The East Carolinian, May 22, 1985






Bht
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.58
Wednesday, May 22,1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Media Heads' Tuition
Scrutinized By Board
By RANDY MEWS
Co-�wj Mllor
The appointment of Jeff
Canady as General Manager of
Expressions provoked members
of ECU's Media Board to con-
sider a policy change Monday
regarding the payment of media
heads' tuition during summer
school.
Canady recently became the
first media head who was not a
resident of North Carolina and
this has media board members
concerned since there is a $639
disparity in tuition between full-
time (six credit hours) in-state
and out-of-state students for each
summer session.
SGA President David Brown
attended the meeting and said,
"the possibility exists in the
future that four or five media
heads could be out-of-state
students He told media board
members that a decision would
have to be made in the event all
media heads who request tuition
payment are from out-of-state.
The tuition for media heads
has been paid in full since the
summer of 1983. However, a
policy change to avert the added
expense of those who reside out-
side of North Carolina is ex-
pected to be approved at the
media board's next meeting.
The new policy is expected to
be similar to one of the proposals
made Monday:
� That out-of-state media heads
be allowed to appoint someone
(that is from in-state) to serve in
their place during the summer
months.
� That out-of-state media heads
must pay the difference between
their tuiton and that of in-state
students.
� That out-of-state media heads
don't have to be enrolled in sum-
mer school (although it has
always been policy that media
board employees be enrolled in
school while working.)
According to Canady, any
change in policy would be unfair
to out-of-state media heads.
"The board needs to consider
that everyone does the same job
regardless of where they live.
"I could be making five times
as much money as I do now if 1
was working at home Canady
continued, "but the experience
I'm getting now could never be
replaced by money
The five summer media heads
who currently have their tuition
paid for include: Tom Norton,
The East Carolinian ; Kate Ab-
bott, WZMB-FM; Beth Davis,
Buccaneer; Jeff Canady, Expres-
sions; Jon Jordan, Photo Lab.
Researchers Hoist Anchor
By HAROLD JOY NER
Oo-Nmh Editor
ECU researchers recently ex-
amined the 1,350-pound anchor
of the Civil War ship USS
Monitor which has been soaking
in a special solution to remove
buildup from the ocean.
Those involved in the restora-
tion of the anchor said the clean-
ing process is on schedule and
that it looks much like it did more
than a century ago. "We hope to
display the anchor at ECU in the
fall said Dina Hill, coordinator
of the Monitor projects. The an-
chor has been soaking in a unique
tank at ECU's power plant while
an electrolysis process removes
barnacles and Crustacea ac-
cumulated on it.
Curtiss Peterson, a preserva-
tionist associated with the
University of South Carolina,
said some salt is still being releas-
ed from the anchor, so a suitable
design for the anchor's display
case will not be built until the end
of the summer.
The researchers work has been
supervised the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administra-
tion. "NOAA will set up a
display schedule for the anchor
Peterson said, "with it probably
going to the U.S. Navy after be-
ing displayed at ECU
"The anchor is the largest ar-
tifact retrieved from the
Monitor Hill said. "Other ar-
tifacts are just too large to be
displayed anywhere else She
added that ECU is the only con-
servation facility for artifacts
such as the Monitor's anchor. "It
is a problem because storage
space is so short
ECU history professor Gordon
Watts, also a part of the Monitor
research team, said the wrecked
ironclad battleship lies in about
200 feet of water 16 miles off the
coast of Cape Hatteras. The an-
chor was recovered during a 1983
expedition to the wreck site by
the ECU Department of
Maritime History.
Examination of the anchor has
given researchers a clue of what
kind of condition the Monitor
may be in. "About 40 percent of
the Monitor is buried in ocean
sediment Watts said, "so it
should be in an excellent state of
preservation The section of the
anchor that was buried in sand
has remained in better condition
than the part that was exposed to
the sea, Watts said.
Because the Civil War bat-
tleship sat low and heavy in the
water, some historians have said
the anchor may have caused the
Monitor to sink � the anchor
pulling the bow under stormy
waves.
According to Peterson, the
cleaning process should continue
for the next five months before
being turned over to NOAA.
JON JORDAN � ECU Pnoto Lab
Several ECU researchers recently examined the century-old anchor of the Monitor.
Time-Out
BRYAN HUMBERT � ECU Photo Lab
Summer school is now in full force and this unidentified student takes advantage of some spare time bet-
ween classes to study her notes.
ECU Offers Solid Education
By BRETT MORRIS
Staff Writer
Many of the students who have
graduated from ECU are finding
themselves in the same boat as
thousands of other recent
graduates across the nation � the
dilemma of what to do with their
bachelor of arts degree.
Many may decide to further
their education in graduate
school in hopes of successfully
competing in the job market.
Those who do find employ-
ment, because they cannot afford
more schooling, may find
themseleves reminiscing about
what they have learned and how
their education will help them in
the real world.
The Association of American
Colleges, which includes
members from both public and
private colleges and universities,
said recently that university
bachelor degrees are not concen-
trating enough on the intellectual
stimulation of the student.
The AAC further states that
students are too involved with the
exterior motives surrounding col-
lege life instead of producing
thinking skills and a broad
knowledge of basic education re-
quirements, such as math and
�English.
Vice Chancellor of Academic
Affairs Angelo Volpe said he
disagrees with the AAC's report
and said ECU students are expos-
ed to all facets of an education
through general education re-
quirements in the fields of liberal
arts, fine arts, social sciences,
sciences and humanities. "We are
in a very good situation as far as
the National Education Associa-
tion is concerned he said.
ECU Philiosophy instructor
Richard Miller said last semester
at the ECU Phi Kappa Phi Sym-
posium that there has been
neglect of thinking and reading
skills at educational institutions.
Volpe said, "We encourage
students to get involved in the op-
portunities that are offered in
curriculum and extracurricular
activities through clubs, societies,
programs and student employ-
ment opportunities
Pesticide Disturbs Immune System
ECUNcwi
A researcher at the ECU
School of Medicine working with
a team of Virginia scientists have
discovered that a form of dioxin
associated with a commonly used
commercial pesticide interferes
with normal immune function in
laboratory mice.
Dr. Donald W. Barnesv ECU
associate professor of phar-
macology, was involved in the
research with three scientists
from the Medical College of
Virginia.
The study focused on the
pesticide pentachlorophenol, a
compound frequently incor-
porated in wood preservatives
and stains to inhibit the growth
of fungus. PCP is the second
most heavily used pesticide in the
United States, according tc the
researchers.
In its unpurified form, PCP is
naturally contaminated with a
form of the chemical dioxin
known as HCDD. Although
chemically related to its most
publicized family member,
TCDD, the most toxic man-made
chemical known, the dioxin
found in PCP has been shown to
be less potent.
Yet the researchers
demonstrated that HCDD, like
TCDD, also interferes with the
immune system � the body's ma-
jor defense against foreign in-
vaders and abnormal cells. The
group found that when mice were
exposed to HCDD for 14 days at
levels similar to those found in
the contaminated pesticide, the
animals lost some of their ability
to manufacture antibodies to
foreign cells. When the resear-
chers tested a form of the
pesticide which had been purified
to remove HCDD, they found it
had no immunotoxic effects.
Barnes said the dioxin, TCDD,
a compound associated with the
defoliant "agent orange" used in
the Vietnam War, has undergone
extensive scientific scrutiny in the
past. HCDD and other members
of the dioxin family, however,
have been studied to a lesser ex-
tent.
Barnes' role in the research in-
volved studies of certain
biochemical changes induced by
exposure to HCDD. In chemical
assays of the livers of laboratory
mice, Barnes found the HCDD
induced the production of liver
enzymes in patterns similar to
those produced by exposure to
TCDD.
The investigators concluded
that while the dioxin HCDD may
not be wholly responsible for the
unpurified pesticide's im-
munotoxic effects, it is at least
partly responsible. Further
research is needed to find out if
other components of the pesticide
are also involved, they said.
Professors Receive Higher Salaries; ECU Above Average
Staff 4 Wire Reports
After years of losing money to
inflation, most college teachers
are earning about 6.6 percent
more than they did in 1984-85, a
new study says.
At ECU the percentage is even
higher as all faculty members
recently received a seven percent
across the board raise as well as a
three percent merit increase.
On the national average, full
professors now make $39,870 �
a 2.5 percent increase after infla-
tion � and experts hope the re-
cent economic recovery and sute
tax increases will prompt govern-
ing boards and state legislatures
to boost faculty salaries even
more next year.
But the salaries still don't let
professors live as well as they did
a decade ago, warns W. Lee Han-
son, author of the American
Association of University Pro-
fessors' Annual Report on the
Economic Status of the Profes-
sion.
"It's still only 85 percent of
what professors were earning (in
real dollars) in the early
seventies he says.
The reason is that, although
most consumer prices were rising
by some 10 percent a year during
the late 70s and early gOs, col-
leges could only afford to grant
faculty members pay hikes of
seven-to-eight percent during
those years.
But the relatively low inflation
rate of the last two years has
"helped ease the burden of col-
leges and universities" this year,
and given faculty their highest
"real salary" increase since the
1960s, Han sen explains.
"In 1981, real salaries were 20
percent below early seventies'
levels he adds. "Now, they're
only about 15 percent lower
Public college teachers are get-
ting the biggest average increases,
6.9 percent, while private college
professors' average raise was six
percent, the study says.
"The increase level in public
institutions is higher because
private institution budgets de-
pend mostly on tuition income
Hansen notes. "And there's
always the usual handwringing
about raising tuition
The study came out days after
a College Press Service report
that tuition will be going up
faster than the inflation rate
again next fall, largely because
colleges need more money to help
restore faculty buying power.
