The East Carolinian, June 12, 1985






Mt
(Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 o4$r LI
Wednesday, June 12, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
North Carolina GOP
mHI Wooing Black Voters
: �
� -t
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lah
Coolin' Out
1 his E I student seems to ge enjoying the dog days of summer as she cools herself down in the fountain
next to centra! campus. Although the water ma he refreshing, man students choose to submerge in other
bodies of water such as the Atlantic Ocean, their neighborhood swimming pool or an ice cold beer.
Chemistry Profs Help Blind
By RANDY MEWS
l o-t� y dilor
Two ECU chemistry professors
are in the final stages of perfec-
ting a device that will enable
blind students to learn chemistry
on the college level.
According to Dr. David Lun-
ney and Dr. Robert Morrison,
the Universal Laboratory Train-
ing and Research Aid utilizes
La from chemical analysis
graphs and turns them into
music, allowing blind students to
n b) sound rather than sight.
'The ULTRA is an extremely
powerful data-analysis tool used
to teach the hearing impaired
Lunney said. "There's nothing
like it that exists to my
knowledge.
"The system functions as a lab
aid and a personal computer
students follow it all the way
through their laboratory
training
Lunney also said the ULTRA
offers a wide variety of applica-
tions, enabling all blind students
to utilize it to some degree.
The device was constructed
around the "infrared spec-
t r osc opy' method which
distinguishes different chemicals
by comparing how their compo-
nent atoms absorb infrared light.
Infrared light cannot be seen
by the naked eye, but each fre-
quency pattern is detected by an
instrument that plots each given
frequence on an eight octave
scale. Although the music is not
interpreted as precise as the fre-
quencies on the original graph,
each chemical compound will
have a recognizably different
melody.
"The human auditory (hear-
ing) sense is amazingly good at
recognizing different sound pat-
terns according to a presenta-
tion the two men wrote on
molecular music in 1983.
"Every person who has grown
up in the western culture can
recognize hundreds of different
melodies and voices Lunney
said. "Even over the phone
where a person's voice is extreme-
ly distorted, most sounds are
recognizable
Research for the project began
in 1977 when Morrison agreed to
help visually imparied ECU
freshmen learn the basics of
chemistry in the laboratory.
After a short time, it became
evident that students were not
benefiting from the system. They
were given so much information
at one time, it became almost im-
possible for the students not to
come up with the right answers.
However, students now have a
chance to learn from their own
mistakes. Utilizing a software
program developed at ECU,
ULTRA uses sound signals and
artificial speech to serve as
substitutes for sight. For exam-
ple, a special thermometer has
been devised which emits sounds
to blind students making it possi-
ble for them to recognize a
change in temperature by a
change in sound (pitch).
Lunney and Morrison expect
the ULTRA to be ready for use
by the beginning of the fall
semester. Both men have plans of
marketing their invention and
feel the concept can eventually be
expanded to accommodate other
science courses as well.
By HAROLD JOYNER
Co-Newi h dilor
North Carolina Republicans
are becoming more attractive to
the predominately black
Democratic Party and this has
prompted some top black leaders
to switch.
President of the Pitt County
chapter of the NAACP and
former Democratic Party Chair-
man D.D. Garrett said many
black Democrats are switching to
the Republican Party because
"they feel they are being taken
advantage of Other state
leaders have said the Democrats
offer no incentives in building up
the Party.
While economics may have
something to do with this, Gar-
rett said, the Republican party
does offer better benefits and
more jobs to blacks. Garrett said
he believes numbers is part of the
political game, "and if we can
reap some of benefits while
building up the base, we'll
switch
President of ECU's College
Republicans Dennis Kilcoyne
said while there are no black
members in the ECU chapter,
they are active in the statewide
organization. He said he felt the
move by the Democrats would be
slow because "blacks hooked on
the Democratic Party can't ex-
pect to overturn old loyalties.
They can't suddenly be enlighten-
ed by the offers of the
Republican Party
Kilcoyne and Garrett both
cited the move made before the
Great Depression was over when
many Republican blacks switched
over to the Democratic Party.
Garrett said economics often
goes hand-in-hand with politics
and will probably play an impor-
tant role in the switch.
Some leaders expect that the
GOP's effort will not benefit the
black community, said Democrat
Frank Ballance. State
Democratic Party Chairman
Wade Smith said blacks should
not think they have to join the
Republican Party to prosper.
"If you listen to the Republicans,
they've got all the patriotism,
they have all the flags, they have
all the religion, they have all the
business. Yet, that's not obvious-
ly true. Democrats are successful
business people
Kilcoyne said he forsees the
Republicans making the Party
more appealing to the black
voters. "Jack Kemp, (a possible
candidate for the 1988 presiden-
tial elections), has already pushed
several bills through that would
stimulate economic growth. He's
offered several bills to Congress
that would promote growth in in-
ner cities.
"The Democratic Party is a
chaotic coalition of selfish in-
terest groups � all of whom want
to cut the economic pie in smaller
and smaller pieces. The
Republican message is that the
GOP does not want to cut the
economic pie, but they want to
make it bigger so we can all get a
bigger slice
Secretary of Correction Aaron
Johnson switched his affiliation
to the Republican party in 1971.
and became on of several blacks
Martin appointed to key state
jobs after the election.
"I think blacks will wake up
and realize what the Republican
party is doingand turn more
and more to the Republican Par-
ty Johnson said. "The party
isn't offering promises. It's offer-
ing tangible benefits. It offers
real opportunity, rather than
tokes and quotas
Out Of Court Settlement
Ledbetter Case Dismissed
By RANDY MEWS
( o-Newi Y dilor
A Washington woman has ac-
cepted a settlement stemming
from a $180,000 lawsuit she filed
against ECU accounting pro-
fessor Gorman W. Ledbetter.
Lonnie Caraway, Ledbetter's
attorney, negotiated the settle-
ment, saying the agreement in-
cluded a clause stating that none
of the details of the settlement be
made public knowledge.
The case was also dismissed
with prejudice, which prohibits
Leggett from taking further legal
action against Ledbetter.
Although she was unable to
discuss the terms of the settle-
ment, Leggett's attorney Sara
Krome said that her client "felt
the terms of the settlement were
satisfactory enough not to take
the case to court
The settlement wai a result of
Leggett's claim that Ledbetter
purposely misled her into selling
what was formerly known as Leg-
gett Cleaners � a family business
operated by her late husband
Ashley Grey Leggett.
Ledbetter purchased the
business located at 130 W. 2nd
St. in Washington on Aug. 2,
1983. As part of the arrange-
ment, Leggett received $5,215 in
cash, release from a $9,784 debt
and bonds worth $60,000.
During the course of the
negotiations, Ledbetter said he
would continue to operate the
business on behalf of a corpora-
tion titled Leggett � Merchant of
Cleanliness, Inc. A name intend-
ed to honor Leggett's deceased
husband and to allow Ledbetter
to remain in control of the
business.
Ledbetter claimed the bonds he
used to purchase the majority of
the business would be backed by
all assets of his new corporation
(Legget � Merchant of
Cleanliness). However, according
to the lawsuit, "Ledbetter made
no attempt to open a dry cleaning
establishment, therefore he had
no intention or ability to assure
repayment of the bonds
Ledbetter said he was satisfied
with the terms of the settlement
when contacted yesterday after-
noon, but had no additional com-
ment.
New Financial Aid Director
Seeks More Efficient System
By HAROLD JOYNER
Co-Newt Editor
Hailing all the way from Col-
umbia S.C. is ECU's new direc-
tor of Student Financial Aid,
Raymond Edwards Jr.
For the past six years, Ed-
wards, 39, was associate director
for programs and professional
staff in the Office of Student
Financial Aid and Scholarships at
the University of South Carolina.
Earlier, he served two years as
assistant director for student
financial aid at USC.
One of Edwards' main goals is
to offer better service to ECU
students by becoming fully
automated. "Our system can
become more efficient once the
staff is freed from the daily grind
of pushing pencils and shuffling
papers. I am pleased to be here
and very impressed to work with
a staff of dedicated people.
"However, I don't intend to
fix what isn't broke he said.
Although a lot of Financial aid
offices are plagued with a
political environment, Edwards
says it is always a challenge to
predict what Congress will
decide. "We basically have to
plan our schedules in three year
blocs � finishing up last years'
work, processing this years' and
planning for next year
Almost 2,400 ECU students
receive more than $2 million in
federal aid and Edwards said not
only are the students still waiting
for an answer as to whether
they'll receive any money, but the
Campus Jobs Cut
financial aid office is also
waiting.
The financial aid office has not
received word on the actual ap-
propriations for federal aid, Ed-
wards said, but students who
have applied and haven't heard
anything should "be patient. We
also encourage students and
parents to write to their con-
gressmen and express their views
and tell them how important
financial aid is to them.
"We wish they (Congress)
would tell us what the situation is
so we can let the student know if
he needs to make other plans. It's
much easier to deal with the
known, not the unknown.
He stressed that as long as the
office has received the proper in-
formation from the student, he
will hear from the office soon.
"It's going to be tough working
in such a short amount of time
Edwards said, "but we'll do the
best we can
Lately, Edwards said, there
have been reports of some
students defaulting on student
loans. However, he said he is op-
timistic about the current system,
citing that ECU has a 95 percent
return on loans. "The media
have really played up the few
students who've failed to repay
their loans Edwards said.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for student life, said "we are
pleased to have found a new
director who comes to us so
highly recommended and we are For those who came to summer school to reap the benefits of academic
looking forward to Mr. Edwards achievement instead of a hangover from downtown, the library is the
being with us best place to spend your spare time.
Serious Student
(CPS) � Students hoping to
stay on campus to make some ex-
tra money this summer may have
to job hunt off campus.
Colleges nationwide report
their federal workstudy funds
for 1984-85 are depleted, leaving
necessary jobs unfilled and needy
students unemployed.
And observers warn possible
financial aid cuts in the 1985-86
federal budget could further
squeeze student employment op-
portunities.
"At our institution we spend
all the money (the federal gover-
ment) sends us and we could
spend more says Del wood
Bagley, spokeman for Park Col-
lege (Mo.). "We generally run
out in May
The student employee cuts hurt
the school physically, too, he
notes.
"Ultimately, there's a domino
effect he explains. "If we don't
have the money to pay students
to work, then less gets done
around the university. The
physical buildings deteriorate and
there's no one to do maintenance
because there's no money to pay
them
"We almost always run short
in the summer agrees Arturo
Pecos, financial aid director at
Texas Aand I. "What we did was
reduce hours to 15 per week
rather than 20. In this way, we're
able to dole out a little more of
the pie
"We'll make it through June,
but just barely adds New Mex-
ico financial aid spokeswoman
Dorothy Chartier-Boyer. "Over
this summer, I'm going to have to
cut back severely
Chartier-Boyer explains that,
while this year's federal funding
levels are about the same as last
year's, more students seem to be
applying for workstudy posi-
tions.
