreck sites for the past
three years and recently led ef-
forts to study the largely intact
remains of the beached 1856
medium clipper ship King Philip,
which was discovered on San
Francisco's Ocean Beach two
years ago.
The survey was accomplished
with Cape Hatteras National
Seashore rangers and a volunteer
staff of student assistants from
ECU. The survey was ac-
complished as part of the ECU
program's on-going effort to
identify and study significant
maritime archaeological sites
along the coast of the
Southeastern United States.
Precious efforts of the Program
in Maritime History and Under-
water Research have included
surveys of Edenton and
Swansboro, N.C, studies of
Civil War blockade runners in
Bermuda, and work on the
U.S.S. Monitor, another victim
of Cape Hatteras' stormy seas.
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3U� Saat (Earnlitiian
Serving the Ernst Caroline campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, au,
Jennifer Jendrasiak. � uu
Harold Joyner. co-m�� &� Tom Luvender, do, oAnum,
Randy Mews, co-n, &�� Anthony Martin, ����� ����,
Rick Mccormac. ��, i John Peterson, o� ���,�
Bill Mitchell. o��i �, Bill Dawson. produce Ma
Daniel Maurer, Lna �, DeChanile Johnson, a immi
s&-m?c09r4meSr uwi&A&iUi&sviu'
1
UNUKE Aly
pRepecessoR,
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iSttratjoai
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AMP
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STRgAJ07H�.
June 26, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Hostages
Save Lives Now, Retaliate Later
GUARANTEES
TO BRING OUR
' HOSTAGE
BACKBv
&&
mauguraiion
Difficult as it may be, the United
States needs to be able to negotiate
some kind of release without giving
in to outrageous demands. The
strong U.S. support of Israeli
policies should give us the leverage
to push for the release of the Shiite
prisoners in return for the release of
the hostages.
As far as this situation is concern-
ed, negotiation and a certain
amount of compromise are an ab-
solute necessity. Getting tough and
allowing those 40 people to be killed
might put on a good show, but it
won't stop terrorist acts. The ter-
rorists will just assume that sooner
or later the American public is going
to refuse to let more citizens die.
What is needed is some kind of
preventative measures, some way in
which Americans take action before
the terrorists strike again.
International security needs to be
increased dramatically. And this
country needs to discover some way
to provide for sanctions against
future terrorists without endanger-
ing more American lives.
But the important thing for the
moment is that the lives of the
Beirut hostages be saved.
As the hostage crisis in Beirut
continues, the dilemma continues as
does the realization that U.S.
citizens are not untouchables, but
pawns to be used in other countries
wars.
America must somehow adopt a
get-tough policy to stop its citizens
from being victimized but must not
sacrifice those citizens currently
held.
The problem with the Shiite's de-
mand that the 700 Shiites held
prisoner by the Israelis be released is
that the U.S. is not responsible for
the prisoners being held in this first
place � that was Israel's decision,
not ours, so why should we be held
accountable?
The situation is growing more
preposterous as the Shiites begin
demanding removal of U.S. war-
ships. To say the least, it is embar-
rassing for the U.S. to be forced to
consider acquiescing to the
unreasonable demands of a small
group of terrorists.
Immediate punitive action is cer-
tainly warranted here, as most peo-
ple will agree. But it's not worth the
price of 40 lives.
Washington's Brace Of Ducks
By Michael Kinsley
Tto New Republic
He looks like a lame duck, and he
quacks like a lame duck, so is he a lame
duck?
This is the question that excites all of
Washington (meaning about three
dozen people.) Suddenly, despite his
overwhelming re-election last
November, President Reagan is losing
legislative battles; coming under attack
from unexpected quarters, stumbling,
backing down.
Newsweek cites "a new conventional
wisdom: that second-term presidents
are afflicted with a kind of politicl
Alzheimer's disease, a progressive and
incurable loss of potency leading sooner
or later to terminal lame duckery
I have a simpler explanation:
idealogical hubris. Ever since the elec-
tion, Reagan and his advisers have been
off on a right-wing bender. On issue
after issue, though, America just isn't
as conservative as the Reaganites
thought.
The president's defenders say the
problem isn't the country. They say it's
the press and the Congress, which have
forgotten who won in November. But
even some of Reagan's friends com-
plain that he ran a "feel good" cam-
paign instead of using the election to
establish a mandate for completing the
Reagan revolution.
This assumes, of course, that such a
mandate was available. I doubt it.
Perhaps nothing he did could have lost
Reagan the election. But a campaign
based on a military overthrow of the
Nicaraguan government, abandonment
of SALT II, cutting Amtrak and stu-
dent loans, and so on, would have cost
him his landslide.
The military budget has gone up by
half in real terms over the past five
years. Cap Weinberger thought the
public's appetite for defense spending
was unlimited and unaffected by the
growing evidence that much of the
money is being wasted. He was wrong.
The defesnse spending spree is over, but
that isn't "lame duckery
Reagan spent his first term tacitly
observing the unratified SALT II trea-
ty. This year, egged on by Weinberger
and others, h was heading toward an
intentional violtion of the treaty's limits
on multi-warhead missiles. Unlike some
arguable Soviet violations of anicillary
parts of the treaty, this would have been
a clear breach for the sake of breach: a
purely symbolic bellicose gesture and
snub at arms control.
But no one except a small band of
zealots is interested in stagy nuclear
bellicosity. Congress, the allies, even
the Joint Chiefs of Staff all expressed
their dismay, and Reagan backed off.
In his first term, Reagan kept his
designs on Nicaragua carefully am-
biguous. Now he openly demands that
the Sandinistas "say uncle But a re-
cent New York Times-CBS poll shows
that Americans are almost 2-to-l
against helping to overthrow the San-
dinistas, and more than 2-to-l against
military aid to the contras. After much
struggle. Congress has agreed to cough
up some "humanitarian" aid.
(If there's anything more humiliating
than Reagan's resort to the charade of
"humanitarian" aid for a guerrilla
fighting force, it's the Democrats' ac-
quiescence in the charade.)
But the problem isn't "lame
duckery The voters and the president
simply disagree.
Reagan's recent appointee troubles
reflect two different kinds of hubris.
First, there's the hubris and contempt
for government of an administration
that thinks it can give importatn posi-
tions to extremists and lightweights like
Eileen Gardner (the one who wrote that
the handicapped have "summoned"
their disability) and Marianne Hall (co-
author of the book that discussed
blacks and their "jungle freedoms)
Conservatives often say that liberals
in Washington suffer from an "inside
the Beltway" mentality, and have no
idea what people are thinking in the rest
of the country. Since November, it's the
conservatives who have been living in
an "inside the Beltway" dream world.
Slowly, though, the spell is breaking.
Real Zealots Justify The Arms Race � Zealously
Jay Stone
From The Left
Conservatives today justify a renewed
arms race and intensified militaristic
posturing in the Third World by tireless-
ly reminding the American people of the
threat of Soviet expansionism. They ad-
mit that the arms race is insane in its
very essence since it involves zealously
manufacturing weapons that can never
be used. This is true because, as we have
been told many times over, a nuclear
war is a war that will have no winners.