This year, professors at
private, Ph.D. � granting univer-
sities are the nation's highest paid
teachers, averaging $49,880, the
study shows.
And men continue to outearn
women professors by about
$5,000 a year.
The study found full pro-
fessors now average $39,870;
associate professors, $29,910;
assistant professors, $24,610;
instructors, $19,150 and lec-
turers, $22,020.
While no school approved the
18.9 percent pay boost necessary
to bring faculty salaries back up
to 1970 purchasing levels, some
did give healthy raises.
California State University
faculty, for example, got a ten
percent pay hike this year, and
hope for another ten percent next
year, says California Faculty
Association spokesman Edward
Purcell.
"But remember, in California
for a number of years, there was
no faculty salary increase he
adds.
But, while some research
universities and schools in states
with booming economies granted
above-average raises, schools in
economically distressed
agriculture and energy states fell
behind.
"The AAUP report shows na-
tionwide averages says Minot
(N.D.) Sute College physics Pro-
fessor Gordon Berkey. "I wish it
were true in North Dakota. In the
last two years, higher education
faculty salaries have gone up zero
percent.
"North Dakota depends on the
farm and oil economy, and it's a
bad time for both adds Berkey,
who conducted an independent
survey of sute education salaries
last fall.
And while college enrollment is
up this year, sUte-wide, he says,
there's little public support for
higher education needs.
"We haven't fared well in
competition for sUte funds he
notes. "The public perception
seems to be that public (primary
and secondary) schools need
more and that we're doing well
Salary increases in Texas,
Maryland, New Mexico and
Wisconsin all fell far below the
6.6 percent average.
"Our increase for this year was
3.84 percent says James
Hickman, University of
Wisconsin-Madison business pro-
fessor and member of the Faculty
Salary Working Group. "It was
far, far below our competitors
Hick man's committee had
recommeded pay increases of 15
percent for Wisconsin faculty.
"But we fed good about the
report he stresses. "We
predicted this, how other univer-
sities kept two to three percent
ahead of inflation, but I don't
know what effect the study will
have on state employee pay
plans

r �� Diillfft-yrr
mm - �- �� �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
.WAY 22, 1983
1
Mayor Responds To Letter
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) �
Mayor Wilson Goode says a let-
ter he received from a member of
MOVE threatened to burn the
radical group's house along with
other nearby homes if police
launched an assault on the cult's
row-house fortress.
Goode said Sunday the city
received the two-page letter from
Ramona Africa, the only known
adult survivor of an incident last
week that claimed 11 lives, in
eluding four children.
In an attempt to evict MOVE
members from their West
Philadelphia stronghold, a police
helicopter dropped a concusssion
bomb on the structure, and an
ensuing fire destroyed 53 houses
and damaged eight in the work-
ing class neighborhood. About
250 people were left homeless.
The mayor said Africa claimed
MOVE had stockpiled weapons
in its heavily fortified row house.
He also said the letter warned
police would be killed and the
house burned if authorities laun-
ched an assault.
Goode did not explain why
police mounted an attack despite
the letter.
He said the letter was received
last Friday by police, and it
traveled through official channels
until Goode saw it Wednesday or
Thursday, The Philadelphia In-
quirer reported.
The back-to-nature cult, whose
members assume the surname
Africa, had been a growing
nuisance in the neighborhood,
residents said. Neighbors had
been complaining about filthy
conditions and disruptive noises
at the MOVE house and had been
asking the city to help control the
group.
Goode estimated the damage
from last Monday's assault at
more than $8 million, and he has
promised new housing for the
victims by Christmas.
Appearing on CBS�TV's
"Face the Nation" Sunday,
Goode called for a day of prayer
for victims but again defended
the police action, saying MOVE
had vowed to destroy the
neighborhood and threatened
him and other city officials
But others disagreed, including
a Baptist minister who planned a
rally against the mayor today
near City Hall.
Appearing on the telecast,
MOVE spokesman Jerry Africa
said threats by the group after the
bombing were not against
Goode's life but his political
career.
"Among black leadership we
are outraged said Rep. John
Conyers, D-N.Y on the same
program. He called the police ac-
tion "the most violent eviction
notice in history
The American Civil Liberties
Union also has criticized the
bombing.
CLfjFHC
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Carolina East Mall 756-6078
(North entrance - Near Belks)
Open AonSat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Su days 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
Presents
LADIES' LOCKOUT
JACKIE KNIGHT'S


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Wed May 22nd
Doors open 7 pm for ladies onlv
50c Wine & Draft 'til 10:00
Doors open 10 pm for men
Entertainment by the WAI.LLR IAMII Y
Los Angeles police chief Daryl
Gates, also on "Face The
Nation came to Goode's
defense, calling him "an inspira-
tion to the nation" who had
"jumped onto my heroes list
Goode called MOVE members
"urban guerrillas" who waged
"psychological warfare on their
neighbors
Goode's approval of the bom-
bing following a daylong siege of
the house has divided the city's
clergy.
"We're talking about prayer
after the fact rather than before
the fact said C. Hamilton
Robinson, pastor of the Christian
Fellowship Baptist Church in
North Philadelphia.
Robinson, who planned to take
part in the demonstration today
against Goode, said, "The basic
issue is a human rights issue. The
right to life takes precedence over
property rights
Other ministers voiced support
for the mayor.
Announcements
Bingo-Ice-Cream
The student Union Recreetlon Committee
l� sponsoring a Bingo-Ice Cream Party on
Tuesday. May 2� at 7p.m In the MendenhaM
Student Center Muttl Purpose Room Enoy
delicious Ice cream and play Bingo for prizes
all for only a 25 cent admission tee
Scholarship Offered
The School of Art. Design Department, of
fers the Eastern Advertisinf Federation
Scholarship for rising Juniors or seniors
The scholarship has been established by the
Eastern Carolina Advertising Federation to
support and promote the study of advertising
by deserving students The applicant must
have at leasty a 3 0 grade point, and must in
tend to pursue a career in advertising or
advertising related
Forum on African Famine
We all know that there are millions of peo
pie starving in Africa, but tew of us really
understand the situation Learn how you can
be a part of relief efforts TONIGHT at
MendenhaM 244. 7 p.m The presentation will
be followed by discussion Sponsored by me
ECU Campus Ministries
Camp Starlight
Interested in working with children and
young people in a beautiful setting? Camp
Starlight is located in the Poconos Mountains
of Pennsylvania They need counselors and
water skiing instructors For more informa
lion contact Cooperative Education, 313
Rawl. 757 4979
National Teacher Examination
There is a special National Teacher Ex
amination scheduled tor Saturday. June 22
Candidates must contact the testing center
prior to June 5 to register for the test To
save candidates travel time, you should be
aware that tests art also being given at
Atlantic Christian College, wnson, N C
Weslyan, Rocky Mount, Fayetteville State,
and New Bern High School
G.P.A.
The Counseling Center is ottering, tree w
charge, the following session on helping r&c
increase your g p a ana still have tun ?�,
mg Exams Setting yourself Up To
Thursday May 23. 1 2 30 P M and iua,
June. 4. i 2 30 P M AM sessions wHI oe I g
m bright Annex No advance regis�'��ior
necessary For further �nformaon picas
call 757 6641
EXPRESSIONS
ECU'S MINORITY PUBLICATION
Has Openings in the following
positions:
Sales Representatives
Applications are available at EXPRESSIONS office
in the Publications Building or contact General
Manager Jeff Canady 757-6927
COUPON
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PRIZE VALUENUMBER OF PRIZESODOSFOR ONE GAME TICKETOODS FOR 3 GAME TICKETSODDS FOR 6 GAME TICKETS
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Stu
(CPSt - Studen
job market this sp
to face a ne
tests.
Companies that
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making stude:
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ding to car
around the co
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part because �
be willing
says Roto
director o'
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author of i
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R. eg
received
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"The
detected n
use
is now ai
D.Js an
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Pitt-Greei
applicat
startine M,
1985. Dm I
and airp
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LU
208 E. Fifth Si
Delivery







AM CAROLINIAN
MAY22.K
ents
G.P.A.
The Counseling Center Is offering, tree of
ara the following session on helping you
�vrease your g p a and still have tun T�fc
ng Eams Setting yourself Up To Win
'lursdav May II 11 M P M and Tue�de.y
on 4 i 2 30 P M Ail sessions will be held
� Aght Anne No advance registration
-pessary for further information pleas.
SAftl
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 22, 1983
SIONS
PUBLICATION
n the following
ientatives
k EXPRESSIONS office
or contact General
?927
cuits

-EAT
29
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unch!
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ore soid To Dealers
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May :s 1985
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$
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RED RIPE
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IALL WEEK WE WILL DOUBLE 5
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')
(CPS) � Students entering the
job market this spring are likely
to face a new hurdle � drug
tests.
Companies that for the past
few years have tested their
employees for drug use are now
making students who apply for
jobs take the same tests, accor-
ding to campus job centers
around the country.
"It's just starting to surface, in
part because more firms seem to
be willing to admit they do it
says Robert Riegle, assistant
director of placement services at
Wayne State University and
author of a recent article on the
subject.
Riegle learned of the practice
last summer, when a student
received a letter from an
employer notifying him that a job
offer was being withdrawn.
"The letter didn't say why, but
in person they told him they
detected marijuana through the
use of urinalysis Rieele says.
Riegle says the tests can detect
marijuana use up to three weeks
after consumption.
Moreover, he says companies
don't always tell students they're
taking drug tests.
Representatives of firms con-
tacted by College Press Service
say they do tell job applicants the
tests' purpose.
They say positive results do not
automatically disqualify job ap-
plicants.
"Keeping the workplace safe is
an increasing concern explains
Robert McKee, Atlantic
Richfield Company health
department director, "particular-
ly given that the use of drugs is
becoming so prevalent
ARCO, based in Los Angeles,
plans to begin giving drug tests to
applicants later this month, he
says.
