The East Carolinian, June 20, 1985






�he iEaHt (Earnltmatt
ThtssAtf
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.3-�;l
, June 20,1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Orientation Offers
Preview To ECU
Test Of Patience
Tawy �vmpta � ECU N�wi w
Summer school students may have noticed some new faces on campus
as freshmen orientation continues through the session. Some of last
weeks' group is seen here waiting to get their ID cards made in
Mendenhall Student Center. They're also receiving a quick lesson in
the class practically everyone has to take, at one time or another, dur-
ing his stay at ECU: Standing In Long Lines 1000.
Alumna Appointed Trustee Member
Staff & Wire Reports
Sandra P. Babb, a consultant
on community and economic
development and a member of
the Raleigh City Council, has
been appointed to the ECl
Board of Trustees for a four-year
term.
"We're very pleased to have
Ms. Babb as a member of the
Board of Trustees ECU
Chancellor John Howell said.
"She has been very successful in
the different business and
academic ventures she has pur-
sued, as well as being a graduate
of ECU
While at ECU, Babb took
several courses under Howell and
the chancellor jokingly added,
"professors should always be
nice to their students, because
one day they might be their
boss
Babb's appointment was one
of four to the ECU Board by the
University of North Carolina
Board of Governors at a meeting
"Professors should
always be nice to their
students, because one
day they might be their
boss, "
� Chancellor Howell
in Chapel Hill last week. The
board reappointed Thomas Ben-
nett of Greenville; Dr. Roy Flood
of Murfreesboro to a second
four-year term and James
Maynard of Raleigh, also to a se-
cond four-year term.
Maynard, who serves as vice
chairman, was given his original
appointment to the ECU board
by Gov. James B. Hunt Jr.
Gov. James Martin is schedul-
ed to announce appointment of
two members of-the 13-member
ECU board shortly. All of the
new appointees, and those reap-
pointed, will be sworn in at a
regularly scheduled meeting of
the board July 12 in Greenville.
Ms. Babb, a graduate of ECU,
received a B.S. degree in Social
Studies and English in 1960 and a
MA degree in Education in 1962.
She also holds an MA degree in
American history from UNC.
She has served as a member at
large on the Raleigh City Council
since 1983 and was a member of
the Raleigh Planning Commis-
sion from 1979-81.
She was director of the Divi-
sion of Community Assistance in
the N.C. Department of Natural
Resources and Community
Development from 1980-1983,
establishing the state's communi-
ty development block grant pro-
gram and directing the dispersal
of approximately $45 million an-
nually to the state's counties and
small cities. From 1977-80 she
was director of the Outdoor
Recreation grants office in the
department of Natural Resources
and Community Development.
She has taught in public
schools in North Carolina,
Florida and California and serv-
ed as an instructor in social
sciences and history at St.
Augustine College in Raleigh and
at N.C. State University.
While at ECU, she was given
the outstanding student award in
the department of Social Studies
in 1960.
By RANDY MEWS
Co-Newt Ldilor
After only two complete ses-
sions, ECU's orientation pro-
gram has already provided many
incoming students with informa-
tion invaluable to those who
desire a smooth transition into
the college environment.
"Our job is to teach new
students exactly what they will
encounter when they arrive at the
university in the fall according
to orientation assistant Bill
Dawson.
Orientation staff members
such as Dawson help familiarize
new students through a series of
seminars held during the three-
day period. Students must attend
both the academic information
session and college life session,
enabling them to consider all
academic and social oppor-
tunities provided at ECU.
"The student life sessions are
very helpful in explaining the dif-
ferent aspects of dorm living
Dawson said, "as well letting
everyone know how the frater-
nities and sororities operate
According to Resident
Counselor Bob Sinclair, "The
academic information sessions
help new students decipher the
ECU catalog These sessions ex-
plain what courses are required
for the General College, how and
when students should contact the
department of their major and
the procedures required for
registering.
By the third and final day of
the orientation period, students
must select their courses and then
use the on-line computer system
to choose a schedule for the fall
semester.
"Many class sections were
closed out and this caused
registration to go a little slower
than we had anticipated
Sinclair said. "But overall, the
last two orientation sessions have
gone smoothly.
"The entire process gives new
students the chance to get per-
sonal, supervised instruction
Sinclair continued. "Most
National Chairman Elected
By HAROLD JOYNER
( o-Nf�i Editor
A former ECU student was
recently elected national chair-
man of the College Republicans
at the 46th bi-annual convention
in Atlanta, said Dennis Kilcoyne,
an ECU College Republican
member.
David Miner, now a senior
business major at Campbell
University, ran unopposed for
the campaign, Kilcoyne said, but
only because other College
Republican candidates knew they
wouldn't have a chance to run
with him. The final vote was 133
to zero for Miner, with two
delegates abstaining.
Miner spent about $20,000 on
his campaign, most of the ex-
penses incurring through travel to
other states.
Kilcoyne said that even though
he went as an alternate, his work
for the Miner campaign involved
contact with Pennsylvania and
New Jersey delegates to make
sure they voted for Miner.
Approximately 100 North
Carolina College Republicans at-
tended the convention, the largest
representation from any state,
Kilcoyne said.
Even though Miner is a Jesse
Helmes conservative, Kilcoyne
said, "he does understand the
ability to compromise when
you're a leader. He will never
cave in to his enemies
Speakers at the convention in-
cluded Lou Lehrman, head of
Citizens for America group,
which Kilcoyne said is basically
an "exploding grass roots
organization. Arnaud DeBor-
chgrave, former Chief Cor-
respondant for Newsweek and
now interim chief for The
Washington Times who recently
visited ECU, spoke on Soviet
disinformation.
The College Republicans also
heard inspirational talks from
Phil Crane. R-Ill. and President
Ronald Reagan, via video tape.
"Probably the person who gets
the College Republicans most
hysterical is Jack Kemp author
of Reagan's tax cut plan and a
possible candidate for the 1988
presidency. "He received over 30
standing ovations from the Col-
lege Republicans
The North Carolina delegation
won the award for the most
outstanding federation. The state
also received the award in 1983,
Kilcoyne said.
Chinese Look To N. C. For Law
DURHAM, N.C. (UPI) �
Chinese leaders want their coun-
try to begin developing a more
sophisticated legal system, and
law schools at Duke University
and other American colleges have
agreed to help, says Duke's law
school dean.
Dean Paul Carrington will
spend two weeks this month at
Jilin University in Changchun
preparing 55 English speaking
students who will attend
American law schools this fall.
Five of them will join four
Chinese students already study-
ing law at Duke.
"It's kind of a head start pro-
gram said Carrington. "Duke
is committed to helping China
develop a legal system
Duke's first English speaking
Chinese student will graduate this
year. He "was admitted on
speculation. He was successful,
and that lead to more applica-
tions said Carrington.
China is a fundamentally
nonlegal society that has func-
tioned without lawyers for more
than 4,000 years, although there
were some unsuccessful attempts
to develop a legal system during
the 1920's Carrinton said.
The move toward a market
economy and a desire for
restraints on power after the
Cultural Revolution led to the
Chinese interest in a Western
system of law, he said.
The Committee for Legal
Education Exchange with China,
headquartered at Columbia
University, was formed to help
Chinese students who want to
come to school here.
Several American law firms
and foundations are helping
Chinese students pay for their ex-
pensive legal education here, Car-
rington added.
Despite the interest in Western
law, Carrington said there is no
evidence China is trying to
develop a legal system com-
parable to that in the U.S with
its hundreds of thousands of
public and private lawyers.
Chinese law institutes and
departments turn out 3,000
graduates a year for the courts,
legal institutes and research pur-
poses but the country wants a
corps of lawyers familiar with the
Western legal system, Carrington
said.
"In some ways Carrington
said, "the whole culture may be
turning inside out
Big Blaze
Whether in the line of duty (above) or between shifts, Greenville
firefighters had to work around-the-clock trying to control Thursday's
fire on the 300 block of Ridgeway Street. Garris Evans Lumber Co.
and Robert C. Dunn Roofing Co. both received extensive damage in
the Maze. A cause has not yet been determined.
students wouldn't know where to
turn to if they came to ECU and
hadn't gone to an orientation ses-
sion
Although Sinclair said a com-
plete fall schedule for each per-
son is the primary objective of
orientation, another important
aspect is placing students in
courses which best suit their level
of achievement.
Placement tests are held
throughout each session.
Everybody is required to take an
English and math test, but many
other optional tests are offered
such as those in foreign languages
and chemistry.
Aside from the many tests and
meetings that orientation
students are required to attend,
they get the opportunity to meet
their future classmates in an en
vironment that will soon be their
second home.
College Hill is homebae for
the orientation program. Those
who have elected to purchase the
meal plan are fed at Jones
Cafeteria, while Aycock Dorm
and Tyler Dorm house the men
and women respectively.
Social opportunities are pro-
vided as well, as the male and
female students enjoy
refreshments together on their
first night. An outdoor concert is
held at Mendenhall on the second
night, and even a brief photo ses-
sion when ECU identification
cards are made allow students to
acquiant themselves with one
another.
Sinclair describes the sessions
as "jam packed with informa-
tion but almost every' student
seems to find time to explore
campus, go to a party or even
check out the alcohol-free con-
fines of the Elbo Room.
"I have talked with several
students about orientation, and
most seemed very happy they
came Sinclair said. "It ac-
complishes its objective, as well
as giving evervbodv a taste of col-
lege life
Campus Police
Find Illegal
Dorm Resident
A non-student, with a lengthy
criminal record, was found to be
illegally living in Fletcher Hall by
Public Safety officers on June 16.
Carl Andre Reese, 28, of
Greenville, faces charges of
breaking and entering and
trespass after the Public Safety
Department received reports
from residents of Fletcher that a
non-student was living on the
fifth floor.
Reese has faced multiple
charges of auto larceny, false
pretense and issuing worthless
checks in North Carolina in the
past, and has faced similar
charges in both Indiana and Kan-
sas. Reese has served time in
prison.
Bond was set at $700 on the
two charges and the court date is
set for July 8 in District Court in
Greenville.
In other crime news, a video
cassette recorder valued at ap-
proximately $770 was stolen in a
break-in of the Media Resources
room at Joyner Library, reported
on June 10. Entry was gained to
the room in the basement of the
library by jerkng the doors open.
Public Safety investigators
believe that the incident occurred
on Friday, June 7 after 5 p.m.
Missing is a Panasonic video
cassette recorder marked as the
property of Joyner Library. A
reward is offered for information
leading to the arrest and convic-
tion of persons responsible.