Conservatives also confess, at least
tacitly, that the arms race wastes
valuable resources that could be better
used for solving problems such as pover-
ty, hunger and disease. These things
even conservatives are willing to con-
cede, yet they insist upon the necessity of
�continuing to play what is obviously an
insane and extremely dangerous game
because the Soviet Union, they say, is an
evil empire that is out to conquer the
world or, at least, a sizable portion of it.
The American left, on the other hand,
has found itself in a very ambivalent and
strange position. While it has attempted
to argue for a more balanced view of the
dynamics at work in the arms race,
which has often involved pointing out
that the United States has been at least
as aggressive in pursuing nuclear
superiority as the Soviet Union if not
more so, it has been maligned by those
on the right for taking the side of the
Soviet Union against the United States.
Of course this state of affairs has not
been helped by the fact that some of
those on the left have, indeed, chosen to
side with the Soviet Union in allocating
blame for the cold war and the arms
race. This is only to be expected,
however, since in a pluralistic society a
variety of different points of view are
likely to be expressed even within the
rubric of any one ideology. It is as true
for the right as it is for the left. Hence
some on the left are pro-Soviet while
others merely advocate a more rational
and balanced view of the Soviets and
their objectives. This latter group con-
cedes that the Soviets are aggressive and
that they seek to expand their interests in
the Third World. They are quick to
point out that thev find the Soviet
Doonesbury
political system to be repressive, and
hence, one with very few redeeming
characteristics. They do not believe that
these two aspects of the Soviet system
are likely to change dramatically in the
immediate future. Yet, they urge a
view that looks upon the Soviets with a
less prejudiced eye. They advocate such
a position in the interest of devising a
foreign policy which can bring an end to
the arms race and wasted wars of in-
tervention in the Third World while
simultaneously containing the spread of
Soviet-dominated client states.
This view from the left suggests that
the Soviets are not really willing to
"bear any burden" or "pay any price"
in order to spread Communism around
the globe. They too have a finite amount
of resources and they too are facing in-
creasing resentment in the Third World.
Moreover, the inferior performance of
the Soviet economy has demanded that
it begin to allocate more of its resources
to upgrading the .level of basic research
and production technology in the
civilian sector of its economy rather than
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
TMPfZAPWUY
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Sec COMICS Page Six
s-nfBW F
cpntinuing to maintain astronomical
levels of defense expenditures. This is
particularly true in an era in which
Japan and West Germany have emerged
as the new pace setters in the world
economy and as the prefered develop-
ment models for the Third World coun-
tries.
The Soviet Union commands far less
allegiance in the Third World now than
it did at the end of the Second World
War and most of the allegiance that it
does command is a result of its role as a
supplier of military hardware and occa-
sional development aid, rather than of
any ideological affinity between itself
and underdeveloped nations. More to
the point, the poor performance of the
civilian sector of the Soviet economy has
begun ! to show up in its lack of
military preparedness as sophisticated
technology has come to play more and
more of a decisive role in the manufac-
ture of new weapons systems. In other
words, oecause the Soviet Union does
not have an advanced microelectronics
industry it is difficult for them to
develop the complex computer
technology used in some new weapons
systems. Up until now the Soviets have
relied primarily upon importing advanc-
ed technology from Western countries.
This was a strategy that was initiated
under Brezhnev. It has become increas-
ingly apparent, however, that this is not
a strategy that will work in the long run.
Conservatives are aware of this fact and
many of them have urged a policy of
resuming the arms race in order to
realize the advantage that the United
States now possesses in technological
know-how and force the Soviets into
"peace" or submission. Taken together,
then, all of the factors mentioned
previously lead one to the obvious con-
clusion that the Soviet Union is in
decline as a world power. In order to
pull out of this decline they must cut
military spending and devote more of
their resources to rebuilding their
economy.
The same can be said of the United
States. This is true becuase over the
course of the Cold War it has become
clear that neither the United States nor
the Soviet Union can afford to dominate
any significant number of Third World
countries by military force. The Soviets
have been expelled from Egypt and
Somalia without a fight. Now they are
embroiled in a protracted guerrilla war
in Afghanistan and civil unrest has
become almost endemic in Poland. The
Soviets must develop new strategies for
expanding their influence in the Third
World that do not involve treating Third
World countries as mere pawns in a
superpowerstruggle. Cuba, Vietnam and
now Central America have delivered the
same lesson to the United States, though
Reagan's reelection proves that we are
slow learning it.
Of course, every time the subject of
the Soviet Union arises in American
parlance, the grisly spector of Soviet-
dominated Eastern Europe is raised
high. It should be raised high as should
all of the other "crimes' committed by
the Soviets. Yet these transgressions on
the part of the Soviets should not blind
us to the fact that many of the things
that most horrify us about the Soviets
were committed under Stalin, a man
who even the Communist Party came to
vilify. Since Stalin's time, Soviet society
and i government have changed a
great deal, though the Soviet system is
still capable of producing horrors.
(Witness the plight of Soviet Jews and
the Afghans.)
The bottom line, however, is this �
though there are plenty of reasons to
treat the Soviets with caution and suspi-
cion, it is not reasonable to believe the
the only thing that is keeping them from
spreading their tentacles throughout the
Third World is the threat of American
military retaliation. That threat has lost
much of its credibility since Vietnam.
We must assume, then, that the Soviets
have failed to implement a strategy of
military aggression in the Third World
for other reasons. Perhaps they are
discovering that in today's world it is not
a workable policy alternative.
As a result, it is likely that the super-
power that is most able to assist in the
economic devlopment of the Third
World will win its allegiance. Since, in
many respects, nothing inspires Com-
munist revolution like poverty the most
effective anti-Communist strategy that
the U.S. could adopt would be to asssist
in Third World economic development
Ironically, this would involve tolerating
the existence of the Yugoslavia, Chinas,
Vietnams and Nicaraguas that might
arise in the belief that a country's own
internal econmic policies pose no securi-
ty threat to the United States and in the
long run democratic political and
economic systems are likely to prevail.
In short, we must exercise a profound
faith in American ideals. We must
believe that history is on the side of
democracy while keeping in mind that
democracy and capitalism are not
synonomous.

I
J
Sum
s
ince the summi
The East Carohj
Theatre has brought
Broadway to a cuiti
Eastern North Caroi
the way it met and sui
a hardship including
tion of its 1969 seas
the Summer Theatre
well and plans a ho
Broadway musicals
its 20th season.
The concept for
Theatre began in
f citizens of ha-
; Carolina wanted
theatre in their com:
approached then Fas
; College President
for assistance Hi
mediate action a B- aj
tors was appoint
L o e s s in c
Produce-
repreier.a
towns wil
muting distance I
It was d e i e i
American musics
bill of fare and
be comparable to thoj
A scene from
Unluc
UPI � Every hod
about them, but nob
be one.