McKee acknowledges the test
detect marijuana up to 21 days
after use, jeopardizing someone
who can smoke the drug on a
WZMB
for
is now accepting applications
DJs and Newscasters. Pick up
application forms at WZMB
office, 2nd Floor, Old Joyner
Library. Monday-Friday, 2 p.m4
p.m.
Pitt-Greenville Airport is accepting
applications for part-time employment
starting May 15, 1985 and ending May 30,
1985. Duties will consist of aircraft refueling
and airport maintenance. Some type of
previous aviation experience is required �
civilian or military. For further information
call 75&r4707 between the hours of 10:00
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EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE
The Minority Publication of East Carolina University
Purpose:
To disseminate personalized journalism.
Target:
Minority students: those of the campus com-
munity differing from others in some
characteristic and often subject to differen-
tial treatment.
Publication:
June 14th
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weekend, for example, without
hurting Monday's performance
because the drug's psychoactive
effects have worn off long
before.
That is why ARCO officials
are being told to use the test only
as a guideline, he says.
ARCO adopted the test policy
in part becauce it operates several
facilities that use hazardous
materials.
But white-collar firms also are
turning increasingly to drug tests.
IBM officials, for example,
began requiring drug tests for all
job applicants late last year.
"We feel a paramount respon-
sibility to ensure the safety of the
workplace for all our
employees IBM spokesman
Tom Mattia says.
Problems with excessive drug
use by IBM employees in several
departments have caused pro-
Market Face Tests
blems, Mattia says.
He declined, however, to pro-
vide examples of safety-related
problems among white-collar
workers.
IBM job applicants get the op-
portunity to explain positive drug
test results, Mattia says.
Other firms, such as General
Motors, allow administrators at
local plants to ask job applicants
to take drug tests. GM's local-
option drug policy has been in ef-
fect since the early 1970s.
At the Adolph Coors Co.
brewery in Golden, Colo job
applicants take polygraph exams
during which they are asked,
among other things, whether they
have abused drugs or alcohol.
Officials at the firms using
drug tests declined to reveal
figures on the rate at which job
applicants test positive for drug
use.
Riegle says students who learn
they will be tested for drug use
can also find ways to beat the
tests.
Beyond that, he is trying to
convince employers the tests are
of limited value.
"There is the potential for peo-
ple to lose employment
unfairly Riegle says. "You
can't tell with these tests, for ex-
ample, whether a person smoked
pot while on the job, like you can
with alcohol tests
Occasional marijuana use
should not disqualify a person
from employment, Riegle main-
tains.
"If businesses started firing
everyone who used pot, they'd
lose a lot more people than they
expect he asserts.
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(M?� �aat (HutnlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, ommmm�
Jennifer Jendrasiak, tanavns Eduor
Harold Joyner. imm � Tom Luvender, mm 0m
Randy Mews, cm &� Anthony Martin, total Manager
Rick Mccormac, 5m��0, John Peterson, o�� A,�
Bill Mitchell. o�w� tta Bill Dawson, Aa Manager
Daniel Maurer, q- �d�o, DeChanile Johnson, a r�.
May 22, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Apartheid
Economic Censure Needed
U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston,
D-Calif said recently that he wants
to "call the roll on racist South
Africa" in the Senate within the
next 60 days. Cranston intends this
to be an integral part of an effort to
impose immediate economic sanc-
tions on South Africa in a protest
against the policy of apartheid,
sanctions which are needed to show
the South African government that
the United States plans to stand
behind its verbal protests against
South Africa's racist policies.
What Cranston proposes to do is
to push for a vote on a bill he is
cosponsoring. The bill calls for an
immediate ban on U.S. export of
computers to South Africa as well
as any new investments in and loans
to the country.
The United States, as a
democracy, has a responsibility to
protect human rights, not only here,
but in the countries where we spend
our money. In the same way in
which stockholders have a voice in a
company, the U.S. should and has
voiced its opposition to South
African policies. But that is not
enough. It's obvious that the situa-
tion is not changing so we should
show our disapproval by withdraw-
ing our contributions to the South
African economy.
As the old saying goes, peoplein
glass houses shouldn't throw
stones and there are certainly bla-
tant examples of racism in U.S.
history. Even now, some politicians
derive their power from covert or
overt racism. But the important fact
is that the situation is improving.
Furthermore, there is no
government-sanctioned racism here.
We have fought against racism
here and negated many racist
policies. Why then should we con-
tinue to provide economic support
for a country which is practicing
policies which we have worked so
hard to eliminate?
Cranston's idea of banning future
investment is a good one. But it is
not sufficient. Total divestiture of
U.S. holdings in South Africa is
necessary to convince the country's
government of how serious we
perceive the problem of apartheid to
be.
There are those who say that total
divestment will only hurt the blacks
who are working for
U.Ssupported companies. In the
short term, it is possible that it will.
But the people it will really hurt,
both in the short and the long term
are the white owners and managers.
These are the people who stand to
lose the most if the economy is af-
fected.
As the situation stands now, the
white people, the people who have
the power to change the structure of
South Africa, have no incentive to
change. Although Americans have
expressed their disapproval of racist
policies, they have done little more
than talk. We have the power to
make conditions better for the
blacks through the exertion of our
economic power.
In order to annihilate apartheid,
immediate action needs to be taken
to stop U.S. support of the South
African economy. Vocal censure is
not effective. Economic censure will
be.
THIS IS m A TEST, IF THIS HAP BEEN AN ACTUAL EMER0EM1
,WVE mn TAKEN OVER gV TEP TURNER,
Conservative Assault Questioned
By Michael Massing
The Not RcpabUr
The current conservative assault on
CBS continues a long American tradi-
tion of network-bashing. Never before,
however, have the attacks fastened so
obsessively on one network.
Sen. Jesse Helms' organization,
Fairness in Media, has urged conser-
vatives to buy stock in "the most anti-
Reagan network in order to "become
Dan Rather's boss Ted Turner, the
owner of Cable News Network, who
regularly denounces the elitism of the
broadcast establishment, badly wants
to buy a network, but none so badlv as
CBS.
The charges against CBS made by of-
ficials of Fairness in Media and Ac-
curacy in Media, another conservative
media watchdog, are rarely specific.
More often they are vague, visceral
judgements about the network's perfor-
mance over the years. The people who
work at CBS are regarded as un-
patriotic, even disloyal. The network is
considered disrespectful of authority,
especially government. Above all, CBS
stands accused of excessive negativism,
of incessant criticism of the American
way.
For proof of CBS's sins, I was
directed time and again to a TV Guide
article in August 1983. Purporting to
measure anti-Reagan bias at the three
networks, the study found that CBS
cast the president in a negative light
seven times more frequently than either
ABC or NBC. By seeming to offer in-
controvertible evidence of CBS's liberal
slant, the TV Guide piece has become
holy writ for the right.
James Cain, a North Carolina lawyer
who helped to organize Fairness in
Media, says that the article was a major
factor in the group's decision to single
out CBS.
On closer examination, however, the
"survey" is far from conclusive. It was
conducted by one individual � John
Weisman, the magazine's Washington
Bureau chief � who viewed a single
week of evening newscasts. Explaining
the criteria he used, Weisman noted on-
ly that he categorized each story "as
positive, meaning that it made the presi-
dent look good; negative, meaning it
made him look bad; or neutral, mean-
ing it did neither In other words,
Weisman simply used his own judge-
ment.
For many CBS haters, though, the
TV Guide article lends an aura of scien-
tific respectability to what they know in
their gut to be true. Most can tick off a
list of accumulated grievances at will.
"My quarrel with CBS started well
before Jesse Helms came along says
Hoover Adams, editor and publisher of
The Daily Record in Dunn, N.C.
Adams, a friend of Helms, has sued
CBS on behalf of Fairness in Media in a
bid for the network's list of
stockholders. He cited CBS's goading
of Lyndon Johnson during the Vietnam
War, its hounding of Bert Lance, and
its harassing of Jimmy Carter during
the Iran hostage crisis.
Adam's inclusion of Johnson and
Carter is revealing. The right, it seems,
is bothered not only by criticism of
Ronald Reagan but by challenges to
presidents in general. In this view, the
president deserves to be treated not only
with respect but with reverence. The
journalist's chief tools � skepticism,
inquisitiveness, criticism � are seen as
"rudeness
Ironically, the right's attacks agajnst
CBS come at a time when the network
probably least deserves it.
In the last couple of vears, "60
Minutes" has more frequently angered
liberals than conservatives. In 1982, for
instance, the program incurred ' the
wrath of organized labor by portraying
Coors as a caring, paternalistic enter-
prise and absolving the companv of
numerous union charges against it A
1983 broadcast on the World and Na
tional Councils of Churches insinuated
that the groups were supporting Marx-
ist terrorists. More recently "60
Minutes" featured a glowing account
of reforms undertaken bv the govern
ment of South Africa.
But "The CBS Evening News" still
gets in its shots. It reported signs of the
impending invasion of Grenada
challenged administration claims about
the threat posed by Nicaragua's armed
forces, and raised questions about the
safety of Provincetown-Boston
Airlines. The program's investigative
team has detailed the dubious
dealings of General Dvnarr.
safety questions about the sweet
aspartame, and exposed
ment's cover-up of cancer
ducted at nuclear weapor �
Moreover, CBS continues
passionate pieces on the home
hungry, the unemr.
castoffs from Rea
What doesn't mudi
hitting political p ccc
Van Gordon Sd
CBS news in 1982, tl t I ci ng
has made a point I .
Washington and into the field
freed the netwo t m hav .
hearings, press confere
appurtenances of official Wasl .