"Our federal funds didn't
change she says. "We've just
had a lot more students with
more needs. I'm going to have to
cut back on both the number of
students and their hours this sum-
mer
"My problem is that when I get
my records of what's been spent,
I'm three pay periods behind
what the students have earned
Chartier-Boyer continues. "It's a
little hard to project that way
Some college financial aid of-
fices recalled last year's tight
workstudy budgets and adjusted
this year's work force to insure
enough money to fund the pro-
gram through May.
But even at those schools,
financial aid officials admit sum-
mer funds are in short supply.
"We spent all our workstudy
money in April last year saus
Melvin Auten, financial aid
director at East Oklahoma State.
"Since then, we've been more
careful. It's the first of May and
we haven't run out yet
Most programs experience fun-
ding problems in the summer,
says Dennis Martin of the Na-
tional Association of Student
Financial Aid Administrators.
"Schools find there are more
people involved than they had
projected and it eats into their
allocations he
r dfi� k. J
t- ���
f � r f





THF EAST CAROL IM N
JUNE 12, 1985

Grads Receive Less
Announcements
(CPS) � This spring's college
grads are getting relatively
smaller starting salaries in their
first professional jobs than their
predecessors, a new survey says.
Starting salaries have not in-
creased as fast as the inflation
rate for the third consecutive
year, the survey found.
The mid-year survey, released
recently by the College Placement
Council, a national organization
of campus employment officers,
discovered that businesses will
make about eight percent more
job offers this year than last.
But starting salaries for those
jobs will be only one to three per-
cent more than last year's.
CPC analyst Judith Kayser
says the new figures cannot be at-
tributed to lingering effects of the
1982-83 recession.
"This represents a dramatic
change in the philosophy of
students Kayser says. "Having
seen their classmates struggle just
to get a job in the past few years,
most consider themselves lucky
to get any kind of job at all.
"Students have lowered their
expectations. They are much
more realistic about what they
can expect now they're much
more likely to say 'I'll accept
what you're offering me
The CPC survey is based on
data covering offers made bet-
ween Sept. 1, 1984 and March 1,
1985. The information was sup-
plied by placement officers at 163
institutions.
Camp Starlight
Interested In working with children and
young people in a beautiful setting? Camp
Starlight is located in the Poconos Mountains
of Pennsylvania They need counselors and
water skiing instructors For more informa
tlon contact Cooperative Education. 313
Hawl, 757 6979
Environmental Health
Position available for Environmental
Health student in INDT with background in
safety with chemical company in Wilm
ington area Salary of U per hour and
assistance in finding housing Excellent op
portunity for summer Contact Co op Office,
room 314 Rawl Bldg
Frisbee
Ultimate The East Carolina Frisbee Club
ana the Irey Irates and everybody play
ultimate on Thursdays and Sundays at 5 30.
the bottom of College Hill Dr Come on out
and play We'll teach you. if you don't know
how. you can teach us if you do Be there or
be oblong!
Construction Management
Positions Available for construction
management maiors with Eastern North
Carolina Building Corporation For more in
formation, contact Cooperative Education
Office, Rawl 313
Crossover
For the latest and the best in Contem
porary Christian music, listen to
CROSSOVER this Sunday morning from 6 12
noon This weekend's special features Chris
tian Jan from II to noon, with artists like
Phil Dr.scon and Kieth Thomas Also, two
CROSSOVERWZVB I snirts and two Pma
Hot pizzas will be given away so don't miss
the great giveaways and music on
CROSSOVER. A 12 each Sunday on ZWB
INOT
Positions e�ist witt- such companies aj
Northern Telecom Burroughs Welcome
Perdue, tnc and Yale Materials Hanoi.ng
Corporation tor the '985a academe �ea'
Start ganng e�perier�ce now tw you' career
by contacting Cooperative Education 313
Rawl. '5 �'�
NASA
An excellent opportun.tr for students "a
Orng in Public AdrrvniS�rat.cm Po I t
Soence or .nteres'eo .n international �H� -s
NASA is seek.ng students with excene"
writing and communicator. �MM! �o� M �
pos.t.on at headquarters .n Washington D C
Contact Cooperative Education Haw 313
r
!
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South Park
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Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville Blvd.
yrsWyyH(4Wsysyyss
Has The Lunch
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!
Buy any 6" Sub, Large Drink and a bag of
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Get A 6" Sub Free
11 a.m3 p.m.
208 E. 5th St.
7 days a week
758-7979
Delivery A variable Thru
"The Jokes On Is" 757-i973
� �
the No. 1
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Western Sizzlin introduces
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items ana Price
Effective tnru Sa-
June 8 1985
ODDS CHART
ODOSTO WIN
Odds vary depending on the number of Game Tickets you ootai'i
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FATHER'S DAY
WEEKEND SPECIAL
Fresh Whole
Strawberry Pie
June 15 & 16, Take Out Only
$4 99 vith can of whipped topping.
Make your Father s Day weekend special with our famous
strawberry pies! They're a delicious, easy way to satisfy your
family and friends.
REGULAR AND LIGHT
Budweiser
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Cans
BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE
KROGER
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BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE
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8 Oz
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v�i
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ASSORTED VARIETY J
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Pies made fresh daily
Plump, fresh strawberries
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Serves 8 or more people
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!
Drug Arrests Dominate Crime
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 12, 1985
A former ECU student was ar-
rested by campus Public Safety
officers and charged with posses-
sion of cocaine and possession of
drug paraphenalia following a
routine traffic stop on Juue 8
John Charles Kuwalik, 22, of
Kaleigh. was stopped bv campus
officers after his vehicle ran a
stop sign in front of Flanagan
Building. Officers observed a
marijuana pipe in the front seat
of the vehicle and placed Kuwalik
under arrest for possession of
drug paraphenalia. A search inci-
dent to the arrest revealed a small
quantity of white powder ten-
tatively identified as cocaine in
Kuwalik's pocket.
Kuwalik was also charged with
a stop sign violation and trespass-
ing, since he had been banned
from campus by Public Safetv of-
ficers in August, 1984.
Bond was set at $800 for the
drug charges and $300 on the
trespassing charge. The court
date is set for July 15, 1985 in
District Court in Greenville.
In other crime news, two
students were arrested for the
theft of a small statue from the
first floor of the Jenkins Art
Building on June 5. Alfred Roger
Pickerel Jr 20, of Jarvis Dorm
and Alan Ray Brannan, 19, of
Eastbrook Apartments were ar-
rested after being found in
possession of a ceramic statue.
The arrest resulted from a traffic
stop in which Brannan was also
charged with driving while intox-
icated. The statue was valued at
$50.
Bond was set at $100 for each
defendant and the court date was
set for August 19, 1985 in District
Court in Greenville.
Other campus crimes included:
JUNE 1, 2:30 p.m. A van-
dalism involving broken windows
was located by Public Safety of-
ficers at the International House.
JUNE2, 12:25 a.m. A door on
the east side of Clement Dorm
was found vandalized. 9:10p.m.
An assault was reported by a
female student in front of Greene
Dorm. Reginald Leon Holliday,
20, of Jarvis Dorm was arrested
on June 4 in connection with the
incident.
JUNE 3, 3:45 a.m. A bicycle
was reported stolen from the west
Student Health Offers Top Services
The Student Health Service,
formerly known as the Infirmary
is located on the mall between
Joyner Library and the Flanagan
Building. We provide both out-
patient and in-patient health care
to ECL students.
The Student Health Service of-
fers the following services:
� Confidential diagnosis and
treatment of illnesses and injuries
through out-patient clinics
� Emergency and urgent care
clinic.
� Psychiatric services by appoint-
ment.
� Self-care cold clinic.
� Women's health program,
which includes contraceptive
education and counseling, breast
and pelvic exams, pap smears and
lab procedures.
� Laboratory services.
� Pharmacy services.
� Allergy, insulin and other
special injections are given free of
charge. The student must provide
the medication.
� Student resource room which
provides health related learning
experiences for students.
The SHS Director handles re-
quests for medical withdrawals.
changes in class schedules
because of a health problem and
medical forms for students who
need special assistance with park-
ing, room assignments or
physical education.
services, selected drugs and many
laboratory procedures. The cost
of meals for in-patients, lab tests
performed outside of the Student
side of Jenkins Art Building.5.25
P-m. A bicycle was reported
stolen from the west side of Jar-
vis Dorm.
JUNE 4, 9:15 a.m. Grinder
Earl Spencer, 33, of Ringgold
Towers was served with a sum-
mons for issuing a worthless
check. 8:30 p.m. A resident on
the first floor of Jarvis Dorm
reported receiving harassing
phone calls.
JUNE 6, 4:10p.m. A table was
reported stolen form the study
room of Fleming Dorm.
JUNE 7, 9:53 a.m. A portable
stereo was reported stolen from a
room on the first floor of Jarvis
Dorm. 11:15 a.m. A bicycle was
reported stolen from the
southeast side of Jarvis Dorm.
2:45p.m. A hubcap was reported
stolen from a vehicle parked on
the west side of the Speight
Building.
JUNE 8, 2:20 a.m. Public
Safety officers discovered a
break-in and larceny from a can-
dy machine in the canteen of Flet-
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The SHS is open 24 hours a
day, seven days a week during the
fall and spring semesters. Physi-
cian hours are 8 a.m4:45 p.m.
Monday through Friday, and
3:30-5:30 p.m. on Saturdays and
Sundays. A physician is on call
for the remaining hours and is
available for emergencies.
Summer school hours are 8
a.m5 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and 3-5 p.m. on Satur-
days and Sundays. We do not
operate on a 24 hour schedule in
the summer.
Most of the services provided
by the SHS are covered by the
medical fee paid as part of tui-
tion, which includes professional
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of referrals to off-campus physi-
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covered by the student health fee.
All students are urged to have
health insurance coverage of
some type. It is important to
remember that the student health
fee does not cover the cost of
X-rays, certain lab procedures,
referrals to off-campus specialists
or to hospitals for surgery and
serious illnesses.
A group student and accident
insurance plan has been selected
by the Student Health Advisory
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brochure will be mailed to each
student.
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need any other information or
would like to tour our facility,
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� Movie: Dr. Stranoolnve n j � j
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7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
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Tues. June 18





, REACHING OUT TO SERVE OU i
-�. i L
m mi -i m �w�W"





(Bift East (Harnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, g�im,
Jennifer Jendrasiak, ���,� Eduor
Harold Joyner, & m�� Tom Luvender, d.�0, Am,
Randy Mews, co-stws &�� Anthony Martin, mm Managfr
Rick Mccormac, spom �,�r John Peterson, cmmi�m
Bill Mitchell, amii� Ma�atr Bill Dawson, production Manager
Daniel Maurer. Ly �� DeChanile Johnson, Ad Techmcan
June 12, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Democrats
New Strategies Needed
The recent indication that some Republicans were in full cry with
North Carolina blacks may be join- their money, patriotism and anti-
ing the Republican Party is yet communist hype Democrats were
another reason for the North forced into a defensive position
Carolina Democratic Party to
realize it needs to take a long, hard
look at itself and reassess its
strategies.