��.s �- "� i
m

Ji





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 20, 1983
Announcements
Camp Starlight
interested in working with children and
vixjng people in a beautiful setting? Camp
Starlight is locate) in the Pocono Mountains
of Pennsylvania They need counselors and
water skiing instructors For more intorma
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Rawl. 757 697V
Environmental Health
Posi'ion available tor Environmental
Mealth student in INDT with background in
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jssistance in finding housing Excellent op
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Frisbee
Ultimate The East Carolina Frisbee Club
and the irey irates and everybody play
ate on Thursdays and Sundays at 5 30
lre bottom ot College Mill Dr Come on out
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Construction Management
Positions Available for construction
a isgement maiors with Eastern North
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� ce Rawl 313
Crossover
For the iatest ana the best in Contem
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CROSSOVER WZMB t shirts and two Pizza
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CROSSOVER 6 12 each Sunday on yVZvlB
NASA
An excellent opportunity tor students ma
jorlng In Public Administration, Political
Science or interested in international affairs
NASA is seeking students with excellent
writing and communication skills tor this
position at headquarters in Washington, DC
Contact Cooperative Education, Rawl 313
Forum On University
Athletics
Mow are a University and Its athletic pro
gram related to one another? is there a dif
ference between how it is and how it should
be? Program and discussion by Graham
Nahouse, sponsored by the ECU Campus
Ministry, Wednesday. June 5, at 7 00 p.m in
Mendenhall 244
Biology Student Dies
A 21-year-old junior biology
major died last Sunday in a single
car accident in Salisbury when his
car ran off the road and struck a
tree, according to state Highway
Patrol officials.
Bruce Alden Ketner, of 105
Wellington St Salisbury, ap-
parently ran off of the right side
of Long Ferry Road and jerked
to the left side of the road where
he hit the tree, said 1st Sgt. Larry
Overby. However, Overby added
that no cause for the 5 a.m. acci-
dent has yet been determined.
Overby said blood tests were
taken to determine if alcohol was
involved.
Long Ferry Road is a two lane,
secondary road in Salisbury,
Overby said.
Ketner was a rising senior at
ECU. According to G.W.
Kalmus, director of
Undergraduate Biology Studies,
Ketner was in the process of
preparing an application to the
ECU School of Medicine.
"Mr. Ketner was a very pro-
mising student Kalmus said,
"and the biology department has
suffered a great loss
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Proposed Cuts Could Help
THfcfcASTCAROI I MAN
I 20.1985
� 'N Officials at least
momentarilj have kept one strug-
gling campus open b convincing
state legislators theii college will
soon be booming if Congress ap-
proves President Reagan's pro-
posed cuts in federal student aid.
rhe Connecticut state
lature wanted to close the
versit) of Connecticut's Torr-
campus, which tins c-ai
an enrollment of fewer than
students, because there just
aren't enough students to attend
� there
ington boosters have
nvinced some state officials the
its will hurl private college
ts so much thai those
will have to transfer to
heaper public campuses like
. 11I (�
'We're about as cheap a col-
an get sas Torr-
mgton campus director Robert
Clover, who predicts Torrington
ma get up to 20 percent more
students if the Reagan cuts are
adopted
"We vsill be among the biggest
short-term gainers Glover says.
Glover nevertheless, opposes
the proposed federal aid cuts,
saying that in the long run, with
fewer students able to afford col-
lege, all schools will lose.
But now Torrington's backers
hae swayed (iov. William
O'Neill, and a legislative panel
has voted to keep all five UConn
campuses open.
The full legislature will vote on
the measure soon.
1 he Connecticut lobbying
campaign is the first instance of
higher education lobbyists
publicly expecting to gain if Con-
Military Drug,
gress approves the proposed cuts.
And some federal lobbyists are
unhappy that the issue of student
migration from private to public
schools has been raised at all.
"We've been careful not to
predict anything specific on
that says Charles Saunders of
the American Council on
Educaton, which is coordinating
opposition to the proposed finan
eial aid cuts.
"We can't come up with any
figures on what the enrollment
shift would be, and it doesn't
make any sense to make seat-of
the-pants guesses he says.
Others acknowledge, however,
that the lack of reliable figures is
not the only reason higher educa-
tion officials won't discuss the
shift.
The prospect of private college
students transferring to
enrollment-starved public col-
leges, they point out, could lessen
public college opposition to the
cuts and jeopardize the unity the
higher education community has
affected in opposing them.
"People are usually playing
several games at once and one of
the games is unity says Chester
Finn, director of the Center for
education and Human Develop-
ment at Vanderbilt University.
"The higher education consti-
tuency groups are working hard
to avoid fratricide he says.
"We're not going to get into
that trap says Dale Parnell,
president of the merican
Association of Community and
Junior Colleges, whose members
probably would gain the most
students from an enrollment
shift.
Evident
e in i
imeni
WA IGTON (I PI)
k congressmen sa they
the military could do
�ar on drugs despite
officials ot civilian
- m agencies who claim
I leased wnh the
milit; efforts.
Representative- of the civilian
md the Pentagon met
closed doors with
the House Select
littet Narcotics Abuse
more than two
i meeting one
11 efesi
onal members have
�n investigating ways to m-
litarj more in drug
id Rep. Charles
D-N.Y and chairman
the committee, admitted sur-
satisfied the civilian
�.re.
AV leased to find out
ot more coopera-
tion than we had suspected.
There seems to be a new spirit of
cooperation they say exists said
Rangel, whose panel met with
military officials in mid May.
The military currently has
limited authority to cooperate
with civilian drug enforcement
agencies as long as readiness is
not compromised and the civilian
law agencies reimburse the
government for support services.
There has been a mood on
Capitol Hill to increase the
mihtarv 's involvement because of
the national security implications
of drug trafficking. One bill, in-
troduced by Rep. Charles Ben-
nett. I) Ma would allow to
militarv to be involved in arrests,
searches and seizures on the high
sea-
Rangel said officials at the
meeting indicated they believe the
Bennett bill is unnecessary.
One of the officials at the
meeting, Frank Monastero, chief
of operations at the Drug En-
forcement Administration, said
he believes cooperation between
the civilian agencies is about at its
zenith.
"There is a point at which (in-
creased military involvement)
becomes inefficient and perhaps
we ought to focus in other
areas he said. One of those
areas, he added, is in the coun-
tries that are the source of nar-
cotics.
Despite the high degree of
satisfaction by the civilian agen-
cies, Rangel and Rep Benjamin
Oilman, R-N.Y. and the panels'
ranking minority member, said
they remained convinced that
more could be done by the
military.
"Does this mean more cannot
be done? Of course not said
Rangel, adding he would look for
"gaps" in the cooperation.
'We're looking at it with a
critical eye and hoping what they
are saying is so added Gilman,
who said the military could do
more in intelligence gathering
and support services. "We're go-
ing to keep a very close watch
over all this
Parnell says Reagan ad
ministration officials designed
their package of cuts in part to
try to split the higher education
community. "We're not going t
be divided he insists
Federal officials deny anv such
motivation.
The leaders of the DC -based
higher education associations
predict the less expensive public
schools wouldn't gain enrollment
anyway because students from
poor families would have to drop
out of college.
Allan Ostar, president of the
American Association of State
Colleges and Universities, says
none of his group's members
have wanted to temper opposi-
tion to the proposals to attract
students from private collleges.
Says ACE's Saunders
"There's something in thest
recommendations to outrage The
everybody ,he Ac Saunders
.Wwww �
Answers From Pane six
31JIOOH SJiMOJ (01
College
"It maj vei ell be th
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more than public hut
everybod) ill los
says
Bui anderbilt's Fini
in the rush tor
miscalculai
Reagan cuts.
" I he real issu Fii
a Wall Street Journa
month, "is r.
Washington ntinue to help
need)
)uw gen a Hi heir
bridge- the ga ween tl
tuitions ot the heavih
state campuses and the loft
of the pr: r
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arolina is the "smut
I the United States" and
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overhaul the state's
i s man speakers at
a public hearing said Tuesday.
But several speakers said they
�i ried that Rep. Richard
W ht endanger con-
il rights of anv one who
rnographj � or even
ines, books or movies that
. tally judged non-
gi aphic.
tharolina has become a
purveyors of por-
said Bev Lake,
liaison for (iov. Jim
1 tin "It we don't proceed and
in my opinion, in a very
ommunit) standards
v that not only will
Iges, but our children, not
jble to recognize obscenity
� hi n the) ee it
urged the House judiciary
ittee hosting the hearing to
pass Wright's bill "on behalf of
ti v.omen and the sake of our
. fnldn n
"North Carolina has more
-rated movie theaters than any
her state said John Showers,
assistant U.S. Attorney. "We are
rd per capita in child por-
raphy availability
He called the state the "smut
. ital of the United States" and
also said the bill should be pass-
ed.
But Jack Nichols, spokesman
for the North Carolina Civil
I iberties Union, said some provi-
sions of Wright's bill are much
too broad.
The bill, he said, defines sex as
touching clothed or unclothed
parts of another person's body,
including the buttocks, Nichols
said, adding, "That might pro-
hibit showing a training film for
parents for changing a baby's
diaper
The bill would make violation
of the obscenity laws a felony in-
stead of a misdemeanor, saying
that community standards of
obscenity do not have to be
statewide, stores have to cover
two-thirds of pornographic
magazines or book covers and to
keep them out of children's reach
and eliminating the prior adver-
sary hearing.
State laws insist that a judge
rule material obscene in a prior
adversary hearing before dealers
can be prosecuted for selling it.
law enforcement officials call-
ed the hearing a legal merry-go-
round.
The bill also wold set up state
laws against child prostitution.
The bill was scheduled to be
discussed further in the commit-
tee's next meeting Thursday.
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Qttfe last Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. GeneralManager
Jennifer Jendrasiak, Manage ���,
Harold Joyner. cow��� Tom Luvender, d�,�,�����
Randy Mews, cva �� Anthony Martin, �u��� mai�
Rick McCOrmac, vo�jW John Peterson, cu Manager
BILL MITCHELL, Circulation Manager BILL DAWSON, Production Manager
Daniel Maurer, t,�M� �rfW DeChanile Johnson, Ad Techmaan
June 20, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Tuition
Proposed Hikes Discriminatory
At a time when college costs are
rising along with federal student
financial aid cutbacks, North
Carolina's legislature, oddly
enough, is giving strong considera-
tion to tuition increases.
The timing of these increases
could hardly be worse. In addition,
the tuition is only being increased
for out-of-state students.
Out-of-state tuition at ECU is
already way out of line with in-state
tuition. While in-state students pay
roughly $400 per semester for tui-
tion and fees, out-of-state students
will be paying four times as much
for tuition alone if the proposed 9.5
percent increase is passed.
Out-of-state students, with their
higher tuition bills, already have an
increased probability of needing
financial aid, why is it necessary to
add to their tuition bills when finan-
cial aid availability is decreasing?
It seems that this increase is being
done in the spirit of "better them
than us A residual of the Civil
War perhaps. After all, we all know
that many of the out-of-state
students come from New Jersey,
and native North Carolinians have
been heard to remark that ECU
would be wonderful "if they'd just
get rid of those people from New
Jersey
But it's the out-of-state and
foreign students who add much
more variety to ECU life in par-
ticular, as well as the rest of the
UNC system. ECU, by its very loca-
tion, tends to draw a less
geographically-diverse student body
than many other students in the
UNC system. Because it was design-
ed to serve the region, many of the
students come from eastern North
Carolina. It's a great asset to their
education to be able to interact with
people with different viewpoints
and different accents.