But the show is now hea n
that cause a chuckle, elic
ing a tear I the eve. Ever. Wa
Cronkite has
gram for growing s '
Quantitative media :�j.e are p
bably no: the besf ay to determine net-
work bias By adjusting the criteria,
usually posMbk to probe whatever c
sponsor wans But given the right's
eager embrace of trie T Guide article.
it's only fair to cite another sui
recently completed at Ge -
Washington University This was
one-man, one-week, seat-of-the-p
affair; it involved a team of researchers
who, over a two-year period, v.euec
more than 1,000 items aired on the
three networks. In the end. the studv
turned up no special slant at CBS. In
fact, the project's director, Michael
Robinson, recently concluded fi i
evidence that "CBS is, in some impor-
tant respects, slightly more
vative' than the other two networks
And, during the 1984 campaign, Robin-
son wrote, "CBS proved least critica
Reagan-Bush
There's an outside chance thai
conservatives' gambit could backfire
CBS continues to harbor mam top-rate
journalists who would like nothing bet-
ter than to put the right in us place. Dan
Rather in particular is not know:
bending, especially to groups
Fairness in Media.
Few people on campus today
remember Patrick O'Neill, the peacenik
gadfly who managed to earn the an-
tipathy of virtually every conservative at
ECU. He was vilified as a Communist, a
traitor and even a wimp by some
members of ROTC and the College
Republicans and today he is serving time
in a federal penitentiary. When Patrick
first told me that he was planning to
break into the Martin-Marietta bomb
factory in Orlando, Florida and destroy
components of Pershing II missiles, I
thought some kind of death wish had
gripped his brain. "Don't do it I
warned him. "Embalming fluid
wouldn't flatter you Even if Patrick
and his friends (eventually known as the
Pershing Plowshares) did manage to pull
off the entire caper unscathed, I reason-
ed, the judge was not likely to be lenient
with O'Neill since he had already com-
mitted civil disobedience four times.
So much for history. Patrick is cur-
rently considered to be one of the most
dangerous men in the Atlanta peniten-
tiary where he is incarcerated, though
his crime was non-violent, and he will
not see the unobstructed daylight for
another year and a half. It is hard to find
many students at ECU who sympathize
with Patrick. Most say that he got what
he deserved or at least what he wanted.
Certainly O'Neill's brusque and ag-
gressive New York mannerisms left
some southerners unkindly disposed
toward him or at least ambivalent.
Whatever the merit of these complaints,
Disobedience And Nuclear Arms
it is not my purpose to defend Patrick's
personality. Suffice it to say that he is a
friend of mine who sometimes ticked me
off. He has been a valuable source of in-
spiration over time and he has always
provoked those closest to him to ex-
amine their consciences and take action.
To know Patrick is to struggle with
him and often, with yourself. It is not an
easy relationship.
One of the reasons Patrick gave me
From The Left
Jay Stone
for the action that landed him in his cur-
rent predicament was that he felt that he
had to address the truth"of the nuclear
arms race. In other words, he felt that
since people in the Third World were
starving to death every day while billions
were being squandered on the arms race,
he had to take some action to reverse
this situation, an action entailing risk
roughly equivalent to that being faced
by people in the Third World. For
Patrick that meant physically destroying
a nuclear weapon and putting his life
and his freedom on the lhV. At the time,
I argued that such logic was at least
slightly off center, if for no other reason
than because getting killed or thrown in
jail for three years is not an effective
way to accomplish one's political objec-
tives.
Yet in the end I feel I must make a
final bow to Patrick. Even if I have
reservations about the effectiveness of
civil disobedience in an era in which the
majority of people don't understand the
issues that inspire a militant minority to
action, I agree that some action is
necessary. Simply sitting back and
allowing events to run their natural
course is a prescription for disaster
For one thing, the technological com-
plexity of the weapons involved is mak-
ing a nuclear accident more and more
likely. The time between pressing the
button to fire a nuclear weapon and its
subsequent arrival and detonation at its
Zf � ?Feasing each year-This means
that countries, particularly the suDer-
powers, now have less time to decide
whether or not a radar system warning
of a nuclear attack is the real thing or a
2?&� ,the lag time betwecn firing
and detonation continues to decrease
the temptation to place all weaponry on
an automatic launch on warning status
increases. Similarly many weapons such
as the cruise missile are so easy to con-
ceal that they thwart conventiaonal at-
tempts at arms control since treaties
establishing ceilings on absolute
numbers become impossible to verify In
addition, the contemporary trend
�25? Z?ng weaP�nry at has tradi-
tioiy been non-nuclear with nuclear
2�� AT� "M sheUs r ex-
ample) makes it more likely that a con-
ventional conflict could escalate into a
full-scale nuclear war.
Perhaps the most potent danger to
world peace, however, comes from the
proliferation and spread of nuclear
weaponry. In the last decade it is known
that India joined the nuclear club and it
is believed that Israel and South Africa
may have as well. It has been suggested
that before the end of the century as
many as a dozen countries will acquire
nuclear capabilities. Some of them such
as Argentina and Brazil and Iraq and
Israel are traditional rivals.
The spread of sophisticated conven-
tional armaments to Third World coun-
tries has also worsened global condi-
tions as more advanced weaponry has
had the predictable result of yielding
more bloodshed. According to the 1982
Sevard's Index of World Military and
Social Expenditures, the international
trade in conventional arms amounted to
more than $35 billion per year,
spreading technologically complex
weapons of war into the most remote
and least developed areas of the world.
Ironically, this is happening when pover-
ty and hunger in the Third World are ac-
tually on the increase.
In fact, according to the Index,
"military expansionism appears to be
the dominant dynamic force in the
modern epoch. The continued upward
thrust of all basic indicators of military
power is in striking contrast to the global
economic decline and, the evidence in-
dicates, bears a heavy responsibility for
it As a consequence, the Index notes,
military spending has now reached $600
billion per year. If military expans
continues at current rates, by the year
2000 national governments will hae
spent an additional $15 trillion (in to-
day's prices) on military defense. T�o
nations representing 17 percent of the
world population, the U.S. and the
USSR, spend half the world's militarv
budget, export 58 percent of the arms
moving in international trade, and con-
trol 96 percent of the world's stockpile
of nuclear weapons.
Despite the rhetoric coming from the
Reagan administration to the contrary,
the U.S. and Russia existed in a relation-
ship of rough nuclear parity even before
the present arms buildup was underwav
The absolute number of warheads on
Sr�S �totalled approximately 10,000
and the United States' disadvantage in
�2221 ICKBMlWaS -othanlom
pensated for by the U.S. advantage in
submarine SLBMs and lZ r8ange
nV nt.Th'e com
plexion of each side's nuclear forces
could actually be seen to give th?U S �
Ptive
are stiU in tKnCmy f ���� whilc thy
biMta"sllos) than � land-
JlJZJ. I find
It isnde ?bjCCt �f the �� r�
business as usual
Lac
(CPS) -
aren't working out :
leges undc
ings, who monit
issues tor the
Students
Washington. D (
Indeed, the I
choked b a .
base, fedei
communican
apathy and a-
Comi
Asbes
(CP -The new
ing college ast c
jects cou . �
dangerou
right ��
A
asbestos-rela:
forced insure
cancel the ab.
struction
asbestos fron
"You cai
with no stai
knows how to do,
Borowski, sp �
Professional Ir.
Association.
While man
ly program
cancer-causing
dorms, auditoriui
and other can-
struction con. .
take the
"abatemerv
can't get liabilit)
the projeo
Many abatement
"sprung up overnig I
five years since ai j
'bad Borow I
A few .or
perience installing asi
get limited c
"but it's from
panies and for s;
long-term p.
Short-term
cover asbes!
claims ten or I
Lung cancer. asb�
other abevtos-relan
generally don't show
years after the
contact with the matej
The federal governi
to issue regula'
asbestos removal
tractors are surpi
their liabi:
cancelled when : I
learns thev 're rer ,
"We're seeing v
back out of b .
no insurance
Hunnicutt . V.i
Nationa
it's becoming a :
Mem
"Schools can't hi
tor without insurant
"They have no .1
shut the d j
with asbestos rev
tor can remo i
The coe ig
affect remoa -
Clay, a healtv
Georgia
Technology 's a
'�Worker compel
place she saw "Thel
people exposed on the
building occupa
coverage 'alls on I"
owner if the contrac
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The universr. j
South Carolina have
money and insured con
remove their asbei
A dvertl

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Offer:
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 22, 1985
msMwe
tioned
iled the dubious financial
-eneral Dynamics, raised
about the sweetener
id exposed the govern-
jp or cancer studies con-
lclear weapons facilities.
JS continues to run corn-
ices on the homeless, the
unemployed and other
Reaganomics
t much appear are hard-
i eces. From the time
or took control of
�v the Evening News
of getting out of
i into the field. This has
� 'rom having to cover
terences and other
official Washington.
i now heavy in features
ickle, elicit a sigh, or br-
the eye. Even Walter
publicly criticized the pro-
ma soft.
media studies are pro-
nest way to determine net-
adjusting the criteria, it is
)le to probe whatever the
It But given the right's
e of the TV Guide article,
to cite another survey
mpleted at George
(University. This was no
le-week, seat-of-the-pants
flved a team of researchers
two-year period, viewed
,000 items aired on the
ks. In the end, the study
special slant at CBS. In
oject's director, Michael
:ently concluded from the
"CBS is, in some impor-
, slightly more 'conser-
jthe other two networks
jthe 1984 campaign, Robin-
BS proved least critical of
outside chance that the
gambit could backfire.
es to harbor many top-rate
Jho would like nothing bet-
it the right in its place. Dan
rticular is not known for
pecially to groups like
ledia.
ms
If military expansion
Current rates, by the year
governments will have
fional $15 trillion (in to-
rn military defense. Two
enting 17 percent of the
tion, the U.S. and the
half the world's military
58 percent of the arms
rnational trade, and con-
of the world's stockpile
ons.