The basic problem is marketing.
In the age of consumption-oriented
yuppies, marketing is growing in-
creasingly more prevalent. And
where they said they didn't really
want to raise taxes, and they didn't
really want to unilaterally disarm,
but by that time, many people had
jumped on the Republican band-
wagon and weren't even there to
listen.
The question is: What does the
Democrats have a product, their Democratic party stand for.
beliefs. So do Republicans. Democrats have been accused of be-
Unfortunately, at this point, the ing the party of special interests,
Republicans seem to be doing a bet- and on the surface this may appear
ter job of marketing their product, to be the case. Actually, though the
Advertising, of course, has its flaws Democrats haven't been very effec-
and it often means telling people tive lately in aiding special interests
what they want to hear along with either.
stressing strengths and minimizing So, taking a lesson from the
weaknesses. Republican party, the Democratic
The Republican party seems to party needs to decide what it has to
have discovered what appeals to the offer all those people hungry for a
American people, found facets of better economy and a strong set of
their beliefs that correlate with this political beliefs. It's hard to believe
and mass-marketed it appealingly that Americans have lost their
and effectively. moral consciousness, so there is no
The fact that blacks, traditionally reason for Democrats to downplay
strong Democrats, seem to be sue- this aspect,
cumbing to this is ample evidence
that this marketing strategy is sue- Democrats need to move into the
cessful. future. The old image has tarnished
In reality, the Democratic party is and a new, revitalized image needs
more civil rights and equality to be projected. In North Carolina,
oriented than the Republican, but especially, it is no longer possible to
the blacks considering switching simply sit back and count on
political orientations seem to be Democratic votes. The good ole boy and Dennis has guts.
Campus Forum
Goodbye, Mr. Kilcoyne
A nemesis of the left, champion of and renewed courage to stand on my
the right and a good friend is leaving convictions.
East Carolina University. Dennis Kil- Good luck in Washington and
coyne is graduating and moving on to Godspeed,
the bigger pastures of Washington,
Babylon!
D.C. I wnat to take this opportunity
to express my thanks to Dennis for all
he has done.
Love him or hate him, never have 1
heard a person complain that Dennis
has ulterior motives for his actions.
Only his deep feelings for the conser-
vative cause make him speak out.
The students of ECU owe Dennis a
lot. He has spent four years of
unselfish service to them, no matter
what the hardship. He has been
threatened with violence, short of cash,
but never has he backed down. He has
been the heart and soul of the conser-
vative movement on campus trying to
move the student body to deeper
political thought.
"Moral conscience" and "courage
of conviction" are terms usuaJly ap-
plied to those of the liberal persuasion,
but they apply to Dennis too. It takes
guts to stand in the face of opposition
Kirk Shelley
Political Science
An Invitation
concentrating on the great economic
offer of "more money
The problems faced by the
Democratic party were evident in
the last election. While the
network just doesn't seem to be
reaching as far as it used to.
To avoid a future as "has-beens"
Democrats need to change the direc-
tion of their publicity efforts now

We have disagreed from time to
time, but I have grown to respect the
man. I owe him a debt I may never
repay my involvement in government
The SGA Executive Council would
like to take this opportunity to invite
all students to come and participate in
our new program, New Student Initia-
tion to Campus Organizations. This
will be an opportunity for interested
students to meet with all clubs and
organizations that ECU has to offer.
Most of these clubs are SGA funded,
which are subsidized by student fees.
So, do not miss out on this opportuni-
ty. The NSICO will be held during each
orientation and this will also provide a
chance to meet some of the incoming
freshmen.
Refreshments will also be served.
The dates and times for NSICO are as
follows: June 13th, 17th, 24th, 27th
and July 8th at 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. and Ju-
ly 10th at 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Thank you,
SGA Executive Council
Until yesterday, I was quite impress-
ed with the varied broadcasting
WZMB offered. Having recently
returned to Greenville, I was enjoying
the music programs - one of my
favorite being the Afro-Carnbean.
Last night (June 6, 9:55 p.m.), I was
listening to "The Gladiators" on that
program and thinking how pleasant to
realize that this music was being
presented from a station on the campus
of "my" Alma-mata, broadcasted in
"my" home town.
Unfortunately, the announcer con-
cluded the tune with a reference to
Tosh and Marley as garbage
I called the station to confirm the
"D.J and express my displeasure
and was disconnected.
It is difficult to understand how
WZMB allows Mr. James to host such
a program considering his opinion of
these two Reggae greats.
Babylon!
Sincerely,
Gloria Fleming
23A Courtney Square
Greenville, N.C 2834
Kilcoyne Looks Back, And Forward To The Right Future
So, four blessed and blighted years at
East Carolina University are coming to
an end for me. Through campus politics
and journalism, I have met some in-
teresting people, some first-rate and
others wretched. I loved every minute of
it; well, nearly every minute.
First, lemme tell ya 'bout Student
Government. What an education that
was! The SGA Legislature taught me
about the fine-tuned workings of
democracy and about how to deal with a
variety of good and bad people: political
whiz kids, prima donnas, backstabbers,
bombastic idiots, and hypocrites. Sorry,
but the bad people are, unfortunately,
the most memorable. However, I want
to thank people for being principled �
and as for the bad guys, they know who
they are and its best they be left unnam-
ed.
Next, lemmee tell ya 'bout my tenure
at The East Carolinian. Here, too, I
found a priceless education. My first
boss was that famous Marxist Patrick
O'Neill. One of his many talents was an
ability to make life hard on both friends
and foes. Knowing I was a conservative,
he increased the pressure on me and,
unknowingly, boosted by determination
to engage and defeat the campus left in
battle.
Another lesson. To be a conservative
writer on an American campus
newspaper is to undergo one of life's
trials. For instance, the same issue of the
EC that carried my last column featured
on the front and editorial pages defenses
of sexual deviance � a favorite liberal
cause. On page one was also a story hail-
ing a Democrat politico. My column, a
lone voice of the right, brought up a
taboo subject on the typical campus
dominated by a liberal ambience: the
consideration of the problem of South
Africa without knee-jerk, all-out panic.
I asked that South Africa, despite the
denial of civil liberties to blacks, be com-
pared with the Iron Curtain countries. A
headline writer stuck on my column:
"Apartheid Not So Bad That remark
caused some to misread my opinion (The
headline contained a grammatical error
called the incomplete comparison). So I
get branded a racist, fascist, etc. Well, I
do not mind defending my beliefs, but
I'll be damned if I'll accept the accusa-
tion that I think South Africa's racial
system is "not so bad It is bad, and I
hope to see it evolve out of existence.
Gulp! Lemmee try to skim over the
subject of the professors and ad-
ministrators, those fountains of
wisdom, always fair, always objective.
Some words of advice to younger
students: Believe it or not, there are
good professors, but they are hard to
find. The best ways you can locate them
are by word-of-mouth or by luckily
stumbling over them.
Good professors, ones dedicated to
scholarly puruits and inspiring their
students to crave learning are an en-
The Right Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
dangered species here. Many have sur-
yived by learning to bow to their masters
in the good ole' boy network. Others
have disappeared because they were toe
independent-minded or because their in-
telligence heightened the insecure feel-
ings of many of their mediocre col-
leagues. And the faculty ideologues
sometimes grade us on our opinion �
it's the only power they have in this
world. So students, opt for the safe
route: behave as the profs want you to
behave, say what they want you to say,
write what they want you to write.
And finally, lemmee tell ya 'bout the
College Republicans. I was Chairman of
the CR club for three of the past four
years and, although ECU has been
derided for political apathy, our CR's
have been instrumental in making ECU
a hot-bed of activism. And this coming
weekend, a former ECU CR will be
elected National Chairman of the CRs,
the largest student political group in the
country. Shucks.
Probably very few of you remember
when, in the spring of '84, a bunch call-
ing itself the Public Interest Research
Group, whose guru is Ralph Nader,
tried to get a tax on students to fund
PIRG's leftist causes. The CRs convinc-
ed students to sav "NO" and PIRG suf-
fered its worst defeat in historv Na-
tionally, PIRG is in full retreatand 1
will be going to Washington to assist it
into permanent flight.
The reason for the success of the CRs
at ECU is partly because students are
more receptive to the truths we preach.
Not unexpectedly, liberal professors
ridicule today's students who want to be
productive and secure. Mavbe thev long
for the attitude of the '60s when students
shunned baths and haircuts and smoked
grass while gazing admiringly at por-
traits of Ernesto Guevara and Ho Chi
Minh. To hell with that! You can help
the poor by going out and making
money, being productive, paving taxes,
and supporting the American wav oi
life. There's an opportunity societv out
there waiting for us. As President
Reagan said in a recent speech, "Go for
it Maybe you won't get it all, but you
can do yourself and the world some
good by trying. Oops, this rhetoric is
beginning to sound like a commence-
ment address.
Reading A Book Does Not Entail Turning The Pages
By Michael Kinsley
Tk. N�� bHMt - TUB '
Seventeen thousand book people are
here for the annual convention of the
American Booksellers' Association,
marching this year under the banner
"Toward a Reading Society For-
tunately for booksellers, though, their
prosperity depends on people buying
books, not on people actually reading
the bulky things.
A report just published by the Book
Industry Study Group asserts that "the
average book reader read 24.8 books
over the six-month period" preceding
the survey. Oh, sure. Asking a self-
defined "book reader" how many
books he's read lately is like asking a
teenage boy how far he got on Saturday
night.
A footnote to the study gives away the
secret: "A respondent did not necessari-
ly have to read the entire book to con-
sider it a book read
How true. It has long been my suspi-
cion that when people say they have
"read" a book, they mean something
other than turning every page and at-
tempting to glean meaning from each
sentence. I recently organized a small
test of this hypothesis. At the beginning
of January, my colleague David Bell
visited several Washington-area
bookstores and surreptitiously slipped a
small note into each of about 70 books.
These included, for example, a dozen
copies of "Deadly Gambits" by Strobe
Talbott, the book about arms-control
negotiations that Walter Mondale prais-
ed extravagantly in one of the presiden-
tial debates.
Other titles were selected to be
representative of the kind of books
Washingtonians are most likely to claim
to have read.
The notes were placed about three-
quarters of the way through each book,
hard against the spine. They could not
be shaken out, or discovered by flipping
through, but they would be impossible
to miss by anyone who actually opened
the book to the page where they were
placed. The notes offered $5 to anyone
who discovered them and called my of-
fice by May 1.
During five months, we didn't get a
single respnse.
Now I don't claim much for this ex-
periment Conceivably the notes fell out
or the books were not sold, or people
thought it was a joke. As a "control
Bell also slipped five notes into copies of
the latest Len Deighton novel, and we
got no response from them either.
