The East Carolinian, May 29, 1985






(51je lEast (ftarnltntatt
Serving (he East arolina campus communit
ol.59 n.
Wednesday Ma 29, P85
irecnville, V(
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ling Homosexual
Groups Could End
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Drug Proposal Aimed
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Rebel Wins Prestigious
A CP Magazine A ward
i
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'Hang A Right Mac'
Ibis ECU student seems to be giiny directions to n truck driver wh
can't find his wa around campus.
B) K N. i ns
Rebel

ite Press j
. a
in it:
. ach t.t lent of the
Pacemaker not only
masters each area, hut
also shows
innovation. "
�Paul Buys
h i is one ol
� es ' eceive the annual
ed a- an Ac P U-
erican
award based
ies:

1 r y.
� I ayout and forma
� Photography and an
� Content, writiri b
� Concept.
According to Paul Buys, Ac p
manager ci services,
"Each recipient of the
Pacemaker noi onl) masters each
area (those listed above), but also
shows innovation
u �
Redb �-
:eld
I
i Tmost
vet

Rebel, wa
ment. Howe
er the follow s
vl :
i
� Ac
i
cep .
. ver formal
id (i.e the
s masthea
� " . The sheei contribui or
. i
� Its amb
egiate
and er
.�
� The show case
in the well's Gallen seel
inspiration, as are the selecl
themselves "
The Rebel is published am
ly, and is usuallv distributed
ECl' and the surroudinc cc
Three persons affiliated with munity in April of each yeat
Representative Lives Up To American Ideals
B H AKOI I) 1) M R
I Sf�. I
people are tun
mply b tuse they d m't
: their sometime i
ticai philosophy, Bui look closer
' ount) and one will find
tha Farmville native and state
Rep Walter B Jones fr is the
eption, rather than the rule
ones, 42, says he likes to live
up to what people like to see in
their state representative �
straightforward answers, honesty
and the ability to get the job
done. Although this is only
Jones' second term, he has been
politically active since 1957, when
he was a legislative page
Recently, he has sponsored
several bills in the General
Assembly aimed at keeping
politics honest and protecting the
counties he represents.
Viewed as a longshot by critics,
one of his most recent bills would
allow voters in the state to amend
the state constitution by making
it illegal for a candidate to libel
his opponent.
'The public heard so many
half-truths during the last elec-
tion Jones said. "I think the
public was being cheated because
they never really got all the facts.
people will
a p a ho is honest and .
le need the
ting
with it) in i fes
and 1 don't think it belongs
in this one "
iB wj
Walter B. Jones Jr.
Jones mentioned that several
people in the area had written to
him concerning the bill, and he
said one person told him that
after last year's bitter elections
she was "ashamed to be a
Tarheel She lauded Jones's ef-
forts to get rid of smear cam-
paign tactics and putting an end
to political slandering.
Politics is a hard game, I
realize that lones said, "But,
other professions that sell a pro-
duct will draw attention to what a
particular product can do foi
you. I don't know why we an't
do that during campaigns
lones' libel bill is similar to a
( aliforma law, which says any
person found guilty of libeling or
slandering an opponent can be
disqualified from the elections
and or lose his elected seat.
lones recently had one ol his
bills made law Now, it is illegal
for anyone to use sulfites to
preserve vegatables or fruits
available at retail and wholesale
markets Sulfites are additives
that keep perishables, such as let-
tuce, looking fresh, but have also
been found to cause adverse reac-
tions in people with respiratory
problems
lones said idea to ban sulfites
came about when he received
word from a constituent who got
sick after eating lettuce with the
additive He did some research
and found many people with
respiratory ailments were allergic
to the additive. After hearing
about an 11-year-old girl m
Oregon who died after a reaction
to the sulfites, he decided to take
action.
"It iok a while to get the bill
introduced, hi: 1 was a I at
theamounl of suppon tc ban this
additive Jones also said the bill
"will now finally put an end to
this serious problem in North
Carolina
Because so man) iI students
aie from a different county oi
state, they mav not see lones as
an one o their people to be con
cerned with However. Jones said
ECU is nonetheless "well
represented in Raleigh
Sens lorn Taft, D-Pitt, and
Bob Martin, D Pitt, both hold
seats on the Appropriations
Committee, as well as Rep Id
Warren, D-N.C . Jones said
"Probably the most important
thing in educational institutions
is funding Jones said, "and
E:ast Carolina Universit students
can be assured that thev are well
represented in the House ami
Senate It is the students that
make a university strong We're
delighted to be able to represent
them
Jones' response to the recent
passage of a bill which would
make happy hours illegal in
North Carolina after Aug. 1 was
that "it was done in the best in-
terest of the state, not anything
against college students
He said many legislators saw
that bars in the state's larger
cities were drawing a large
number of people after work,
many o' whom were tired and
had not eaten for several hours
"Before the bill, happv hours
were encouraging people to drink
more than they should, therebv
endangering main others
The bill received no opposition
from the State Restaurant
�Vsociation, which Jones said
was a positive move. He also add-
ed that the Association wanted
the Alcoholic Beverage Control
Commission to make a decision.
not the legislators
lones' latest bill will probablv
have the greatest influence in pro-
tecting state employees from los
mg their jobs if thev fail to make
political contributions or support
an elected or appointed political
candidate.
"It is the right of every
American to support whoever he
chooses. It is also his right to
choose not to support someone.
It's just not the American way
for someone to fear losing his or
her job because they don't sup-
port a particular candidate
In supporting Jones' bill. The
Raleigh Times said in a
editorial that "Pressure foi cam-
paign contributions
manv corrupting abuses �
follow from letting ele ons
decided bv who can raise tthe
most money, bv fair means or
foul. We should noi tolerate I
abuse. To keep state employment
honest and productive, and state
emplovees free to do their work
without fear, (this) bill must
pass
'I have faith in state
emplovees lones said "1 think
when this bill is passed, taxpayers
will be helped as well � state
emplovees will be able to do their
iob. instead of worrying if thev Ml
lose it or not
Jones declined to comment on
the specifics of who was being
threatened, but said, "the situa-
tion has gotten out of hand
Jones' political career is grow-
ing everyday and some suspect
he'll probably run for his father's
congressional seat when the time
comes. But right now, Jones said,
"I'll run for the State house in
'86. I may seek another office �
I'm very interested in doing that
� and with the Lord's help and
the help of my friends, I'll just
have to wait for that opportunity
to arise





1 Hi" EAS1 CAROLINIAN
MAY 29, 198
May's Campus Crimes Top Record
More crimes were reported on
campus during the month of
April than in any other month of
the 1984-85 school year, accor-
ding to Uniform Crime Reports
filed b the Dept. of Public Safe-
ty
total of 90 crimes were
reported to campus Public Safety
officers during that period, which
included four assaults, 30
burglaries. 54 larcenies and two
� vehicle thefts. Nineteen of
the incidents were either cleared
b arrest or by other means.
Property stolen was valued at
$14,847. Public Safety officers
also recovered $8,563 worth of
property and arrested 29 people.
During the last two years, we
have witnessed a changing pat-
tern of crime on campus accor-
ding to It. Gene McAbee, Crime
Prevention Officer for the ECU
Public Safety Department.
McAbee also said that prior to
those years, campus crimes usual-
ly decreased during the final
months of the regular school year
as students were preparing for ex-
ams. But. for the last two years,
crime has increased during that
period. "The totals for April
mus! be close to an all-time mon-
thly high says McAbee.
e previous high crime totals
the year were for Oct. and
when 86 crimes were
Tied.
V ith the end of the spring
semester, reports of crime
decreased as indicated in the
crime log for May 1 to May 27:
May I. 1:45 p.m. � A bicycle
reported stolen from the west
ide of Jarvis Dorm. 6 p.m. �
Three books were reported stolen
from a room on the 7th floor of
White Dorm. 7:45 p.m. � Dar-
rell Ray Woody, 18, of Jones
Dorm was arrested for larceny of
pedals from a bicycle.
May3, 3:20p.m. � A painting
was reported stolen from the Art
Building.
May 4, 12:55 a.m. � A break-
in of a room was reported on the
first floor of Garrett Dorm. 12:15
p.m. � A break-in and larceny
was reported at a room on the 4th
floor of Scott Dorm. 3:IS p.m.
� A refrigerator was reported
stolen in a break-in of a room on
the 3rd floor of Garrett Dorm.
4:15 p.m. � A wallet was
reported stolen from a room on
the second tloor of Umstead
Dorm.
May 6. 12:30p.m. � A larceny
was reported from the Resident
Director's office at Umstead
Dorm.
May 11, 1 p.m. � A larceny of
money from a wallet was
reported at WZMB.
May 12, 4 a.m. � Gary Ber-
nard Nobles, 20, of Ayden was
arrested for driving without an
operator's license.
May 19, 1:40 a.m. � Matthew
Michael Nagem, 19, of Jarvis
Dorm was arrested for being in-
toxicated and disruptive on the
west side of Hetcher Dorm.
May 20, 4p.m. � A larceny of
athletic equipment was reported
at Harrington Field.
May 21, 6p.m. � A larceny of
personal items was reported from
a locker at the swimming pool at
Minges.
May 22, 2:40 a.m. � Leigh
Cole Poland, 22, of Greenville
was arrested for DW1 and
careless and reckless driving at
Ninth and Charles St. 4:40 a.m.
� Jessie Thurman Mitchell, Jr
32, of Greenville was arrested for
DWI at Fifth and Meade St.
May 24, 11:25 a.m. � A
break-in of a vehicle and larceny
of a stereo equalizer was reported
in the parking lot at the east end
of Ninth St.
May 25, 2:44 a.m. � Billy Joe
Bunting, 20, of Farmville was ar-
rested for DWI on the east side of
Umstead Dorm.
May 26, 12:45 a.m. �
Christopher James O'Brien, 20,
of Pinehurst, N.C was arrested
for DWI on the north side of
Joyner Library.
Announcements
GPA
The Counseling Center is offering, free of
charge, the following session on helping you
increase your g p a and still have fun Tak
mg Exams Setting yourself Up To Win,
Tuesday. June, 4, 12 M PM The session
will be held in Wright Annex No advance
registration necessary For further mforma
tion, please call 757 66I
National Teacher Examination
There is a special National Teacher Ex
amination scheduled for Saturday, June 11
Candidates must contact the testing center
pric to June 5 to register for the test To
save candidates travel time, you should oe
aware that tests are also being given at
Atlantic Christian College. Wilson N C
Weslyan Rocky Mount Fayetfeville State
and New Bern High School
Ambassadors
Frisbee
Attention Feesh and Bisoo and anyone in
terested in playing fr.sbee 'his somme' r
Greenv.Me The ECU Fnstoe OjB ana �rv
Ultimate irates extend �her warmest shot
invitaion to everyone to come out ana ' .
it it you don t know how to wh.p .t w�
teach you Bottom of College Mill Tjesoa.
Thursday and Sunday at 5 30 Be 'here o� o
ofciong I
We will have a m
in room 147 MSC
etmg Thursday a� 4 PV
Camp Starlight
interested in working with children and
young people in a beautiful setting? Camp
Starlight is located in the Poconos Mountains
of Pennsylvania They need counselors and
water skiing instructors For more informa
tion contact Cooperative Education, 3)3
Rawl 757 6979
Environmental Health
Position available for Environmental
Health student m INDT with background m
safety with chemical company m Wiim
mgton area Salary of 6 per hour and
assistance in finding housing Excellent op
portunity for summer Contact Co op Office
room 314 Rawl Bldg
Construction Management
Positions A�aiabie tor cons
management maiors wth Easte'r sw
Carolina Building Corporation For'more r
formation contact Coope'a' ve Educal
Office Ra
Correction
In the May 22 issue, the amount of faculty raises was incorrectly
reported. According to James L. Smith, chairman of the Faculty
Senate, not all of ECU's faculty received a 10 percent across the board
raise. All other state employees did, however. Smith explained that the
UNC Board of Governors believed university teachers should receive
pay raises based partly on merit.
Therefore, each department, including faculty and staff, received a
10 percent raise based on salaries. The money was divided in each
department and went towards merit awards, promotions, past salary
inequities and upgrading of positions.
The Plaza Deli located at
THE PLAZA
Offers a New Concept In Deli Foods
We Offer
Daily Specials Orders to Go
Happy Hour 5 til Closing
Good Music Good Times
11AM-9PM Mon. Ihru Sal. 756-4024
Are We Having Fun Yet?
A dvertise
Eyeglass Frame Sale
30 to
60 OFF
AM
Frames
In Stock
a h purchase of RX Lenses)
QftO ALL NON-PRESCRIPTION
OU O off SUNGLASSES.
B8.L Rayban
v&
u d e d
Sale Ends May 31, 1985 (NoOther Discounts Valid)
c�ar
V'UE
pucians
CALLUS FOR AN
EYE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
OF YOUR CHOICE
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Phone 752-1446
Other Locations In Kinston, Goldsboro & Wilson
Open Mon. Fri. 9 AM til 5:30 PM
Beecher Kirkley Dispensing Opticiar
�m� 50 OFF
Process & Print
13VaC
From
I print y
Ex uiit � �; . 1
i-xpires ftp 8�
mm - lor print niir.
� � ftartfe reg M
NOW $4.73!
PLAY
7�t:
7
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Bivd Greenville
ODDS CHART
ODDS TO WIN
Odds vary depending on the number o� Game TicKets you ootair
Trie more Tickets vou collect the better your chances of �inmn(
ODDS CHART EFFECTIVE May 11, IMS
! NUMBER ' ODOSFOR I OOOS FOR OOMToT
PRIZE OF ONE OAME 2 QAME 4QJUIE
VAUJE , PRIZES TICKET TKKETS � TV-Krn
12.000
1 In . y . 14 1
11.000
1 In
1 In
4-
1 m
� ' '985
1