Jtietoric coming from the
(stration to the contrary,
issia existed in a relation-
luclear parity even before
s buildup was underway,
lumber of warheads on
ed approximately 10,000
States' disadvantage in
Ms was more than com-
the U.S. advantage in
.BMs and long-range
to the point, the com-
h side's nuclear forces
seen to give the U.S. an
sea-based and air-based
far less vulnerable to
tack (an attack that
emy's missiles while they
ir silos) than are land-
analysis then, I find
agreement with many of
expressed by Patrick
mbject of the arms race,
le to put an end to
(CPS) - -It's clear things
aren't working out for black col-
leges understates Keith Jenn-
ings, who monitors black student
issues for the United States
Students Association in
Washington, D.C.
Indeed, the black colleges �
choked by a withering money
base, federal aid cuts, muddled
communications, b'ack student
apathy and desegregation efforts
Of Money Hurting Many Black Colleges
things that are pushing black students It's serious enough, moreover a ;�. r� C5
that are pushing black students
into historically-white campuses
� are having their worst season
in years.
Enrollments at black colleges,
after increasing steadily for the
past 25 years, have dropped five
percent in just the last year.
And amid cries of racism and
even bureaucratic "genocide
black education leaders apparent-
ly aren't sure what to do about it.
Companies Against
Asbestos Removal
(CPS) � The newest snafu fac-
ing college asbestos removal pro-
jects could keep a lot of
dangerous asbestos insulation
right where it is: on campus.
A recent rash of expensive
asbestos-related health claims has
forced insurance companies to
cancel the ability policies of con-
struction firms which remove
asbestos from existing buildings.
"You can't (insure) a process
with no standards that no one
knows how to do says Particia
Borowski, spokeswoman for the
Professional Insurance Agents
Association.
While many colleges have cost-
ly programs to remove the
cancer-causing substance from
dorms, auditoriums, classrooms
and other campus buildings, con-
struction companies now won't
take the removal, or
"abatement jobs because they
can't get liability insurance for
the projects.
Many abatement contractors
"sprung up overnight, in the last
five years since asbestos became
'bad Borowski explains.
A few companies, with ex-
perience installing asbestos, can
get limited coverage, she says,
"but it's from speciality com-
panies and for specific jobs. No
long-term policies
Short-term policies won't
cover asbestos-related health
claims ten or 20 years from now.
Lung cancer, asbestosis, and
other asbestos-reiated diseases
generally don't show up for 20-40
years after the victim comes in
contact with the material.
The federal government has yet
to issue regulations covering
asbestos removal, and many con-
tractors are surprised to discover
their liability policies limited or
cancelled when their insuror
learns they're removing asbestos.
"We're seeing contractors
back out of big jobs because of
no insurance confirms Jane
Hunnicutt of the Atlanta-based
National Asbestos Council, "and
it's becoming a nationwide pro-
blem
"Schools can't hire a contrac-
tor without insurance she adds.
"They have no recourse but to
shut the doors in any building
with asbestos because no contrac-
tor can remove it
The coverage problem doesn't
affect removal workers, adds Eva
Clay, a health specialist for the
Georgia Institute of
Technology's asbestos program.
"Worker compensations are in
place she says. "The liability is
people exposed on the job site or
building occupants. Liability
coverage falls on the building
owner if the contractor can't get
it
The universities of Florida and
South Carolina have found state
money and insured contractors to
remove their asbestos.
A dvertise
x&
"We have no specific in-
surance for asbestos exposure
comments Dave Rinker, vice
president for facilities planning at
the University of South Carolina.
"We just make sure we deal only
with contractors who have in-
surance
USC, among other schools,
conducted a lengthy asbestos
search on campus, and " after a
substantial amount of time and
effort, we're taking steps to
remove it he states.
The University of Penn-
sylvania, meanwhile, has no
plans to remove asbestos from
dozens of campus buildings
despite the concern of
maintenance workers who are ex-
posed to the substance daily.
Penn officials say the project is
too risky and too expensive.
While the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency in June will offer
$45 million to local schools
boards to help remove asbestos
from nearly 30,000 school rooms
across the country, colleges have
to spend their own money or lob-
by their state legislatures for
removal funds.
Meanwhile, only two com-
panies in the country will insure
asbestos removal contractors,
and Georgia Tech's Clay says the
policy costs are prohibitive and
claims can be made only in the
policy period, usually 12 months.
"A (claimant) has to prove
symptoms within the policy
period when the disease symp-
toms may not appear until 20
years down the road she says.
"With most contractors there's a
snowball's chance of keeping any
policy 20 years
The restrictive policies will
continue until guidelines and
standards for removal are deter-
mined, the PIA's Borowski con-
tends.
"The federal government
should provide standards
Borowski insists. "We don't feel
the insurance industry should
have to be responsible to set
them. You can't insure
something you can't assess or
regulate
It's serious enough, moreover,
that inside observers are labeling
it "the quiet death of black col-
leges Jennings reports.
Some colleges aren't going
quietly.
Cheyney University in Penn-
sylvania, for instance, recently
lost its accreditation by the Mid-
dle States Association of Colleges
and Schools because it lacked
"coherent and purposeful direc-
tion, mission and leadership
President C.T. Enus Wright
resigned the next week, and soon
after that two administrative vice
presidents were fired.
"It's nothing more than
cultural genocide to get rid of and
destroy black colleges claims
former Cheyney student govern-
ment leader Cynthia Jefferson.
Most of the reasons for the ac-
creditation denial "could be ap-
plied to any college if you looked
hard enough Jefferson claims,
adding President Wright was
merely a "sacrificial lamb" to
appease the accrediting associa-
tion.
Historically-black Knoxville
University in Tennessee and Lin-
coln College in Nebraska also
have lost accreditation this year
on similar grounds, Jennings
notes.
Three financially-strapped
black Texas colleges � Wiley,
Huston-Tillotson and Texas Col-
lege � may merge to pool their
resources and enrollments.
Tennessee State University,
meanwhile, is under pressure to
integrate its predominantly black
student body and have a 50 per-
cent white enrollment by 1992.
The crises follow last year's
financial failure of 119-year-old
Fisk University, long regarded as
the flagship of black colleges.
"Black colleges are facing a
problem which has two con-
tradictory ends laments Samuel
Myers, president of the National
Association for Equal Oppor-
tunity in Higher Education.
Myers says that while black
students need black colleges more
than ever now, there's a "new
threat to black schools that their
funding, enrollment and support
will decline. The image of black
schools is hurt by problems at
some black institutions, which
adds to the problem even more
Only 20 percent of all black
students attend predominantly-
black colleges, but nearly half of
all black students who complete
their degrees do so at a black
school.
"Students in black colleges
seem to have a virtual corner on
intellectual satisfactions and out-
comes during the college years
chiefly because of the sense of
belonging, support and
understanding they receive,
claims psychologist Jacqueline
Fleming, author of the newly-
released book Blacks in College.
On white campuses, black
students often "fall prey to the
feelings of alienation and
estrangement, and are less likely
to develop motivating relation-
ships with faculty or to feel a part
of campus life
More black students head for
predominantly-white campuses
anyway.
"Ironically points out Har-
riott Schimel, spokeswoman for
the United Negro College Fund,
"the traditional information
systems among blacks for passing
along the advantages of black
schools have become more dif-
fused, so many blacks go off to
white colleges not knowing the
vaiue they could get from a black
college
Many of today's black students
seem more interested in
assimilating faster into white
society, some sources add.
Even on historically-white
campuses, enrollment in black
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studies courses and membership
in campus black student unions
have plummeted in recent years.
And the nation's only national
black student lobby group � the
National Organization of Black
University and College Students
� has locked the doors of its
Washington offices and all but
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flicts sources report.
Many black colleges today are
run by administrators who
graduated from white, not black,
schools, "and are completely un-
familiar with the history and pur-
pose of black institutions Jenn-
ings says.
And as blacks themselves for-
sake black colleges, the politi-
cians who finance them now
question the need for them.
"The Brown decision (the
hallmark court case which forced
integration of public schools) is
being reinterpreted in an upside-
down manner now, in effect say-
ing that we should close black
schools so those students can go
to white schools says Jennings.
In response to all the problems,
NAFEO is planning a nationwide
marketing strategy for black col-
leges.
Pepsi Cola officials, in fact,
have volunteered "to help us
identify the strength of our pro-
duct and market it the same way
you would market anything else
these days says Myers.
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sophisticated marketing
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But "the problem just isn't get-
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in the family attitude, nothing
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I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
MAY 22. 1985 Page 6
Chuck Norris Trys
For All-American
Image On Screen
By JAY & ELLIOT KRAVETZ
ialrmallonil Photo New,

I'll never play a
drug addict or
an alcoholic.
When I do films,
whatever the
role I play, in the
kid's eyes , it's
Chuck Norris up
there on the
screen, not the
guy I'm portray-
ing.
� Chuck Norris
ns
Chicago police and those in other cities.
"Attitudes were different there he noted. "Personalities were
different. Those guys are tougher, more lively, more outgoing.
They joke around a lot more then L.A. cops do, for example. I
think it's due to the fact that they are probably put in more dire
situations there than other cops are
Invasion, U.S.A. materialized as I was reading an article in
Reader's Digest about terrorism all over the world and they had
done a three year investigation on Iran on how terrorism was
building there and they were infiltrating the terrorists into the
United States and France, primarily he said. "There are ter-
rorists circulating in the United States, today.
"I thought, 'Holy mackerel, if they ever got mobilized we could
be in a lot of trouble over here he continued. "I wrote the
screenplay and that is what the whole story is all about. In the story
we have an international terrorist who is hired by a Khomeini or a
Qaddafi to mobilize the world's terrorists and he sends them out to
every major city in America.