"It's hard to tak
'Yuppie' seriously; it
a fish says Chicago
businessman Steve Fi
"It's sort of lii
Calvin on your behi
meaningless title ev
Rczmkoff, 29, a
marketing specia.
"I hate the word
Jacobs, 31, prei Jen:
Dallas advertising
relations firm.
The offshoot
"young urban
more demeanun
Newsweek po-
tion b utton last Decc
cover story on "The
Yuppie" and their
consumptions �
Volvos, Rolex watch
gingerbread townhou
torian neighborhood
All this attention
excess takes awa
human sides, eomp
typecast in the group
"In terms of the si
am a total yuppie
nikoff. "I have an
Japanese dog known
pic puppy, I drive a
lexj
I
Clas
Throughout the
July, The East
Summer Theatre wil"
its 20th Anniversary
producing lavish
musicals for theatn
Eastern North Caroij
Kicking off the
celebration will be
run New York musici
hit, A Funny Thing
on the Way to tht
scheduled for six!
mances: July 1-6, at
in McGinnis Theatr
corner of Fifth an
Streets in Greenvillel
by six Tony Award sj
including Broadway
"Best Musical of the
Forum ran in New
more than 28 month!
made into a major ml
ture in 1966, starr
Mostel in his origin a
Phil Silvers and Buv
in supporting parts
I
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1
AMP
umm
STRBmiH
w
ucks
m he openly demands that
tas "say uncle But a re-
ork rimes-CBS poll shows
encans are almost 2-to-l
Iping to overthrow the San-
id more than 2-to-l against
c to the contras. After much
.ongress has agreed to cough
I nanitarian" aid.
Vs anything more humiliating
m's resort to the charade of
man" aid for a guerrilla
rce, it's the Democrats' ac-
:n the charade.)
e problem isn't "lame
he voters and the president
jree.
s recent appointee troubles
different kinds of hubris.
s the hubris and contempt
iment of an administration
it can give importatn posi-
Itrernists and lightweights like
Jdner (the one who wrote that
capped have "summoned"
pity) and Marianne Hall (co-
the book that discussed
their "jungle freedoms)
latives often say that liberals
gton suffer from an "inside
mentality, and have no!
eople are thinking in the rest
try Since November, it's the
-es who have been living in
the Beltway" dream world.
)ugh, the spell is breaking.
It
Jay Stone
From The Left
their influence in the Third
io not involve treating Third
lines as mere pawns in a
truggie. Cuba, Vietnam and
' America have delivered the
to the United States, though
Section proves that we are
tg it.
every time the subject of
I Union arises in American
be grisly spector of Soviet-
Eastern Europe is raised
ild be raised high as should
icr "crimes" committed by
I Yet these transgressions on
(he Soviets should not blind
let that many of the things
Torrify us about the Soviets
uted under Stalin, a man
Communist Party came to
Stalin's time, Sonet society
Ivernment have changed a
hough the Soviet system is
of producing horrors.
plight of Soviet Jews and
line, however, is this �
are plenty of reasons to
lets with caution and suspi-
t reasonable tc believe the
that is keeping them from
lir tentacles throughout the
1 is the threat of American
lation. That threat has lost
credibility since Vietnam
pe, then, that the Soviets
implement a strategy of
sion in the Third World
sons. Perhaps they are
it in today's world it is not
ucy alternative,
it is likely that the super-
I most able to assist in the
iopment of the Third
In its allegiance. Since, in
s, nothing inspires Com-
tion like poverty the most
ommumst strategy that
adopt would be to asssist
Id economic development,
p would involve tolerating
f the Yugoslavia, Chinas,
Nicaragua that might
ief that a country's own
ic policies pose no securi -
United States and in the
locratic political and
cms are likely to prevail.
Sust exercise a profound
ican ideals. We must
tory is on the side of
keeping in mind hat
capitalism are not
I
I
3
I
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
JUNE 26. 1V85
Page 5
Summer Theatre Prevails Aft
Since the summer of 1964
The East Carolina Summer
Theatre has brought the best of
Broadway to a culture starved
Eastern North Carolina. Along
the way it met and survived many
a hardship including the cancela-
tion of its 1969 season. Today,
the Summer Theatre is alive and
well and plans a host of lavish
Broadway musicals to celebrate
its 20th season.
The concept for the Summer
Theatre began in 1962. The
citizens of Eastern North
Carolina wanted a summer
theatre in their community and
approached then East Carolina
College President Leo Jenkins
for assistance. He took im-
mediate action: a Board of Direc-
tors was appointed, Edgar
Loessin vas engaged as
Producer rc� r a.�d ticket
repreenta' vere selected in
towns within ieaso.table com-
muting distance of Greenville.
It was determined that
American musicals would be the
bill of fare and that they would
be comparable to those produced
on Broadway. Costumes and
scenery were to be top quality,
the best talent possible was to be
secured and full orchestras were
to be used.
By Christmas of 1963, ticket
sales guaranteed the season, and
six musicals were produced the
summer of 1964. During its first
10 years of full operation, the
Summer Theatre produced a total
of 52 musicals and a score of
dramas. Over a quarter of a
million people were in atten-
dance, and the shows played to
an average 87 percent capacity.
Many shows sold out and people
were turned away. One-week
stock demanded rehearsals of one
show during the day while perfor-
ming another show at night. Per-
formers had to be fully trained
and capable of playing a variety
of roles over the five-to-six-week
season.
The Summer Theatre con-
tinued producing large-scale
musicals (usuallv six each
season), until 1969. After the first
season, the Summer Theatre had
run at an expected loss each year.
A scene from the Summer Theatre's Crease 1983.
M
Unlucky
UPl Everybody is talking
abour ihem, but nobody wants to
be one.
"It's hard to take the term
'Yuppie' seriously; it sounds like
a fish says Chicago writer and
businessman Steve Fiffer, 34.
"It's sort of like wearing
Caivin on your behind � it's a
meaningless title explains Anne
Reznikoff, 29, a New York
marketing specialist.
"I hate the word says Susan
Jacobs, 31, president of her own
Dallas advertising and public
relations firm.
The offshcot lexicon from
"young urban professional" is
more demeaning.
Newsweek pushed the satura-
tion button last December with a
cover story on "The Year of the
Yuppie" and their conspicuous
consumptions � BMWs and
Volvos, Rolex watches, restored
gingerbread townhouses in Vic-
torian neighborhoods.
All this attention to wretched
excess takes away from their
human sides, complain those
typecast in the group.
"In terms of the stereotype, I
am a total yuppie says Rez-
nikoff. "I have an Akita, a
Japanese dog known as the Yup-
pie puppy, I drive a Saab Turbo.
Productions received excellent
reviews, but costs grew with in-
flation. Due to this changing
economic climate and a drop in
subscription sales, Loessin realiz-
ed that he could not hire a com-
pany without the certainty that he
could pay their salaries. He reluc-
tantly decided to cancel the 1969
season.