items ma pces
WIN
OP TO
1 In
I 200
S 100
t 20
S K
$ 5
f 1
TOTAL -v�
$2,000!
AIIft J
$100
FREE GROCERIES
DIET COKE SPRITE
DIET SPRITE TAB OR
Coca
Cola
Puffs
REGULAR AND L �
Budweiser
JKobfW&ild.
F5-
KROGER ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
Wieners
J2P
CREAMi OR
CP. - �
imiSi
� � �� � �.
80 OFF
Beprints
' ' �'�' �� or print film
Juirt 39c each eg 37c
Exp,rcl 85 tPhx&PW&Lbd F3-22
iiS?
A" A
50 OFF
Color Enlargements
B7 � � mm ii as
a� 10 reg i ' row ta so
nxi4 r�� iii 50 mm �8 7B
12 5x5 ftxH 35mr md ��,
rn; rr.
Expires 6-17 85
JilQkfW&lld
Carolina East Mall 756-6078
(North entrance - Near Belks)
Open AonSat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Su.days 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
COUNTRY OVEN PLAIT
Sugar
Donuts
Jif
Peanut Butter
16 Ct
Pkg
COST CUTTER
HOT DOG OR
V.
LEMON LIMf
� �� " UNCH or
Orange
Gatorade
BUY ONE 14 OZ CUP
MEXICAN SALSA OR
NACHO CHEESE SAUCE ($2.99)
GET ONE 14 OZ. BAG DELI
Hamburger i JJi
Bun JZw-
4b OZ
Jar
Nacho Chips
�� " � v SAVE
� - $189
AOVEBTISED ITEM POllCV
Eacn o� tnese .lOvertisea items
is rpauireo to oe reaany
�fvaiiaoi for saie m earn Kroger
Sav on except as soeofiraiiy
notea m tnis �a i� we ao run
Out o an item we wm ofer you
your cnoice o a comparable
item when avanaoie reflecting
me same savings or a ramenecx
wnicn win entitle you to pur
cnase the advertised item at
tne advertised pnee within jo
days Only one vendor coupon
,mii oe accepted per item
J
INCLUDES 1-PT
POTATO SALAD AND 6 ROLLS
WISHBONE
Fried
Chicken
SWEET Ripe
Largeib
S.ze
$
Pc
Bkt
499
HAVE YOU CHECKED
YOUR PRESCRIPTION
PRICES LATELY?
Compare what you
presently pay with
the price at the
KROGER PHARMACY!
DOUBLE
MFG'S
FOR IJcSv FACE VA-UE)
�-UR EVERY S10 PURCHASE'
��� mm teton. -1lL


1 pi iiQi
MHMcnq
I - �
�arf�
Coll
(CPS) V
heav congn
National
hae di
campaigr
to "a
IMicarajj
The g
"Save th�
onl awi �
��
humor
Ilcge -
Din
The ge Repul
ched the
publicize ;
back
relic �
MedS

S
-
Dia
Dr
Ticks Posi
Summerti
Complica
Rock M
Fevei
eastern N"X No
�reather is
ow
-
Rock M
HEALTH
COLUMN,
-
Ticks nfes
i anism Ricke
may he I 1
heay brush
a1 e pic ked up "
�� om � d
nil the d w as
humariN.
S � �- Rock
Spotted Feei isua i
three to ten da-
- continuous fe 1
are present. A ras
� aKsas preseni
starts on the wrists, -
and palms j
then spreads to the
of the bodv Cither s
may include musck
pain, sci
tiredness, sweltini
� estlessness
Prevention of Rocl
Spotted Feer is to a
areas such as woods
brush areas It's aio a
to appl tick repellent w
into a tick-infested area)
If a tick is found on yj
01 clothing. remoe it
with some paper or si
touch the tick with unj
hands � Rocky Mount;
ted Fever can be
crushing a tick and
laminating the broken
infectious tick secretion
If you think you ha'
Mountain Spotted Fee
our health provider a-
possible. Treatment tcj
Mountain Spotted Fei
to obtain and er e?
started in the early stag
disease. Rocky Mountan
Fever cannot be transmij
one person to another
also a vaccine available!
sons with regular e
Rocky Mountain Spotu
More information
disease may be obtained I
Student Health Center





THEJAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 29, 1985
ts
Fnsbee
B sor aria anyoo n
�.ex mil summer in
snee C 'vib ana fh�
rfM �'mfsl hott
� f ou' a"d wriip
n p t we 11
� , H Toesday
M rHec� or t�
If jn Management
J15 'ruction
�s'?�- Nortrt
re in
i iia'ion
oods
04
� - Saw on

�. sgr�rs Beservec!
id Pnces
� tnru Sat
jnel '985
CERIES
ese
iffs
8
Jif
iut Butter
69
ripe
exas
iteloupe
8�
OUBLE
MFCS
,UPONS
K WE WILL DOUBLE 5
UP TO 50 FACE VALUE)
fRY S10 PURCHASE'
��� deta4� � ,��
College Republicans End Contra Campaign
iCPSl � Aft�
(CPS) After encountering
heavy congressional pressure, the
National College Republicans
have dropped a half-facetious
Reagan administration win ap- Since Congress, upon discover-
nroval for renewed eovernment ing the CIA's program last year,
funding for the rebels. angrily stopped the aid, a dozen
Pandin says the "campaign" or so U.S. conservative organiza-
campaign to get college students was really just a poster "roughly" tions have been raising funds to
adopt' individual modeled on a "Save the �JH thP rohok
Nicaraguan rebels.
The group has dropped its
"Save the Contras" fund drive,
only a week after it was launched!
"Some people have no sense of
humor about this sort of thing
College Republican Depu'tv
Director Jeff Pandin says.
The College Republicans laun-
ched their drive, Pandin says, to
publicize private-sector efforts to
back the Nicaraguan rebels with
relief supplies, and to help the
Children" poster, which solicits
donations by pointing out that
for just a few cents a day, patrons
can support an improverished
child abroad.
"For 53 cents a day, you can
support a Nicaraguan freedom-
fighter the College Republican
poster says.
Until last June, the Central In-
telligence Agency aided rebels
fighting the Nicaraguan govern-
ment regime.
aid the rebels.
Now the Reagan administra-
tion favors renewed aid to the
rebels, claiming Nicaragua's
government and the Soviet Union
are allied to export revolution to
other Central American coun-
tries.
To help the administration and
the private fundraisers, the Col-
lege Republicans' national board
authorized the posters in
January. The group distributed
some 5,000 posters in mid-
Med School Sponsors Camp
March, but quickly was attacked
in Congress.
On March 19th, Reps. Jim
Leach, R-Iowa, and Mel Levine,
D-California, brandished a copy
of the College Republican poster
on the floor of the House of
Representatives as they introduc-
ed legislation to ban all forms of
private U.S. aid for the rebels.
Leach contends the Founding
Fathers believed the "American
citizens should not be allowed to
wage war on governments with
which the U.S. is at peace, and
with which Congress has
specifically proscribed interven-
tion
The groups funneling aid to the
Nicaraguan rebels have "decided
to take foreign policy into their
own hands Leach says.
Several congressmen endorsed
the College Republican cam-
paign, Pandin claims but the
overall reaction suggested it
would not help renew congres-
sional support for the rebels.
"Because we're associated with
the Republican Party, people
take what we do as having party
approval he says. "We have to
be sensitive to that
The Save the Children Founda-
tion was unhappy too, claiming
the College Republican poster
violated the copyright on its
poster.
Pandin says any funds donated
will be returned to the sender.
The GOP organization had
Dlanned to purchase non-militarv
supplies such as medicine. Pan-
din declined to say how the group
planned to transport the supplies
to the rebels.
Pandin says College
Republican leaders did not
estimate how much the campaign
would raise.
ATTIC
THUR. Q & FRI.
Buster Brown
SAT.
Brice Street
(Phil Collins Video)
HI Nr�sBurrau
A special camp for youngsters
and teenagers who have diabetes
is planned for June 16-2! ii a
waterfront camp sponsored by
the ECU School of Medicine and
the Carteret County Diabetic
Support Group.
Camp Needles In The Pines
will be held at Camp Mitchell, the
4-H camp located on Bogue
Sound at Swansboro. This water-
front location will enable
campers aged 8-16 to enjoy swim-
ming, canoeing, sailing, baseball,
softball, volleyball, tennis, arts
and crafts, square dancing,
nature study and folklore classes.
Special activities will include a
beach outing with campfire,
storytelling and a talent show.
Diabetes education is a very
important aspect of the camp,
said Dr. James P. Gutai,
Ticks Pose
Summertime
Complications
Rocky Mountain Spotted
Fever-weather has arrived in
eastern N.C. Now that the
leather is warm, many people
enjoy camping, hiking and other
outdoor activities. But students
should be advised of the potential
dangers of ticks, the carrier of
Rocky Mountan Spotted Fever.
HEALTH
COLUn
Ticks infested with the
organism Rickettsia rickettsii
may be found in woods and
heavy brush areas. These ticks
have picked up the organism
from rodents and dogs and may
transmit the disease by biting
humans.
Symptoms of Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever usually appear
three to ten days after exposure.
A continuous fever and headache
are present. A rash is often (but
not always) present and usually
starts on the wrists, ankles, soles
and palms of feet and hands, and
then spreads to the central parts
of the body. Other symptoms
may include muscle and joint
pain, sensitivity to light,
tiredness, swelling, insomnia and
restlessness.
Prevention of Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever is to avoid infected
areas such as woods and heavy
brush areas. It's also a good idea
to apply tick repellent when going
into a tick-infested area.
If a tick is found on your body
or clothing, remove it carefully
with some paper or sticks. Never
touch the tick with unprotected
hands � Rocky Mountain Spot-
ted Fever can be caught by
crushing a tick and then con-
taminating the broken skin with
infectious tick secretions
If you think you have Rocky
Mountain Spotted Fever, contact
your health provider as soon as
possible. Treatment for Rocky
Mountain Spotted Fever is easy
to obtain and very effective if
started in the early stages of the
disease. Rocky Mountain Spotted
Fever cannot be transmitted from
one person to another. There is
also a vaccine available for per-
sons with regular exposure to
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.
More information about this
disease may be obtained from the
Student Health Center.
associate professor of pediatrics
at the ECU medical school and a
specialist in childhood diabetes.
"It is imperative that young peo-
ple with diabetes learn to manage
their disease early in life he
said, "in order to avoid needless
complications later
Teaching the youngsters about
proper diet, new types of insulin
and glucose monitoring at home
are integral parts of the camping
program. Last year, a number of
campers learned for the first time
to give themselves insulin injec-
tions.
All these activities will be
supervised by Gutai, and a
specially trained camp staff made
up of pediatric residents from
ECU, diabetes nurse educators
from Pitt County Memorial
Hospital, recreation specialists
from Carteret Technical Institute
and members of the Carteret
County Diabetic Support Group.
All are unpaid volunteers.
This year's camp is limited to
60 participants and will cost them
$100 each, which includes
medications, supplies, food and
lodging.
This Summer
7F VOW RE COMING TO SUMMER SCHOOL ANV NEED A LACE TO LIVE, CALL US
A FEW RJNGG0LV TOt'JERS UNITS ARE AVAILABLE TO SUBLET FOR THE SUMMFR.

m
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
student condos at ECU campus
vale and rental units
on-site management
night security personnel
fully furnished and accessorized
carpeted & air conditioned
kitchen appliance fjrr.shed
lxjry facilities
resilient parking stitters
h
WARD PROPERTY BROKERS
IOB :cERCE SRE E I
r-RAA er see
GREE . .E N C 2-83S
919 756-84.0
2510 E. 10th St. Next To Pizza Hut
'If you have to do laundry
do it in style
New Student Initiation
To Campus
Organizations
Student Government requests any
campus organization interested in the
opportunity of meeting new ECU
Students to contact the Student
Government offices by Friday May
31st. (757-6611, ext. 218). Thank You.
S3
- ' : '�?"�" C. 7
i'm�i