'They start blowing up track homes, shopping malls, buses,
restaurants, businesses to the point where people are afraid to go to
work,they are afraid to go out and eat, they are afraid to send their
kids to school and they become prisoners in their owa homes he
explained. "Vigilantism sets in and people start protecting their
own neighborhoods because with this random terriorism there is no
way for the cops to track them down.
Chuck Norris feels strongly
about the characters he plays. He
currently stars in Code of Silence,
an exciting action-adventure film
about a police detective, who
becomes involved both in the ac-
cidental killing of a Hispanic
youth by a fellow officer and two
warring underground organiza-
tions vying for control of the
total drug trade.
"I'll never play a drug addict
or an alcoholic he explained
during an interview on the set of
Invasion, U.S.A in Fort Pierce,
Florida. "When I do films,
whatever the role I play, in the
kid's eyes, it's Chuck Norris up
there on the screen, not the guy
I'm portraying
Norris, who films all his
movies on location, felt Chicago
was the perfect place to set Code
of Silence, which was originally
scripted for San Francisco. Nor-
noted a difference between
Chuck Norris
"I work for the government and after our economy freezes I'm
called in because I've run in to this terrorist before while working
for the CIA
This is the second screenplay Norris has written. He previously
wrote Missing In Action.
"I enjoy writing screenplays he said. "I especially enjoy it
when the character is played by me because I get to bring a
character I have created to the screen
Whenever possible Norris does his own stunts. In Code of
Silence,he actually fights on top a moving "el" train and drives in a
chase scene with a limousine. In Invasion, U.S.A he will ride on
the outside of a truck through a shopping mall and drive in another
chase scene.
Norris will soon be working on his first action comedy, called Ci-
ty Slickers and another action adventure film called Delta Force.
Delta Force is about a 15,000 man force like the SAS in London
which operates in America to counter invasion he explained.
"We are currently doing research on that now. City Slickers was
written by my wife Dianne and is about a contemporary cattle drive
and a group of city slickers who tag long thinking it will be fun. I
play the foreman of the drive. I think this will be a very funny
movie
Few actors have the convictions Chuck Norris has both on screen
and off. He cares about how his audience feels about him and he is
very sincere about his image.
"The reason you read so little about me is beacuse I am a
homebody he explained. I have been married for 26 years. I
married my childhood sweetheart. We have two sons who are both
entering the movie business because I bring them with me when we
film on location.
Murphy's Gay Jokes Found Offensive
(CPS) � Comedian and movie
star Eddie Murphy closed out his
controversial national campus
tour last week in Texas without
reference to the sporadic protests
that marred several visits, but
with a pledge to do another cam-
pus tour in the fall.
Murphy played to packed
auditoriums at Florida State,
Florida, North Carolina, William
and Mary, Michigan State,
Rutgers, the State University of
New York-Stony Brook and Pur-
due, among other schools, this
year.
But Murphy's appearances at
the University of Illinois-Urbana
and Brandeis drew protestors of
the comedian's "anti-gay"
humor, once even provoking an
on-stage response from Murphy.
Murphy, who attained recogni-
tion on NBC's "Saturday Night
Live" and in movies like Trading
Places and the current Beverly
Hills Cop, first angered
homosexuals with some sketches
he performed on a cable televi-
sion special last year.
In the TV special, Murphy
makes several references to cat-
ching AIDS (Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome) by being
kissed or just in the same room as
a gay person.
In addition, he implies several
times in his performance that he
fears gays making passes and sex-
ual gestures toward him.
After hearing from gay
organizations, Murphy made a
public apology several months
ago, saying he was not anti-gay
and "did not mean to offend
anybody" with his material.
Since then, the comic has
eliminated or softened most of
his gay jokes, says Robert
Wachs, Murphy's co-manager.
It didn't stop some protestors
on the current tour, however.
Brandeis demonstrators, for
example, taunted Murphy into
declaring on-stage that he
wouldn't donate his appearance
fee protestors said it was
$60,000, but Murphy's agent
won't confirm or deny that figure
to the Boston AIDS Action
Committee.
"Ha he said to the pro-
testors' request, adding,
"Besides, it's only $50,000
And at Illinois, a group of five
anonymous students leafleted the
campus several days before Mur-
phy's appearance there, asking
students to boycott the event.
"Mr. Murphy has apologized,
but he is still reaping the
profits a spokesperson for the
group told the campus paper,
The Daily Illini.
The protestors charged Mur-
phy still jokes AIDS can be
spread by kissing.
Nevertheless, the Urbana show
sold out, playing to nearly 8,000
students, says Tom Parkinson,
campus concert hall director.
Indeed, all of Murphy's cam-
pus appearances have been
"fabulous, outstanding"
sellouts, co-manager Wachs
reports.
"The college kids are going
beserk Wachs continues. "At
times the noise gets so loud you
have to cover your ears. I'm not
kidding. It's more intense than
the hottest rock act imaginable

111
Entertainment
Trivia
1) In the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C.
Clark, what planet did the spaceship Discovery visit?
2) What song was number six on the charts this week 20
years ago?
3) What is the name of Merlyn's owl in T.H. White's
novel The Once and Future King!
4) In what college newspaper did Garry Trudeau's com-
ic strip "Doonesbury" make its debut, and what was
the date it first appeared?
5) How many publishers did Auther Frank Herbert send
his Dune manuscript to before he finally made a sale?
6) What was the title of the "Star Trek" episode in
which Spock wore a beard?
7) In Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonder Land, what is the
caterpillar doing when Alice meets him?
8) What three actors established the United Artists film
company?
9) What was the original title of Garry Trudeau's comic
strip "Doonesbury.
Chevy At
His Best
In 'Fletch'
By DANIEL M AURER
Lifestyle T
Pictures, Fletch.
With out uttering one profane
syllable (at least none that I notic-
ed), Chevy kept the humor hot as
a comical yet capable in-
vestigative .reporter named
Fletch. While working under-
cover as a vagrant (just one of his
many disguises) to expose a drug
ring operating on a local beach,
Fletch becomes entangled in a
seemingly endless web of mystery
10) What was King Arthur's nickname as a young boy?
What's the difference between
an actorcomedian like
Chevy Chase and one like Eddie
Murphy?
Answer: the word F-k.
Yes, that four letter synonym
for sex that seems to creep into
most every comedian's routine.
F-k this, or fk that seems to in-
voke hysterical laughter in au-
diences, and for a comedian,
laughter means money.
Don't get me wrong. I don't
mean to malign the likes of
George Carlan, Eddie Murphy or
Robin Williams. They're some of.
my favorites. But I appreciate
more a comedian who can keep
me in stitches without resorting
to that four letter fiend and his
chorttling cohorts. Yes friends,
I'm talking about clean comedy
� specifically Chevy Chase in his
squeaky clean and outrageously
funny new film from Universal
and intrigue.
In his vagrant guise, Fletch
stakesout Fat Sam (George
Wendt), the local drug pusher, in
hopes of discovering Sam's sup-
plier. During his stakeout he is
approached by a young executive
named Alan Stanwyk (Tim
Matheson). Stanwyk offers
Fletch $50,000 and an airline
ticket to Rio. In exchange Fletch
meerly has to murder Stanwyk.
Sound strange? Now throw in
a corrupt police chief, Stanwyk's
nch and beautiful wife, a second
not-so-rich wife, and two beach
combing junkies named Gummy
and Creasy. Take these strange
and mysterious ingredients, add a
good dose of Chevy's whimsical
and witty brand of humor, shake
MENDENHALL
HOTSPOTS
The first summer session
at ECU is upon us once
again, and once again the heat
of summer accompanies it in
full force. Mendenhall Student
Center continues in the
fashion of the season by offer-
ing an equally hot lineup of ac-
tivities and events.
This session the center will
be showing a kaleidoscope of
movies from the Student
Union Films Committee rang-
ing from such cult classics as
Barbarella to the cliff-hanging
genius of Alfred Hitchcock's
North by Northwest.
A wide variety of music will
be available for those who at-
tend the three musical concerts
scheduled by the Student
Union Special Concerts Com-
mittee. For those who enjoy
ESP, hypnotism, and magic,
there will also be a special con-
cert on slate.
Finally, if the heat becomes
too much for you there will be
a BingoIce Cream party and
a Watermelon Feast so you
can cool down.
The week's entertainment is
kicked off this Wednesday by
the movie Barbarella. This
1969 film, based on a French
comic strip for adults, depicts
the lovely astronaut Barbarella
(Jane Fonda) as a cross bet-
ween James Bond and Batman
who zaps around the universe
in the year 40,000 saving the
earth from interstellar evil.
Showtime will be 7 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre.
Admisssion is free to ECU
students and guest with a valid
ECU ID and ECU Faculty and
Staff and dependents with
their ECU ID's.
On Thursday, the high
energy sound of "The
Amateurs" will be here to
entertain you. Their unique
sound includes not only their
own music but also the works
of other well known artists.
The group's selection of music
consists of jazz, rock'n'roll,
and reggae � all of which is
flavored with their own special
rhythm and beat. The concert
is to be held at 9 p.m. on the
Mendenhall Student Center
Patio and is free to everyone.
In case of rain, the concert will
move to Hendrix Theatre.
On Monday, Dudley Moore
hits the big screen at Hendrix
Theatre as he chases after a
ravishing blonde in the movie
"10 At the age of 42,
George Webber (Dudley
Moore) spots the girl of his
dreams. She is the titillating
Bo Derek and on a scale of 10
she is an 11. Determined to
win her over, Moore leaves
behind his relationship with an
attractive woman (Julie An-
drews) and all his friends so he
can pursue his dream girl. The
chase is full of obstacles and in
the end he succeeds but with
unpredictable results. Show
time is 7 p.m.