This shocking news seemed to
revive interest in the community
to have musicals back, and the
announcement of a 1970 season
was met with enthusiasm and
brisk ticket sales. The Summer
Theatre continued with the
musical productions and occa-
sional comic plays for another six
years until the deteriorating, anti-
quated facilities of McGinnis
Theatre made the "pressure
cooker" work schedule of the
summer unsafe. These conditions
necessitated another closing in
1974.
As early as 1971, East Carolina
University placed a request for
theatre renovation money on its
priority list, and in 1973, a 3 and
one-half-million-dollar allocation
was approved. Unfortunately,
the renovation funds were
delayed year after year until
1978, when the money arrived for
the theatre.
Inflation had sharply reduced
the buying power of the money
allotted seven years before. Items
had to be deleted while making
sure the facility included basic
needs for the present and future;
nevertheless, the diligence paid
off, and the new theatre began to
take form.
In the meantime, arrangements
were made for the Summer
Theatre to produce a "demi-
season" of musical revues in the
ECU School of Music's recital
hall. Greenville audiences, ac-
customed to large, lavish
musicals, were uncertain about
these small, sophisticated offer-
ings, but the reviews were
Get Yucky
positive and the two-show
schedule was continued during
the next two summers with small-
cast, one-set plays. Most impor-
tant, the community began to
discuss the return of a full Sum-
mer Theatre when building
renovations were completed.
Sometime prior to the comple-
tion of the building, Loessin
began trying to decide what
course of action to take in reviv-
ing the Summer Theatre. Infla-
tion made a season a musicals ap-
pear prohibitive, and yet, the
reputation of the Summer
Theatre was built on those shows.
The decision was made to give the
big musicals one more try.
It was obvious box office
receipts would never cover the ex-
pense of producing four large
musicals. East Carolina Universi-
ty came to the rescue with ser-
vices, facilities and a generous
allocation of funds. The East
A scene from the Summer Theatre's Production of Pippin 1983.
Carolina Summer Theatre En-
dowment, under the direction of
Mrs. June Ficklen, was establish-
ed and the solicitation of cor-
porate and private support
throughout Eastern North
Carolina was begun. The early
response was favorable. The en-
dowment received $60,000 and
the NC Arts Council support in
1982 was $12,000.
In 1982, the day arrived:
theatre renovations were com-
plete.
In July, the Summer Theatre
reopened with four large-scale
musicals: Grease, Shenandoah,
Cabaret and She Loves Me. A
fully-paid professional company
numbering slightly more than 100
actors, singers, dancers,
designers, technicians, musicians
and management personnel was
assembled for a seven-week
residency in Greenville.
By all accounts the season was
a tremendous artistic success.
Overall, the theatre played to 94
percent capacity, or slightly more
than 14,000 people.
Encouraged by such over
whelming response, yet un-
daunted by rising production ex-
penses, royalty payments anj
salaries, Loessin and company
elected to continue the next sum-
mer season with their celebrated
trademark: "Big Broadway
Musicals
It is now 1985, four years since
the re-birth of the' Summer
Theatre. Twelve more shows
have come and gone, and with
the close of the season, more tl
one-half million people will ha
seen the 72 musicals prodt.
since 1964. Put into proper
perspective, the East Cai
Summer Theatre has broug
Broadway to Eastern
Carolina.
1 live in a co-op in New York. I'm
pregnant, which is total yup.
"But underneath all this stuff
is a person who has very basic
values, who loves her husband, is
excited about having a child, is
involved in women's causes and
gives to a lot of money to dif-
ferent charities. Just to give me
that label of yuppie is yucky
Like Reznikoff, Jacobs feels
she is unfairly judged on the sole
basis of her material world � a
white BMW, her own business, a
condominium, and hopping
planes down to Cancun on
weekends to meet her "Jetset
designer friend, Adam Beall.
"I don't want to be judged by
this, because I feel that I give
back to the community equally
what I take from it says
Jacobs.
"I'm on the board of a service
that places abused and neglected
children in foster homes. I do
work for the March of Dimes, for
the Dallas Ballet, for the Parks
and Recreations Center. To me,
the word yuppie does not connote
someone who is a very giving
kind of person; it means self-
centered and only after personal
benefit. That is not me
Chicago businessman Fiffer
shudders at the stereotype
HOTSPOTS
because of it's contrast to the hip-
pie ideology.
"I think there is a certain
amount of guilt on the part of
our generation, because we at
least paid lip service to being
somewhat anti-materialistic and
liberal and cause-oriented in the
late '60s and early '70s he ex-
plains.
"And now with this kind of
preoccupation with material
possessions, we're everything we
claimed we never wanted to be
Rather than stew, he has opted
to make light of the yuppie obses-
sion. And money.
Through his Evanston, 111
company, Da Vinci Productions,
he recently created "The Last
Yupper" poster to be marketed
across the country at $20 a pop.
A takeoff of Da Vinci's original
"The Last Supper Fiffer's ver-
sion includes yuppies seated
around the table in the same posi-
tions as the apostles. The table is
set with gourmet cheese, sushi,
fine wines, imported beer and a
game of Trivial Pursuit.
The central figure is a man in a
three-piece suit adding up the
dinner check on a pocket
calculator.
To unveil the poster, he threw
a "Yupperwear" party.
(�xtitorfs Note; Due to dr-
cumstances beyond our control
the Nightclubs section of
Hotspots wiff not appear in this
week's issue, but wilt return next
weekj
On Campus
Alien is the Student Union Films
Committee's scheduled film
for tonight. Picking up
signals from a wrecked
spaceship, the crew of the
space cargo carrier
Nostromo respond. Within
the wreckage they find car-
nage � and some odd egg
pods bathed in a mist glow.
So begins one of the finest
science fiction films of the
70$. Kreetor Ridley Scott
has fashioned a stunning
visual nightmare where ter-
ror lurks at every turn. An
outstanding cast makes the
film intensely real as well as
frightening. H.R. Gigcr's
stunning production
designs aid an errie at-
mosphert to the picture.
Alien is playing at 7 pjn. m
Hendrix Theatre
Siripea, a comedy classic, graces
the Hendrix Theatre movie
screen next Tuesday. John
Winger (Bill Murray) and
Russell Zjskc (Harold
Ramis), two dov nr�-?re: -
luck guys, join nc ntw"
U.S. Army to h�. p make the
world sa e for
democracyand meet girls.
They soon become the Ar-
rays uniikeiiest heros, and
prove to be certifiably
" wacko as they nearly set
off World War HI by in-
vading Czechoslovakia. Ail
films start at 7 p.m. Ad-
mission is free to all with
current ECU ID's, but only
ECU students can bring a
guest.