Continued tuition increases for
out-of-state students may threaten
this opportunity. While many peo-
ple from out-of-state come to ECU
because out-of-state tuition here is
lower than in-state tuition in their
home state, the policy of keeping
out-of-state tuition in line with na-
tional averages will tend to
discourage this.
Students from another state who
are educated here are an asset to
North Carolina, as are the in-state
students who attend school here.
Discriminatory tuition hikes may
only serve to decrease the
heterogenity of campus life, and
students' exposure to new ways of
thinking, talking and relating.
4HtoQG&mnv6rMrV
I
L
Murdoch May Abandon Ship
By Patrick Brogran
TVNnfafiMk
"City Horror: Murdoch Slays
Favorite Child I'll be sorry if that hap-
pens, and, one would think, so will
Rupert Murdoch. Killing off The New
York Post would be most painful. It's
his best-loved paper, the one he's
labored over most devotedly since he left
Australia in 1969. He has titles �
publisher and editor in chief � on top of
the masthead.
But perhaps I'm being sentimental.
Murdoch isn't. He has lost from $10
million to $15 million a year on the Post
since he bought it in 1976, and lately it's
been losing circulation and advertising
as well. A year ago it sold nearly 1
million copies daily; now it's down to
900,000. Despite the drop, it still
describes itself as "America's fastest
growing newspaper
Now Murdoch wants to buy
Metromedia, a TV chain with stations in
New York and Chicago, among other
places. The Federal Communications
Commission doesn't permit companies
to buy TV stations where they already
own newspapers. So Murdoch must sell
the Post and the Chicago Sun-Times.
He win nave trouble finding a buyei
for the Post. If Rupert Murdoch can
make the Post successful, who can? The
odds are that it will fold, or be swallow-
ed up by the Daily News or Newsday,
the ambitious Long Island daily.
Though Murdoch is a highly skillec
newspaperman, his ambitions rise well
above the inky trade, and he knows hov
to use his papers to attain them. In 1977
the year after he bought the Post, ht
backed Ed Koch for mayor, and Koch,
who ascribed his victory to the Post's
support, has been suitably grateful ever
since. The Post's partisanship was so
flagrant that most of the editorial staff
protested. The protest was disregarded
� and all the squeamish reporters soon
left.
A.M. Rosenthal, executive editor of
The New York Times, once called Mur
doch a "bad element, practicing mean
ugly, violent journalism That more or
less sums up the Post, but there's mor
to it than that. It's also sharp, bright,
and has an acute news sense, frequently
provided by Murdoch's imports from
Sydney or London, where newspaper
competition blazes in a manner
unknown in the United States for
decades. By news sense, I mean the abili-
ty to pull out of the mass of information
constantly flooding reporters' desks the
stories and angles for those stories that
will most surely sell papers. Murdoch's
men didn't build the paper's circulation
from 550,000 to almost 1 million with
just bingo and a snazzy layout.
Murdoch asccuses other papers of
condescending to their readers, and bor-
ing them. He also claims he must be do-
ing something right, because so many
people buy his papers. He has a point.
But despite its huge circulation, the
Post is dying for lack of advertising. An
advertising man at Bloomingdale's told
Apar
(CPS) � On March 19J
then-obscure studen:
demonstrated at the
Manhattan Bank in New
protest the bank's loan:
segregationalist governn
South Africa � 43 stude
arrested
It was the first act
disobedience by Studer.j
Democratic Societv. r.i
helped lead a tidal wa.
dent protest aga.
War and nurtured
social movements.
Student activism ha1
since then
Then, six weeks .
changed:
Protests of Air
ment in South Aft I
and, to a lesser exl
Central American
policies, erupted
puses.
Students have t
buildings, staged mon
ins, held hungr
Snake
The Hall Street Journal in 1980
immaterial to us if the Post's circulatj
is 600,000 or 6 million, our custon
are sophisticated and urbane and don't
want to hear about the violence and
the Post touts That's all snob!
nonsense.
A real, fundamental ditticultv v
the Post is an evening paper. Pec
read the Times and the News at home,
and study the ads. The News's 20 or 4
pages of ads for an Alexander's sale
send tens of thousands of buyers to the
department store. People don't read
ads in evening papers they leae the
on the subway � so the Post is dow
6 percent of the ad revenue in the
Perhaps if Murdoch had made the
Post into a morning paper at the time
the 1978 strike, he would have beaten
the News. He nearly won, anyway, when
the News was almost closed bv
Tribune company in 1982. At the
moment, the Tribune decided to sae
and from then on the Post was bound to
lose. Murdoch kept it going for
Dower it brought him.
Murdoch is one ot tne smartest fia&n-
ciers around. He has built an interna-
tional media empire far bigger than Dov�.
Jones or Gannett, starting from scratch
(actually starting from Adelaide � ho
many Americans know where thai
Now he is putting together a fourth TV
network. And if he has to kill off The
New York Post to do it, ending a historv
that began with Alexander Hamilton in
1804, he will.
Snakebites -
worrv a the repl
their dormant state
warm summer
snake-
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HEALTH"
There are four
species in North Carol
perheads, water m
tonmouthv), ra
coral snakes. T: (
pit vipers � the
dentation between th
nostrils which be
blooded animals. I
their venom via
hollow
Snake venom
chem
destroys protein i
in rhe body. Thai
localized swelling
occur within an hour
Fatal damage
and kidneys COOKS
snake bites pro
toms. with onlv s
numbness around
Michiganders Lead lowans In Caucus Run
Th.
By Paul West
I New RepabHc
At last, some enterprising
Michiganders have a better idea. They're
doing everything they can do to replace
Iowa as the first presidential state in
1988, at least on the Republican side.
If successful, Michigan's move would
be rewarded with lavish campaign
dollars and extravagant media attention.
And it could change the complexion of
the '88 race by forcing the candidates to
confront, at the outset, a new mix of
voters and issues.
Here's how it would work: In August
1986, Michigan Republicans would elect
up to 10,000 precinct-level delegates and
open the "invisible primary" season for
1988. Invisible primaries are straw
ballots and other non-binding contests
that can make or break candidates long
before the real nominating process
begins. Michigan's precinct delegates
eventually determine which Republican
gets the state's national convention
delegates. So next summer's election
could produce an early Republican fron-
trunner in the race to succeed Ronald
Reagan.
The official nominating season pro-
bably won't begin until 1988. When it
does, Michigan expects to be first again.
Sometime in the January of that year the
precinct delegates will meet in county
conventions to begin selecting national
convention delegates. But according to
the state party chairman, Spence
Abraham, who is palpably anticipating
that first TV network poll: "Next
August will really be the kickoff.
Whoever wins big there will probably be
the winner" of the state's 1988
delegates.
All of this may sound absurdly
premature, but the candidates are taking
it quite seriously. Local Republicans
Doonesbury
think former Gov. Pierre du Pont IV of
Delaware got a jump on the field by sen-
ding a covey of aides to the Republican
state convention in January. Du Pont,
they believe was operating on the proven
theory that the unknown candidate who
hits the first state earliest and most often
will suprise the experts every time.
But he'll have to go some way to over-
take George Bush, who is vice president
today because he followed that same
strategy in Iowa in 1979. Bush intends to
be as strong as horseradish in Michigan,
where he beat Ronald Reagan nearly
2-to-l in the 1980 primary (though
Reagan, on the verge of clinching the
nomination, spent his time and money
elsehwere that year). Jack Kemp sup-
porters are counting on Michigan's fast-
moving political currents to swing things
their way. They point out that moderate
Republicans lost control of the gover-
norships several years ago and that the
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
ANDONFRlPfffXLieEIHMLM
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conservative wing of the state party has
surged ever since.
Bush expects to visit Michigan twice
and Kemp expects to visit three times in
the first half of this year alone. Each
also has dispatched top political aides to
the state for some early organizing. In
Washington, Bush aides are also quietly
citing Michigan as an important first
contest for '88.
This isn't the first time that Michigan
has attempted to get a head start on the
presidential campaign. In 1984, it suc-
ceeded in opening the nominating pro-
cess, staging county conventions more
than a month before Iowa's caucus.
Hardly anyone noticed, though, since
Reagan had no Republican challenger
(and Michigan Democrats didn't vote
until much later). One who did notice
was Terry Brans tad, Republican gover-
nor of Iowa. Sensing danger, Branstad
mounted a brief crusade at the
Republican convention in Dallas to write
Iowa's pre-eminence into the party rule
book. The plan died for lack of support.
This time the odds favor Michigan,
and the first-in-the-nation duet of Iowa
and New Hampshire wuld become a
trio, at least for Republicans:
Michigan's conventions, followed by
Iowa's caucus and New Hampshire's
primary. The official attitude of lowans
now is to downplay the Michigan
menace. "The media is used to coming
here sniffed Branstad's press
secretary, Sue Neely, "and wherever the
media goes, the candidates follow
That could prove a serious miscalcula-
tion, somewhat akin to an earlier
Midwestern belief that rain would
follow the plow. True, the political press
has developed a certain attachment to
Iowa and its people, who proudly claim
to be America's most literate and
thoughtful. What better place to pick a
president than a sincere, straight-
shooting, unspoiled heartland state?
Thanks to their famous caucus, Iowa
politicians have become household
words, at least among the several dozen
national reporters who run away every
four years to join the political circus.
Why bother to learn a whole new state
and a new group of pols, when the ones
in Iowa will do just fine?
Lots of reasons. Michigan is far closer
to the rest of the country in its
demographic mix, its collapsing in-
dustrial base and its changing pari)
makeup. It has large cities and pv"sn
suburbs, small towns and slums, big in-
dustry and big labor; Iowa has farm
far as the eye can see.
Michigan Republicans are mounting
one of the stiffest challenges to
Democratic dominance any place out-
side the South. They've assidously
wooed blue-collar workers. And the
made a bold pitch for black votes with
the recent party switch of a prominent
black elected official, Wayne County ex
ecutive Bill Lucas, a likely Republican
gubernatorial candidate next year. Iowa,
despite a peculiar habit of picking one-
term senators, can't match Michigan's
intense two-party competitiveness.
Then there is Michigan's approach :o
Realpolitik. Just last fall, Iowa voters
tossed Roger Jepsen out of the Senate
after learning he had once visited a
bawdy house. Michiganders are les
finicky. They re-elected Rep. Charles
Diggs by a landslide some years back,
right after his conviction on criminal
charges of stealing thousands of tax-
payer dollars.
If it were true that the press really did
decide where the race begins, Iowa
might be up against an even deadlier
drawback � the boredom factor. How
much longer can grown men and women
be expected to return, election after elec-
tion, to a state that offers no relief from
a relentless diet of steak and pork
chops? ' ' - '
Fortunately, the press doesn't decide.