On Tuesday, everyone has a
chance to beat the heat and
relax a little at a BingoIce
Cream Party. For only 25
cents you can choose between
the 3 or 4 flavors of ice cream
available or try them all, and
eat as much as you want. If
you enjoy bingo, there will be
eight games scheduled with
special prizes being awarded to
the winners. This event is
sponsored by the Student
Union Recreation Committee.
The party will be held at 7
p.m. in the Multi-Purpose
Room in Mendenhall.
well, and you get a film with the
same comic pathos as National
Lampoons Vacation or Police
Academy
Andrew Bergman's screenplay,
adapted from the novel by
Gregory McDonald, creates just
the right blend of humor and
homicide. The story offers just
enough twists and turns to keep
audiences puzzled while serving
as the perfect vehicle for Chevy's
antics. Meanwhile Director Fred
Schuler of Stir Crazy fame kept
the flim paced perfectly, never
once letting the audience go
without a laugh or a plot twist.
Fletch is no boxoffice
blockbuster. But it offer a
brilliant Chevy Chase, one not
seen since the early days of
"Saturday Night Live Fletch
will simlpy lift your spirits
because Chevy is at his best, and
he's unbeatable.
Cnevy Chase plays the wisecrack-
ing investigative reporter l.M.
Fletcher in Universal Pictures
latest comedy release, "Fletch

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
MAY 22, 1985
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I
FHE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MAY 22, 198?
Page 8
Pirates Eliminated From EC A C Tournament
By TONY BROWN
AnlfUBI Sporu Editor
The Pirates played probably their
best game of the ECAC tourna-
ment on Saturday against Iona,
but were knocked out of the tour-
nament by a late Gael rally which
gave Iona a 6-5 victory.
After taking an early lead 2-0,
the Pirates padded their margin
with one run in the top of the
third. Chris Bradberry singled
and Winfred Johnson followed
with a hit to move Bradberry to
third. Johnson went to second on
the throw to third, then
Bradberry scored on a sacrifice
fly by Jay McGraw.
Iona cut into the Pirate's lead
in the fourth. Glen McElroy got
on by a error, moved up on an
out and scored on a sacrifice fly
to make it 3-1.
The Gaels again scored a run in
the fifth, but could have gotten a
lot more. Nick Salzano doubled
to lead off and Mark Davis singl-
ed. Bob Zottoli walked to load
the bases with none out as Pirate
pitcher Winfred Johnson began
to struggle. A sacrifice fly
brought one runner home, but a
great double-play cut the rally
short.
The constant stranding of
baserunners by ECU proved to be
fatal as Iona took the lead for
good in the sixth. Sam Tolisano
started with a two-bagger and
went to third on an out. An error
on a grounder let him in, then
Vinnie Ammirato doubled to left,
putting men on second and third.
A wild pitch brought a run in,
then Mark Davis upped the
Gael's lead to 5-3 with a single to
right, but rightfielder Jay
McGraw's throw to the plate was
in time to catch the runner from
third, who was tagged out by cat-
cher Jim Riley after missing
home.
Unfortunately Riley was in-
jured on the play. McGraw came
in from right field to replace him
and Mont Carter took McGraw's
place. Ironically, Carter almost
proved to be the hero of the
game, as he got two hits later.
ECU narrowed the lead to one
in the seventh. Mark Shank singl-
ed, and after two outs, Johnson
doubled to put the score at 5-4.
The Gaels struck for what
turned out to be the winning run
in their half of the frame,
however. With one out, Tolisano
bounced a ground-rule double
throw-in let him score anyway.
Chris Hansen came in on relief
at that point and shut ECU out
the rest of the way, giving Iona a
hard-fought 6-5 victory and
eliminating the Pirates from the
- j �
I
Pirate catcher Jim Riley was forced to leave the game against Iona due
to an injury he suffered to his hand making a play at home plate.
over the fence. Joe Starace's
single increased their lead to 6-4.
The Pirates had a chance to tie
it up in the eighth, hjit.only could
manage one run. Carter excited
the crowd with a ground-rule
double which at first seemed a
possible homer. Mike Wells
followed with a single and Carter
held at third, but a misplay on the
tournament.
Winfred Johnson took the loss
for the Pirates, dropping his
overall record for the year to 7-5.
Johnson went 3-for-5 for ECU
with a double, while Cockrell and
Mont Carter also collected a dou-
ble each. The Pirates stranded 11
runners during the game, which
made the difference in the out-
come.
ECU got off to a bad start in
the ECAC tournament, playing
sluggishly in a 7-2 loss to George
Mason.
Pirate starter Mike
Christopher was in trouble
almost from the start. After strik-
ing out the first batter, he walked
three straight to fill the bases. A
double down the third base line
by Ralph Schmidt gave the
Patriots a 3-0 lead.
ECU got men on second and
third in the bottom of the frame
on a walk and a Winfred Johnson
single, but failed to score, as later
proved to be a problem
throughout the tournament.
George Mason again tallied
three runs in the second to zoom
to a 6-0 margin. Christopher got
the first two batters out, but pro-
ceeded to walk two straight. Ail-
American candidate Kevin Burke
then slammed a homer down the
leftfield line to really put the
Pirates in a hole.
ECU had a good chance to
score in the bottom of the frame,
but couldn't take advantage of it.
Jay McGraw opened the inning
with a single and moved to third
on Jim Riley's double with none
out. Two strike-outs and a
grounder prevented a run,
though.
Ralph Schmidt added what
turned out to be GMU's last run
with a homer in the third, making
the score 7-0. At that point, a
transformer blew, delaying the
game for about an hour.
When the game finally resum-
ed, the Pirates scored a run in the
bottom of the frame. Chris
Bradberry singled and Winfred
Johnson doubled. A ground-out
then allowed Bradberry to come
home, narrowing the margin to
7-1.
The element seemed to be tell-
ing ECU fans something as the
game was suspended in the fifth
because of lightning. Chubby
Butler came in on relief for
Christopher in the sixth, striking
out three and allowing one hit,
but hurt his shoulder striking out
Burke and had to leave the game
in the seventh.
The Pirates added one more in
JOS JORDAN M I Pfco��. I �f
Mark Cockrell (23) beats out an infield hit in the Pirate win against
New York Tech. Cockrell was named to the all-tournament team.
.� 0 g "M-T -� iW riraies aaaea one more in Bradberrv
Pirates Sign Football Pact With
their half of the seventh, but
couldn't get any closer. A
fielder's choce got a man on first,
then Mark Shank blooped a
single to put men on first and
third. With two out Bradberry
singled to make what turned out
to be the final score of 7-2.
Christopher's final season pit-
ching record went to 10-3 with
the loss, while the Pirates com-
mitted two miscues. ECU got
nine hits, but few came at critical
moments, which left 11 runners
stranded in the game.
Bradberrv ih the Pirate bat-
ters with two hits, while Riley and
Johnson each had a double.
ECU came back after the loss
to George Mason to beat New
York Tech 5-4 on Friday The
Patriots took the initial lead in
the first when Fred Gianelli's
double was followed by Mike
Frustaci's two-out single, giving
Tech a 1-0 margin.
NY padded their lead in the se-
cond to 3-0. Two s.ngles and a
walk loaded the bases, then an er-
ror b first baseman Mike
See Boone Page Ten
By RICK McCORMAC
Sporti Editor
FOOTBALLL: ECU, in a conti
nuing effort to upgrade it's foot-
bail schedule, has signed a two-
year contract with Syracuse.
Pirate athletic director Ken Karr
announced Monday.
The Orangemen, 6-5 last
season and upset winners over
then No. 1 Nebraska 17-9, will
come to Ficklen Stadium in 1988,
while ECU will visit Syracuse,
N.Y to play in the Carrier
Dome in 1989.
"We are very excited about ad-
ding a school like Syracuse to our
future schedule Karr said.
"They carry a national reputa-
tion
Specific dates and times for the
contests have yet to be finalized.
Syracuse is the latest addition
to a rugged schedule the Pirate
football team can look forward
to facing in the future. Next
season ECU will travel to Penn
State, Auburn, LSU, Southern
Mississippi, Southwestern Loui-
siana and North Carolina State.
The Pirates will also have
perhaps their most attractive
home slate in the school's history
as Miami (Fla.), South Carolina,
Tulsa and Temple will all visit
Ficklen Stadium in 1985.
The 1986 schedule with one
date still open will include games
against Auburn, North Carolina
State, Southern Mississippi,
Miami (Fla.), South Carolina,
Temple, Tulsa, Penn State
Southwestern Louisiana and
West Virginia.
BASEBALL: ECU shortstop
Greg Hardison and third
baseman Mark Cockrell were
both named to the ECAC
Southern Division all-
tournament team. Both players
will return to ECU next year for
their senior seasons.
The 32 wins the Pirates posted
this year under first-year head
man Gary Overton were the most
ever for a baseball coach in his
first year at ECU. That total is
only two games shy of the school
record that ECU tied last season.
Next year looks even more pro-
mising as the Pirates will lose on-
ly four seniors. Reliever Chubby
Butler, first baseman Mike Wells,
outfielder Mark Shank and pit-
cher Tom Webb all must be
replaced. But the nucleus for a
strong team should return as
Shank was the only regular who
must be replaced.
Record setting Winfred
Johnson, who returns for his
senior season, assuming he
doesn't sign with a professional
team. He has already set virtually
every Pirate hitting record.
The return of second baseman
Steve Sides, who started in '84 as
a freshman and combined with
shortstop Hardison to form an
excellent double-play combina-
tion, but missed all of this season
due to an injury should make the
Pirates even tougher next season.
SWIMMING: Pirate swimming
coach Rick Kobe has announced
the signings of four swimmers
who will be attending ECU in the
fall.