Leon Jordan and Ms Continen-
tals Orchestra will enliven
the Mendenhall Student
Center Patio with the
sounds of Glenn Miller,
Harry James and Tomy
Dorsey on Thursday, June
27 at 9 p.m. Formed in
Raleigh back in 57, the
Continentals have been in-
strumental in keeping alive
the energetic big band
sound of the '30s and '40s.
Admission to the concert is
tree to all. n case of rain
the concert if; move int.
Hendrix Thea re.
the Kre is positively unique. Ii
con. ?tl Monday, July 2 at'
p.m. tn the Sfendenhal!
Student v. nrci Patk . H
Rare is a con plete bana n.
to be misled. Sponsored b-
the Student Union Snecia
Concerts Committee the
band consists of Janei
Brammer (vocals, acoustiv
and synthesized quitars
and keyboards) and Be.
Martin (vocals, basj
keyboards, and autoharp).
Rainsite is Hendrix
Theatre.
Hotspots is a listing of entertain-
ment available to the University
community. Any local mghtclul
or University sponsorec
organization interested in being c
part of Hotspots can do so by
contacting the Features Depart-
ment of The East Carolinian
Submissions to Hotspots will be
printed only if space allows.
Guidelines may be obtainec
through the Features Depart-
ment.
Classic Comedy To Open '85 Theatre Season
i
Throughout the month of
July, The East Carolina
Summer Theatre will celebrate
its 20th Anniversary Season of
producing lavish Broadway
musicals for theatregoers in
Eastern North Carolina.
Kicking off the birthday
celebration will be the long-
run New York musical comedy
hit, A Funny Thing Happened
on the Way to the Forum,
scheduled for six perfor-
mances: July 1-6, at 8:15 p.m.
in McGinnis Theatre on the
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets in Greenville. Lauded
by six Tony Awards in 1962,
including Broadway's coveted
"Best Musical of the Season
Forum ran in New York for
more than 28 months and was
made into a major motion pic-
ture in 1966, starring Zero
Mostel in his original role, and
Phil Stivers and Buster K eat on
in supporting parts.
Forum is the combination
of all the best gags that have
delighted theatre audiences for
the last two thousand years.
The tomfoolery of the show is
based by its authors, Burt
Shevelove and Larry Gelbart,
on hilarious situations derived
from seven different farces of
Plautus, the Roman comic
playwright whose works were
played in the Colosseum
around 200 BC, and were
known for their wacky situa-
tions.
The plot is a medley of time-
honored stock situations of
farce: mistaken identities, sw-
inging doors, kicks in the
posterior, double takes and all
the rest of the paraphernalia
associated with burlesque and
vaudeville.
The opening number is a
quartet entitled "Comedy
Tonight and it sets the tone
for all that follows in the
streets of ancient Rome. But it
is not necessary to understand
Latin to appreciate Pseudolus,
a slave-in-a-toga who creates
uproar as he tries to gain his
freedom, aided and abetted by
his side-kick, Hysterium;
Senex, an aging but all to chip-
per senior citizen; his Amazo-
nian wife, Domina; Philia, the
v
OH THE
WAYS) THE
girl everyone desires; and four
girls from a house of ill fame
called Tintinabule, Panacea,
Gymnasia and Vibrata.
The composerlyricist of
Forum is Broadway's resident
genius, Stephen Sonheim, who
lists among his many credits
West Side Story, Gypsy, A
Little Night Music and the cur-
rent New York hit, Sunday in
the Park with George. In
Forum, Sondheim has written
some of his more melodic
tunes, including "Everybody
Ought to Have a Maid
"Pretty Little Picture and
"Lovely
This is not the first time area
audiences have seen this
popular musical. It was
originally produced by The
East Carolina Summer
Theatre in 1970, with Greg
Zittle as Hysterium, the
hyperactive, hysterical slave
with the high-pitched voice.
Now, 15 years later, Director
Edgar Loessin has again cast
Zittel � this time in the
leading role of Pseudolus.
"Bringing Greg back to be in
the show has been something
we've wanted to do for years,
but because of his other com-
mitments, we couldn't get
him said Loessin. "Then,
when he called to say he was
free in July, we knew it would
be perfect to have him open
the Anniversary Season in
Forum
Season tickets are still
available for the Monday
through Saturday evening per-
formances at 8:15 p.m and
telephone reservations are be-
ing accepted for reserved seat
tickets as well. Reservations
and further information may
be obtained by visiting the box
office in McGinnis Theatre,
or by calling 757-6390.
m,it �





-JIHEEAS7 CAROLINIAN
JUNH 26, 1985
Doonesbury
' liK.iK.Ui'iiii:
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
yes. maam n
- V4HE (S UAS BROUGHT
MR ROYCE AN HOUR
I UHUY ROYCE AGO
6 ZJo
( onlinued From Paye I-our
ON
WHAT
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yes, on
WHAT
CHARGE
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ARRESTED'
lAjen heujasan
UNPESIRABLE I'M
NOT SURE UHAT THE
EXACT CHARGE MS

MAYBE
you
COULP
CHECK!

HB MAS RIOTING
OR SOMETHINGI
KNOWUJE CAUGHT
HIM RED HANDED

The Plaza
Deli
'i
�7
The Piaza Mall
Greenville, N C.
756-4024
beeh � ta
- MA'AM
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:v
i m sorry:
HAAM.WE
CAN ONLY
jam CASH
HOUI ABOUT COLLAT
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LEAVE THIS DIAMOND
BROOCH UJfTH YOU
UNTIL I CAN HAVE
H �?'�� W'RED
UH MAAM.
IPONT THINK
Thi ATS ACCEPT
ABLE AS.

ACCEPTABLE? PEAR
MAN. This BROOCH
WAS GIVEN TO MY
MOTHER BY THE
PUCHESS OF KENT

KW
MOTHER ALWAYS
NO, I TOOK IT WTThl HER
MEAN TRAVELLING IN CASE
THE LOCALCURRENCY
COLLAPSED.

-GB'fa
The Plaza Deli located at
THE PLAZA
Offers a New Concept In Deli Foods
We Offer
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade and Orangade
Daily Specials Orders to Go
Happy Hour 5 til Closing
Good Music Good Times
10 AM-9 PM Mon. thru Sat. 756-4024
Are H e Having Fun Yet?
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. PN18t
SOURER ABOUT TH S
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BOSS.
YES, IT IS DEAR BOY
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ASKED YOU TO ACCOM'
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TREATED HERE I MAS UNDER
�J the MISTAKEN IMPRESSION
� i Ai BEACH HAD JOINED
' THE WGV7E7WCBOURt
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I'VE PEClPED TO CANCEL MY
P'NNER PLANS TONIGHT. J
51 WANT YOU TO MEET ME HERE
J W THE LOBBY AT 6 00 AND
y WE'U GODIRECTLYOUT TO
4 : -jyf airport, all right?
7P
EXCUSE MAYBE I
AT the an
LIMITS.
yrr ���,�
HOME COOKED FCOp
Student Special
Free desert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.25plus tax & beverage.