The candidates do. When R.W. Apple
of The New York Times made his now
legendary trip to Iowa in 1975 and found
Jimmy Carter about to emerge, he was
merely reporting on a grass-roots effort
that was months in the making. This
time around, the candidates and pot en
tial candidates seem to be picking
Michigan. They are already lining up
supporters to run for precinct delegate
on the 1986 ballot.
Meanwhile, Michigan party leaders
are engaging in some gamesmanship of
their own. They plan to hold off setting
a date for their '88 conventions, in case.
some shrewd Iowan tries to pull a fast"
one. Theough the primary calender is in
flux and Democrats may again start:
their season in Iowa, the pretenders to
the Republican throne are about to
begin jousting in Michigan.
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THE EAST CARPI INI AN
-AmNce
if TO Uty
hip
reel Journal in 1980
if the Post's circula:
million, our customer
luated and urbane and dorft
about the wolenee and sex
That's all snobbish
ndamental difficulty is that
I. an evening paper. People
I es and the News at home.
fte ads. The Nevs 20 or 40
� for an Alexander's sale will
thousands of buyers to the
c People don't read :he
Mpers, they leave them
-as � so the Post is down to
t the ad revenue in the city.
Murdoch had made the
I rning paper at the time of
r ke, he would hae beaten
: nearh won. anywa, when
:losed by the
x2 At the
le Tribune decided to save
Jen on the Post was bound to
joch kept it going for the
)ught him
is one ot the smartest finan-
id. He has built an interna-
ia empire far bigger than Dow
jiannen. starting from scratch
farting from Adelaide � how
Jr-cans know, where that is
I ring together a fourth TV
i d if he has w kill off The
Ml to do it, ending a histor
Alexander Hamilton in
Run
Je and its changing party-
has large cities and posh
' towns and slums, big in-
ig labor; Iowa has farms as
t in see.
Republicans are mounting
stiffesi challenges to
ninancc an pla
)uth. They've assidousiy
:ollar workers And they
pitch for black votes with
krty switch of a prominent
official, Wayne County e-
-ucas, a likely Republican
candidate next year Iowa,
Juliar habit of picking one-
i. can't match Michigan's
Jam competitiveness.
is Michigan's approach to
I last fall, Iowa voters
Jepsen out of the Senate
he had once visited a
Michiganders are less
re-elected Rep Charles
pidslide some years back,
conviction on criminal
ealing thousands of tax-
ie that the press really did
the race begins, Iowa
i against an even deadlier
me boredom factor. How
in grown men and women
return, election after elec-
that offers no relief from
liet of steak and pork
the press doesn't decide,
do. When R.W. Apple
for Times made his now
Jo Iowa in 1975 and found
about to emerge, he was
ig on a grass-roots effort
tns in the making. This
"ie candidates and poten-
seem to be picking
by are already lining up
run for precinct delegate
llot.
Michigan party leaders,
some gamesmanship of
plan to hold off setting!
'88 conventions, in case
wan tries to pull a fast'
le primary calender is in �
ocrats may again startj
Iowa, the pretenders to
throne are about tQ:
Michigan.

f
Apartheid Still Widely Protested By Students
985
(CPS) - On March 19, 1965, a
then-obscure student group
demonstrated at the Chase
Manhattan Bank in New York to
protest the bank's loans to the
segregationalist government of
South Africa � 43 students were
arrested.
It was the first act of civil
disobedience by Students for a
Democratic Society, which soon
helped lead a tidal wave of stu-
dent protest against the Vietnam
War and nurtured a range of
social movements.
Student activism has waned
since then.
Then, six weeks ago, all things
changed:
Protests of American involve-
ment in South African politics
and, to a lesser extent, of U.S.
Central American and nuclear
policies, erupted on some 60 cam-
puses.
Students have blockaded
buildings, staged month-long sit-
ins, held hunger strikes and
organized class boycotts.
Thousands have been arrested.
The abrupt, prolonged and
quite disruptive spread of student
street politics this spring has con-
fused a good many campus
political observers, and left
others wondering if the dormant
period of activism is ending.
"Something new is definitely
going on says Washington
State University sociology pro-
fessor Joseph DeMartini, who
has studied the assimilation of
the leading student activists of
the sixties.
"The question is 'Does it stem
from a deep ideological commit-
ment or are they responding to
the issue of the moment'?"
Some see parallels between the
beginning of the 60s -era protests
and this spring's protest wave.
"The civil rights movement in
the early 1960s gave legitimacy
to public protest DeMartini
says.
"The arrests at the South
African embassy in D.C. that
began last fall are doing the same
thing this year � public protests
against apartheid have become
legitimate. They are an accep-
table form of social action
"The anti-apartheid protests
could very well represent an 80 s
manifestation of the civil rights
movement concurs Kenneth
Green, associate director of a
UCLA-related institute that
surveys college freshmen at-
titudes.
Social scientists cite other
similarities between the 60s and
the current unrest � they arose
while the nation's economy was
healthy.
"If students are less worried
about getting jobs, they can relax
from their studies and get involv-
ed in other activities says
Seymour Lipset, a Stanford
professor who has written several
books on student activism.
"South Africa is a perfect
moral issue because everybody is
on your side Lipset says.
"Even parents of the student pro-
testors are forced to say, "Of
ocurse you're right, it's just the
way you're going about it
Vietnam was divisive, but no
less of a compelling moral issue
to those protesting against it. In
both cases, there's the chance to
achieve tangible results.
With the 60s protests, it was
getting out of Vietnam. Now it's
selling stock in companies that do
business in South Africa.
University governing boards,
state legislatures and elected of-
ficials are increasingly advocating
divestiture. "It's hard not to
come out against apartheid
Lipset says.
In Berkeley, Cal three
municipal court judges have dis-
qualified themselves from con-
ducting the trials of some 150
anti-apartheid protestors, ex-
plaining they agree with the
students' cause.
There are obvious differences
between 1965 and now, too.
"These student protestors
make it clear they are not full-
time demonstrators UCLA's
Green says.
"They emphasize that even
though they are blocking the ad-
ministration building, they are
still acting as students
"They're there with their
books as well as their banners in
some cases
Green says his most recent an-
nual survey of the attitudes of
college freshmen gives no reason
to expect a long-term student
movement.
Only 3.9 percent of this year's
freshmen expected to be political-
ly active within the year, slightly
below the 1982 figure and well
below the all-time high of 4.7 per-
cent in 1967.
While the UCLA survey, co-
sponsored by the American
Council on Education, did find
students moving slightly toward
liberal political values. Green
says the movement was too small
to suggest a new protest era.
And Stanford's Lipset doubts
South Africa has the political
punch of the Vietnam War.
Lipset does think U.S. involve-
ment in Central America even-
tually could galvanize students as
thoroughly as Vietnam did.
Demonstrations against the ad-
ministration's Central American
policies have been small but cons-
tant on several campuses for the
last year, and Lipset believes pro-
tests will escalate if U.S. troops
are sent into combat in the
region.
RESUMES
prepared by
Greenville Resume Services
752-2290
5o Discount for students
Snakes Of Summer
Snakebites become a common
worry as the reptiles come out of
their dormant state during the
warm summer months. Most
snakes can inflict painful bites
whn cornered.
HEALTH
C0LUM
There are four poisonous
species in North Carolina: cop-
perheads, water moccasins (cot-
tonmouths), rattlesnakes and
coral snakes. The first three are
pit vipers � they have a small in-
dentation between their eyes and
nostrils which helps sense warm
blooded animals. They inject
their venom via two sharp,
hollow fangs.
Snake venom is a complex
chemical mixture that digests and
destroys proteins and membranes
in the body. That is why pain,
localized swelling and bruising
occur within an hour of the bite.
Fatal damage to blood vessels
and kAdnevs comes later. Coral
snake bites provide fewer symp-
toms, with only slight pain and
numbness around the bite, but
the nerve block may extend and
cause blurred vision, muscle
weakness, and eventually
paralyze the lungs.
First aid of snake bite victims
conjures up visions of John
Wayne treating bites with the
"cut and suck" method. Many
first aid techniques such as using
a tourniquet, ice packs, and inci-
sion & suction actualy cause more
damage.
Keep the injured person calm
and do not give him any alcohol.
Splint the injured arm or leg to
avoid spread of the venom. Get
to a hospital as soon as possible
to get antivenin. Also, try to
identify the snake since antivenin
for each species is different. Be
sure to tell the doctor if you have
ever had a serum sickness before.
Continue to care for the wound
after the hospital visit to make
sure infection doesn't occur.
The survival rate for victims of
poisonous snakebite has improv-
ed drastically with some experts
stating the rate as high as 98 per-
cent. This is due primarily to
easier access to health care
facilities. Remember � not all
snakebites are poisonous, but the
ones that are can cost you.
&JTK(j)
Present
, DRAFTNITE
Wednesday, June 19, 1985 9:00-2:00a.m.
Admission $1.50Guys $1.00Ladies $1.00 18yrs
10C DRAFT ALL NITE
Presents
SUMMER COLLEGE NITE
Thursday, June 20, 1985
Admission1.00 Guys & 18 yrs.
9:00-2:00 A.M.
Free for Ladies
"Ren'ember, Drinking and
Driving don't Mix
5 DRAFT WHILE IT LASTS
60 CANS TIL MIDNIGHT
85 TIL CLOSE
The Plaza
Deli
A
0c
The Plaza Mall
Greenville, N.C.
756-4024
ij,ji!r
The Plaza Deli located at
THE PLAZA
Offers a New Concept In Deli Foods
We Offer
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade and Orangade
Daily Specials Orders to Go
Happy Hour 5 til Closing
Good Music Good Times
10 AM-9 PM Mon. thru Sat. 756-4024
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i�AVjM'M.vjvmr�
HOME COOKED FOOD
Student Special
Free desert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.25plus tax & beverage.
Semester Meal Plans Available
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM - 8 PM
y.
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vxX'v'WXysw. sv , ;y,v;ss,y ,s.
Welcome Freshmen
The N.A.A.C.P. is not a militant organization. And this letter is
not for an expressed desire to show that we as members are pro-
vocating racism.
There is potential for problems to arise in any endeavor of life,
the N.A.A.C.P. wants you as new students here at E.C.U. to know
that when the occasion arises and you encounter a problem here at
school, we are here to help!
So we urge you to become a member of E.C.Us N.A.A.C.P.
Chapter. Where there is many, there is STRENGTH
Its
1. To eliminate rocu ' ' ition and segregation from all
aspects of public life in America.
2. To secure a free ballot for every qualified American Citizen.
3. To seek justice in the courts.
4. To secure legislation banning discrimination and segregation.
5. To secure equal job opportunities based upon individual merit
without regard to roce, religion, or national origin.
6. To end mob violence and police brutality
mmmm Ite ����� Sfet �coofcy,N.Y. 11101
J
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I :





1HI I AS! I AKOI INIAN
Lifestyles
JU.Nh 20, lVh Fagr s
The
GOON IBS
Spielberg Magic 4 .
carried their respective films to
success. Neither Astin nor Brolin
display anv more charm or talent

make I iis longf
lymeni s in at
than might be
average "ABC
Special
found in the
After School
empt
n g i s
I em

- �
ich 1 n
rman the
j :
p i e 1 b e .
film
� at's ni
s a
Goonies is
a bad
movie. On
t h e c o n -
trary. it's
rather
good
. children's film,that is.