Still, I have backed up my survey with
a few in-depth interviews of typical
Washington "book readers I asked a
writer on defense issues, for example,
"Have you read 'Deadly Gambits'?" He
said, "Of course
I pressed further: "Have you really
read the whole thin
He frowned. "I wouldn't say I've
read it cover to cover he said, "but
I've read large chunks of it
And what about Jean-Francois
Revel's "How Democracies Perish"?
"I've written about that he said in-
dignantly. "It's brilliant
Yes, but have you read it � every
word? "Well he said, "I mean, it's
not the kind of book you do that, is it?"
Reviews are what produce the esteem,
the money, and even the policy in-
fluence. A tree may fall in the forest and
be turned into "The Blood of
Abraham" by Jimmy Carter, for exam-
ple, but a book like this "happens" as a
consequence of the reviews.
Consider the memoirs of Carter
predecessor, Gerald Ford, which were
the subject of a Supreme Court ruling
last month. Ford produced 200,000
words that Harper & Row published as
A Time to Heal Time magazine
nought the right to run a 7,500-word
pre-pubUcation excerpt, but before it
:ould do so The Nation obtained a copy
af the manuscript and ran a 2,250 word
summary of the best parts, such as thev
were.
Time pulled out of the deal and
Harper sued The Nation, arguing that
the 2,250 word summary vitiated the
value of Time's 7,500-word excerpt, to
say nothing of the 200,000-word book.
The Supreme Court ruled for Harper,
emphasizing the crucial importance of
just 300 words of direct quotation.
Far be it from me to suggest that all
the wisdom to be derived from Jeane
Kirkpatnck's United Nations memoirs,
for which Simon Schuster recently
paid a reported $900,000, could be sum-
marized m just 300 words. But as for the
memoirs of Oeraldine Ferraro and
James Watt, both due out this fall, well,
I look forward to the reviews.
Le
� PS) - Aln
the hoopla over
pus protests eruj
country over the
the U.S. Student
ventured back to
USSA, Ahich
tias confined its
aid and drinking
lobbying, has bee
nnanv of the prot
connections to th
governmen
apartheid p
In doing so. I:
nwide ass j
lent governmej
Mar.
pi)- .
be keeping pace:
c�n nnoij
field of con
;ng a
U.S. De;
publisher
magazint I
job-growr
tion.
Alread
:he cornpute:
expected to �
1990, accorc
by Arthur A
"All ��
en po - �
wth said C
ECU
B HAROl 1)
helping the C
munity and EC I
-
0 to
Chapter i
Foundation
rele K memi
u a s h to
Fibr
sident o: EC
Club. The
James Ma �
- - - in the
Susan Steinman. pH
to Dr. James Markt-I
chapter of the Cysn
?.
N"V �
- �





iiOREM
me
Bafuion!
ute impress-
ed broadcasting
Having recently
�'lie, I was enjoying
one of my
am bean.
" p.m.), I was
ors" on that
pleasant to
was being
n the campus
i-mata. broadcasted in
nouncer con-
a reference to
. garbage
confirm the
displeasure
and how
) host such
opinion of
Sincerely,
Ciiona Fleming
2 ; -ourtney Square
Greemille, N.C. 27834
Future
NO and PIRGsuf-
eat in history. Na-
m full retreat, and I
Washington to assist it
til flight.
:he success of the CRs
artly because students are
� e to the truths we preach.
:tedly, liberal professors
Jents who want to be
-ecure. Maybe they long
udeof the '60s when students
d haircuts and smoked
ing admiringly at por-
Inesto Guevara and Ho Chi
fh that! You can help
B out and making
xJuctive, paying taxes,
I ing the American way of
an opportunity society out
ng for us. As President
in a recent speech, "Go for
on't get it all, but you
uself and the world some
nng. Oops, this rhetoric is
sound like a commence-
es
fion excerpt, but before it
The Sation obtained a copy
Jscript and ran a 2,250 word
" the best parts, such as they
lled out of the deal and
The ation, arguing that
ord summary vitiated the
"e's 7.500-word excerpt, to
of the 200,000-word book.
rme Court ruled for Harper,
the crucial importance of
rds of direct quotation.
I from me to suggest that all
J to be derived from Jeane
ft United Nations memoirs,
Simon & Schuster recently
ted $900,000, could be sum-
ist 300 words. But as for the
If Geraldine Ferraro and
both due out this fall, well,
rd to the reviews.
T
(CPS) � Almost unnoticed in
the hoopla over the varied cam-
pus protests erupting around the
country over the last few weeks
the U.S. Student Association has
ventured back to protest politics.
USSA, which in recent years
has confined itself to financial
aid and drinking age legislation
lobbying, has been coordinating
many of the protests of campus
connections to the South African
government's segregationist
apartheid policies.
In doing so, USSA � the na-
tionwide association of college
student governments that lobbies
Market C
(UPI) � The challenge used to
be keeping pace with growing
computer technologv. Now the
business world is discovering a
highly lucrative market in the
field of computer repair.
Citing a recent studv by the
S. Department of Labor, the
publisher of a new national
magazine for computer servicers
says computer repair is the top
job-growth category in the na-
tion.
Already pegged at $20 billion,
the computer servicing industry is
expected to swell to $46 billion by
1990, according to a recent study
by Arthur Anderson & Co.
"All the research that we've
seen points to significant
growth said Cameron Bishop,
Disagree With Groups
IMJLEAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 12, 1985
in Congress on student and
education issues � again risks
driving out conservative student
members.
While USSA officials minimize
the discontent among their
members, a number of student
politicians from around the coun-
try say they resent the time and
money USSA is spending on the
South Africa issue.
"1 don't think USSA's opi-
nions parallel the students in
general says Xavier Cortada of
the University of Miami Student
Senate. "USSA takes a more
liberal stand than is warranted in
an era of renewed conservatism
"Though USSA is dealing with
apartheid, they're not dealing
with financial aid and the educa-
tion budget says Ariel Anguino
of U. Cal-San Diego's student
council.
"Because of this, the (Reagan)
administration may look at it and
say, 'Okay, no one cares. Go
ahead and dump on it (the
budget)�� Anguino adds.
"There's a need for social cons-
cience, but I think it would be
more appropriated if (USSA)
dealt with more education
issues
USSA in fact has been very ac-
tive in education issues over the
last four years, organizing na-
tionwide student opposition to
the proposed cuts, lobbying
against them in Congress, spon-
soring annual student lobbying
days in Washington and helping
local student governments in-
fluence their local represen-
tatives.
USSA's critics, however, seem
to be unaware of the group's ac-
tivities.
"I think USSA should pay at-
tention to direct educational
issues, things like financial aid
publisher of Microservice
Management in the Kansas City
suburb of Overland Park, Kan.
But a problem exists for many
of those trying to break into the
fast-growing business of com-
puter repair, Bishop said. Rising
from the ranks of service techni-
cians, these would-be managers
often lack essential management
know-how.
Microservice Management is
intended to bridge that gap,
Bishop said.
Computer servicing tradi-
tionally has been handled by
manufacturers of computer
equipment and field engineers,
the magazine's editor, Jan
Calloway, a former systems
engineer for IBM, said
According to the Andersen
report, by 1990 the third-party
and dealer-distributor services
will be responsible for as much as
40 percent of all revenues in the
microprocessor servicing market.
Bishop said the publication will
focus on business management,
marketing strategy and techni-
ques, personnel management,
employee training and pricing
strategy. Also covered will be in-
dustry trends, product news,
association announcements and
literature in the field.
Calloway believes the new
magazine can be a big help to
managers with a strong
background in the sciences but
with weak communication skills.
There's an awareness among
� 4-
managers that their image has
been less-than-perfect
Calloway notes.
She said that up until now,
great numbers of managers have
learned new communication
skills through seminars and in-
dependent consultants.
According to Bishop, the for-
profit enterprise of servicing
computers is a promising one.
For most of its history, he said,
computer repair has been regard-
ed as a cost center, while it now is
being viewed as a profit center.
He attributed the shift to the
advent of service contracts, im-
proved cost controls within ser-
vice departments and ad-
justments in servicing prices to
provide profit margins.
�, v j �' oihicw among provide protit margins.
ECU Club Donates Money To Cystic Fibrosis
By HAROLD JOYNFH mk ���. - .
B HAROLDJOYNTR
( ontinuing their commitment
to helping the Greenville com-
munity and ECU's Campus, the
Circle K Club recently donated
S100 to the North Carolina
Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation
"Circle K members held a car-
wash to help out Cystic
Fibrosis said Susan Steinman,
president of ECU's Circle K
Club. The $100 was given to
Fames Markello, professor of
pediatrics in the ECU School of
Medicine and a member of the
Board of Directors of the N.C.
Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation.
Markello explained that cystic
fibrosis is a hereditary disease
and is not contagious. While at
this time there is no test for the
disease to identify carriers,
research is being done through
the help of contributions, he said.
CF usually affects the lungs,
though other organs may be in-
volved. Treatment is aimed at
retarding lung damage, improv-
ing digestion and enhancing the
quality of life.
The money received from Cir-
cle K will be sent to the CF Foun-
dation Research � Patient Care,
Markello said. Also, the majority
of the money raised is through
the annual telethon.
Steinman, a junior majoring in
Theraputic Recreation, said ECU
has one of the oldest charters of
the Circle K Club. Members
recently participated in the Stu-
dent Unions' Barefoot on the
Mall in April and helped with
Special Olympics, she said.
Members also were sent to a
district convention in March,
where the ECU organization
brought home the honors of most
improved club, most outstanding
club and the best learned club.
Steinman said upcoming events
include the club's future plans of
hosting a membership training
rally in October, and setting up
an information booth at the
SGA's New Student Initiation
Conference next week.
A video of the club and its'
members working was recently
made, she said, adding that it will
help interested students see what
the club is all about.
Circle K does not meet regular-
ly in the summer, she said, but in
the fall meetings will occur every
Sunday night. "It's a coed
organization that helps the com-
munity, as well as ECU Stein-
man said. "We invite anyone
who's interested to come to the
meetings or call me
asserts Dave Sullivan, student
body president at Marquette
University.
"Primarily the issue we're
working on is the (federal educa-
tion) budget says USSA
Legislative Director Kathy Ozer.
"But there's a clear policy plat-
form each year with a USSA
position on a variety of issues.
We lobby on only a few of
them
"The (apartheid) issue crosses
political lines adds Greg
Moore, USSA president. "And
we're doing a good job with both
types of issues, but our top
priority is financial aid
The controversy is not a new
one for USSA.
In years past, students
dissatisfied with the activism of
USSA and its predecessor � the
National Student Association �
have formed splinter groups like
the Young Americans for
Freedom, the Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee,
Students for a Democratic Socie-
ty and the National Student Lob-
by.
Most recently, in 1978, some
dissidents formed the American
Student Association as a conser-
vative student lobbying group.
But ASA, plagued by ongoing
internal upheavals, never had a
lobbying presence in Congress,
and has since moved its offices to
Philadelphia.
The defection and subsequent
membership losses, however, un-
til recently led USSA to concen-
trate on financial aid issues, with
some additions; organizing
against lowered drinking age bills
in various states.