Semester Meal Plans Available
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM - 8 PM
M9ii-Q-$tiyk
wi er -r-r r-A 1 . a
EZETKICU(. HtttO HAp S73p'F'aZC
AMP F&ezc AH
BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
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MVSetP OPWA�iLY
MOBUS
Tooth
DATE: Thur. June 27 TIMEo� -1:30 p.m.
PLACE: Student Supply Store

jy 0,rio� o C�rn�tlwi Comply
Saving Include All Qwolity Ring,
Summer Class Ring Specials
Low Low Prices
Tou
By TONY BRCW
Aumm Sporu tMiot
In a special NCAA corJ
held last week in Nev. ��
sweeping series of ne rui
passed in an attempt to jj
cheating which has gr
epidemic proportions
collegiate athletics.
Those changes are g(
make it a lot tougher in tfaj
on players, coaches and
that incur major violati
NCAA regulations.
Athletic Director Ken
The most seriou
I tions which ma
I against colleges are ihe
penalties for first anc
fenses of major violation
are effective as of Sep'
For an initial ii
IRSSp
B JKNNETTKRO
xuff w nier
This is your opportune
a part of an ade I
lifetime. Intramural-Recn
Services, in cooperatio:
Nantahala Outdoor Cei
ferine an exciting whiles;
ting trip down the Fren,
River.
The French Broad Rii
through rugged 1.000 footl
tains and provides chailen
excitement for the inexpq
as well as expene:
Located near Ho: Sr
the French Broad outl
located in the hea
National Forest. The rivfli
a combination o-
placid pools for i
larger rapids through
seven-and-a-half-mile :
The ECU Outdoor Red)
Center will take reera:i
the trip until 5 p.m. Fr
!
McNeill
German
ByRlCKMcCORM
Sports f ('
ECU track sensation LI
I non McNeill continued
; cellent string of meets
: First and second place til
I the Pacific Conference
I held over the weeki
Berkeley, Calif.
McNeill, a freshman f
Pauls, ran the opening lei
3 winning 4:100 rela tej
finished second in the 100
McNeill led off for ti
fcielay team, which also n
N.C. State's Hare M(
immit King (forme;
Manama), and a hurdler!
lodges, to a time of 39 3
In the 100 meters, Ki
Jowly edged McNeill to th
$ne, giving the United
Jeam a sweep in the event
nning time of 10.44 w
e-hundredth of a seconc
McNeill's time of 10
Pirate track coach Bill
pleased by McNeill's
ance in both events.
"Every sprinter in any a
eets is one of the top teij
ountry Carson
Anytime you are able t
the top two in these evej
e doing all right
Carson was impressed
e of the winning 4xl
considering their U
evious experience n
ether.
The 39.30 they ran
y was tremendous fc
ys who had never run ol
together before N
ou can practice all y
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cials
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 26, 1985
Page 7
Tougher Penalties Favored By ECU
By TONY BROWN
�u�'�i Sport Mtlor
In a special NCAA convention
held last week in New Orleans, a
sweeping series of new rules were
passed in an attempt to curb the
cheating which has grown to
epidemic proportions in major
ollegiate athletics.
Those changes are going to
make it a lot tougher in the future
on players, coaches and colleges
that incur major violations of
NCAA regulations.
Athletic Director Ken Karr
The most serious of the sanc-
tions which may be placed
against colleges are the minimum
penalties for first and second of-
fenses of major violations, which
are effective as of Sept. 1, 1985.
For an initial infraction, the
minimum punishment includes
two years on probation, no
expense-paid recruiting visits for
a year, no off-campus recruiting
for a year and no postseason or
televised games for a similar
period.
Schools which commit a se-
cond major violation within a
five year period could face a two
year ban of intercollegiate com-
petition (the so-called "death
penalty"), recruiting and scholar-
ships, along with a four year
suspension of the right to vote on
NCAA legislation.
The definition of "first of-
fense" was made retroactive to
Sept. 1, 1980, which means
schools which have been sanc-
tioned between then and now will
be considered "repeat" violators
if found guilty of another major
infraction within the prescribed
period of time.
Colleges which fall into this
category � and thus already have
one strike against them � include
Florida, Illinois, Kansas,
Arizona, Southern Cal, Wichita
State, SMU, Clemson and
Wisconsin in football.
In other sports, teams affected
include Arizona St. (baseball,
men's gymnastics and wrestling),
along with Akron and Wichita
State in basketball.
Although some delegates
disliked the retroactive nature of
this penalty, such as former ECU
football coach Mike McGee �
who is now the athletic director at
Southern Cal � most of them,
including McGee, voted for the
measure. The final tally was
427-6.
A new wrinkle adopted by the
convention involves the penalties
to be applied against coaches and
athletes found to be in violation
of NCAA rules. Future contracts
between coaches and institutions
must include the stipulation that
those found in violation of
NCAA regulations shall be sub-
ject to the disciplinary or correc-
tive action of the NCAA.
The penalties placed upon
coaches, which can include fir-
ing, suspension for a year
without pay or reassignment to
an position that prohibits contact
with student-athletes for a year,
now will apply even if the coach
moves to another NCAA school.
This rule is designed to stop
coaches who get caught cheating
from avoiding the consequences
of their actions by merely chang-
ing jobs, which has often been
the case in past.
Such sanctions should have a
major effect on how coaches and
athletic departments conduct
their operations in the future, ac-
cording to ECU head football
coach Art Baker. "No coach
wants to permanently affect their
future by violating these new
rules he said, "and universities
don't want to run the risk of hav-
ing their programs taken away.
"A coach who is under these
restrictions will have a hard time
getting another coaching job
Baker added. "I think these
IRS Sponsors Rafting Trip
By JENNETTE ROTH
Miff Wntrr
This is your opportunity to be
a part of an adventure of a
lifetime. Intramural-Recreational
Services, in cooperation with the
Nantahala Outdoor Center, is of-
tering an exciting Whitewater rat-
trip down the French Broad
�or.
The French Broad River winds
through rugged 1,000 foot moun-
tains and provides challenges and
excitement for the inexperienced
as well as experienced rafter.
Located near Hot Springs, N.C
the French Broad outpost is
located in the heart of the Pisgah
National Forest. The river holds
a combination of small rapids,
placid pools for swimming and
larger rapids throughout its
seven-and-a-half-mile path.
The ECU Outdoor Recreation
Center will take reservations for
the trip until 5 p.m. Friday, July
5. Registration, transportation,
lodging and the river trip cost
$52.00. The trip will take place
the weekend of July 13.
ECU adventurers will leave on
Friday, camp out that evening,
arise Saturday morning and hit
the rapids for approximately six
and a half hours. Camp will once
again be set up Saturday night
and the rafters will return to
Greenville early Sunday evening.
Each person should be
prepared for hotelmotel ac-
comodations in case the weather
becomes unfavorable.