Spielberg's films have been
labeled, to a large extent, as
dren's movies. However.
the signature of a Spielberg
film is its ability to appeal to the
older generation as well � such
was the case in ET, f'oltergiest,
i a lesser degree. Gremlins.
This is where Goonies fails.
The story, conceived by
Spielberg himself, contains too
main fantasy elements for an
adult to swallow. He attempts to
make up for this with a host oi
act ion-packed cliff-hangers.
While younger audiences are ad-
dicted to the action, adults tend
to find more enjoyment watching
their children's reactions rather
than the film itself.
r h e
screenplay, b
Chris Colum-
bus, lacks the
polish of his
earlier work.
Gremlins. The
dialogue js in
desperate need
of the substance
and meaning
that have
b e c 0 me t h e
trademark oi so many Spielberg
productions. In fact, at times,
Goonies seems more like a first
draft than a final shooting script.
The characters leave quite a bit to
(Of 'Goonies') "I don't want
it to end
� The Voice of Innocence
be desired. For instance, Mike
Walsh's nagging asthma, one of
his few character traits, has little
purpose other than to act as the
subject of a lame joke with a
sorry punch line.
One of, if not the, most
detr imental factors in Goonies is
the absence of a child actor with
charm. Heather O'Rourke of
Poltergiest, and Drew Barrimore
of ET were all gifted with a
magnetic appeal and exceptional
acting ability that illuminated
their performaees and ultimately
It's this type of edge-of-your-
seat action and hair-raising
suspense that lets the younger au-
dience forget the inadequate ac-
ting, poor script and implausible
plot. This was proven beyond a
doubt when a child turned to his
father and asked, "Daddy, how
long has the movie been on?"
"Only 30 minutes his father
replied.
"Good the young boy said,
"because I don't want it to end
HOTSPOTS
� �mvv-�r�r
On Campus
Mm, lead rimer for the Police,
II featured in Wednesday
night's movie, Brimstone
and Trmcit. Sting portrays a
mysterious stranger who
drifts into the lives of the
Bates family. No one knows
if he realty was an intimate
friend of PatrJc Bates, a
young woman paralyzed in a
hit and rum accident. All
they really do know is that he
is a sinister individual who
changes the fate of their bit-
ter houeshold. Slow time is 7
p.m. in Hendrix theatre.
The rope of Greenwich Village is
the movie scheduled for next
Tuesday night. Charlie
(Micky Rourke) works as the
manager of a restaurant and
wants a place of his own. The
trouble begins when his
cousin Paulte (Eric Roberts),
a reckless loser whom he
loves and protects, pulls him
into a heist that lands them
millions of dollars that
belong to the Mafia. Show
time is 7 p.m. Admission is
free to ECU students and
guest with a valid ECU ID
and ECU faculty and staff
and dependents with their
ECU ID'S.
will bring the best of
beach music and top 40 to
the Mendenhall Student
Center Patio This six
member band is a favorite at
ECU, and this marks their
fourth appearance here. The
concert begins at 9 p.m. and
is free to everyone. In case of
rain, Hendrix Theatre will be
the rain site.
Nightclubs
The Attic brings a little nostalgia
to Greenville on Thursday
night when it hosts Long
Live The Beatles. This act,
featuring two ex-members of
Beatltmania, presents a
musical history of the legen-
dary foursome. Illusion is
scheduled to rock the Attic
on Friday night, and capping
off the weekend is the hard-
hitting rock 'n' roll of Nan-
tucket. All shows start ap-
proximately 9:30 p.m.
The Loft offers Tom Jones with
his brand of top 40rock
music. Tom Jones is schedul-
ed for Friday and Saturday
nights at 9 p.m.
New DeU hosts one of their few
live performances this sum-
mer with the original rock
sounds of Barlow. One per-
formance only on Friday at
9:30 p.m.
Premiums presents the best in
alternative music this
weekend beginning with The
Acrylics. This pop rock band
is scheduled for Thursday
night. The Other Bright Col-
ors brings strait-ahead rock
'n' roll to Greenville's alter-
native music bar on Fndav
night. Scheduled to close out
the weekend is Blark on
Saturday night. All shows
start approximately 10:30
p.m.
TW's Niteiife plans to party
down this weekend with the
popular 50s-60s show band,
The Marvells, Wednesday
thru Saturday. Next Tuesday
TW's features the Comedy-
Zone with comedians Glen
Far'igton and Bill Silva
However, its fast-paced action
and simple charm saves Goonies
from the disaster it could have
been. One scene that exemplifies
this takes place in the
underground caverns built by
One-Eyed Willie. The Goonies
encounter a macabre organ made
from human bones. If the correct
notes are played, a secret passage
is revealed and the troupe escapes
deadly pursuers. If a wrong note
is played (and it predictably is),
the stone floor crumbles beneath
their feet, plundering them into a
bottomless pit.
Entertainment
Trivia
1) What was Neil Simon's first broad way play?
2) In what film did rock singer Sting make his moi
picture debut?
3) Who wrote the blockbuster film Ghostbusters?
4) In the television series "Bonanza what actor played
little Joe1
5) What was the title of the first sound cartoon,
who was the feature character'1
6) What TV personality was once known as "The
Romantic Voice of America?"
7) Clint Eastwood began his acting career on what
television series1
8) What wa.s the password that gave Matthew Brodei . �
access to the defense computer in the film Wargames?
9) What eight actors plaved the principle leads in the
film The Big Chiir.
10) What actor won an Emmy for his performance in
the title role of the television film The Guyana Tagedy :
The Story of Jim Jones?
Answers Pajji' I hree
Wayne Rogers Stars In Sitcom Revival
JA & El I ion
KRAVETZ
lniwn�tun�i Pholtj St�,
Wayne Rogers will be
replacing Larry Hagman
in the role of Major Tony-
Nelson in the television movie,
"I Dream of Jeannie: 15 Years
later for NBC. Barbara
Eden will reprise the role of
Jeannie. This change in co-
stars means reshooting the
flashback that would have
come from the situation com-
edy which aired from 1965 to
1970.
"He wears that cowboy hat
all the time, now Rogers
said of his replacing Hagman
in the role. Hagman, of course
is busy being J.R. Ewing on
"Dallas" on CBS. The series
which ran on NBC is going
strong in syndication, which is
why the genie and her bottle
are making a return.
"A lot of high concept
shows have been done lately
Rogers explained on the
California beach set. "This is
high camp and high fun
The series, which first aired
before the women's liberation
movement, began with
Astronaut Tony Nelson abor-
ting a space mission, forcing
him to parachute onto a desert
island. While waiting for a
rescue team he came across an
old bottle that had apparently
washed ashore. When he
opened the bottle, out popped
a 2,000-year-old genie, who
promptly accepted him as her
master.
"Her love for her husband
and mastet is very real, very
honest and certainly direct
Rogers explained. "I wouldn't
call that sexist, but if it is,
yea
In the pilot, returning to
Cocoa Beach, Florida with the
rescue team, Nelson found
that nobody would believe
that he had found a luscious
sexy genie. The base
psychiatrist, Dr. Bellows, was
convinced that Nelson had
suffered delusions caused by
exposure, complicating the
matter, the genie, appropriate-
ly named Jeannie, refused to
perform magic or even appear
for anyone but Nelson. During
the series her efforts to serve
him often resulted in rather
confusing situations, caused in
part by her lack of understan-
ding of 20th century American
customs.
"Listen, she is a beautiful
and sexy lady Rogers said of
his co-star. "That's the way
she's portrayed on television
and every man wants to lust
after her and I'm no different
and I don't think any other
man is. If that's sexist, then
I'm a sexist
By the second season, Roger
Healey (Bill Daily, who will
returing to the role), became
the only other person other
than Tony who realized that
Jeannie existed and had
magical powers. After four
seasons of trying, Jeannie
finally succeeded in convinc-
ing Tony that he loved her
enough to marry her and they
were wed.
"A genie is a genie and she's
made to serve Rogers ex-
plained.
Rogers is best known for his
protrayal of Trapper John
from the CBS television series,
"M.A.S.H and Dr. Charley
Michaels of the series "House
Calls
"I don't think I miss doing
a television series he ex-
plained. "I've done three. I've
made some films that I wanted
to make and found some
scripts that I was interested in
doing
Rogers was born on April 7
in Birmingham, Ala. He
graduated from Princeton in
1954 with a major in history.
He had dabbled in dramatics
in college and performed in
Princeton's Triange Show, but
it was during his Naval service
as a navigator that the idea of
becoming a professional actor
first occured to him.
Wayne Rogers stars in 'I Dream of Jeannie: 15 Years Later '





Doonesbury
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 20, 1985 7
SO -OWS PRETTYCUSHY
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AFRAIP NOTJOANIE
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51
Continued From Page Four
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WITH NAMES LIKE "UINPSPRAY"
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THE STREETS
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INC.

,





THE FAST CAROI INIAN
McNeil
Sports
JUNE 20, 1985
Page 8
B RICK McCORMAC
Sporu t.dltor
ECU sprinter Lee Vernon
McNeil continued his excelllent
running in the USA-Mobil Track
& Field Championships held June
15-17, at Indianapolis, Ind.
In the 100-meters of the USA-
Mobil, also known as the Track
Athletic Congress, McNeil finish-
ed second behind 1984 silver-
medal winner Kirk Baptiste.
Baptiste's winning time of
10.11 was a personal best which
narrow 1 edged McNeil, who had
a time of 10.1 Finishing third
behind Baptiste and McNeil was
!00-meters world-record holder
Calvin Smith with a time of
10.18. Current NCAA champion
Terr Scott of Georgia finished
fourth with a time of 10.19.
While competing in the TAC,
McNeil defeated seven Olympic
Medalists including Carl Lewis,
Sam Graddy and Thomas Jeffer-
son.
ECU track coach Bill Carson
accompanied McNeil to In-
dianapolis for the meet and was
impressed by both McNeil and
the quality of the race.
"It was a great sprint run into
the wind Carson said. "Going
into the last few strides, from
where I was sitting, I could tell
Lee was going to at least get
fourth, but he had a great finish
and just edged Smith at the
tape
By finishing in second place
McNeil, a freshman from St.
Pauls, NC, was selected for the
United States national team and
will compete in five or six major
events this summer.
This weekend will start the
schedule of meets for McNeil as
he will travel to Berkeley, Ca. to
compete in the 100-meters as well
as the 4X100 meters relay team.
McNeil will then fly to New
York Sunday night and get his
passport on Mondav. He will
then join the U.S. National team
in Bremen. West Germany to
compete in the USA vs Federal
Republic of Germany games June
29-30.
McNeil will also compete for
the South team in the National
Sports Festival July 27-28 in
Baton Rouge, La. Later in the
summer, he will participate in the
World University Games in
Kobe, Japan Aug. 29 through
Sept. 4.