2Uib iEaat (Earflltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, c�, sianager
Jennifer Jendrasiak, mmm nam
Harold Joyner. co-s e� Tom Luvender. nmrvM,
Randy Mews, cos &�, Anthony Martin, inW m
Rick McCORMac, spomEduo, John Peterson, cmm
Bill Mitchell, crcui,� bill Dawson, ���� hmt
Daniel Maurer. .�.�.� �� DeChanile Johnson. ��
May 29, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Discrimination
Decision Should Be Students'
A bill filed in the state legislature
which would prohibit campus
recognition of homosexual
organizations is a step back to the
dark ages as well as an infringement
on the rights of student govern-
ments.
The bill, which was filed by Rep.
Michael P. Decker, R-Forsyth,
would not allow university recogni-
tion of a n y "avowedly
homosexual'1 organization or one
which advocated homosexuality.
The recognition andor funding
of individual groups should be left
up to individual student government
associations. Any gro'ip can be
recognized by the ECU SGA simply
by presenting a constitution for ap-
proval by the SGA legislature.
When universities acted in loco
parentis, they had the power to
determine what was considered to
be "moral" behavior for students.
It seems as if the state is now trying
to acquire that power by determin-
ing which groups deserve recogni-
tion by the SGA.
The state has no place in the
determination of which groups will
be officially recognized. SGA
legislators pay student fees, as do
the students they represent, in-
cluding homosexuals. If the SGA
wants to recognize homosexual
organizations and provide them
with funding from student fees,
they should be able to do so.
The implications of state involve-
ment in the SGA recognition of
groups are frightening. For exam-
ple, could the state then decide they
didn't want schools to recognize
left-wing groups because they con-
sidered their beliefs to be wrong?
From Decker's proposal, one
could almost assume he was in-
spired by massive uprisings of
homosexual organizations
throughout the UNC system. It's
actually extremely ditticult for a
homosexual organization to get
started on a campus.
When the East Carolina Gay
Community attempted to get
recognition and funding several
years ago, there was a tremendous
furor. The group wanted a small
amount of money to print literature
addressing homosexual concerns.
Thev were finally funded.
Prohibiting recognition of
homosexual organizations might
well affect a significant proportion
of the student body. According to
many surveys, approximately 10
percent of the adult population is
homosexual. Discriminating against
10 percent of the tuition- and fee-
paying student body is un-
forgivable.
Also, discrimination against
homosexual organizations can have
strong legal consequences, as of-
ficials at Georgetown University
discovered recently. Georgetown's
trustees voted to recognize twc
organizations for homosexual
students to settle a discriminatior
lawsuit brought against the universi-
ty-
One of the purposes of a college
education is hopefully to expose a
student to different values anc
lifestyles, thus broadening theii
horizons. It's not as if students art
being forced to understand and con-
done the homosexual lifestyle.
Like any other minority
on campus, homosexuals should
have the right to organize and
students should have the chance to
hear what the groups have to say.
Students themselves should be
able to determine what they con-
sider morally permissible legislation
for the student government, not the
state legislature.
Russians Are Worse
Apartheid Not So Bad
For God's sake, will all the bleeding
hearts please stop yelling about South
Africa's apartheid? Let them turn off
their tear glands, forget about their silly
slogans, and listen to some reason for a
change.
There are so many misconceptions
and misunderstandings about the apar-
theid issue that it's hard to know which
one to attack first. One thing that must
be cleared up concerns how repressive
South African society is compared to
others. Congressman Walter Fauntroy,
D-D.C, represents the contemporary
warped thinking here � on CNN's
"Crossfire" program, he branded
South Africa "the most repressive
society in the world He was denounc-
ing the arrest of hundreds of blacks,
some of whome died in custody.
His solo denunciation is a sign of the
mentality among many American
leaders. South Africa arrests hundreds
of blacks and Fauntroy and Company
are filled with righteous but selective in-
dignation. The Soviet Union and its ilk
throw millions into slave labor camps to
be worked to death, and Fauntroy is
silent. South Africans have some
religious freedom; communist countries
like Albania enforce atheism by killing
the religious. But according to Faun-
troy's logic, South Africa is worse.
Such thinking, if it deserves to be called
that, is pathetic.
Now let's talk about disinvestment.
Some apartheid opponents want total
disinvestment in order to pressure
South Africa to grant full civil rights to
its black and colored population.
Despite evidence to the contrary, they
proclaim that such a move would work.
Actually, disinvestment would give only
moral comfort to its opponents. What
does this mean?
Unpleasant reality would whack us in
the face if we disinvested We cannot
escape the fact that South Africa is
loaded with precious metals we simply
can't do without, many of which aren't
found elsewhere. As one steel executive
The Right Word
Dennis Kilcovne
puts it, "Without these (minerals), you
couldn't build a jet engine or an
automobile, run a train, build an oil
refinery or a power plant. You couldn't
process food, or run a sanitary
restaurant, or a hospital operating
room, or build a computer In other
words, if we disinvested and cut
ourselves off from these minerals, we
would simply have to write off any fur-
ther technological advance. We could
kiss our economy goodbye and watch
national security go down the tubes.
Consider also the regime that might
emerge if the present government is
overthrown. For decades the blacks
have been denied education and ex-
perience in civil affairs and, conse-
quently, are probably not ready to
assume full control of a democratic
government. A look at all the other
states of Africa, where self-government
usually fails, is not reassuring. The
same situation exists in neighboring
Rhodesia. International pressure was
applied there, white rule ended, and
black tribal rule, led by Marxist Robert
Mugabe, began. Today Rhodesia,
known as Zimbabwe, is a poverty-
stricken, chaotic mess. The minority
tribes are severly oppressed, whites are
fleeing the country and takine their
money with them, and a one-par j
tatorship has emerged fina
primarily by communist North K �
I'm not saying that such a scci u
necessarily happen in South Africa
it seems the liberals have ,
thought to such possibilities Thev &
mand South Africa grant c mp :
rights to blacks in a day � it to .
100 years after slavery to do the tanu
for American blacks so who th
are we to be lecturing them0 And
tainly when vou compare South V-
to the U.S there is a big differenct
But South Africa is an African rial
not a western one. It is Africa's
prosperous nation, especialh
blacks, for whom wages rose 275 re-
cent from 19"1 to 1982. In faci
reason. South Africa has a seri
blem with illegal immigration.
Hey, maybe we should ask South
Africa's blacks what they think 7
are overwhelmingly opposed tc
disinvestment. Gatsha Buthetezei,
leader of the Zulu tribe (the couain i
largest) said, "it is moralh impenswe
that American firms remain active here
U.S. Ambassador to Sou ft a
Herman Nickel pointed out thai theen-
tire history of racial progre- is linked
to economic progress. Economic ad-
vancement under free-markei
economics has been the most powerful
force for integration and civil rights
because economic power is political
power. Disinvestment would soi i
the miserable position of South Africa's
blacks, isolate them economical!), arc
sentence them permanently to the suf-
fering which is so often decried b
disinvestment proponents.
Getting Mentioned Key To Presidential Race
By Charles Lane
Th� New Republic
From his perch in a small office on the
top floor of a glass and steel tower
somehwere between Capitol Hill and the
Potomac, the Great Mentioner scans the
crop of promising politicians in search
of the lucky few who deserve to be Men-
tioned as possible presidential con-
tenders in 1988 and, believe it or not
1992.
AW York Times columnist Russell
Baker first discovered the Great Men-
tioner, who has never been seen or inter-
viewed, in 1963. Since then, the G.Ms
only media contact has come in
clandestine phone calls to a select group
within the Washington press corps who
dutifully report his early predictions.
The G.Ms work is critical. Getting
Mentioned lends that elusive yet essen-
tial quality � credibility � to a fledgl-
ing campaign. It often means further
press coverage and early financial com-
mitments. Indeed, the contest to catch
the eye of the G.M. is, in many ways, the
first "primary" of the 1988 campaign �
and it's already under way.
Why do some get Mentioned and
others do not? The Mentioner, of
course, could not be reached for com-
ment. But those who know him best,
Washington's political consultants, col-
umnists and other insiders, supplied
clues.
The Automatics Kennedys and incum-
bent vice presidents are automatically
Mentioned. So is anyone who ran last
time and lost without appearing
ridiculous � Gary Hart, but not Rubin
Askew. Governors from big states like
New York, California, Illinois and
Texas almost always get Mentioned,
mainly because these states contain the
largest media markets.
Chris Matthews, House Speaker Tip
O'Neill's administrative assistant, says
Ohioans are also automatics, because
somewhere along the line the G.M.
noticed that the state supplies big-name
politicians for both parties.
Grooming Counts Wherever possible,
the Great Mentioner prefers to Mention
heroes. Astronauts, former atheletes
and veterans are practically shoo-ins.
Otherwise, it's usually enough to be
young and handsome.
"You have to comport yourself in a
certain way that's not flaky says a
political reporter. "That means appear-
ing at all the right parties, making solid,
non-flamboyant speeches Colorado
Gov. Richard Lamm used to get Men-
tioned, but then he made a speech about
letting elderly people die.
It helps to come from a famous
political family, but the Mentioner has
grown tolerant of would-be candidates
who don't have pedigrees. Those close
to the Mentioner say this is why Lee
Iacocca, Jeane Kirkpatrick and
Elizabeth Dole are being Mentioned.
But, they add, the G.M. is probably ex-
perimenting and will revert to traditional
preferences when the campaign gets
serious.
Go Against the Grain The G.M. loves
it when a poitician defies "conventional
wisdom Bruce Babbitt of Arizona,
who has taken on non-means-tested en-
titlements and labor unions, has scored
big here.
The Great Mentioner favors pols like
Babbitt and Virginia Gov. Chuck Robb,
both elected in states where the other
party traditionally dominates. He
believes this demonstrates a moderate
ideology that has national appeal, and
ever since Jimmy Carter surprised him,
the G.M. has been big on "outsiders
The Importance of Timing The G.M.
looks for a "good calendar He ad-
mires the tidy logic of politicians who ar-
range careers so they leave a lower office
precisely when a higher one is opening
up. One Democratic media consultant
cited Gov. Bob Graham of Florida as so-
meone with a good calendar.
"His timing is perfect. If he wins his
race against Paula Hawkins for Senate
in '86, he can serve six years and then be
coming right up in '92
Of course, those who possess these
qualities can't sit idly by. There are at
least three tried-and-true methods of
catching the Mentioner's eye.
Come Up with a New Idea Making a
lot of noise about a major national issue
is a good way to start. Mario Cuomo's
Notre Dame speech on religion and
politics set the Mentioner on his ear.
The G.M. also likes tax bills. Both
Sen. Bill Bradley and Rep. Richard
Gephardt have parlayed their "Fair
Tax" into heavy Mentioning. Jack
Kemp first burst onto the Mentioning
scene with his Kemp-Roth tax cut and
has been keeping the pressure on with
his own FAST tax reform plan.
Break Up the Monotony "You have
to find out where the Mentioners gather,
and do something in that place says
political consultant Bob Squier, ap-
parently confusing the G.M. himself
with his associates in the press.
"Things like the National Governors
Conference, or a convention convened
for the nomination of a candidate
everyone knows is going to lose, are bor-
ing, awful events that the Mentioners
have to cover, so they're a great place to
do something impressive
Creative Schmoozing Probably the
oldest trick in the book is to plant your
name. It's bad form to call up the Men-
tioner and ask to be Mentioned, but it's
acceptable to call up one of his press
associates and offer to buy dinner.
"Anyone who sits down with a col-
umnist and can comment on his column
is an 'insightful' guy says Post colum-
nist Mark Shields. "And, if he does it in
a way that doesn't look rehearsed, then
he must certainly know his way around
New Hampshire
Those who do get Mentioned usually
fulfill some combination of these condi-
tions. No single condition is necessary or
sufficient. Hence Babbitt gets mention-
ed because he's an outsider who
schmoozes well, but also because he's
gone against the grain and has good
calendar. Massachusetts Gov. Michael
Dukakis is an able official with decent
calendar, but he's almost Unmen-
tionable � a Democrat from a heavily
Democratic state, he doesn't go against
the grain.
Oddly, the Great Mentioner has rarely
predicted winners. The history of
presidential politics is littered with can-
didates who were Mentioned but either
never ran or lost badly: Mark Hatfield
William Milliken. Jim Thompsen
Harold Hughes, William Scranton. In
1972 the G.M. bet on Ed Muskie. but
George McGovern won. In 196 the
Mentioner never saw Jimmv Carter until
the Iowa Caucus. In 1980 the G.M. was
high on George Bush and Howard
Baker.
Indeed, some say the Mentioner has
lost touch with the American people.
Yet the G.Ms forecasts continue to
find their way into print, and to be taken
seriously. As long as politicians see an
advantage in being Mentioned, thev will
clamor for the G.Ms attention. And as
long as columnists have to file twice a
r w y wiU in thc mket for the
j.m. s words of wisdom
1 h
Award
newest maj i a,a
ship pi j
privau
established
trav"
for lea :
cellcn
the pr .
succci
"The
end s
r ol i n a
Wi r
the Univei
"The t
A n a .
bright
ville camp
in their pr
The
operat:
ship-
and Dul
.
Sch
-
pensev i h.
for up toeig
thc
I
ft I
diffei
in thai
and e
I
univ e
Ten
endowed I
ibei
h ii
I
Execu
Plans
BH4ROil 1
Although E(
:tive during
Executive Co
make upcomina
manage '
student govern m
SGA President D
recently announ
the ma
this Mimrncr will
tion of vamp is g
freshmen one
repress es
tial members
"�The
meetir.
campus -
posure to new
thev return
ahead and
The New v
Campu- I
aid. will c
organizati. ieth
funded by the S
have a rep
explain to fi men
66T COT OF JAIL FREE CARP
Rising
Push
(CPS)
more to live on cam pi
thanks to rising utilitv
ing costs
and inflation ra
housing
tion.
Last year
an average c'
cent, and obsei ers sm
factors tha
vear will increa-e v
iates by about t'r.
tages.
"There's do i
trend contc I
research committee c
the Association
University H, uj
"Each instuuuo
demographics tl
rates
"Dorms c
rates rising, kw
probably ail true.
Grimm, presider
and Universitv H
International anc
tor at the Imversitv ,
"There is no n
he concurs. "Rates a.
on each institution ai.
ment standards "
Yet each instuuuo
conditions seem to bar
hikes whether enroling
fall.
University of Terl
ficials, for exampn
enrollment will
-�






r
I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 29, 1985
o Bad
- a one-party die-
ted financed
North Korea.
ich a Ncenario will
South Africa, but
have given no
ibilities. They de-
frica grant compiet.
a Jay it took us
er to do the same
so who the hell
s �r.em'1 And cer-
pare South Africa
s a big difference.
A frican nation,
is Africa's most
especially for
ges rose 275 per-
82 In fact, for this
� a erious pro-
- ation.
uld ask South
think. The
opposed to
a Buthelezei,
. - ibe (the country's t
ralh imperative
i ctive here.
S mth Africa
ted vu; that the en-
cress is linked
Economic ad-
fr ee-market
the most powerful
n and civil rights,
momic pouer is political
I rient uould solidify
I on of South Africa's
economically, and
nanently to the suf-
is so often decried by
inents.
Race
S, William Scranton. In
bet on Ed Muskie, but
overn won. In 1976 the
fver saw Jimmy Carter until
icuv In 1980 the CM. was
forge Bush and Howard
me sa the Mentioner has
mh the American people.
Ms forecasts continue to
into print, and to be taken
long as politicians see an
Ibeing Mentioned, they will
ie C.Ms attention. And as
mists have to file twice a
Jill be in the market for the
Is of wisdom.
Ierm
CTWC
CARP
ECU
ECU News Bureau
The University Scholars
Awards program at HCU is the
newest major academic scholar
ship program in the state. The
privately-funded program was
established this past year to at-
tract students with high potential
for leadership and academic ex-
cellence to ECU. In its infancy,
the program is being hailed as a
success.
'The University Scholars pro-
gram is a splendid addition to the
endowment program of East
Carolina University says
William C. Friday, president of
the University of North Carolina.
'The University Scholars
Awards will bring talented and
bright young people to the Green-
ville campus, and we will rejoice
in their presence
The University Scholars
Awards program is similar in
operation to the Morehead,
Caldwell and A.B. Duke scholar-
ships at UNC, N.C. State and
and Duke University. Each stu-
dent selected as a University
Scholar will receive $3,000 per
year to cover tuition and ex-
penses. The awards are renewable
for up to eight semesters, provid-
ed the recipients maintain 3.0
grade point averages.
ECU's scholarship program
differs from the others, however,
in that it is funded by individuals
and groups of individuals instead
of a single donor or family. To
date, 14 donors have endowed 23
scholarships, surpassing the
university's initial goal by three
Ten of the scholarships wen
endowed by current or former
members of the ECl I board of
m
trustees or other boards; 18 were
endowed by alumni, parents of
alumni or former staff members.
Included in the list of donors is
ECU's Alumni Association,
which has endowed four scholar-
ships. "Although the Alumni
Association sponsors many
scholarships each year, the
University Scholars Awards pre-
sent a distinct opportunity to in-
fluence the lives of our future
leaders says N.C. Appeals
Court Judge Gerald Arnold,
ECU Alumni Association presi-
dent. 'The program represents
an exciting challenge for both
donors and recipients, a
challenge to uphold and pursue
the quality of excellence alumni
have already experienced at ECU
and a challenge to incoming
students to discover and surpass
that traditional quality
CD. (Don) Langston of
Winterville, a long-time sup-
porter of ECU, also endowed
four scholarships. "ECU has
been good to my family and to
me over the years Langston
said. "The university is an impor-
tant asset to all of us in Pitt
County, and I'm glad that my in-
vestment will help attract deserv-
ing students
It was Langston's endowment
that allowed the university to sur
pass its initial goal of securing 20
scholarships by the end of the
1984-85 school year. "At every
stage, the University Scholars
wards Piogram has exceeded
our dreams says Dr. John M.
How ell, ECU Chancellor.
Howell began putting the pro-
gram together a year ago with the
help of James L. I anier Jr vice
chancellor of Institutional Ad
Executive Council
Plans New Seminar
B HAROLD .IOYNEK
l SNewi Mil r
Although ECU's SGA remains
inactive during the summer, the
Executive Council continues to
make upcoming plans and
manages to keep the wheels of
student government turning.
SGA President David Brown
recently announced that one of
the major activities planned for
this summer will be the organiza-
tion of campus groups during
freshmen orientation, enabling
representatives to recruit poten-
tial members.
'The purpose of this
meeting Brown said, "is to give
campus groups an initial ex-
posure to new students. When
they return in the fall, they can go
ahead and join these groups
The New Student initiation to
Campus Organizations, Brown
-aid, will comprise of all campus
organizations, whether they are
funded by the SGA or not, and
have a representative on hand to
explain to freshmen what the
group is about "It will be an ex-
cellent opportunity for campus
groups to introduce themselves to
the freshmen Brown said.
"So far, the SGA excutivc
council and WZMB-FM have
committed themselves to the pro-
gram he said. Other groups will
have until Friday, May 30, to
contact the SGA office to reserve
space for the meeting.
The program will be offered
once to each of the freshmen
orientation groups begining June
13 at 1 p.m. and ending July 10
from 7-9 p.m.
"I think when we give respon-
sibly to freshmen Brown said,
"we make responsible students. I
encourage all campus groups to
become a part of NSICO and get
the freshmen involved.
Other members of the SGA Ex-
ecutive Council include Chris
romasic, vice president; Tony
Braswell, treasurer and Lisa Car-
roll, secretary. Brown added that
through their efforts, NSICO was
made possible.
Rising Living Expenses
Push Dorm Costs Up
(CPS) � Students will pay
more to live on campus next fall,
thanks to rising utility and hous-
ing costs, increasing staff salaries
and inflation rates, say campus
housing officials around the na-
tion.
Last year, dorm rates went up
an average of four to seven per-
cent, and observers say the same
factors that forced up costs last
vear will increase 1985-86 dorm
rates by about the same percen-
tages.
"There's no definite dorm
trend contends Paul Jahr,
fourth consecutive year, thanks
to tighter admissions re-
quirements.
Because there will be fewer
students, UT housing rates will
go up 5.5 percent next fall, says
Residence Director Jim Grubb.
"The yearly increase for us is
more related to the inflation
trend he explains. "In the
future, we'll see increases staying
at about four to six percent
Meanwhile, Michigan State ad-
ministrators anticipate the largest
freshman enrollment in five
years, and a six to seven percent
research committee chairman of increase in the rate of returning
the Association of College and students.
University Housing Officers.
"Each institution has its own
demographics that determine
rates
"Dorms closing, opening,
rates rising, lowering. They're
probably all true adds Jim
Grimm, president of the College
and University Housing Officers
International and housing direc-
tor at the University of Florida.
"There is no national trend
he concurs. "Rates are dependent
on each institution and its enroll-
ment standards
Yet each institution's specific
conditions seem to being on dorm
hikes whether enrollments rise or
fall.
University of Tennessee of-
ficials, for example, predict
enrollment will drop for the
But at Michigan State, more
students mean "housing will still
go up 2.9 percent says Housing
Officer Chasrles Gagliano.
"We're very proud it's below
the inflation factor he says.
"It's one of the lowest increases
in the nation
Gagliano says higher enroll-
ment won't offset the increasing
costs of institutional
maintenance.
Indeed, Penn State's rates will
go up five percent next fall to
cover increased utility and
operating costs. School officials
predict nearly SOX) students won't
be able to get into campus hous-
ing.
"Prices are going up adds
UW student Lisa Stewart. "But
mostly they're fair. I think the
dorms are fine
vancement. Their original plan
called for five University
Scholars to enter ECU in the fall
of 1985, followed by five more in
1986, five more in 1987, and five
more in 1988 for a total of 20
scholarships.
They decided that endowments
of no less than $40,000 would be
needed to fund each scholarship.
The endowments would be in-
vested with $3,000 of the interest
going to the recipient to cover tui-
tion and expenses. The excess in-
terest money would be reinvested
to cover any rising costs in the
years to come.
Each endowment would be
presented to its recipient in a
name selected by the donor. "We
felt that it was important for the
students receiving the scholar-
ships to understand that there
were individuals and families
who thought enough of the
potential for service that the
students exhibited to be willing to
make that sort of investment in
people they've never seen
Lanier commented.
Lat fall ECU's Admissions Of-
fice began seeking nominations
for the first awards from high
school principals and guidance
counsellors � 135 were received.
Fifty-three semi-finalists were
selected by the admissions office,
which were then evaluated by
regional selection committees
made up of alumni, faculty,
trustees and high school guidance
counselors. These committees
selected 24 regional finalists who
were interviewed. From those 24,
10 finalists were selected. A final
screening committee selected the
five recipients and two alternates
after talking with the 10 finalists
during extensive interviews on
campus.
RL. Jones of Raleigh, a
member of that final screening
committee, felt so strongly that
the two alternates were just as
qualified as the five recipients
that he personally funded two
scholarships for the alternates. "I
just couldn't stand to see those
two left out he said. "I was just
amazed at the quality that was ex-
hibited by this group of people
Jones said.
In addition to the money pro-
vided, University Scholars will
have many advantages as ECU
students. Each scholar will be
automatically admitted to the
Honors Program, a program
which allows exceptional students
to take most of their freshman
and sophomore requirements in
small classes with the best
students and professors.
University Scholars will also be
offered opportunities for
research and publication not
usually available to
undergraduate students. And
through the Thomas W. Rivers
Foreign Exchange Endowment
Fund, University Scholars will
have the option of attending a
�rvii
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Large Selection of Land Hermit Crabs
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is
available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 756-9222
�?
RIVERHBUUFF
'Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments"
Your Choice of a Microwave Oven or 13
Color TV If You Sign A 12 Month's Lease.
Limited Time Only Offer For New
Residents Only. Present Residents Not Eligi-
ble For Offer.
� Professional Management and Maintenance
� 2 Bedroom Townhouses & 1 Bedroom Garden Apartments
� Kitchens Feature Dishwashers & Disposals
� Fully Carpeted
� Private Laundry Facilities
� Large Pool
� Cable T.V. Included
� Private Balconies
� Convenient To Shopping Centers & Restaurants
� ECU Bus Service
� Security Deposits Negotiable
Directions: 10th Street Extension To River Bluff Road
Next To Rivergite Shopping Center.
PHONE 758-401S
university outside the United
States for at least one semester.
Another unique aspect of the
University Scholars Program is
its commitment to the handicap-
ped. James M. Dixon of
Greensboro, an ECU trustee
whose daughter participated in
ECU's first post-secondary pro-
gram for the hard of hearing, en-
dowed two scholarships that will
be reserved for qualified students
who are handicapped.
"The University Scholars is a
very outstanding program Dix-
on said. "I thought that if han-
dicapped students could benefit
from it, that would make the pro-
gram that much more special
The first University Scholars
were formally introduced in April
during ECU's scholars weekend.
The seven � Leslie Council and
Erik Johnson of Raleigh, Clay
Deanhardt of Greenville, Alan
Jones of Rutherfordton, Andy
Miskavage of West Newbury,
Mass Tommy Pittman of
Wilson, and April Weatheringotn
of Washington, N.C, � will be
majoring in such fields as pre-
med, music, art and applied
physics. All are similar
academically, participate in ex-
tracurricular activities and share
excitement about the University
Scholars program.
"It's about the best thing
that's ever happened to me
Alan Jones said.
Howell's plans for the future
of the University Scholars
Awards are to continue to seek
endowments so that more and
more students of the caliber of
the first seven recipients will be
attracted to ECU. "We're very
excited about this new program
and what it means for East
Carolina Howell said. "Those
honored with the award will
know they've been selected to at-
tend one of the most challenging
schools in North Carolina, and
one of the great young univer-
sities of the south
Ort'ICAL
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THE fcAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
Doonesbu
MAY 29. 1985
Page 6
Travolta Comes Of Age With
'Perfect' Role In New Film
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) � John
Travolta, 31, says he's come of
age as an actor.
As the star of Perfect, to be
released in threaters next month,
Travolta plays a journalist caught
up in an intellectual web of pro-
fessional ethics and a personal
romantic entanglement.
"For 10 years I've done the
best I could with the roles given
me he said. "Now I'm Finally