On Tuesday, July 9 at 4 p.m a
pre-trip meeting will be held in
room 105 of Memorial Gym. All
people planning to participate
should attend since additional in-
formation will be available.
Want to go but ust don't
know what to bring? The
Natahala Outdoor Center recom-
mends:
�an extra change of clothes (you
will get wet)
�shoes that fasten across the foot
(this is a requirement)
�shorts or bathing suit
.�wool apparel for chilly days
�cameras may be taken at
owner's risk
If safety is your concern, all
participants are required to wear
a Coast Guard-approved life
jacket, supplied by the Natahala
Outdoor Center.
All participants should be able
to swim and unafraid of water.
Although risks are involved in the
rafting adventure, an attempt has
been made to minimze any
danger. Guests must be willing to
accept the responsibility for any
risk.
Be sure to sign up for this sum-
mer's white water rafting adven-
ture in room 204 of Memorial
Gym. It will be a trip you never
forget.
McNeill Continues Superb Efforts;
German Meet Is Next On Calendar
By RICK McCORMAC
Sporu Editor
ECU track sensation Lee Ver-
non McNeill continued his ex-
cellent string of meets with a
first and second place finish in
the Pacific Conference Games
held over the weekend in
Berkeley, Calif.
McNeill, a freshman from St
Pauls, ran the opening leg of the
winning 4x100 relay team and
finished second in the 100 meters.
McNeill led off for the USA
relay team, which also included
N.C. State's Harvey McSwain,
Emmit King (formerly of
Alabama), and a hurdler named
Hodges, to a time of 39.30.
In the 100 meters, King nar-
rowly edged McNeill to the finish
line, giving the United States
team a sweep in the event. King's
winning time of 10.44 was just
one-hundredth of a second better
than McNeill's time of 10.45.
Pirate track coach Bill Carson
was pleased by McNeill's perfor-
mance in both events.
"Every sprinter in any of these
meets is one of the top ten in his
country Carson said.
"Anytime you are able to finish
in the top two in these events you
are doing all right.
Carson was impressed by the
time of the winning 4x100 relay
team considering their lack of
previous experience running
together.
"The 39.30 they ran in the
relay was tremendous for four
guys who had never run or prac-
ticed together before he said.
"You can practice all year with
your relay teams and they still
will drop the baton on the han-
doff. It just goes to show when
you have good athletes � good
things will happen
McNeill, who finished fourth
in the NCAA Championships this
spring, and second in the USA
Outdoor Track and Field Cham-
pionships in the 100-meters, came
close to capturing the top spot in
this meet.
Lee Vernon McNeill
"In the 100 meters, a tenth of a
second is like a hare's breath
Carson continued. "Lee could
have easily won
Next on the agenda for
McNeill � who has already
become eligible to run on the
American team in every interna-
tional competition this year � is
the USA-West Germany dual
meet in Breman, West Germany,
June 29-30.
After that, he will participate
in the National Sports Festival in
Baton Rouge, La July 27-28;
the World University Games in
Kobe, Japan, Aug. 29-Sept. 4.
He also will run on the USA relay
team, and perhaps in the 100, at
the World Cup meet in Canberra,
Australia, Oct. 4-6.
Carson feels that competing in
the international events will not
only help McNeill's running, but
also his school work.
"This is really a tremendous
learning experience for Lee and it
will help him mature Carson
said. "It will also help him
academically. If you can get
yourself to West Germany and
back, you can certainly go across
campus to the library and check
out a book
McNeill, in addition to having
to overcome the van wreck which
killed one teammate and injured
eight others, also had to fight the
reoccurence of a high school leg
injury.
At the NCAA indoor meet,
McNeill aggravated an old injury
to a muscle behind his knee,
which made starts painful to him.
"We realized that his method
of starting w��s painful for him
Carson said. "So we switched his
legs at the start, putting his left
leg up front and his right leg back
and it seems to be clearing up
Another thing that seems to be
getting clearer, is that McNeill is
entrenching himself as one of the
top sprinters in the nation, and
barring injury, will be for a long
time to come.
changes will have a major effect
in curbing violations. In the
future, college presidents and
athletic directors should become
more aware of how the various
sports are being run
Officials at ECU, including
Baker, head basketball coach
Charlie Harrison, assistant foot-
ball coach Mike O'Cain and
athletic director Ken Karr, see no
major impact upon Pirate
athletics from the new legislation
because the various sports have
adherred as closely as possible to
NCAA regulations.
"I don't think it will have a big
effect on us said Baker. "This
area doesn't have a reputation of
cheating anyway. It will probably
impact on Southwestern teams
the most, because there's a lot of
oil money out there
The result of the penalty for
repeated violations would put a
school's whole program in
jeopardy, according to Baker.
"Take the example of Florida
State he said. "They already
have TV contracts for their first
three games worth $640,000, plus
a $500,000 deal with Hardee's.
"How is Florida, who is under
probation � with no revenue
from bowl games or TV � going
to compete with them?
"Almost all coaches are ex-
athletes, so they are very com-
petitive when it comes to gaining
the winning edge Baker stated.
"These new rules will strike close
to home. The NCAA was reluc-
tant to pass severe penalties in the
past, but since the abuses hadn't
been curbed, it was felt some
strong action had to be taken
before the government stepped
in
"I don't know of a case where
I've lost a recruit to another
school because of illegal offers
Harrison said. "I think college
basketball and athletics have
come under attack as a result of
some things which have happen-
ed recently and these rules were
devised to prevent schools from
recruiting people illegally
Harrison feels the intention of
the changes is good, but that
See SUFFER, Page 8
I ,
The result of a two-year ban on this playing field would have a devastating effect far beyond the football
team. Cheerleaders, minor sports and others who derive support from the sport would also be affected
ECU Intramural Activities;
Cure For Summertime Blues
By DAVID McGUINNESS
Suff Whirr
Anyone who has spent a summer in Greenville
knows that it is not the most exciting place on
earth. Most students are gone and with them go
many of Greenville's social and recreational ac-
tivities.
But the ECU Intramural Department may have a
cure for some of your summertime blues.
For the second summer session the IRS depart-
ment will sponsor the a number of recreational ac-
tivities.
arranged for groups of six to 15 riders by the IRS.
Other IRS services include sports equipment
checkout (free) and outdoor recreational equip-
ment that can be rented on a daily, weekend and or
extended use basis.
For people more interested in informal recrea-
tion, ECU has two swimming pools, 16 lighted ten-
nis courts, four volleyball courts, four outdoor
basketball courts, playing fields near Fieklen
Stadium and on College Hill Drive, two weight
rooms two gymnasiums and two racquetball
courts.
ACTIVITY
Tennis Singles
Co-Rec Volleyball
Putt-Putt Tourney
One-on-One Basketball
Horse Shoes
Softball Tournament
ENTRY DATES
619-628
619-628
71-72
71-73
78-710
78-710
BEGINS
71
71
73
78
711
715
For people who like to get outdoors and like
horseback riding, the Intramural Department has
something for you also. Jarman's Stables is
cooperating with the IRS in providing reduced
rates to ECU faculty and students. Anyone in-
terested should contact the IRS to obtain a dis-
count form. Without this form you will be unable
to receive the reduced rate.