Depending on how much
school work McNeil misses dur-
ing the World University Games,
he may compete in the IAAF
World Cup IV Games in
Canberra, Australia October 4-6.
Carson felt McNeil's recent ex-
ploits signal a runner coming into
his own, and his finish in the
TAC was one of the best in the
history of the school.
"Lee simply had a great per-
formance, one that will lead to
many more he said. "His
second-place finish is the greatest
accomplishment ever by a ECU
sprinter. You have to realize that
the TAC is the most competitive
track meet in the world, with the
exception of the Olympics and
USA Championships
Olympic trials
Carson felt the final in the
100-meters was an excellent race
and also signaled the beginning
of a new era in track and field.
"The wind was in their faces,
and it was a great sprint he
said. "It signaled a changing of
the guard among the sprinters
with Harvey Glance and Graddy
going down and Lee Vernon
(McNeil) and Terry Scott and the
other top young sprinters taking
their place.
Carson is not only pleased with
the success McNeil has enjoyed as
an individual, but he also feels
McNeil's performences will help
the ECU track program as well.
"The NCAA nationals will be
run next year at Indianapolis and
it will help with Lee having run
there before the coach said.
"Tom Jones (ex-N.C. State track
coach) said 'Bill this is really go-
ing to help your recruiting.
Sprinters like to go to schools
where other top sprinters are run-
ning I feel this is a big
breakthrough for us
The future does indeed look
bright as Carson has three good
recruits coming in as well as a
Lee McNeil
talented list of returners.
"This has really turned around
our recruiting he continued.
"The kids that were hurt are do-
ing well and all will have tu
years of eligibility left. All I need
is two sprinters and two jum;
and we'll do well next season '
In addition to McNeil,
Pirate tracksters return I
Brooks, who had the fourth h
time in the nation last year in
400-meters, Ken Daughte-
Julian Anderson and a host
other talented performer-
depending upon when the L'M 1
decides to play their gan
Henr Williams may return I
finish up his eligibility.
"We are getting better and I
ter Carson said. "But the oi
thing is the eompetion at the
tional level keeps getting I
too
While the prospect doe-
bright for the Pirate trad
next year, McNeil is still enje
the benefits of a very sUvv
freshman year. Carson sumr;
up best the type of year NUN.
having with the comme;
Lee Vernon McNeil come
once in a lifetime
Dement, Talbot Named To Vacancies
ECU coach Charlie Harrison, has two new assistant coaches.
By RICK McCORMAC
Sports Editor
ECU has hired Mike Dement
and Leon Talbot to the positions
of assistant basketball coaches,
head coach Charlie Harrison an-
nounced Saturday.
The hirings fill two vacancies
left on Harrison's staff after
former assistants Tom Barrise
and David Pendergraft left last
month for other positions. Bar-
rise left the Pirates for Fairfield
University, while Pendergraft
joined the staff at North
Carolina-Charlotte.
Harrison also announced the
promotion of Al Walker from
part-time assistant to a full-time
Best Ends Premiere Season
position. Walker served as a part-
time assistant basketball coach
for the 1984-85 season.
Dement will hold down a full-
time position and comes to ECU
from Cornell University, where
he had served as an assistant
coach since 1983. Prior to his
stop at Cornell, Dement was a
volunteer assistant under Mike
Krzyzewski at Duke while also
coaching in the North Carolina
high school ranks. Dement had
stops at Louisburg High School,
J.H. Rose High School, Kerr
Lake School and Vance
Academy.
"Mike has a diversified
background Harrison said.
jTjiKV-i?-
"He is an East Carolina graduate
(1976) and he has coached on the
high school level in the state
Dement was excited to return
to ECU and Greenville, and fell
the ECU program was moving in
the right direction.
"We're real excited about the
team coming back and the
recruits Dement said. "If thev
work hard between now and Oc-
tober 15th things really should
improve for our program
Talbot, who will serve as a
part-time assistant, comes to
ECU from St. Lawrence Univer-
sity in Canton, NY, where he was
head basketball coach the past
four years.
"He wanted the opportunity I
i Di -on I pi s
Harrison said. "He wa- . .
tant under Paul Eva
X.ademv head coach)
I vans a a- head coach a:
1 awrence, and tl
�v him.
"I feel like now I have a �.
exper enced and diver � I
staff Harrison said, "and I
good thing was they all war -
come to Lao Carolina
Dement. 31, will assume his
duties immediately while Talbo:
will not officially begin until the
academic year starts in August.
B 1()NA BROWN
tuftstftM vport hdltnr
In 1984 former Pirate baseball
stai Billy Best had to answer the
question many people face at
-ome point in their lives �
Ahether to continue to chase an
elusie dream or change course
:oward an alternative goal.
Best decided on the second op-
ion, and it led to a new career as
he assistant baseball coach for
I I.
The decision didn't come easy,
ugh. He had been drafted in
the twenty-seventh round by the
asit Royals in 1980 and
ad slowly worked his way up to
he Goubie A minor leagues, but
the chances of reaching the ma-
jors seemed slim.
Although he had made the all-
ar team four out of his seasons
in the minors, there was con-
derable evidence that the poten-
I ai fur advancement in the
There were three number one
draft pick outfielders in triple A
for KC � and each one stood
between Best and a shot at the
major leagues.
Even the most casual observer
of professional baseball knows
that the odds on a low-draft pick
player being advanced to the ma-
jors over a first round pick are lit-
tle to none. With three ahead of
you in your position � the odds
go down even more.
Best gradually came to realize
that it was time to look at his op-
tions realistically. Not only
would he be battling with three
high draft picks, but his years in
the minors had made him "old"
in baseball terms, since many ma-
jor league starters are only in
their early twenties.
That's when he made the tough
decision to retire from profes-
sional baseball and applied for
the assistant ECU baseball
up when former assistant Gary
Overton was moved up to head
coach to fill the vacancy left by
Hal Baird, who had accepted a
similar position at Auburn.
"I had always wanted to coach
baseball anyway said Best, "so
when I talked it over with the
head of the Royals' minor league
operation, I decided it would be
better for me to pursue that goal.
"Even though he said I would
probably move up to triple A the
next season, we both recognized
that the talent on the KC roster,
combined with my age, made it
unlikely that I would become a
starter in the majors Best add-
ed. "When I heard about the
coaching vacancy at ECU, I call-
ed Coach Overton and applied
When Best was selected by the
screening committee, his decision
proved to be a wise one. His
overall experience and general
als'organization was limited. coaching position. It had opened c�� ccii:tav't n,jmi nlno Dl, n . , .
y P Se� ASSISTANT, page nine Billy Best (3) currently holds the single season record for triples at ECU, and is tied for the career mark
Sports Medicine Program One Of Finest
B DAVID McGlNNESS
Staff Writer
Many people know that sports
edicine deals with athletes and
the injuries they suffer.
But sports medicine is really
much more than that. It deals
with all aspects of prevention,
treatment and rehabilitation of
injuries.
ECU is fortunate to have one
of the best � if not the best �
sports medicine departments in
the nation.
The program here at ECU is
two-fold. It functions in the dual
capacity of on-the-job experience
as well as classroom training.
What makes the program so
good? First, ECU student
trainers receive as much as 2500
hours of actual field training ex-
perience in their four-year pro-
grams, plus the hours spent in the
classroom. Comparing this to the
800 hours required by the Na-
tional Athletic Trainers Associa-
tion (NATA) shows how exten-
sive their training and experience
is.
Secondly, the students are ex-
tremely interested in and
dedicated to their work.
"The staff trainers work an
average of 31 hours a week, while
at the same time, they have main-
tained a cumulative 3.1 grade
point average in the classroom
said Rod Crompton, director of
the sports medicine program at
ECU. "You don't have that kind
of performance unless there are
dedicated people behind it
Third, the program is well sup-
ported by the ECU administra-
tion and local physicians. The
university provides the program
with up-to-date facilities and
equipment, while local physicians
and other professionals donate
their skills and time.
These factors have made the
program at ECU one of only
three undergraduate training pro-
grams in North Carolina that is
NATA approved. It also has one
of the best records in the country
in terms of the number of NATA
scholarships that have been
awarded to its students.
Another indicator of the pro-
gram is its job placement record.
ECU trainers are working in pro-
fessional football and baseball
for organizations like the New
York Giants, the Toronto Blue
Jays and the Baltimore Orioles.
Many others have gone on to
work at universities and high
schools throughout the country.
Compton is a certified athletic
trainer and a member of NATA
and the Orthopedic Society for
Sports Medicine. Compton serv-
ed as editor-in-chief for the
NATA Journal for more than six
years. NATA headquarters are
located here in Greenville.
Assisting Compton are Dr.
James McCallum, acting team
physician and director of the
ECU Student Health Services
Center and assistant trainer Greg
Beres, also an NATA certified
athletic trainer.
The program is divided into
two parts. The Sports Medicine
Division is part of the ECU
Athletic Department. It is
responceable for all ECU varsity
athletes and its "Sports
Paramedics as Compton calls
them, attend every athletic event
that involves ECU athletics. The
division is the part of the pro-
gram that gives student trainers
field experience.
The sports medicine cur-
riculum, a part of the Health,
Physical Education and Recrea-
tion Department at ECU gives
students the medical and
academic background needed to
become trainers.
Graduates of the Sports
Medicine Curriculum receive a
B.S. degree in either Physical
Education or School and Com-
munity Health Education, with a
concentration in sports medicine.
Required courses include:
biology, chemistry, first aid,
psychology, kinesiology,
anatomy, physiology, as well as
courses in coaching and teaching
methodology.
They also learn to use the
techniques and advanced medical
equipment employed in sports
medicine.
In the preventive area, trainers
serve many functions. Besides
taping and wrapping of athletes,
they make specialized pads and
braces that are often individually
tailored to the athlete.
Trainers also interpret doctor's
evaluations of athletes physical
capabilities and limitations, and
assess environmental conditions
that may affect their per-
formance.
In the area of immediate or
emergency treatment, trainers
must be able to evaluate an in-
jured athlete's condition and pro-
vide treatment right away. This
can range from taping and ice
packing to life-saving first aid.
Knowledge of rehabilitation
techniques in sports medicine has
grown dramatically in the last
eight to ten years. Methods that
were completely unknown and
therefore unavailable are now in
widespread use.
Techniques include:
�isokinetics (variable resistance)
and isotonic (egual resistance)
�whirlpools
�heat and ice packs
�ultrasound
�shortwave and microwave
therapy
�paraffin wax heat therapy
�flexibilitystretching techniques
Some of the devices available
to the trainer are indeed
fascinating. The shortwave and
microwave machines excite the
molecules of the injured area to
produce deep penetrating heat
that makes healing faster. The
energy in these machines,
although invisible, is capable of
lighting a fluorescent light tube
placed beneath it.