"We pulled out a number of
years ago because of political
stands that USSA took that we
felt didn't properly reflect our in-
terests says Mark Jones, Kan-
sas State student body vice presi-
dent. "We don't miss them
"There's no way that any stu-
dent group can truthfully repre-
sent all students on any political
issues says Mark Bannister,
student body president at Fort
Hays (Kan.) State University, a
former USSA member.
USSA's Moore says he's heard
no political complaints from
members, particularly about the
South African protests.
"We're getting good feedback
now he asserts. "I've never
heard students call (apartheid) a
'non-student issue
Moore says USSA will con
tinue to tackle both types of
issues if a majority of member
vote to do so at the conventions.
"Membership is beginning to
be more inclusive of all political
spectrums he notes. "Our July
conference will help find more of
a concensus among the different
political beliefs
Still, USSA won't be signing
up many of the schools that drop
ped out in the days when ASA led
the last big defection.
"I don't think we'll join
USSA says Idaho State's Todd
Walters. "I'd be afraid that we'd
have to compromise on issues
that we're pretty adamant
about
"We belong to the Associated
Students of Idaho he adds. "
and we just initiated a letter cam-
paign to protest the student aid
cuts. I don't know that USSA is
interested in that sort of thing
THUR.
The Janitors
(Rhythm & Blues)
FRISAT -
Stratus
Susan Steinman, president of ECU Circle K presents a check for $100
to Dr. James Markello, member of the Board of Directors of the N.C.
chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
Allman Plays The
Attic With Style
By BRETT MORRIS
SMI W rltcr
The legendary Gregg Allman
took the stage at the Attic in
Greenville Saturday night to per-
form for an enormous sell-out
croud of enthusiastic fans that
consisted of young and old ad-
mirers alike.
Allman once again displayed
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Dan Toler
blend of southern rock and
soulful blues that have been his
trademark since his early involve-
ment with the Allman Brothers
Band. His low growling voice ac-
companied the lyrics melodically
in every way.
Allman is continuing his tradi-
tion a one of the leading
forefathers of the southern rock
tradition and he proved this
Saturday night. His band is made
up of a few great names that have
been a part of southern rock since
the early '70s.
"Dangerous" Dan Toler, who
was previously on three ABB
albums, is still captivating au-
diences with his smooth and
energetic guitar licks. His brother
David on drums is also with the
band and he has also had a
respectable southern rock past in-
volvement with bands such as
Great Southern.
The rest of the band fills out at
Greg Vourhees on bass, Tim
Heding on keyboards, and
Charles Trippy on percussion;
who is adding a style blend of
music that is reminiscent of the
Santana image.
Allman began his set with their
ever popular tune "Dreams" and
led into many more songs from
his early Allman Brothers days.
The concert reached a bit of an
emotional peak when Allman and
Dan Toler graced the stage alone
and played "Sweet Melissa and
"Midnight Rider" with the ae-
companiament of an acoustic and
electric guitar.
Allman, although he didn't
show any hint of a new style, has
introduced some new material in
the past few years. There have
been talk of a new album on the
way and the rumors of a com-
eback, with a major record lable,
are in the air.
All of tlm may be possible but
the idea of Allman changing his
format is not very likely. This
may hinder him from seriously
competing on the same scale with
the overnight successes that have
become prevelent in the music
business, but it sure will make a
lot of the fans happy who ad-
mire, and still appreciate, the
musical tradition that Allman
began over a decade ago.
JUNE 12, 1985
Page f
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
�regg Allman and companv sang the blues for Attic patrons.
The Black Cauldron'
fell Datrlint
On July 26th, Walt Disney
Pictures will release one
of the most ambitious anima-
tion undertakings of the
decade. The Black Cauldron '
a full-length feature film based
upon the Dell Publishing
C ompany's award-winning
Chronicles of Prydain, written
b I loyd Alexander.
The lilac k Cauldron,
Disney's 25th full-length
animated feature, has been
more than 11 years in the mak-
ing (at a cost of S23 million)
and has been hailed by its
veteran team of directors, pro-
ducers and animators as their
most ambitious project since
the classic film Pinocchio.
The fantasy epic, rooted in
Welsh mythology, will feature
all of the lovable creatures, en-
chanting heroes and terrifying
villains that endeared Alex-
ander's Newbery Award-
winnning series to thousands
of young readers everywhere.
To celebrate the release of The
Black Cauldron, Dell is reissu-
ing all five Chronicles of Pry-
dain including: The Book of
the Three, The Black
Cauldron, The Castle of Live,
Taran Wanderer and The
High King.
Comedy Zone Offers New Dimension
By DANIEL MAURER
I tfestyiea Kditor
TW "s Nitelife is adding a new
dimension to the local
entertainment scene by offering
The Comed one. Greenville's
very first comedy night. TW's
Comedy Zone premiered Tues-
day evening at 8:30 p.m and will
inue ever) Tuesday.
Inspired by the sell out success
ol Charlie Goodnite's comedy
night in Raleigh, TW's manager,
Sandra Corbett. began arranging
for a show of her own.
'They were selling out days in
advance- of the show Corbett
said of Charlie Goodnites. "We
stood there and watched people
come up and beg to be let in. If
they were doing that well on a
Tuesday night in Raleigh, then
we should be able to do
something like it in Greenville "
The cautiously optimistic Cor-
bett will give The Comedy Zone
an eight week trial period in
which to prove itself. Corbett has
already booked 'Comedy Zone
performances for those eight
weeks and plans to re-evaluate
the show at the end ol that time.
Rick Rockwell
She claims she will not be
discouraged by small turn outs at
initial performances, but will give
the show time to catch on by
word of mouth.
The Comedy Zone is directed
primarily toward young adults,
but Corbett feels students will
also find it appealing.
"Our target audience Cor-
bett said, "is the young adults
because we feel like they're the
ones that are going to be more in-
terested in a laid back comedy
evening
The last time Greenville has
seen a comedian was the unsuc-
cessful Jay LenoJames Brown
concert in Minges Coliseum. Cor-
bett, however, does not feel the
concert's poor reception was due
to comedian Jay Leno. The con-
cert, she say, is not neccessarily a
reflection of Greenville's attitude
toward comedy.
"I don't think it was Jay Leno,
in fact I'm sure it was not Jay
Leno, who failed at Minges. It
was James Brown who failed
Corbett said.
"That act failed for a lot of
reasons, one being that I don't
think James Brown has that
much of an appeal in today's
market. He is a has been
superstar. 1 don't think Jay Leno
had anything to do with it. I
think that was a bad combination
of entertainment to put together
on one night she continued.
HOTSPOTS
Nightclubs
The Attic offers the rhythym and
blues sounds of The Janitors,
featuring tunez by the Blues
Brothers and George
Thorogood. The Janitors are
scheduled for Thursday at
9:30 p.m. The Attic will par-
ty through the weekend with
the sounds of Stratus and
their dance oriented rock V
roll. Stratus is scheduled for
Friday and Saturday at 9:30
p.m.
Corogaa's highlights its Ladies
Night this Wednesday with
some contemporary rock 'n'
roll by Lahnn & Loftin. The
versitile duo is scheduled to
perform at 9:30 p.m.
Premiums offers alternative
entertainment with the
sounds of the Amatures, on
Thursday at 10 p.m. Keeping
the party going is the pop
rock of The 3-Hits, schedul-
ed for 10:30 p.m. on Friday.
Closing out the weekend is a
band to be announced at a
latter date.
TW's NlteHfe is featuring sounds
to shag by with the beach
music of Breeze on Wednes-
day night, On Friday even-
ing, TW's offers top-40 and
countrv rock with the
Carolina Jam. And closing
out the weekend on Saturday
night is country superstar
Johnny Paycheck with
Carolina Jam. On Tuesday,
June 18 TW's hosts Green-
ville's First and only regular
comedy night, featuring the
comedic talents of Rick
Rockwell with Happy Cole.
The comedy is scheduled to
commense at about 8:30
p.m.
On Campus
Mendenhall Student Center has a
full schedule of entertain-
ment this week. Playing on
Wednesday is the movie
classic Dr. Strangelove: or
How I teamed To Stop Wor-
rying And Love The Bomb.
This Stanely Kubrick film is
a comk nightmare that sees
the President of the United
States (Peter Sellers) and the
Premier of Russia
cooperating in a bizarre ef-
fort to save the world from
total disaster. Show time is at
7 p.m. in the Hendrix
Theatre.
David Cailnw gives a special
xrformaace of mystifying
unentaMff titetti oil Tours-
day. The Student Union
Special Concerts Committee
sponsors this exhibition of
magic, hypnotism and ESP
(See story this page).
A Watermeilon Feast, sponsored
by the Student Union
Recreation Committee is
slated for Monday. This orgy
of fattening fun, featruing 50
ice-cold watermellons, it
scheduled for 3 p.m. on the
University Mall.
Lahnn & Loftin bring their com-
puterized brand Of music to
the Mendenhall Student
Centex Patio on Monday
night. Then music ranges
from James Taylor to the
Rolling Stones. This tm
concert starts at 9:00 p.m.
Rainsite will be in Hendrix
Theatre.
Alfred Hitchcock's cliff-
classic, North By Nort)
closes out the week's
tainment. Carry grant stars
as a businessman who is
mistaken for a counteres-
pionage agent m this �
thriller. Show time It it 7
p.m. m Hendrix Thsjlij
Admission to all Mendeah
films is free to ECU students
and guest with valid ECU
and BCU
Happy Cole
Corbett choice of Tuesday
nights for the Comedy Zone was
one of convenience, not just for
TW's, but for patrons as well.
"The comedy does not last
long. We, at most, will be open
three and a half hours Corbett
said. "That way people can come
out, have a couple of drinks,
relax, enjoy some good comedy
entertainment and still get home
at a reasonable hour
Next Tuesday The Comedy
Zone offers Los Angeles come-
dian Rick Rockwell as its major
attraction. Warming up the
crowd for Rockwell will be Hap-
py Cole. Show time is 8:30 p.m.
Bond Bombs Big
On Latest Mission
By JERR1E McGOWAN
Suff Writer
A View to a Kill, the latest
film about the fictionalized
007's battle with colerful villians,
is a flop if not a catastrophe.
Although the movie does show
some promise in the beginning
with good plot stucture, adven-
ture scenes and cliffhangers, it
fails miserably in the middle and
just crumbles at the end with
poor actors, out-of-place scenes
and unnecessary violence.
The movie itself starts out well
enough. The plot gets heavy as
we are introduced the villian
Zorin (Christopher Walken). The
movie moves along with his plans
to "take over the world" by cor-
nering the micro-chip market.
That's fine, but the plot begins to
waver. Not only are we subjected
to the world of Silicon Valley,
but the world of race horses mar-
ches in. Zorin injects melted
down micro-chip solution into
the race horses right at that
critical moment in the race when
the horse is coming into the final
stretch. This is just too far fetch-
ed. Come on, it's 1985. Au-
diences are too intellgent to
believe such garbage.