at an age where I can play really
interesting roles. I no longer have
to settle for the various
statements of youth.
"I'm at a state in my career to
accept roles that went to Red-
ford, Beatty, Hoffman and
Newman when they were my age,
playing guys in their 30's and 40's
who have experienced more in-
teresting events in life than guys
in their 20's
Travolta has little competition
in his age group. He is older than
the horde of new screen heroes,
Tim Hutton, Sean Penn, Michael
Pare and the rest, and con-
siderably younger than the likes
of DeNiro, Hoffman and Pacino.
"When I was coming up there
were only a few actors my age
working regularly he said,
"guys like Richard Gere, Treat
Williams and Henry Winkler.
Producers though realized the
talent pool was too small and
they began developoing new
talent to Fill the generation gap
Travolta has matured im-
pressively since his debut in 1975
as Vinnie Barbarino, the high
school heart throb in the TV sit-
���� com "Welcome Back, Kotter
Travolta feels he has come of age as an actor with his work in the new film "Perfect" in which he plavs a His electric blue eyes, square jaw
Rolling Stone magazine reporter who falls in love with his subject, played by Jamie Lee Curtis, and cleft chin look better on the
man than the boy.
In the past decade Travolta has
starred in only 10 movies, four of
which were stunning box-office
hits that collectively earned a
billion dollars worldwide:
� Grease, $400 million, plus 25
million records sold.
� Saturday Night Fever, $350
million, 30 million records.
� Urban Cowboy, $100 million, 5
million records.
� Staying Alive, $150 million, 3
million records.
Blowout, Moment By Moment
and Two of a Kind were less suc-
cessful, but did not lose money.
Travolta turned down other
Films that suceeded beyond all ex-
pectations: An Officer and a
Gentleman � which was written
for him � Arthur, Midnight Ex-
press and Splash,
"I don't regret not making
those pictures Travolta said.
"They probably served other ac-
tors better than they would have
me
Travolta has wisely avoided
over-exposure and type-casting,
although he denies following any
speciFic career plan. He has tried
to counter balance the negative
aspects of being a media star by
keeping a low proFile in private
life.
Travolta takes pride in his ver-
satility. Since leaving "Welcome
Back, Kotter he has starred in
comedy, musicals and drama.
His range includes high school
kid, ballet dancer, bank robber,
sound technician and now in
Perfect, a journalist.
Travolta reads as many as 150
scripts and screen treatments a
year, never seeing hundreds of
others that his agents turn down
without consulting him. He
chooses his roles by gut reaction
rather than with an eye to career
moves.
"I do mosily what inspires
me he said, "and that seems to
keep variety in my career. Some
of my pictures I've developed
myself. But the inspirational
qaulities of a script are the bot-
tom line personal values and a
good story
Like other, older successful ac-
tors, Travolta is becoming a pi
ducer director. He will art pro-
duction on lake Forest in
September on locations in that
Chicago suburb. He will nor.
however, appear on screen.
"Columbia Pictures is tal
gamble with me Travolta said
with an easy grin, and I'm
determined to make il a fin
movie.
"I wanted to direct this picture
because the material is close I
mv heart. It's what I'm all abou(.
It reflects my personal alues. 1
don't know if I'll ever have the
opportunity to act in a film li
lake Forest, so I'm taking
vantage of this chance to direct.
"It's a family drama and I
haven't even cast it yet. I'm look-
ing for a 40-year-old man to plav
the father and an l8-ye�
to play his son. It's realh a
tragedy, but not as dark as Or-
dinary People
"I'm also developing another
picture based looseh on m own
big family with major role tor
my brother and sister. I feel
strongly about famil) relatii
ships and mutual Mirpo I've
wanted to put together a Film like
this for a lonu tune
HOTSPOTS
Tu week's entertainment at
Mendenhall Student Center
wiii be offered in the form of two
motion pictures to be shown in
Hendrx Theatre. This Wednes-
day's feature is Eddie And The
Cruisirs and the following Mon-
day's picture will be Eating
Raoul.
Eddie And The Cruisers is a
story of an innovative new band
emerging from second-rate clubs
to uncertain superstardom. Un-
fortunately, just as the band is on
the rise the lead singer of the
group, Eddie Wilson (Michael
Pare), drives off a bridge and is
presumed dead. Twenty years
later, an investigative reporter
(Ellen Baskin) begins an ex-
haustive probe into the star's
mysterious life.
Eddie And The Cruisers is a
tale that many critics described as
being similar to a Bruce Springs-
teen image. The musical score is
performed by John Cafferty and
The Beaver Brown Band, who's
soundtrack has gone gold with
over 500,000 copies sold so far.
Eating Raoul is an offbeat,
satirical look at sex, greed, and
modern times. It is the saga of
Paul and Mary Bland (Paul
Bartel and Mary Woronov) a
solidly middle class couple, who
are trying to raise enough money
to open a restaurant. However,
their means of earning the money
are far from typical methods of
income. They lure wealthy
perverts into their apartment,
bonk them on the head with a
frying pan, and steal their cash.
The plot thickens as Raoul, a
charming psycopath played by
Robert Beltran, becomes involv-
ed with the couple's mischievous
endeavors.
Paul Bartel, co-star, co-
author, and director, created
Eating Raoul in the spirit of fun.
However, in the beginning, he
found it anything but fun. Even
though he was an accomplished
director, whose work included
Death Race 290$ and Cannon-
bmB, Band could not find anyone
interesting in using the script.
Because of Us offbeat theme and
uflustwl title, everyone thought it
not sett at the bos office.
Writer To Conduct Workshop
Emmy A ward-winning
playwright John Ford
Noonan will be featured at a con-
ference for writers of poetry and
plays scheduled for June 21-23.
The event, the Southeastern
Playwrights and Poets Con-
ference, will include workshops
conducted by Noonan and poets
J.W. Rivers and David Chorlton,
a seminar on incorporatin of
human values into dalogue and
poems, readings of works by con-
ference participants, and several
productions, including the
premiere of a Noonan play writ-
ten especially for the conference,
entitled The Critic and His Wife.
The conference is a cooperative
project of the state and local arts
councils, the N.C. Humanities
Committee, Carolina Telephone
and Telegraph Co and the
Playwrights Fund of North
Carolina, Inc. (PRNC), a non-
profit corporation based in
Greenville. All sessions will be
held at the Greenville Sheraton
Inn.
According to Don Roebuck,
PFNC president, the conference
is the first such program in the
southeastern region "devoted in-
tirely to poets and writers of new
works for the stage
"It will be an intensive, hands-
on conference workshop, plann-
ed to assist playwrights and poets
in developing their writing to its
fullist explains PFNC Artistic
Director Christine Rusch.
Two PFNC award winners will
present their works � Terry
Cawley of Praleigh, author of
Pull, judged best play of the year
in PFNC's annual playwriting
competition, and Shelby
Stephenson of Southern Pines,
whose book Carolina Shout! won
the PFNC poetry chapbook com-
petition.
Noonan won an Emmy Award
last year for a "St. Eslewhere"
episode he wrote. His play Some
Men Seed Help was produced for
the PBS series "American
Playhouse An earlier play,
Older People, received the 1972
Drama Desk Award. Most
recently, Noonan has written
screenplays for films produced
for broadcast on ABC and CBS
television.
Interested persons may write
Barbara Gilmore, conference
director, at P.O. Box 646 for fur-
ther information and registration
materials. Conference fee is $50,
which includes all sessions, some
light meals and a Saturday even-
ing buffet reception. Conference
participants are responsible for
making their own lodging reser-
vations, available at a flat rate of
$40 per night from the Sheraton
Greenville, 203 W. Greenville
Blvd.
Since enrollment will be limited
in order to keep workshop groups
small, early registration is advis-
ed.
Entertainment
Trivia
1) At one time or another, actor Mark ' enard I
played all three principle aliens in the TV and film ver
sions of "Star Trek What is the title of each film or
episode in which he appeared and the alien he played?
2) Who directed the academv-award-winning film
Rocky?
3) What character in the film Risky Business 1
have a Trig test tomorrow and I'm hem.
Guido the killer pimp?"
4) How many Cecil B. DeMille films featured actress
Gloria Swanson?
5) Richard Bachman is a pseudonym for what best-
selling author?
6) What was the color of Blofelds cat in the film Sever
Say Sever Again!
7) What was the name given to the evil leader of the
gremlins in Director Joe Dante's film Gremlins
8) Who was the voice of Snow White in Walt Disnev's
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs'
9) Who produced the television series "I ost in Space?"
10 In what Film did Stephen Speilbere make hi- direc-
tor �' cbut?
Answers page 1
his idea aod
fiMgftejng aad tfet htip ef U�
iaflrihr and Maids, be wm able to
complete tbefibn.
Hurt, Cher
Get Awards
At Cannes
Festival
CANNES, France (UPI) �
Yogoslav director Emir
Kusturica's film Papa is Away on
a Business Trip won the Golden
Palm Award for best film at the
Cannes Film Festival and
Americans William Hurt and
Cher were named best actor and
actress.
The awards were presented
Monday night at the conclusion
of the 38th Cannes Film Festival
� one of the most famous film
award competitions in the world.
Papa is Away on a Business
Trip centers on a 6-year-old
Moslem boy in 1950s Sarajevo
whose civil servant father is sent
to a work camp. It deals with
Yugoslav resistence to the Soviet
Union under Stalin and how
events affected the Boy's shat-
tered family.
Hurt won best actor for his
��:� �;
performance in the film Kiss of
the Spider Woman by Brazilian
director Hector Babenco. Hurt,
34, plays a tragic but warm lead
role in the violent, political film.
Cher, for her role in the
American film Mask, shared the
best actress award with Argentine
Norma Aleandro, star of Luis
Puenzo's The Official Story.
Famine LP Proves Top Pop
William Hart
By MATTHEW GILLIS
Staff Wite
For some time now, all of us
have heard that one song
over the radio � a song featuring
45 top pop, rock, soul, and coun-
try artists singing to raise funds
for the needy in Africa and even
here in the United States. Still,
the song "We Are The World
even with its big success, has been
criticized for being too pop-
flavored, and many felt the
album that was to come might
turn out the same way. The
album, We Are The World, is out
on ColumbiaCBS Records, and
even though it is very much like
any other pop album, it still turns
out to be quite enjoyable.
Steve Perry, The Pointer
Sister, Tina Turner, and Chicago
all feature solo tracks on the LP,
all with their own distinctive
style. They're not great songs,
but any and all of these are still as
good as this album can provide,
and that's good enough.
Prince makes an appearance
with a somewhat better song. It's
a little intriguing, and well put-
together, much like a lot of his
work. Kenny Rogers also pro-
vides more than the ordinary with
his country-flavored track as
well, sounding much like his early
days as part of the countryrock
band The First Edition.
However, two of the album s
best songs were recorded in con-
cert. Huey Lewis and the News
provide a little good news with
one of their concert classics,
"Trouble In Paradise Bruce
Springsteen and the E Street
Band go full force on the classic
Jimmy Cliff tune "Trapped
Bruce and the boys must have
known what they were doing
when they put a lot of effort into
this song � and they do.
Still, the album holds one more
surprise, a look at the "Northern
Lights Actually, it's the "Nor-
thern Lights for Africa Society
better known as Canada's answer
to Band-Aid and USA For
Africa. The concept itself is not
new, but the song they provide
may be good enough to put even
both Band-Aid and USA to
shame! It's a simple enough
song, but the arrangement is ab-
solutely dynamic, thanks in part
to Grammy-winning producer
David Foster and a nice song,
written in part by one of today's
top Canadian stars, Brvan
Adams.
Of course, it also helps to have a
chorus including Adams, Anne
Murray, Joni Mitchell, Gordon
Lightfoot, Geddy Lee of Rush
Neil Young, Corey Hart, Mike
Reno of Loverboy, and other top
Canadian stars of music and even
of the silver screens (among them
?SJ2rSf!ldyJind Eugcnc of
M. IV and, more recently, the
hit film Splash.)
True, the album should have
had a chance to feature more ar-
Usts but the USA for Africa's
E AZ VZ WoHd enough
time and dedication put into it to
make it worth listening to.
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IHE EAST CAROI INIAN
Lifestyles
Doonesbur
MAY 29. IS�X
PaKf f
Travolta Comes Of Age With
'Perfect' Role In New Film
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) � John
Travolta, 31, says he's come of
age as an actor.
As the star of Perfect, to be
released in threaters next month,
Travolta plays a journalist caught
up in an intellectual web of pro-
fessional ethics and a personal
romantic entanglement.
"For 10 years I've done the
best I could with the roles given
me he said. "Now I'm finally
at an age where I can play really
interesting roles. 1 no longer have
to settle for the various
statements of youth.
"I'm at a state in my career to
accept roles that went to Red-
ford, Beatty, Hoffman and