Paraffin heat wax therapv is
also an interesting method. Many
muskuloskelatal injuries require
the application of heat to speed
the healing process, the more the
better. However, water can only
be heated to about 110 degrees
(farenheit) before it scalds the
athlete's skin. Paraffin wax can
be heated to 125 degrees without
causing such scalding.
While such techniques are be-
ing used, the trainer must also
keep the athlete from losing his
or her conditioning. To do this,
the trainer devisesxeercise pro-
grams that allow the injured
athlete to stay in shape without
aggravating the injury.
The athlete may swim, use
weights or ride a bicycle in order
to keep from losing conditioning
while the injury heals.
"A person interested in becom-
ing an athletic trainer said
Compton, "should have certain
basic characteristics, a strong
love of being involved with sports
and a strong interest in helping
others
Ewin
NI u Okk .i pi)
"Year of the Big M I
said, and National B
Association teams I
Tuesday bv taking (
led by Patrick I mn$
wards in the first r
collegc
But none of the
were from the
Conference The :
onlv one player
first round
V b �: I
Washing'
pick
Three A(
second round �
Joseph
36th b New
Hawks Se
�Ml M
A � �
fide: ' 7-fooi
pro-
tea
que
in the NBA
Oil .
killc
qui
soon � : �
were the sar
jJ Harrison Fills Two Assistant Positions; A SSL
C ontinut d from p
familiar
allowed him I
and mai
The former
had made .
the ECU '
days as a
1980. The d
record tor re
hits � . RBI '
runs (124). He .
in the tor;
The speed; B
ECU sing
triples (6) and
Davis (now
tion) for career
remains the :
stealer with
and third in single
behind I
One of his most
statistics s : i
fewest sti 1
199 h
at-bat-
IRS Sel
B JENNETTI K
. -�- �
It's the stai
and with it
tramura! -
But first,
sion's act
tennis tournan
favorite. She -
Linda Gav- r.
court, top picnoj ?
Robert Long
ship. Neither have b
results of their .
Tom Kiehl w
his title.
In three- ee r
action. No. 1 ranker FE
another defending cl
beat out the NFTBl
20-18 in Tuesdav - .
On the same evening the
champions -a ere d
battle against the ENFQ
SI MMER FUN came oj
20-12.
Co-rec v oUej b
prise as the GOOD, BAJ
l.Y, undefeatec thi
session, walked awav
victory. However, it I
of cake, as their opj
SIMMER Bl MS I
r
So
Compleq
756-
3101
� � � � �
-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN jnsip m.
nships
all siil have two
igibility left All 1 need
rs and two jumpers
veil next season
to McNeil, the
rs return Chris
ks, m had :he fourth best
line in the nation last year in the
ken Daughtery,
V jerson and a host of
er talented performers. Also,
hen the USFL
� their games,
u ' s maj return to
� . g bilit)
g better and bet-
el "But the only
n at the na-
- � ng better
peel does seem
trackstcrs
x - still enjoying
very successful
summed
ai McNeil is
�mment, "A
McN comes along
ositions;
acancies
pportunity to
program
"He uas an assis-
ms (Naval
tch) while
: coach at St.
's how I got to
� ! hae a very
diversified
aid, "and the
ad wanted to
��' na
will assume his
tely while Talbot
icially begin until the
:ar starts in August.
d is tied for the career mark.
inest
a fluorescent light tube
b beneath it.
lattin heat wax therapy is
interesting method. Many
oskelatal injuries require
Jplication of heat to speed
laling process, the more the
However, water can only
ited to about 110 degrees
leit) before it scalds the
s skin. Paraffin wax can
kted to 125 degrees without
Ig such scalding.
lie such techniques are be-
led, the trainer must also
jhe athlete from losing his
conditioning. To do this,
ner devisesxeercise pro-
that allow the injured
to stay in shape without
lating the injury,
athlete may swim, use
or ride a bicycle in order
from losing conditioning
Ihe injury heals.
person interested in becom-
athletic trainer said
ton, "should have certain
characteristics, a strong
being involved with sports
strong interest in helping
Ewing Top Selection In Year Of Big Man
NEW YORK nipn if, .u� , C5
NEW YORK (UPI) - It's the
"Year of the Big Man scouts
said, and National Basketball
Association teams proved it
Tuesday by taking seven centers,
led by Patrick Ewing, and 11 for-
wards in the first round of the
college draft.
But none of the big Big Men
were from the Atlantic Coast
Conference. The proud ACC had
only one player selected in the
first round � Kenny Green of
Wake Forest, diafted by
Washington, the 12th overall
pick.
Three ACC heavies went in the
second round � center Yvon
Joseph of Georgia Tech, picked
36th by New Jersey; powerful
forward Lorenzo Charles of N.C.
State, picked 41st by the Altanta
Hawks; and guard Adrian
Branch of Maryland, drafted
46th by Chicago.
The remainder of the 12 ACC
players selected were drafted in
lower rounds.
Frontcourt players so
dominated the selections that of
the first 17 picks, only two
guards, Chris Mullin of St.
John's and Alfredrick Hughes of
Chicago Loyola, were selected.
Ewing's official coming-out
for the New York Knicks was
followed by the selections of 6-9
forward Wayman Tisdale of
Oklahoma by Indiana, 7-0 center
Benoit Benjamin of Creighton by
the Los Angeles Clippers, 6-7 for-
ward Xavier McDaniel fo
Wichita State by Seattle, 7-0
center Jon Koncak of Southern
Methodist by Atlanta and 6-11
center Joe Kleine of Arkansas by
Sacramento.
Finally, Golden State broke the
string of big men by taking the
6-6 Mullin.
Then five more inside players
were taken before another
backcourt pjlayer was picked.
They were 6-9 forward Detlef
Schrempf of Washington by
Dallas, 6-9 forward Charles
Oakley of Virginia Union by
Cleveland, 6-9 forward Ed Pin-
ckney of Villanova by Phoenix,
Hawks Seek Rebounding Help From Koncak
ATLANTA (UPI) The
Atlanta Hawks say they are con-
fident 7-foot Jon Koncak can
provide the inside muscle the
team lacked last season despite
questions about his desire to plav
in the NBA.
Critics say Koncak lacks the
killer instinct and he once was
quoted as saying he would just as
soon take a desk job if the pay
were the same.
But Atlanta made Koncak the
fifth pick in the NBA draft Tues-
day and Coach Mike Fratello said
he has high expectations for the
soft shooting center from
Southern Methodist University.
"He gives us tremendous flex-
ibility and gives great hope for
the future of the Hawks
Fratello said. "His strength, size
and offensive potential will cer-
tainly give us help in the low-post
area
Koncak promised by telephone
to work hard for the Hawks.
"I'm looking forward to big
things said Koncak, who
averaged 17.2 points and 10.7 re-
bounds a game last season. "I
think they need help inside and I
think I can go in there and re-
bound for them
Coach
6-10 forward Keith Lee of Mem-
phis State by Chicago, the 6-7
Green of Wake Forest by
Washington and 6-9 forward
Karl Malone of Louisiana Tech
by Utah.
Then Hughes, known as an
outside gunner, went to San An-
tonio as the 14th player, but only
the second guard, selected.
Lee was later traded by the
Bulls, along with guard Ennis
Whatley, to Cleveland for Oakley
and Calvin Duncan of Virginia
Commonwealth, a second-round
pick of the Cavaliers.
Seven-foot center Blair
Rasmussen of Oregon was taken
15th by Denver, which wanted to
replace the retiring Dan Issel.
Then the Mavericks, frustrated
for years in their attempts to get a
top center, went for two 7-footers
� Bill Wennington of St. John's
and Uwe Blab of Indiana � with
their own pick and one they ac-
quired in a trade with New
Jersey.
Blab was the seventh center
taken with the first 17 picks and
also the eighth 1984 Olympian.
Ewing, Tisdale, Koncak,
Kleine and Mullin were on the
gold-medal winning U.S. team,
Wennington played for Canada
and Schrempf and Blab for West
Germany.
Yet another big man, 7-7
Manute Bol of the Sudan and the
University of Bridgeport, was the
31st pick, by Washington in the
second round. Bol's future is
clouded by his 190-pound frame.
Four of the six guards picked
in the first round were among the
last seven choices.
Detroit took 6-2 Joe Dumars
of McNeese State, Houston grab-
bed 6-5 Steve Harris of Tulsa,
Boston selected 6-2 Sam Vincent
of Michigan State, Philadelphia
took 6-8 forward Terry Cat ledge
of South Alabama, Milwaukee
picked 6-8 forward Jerry-
Reynolds of LSU, the Los
Angeles Lakers selected 6-9 for-
ward A.C. Green of Oregon State
and Portland finished the first
round with 6-3 Terry Porter of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point.
DeBusschere called it a "land-
mark day" in the history of the
Knicks and said Ewing "will
become the foundation for a str-
ing of very competitive teams for
many years to come
Ewing, cheered wildly by a
packed crowd at Madison Square
Garden's Felt Forum for the
draft, said: "I'm used to hearing
boos in New York. It was a little
unusual
The three-time Georgetown
All-America said he has always
been a Philadelphia 76ers fan
because of Juluis Erving, "but
now I'm a Knicks fan
Indiana kept secret its decision
on whether to take Tisdale, who
was named All-America in all
three of his college seasons, or
Benjamin until the draft itself.
Tisdale, the first of five first-
rounders who had a year of col-
lege eligibility left, said: "In col-
lege, a lot of zones would col-
lapse on me. Right after tip-off,
I'd have three guys on me. 1
won't see that coverage in the
pros
The Knicks, assured of getting
the rights to Ewing on May 12
when they won the "Patrick Ew-
ing Lottery now must turn to
the task of signing him, probably
to a contract in excess of $1
million a year.
"We are going to enter into
negotiations immediately with his
representatives Knicks ex-
ecutive Dave DeBusschere said.
"We are looking forward to an
amicable and speedy negotiation.
We don't anticipate anv pro-
blems
Continued from page eight
familiarity with ECU's program
allowed him to quickly blend in
and make his presence felt.
The former Pirate outfielder
had made quite an impression on
the ECU record books during his
days as a player from 1977 to
1980. The durable Best set a
record for most career at-bats,
hits (181), RBIs (90) and most
runs (124). He continues to rank
in the top three in each category.
The speedy Best still holds the
ECU single-season mark for
triples (6) and is tied with Butch
Davis (no in the KC organiza-
tion) for career triples (10). He
remains the top career base
stealer with 54 and ranks second
and third in single-season swipes
behind Eddie Gates.
One of his most impressive
statistics is his 1-2 ranking for
fewest strike-outs in a season. In
1979 he fanned only twice in 170
at-bats, then even improved on
that by striking out just once in
121 plate appearances.
The Pirates sported a combin-
ed 110-56 won-loss record during
Best's playing days and took first
place in the Southern Conference
with a 15-1 mark in ECU's last
year in that conference.
In his tenure with the Royals'
farm system, Best led his teams in
batting average for four years
and won the 60 yard dash in one
league.
Overton had the good fortune
to be in the right spot as the assis-
tant coach during Best's ECU
career. He observed the swift out-
fielder in his playing days as a
Pirate � and the good impres-
sion of Best's dedication was
remembered when the assistant
coach applications were screened.