The stables are open from 9 a.m. until dark during
the summer for drop-in business. Early bird rides
(7-8 a.m.) as well as afternoon trips (4-5 p.m.) are
The programs offered by the IRS provide
students with a diverse range of recreational ac-
tivities from which to choose.
"Our goal is to provide an enjoyable activity for
everyone, to allow people to participate rather than
spectate said Pat Cox, assistant director of the
IRS. "Although we are limited in our budget and
our faciities, we try to furnish students with an ac-
tivity that fits them. Whatever your interested in,
we want you to have the opportunity to do it
Harrington Hosts Try-Out;
Overton Signs New Recruit
BASEBALL TRYOUTS: The
Pittsburgh Pirates will hold
tryouts at Harrington Field on
Monday July 1, at 9 am.
Players aged 16 to 22 years of
age are invited to attend. Pro-
spects must bring a complete
uniform, shoes, glove and per-
sonal gear. American Legion
players are required to bring writ-
ten permission from their Legion
coach or post commander to par-
ticipate.
Players selected in the recent
amateur draft are ineligible to
participate.
BASEBALL RECRUIT SIGNS:
Paul Hill, who played his high
school baseball here in Greenville
at D.H. Conley, has signed a let-
ter of intent to attend ECU on a
baseball scholarship.
Pirate assistant coach Billy
Best announced the signing of
Hill, who went 8-3 with an earned
run average of 2.63 and 115
strikeouts in 77 innings this past
season.
Hill batted .287 with four
homers and 20 runs batted in as
the Vikings finished the season
with a 19-6 overall record. Con-
ley was eliminated in the second
round of the state high school
playoffs by North Lenoir.
Best feels that Hill is a definite
prospect for the Pirate baseball
program.
"He really worked hard on the
weight program and that's
brought him around Best said.
"We can see him coming in and
helping us right away.
"He's got a good arm, and
that's something you can't teach.
Hopefully we can teach him a few
things in the fall, and he can help
us in the spring
Hill is the first signing for the
Pirate baseball program this spr-
ing, with more signings expected
to follow.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 26, 1985
Stiffer NCAA Penalties Favored By ECU
Continued From Page 7
there may have been an overreac-
tion in New Orleans. "I think
there needs to be some more
thought and clarification of the
rules in general he said. "The
main problem I see is enforcing
them equally
The Pirate basketball coach
also feels there are too many
minor rules now and that some of
them adversely affect the very
student-athletes they are designed
to protect. "Sometimes you just
want to do something to help a
kid out he stated, "but the
rules say you can't. As a result,
the kids may be susceptible to of-
fers bv alumni as a matter of sur-
vival
"This was a national move to
prevent circumvention of the
NCAA rules said Dr. Karr.
"There's been a gradual erosion
of the academic credibility of col-
legiate athletics. The greatest ef-
fect on East Carolina will be the
improvement of intercollegiate
athletics in general.
"These new rules should have
some of the same leveling effects
of the rules which limited the
number of scholarships Karr
feels. "These are the strictest
rules ever applied to coaches
Theoretically at least, if the
new regulations have the desired
effect, schools which have been
following NCAA guidelines in
the past will now be on a more
equal basis with those who have
violated the rules with impunity.
A large part of the reason for
the willingness by some coaches
and alumni to violate the rules in
the past was the feeling that what
would amount to a slap on the
wrist would be worth a national
championship.
This seemed to be the attitude
which prevailed at Clemson,
where Bill Atchley felt compelled
to resign as the university presi-
dent because the board of
trustees � backed by certain
powerful alumni � refused to
back him in his attempt to con-
trol abuses in the athletic depart-
ment.
This and many other questions
arising out of the recent changes
remain to be resolved some time
in the future, but for now the
general atmosphere among
coaches and administrators is
that the new legislation will be a
major step toward regaining the
academic and amateur credibility
of college athletics.
The meeting in New Orleans,
which was attended by about 200
college presidents � many at
their first NCAA athletic conven-
tion ever � shows the seriousness
with which they view the current
collegiate athletic situation.
In addition to the increased
penalties on institutions and
coaches found cheating, student-
athletes will now be held accoun-
WANTED
HOUSE FOR RENT: 6 bedroom
house near university, 305 E. 14th St.
Summer or long term rental. To be
renovated $350, 758 5299.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Im-
mediately, $125 month, no deposit,
bus service, call 758 5628.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Village Green,on bus route, for July
and next semester, $130, plus Vj
utilities Call 752 1507.
COME SEE THE SHOWS Usher
and see the ECU Summer Theater
Shows fra. Come by the Theater
Arts Department for details and sign
up sheets.
PERSONAL
TO PATTI FROM
BRIDGEWATER, N.J.
:Welcome to ECU. Hope you
enjoy orientation. When you
get back home, be sure to tell
Chris how much I miss her.
Bob
SALE
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro-
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An-
thony at 757-6366 or 752-0291.
table for serious violations of
NCAA rules. It states that "the
Eligibility Committee restore the
eligibility of student-athletes in-
volved in violations only when
circumstances clearly warrant
restoration
More specific legislation regar-
ding penalties to be suffered by
student-athletes for serious rule
infractions will be considered at
the next NCAA convention in
1986. Proposed rules will be
made available for review in Oc-
tober by the Presidents Commis-
sion of the NCAA.
Although Clemson's long-time
athletic director Bill McClellan
later lost his position over a drug
scandal, the fact is that under the
new rules, Atchley would
presumably have had the power
to correct the situation in the first
place.
The possible consequences a
school in a similar situation
would face now seem to make it
less likely that athletic supporters
would think a repeat violation
would be worth the sanctions. A
team that was prohibited from
playing and recruiting for two
years would virtually have to
start from scratch, according to
ECU Marketing Director Dave
Hart.
"From a marketing viewpoint,
it would kill you he stated.
"You would have no product to
sell. Not only would you lose a
lot of revenue, but it would
seriously affect your scheduling.
Teams may be reluctant to play
you because it might not be at-
tractive to schedule a team that is
virtually brand-new.
"Also, once you get off so-
meone's schedule, it's hard to get
back on Hart said, "because
schedules are set so far in ad-
vance now. There's also the legal
questions which might arise from
the suspension of a college team's
schedule
One of those questions might
result from the following
hypothetical scenario � Team A
signs a contract in 1985 with
Team B � a habitual tenant of
the top 20. The game is set for
1988, but in the meantime Team
B is found in a major violation
for the second time in five years
and its team suspended from
playing in 1986 and 1987.
Would not Team A have a
valid legal point to justify replac-
ing the now unattractive oppo-
nent with one of a more com-
petitive nature?
THE ��WWfmmir 11?�
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 26, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 26, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.413
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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