Newman when they were my age,
playing guys in their 30's and 40's
who have experienced more in-
teresting events in life than guys
in their 20's
Travolta has little competition
in his age group. He is older than
the horde of new screen heroes,
Tim Hutton, Sean Penn, Michael
Pare and the rest, and con-
siderably younger than the likes
of DeNiro, Hoffman and Pacino.
"When 1 was coming up there
were only a few actors my age
working regularly he said,
"guys like Richard Gere, Treat
Williams and Henry Winkler.
Producers though realized the
talent pool was too small and
they began developoing new
talent to fill the generation gap
Travolta has matured im-
pressively since his debut in 1975
as Vinnie Barbarino, the high
school heart throb in the TV sit-
com "Welcome Back, Kotter
iravolta feels he has come of age as an actor with his work in the new film "Perfect" in which he plavs a His electric blue eves, square jaw
Rolling Stone magaine reporter who falls in love with his subject, played by Jamie Lee Curtis, and cleft chin look better on the
man than the boy.
In the past decade Travolta has
starred in only 10 movies, four ot
which were stunning box-office
hits that collectively earned a
billion dollars worldwide:
Grease, $400 million, plus 25
million records sold.
� Saturday Sight Fever, $350
million, 30 million records.
ml roan Cowboy, $100 million, 5
million records.
� Staying Alive, $150 million, 3
million records.
Blowout, Moment By Moment
and Two of a Kind were less suc-
cessful, but did not lose money.
Travolta turned down other
films that suceeded beyond all ex-
pectations: An Officer and a
Gentleman � which was written
for him � Arthur, Midnight Ex-
press and Splash,
"I don't regret not making
those pictures Travolta said.
"They probably served other ac-
tors better than they would have
me
Travolta has wisely avoided
over-exposure and type-casting,
although he denies following any
specific career plan. He has tried
to counter balance the negative
aspects of being a media star by
keeping a low profile in private
life.
Travolta takes pride in his ver-
satility. Since leaving "Welcome
Back, Kotter he has starred in
comedy, musicals and drama
His range includes high school
kid, ballet dancer, bank robber.
sound technician and now in
Perfect, a journalist.
Travolta reads as manv as 150
scripts and screen treatments a
year, never seeing hundreds of
others that his agents I wn
without consulting him.
chooses hi- role ;b gut reaction
rather than with an eye to
moves
"I do mostly
me he said, "an thai
keep variety in my
of my pictures I've d
myself. But t; nal
qaulities of s u rip! are tr
torn line per m m � la
good story
like othei iccessl
tors, rravolta
Jucer director He ���. ill
duction on I ake ltr
September on i
Chicago suburb
however, appear on screen.
"Colun
gamble wit!
with an ea �
deter mined
movie
"1 wanted
because the
mv heart. It's what
It reflects mv .
don't know if I'll
opportunity I
lake Forest,
vantage of this c u
"It's a family drama a;
haven't even cast it yet. I'n
tng for a 40-yea
the fai
to plav his son
tragedy, but no' Or-
dinary People
"I'm also dev .
picture ba
big
my brother and
?nglv ar t fa
ships �
wanted to pul
this long in
Writer To Conduct Workshop
Tiis week's entertainment at
Mndenhall Student Center
mu be offered in the form of two
notion pictures to be shown in
Hendrix Theatre. This Wednes-
day's feature is Eddie And The
iSirs and the following Mon-
day's picture will be Eating
Raoul.
Eddie And The Cruisers is a
story of an innovative new band
emerging from second-rate clubs
to uncertain superstardom. Un-
fortunately, just as the band is on
the rise the lead singer of the
group, Eddie Wilson (Michael
Pare), drives off a bridge and is
presumed dead. Twenty years
later, an investigative reporter
(Ellen Baskin) begins an ex-
haustive probe into the star's
mysterious life.
Eddie And The Cruisers is a
tale that many critics described as
being similar to a Bruce Springs-
teen image. The musical score is
performed by John Cafferty and
The Beaver Brown Band, who's
soundtrack has gone gold with
over 500,000 copies sold so far.
Eating Raoul is an offbeat,
satirical look at sex, greed, and
modern times. It is the saga of
Paul and Mary Bland (Paul
Bart el and Mary Woronov) a
solidly middle class couple, who
are trying to raise enough money
to open a restaurant. However,
their means of earning the money
are far from typical methods of
income. They lure wealthy
perverts into their apartment,
bonk them on the head with a
frying pan, and steal their cash.
The plot thickens as Raoul, a
charming psycopath played by
Robert Beltran, becomes involv-
ed with the couple's mischievous
endeavors.
Paul Bartel, co-star, co-
author, and director, created
Eating Raoul in the spirit of fun.
However, in the beginning, he
found it anything but fun. Even
though he was an accomplished
director, whose work included
Death Race 2000 and Cannon-
ball, Bartel could not find anyone
interesting in using the script.
Because of its offbeat theme and
unusual title, everyone thought it
would not sell at the box office.
Bartel remained optimistic about
hit idea and through personal
financing and the help of his
family and friends, he was able to
complete the film.
Afl features begin at 7 p.m.
�ad Wtttm
Emmy A w a r d - w i n n i n g
playwright John Ford
Noonan will be featured at a con-
ference for writers of poetry and
plays scheduled for June 21-23.
The event, the Southeastern
Playwrights and Poets Con-
ference, will include workshops
conducted by Noonan and poets
J.W. Rivers and David Chorlton,
a seminar on incorporatin of
human values into dalogue and
poems, readings of works by con-
ference participants, and several
productions, including the
premiere of a Noonan play writ-
ten especially for the conference,
entitled The Critic and His Wife.
The conference is a cooperative
project of the state and local arts
councils, the N.C. Humanities
Committee, Carolina Telephone
and Telegraph Co and the
Playwrights Fund of North
Carolina, Inc. (PRNC), a non-
profit corporation based in
Greenville. All sessions will be
held at the Greenville Sheraton
Inn.
According to Don Roebuck,
PFNC president, the conference
is the first such program in the
southeastern region "devoted in-
tirely to poets and writers of new
works for the stage
"It will be an intensive, hands-
on conference workshop, plann-
ed to assist playwrights and poets
in developing their writing to its
fullist explains PFNC Artistic
Director Christine Rusch.
Two PFNC award winners will
present their works � Terry
Cawley of Praleigh, author of
Pull, judged best play of the year
in PFNC's annual playwriting
competition, and Shelby
Stephenson of Southern Pines,
whose book Carolina Shout! won
the PFNC poetry chapbook com-
petition.
Noonan won an Emmy Award
last year for a "St. Eslewhere"
episode he wrote. His play Some
Men Seed Help was produced for
the PBS series "American
Playhouse An earlier play,
Older People, received the 1972
Drama Desk Award. Most
recently, Noonan has written
screenplays for films produced
for broadcast on ABC and CBS
television.
Interested persons may write
Barbara Gilmore, conference
director, at P.O. Box 646 for fur-
ther information and registration
materials. Conference fee is $50,
which includes all sessions, some
light meals and a Saturday even-
ing buffet reception. Conference
participants are responsible for
making their own lodging reser-
vations, available at a flat rate of
$40 per night from the Sheraton
Greenville, 203 W. Greenville
Blvd.
Since enrollment will be limited
in order to keep workshop groups
small, early registration is advis-
ed.
Entertaini
Trivia
ent
1) At one time or another.
played all three principle ai � ��
sions of "Star Trek What is th� title I
episode in which he appeared and the
2) Who directed the academy-aw g
Rocky?
3) What character in the film �� ;�
have a Trig test tomorrow and I'r
Guido the killer pimp?"
4) How many Cecil B. DeMille films featured aci
Gloria Swanson?
5) Richard Bachman is a pse .
selling author?
6) What was the color of Biofeld tl in the Sever
Say Never Again?
7) What was the name given to the evil lea ler oi
gremlins in Director Joe Dante's film Gr
8) Who was the voice of Snow White in Walt Disney's
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs 7
9) Who produced the television sene- ost
10 In what film did Stephen Speilberg n
tori ' but?
Answer pmc 7
Hurt, Cher
Get Awards
At Cannes
Festival
CANNES, France (UPI) �
Yogoslav director Emir
Kusturica's film Papa is Away on
a Business Trip won the Golden
Palm Award for best film at the
Cannes Film Festival and
Americans William Hurt and
Cher were named best actor and
actress.
The awards were presented
Monday night at the conclusion
of the 38th Cannes Film Festival
� one of the most famous film
award competitions in the world.
Papa is Away on a Business
Trip centers on a 6-year-old
Moslem boy in 1950s Sarajevo
whose civil servant father is sent
to a work camp. It deals with
Yugoslav resistence to the Soviet
Union under Stalin and how
events affected the Boy's shat-
tered family.
Hurt won best actor for his
performance in the film Kiss of
the Spider Woman by Brazilian
director Hector Babenco. Hurt,
34, plays a tragic but warm lead
role in the violent, political film.
Cher, for her role in the
American film Mask, shared the
best actress award with Argentine
Norma Aleandro, star of Luis
Puenzo's The Official Story.
Famine LP Proves Top Pop
William Hurt
By MATTHEW GILLIS
Staff Writer
For some time now, all of us
have heard that one song
over the radio � a song featuring
45 top pop, rock, soul, and coun-
try artists singing to raise funds
for the needy in Africa and even
here in the United States. Still,
the song "We Are The World
even with its big success, has been
criticized for being too pop-
flavored, and many felt the
album that was to come might
turn out the same way. The
album, We Are The World, is out
on ColumbiaCBS Records, and
even though it is very much like
any other pop album, it still turns
out to be quite enjoyable.
Steve Perry, The Pointer
Sister, Tina Turner, and Chicago
all feature solo tracks on the LP,
all with their own distinctive
style. They're not great songs,
but any and all of these are still as
good as this album can provide,
and that's good enough.
Prince makes an appearance
with a somewhat better song. It's
a little intriguing, and well put-
together, much like a lot of his
work. Kenny Rogers also pro-
vides more than the ordinary with
his country-flavored track as
well, sounding much like his early
days as part of the countryrock
band The First Edition.
However, two or the album s
best songs were recorded in con-
cert. Huey Lewis and the News
pi 3vide a little good news with
one of their concert classics,
"Trouble In Paradise Bruce
Springsteen and the E Street
Band go full force on the classic
Jimmy Cliff tune "Trapped
Bruce and the boys must have
known what they were doing
when they put a lot of effort into
this song � and they do.
Still, the album holds one more
surprise, a look at the "Northern
Lights Actually, it's the "Nor-
thern Lights for Africa Society
better known as Can ia ansv
to Band-Aid and USA lor
Africa. The concept itself is not
new, but the song they provide
may be good enough to put even
both Band-Aid and USA to
shame! It's a simple enough
song, but the arrangement is ab
solutely dynamic, thanks in part
to Grammy-winning producer
David Foster and a nice song,
written in part by one of today's
top Canadian stars, Bryan
Adams.
Of course, it also helps to have a
chorus including Adams, Anne
Murray, Joni Mitchell, Gordon
Lightfoot, Geddv lee of Rush
Neil Young, Corey Hart, Mike
Reno of I overboy, and other top
Canadian stars of music and even
of the silver screens (among them
John Candy and Eugene Levy of
"SCTV" and, more recently the
hit film Splash.)
True, the album should have
had a chance to feature more ar-
tists, but the USA for Africa's
We Are The World has enough
time and dedication put into it to
make it worth listening to.
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SCOTSMAN THAN EXCELLENT
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9) Irwin Alien
10) The Sugarkmd Express
&����m(����������m�
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HOME COOKED FOOD
it
Student Special
Free desert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.2Splus tax & beverage.
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM - 8 PM
Immediate Medical Care
I U II MED-CENTER1
Ul EASTERN CAROLINA
X-M;T,77v
v .�.�.�:�.�:�:�:�:�:���.��.�.�.�.�.� r
Med Center 1 of Greenville is pleased to announce its opening on Monday,
September 24, 1984. Med Center 1 offers extended hours, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m 7
days a week, for your convenience.
We offer services in family and industrial medicine and workmen's compen-
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trol services available. Minimal waiting time and no appointment necessary.
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at 507 E. 14th Street.
Med Center 1, a new concept in health care.
Movie: Eddie And The Cruisers Wed. May 29
7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Movie: Eating Raoul Mon. June 3
7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
ID's Made Tues. June 4
11:00 a.m12 noon Multi Purpose Rm
Movie: Shampoo Wed. June 5
7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Movie: The Jerk Mon. June 10
7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
I.Ds Made Tues. June 11
11:00 a.m. - 12 noon Multi Purpose Rm
C
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU


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THE fcAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Winfi
Marks
��?$-&

-
Winfred Johnson touches home plate after another of his homemns.
Holt Leaving ECU
Pam Holt, Assistant Athletic
Director for Student Life and
Special Events for the past four
years at ECU, has resigned her
position effective June 30, 1985,
Dr. Ken Karr, director of
athletics, announced Friday.
Holt, 38, will accept the posi-
tion of Director of Promotions
and Public Relations for the
Women's Athletic Department at
the University of Minnesota ef-
fective July 1, 1985.
"We want to thank all the
many Pirate fans for their sup-
port over the 11 years that I have
been in Greenville said Holt.
A native of Bloomfield, IA,
Holt is a 1969 graduate of Nor-
theast Missouri State Universitv
and joined the ECU athletic staff
in 1981.
By TONY BROWN
AnisUat Spom fr dttnr
"Winfred Johnson is one of
the best baseball players East
Carolina has ever had said Bil-
ly Best, upon the conclusion of
another outstanding season for
the Pirate slugger. "He not only
has power, but hits for a con-
sistently high average as well
Best's statement is backed up
by the impressive statistics and
awards the junior righthander
has achieved in his first three
seasons at ECU. In the season
just concluded, Johnson shared
with Chris Bradberry the honor
of being the first Pirate to bat
over .400 with at least 100 at-bats
Bradberry hit for a superb .405
average with 173 at-bats, but had
the misfortune to do it in a year
when his feat was overshadowed
by Johnson's .432 average with
169 at-bats. That new Pirate hit-
ting record was only the latest in
a large number of career and
single-season marks held by
Johnson, though.
He first began his assault on
the ECU record books as a
freshmen, when he led the team
with 11 roundtrippers � and has
repeated as the homer champ
each year since. He first set the
single-season homerun record
with 18 last year, then topped his
own mark with 22 in '85.
By the end of the '84 season
Johnson had already set the
career longball mark with 29, so
the 22 he hit this year increased
his own record total to 51 � with
a year of eligibility still remain-
ing.
The amazing junior is far from
just being a homerun hitter. For
two consecutive years he has set
new records for rbi's and total
bases. In '84 he knocked in 46
runs, then topped that with an as-
tounding 75 this season.
In total bases (a homerun
equals four bases, a triple three
etc.), Johnson topped his '84
record of 115 by hitting for 150
this year. Todd Evans' ECU
record of 64 hits, set in '82, also
fell to Johnson this year, who
stroked the ball for a hit 73 times.
The timeliness of the Pirate
clean-up batter's hits has been a
major factor in ECU's success
also. In the NCAA playoffs last
year he smashed a grand-slam
homer to eliminate Florida State
in the South regional, and con-
tinued to contribute to game-
winning rbi's this year with eight.
These offensive statistics have
been compiled while Johnson
performed in three capacities for
ECU. He not only has shown his
prowess defensively as the star-
ting first baseman with a number
of fine plays throughout his
career, but has been a team leader
as a pitcherdesignated hitter
also.
Johnson hurled a 7-1 record in
his freshman year, followed with
a 10-3 mark in '84. He slumped
somewhat this season, ending
with a 7-5 slate after an excellent
start. He now stands at 24-8 over
his three years at ECU.
Along with the impressive
statistics compiled bv John:
have come a wave of honors I
recognition bv his peers and thc
media. He was named co-player
ot the year for the I c V South
in '84 with Steve lannini and is
one of the leading candidates,
along with George Mason's
Kevin Burke to gain that honor
again this ear.
A comparison of some
statistics shows the pair as firsi
second in a number of categories
among ECAC-South plavers
Johnson's top mark of 22 home-
is followed by Burke's 19. wi
Burke also was second in rl
W JOHNSON Paue s�
Winfred Johnson shows the swing that currently holds virtualh even hitting record at EC!
By RICK McCORMAC
Sjxrts Editor
In the midst of ever increasing
concerns about athletics and
academics on the college level,
there have been various proposals
on what should be done to
achieve a balance between the
two.
On the national level, the
NCAA � the governing body of
collegiate athletics of which ECU
is a member � is holding a
special session in New Orleans
later this summer.
Among the items being con-
sidered is Proposition 48, a bill
that would require incoming
freshmen to have a 2.0 grade
point average, not only in all of
their school work, but in a basic
core curriculum as well. In addi-
tion, the measure would require a
minimum SAT score of 700.
The core curriculum would
consist of 11 academic courses in-
cluding at least three English
courses and two each in math,
social sciences and natural
sciences. Also a laboratory class
would be required if it is offered
at the student's high school.
The only exceptions to those
guidelines would be exceptional
students who complete high
school early.
Proposition 48 was revised to
its present form in January of
this year and is scheduled to go
into effect beginning with the fall
semester of 1986.
The issue is certain to draw
heated debate when the NCAA's
special convention meets next
month to vote on proposals to
change existing rules. Most of the
rules changes will be aimed at
tightening institutional control
over sports programs and assess-
ing tough penalties for those who
violate regulations.
Among the other proposals is
one that would require all NCAA
member schools to conduct self-
studies of their sports programs
every five years as a condition of
membership.
Other proposals would:
� Require members to report the
academic status of their athletes
to the NCAA.
� Require institutional supervi-
sion and outside audits of athletic
department budgets.
� Provide for stiffer penalties for
violations of NCAA rules and
tighten the enforcement process.
Among all the different pro-
posed regulations the two that are
receiving most of the publicity
are the minimum scores for the
SAT's and freshman eligibility.
ECU football coach Art Baker
is in a position to be greatly af-
fected by the impending regula-
tions, especially Proposition 48.
"If Proposition 48 goes into
effect, 80 percent of the black
athletes now competing and 40
percent of the white ones would
not be eligible to participate
Baker said. "You want the best
students in all of the other fields
like art and music why not
have the best athletes. I'm sure
exceptions are made in other
areas
Baker feels that there are two
sides to the possibility of having
freshmen ineligible to participate
at the varsity level.
"Freshmen would not have the
pressure of having to make the
varsity and would have more time
to hit the books and get off on
the right foot academicallyhe
said. "But, the rule would hurt us
this year because we have a few
freshmen coming in who will be
able to help our football team
Baker, who has coached when
freshmen were ineligible to par-
ticipate, was not so sure as to
how he liked the minimum SAT
proposal of 700.
&, �ii
�m
Art Baker
"I coached at Furman, where
the average SAT score was 1150.
I once recruited a player who
scored 500 on the SAT and he
went on to graduate in four
years. I also had players who
scored over 1100 who flunked
out Baker said. "I'm just not
sure that the SAT is the best yard-
stick for determining how a per-
son will do in the classroom
Baker feels that the state
school systems were beginning to
do a better job of preparing
athletes for college. Some states
have already passed minimum re-
quirements for athletes to be
eligible to compete in athletic
competition. In Texas, for in-
stance, a student is declared in-
eligible if he fails even one sub-
ject.
The minimum SAT score of
700 would not affect Baker's first
recruiting class very much since
only four of the 20 players he
recruited this year scored below
700.
"I hope I would never recruit
anybody who I thought
realistically didn't have a chance
to graduate Baker said. "In
four years I know that my cons-
cience will be clear and that all
my athletes will have had every
chance to graduate
Baker and his staff monitors
the class attendance of every
player. Study halls with tutors are
Campuses
made available as well, during the
day and at night.
Baker feels that the biggest
problem in dealing with a situa-
tion like the one that has arisen
today in college athletics, is that
"you are dealing with so manv
different people and universities
with their own ideas "
"When I was at Florida State.
of the thirty plaver- we recruited
a year, we were allowed seven ex-
ceptions to our admissions
policy he said. "All those kids
had to have was a 2.0 in high
school and we would admit them,
knowing that thev would need
special attention to graduate.
"The only problem was that
there really weren't any majors
that were offered that thev had a
realistic chance to make it in.
Here we have over 100 majors
and have adopted a realistic ap-
proach in helping our athletes to
graduate
"Individual motivation piavv
big part in whether or not so-
meone obtains a degree he con-
tinued. "But. if a young man
wants to graduate from here he is
going to have everv opportunity
to do so
LCU Scuba Program One Of Region's Best
By DAVID McGINNESS year. It is the largest such associa- credit r;�. � O M0 K, & I
By DAVID McGINNESS
Staff Writer
Imagine a world totally unlike
the one you live in. It is a world
without gravity, without air and
only limited amounts of light and
sound.
As in our world, the environ-
ment can vary greatly. It can be
dark, cold and lifeless � or a
tropical paradise filled with
beautiful and exotic creatures.
This is the world the scuba
diver experiences.
ECU is blessed with one of the
largest and most qualified scuba
programs in the Sou'heast. It is
also fortunate to be located only
two hours from the Atlantic
Ocean.
The ECU diving program will
begin its ninth year of instruction
this fall. While only seven
students participated in the fall of
'77, the program has grown
steadily. Today it is the most
popular elective at ECU.
year. It is the largest such associa
tion in the country and provides a
national standard for scuba in-
struction.
Ray Scharf heads the ECU
scuba program and is Director of
Aquatics at the university. He has
been diving since the late '50's
and received his NAUI instruc-
tor's certification in 1972. Scharf
teaches diving in other Down
East communities as well as
teaching day and evening classes
at ECU year round. What does
he do in his spare time? He goes
diving, naturally.
Scharf can be rightfully proud
of his record as a diving instruc-
tor. Since 1972 he has trained and
certified � with a perfect record
� over 1,100 divers from the
basic to instructor levels.
Scharf feels that the divers he
trains at ECU are even better
prepared than the average NAUI
diver. This is due in part to the
fact that ECU divers go through
The program certifies 240-250 approximately two and a half
students as basic National times as many classroom hours as
Association of Underwater In- most NAUI divers. In addition,
structors (NAUI) divers each ECU students take the course for
credit and receive a letter grade,
providing extra incentive.
This quality and amount of in-
struction is vitally important.
Scuba diving is far more com-
plicated than just swimming
around underwater and
breathing. Students learn about
maintain all of the equipment us-
ed by scuba divers. "I like the
freedom I feel being able to
breath underwater said senior
history major and ECU diver
Tom Allen.
"When you finish the basic
course you are really just beginn-
Tjje scuba class is one of the most popular electlves offered at ECU.
ine program certifies about 250 NAUI divers each year.
SfctlillSfllH and ecol0�y � 8 said Ray Scharf. In order
ThevtL? u8' to accommodate students who
y 9ao lcarn now to use and wanted to learn more about div-
ing, ECU began offering an ad-
vanced class in 1982.
The class was originally re-
quested by the Marine Maritime
History (MMH) Program here at
ECU. MMH students utilize
scuba a great deal in their
research and need certain advanc-
ed skills.
In the advanced class they are
taught :
� Underwater navigation skills
� Search and recovery skills
� Night diving
� Deep diving
� Diving in strong currents
� Offshore boat diving techni-
ques
"In addition Scharf said,
"the course is designed to help
the diver cope with various condi-
tions and stresses in the under-
water environment
In the fall of '84, ECU in-
troduced the Diving Leadership
Program (DLP). Students who
complete this course are certified
as NAUI Divemasters and Assis-
tant Instructors. DLP students
gain practical experience through
helping to teach a basic scuba
course. DLP's give classroom lec-
tures, teach diving and equip-
ment skills in the pool, and act as
"buddy or "coach" to
students on their checkout dives
Twelve students at ECU have
completed the Diving Leadership
Program.
By-the spring of "86, Scharf
hopes to expand the ECL divine
program to include an instructor
trammg course. "It would give us
a total diving program from the
standpoint of instuction "
Local divers who are interested
XLTT duiUg throu8h�ut the
state and the world may want to
�v?n�K �Cean �
m 1982 to ThKC dUb Was formed
till eX'hai,8e ,deas and in-
SZ uT and t0 Prom�te safe,
enjoyable conditions for d.ver
from Greenville and the surroun-
ding communities.
This year the club sponsored
mps to: Key Largo, Australia
o?ConeTaIS,andSandThe
month at ST �5, �f "�?
Greenville ��. aJ�'
Joh
Continued Imm i
'during the regular
Johnson. Burke tj
eluding the play
first, however
Burke led the le
and triples a- �
the addmona.
but Burke's all-a:
been rec
league also Both
named to the I
all-tournament
recentlv conclu I
Harnngto: �
No matter how t
the year voting .
Johnson has a
media attenti
ECL Last -e;
Dan
INDIANA
Lakes Dan:
to drive fi -
Louisville to I:
took him
three hour
of LS. auto -
Sullivan drove
trouble twice Sui
world's riche
dianapous 3�
start here
At the �
lapofthe200-la
two and c �
Sullivan went
managed to
mario Andrett
trol of his car in
Suddenly his
smoky coasters a
powered March
seeminglv headed I
Sea
CHICAGO (UP1
Seaver can smile a
It was I
ago the poter. j
held a tearv-eec
ference in New
would think it over
agreed to come
White Sox.
Seaver, along -
tion of the baseball
was stunned to
the unprotected
to be picked as
the Sox for losing
cher Dennis Lan
At 39, Seaver wa
with the prospe.
New York Metv m d
ty. The idea of
at that stage oi
popular one. either
But Seaver go: a
job by genera,
Hemond and he sigrj
with the White Sox.
"I don't knew if
totally accurate to
selling job He I
"We just believed
use a solid starter
experience. It turn, j
good move
One of those se.
the fact the So were
League Western Dr. - l
the year before and Sej
have a chance to
World Series.
"The first time I
was back in 19 and
the Cincinnati Reds
just won two World S
I came aboard on Jui
they were six game-
later, they were 12 g
Seaver recalled. "Thev
i� i� Q Q Q v
ToP
all a a?
IN TH
ToHiJ o�v
AS L0N6AS
ALL y
OPEtf MoJ.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 29. 1985
sault
nance
� .tnu
md the
i .
v South
and is
lidates,
Mason's
v o r v
NmN Pave Y
K I
uses