Beyond that point, the movie
gets even more pointless. The
chase with the San Francisco
police resembled a keystone cops
routine. It's ridiculous, which is a
milder word than what 1 wa-
thinking at the time. Bonds' clif-
fhangers are also getting a bit
predictable. He's shoved in a
Rolls and sent into a lake. Then,
like a wizard, he busts out. Even
a garbage collector would think
of smashing a window and swim-
ming to the surface.
The scene which has become
the signiture of all Bond movies,
is View's most disappointing the
climactic confrontation between
007 and his villian. This scene is
botched up in part by the so-
called heroine, Stacev Sutton
(Tanya Roberts). The scene final-
ly ends with Zorin falling into the
river. This is a relief, not just that
Zorin dies, but that the scene
ends. This farce can only be
withstood for so long.
The characterization is very
disappointing, specially in the
case of Roberts' Stacy Sutton. In
the past, James Bond woed the
most beautiful women in the
world, but they did have a good
deal more brains than thi
Whatever character dircetor J
Glen was trying to proj
Roberts certainly bleu it
couldn't act in Sheena, and
certainly can't act in Vie t
Kill. As for Christopher A a
his portrayal of Zorin, is �
comic stip character with
much brutality for an advent
spy thriller. Even Roger v '
seemed like he was just goi
through the motions as Jar
3ond.
The onlv two a
Roger Moore
played their roles
any degree of finest we
MacNee as Tibbit, ai
Jones a Mi. Da; v
flair to any role he take-
bad he was killed in the R,
would have made th
tie more bearable-
Jones is a
perfect Jame Bon
projects a strong cha
possesing frail hum .
She's just a mere ;
Zorin's hands, but -
Richard Maibaum and v
Wilson should have made
primary villianess
A growing trend in the B
movies has been tastele
plots. This movie is ju
ing that format. Goldfinger
hard act to follow. Unfortun
ly. producers Albert Broccoli
Michael Wilson are tarnishing the
excellence of the James Bonj
series with poorly written e
quals.
4 iew to a Kilt is now playing
the Plitt Theatres in the C"a
East Convenient Center.
SSm4&ySSSSSSSW'SS'SSSSSSSSSSSMs.
The three villians plot 007's demise in 'A View to a Kill
Magic Show At Mendenhall
treat
ans of mentalism and the
art of illusion are in for a
when David Calhoun
presents his one-man show at
9:00 p.m. on June 13 at the
Mendenhall Snack Bar Patio,
sponsored by the Student
Union Special Concerts Com-
mittee. In case of rain, the
I program will be moved into
Hendrix Theatre.
Calhoun's specialties in-
clude mentalism, hypnosis,
sleight of hand and comedy
magic. Accomplished at card
tricks as well, Calhoun often
presents demonstrations of
techniques used by gamblers,
professional cheats and card
sharps.
With more than 15 years of
performing experience,
Calhoun's magic has been seen
by audiences that have includ-
ed college students, trade
shows, civic and church
groups.
Magic of the mind is his
strongest area of presentation.
In one highly publicized
routine he challenged the staff
of "P.M. Magazine" in
Greensboro to hide a driver's
license anywhere in the city
limits. He found the license
within 30 minutes, well under
the one hour stipulated in the
challenge.
A graduate of the University
of Alabama, Calhoun holds
the Master of Divinity from
Emory University. He became
interested in magic at the age
of five and has been working
on it ever since.
He is a member of both the
International Brotherhood of
Magicians and the Societv ol
American Magicians and has
published articles in the jour-
nals of both societies.
Dooneshur
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JUNE 12, 1985
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I HI I ASAROI INIAN
EC AC
Hv KUKMt(()RMA(
sp�rl� Jdllor
i move to provide the eight
institutions with a more
recognizable identity, the ECAC
ague schools have band-
ed togethet to form the Colonial
thi c Association.
letic directors o
American I niversity, George
n I niversity, James
I niversity, the United
al cademy, the
ol North Carolina-
n, the University oi
lond, the College of
v Man Md I Cl all
hi ECAC South title in
e oloniaJ Athletic
'or our change in
c ture is to create a
ff tive regional iden-
. expanded ability
�I at is an effective
npetitive programs
rsit of Richmond
Sports
II si 12. 196! Pagi �
Athletic Director Chuck Boone,
who will serve as the association's
president.
Form New Confi
Charlie Harrison
In addition to the name
change, the conference offices
will be located in Richmond, and
a commissioner will be hired to
lead the group. The association
will provide 12 championship
sports, including seven for men
and five for women.
Men's championships will be
held in basketball, baseball, soc-
cer, cross country (at present
ECU has no cross country team
for either men or women), golf,
tennis and swimming.
The women's championships
will be held in cross country,
basketball, swimmming, tennis
and volleyball.
According to Boone, formal
application has been made to the
NCAA Basketball Committee to
continue automatic qualification
for the men's basketball cham-
pionship. During the past five
years, under conference struc-
ture, the ECAC South received
an automatic bid to compete for
the national championship.
"We believe our competitive
record in basketball speaks for
itself said Boone. During the
past two years, the ECAC South
ranked 14th and 17th in terms of
national power rankings, and
conference members have won
first-round games in the NCAA
tournament in each of the past
five seasons. Victories have come
over such prominent teams as
Georgetown, Ohio State, West
Virginia, Auburn and Louisiana
State University.
In addition to the automatic
bid for men's basketball, the
group is also soliciting an
automatic berth for baseball and
women's basketball.
"The records of the ECAC
South membership during con-
ference, intersectional and
NCAA post-season play has gain-
ed the respect of knowledgeable
college basketball fans across the
nation commented ECAC
Commisioner Scotty Whitelaw.
"We are all proud of the ac-
complishments of James
Madison, Richmond and Navy in
basketball and George Mason,
William & Mary and East
Carolina in baseball and wish
them continued success within
the Colonial Athletic Association
structure
"We look forward to a very
bright future as the Colonial
Athletic Association Boone
said. "We are most appreciative
and thankful for our involement
with the ECAC and its commis-
sioner, Scotty Whitelaw, since we
began our affiliation in 1980
The new conference will not ef-
fect ECU in football where the
Pirates will remain a Division 1
Independent.
1I men's basketball o
Charlie Harrison feeL tl H the
move is defimtelv a step in the
right direction.
"Our league is strong
getting better and better c
vear Harrison said 'T
ting out from under the I V
umbrella) a big step It not
will solidify our league in
of recognition, hut it a.
that we. as a league are read) I
make a move forward l a
national prominei
Lady Pirate head coacl I
Manwaring also felt the new
league's time had come.
"Before, the E V
kind of went unnoticed bv.
we were one of three conferei
within the E C si t :
feel the Colonial Athlei
Association will give us a m
recognizable identity
leads to m o i
exposure
Pirates Close Successful Year;
tented Nucleus Returning
Bj iON BROUN
Pirates were
.i bid the
b losing out in
v �southern tournament,
be pr another ex-
baseball.
i le into the
pulling a ma-
N A southern
south
minating Florida '
ill beii ted
rematch,
ts being tilled
nexperienced
;pec ts were
the continuation
ess. An injury to star-
scond baseman Steve Sides
lit at the beginning of the
lelined him for the
ausing coaches around
. i � irtually write off the
� a good vear.
.ether though.
EC south
n championship on
� conference play,
- to the ECAC
�:n tournament.
E I fell a little short in the
oring column during the
irnament and were eliminated
es to George Mason and
but the season was still
fine effort by the Pirate
it wd- only by a concerted team
tl the Bucs even got to
�urnament. LCL' trailed
igue-leading UNC Wilmington
unt' the next to last conference
game oi the season, due to the
fact that the first ECU league
�ere washed out. Finally
the Pirates got into first place on
April 21 by beating George
n, while UNC-W fell to
James Madison.
Then, on the last day of the
regular conference season for
ECU, rhe Pirates clinched the
regular season title by defeating
UNC-W in a head-on meeting of
the first and second place teams.
The win qualified them for the
ECAC Southern play-offs, but a
lack of enough hits at critical
times caused the Pirates to drop
tour out oi five of the last games
of the season, including two in
the ECAC tournament.
Man records were set along
the wav, with powerful Winfred
Johnson rewriting virtually the
entire record book on offense.
Johnson had already set the ECU
homerun marks for a season (18)
and career (29) in '84 � in only
two years of play.
He also set a mark that year in
RBIs with 46 and total bases
(115), but that was merely child's
play compared to '85.
Still just a junior. Johnson
continued his onslaught on the
record books. He set another
single-season homer mark with
22, thus increasing his career
record total to 51, but that was
just the beginning.
Johnson also bettered his own
single-season RBI and total bases
records. He knocked in an amaz-
ing 75 runs, while stroking the
ball tor 150 total bases, increas-
ing that total by a whopping 35
bases. Such records pale in com-
parison to Deep South and
Southwestern marks, but those
teams play about twice as many-
games.
Johnson, who pitches and
plays as a designated hitter when
not at first base, teamed with
centerfielder Chris Bradberry to
become the first Pirates to bat
over .400 with at least 97 at-bats.
Bradberry hit .405, but unfor-
tunately for him, he did it in a
year when Johnson overshadow-
ed him with a record .432 average
(with 97 at-bats or more).
Although at times it seemed like
it, Johnson was not the only
record-setter for the Pirates in
'85.
Shortstop Greg Hardison grab-
bed the new ECU record for
doubles, smashing 18 two-
baggers for the year. His improv-
ed play on defense in the latter
part of the season was also a ma-
jor factor in the Pirates' success,
according to assistant coach Billy
Best.
Ace moundsman Mike
Christopher soared to a perfect
10-0 record at the beginning of
See PIRATES, page 9
A
Pirate Gridders Work On Conditioning
By DAVID McGINNESS aue called nliometrics Thp hones for an avpnop oain in
Senior left fielder Mark Shank (1) being congratulated b assistant coach Bilh Bext
B DAVID McGINNESS
Suff Wrlcer
It is 3:30 and 95 degrees in the
shade. If you are like most peo-
ple, you are taking in the AC or
trying to find a place to go swim-
ming. But if you are a Pirate
football player, your next two
hours will be spent trying to see
how hot and exhausted you can
get.
Some 58 members of the ECU
football team are participating in
the summer training program.
Five days a week for at least two
hours daily, the Pirates are
pushing themselves to the limit.
The program is directed by
fourth-year ECU strength coach
Mike Gentry. Gentry came to
ECU in 1982 after serving as
assistant strength coach at UNC
for two years. "I'm really proud
of the effort the guys are putting
out said Gentry, "they're giv-
ing 100 percent every day
The program has two main
goals � to increase players'
athletic abilities and to prepare
them to play in the intense heat of
late summer.
The training schedule includes:
running (distance and sprints),
weight training, calisthenics and
stretching.