"I had thought about the
possibility of Billy being my assis-
tant coach Overton said, "so
when I got a phone call from him
saying he wanted to apply, I was
pleasantly surprised.
"As a player he was the
number one most dedicated,
loyal and hard-working player
said the head coach. "He concen-
trated all his attention to the
game, also � and those are the
qualifications you look for in an
assistant coach
Best's background was im-
mediately put to use by Overton,
who assigned him the tasks of
working with the hitters and
baserunners. A quick look at the
stats reveals the contribution Best
made in his first season as a
coach, according to Overton.
"We stole 39 out of 51 at-
tempts this past season, which
was far more than last year" he
stated. "It was his expertise in
this area that allowed us to run
more than we had previously
Coach Overton also attributes
some of the reason for the team's
improved batting percentages to
his first-year assistant. "Coach
Best's influences as a hitting in-
structor this year are evidenced
Adapts To Coaching
by the offensive stats he said
"We had two players hit over
.400 with 97 at-bats for the first
time ever and the team batting
average was improved as well
While Best's debut as an assis-
tant coach is given rave reviews
by his head coach, personally he
feels the experience he gained in
this year of transition from being
a professional baseball player to
the collegiate coaching ranks will
help him contribute even more as
a coach next season.
"It's like being on the other
side of the fence Best said. "I
miss the clowning around of pro-
fessional baseball, but I don't
miss a lot of things like traveling
on buses and the politics involved
with deciding who plays.
"I thought I was ready for the
job of assistant coach he add-
ed, "but I didn't realize all the
administrative matters that have
to be taken care of on a daily
basis. You have to deal with the
public, teach classes, go out
recruiting, maintain the playing
field, as well as things like the
baseball camps which we hold
each year.
"I think one of my main assets
in dealing with the players is the
ability to relate well to the
players Best feels. "As far as
advice to players who are drafted
in the late rounds goes, the deci-
sion to sign or not rests on each
individual circumstance.
"If you're not motivated to
IRS Second Session Activities Beginning
By JENNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
It's the start of a new session,
and with it come six new in-
tramural sporting events.
But first, lets round up last ses-
sion's activities. The women's
tennis tournament saw the
favorite. Sheryl Redman, defeat
I inda Gassaway. On the men's
court, top picked Tom Kiehl met
Robert Long for the champion-
ship. Neither have brought in the
results of their contest. However,
Tom Kiehl was picked to defend
his title.
In three- on-three basketball
action. No. 1 ranked FELLOWS,
another defending champion,
beat out the NETBUSTERS
20-18 in Tuesday night action.
On the same evening the women's
champions were decided. In a
battle against the ENFORCERS,
SUMMER FUN came out on top
20-12.
Co-rec volleyball was no sur-
prise as the GOOD, BAD & UG-
LY, undefeated throughout the
session, walked away with the
victory. However, it was no piece
of cake, as their opponents,
SUMMER BUMS, beat THE
GOOD BAD & UGLY 15-4 in the
first game. GOOD, BAD & UG-
LY picked up the pace in the next
two games and came away with a
15-2, 15-10, title.
And of course, this leaves the
diamonds where, once again, No.
1 ranked BASEBENDERS took
first place. In the championship
game against the LAKE BOYS,
BASEBENDERS took a com-
manding lead, rounding the bases
24 times and walked away with a
24-11 first place victory.
This week marks the beginning
of second session activities. First
on the agenda is this sessions ten-
nis tournament. Co-rec volleyball
registration begins this week.
You can register for both the ten-
nis tournament and the co-rec
volleyball June 19-25.
Up next in July are putt-putt
and one-on-one basketball.
Registration for the putt-putt
tournament begins July 1-2 while
registration for one-on-one
basketball ends the third.
July 8-10 marks registration
for the intramural horse shoe
tournament to be held on college
hill and the final event of the
summer, the IRS softball tourna-
ment will hold its registration Ju-
ly 8-10.
Be sure to participate in this
sessions activities!
Remember: horseback riding
at Jarman's stables every Thurs-
day. The IRS will give you a
$3.00 discount from the regular
$8.00 fee. Advanced registration
is required.
Listen to the Tennis Shoe
Talkshow each Thursday at 2:30
and 5:30 for the latest intramural
scores and highlights on WZMB.
ATTIC
THUR
F) THE 91
DEAJLES
Ladies Night
FRI
Illusion
Win a T. V.
SAT In Concert. . .
Nantucket
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville Blvd.
VER
"Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments"
Your Choice of a Microwave Oven or 13"
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Limited Time Only Offer For New
Residents Only. Present Residents Not Eligi-
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� Professional Management and Maintenance
� 2 Bedroom Townhouses & 1 Bedroom Garden Apartments
� Kitchens Feature Dishwashers & Disposals
� Fully Carpeted
� Private Laundry Facilities
� Large Pool
Cable T.V. Included
Private Balconies
Convenient To Shopping Centers & Restaurants
ECU Bus Service
Security Deposits Negotiable
Directions: 10th Street Exteasloa To River Bluff Road
Next To Rlvergate Shopping Center.
PHONE 751-4013
graduate, you might be better off
signing, but since players drafted
real late aren't really even pro-
jected to make the minors, you'd
have to carefully examine your
self-motivation toward whatever
goal you set Best concluded.
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"f





10
im t si . rqi iM VN
JUNE 20, 1985
Unknowns
Atlantj
despite
Open, the Classic, despite its
half-million dollar purse, failed
to draw most of the "Big
names No Jack Nicklaus, no
Tom Watson, no Seve
Ballesteros, no Masters champ
Bernhard Langer.
It doesn't even have Andy
North the Open winner, but until
this past Sunday that absence
wasn't considered noteworthy.
But there are three foreigners
ho will be playing � Taiwan's
Tze-Chung Chen. Canada's Dave
Barr and Soth Africa's Dennis
Watson. The recognition those
three goi this past weekend while
tying for second in the Ope
one shot behind North's
ha
ven, just
e shot behind North's pace,
s turned them into gate attrac-
tions
Especially Chen. the
dimenutive Chinese golfer, who
led Open from the start until a
quadruple bogey on the fifth hole
in the final round, may, at this
moment be the hottest draw in
the game.
Tom Place, long-time Infor-
mation Director for the PGA
Tour, thinks the media puts too
much emphasis on the top name
golfers like Nicklaus and Watson
when previewing tour events.
"Sure, the public is more
aware of Jack Nicklaus' past ac-
complishments said Place.
"But those people who follow
pro golf are also aware that we
have a lot of other golfers who
are capable of playing excellent
golf, capable of winninc in anv
given week,
don'
"I
den;
that when
Nicklaus is playing, he draws a
far bigger gallery than any of the
younger golfers said
"But, he doesn't draw it all
There are lots of other special
divided up among the ot
pla
e.
tors
.�v other
lyers. And, check it out, we've
had some record attendences at
tournaments where Nicklaus
didn't play
As Place points out. you can
take two approaches to this
week's entry list. You can note
that eight of the top 20 on this
year's money list are absentOr
you can note that 12 of the top 20
will be playing in Atlanta.
There would have been 13 of
the top money winners. But 1983
Classic winner Calvin Peete
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Summer or long term rental. To be
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MISC
REUMES: Prepared by
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752 2290
SALE
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups ann some
extras including: 6 gam tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro-
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200 Call An-
thony at 757-6366 or 752-0291.
oack tnat also forced him to
withdraw from the U.S. Open.
Peete became a legend in Atlanta
when he went into the third and
final round of the rain shortened
'83 event seven shots of the lead.
He waited five hours in the
clubhouse to learn his early
finishing nine-under-par 63 had
been good enough to make him
the winner.
As Place pointed out, there are
so many probable winnners in the
Classic's 156-man field it's futile
to proclaim any one of them
the "favorite
as
But if you are picking one in
the office pool, your best bet
would seem to be defending
champion Tom Kite, who
slumped to 13th in the Open with
a closing 74, but whose controll-
ed game is tailor-made for the
tight, twisting fairways at the
Atlanta Country Club.
"I know I'm optimistic said
Kite, this year's Tournament of
Champions winner. "My game
has been coming around (he's
earned more than $171,000 so far "Any
this year) and I figure I'm about tion t
due again. The thing is, I like this on � r
course and I think this course
likes me
Although one would think the
Atlanta Country Club's hilly,
7,000-yard course would be out
f Atlanta Ope
i ques-
mmm yjuimy ciuos nilly,
7,000-yard course would be out
of the reach of a 155-pounder like
Kite h uac to ni
Augusta National which is 100
yards shorter, but provides fewer
problems for the power-hitters
who fail to stay on the much
wider fairways.
"I can't afford
-yard
-J reach of a 155-pounder like
Kite, he was 19 under par last
year with rounds of 69-67-66-67
to win by a commanding five
stokes.
"I'm longer than people give
me credit for said Kite.
"Anyway, while there is no ,
tion that length is an advantage
on a course like this, accuracy is
even more important. There are a
lot of places out there where you
can get into trouble and hitting it
long doesn't mean a thing if you
don't keep your ball in play
Kite's biggest disappointment
in his 13 years on the Tour has
been his inability to win the
Masters � where he has been
sixth or better on eight separate That's the sort of course Kite
occasions. But, unlike Atlanta, will be playing on this week in
length means much more at the Atlanta. "
. vc. i anuiu to get into a
driving duel with all those big,
strong guys we h?'
the tour,
on a
ave out here on
said Kite. "But put me
me iuur, said ruie. out put ri
on a course where finese is at
premium and I'll give them a ba
tie
That's th
SEE OET

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88
FRENCH STYLE OR CUT GREEN BEANS � SLICED CARROTS
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Stokely Vegetables
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SAVE
49c;
2
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cans
79
0
CRISCO
REGULAR � BUTTER FLAVOR
Shortening
teas
TIL

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SAVE
61e
LIMIT ONE WITH
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can
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59
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DIET COKE � TAB
Coca Cola
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FROZEN
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WAREHOUSE PRICES
WHOLE
2ltr.
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99
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ALL VARIETIES
Pringles Chips
SMUCKERS
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PETER PAN
Peanut Butter
REGULAR�LARGE
Skinner Macaroni
PRIDE OF THE FARM
Canned
Tomatoes
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Tea Bags
DREAM WHIP
Topping Mix
CAMPBELLS
Tomato Soup
HI TOP
Saltine Crackers
REGULAR � LIGHT
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SAVE
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100
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B8Q STYLE
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11920
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59016
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MEAT LOAF � CHICKEN � TURKEY � SALISBURY STEAK
Ann Page Dinner
A4P REGULAR
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DONALD DUCK CHILLED
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PRODUCE SPECIALS
RED RIPE
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Health & Beauty Aids Specials
SIGNAL
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CONDITIONER OR
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24 oz
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GET HALF P UND OF
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ichorltalian Bread77





Title
The East Carolinian, June 20, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 20, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.412
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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