Best
lents r E(
t o
lives.
hae
rship

Scharf
:I Jiving
iCtor
ild give us
mi from the
ituctiort
s who are interested
'ng throughout the
'rid may want to
Ocean Atlantic
ie club was formed
change ideas and in-
�d to promote safe,
editions for divers'
ille and the surroun-
Hties.
the club sponsored
Largo. Australia,
Elands and The Sea
Leungs are held on
I'ednesday of every
lhe Ramada Inn,
Nm at 6:30 p.m.
( ontinued From Page 8
during the regular season to
Johnson. Burke's total rbi's in-
cluding the playoffs puts him in
first, however.
Burke led the league in doubles
and triples as well. Johnson has
the additional factor of pitching,
but Burke's all-around ability has
been recognized around the
league also. Both players were
named to the ECAC Southern
all-tournament team of the
recently concluded playoffs at
Harrington Field.
No matter how the player of
the year voting goes for '85,
ohnson has already gained much
media attention in his career at
ECU. Last season he was named
Improves On Career Homer Mark
to the All-NCAA South I
Regional team as a result of a
444 batting. He also pitched a
complete game in the win against
Florida State � the same one he
won offensively with a grand-
slam.
His nine complete games and
3.30 ERA in '84 resulted in his
being named the winner of the
Gaylord Perry Award for last
season. This award goes to the
best amateur pitcher in North
Carolina.
Johnson was the subject of a
feature article in Baseball
America and was selected as The
Daily Reflector male player of
the year recently as well.
Not the least of those impress-
ed by Winfred Johnson's stats
are the Pirate coaches. Just the
mention of Johnson's name is
enough to bring out a smile from
them, even after the recent losses
in the ECAC-Southern playoffs.
Head coach Gary Overton and
assistant coach Billy Best have
nothing but good things to say
about their star player. "The
statistics speak for themselves
said Overton. "Winfred's simply
a very good hitter. He played ex-
cellently last year and even better
this season.
"One day the young man's go-
ing to make his mark in the
pros Overton stated. "It may
not be right away, but it will hap-
pen. He pitched a fine game in
the ECAC tournament, but just
lost one of those one-run
games
Best, who works with the hit-
ters as part of his duties, feels
Johnson's .432 bating average is
symbolic of the experience the
first basemanpitcher has gained
since arriving at ECU.
"The unique thing about Win-
fred is the combination of power
and a high average Best said.
"He seemed to lay off a lot more
pitches this year, which is
demonstrated by the fewer
number of times he struck out.
He got more walks by being more
selective
This relationship between ex-
perience and strike-outswalks is
vividly shown by the stats.
Johnson went from striking out
32 times and walking only eight
Danny Sullivan Takes Indv With
times in 39 games his freshman
year to 21 strike-outs and 25
walks in 46 games his sophomore
year.
He topped all those figures in
'85 with only 14 strike-outs in 46
games, with 33 walks. The
"Cat as he has been nicknam-
ed, has never had a triple in col-
lege play, but has increased the
number of doubles each year, go-
ing from seven his first season to
nine in '84, then hitting 11 this
year.
"Winfred has the ability to hit
all kinds of pitches Best said.
"He's one of the best breaking-
ball hitters I've seen, but he can
hit fastballs just as well
Johnson has improved in his
defensive play at first base, also,
according to Best. "He was play-
ing as just the designated hitter
sometimes in previous seasons
the Pirate assistant coach said,
"but since he became the starting
first baseman, he's done a fine
job
Johnson ended the '85 season
with a .975 fielding mark, with
only six errors, while being
credited with 216 put-outs.
Pirate fans are already looking
for even more excitement from
Johnson in 1986, but one of the
problems with playing so well is
the difficulty of topping previous
performances.
If the continued improvement
over three seasons is any indica-
tion � Winfred Johnson is one
man that can do it.
INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) � It
akes Danny Sullivan two hours
to drive from his hometown of
Louisville to Indianapolis. It
took him just a little more than
:hree hours to reach the pinnacle
of U.S. auto racing.
Sullivan drove in and cat of
trouble twice Sunday to win the
world's richest car race, the In-
dianapolis 500, in only his third
start here.
At the first turn in the 120th
lap of the 200-lap race around the
two and one-half mile oval,
Sullivan went for the lead. He
managed to pass front-runner
mano Andretti, but he lost con-
trol of his car in the process.
Suddenly his tires became
moky coasters as his Cosworth-
powered March whirled around,
seemingly headed for the wall
and catastrophe. But the car
merely completed a perfect
360-degree spin, came out of it
facing the same way it had gone
into it. "I was just holding on
Sullivan said. But with his
pirouette, he relinquished the
lead to Andretti.
Four laps later, rookie Rich
Vogler spun out in the same first
turn. He ran out of room and out
of luck. His car hit the wall,
splashing wreckage acrossthe
track as Tom Sneva, Andretti
and Sullivan approached.
Sneva spun out and hit the
wall, too. Andretti and Sullivan
survived again. Int he 140th lap,
on his third try at passing Andret-
ti, Sulivan did it. He was in front
to stay, finishing the race in 3
hours, 16 minutes, 6.069 seconds
� 2,477 seconds ahead of An-
dretti.
Andretti had been shooting for
his second victory. He ound up,
instead, with his second second.
And Sullivan, who only a decade
or so ago was careening around
the streets of New York city
behind the wheel of a taxicab,
wound up giving the Roger Pen-
ske Racing Team its second
straight Indy 500 victory.
"The taxi driver business is
really blown out of proportion
because I didn't drive for very
long Sullivan said, while still
enjoying the spotlight his victory
produced. "I worked as a waiter
there more of the time than
anything else
Sullivan is a new breed of racer
� one with a jet-set reputation.
Unlike A.J. Foyt, Al Unser and
other veterans of the Indy-car cir-
cuit who began their careers rac-
ing on dirt tracks and sleeping in
the back seats of their cars to save
money, Sullivan spent his ap-
prenticeship on the glamorous
European racing circuit.
"I enjoy making a good im-
pression both on the track, when
I'm relaxing and in all my ac-
tivities Sullivan said. "That's
important to me That � and
his driving skills � were too
much for Penske to resist.
"This time last year I wouldn't
have considered hiring him. I
knew Danny, but he hadn't
shown me his credentials. At
Pocono I saw him get behind and
work his way up again, then hold
off and beat Rick Mears. That
showed his progress Penske
said. It was Mears who gave Pen-
Comes Back With
CHICAGO (UPI) � Tom
Seaver can smile about it now.
It was just a little over one year
ago the potential hall of famer
held a teary-eyed news con-
ference in New York to say he
would think it over before he
agreed to come to the Chicago
White Sox
Seaver, along with a large por-
tion of the baseball community,
was stunned to find his name on
the unprotected list and eligible
to be picked as compensation to
the Sox for losing free agent pit-
cher Dennis Lamp.
At 39, Seaver wasn't thrilled
with the prospect of leaving the
New York Mets or New York ci-
ty. The idea of switching leagues
at that stage of his career wasn't a
popular one, either.
But Seaver got a good selling
'ob by general manager Roland
Hemond and he signed aboard
with the White Sox.
"I don't know if it would be
totally accurate to say it was a
selling job Hemmond recals.
"We just believed that we could
use a solid starter with his kind of
experience. It turned out to be a
good move
One of those selling points was
the fact the Sox were American
League Western Division champs
the year before and Seaver could
have a chance to pitch in the
World Series.
"The first time I left New York
was back in 1977 and I went to
the Cincinnati Reds. They had
just won two World Series titles.
I came aboard on June 16 and
they were six games out. A week
later, they were 12 games back
Seaver recalled. "They didn't win
the World Series that year,
either
You don't have to remind
Seaver twice what happened to
the Sox last year.
"I come aboard a division win-
ning team and they wind up in
fifth place Seaver said. "I
warned you, Roland
Things are different this year,
if the first part of the 1985 season
can be a barometer. Seaver has
become part of a revitalized Sox
p;tching staff that includes
Richard Dotson, Britt Burns and
Floyd Bannister and the Sox are
back contending in the American
League Western division.
Seaver won four of his first six
decisions and climbed to the 292
career victory plateau on May 20,
giving him an excellent shot at
reaching the career 300-win mark
this season.
Truth is, had it not been for
Seaver, the Sox probably would
have finished last in the AL West
last year. Seaver, who won 15
games, was the club's most
dependable starting pitcher and
could have won 20 games had he
gotten any support.
"In seven games he started, we
scored two or less runs says
Manager Tony LaRussa. "In six
games he left with a lead and we
didn't hold it for him
"You just know that if you can
keep the other guys down, then
we are going to score some runs
and win the games Seaver says.
"You can feel it on this club
Last year, Seaver compiled a
3.95 earned run average, high for
him compared to his lifetime
statistics, but among the best on
the Sox staff. This year, his ERA
is down about a half a run.
Last year, he was 9-4 at Com-
iskey Park with a 3.64 earned run
average. Seaver won't say so, but
pitching in unfamiliar parks for
the first time in his career may
have affected his performance on
the road.
"It was a thrill pitching in a
place like Fenway Park. All the
history and I hope they never
take that away from the fans
says Seaver with an obvious
finger toward anv efforts to get
rid of crosstown rival Chicago
Cubs' home, Wrigley Field.
With the departure of former
Cy Young Award winner LaMarr
Hoyt to San Diego, Seaver was a
strong candidate to be the ace
and stopper of a staff that at one
time was considered to have the
best young arms in baseball. But
with the pitching of Dotson,
Burns and Bannister, the club has
not had to rely as heavily on
Seaver as it did one year ago.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
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756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
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1:15-3:15
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ske the checkered flag at Indy a
year ago.
In public, Sullivan's hair is
neatly combed, his face well-
tanned, his physique well-
muscled. Away from the speed-
way, he still travels in the fast
lane.
He also thinks his reputation as
a jet-set playboy isn't justified.
"That's overplayed. A lot of peo-
ple talk about it, but it's mainly
something they speculate about.
I'd be lying if I said I don't enjoy
life, but I don't think that is
something to speculate on.
"Besides, I don't spend much
time away from the track. I like
to ski, get away from it and I
have a girlfriend. But my private
life is just that
He spent a lot of time Sunda
night viewing tapes of Sundays
race, paying special attention to
the spectacular spin. "There's no
book on how to handle
something like that, especiallv
when your eyes are closed he
said. "I was just luckj then �
and also I just missed riding into
Sneva's crash minutes later. I
missed it by about this much he
added, holding his fingers about
three inches apart.
He didn't have that margin for
error in his two previous starts
here.
SLEEPING BAGS
ackpaocs rtNTs - .
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ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S Evans
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I

Make Your Next Meal
PORTABLE
PICNIC
from
208 E. Fifth St.
758-7979
Delivery available thru "The Jokes On Us"
757-1973
VSSS 'SsSSsSSWSSSSfJSJI.
�' � ����� i i ����
t;
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IS NOW A CCEPTING
APPLICA TIONS FOR
SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Must Have
Selling Experience
Apply in Person
2nd Floor
Old South Building
l-SPM
t
"l '��" ���!
m.m��
1 ��





10
JHE EAST CAROL INI AN
MAY 29, 198S
IRS Sponsors Trip To Uwharries
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Suff Writer
Are you looking for something
refreshing, exciting and exercis-
ing for your weekend enjoyment?
Well, the outdoor recreation
center can satisfy your summer
needs.
On the weekend of June 7-9,
the intramural outdoor recrea-
tion center will sponsor a
backpacking trip to the Uwharrie
National Forest. The Uwharrie
Forest is nestled among the oldest
mountain ranges in the Western
Minges Pool
M-F 4 p.m7:00 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m. -5:00 p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
T-Th 10a.m12 noon
T-Th 1 p.m4 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 11 p.m7:00 p.m.
Friday 11 p.m5:00 p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m4 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 11 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 11 a.m5:00 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m4p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
MF 1:30 p.m5 p.m.
T-Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED. Room
mate wanted as soon as possible to
share a two bedroom apartment at
Oakmont Square. Private Room,
pool, tennis courts, laundry
facilities Call 756 8503 after 6:30.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
2 bedroom townhouse with 1 other
person 34 mile from ECU on 5th St.
$145 per month plus utilities. Heat in
eluded in rent. 830 1306
NEEDED: Art student with silk
screen-print background Call
756 8801.
ROOMMATED WANTED: Need
female roommate. Private room,
AC, near campus, $107, one third
phone, utilities, cable. Must be neat.
Nonsmoker. No pets. Call Lori or
Diana: 752 1001
NEEDED: Seeking responsible
roommate to share B unit at Ring
gold Towers for the summer. Com
pletely furnished, AC, accessories
included. Call weekdays before 3 PM
757 6366. Ask for Dan.
NEEDED: Apartment cleaned on
regular basis. For information, call
757 3509 after 5 PM.
NEEDED: Part-time instrument
man party chief and drafstperson
for local surveying company. Ex-
perience required Call 752 5998 for
appointement.
NEEDED: America's largest inven-
tory co needs H.S. graduates to take
inventory in the Greenville area.
Work 10 20 hours per week.
Weeknights and weekends. Start at
$4.50 and hour. We will train. Call
collect on May 30th between 10 AM
and 3 PM, 787 0591.
HOUSE FOR RENT: House for
rent: 6 bedroom house near univer
sity, 305 E. 14th St. Summer or long
term rental To be renovated. $350.
758 5299
MISC
BICYCLES PAINTED: CALL JIM
FOR MORE INFORMATION.
757 3861
SALE
FOR SALE: Men's 23 " Univega
10-Speed. 9 Months old excellent con-
dition, $120. Call 757 3517 after 3.
FOR SALE: RCA VHS VCR for $200.
Pioneer sx 780 receiver 55 wch
$125. Hitachi HT 405 turntable, DD
with new ADC cartridge $110. I
negotiate. 752 8483.
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An-
thony at 757 6366 or 752 0291
Hemisphere near Asheboro,
N.C. The entire trail passes
through both public and private
lands extending through six of
North Carolina's most scenic
counties.
The expedition will leave from
Memorial Gym at 3:00 on Friday
June 7 and arrive at their destina-
tion early in the evening to
prepare for the overnight stay.
Saturday will feature a full day of
trailblazing until camp is
established at approximately 5:00
that evening. During Sunday, the
group will once again hit the
trails until departing for home at
3 p.m. They should arrive in
Greenville around 8 p.m.
To partake in this session's
adventure trip, a payment of
either $12.00 or $20.00 is
necessary. The $12.00 fee is for
transportation only. The $20.00
covers transportation, tent, sleep-
ing bag, cook sets and water bot-
tles. A $10.00 cash payment
should be made for food provi-
sions.
The trip is geared toward
novice or beginning trail blazers.
However, six miles of moderate
to heavy hiking can take its toll
on anyone. The IRS suggests that
you begin conditioning now by
jogging, running or walking.
A Uwharrie packet containing
all the information concerning
this year's trip can be obtained by
going to the outdoor recreation
center in room 204 Memorial
Gym or call 757-6387 for more
information.
A pre-trip meeting will be held
June 4 at 4 p.m. in room 105-B
Memorial Gym. Ihis meeting is
mandatory for all who plan to
hike with the IRS.
Be sure to tune in every Thurs-
day at 2:30 and 5:30 for in-
tramural sport highlights and in-
terviews on WZMB and the IRS
Tennis Shoe Talkshow 91.3 FM
is your channel for sport- ol sorts
with intramurals.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7a.m8a
M-f 12 noon-1:30 p.m.
T ' � n
f
'
y
f!
SEEOEWV
SMGIEHV.UE STORE
jfiEW SSg- vri I WITH
tnfflHBI
FltlO
�msyovjwantjaosti
xmmlTQWALL
yai'j:hoiisi:
prh:i:s
JANE PARKER
HAMBURGER OR
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3100
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8 ct. �
pkgs. �
LIMIT THREE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00
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pkgs. m
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00
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FLAV-O-RICH
up to
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"
UP TO
WAREHOUSE PRICES
HELLMANNS
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ctn.
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FROZEN
SAVE
UP TO
2oo
9 12 lb.
avg.
lb.
LIMIT ONE
CUT FREE
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
MORE THAN 81 LEAN
Ground Chuck
tb
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Fresh
Daily
Mayonnaise Fox Pizza
SAM j
UP TO
T032o2
jar
25- OFF LABEL
azola Corn Oil
;bler
eady Crust Pie Shells
Honeycomb Cereal
Ikraft
BBQ Sauce
ITEXAS PETE
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 29, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 29, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.409
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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