In addition, Coach Gentry is
employing a new training techni-
que called pliometrics. The
system, developed by Soviet and
Eastern European athletes, in-
volves sustained jumping techni-
ques. It is used to develop
quickness and explosive leg
strength needed by football
players.
The players' Monday-
Wednesday-Friday schedule runs
as follows: 3:30 � stretching,
3:45 � weight training, 5:15 �
stretching, calisthenics, 5:30 �
mile and a half run.
On Tuesdays and Thursdays
players run sprints and use a
method called a metabolic speed
pack. The speed pack employs
short sprints of different
distances interspersed with rest.
The idea is to simulate game con-
ditions in which players need
short bursts of explosive speed
and strength.
Although all players use the
same training program, goals for
personal improvement in
strength, speed and endurance
are individual. At the conclusion
of the program, each athlete is
tested for muscle strength and
speed.
Building that strength is a time
consuming and exhausting
precess. Of course, it is not made
much easier by summer heat and
humidity. Still, Coach Gentry
hopes tor an average gain
strength of about ten percent.
Two men who help make goals
like that a reality are assistant
coaches Chris Durand and David
Pratt. They assist athletes in
working out individual weightlif-
ting programs and coach in
weightlifting technique. "They
are essential to the program
Gentry said, "They make it go
Gentry and the team also ap-
preciate the support and freedom
that head ECU football coach
Art Baker gives him and the pro-
gram. "Coach Baker and the new
staff gives us a family at-
mosphere, with a feeling of
mutual respect said junior
defensive back Joe Aloia.
To find the success of the
strength program, one has merely
to look at its results on plavers.
Daniel Cole, a 215 lb. fullback
bench-presses 425 lbs squats 825
lbs, and hangcleans 380 lbs.
Robert Washington, a 225 lb.
linebacker benches 455 lbs
squats 770 lbs. and hangcleans
400 lbs. Offensive guard Greg
Thomas benches 430 lbs squats
650 lbs. and hangcleans 350 lbs.
Another indicator of the pro-
gram's quality might be that it
produced North Carolina
powerlifting champion and NFL
strongman Terry Long.
Players like senior I arry Ber
New Bern are training
this summer because thev
committed to improving
themselves and their team. "1
heat takes a lot oi strength out
you, but we're going to train hard
to prove ourselves after lasl
season said the sen
linebacker.
Another player seeing her.
from the ECU strength program
i- junior defensive back Joe
Aloia. Since coming to ECU his
40 yard dash time has impro
his benchpress has increased 100
lbs. and his bodyweight has
creased from 170 lbs. to 205 lbs.
Aloia has a lot oi respect :
the strength coach.
"Coach Gentrv has the
Players' interests at heart Aloia
said. "He's willing to talk with us
about our problems and help us
when we need it
The inspiration provided bv
Gentry, plus the plavers' commit-
tment to bring back the success
1983 should bring the Pirates ,
winning '85 season. The Pirates
will indeed need every edge hard
work, dedication and skilled
coaching can gIve them during
this tail's difficult schedule
Golfers Look To Fall Season
Mark Arcilesi was an All-Conference performer last season.
By RICK McCORMAC
Sport Kdlior
The ECU golf team is anxious-
ly looking forward to their fall
schedule as they will try to turn
their unlimited potential into low
scores.
The Pirate golfers will be led
by three experienced returners
and some new talented recruits.
Leading the way will be juniors
Mark Arcilesi, Mike Bradley and
Paul Steelman.
Arcilesi earned
South honors with
place finish in the
tournament held at
Academy this spring.
Other returning team members
are sophomores David McKenzie
and Chris Riley. Kelly Stimart
rounds out the list of returning
golfers.
all-ECAC
his fourth
conference
the Naval
Among those expected to sign
letters of intent with the Pirates
for the fall are two members of
the North Carolina high school
champion Raleigh Millbrook golf
team.
ECU golf coach Bob Helmick
is planning at least four tour-
naments for the squad in the fall,
while experimenting with dif-
ferent combinations of people.
"As always the fall season will
be a time of experimentation
Helmick said. "During the fall
we try to get in as much practice
as possible and give everybody
some tournament experience
Among the tournaments the
Pirates are expected to play in are
the MacGregor Golf Classic at
Pickens Country Club in
Pickens, SC, as well as events
hosted by Duke, North Carolina
State and Campbell University.
"We're as talented as we've
ever been, but you can't place
Mike Bradley
talent on the scoreboard
Helmick said. "You must pro-
duce � which is where we have
tailed over the last two vears
Helmick feels his team's per-
ormancc in '8586 will depend
lar�y on the play of his three e"
penenced returners.
'We have thrpP
remaining three spots w,1k"
determined bv hou �, l
pUy, when S, tner ?h?ee
PS.X positions a,e u?�
haf noTf nfCU �" 'earn
15 very opt,mistic ab "e "Ml
coming season. he up'
"We'vegot the potential t� u
very successful �� u , . � be
"We've inft ' HeIm, said,
together St 8�l l� ut all
Pira
B hV)
.�
� i
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their ' � �
Kobe �

will '
veteran sw
lose onlv
women
Rising
Chris p
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vetci
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The �
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Bra-rv
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junior center!
the team in nil
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ence
ach
in the
I , K
only
shows
� ai ds
s
luse
ices
"1
ore
lil� Bevt
A
oning

are
� � ; n g
:am. "The
igth out of
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seeing renefit
gram
foe
' "roved.

m-
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the
Aloia
� Mth us
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Jed by
mmit-
:ess of
the Pirates a
I he Pirates
ed eery edge hard
ition and skilled
ge them during
:ult schedule.
son
e last two vears.
his team's per-
586 will depend
jpiay of his three ex-
irnerv
r three strong
pning from last
and they will have
-continued. "The
ree spots will be
how everybody
fev come in. Three
itionsareup for
���
M
! ECU golf team
as successful as
have liked he still S
sue about the up-
the potentiaJ to be �
Heimick said. 5
Igot to put it all B.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE5. 1985
B DAVID McGINNESS
Stiff Writer
Swim Teams
As the ECU men's and
women's swim teams come off
their best year ever, coach Rick
Kobe foresees an even better
'8586 season.
One thing in the Pirates' favor
will be the number of returning
veteran swimmers. The men will
lose only three seniors and the
women only one
Rising seniors Keith Kaut,
Chris Pittelli and Andy Cook are
expected to make strong con-
tributions for the Pirates.
'This is our first year with a
veteran team said Kobe as he
enters his fourth year as head
coach. "With the strength of our
veterans and this year's recruiting
ass, we should have a very good
season
The '8485 season was indeed
an excellent one from a recruiting
tandpoint. Incoming freshmen
�wimmers include five junior na-
onals qualifiers one of which
vas a prep school all-America.
Rising freshman David Killeen
of Long Meadow, MA is a multi-
stance freestyle swimmer of na-
tional potential. "He should pro-
duce conference winning times at
the ECAC South Championships
in Wilmington this year said
Kobe.
The women gain five new
potential stars this fall. Coach
Kobe recruited women more
heavily this year because he felt
the women's team is more in need
of strengthening.
Patricia Walsh of Charleston,
SC is a junior nationals qualifier
whose prep school times are
already ECU varsity records.
"She is the best all-round female
ever to swim for ECU Kobe
said.
Susan Wentink of Charlotte,
NC is also a junior nationals
qualifier and swims for the
Mecklinburg Aquatic Club. Her
times in the 100 and 200-yard
breast stroke are below present
ECU varsity records.
Angela Winstead of Rich-
mond, Va is a junior natonals
qualifier in freestyle sprinting.
Ever
A good nucleus of returning swimmers, as well as some talented freshman, could give the Pirate swimmers
two of their strongest teams in school history.
Pirates Returning Firepower
Continued from nno� s tri � ci��� � . .
Continued from page 8
the season, surpassing Mickey
Britt's 1977 mark of nine straight
and tying the season mark for
sl wins. He threw more than
103 innings � by far the most of
the staff � and finished with a
tine 3.14 ERA, which was the
second-lowest on the squad.
Daniel Boone had the lowest
ERA at 2.87, but that was in only
53 innings. Boone was rocked in
his first start, but surprised just
about everybody after that rough
beginning by finishing with a 5-1
mark as a junior.
Freshman rightfielder Jay
McGraw met the pre-season ex-
pectations of head coach Gary
Overton by hitting for a .306
average and knocking in 33 runs,
which was second-highest for the
team. He did it with only 48 hits,
so he will obviously be counted
on in crucial situations next
season.
Bradberry tied with left fielder
Mark Shank for most stolen
bases in '85 with 11, but got
caught one less time to lead that
category by percentage. The
junior centerfielder also paced
the team in runs, touching home
53 times. He was second to
Johnson in hits (70), total bases
(109) and homers (8).
With the firepower of
Johnson, Bradberry and Har-
J;son � who will all be in their
finaJ season � plus McGraw,
ECU fan should enjoy one of the
greatest offensive Pirate baseball
teams of all time.
Mike Christopher, who would
be in his junior year in '86, was
recently drafted by the Yankees
in the seventh round and must
decide whether to return for his
junior year at ECU. If he does,
the prospects look excellent in
that area.
If he doesn't, the Pirates will
have to rely on Jim Peterson
(6-2), Boone (5-1) and Johnson
(7-5). Johnson's main asset is his
ability to place pitches, while
Peterson notched 49 strike-outs
in '85.
Barring more unforeseen
losses, the Pirates will put a lot of
experience on the field next year.
Leftfielder Mark Shank, back-up
first basemanoutfielder Mike
Wells and pitchers Chubby Butler
and Tom Webb will be gone, but
the rest of the team should re-
main intact.
Second baseman Sides will
return, so the position there
should be solid for ECU. Sides
was the starter prior to his injury,
but he'll have to battle it out with
Robert Langston next year.
Although Langston is listed as a
senior, he has a year of eligibility
left because he was red-shirted
one season.
Mont Carter, Dean Ehehalt
and freshman David Ritchie will
be vying to replace the departing
Mark Shank in left field. Ehehalt
returns to action after an injury
also.
Coach Overton and assistant
coach Billy Best are now on the
recruiting trail, looking for the
next crop of Pirate stars. They
are looking for pitching help
especially, and are expecting to
sign one or more from the '85
North Carolina state champion
Southern Wayne squad.
The coaches are also looking
for another catcher to relieve
starter Jim Riley. He was forced
to play virtually every inning this
year due to the lack of depth at
that position. With ECU playing
a lot of doubleheaders and three
game series in quick succession,
fatigue can be a factor at this
strenuous spot.
When Riley injured his hand
on a play at home during the
ECAC tournament, Jay McGraw
had to come in from rightfield to
make one of his rare appearances
behind the plate, but he's really
at home in right field. Although
Riley's hand has not totally heal-
ed yet, he is expected to be ready-
next season.
"We played better than we ex-
pected said assistant coach
Best. "With really only leftfield
open, we appear to be in good
shape for next season. We're go-
ing to be solid up the middle he
added, "and that's where you
win ballgames
The first win next year will be
number 700 in the proud history
of 36 years of Pirate baseball �
and with Winfred Johnson back
to continue increasing his own
records � it should be a great
year to be a Pirate baseball fan.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave.
We Buy Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
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511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 756-9222
RIVER BtUFF
"Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments"
Your Choice of a Microwave Oven or 13"
Color TV If You Sign A 12 Month's Lease.
Limited Time Only Offer For New
Residents Only. Present Residents Not Eligi-
ble For Offer.
� ProfessionaJ Management and Maintenance
� 2 Bedroom Townhouses & 1 Bedroom Garden Apartments
� Kitchens Feature Dishwashers & Disposals
� Fully Carpeted
� Private Laundry Facilities
� Large Pool
� Cable T.V. Included
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� Convenient To Shopping Centers & Restaurants
� ECU Bus Service
� Security Deposits Negotiable
Directions: 10th Street Extension To River Bluff Road
Next To Rivergate Shopping Center.
PHONE 758-401S
This is an area in which the
women need strength .
Brenda Horton of Wilm-
ington, Del is a junior nationals
backstroke qualifier as well a
strong freestyle swimmer.
Sherry Clayton of Longwood,
Fl is a distance swimmer with ex-
cellent potential. She will com-
bine with Scotia Miller to give the
women better depth in the 500
and 1000.
Sherry Campbell of Charlotte,
NC is a springboard diver. She
placed second in the North
Carolina State High School Div-
ing Championships this year.
Coach Kobe hopes the incom-
ing talent plus the returning
veteran swimmers will produce
some qualifiers for the NCAA
Championships this
season.Freshman Bruce
Brockschmidt missed qualifying
last season by only half of a se-
cond in the 100 freestyle.
Both the men's and women's
teams will start practice after the
first week of school.
They begin with a two week
running program. The program
ends with a biathlon in which
both men and women will swim
two miles, run five and then swim
one more. During regular season
practice the team swims about
fourteen thousand yards per day.
A typical day for a swimmer
goes about like this:
� 6:00-7:30 ammorning prac-
tice.
� 9:00-2:00 pmclass.
� 2:15-3:00 pmweight training.
� 3:00-3:30 pmstretch.
� 3:30-6:00 pmafternoon swim
practice.
�7:00-9:30 pmstudy hall.
Once again the Pirate's
schedule is formidable. Or as
Coach Kobe puts it, 'JWe don't
swim against too many
lightweights
ECU's opponents include:
UNC, NC State,
Duke,Navy,Johns Hopkins,
West Virginia, Pittsburgh and
Penn State.
Although the Pirates face a
tough schedule, Kobe believes
that the upcoming season has a
good chance of being ECU's best
ever. This year's recruits will add
strength to the program this year
and in the years ahead.
"As far as recruiting is con-
cerned said Kobe, "no team in
the country with our budget can
beat us
2510 E. 10th St. Next To Pizza Hut
'If you have to do laundry
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OPTICAL i
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The Aerobic
Workshop
417 Evans St. 757-1608
Walking Distance from Campus
Is offering these specials for students:
� Second Summer Session $20
� Join now till August 31st for $40
(This is $30 off our regular price!)
M�t Ftnut V�M ttmUm IP













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10
1HI FAS! CAROI IN1AN JUNE 12. 1W
Summer Session Playoff Action Underway
By JENNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
Summer session playoffs are in
the are as teams approach the end
of this sessions activities. 3-on-3
basketball and softball playoffs
start Monday, June 17.
In the latest 3-on-3 basketball
action, the ladies from SUM-
MER FUN demolished the EN-
FORCERS 20-5 SIMMER FUN
takes the No. 1 spot with a 2-1
record while the ENFORCERS
fall to 0-3. The ENERGIZERS
hold second place with a 2-0
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-lF 7a.m8a.m.
M-F12 noon-l:30p.m.
Minges Pool
M-F4 p.m7: p.m.
Sat.1 p.m5 p.m.
Sun.1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th9a.m7 p.m.
Fridav9 a.m5: p.m.
Minges
M-F3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
T-Th 10a.m12 noon
T-Th 1 p.m4 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 11 p.m7: p.m.
Friday 11 p.m5: p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m4 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gm 115)
M-Th 11 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 11 a.m5: p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m4 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
M-F 1:30 p.m5 p.m.
T-Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
RACQUKTBAII
RESERVATIONS
M-Fl 1:30 a.m3 p.m. (in person)
M-F 12 noon-3 p.m. (phone in)
� Operational hours adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Private
room, near campus, $107, �i phone,
utilities, cable. Must be neat.
Nonsmoker. Call Lori or Diana:
752-1001.
NEEDED: Seeking responsible
roommate to share B-unit at Ring
gold Towers for the summer. Com
pletely furnished, AC, accessories
included. Call weekdays before 3 PM
757 6366. Ask for Dan.
HOUSE FOR RENT: House for
rent: 6 bedroom house near univer
sity, 305 E. 14th St. Summer or long
term rental. To be renovated. $350.
7585299.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Needed for 2 bedroom Apt. Call
after 3 PM, 757 3131.
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 bedroom
apt. V2 utilites, King's Row Apts.
Call after 7 PM. 758 9119.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
new, modern townhouse starting Ju-
ly 1 or Aug 1 Call 355 5325.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Large 2
bedroom apt. $92.50 per month plus
3 utilities, Village East Apts. Call
Doug at 758 0395 and leave message.
MISC
TYPING: Resumes, term papers,
letters, etc. Call Karen, 752-0498,
M-F, 8-5.
SALE
FOR SALE: RCA VHS VCR for $200.
Pioneer sx 780 receiver 55 wch
$125. Hitachi HT 405 turntable, DD
with new ADC cartridge- $110. I
negotiate. 752-8483.
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro-
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An
thony at 757-6366 or 752-0291.
record.
On the men's side of the court,
NETBUSTERS barely passed the
HUSTLERS 20-18 giving both
teams a 3-1 won-loss record.
Undefeated FELLOWS downed
JOE'S JAMMERS 20-17 and the
OSCARS took the trophy away
with a 20-17 victory. NET-
BUSTERS, OSCARS and
HUSTLERS have identical 3-1
records and hold on to second
place.
Zero is the BASEBENDERS
lucky number as they continue to
hold on to their 5-0 record in
softball. The LAKE BOYS hope
to break their streak in next
weeks play-off action on the in-
tramural diamonds.
The semi-final round has
begun on the tennis courts across
campus. The lady netters have
almost completed this session's
tournament as Sheryl Redman
and Linda Gassaway swing into
the finals.
It's come down to the 'Big
Four' on the men's court. Tom
Kiehl takes on Tommy Sketeris
while Robert long goes head-to-
head with Ken Waters. In
tramural sources pick one of last
years contenders. Tom Kiehl to
win this session's tennis tourna-
ment.
No news is good news for co-
rec volleyball teams. GOO I).
BADUGLY continue to
dominate their fellow spikers
with a 5-0 record. SIMMER
BUMS are running a close second
as they hold a 4-1 record.
Second session aerobic fitness
registration begins June 19-21. Be
sure to sign up t �
workouts in the
Memorial G y n
register come b
Memorial Gym
June 24
Remember: trail rid
man's stables every Th
pm. Your cost is onl)
hour with th special IK
count. Transportation
ed as long as four or m pie
are joining in on the fun.
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pm WZMB-91 3
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QPENSUHDMS8'
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PM
ALL VARIETIES
Pillsbury Flour
C
5 lb.
bag
58
STAR KIST
I
MARKET STYLE
Chunk Tuna Ground Beef
.
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
10.00 OR MORE PURCHASE.
HUNT'S
Tomato Ketchup
0
32 oz.
btl.
68
40con
2
6V2 oz
cans
99
0
SAVE 4 O
II 71c
LIMIT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL
10.00 OR MORE PURCHASE
DIET COKE-SPRITE-TAB
Coca Cola
,t
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
10.00 OR MORE PURCHASE.
I
SAVE ?
60c f
2
Itr.
btl.
99
v
lbs. or
more
lb
88
c
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
Rib Steak
Eye
j Boneless
SAVE
r
lb

398
WAREHOUSE PRICES
A&P TRADITIONAL
WAREHOUSE PRICES
MRS. FILBERTS
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FRESH LEAN COUNTRY FARM
Spaghetti Sauce Margarine Qtrs. Pork ChODS
SAVtt
V 3�C32 oz.
-�� jar
BEEF � SPANISH � CHICKEN
Rice-A-Roni
99
c
SAVE ,
41ei
2100
Assorted
1 lb. H LIMIT T
MB AOOITIC
SB ORMOF
A-1
Steak Sauce
A&P
Mixed Vegetables
PRIDE OF THE FARM
Canned Tomatoes
KRAFT
3
3
8 oz
p�g
10 oz
btl.
16 oz
cans
14' 7 oz
cans
SAVE
pkgs.
TWO WITH
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MORE ORDER
SAVE
81
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179 save
100 �
KRAFT
Grape
Jelly
MARTHA WHITE JIM DANDY
Quick Grits
Coffee Creamer
A4P WHITE � YELLOW
Facial Tissue
Lib.
jar
99
0
American Singles
CHEESE FOOD SLICES
Ched-0-Bit
A&P SHARP � EXTRA SHARP
Cheddar Bar
KRAFT PHILADELPHIA
Cream Cheese
DELUXE
I SAVE
8 oz
pkg
12 oz
pkg
8 oz
Pkg
8 oz
pkg
m
129 SAVE
I19
t" 30
Ion SAVI
10'
108
lb
PRODUCE SPECIALS
TEXAS
SAVE
10c
99c S
Jumbo
Cantaloupes
T SAVE
each
only
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Fox
Pizza
10 02.
pkg.
59
RED
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lb
2
pkg
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11 oz
jar
SAVE
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2 1
PiQ BRAND
Paper Towels
REGULAR
t SAVE
144
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2 rot
59
�, SAVE
9920�
. SAVE
990 35�
. SAVE
88 ff
Busch
Beer

�.
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12
12 oz.
cans
FROZEN
Ann Page Dinners
PACKERS LABEL
French Fries
GREEN GIANT NIBBLERS
Corn on Cob
PET REGULAR
Pie Shells
TAYLOR , Ma
California
SAVE
Ripe
Watermelon
11 oz
pkg
5 lb
pkg
6 ear
Pg
12 oz
pkg
79 26
�J29 SME
99
7940
88
129
ich S
alf 1
GENERAL MERCHANDISE SPECIALS
10
SAVE
SAVE
REGULAR � MINT . GEL
Crest Toothpaste
PEROXIDE OR
A&P Alcohol
SMTfTf
2 6 4 oz O00
tubes O
2 16 oz "100
btis
DELI SPECIALS
Cellars

1.5 Itr.
btl.
349
BUY ONE LB OF WHITE S QUALITY
Boiled Ham
GET ONE LB OF
Potato Salad
2
99
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 12, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 12, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.411
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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