The lone male swimmer is
Longmeadow, Mass native
David Killeen. A prep all-
america, Killieen swam for Kiski
Prep in Saltsburg, Pa. A freestyle
specialist, Kobe reports that
Killeen could swim every freestyle
event from the 50 up to the 500
and that he has national potential
as a Pirate swimmer.
� 9 J ��� � � riiaie swimmer.
Ultimate Frisbee A Competitive Affair;
The Ultimate Campus Sport For All
The remaining three signees all
will compete for the Lady Pirate
tankers. Charleston, SC, native
Patrica Walsh will enter ECU
with high school times already
under current Pirate varsity
records. A junior national
qualifier, Walsh swam for the ci-
ty of Charleston swim team.
The Lady Pirates have also
tabbed a pair of swimmers from
Charlotte in Susan Wentink and
Sheri Campbell. Wetink comes
from the successful Mecklenburg
Aquatic Club where she was a
junior qualifier. Wetink, a
breaststroker, also has times cur-
rently under ECU varsity-
records. Campbell is a diver from
Myers Park High. She was the
state runner-up on the one-meter
board, and has the potential to be
one of ECU's Finest divers ever.
Angela Winstead of Rich-
mond, Va completes the list of
incoming freshman. Another
junior national qualifier.
Winstead swam for the Briar-
wood Swim Club and should
bolster the Lady Pirate freestyle
sprinters.
FOOTBALL: Carolina
Telephone and Telegraph an-
nounced recently the renewal of
their scholarship presented at
each ECU home football game in
recognition of an athlete's
academic achievements.
Wayne Peterson, president of
CT&T and ECU Chancellor Dr.
John Howell were present at the
presentation of the 15,000
scholarship.
The ECU Educational Founda-
tion presented Peterson with a
plaque in appreciation of
CT&T's committment to athletic
and academic excellence at ECU.
By DAVID McGINNESS
Suff Writw
Ultimate frisbee is a sport that
combines the passing of football,
the cutting, guarding, and
pivoting of basketball, and the
strategy of soccer.
However, although it combines
aspects of several sports, it is a
truly unique game. Due to the
frisbee's aerodynamics, it can
curve around or even float just
out of defender's reach. It also
requires less strength and natural
ability to throw long distances
than does a football.
Ultimate is played by two
seven-person teams. The playing
field is 70-yards long, 40-yards
wide and has two-25 yard end
zones.
To play ultimate well requires
speed, endurance and precision,
but that doesn't mean that
everyone can't play it. The
throws and basic strategy can be
learned quickly. Then it is just a
matter of practice.
Some of ultimate's good
qualities include:
� it is a non-contact sport.
� it is self officiating (no
referees).
� it can be played equally well
buy men and women.
� it is competitive, but the real
object is to have fun.
ECU's ultimate team, (the
"Irates") is going into its fifth
season this fall.
The Irates are sponsored by the
ECU intramural department and
recognized as the outstanding
club of the year during the
'83-84 season.
The team presently has 20-25
active members and travels
throughout the state and along
the East coast from Virginia to
Florida.
The Irates went 16-9 last
season and finished first in the
South Atlantic Ultimate Con-
ference, while playing some of
the top U.S. teams. Among their
opponents were the 1985 No. 1
ranked "Tunas" of St. Louis,
Mo. The Tunas boast four world
class sprinters on their squad.
The Irates also played the No.
1 team of 1984, the "Refugees"
as well as "Mr. Pouce one of
the top teams in N.C.
The Irates host four frisbee
competitions each year:
The Natural Light Ultimax
tournament each fall and spring.
The Natural Light Flying Disc
Classic (a freestyle event).
The Annual Frisbee Golf tour-
nament.
In addition, Irate members
promote frisbee as well as com-
munity spirit in the Greenville
area. Irates went to Greenville
area junior high schools to give
ultimate clinics. They also
donated time to help at this year's
Special Olympics.
The team's primary purpose is
to have fun and promote frisbee
in the Greenville area. However
as vice-president David Bar-
nhardt said, "Our ultimate goal
is to promote world peace
through frisbee disc
This Fall, the Irates will gain a
sister team when the new
women's club begins its first
season.
"It's a light-hearted, fun sort
of sport. It gives you a chance to
let loose and get rid of frustra-
tions Ultimate women's team
member Jennifer Hughes said.
The formation of the women's
team does not mean that women
are not welcome to play with the
men's team though.
Anyone interested is invited to
Play at the bottom of college hill
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Sundays at 5 pin. This includes
faculty, staff and any other
Greenville area residents as well.
So come on out and participate
in one of the most enjoyable
sports in the country. It's a great
way to get in shape, develop a
skill and have fun at the same
time.
Lak
INGLEWOOI
� Some "pure
and a fractured dl
put the Los Ange
excellent positioi
their fifth Nati
Association Chai
in the last six ye
The Laker
by beating the J
tonight at the F
they've won 23
games � in the f 1
Western Cor
Angeles has a
series and the
without leadm
English, whc
thumb ii - .
Should the I
would plaj c '
Cun
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PHILAD1
Coach B
predicting a ve
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Boston Ga
The "6e:
115-104 here Sun
being swept
series for the
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tory in this CM
would force
night in P
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not awed by, the
become the fi
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come back fi
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:��:
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merit
the Pirate win against
li-tournamenl team.
vhileR iley and
I . lou I
� tfter the loss
i Mason to beat New
4 on Friday. The
the initial lead in
when Fred Gianelli's
fas followed by Mike
two-out snge, giving
'he se-
gles and a
"d f nen an er-
an Mike
rtoone Page Ten
ise
freshman. Another
nal qualifier,
swam for the Bnar-
im Club and should
' Lady Pirate freestyle
ALL: Carolina
e and Telegraph an-
Irecently the renewal of
plarship presented at
home football game in
on of an athlete's
achievements.
Peterson, president of
rd ECU Chancellor Dr.
? ell were present at the
tion of the 15,000
U Educational Founda-
ented Peterson with a
n appreciation of
:ommittment to athletic
:mic excellence at ECU.
n the ECU
f

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 22, 1985
Lakers Hope To End Series With Victory
INGLEWOOD, Calif, (UPI)
� Some "pure helter-skelter"
and a fractured digit have helped
put the Los Angeles Lakers in an
excellent position to qualify for
their fifth National Basketball
Association Championship Series
in the last six years.
The Lakers can earn their spot
by beating the Denver Nuggets
tonight at the Forum � where
they've won 23 of their last 24
games � in the fifth game of the
Western Conference finals. Los
Angeles has a 3-1 lead in the
series and the Nuggets will be
without leading scorer Alex
English, who suffered a broken
thumb in Sunday's game.
Should the Lakers win, they
would play either the Boston
Celtics or Philadelphia 76ers for
the NBA title.
Philadelphia beat Boston
115-104 Sunday to avert a sweep
in their Eastern Conference
series. The Celtics, trying to
become the first team to win suc-
cessive league titles since they ac-
complished the feat in 1968 and
1969, can clinch the series in
Game Five at Boston Garden last
week.
The Lakers, meanwhile, put
the Nuggets on the brink of
elimination by winning a wild,
120-116, decision at Denver on
Sunday.
Los Angeles took the lead for
good on a tip-in by James Wor-
thy with 20 seconds left to make
it 118-116. But that doesn't come
close to telling the story � Wor-
thy's tip-in capped a bizarre
39-second sequence that Michael
Cooper called "pure helter-
skelter
During that period, the Lakers
kept shooting, missing, and get-
ting the ball back. Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar had missed twice,
Worthy once and Cooper once
from close range before Worthy
came up with what proved to be
the game-winner when he tipped
in Cooper's miss.
"It seemed like the ball was
loose for an hour said Denver
coach Doug Moe, whose injury-
plagued team had three guards on
the floor at the time. "We tried
to get the ball off the boards
there, but we just couldn't. It was
one of the most frustrating se-
quences in my basketball career,
an unbelievably tough way to
lose
No foul was called on the play
though several players on both
sides hit the floor and each other
in pursuit of the ball.
"Nobody got away with
anything flagrant said Abdul-
Jabbar, who finished with 29
points, 12 rebounds and eight
assists. "Besides, who were they
going to pick ofot? There was a lot
of contact
Said Moe: "You don't expect a
call at that time. The Lakers were
leaping all over us, but if we had
been on their backs, we wouldn't
have been expecting a call
either
The Nuggets had one more
chance to tie the score, but
Abdul-Jabbar knocked the ball
away from Danny Schayes, and
Byron Scott made two free
throws with five seconds left to
complete the scorir
English, who averaged 30.4
points a game in the playoffs and
scored 28 points in 26 minutes
Sunday before he suffered a frac-
tured thumb on his shooting
hand late in the third quarter, is
one of several injured Nuggets.
Calvin Natt, Lafayette Lever
and Mike Evans are nursing knee
injuries, Wayne Cooper has a
strained rib ligament, Elston
Turner a sore hamstring and Dan
Issel a deep thigh bruise.
"If we had everybody healthy,
we would be up 3-1 Natt said
after scoring 28 points Sunday.
"We have 12 guys, and six are
hurt (actually seven) and the
Lakers are at full strength. We
almost beat them today,
anyway
It didn't appear that the Lakers
would need Worthy's heroics
when they had a 116-110 lead,
but the Nuggets tied it on three-
point field goals by Turner and
Evans, the second with 1:01 left.
Then the scramble began.
Abdul-Jabbar acknowledged
that the Lakers had some good
fortune in the late going, but add
ed that they had something to do
with it.
Cunningham Seeks Seven Game Series;
Sixers Must Win Tonight To Stay Alive
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) �
Coach Billy Cunningham is
predicting a seven-game NBA
Eastern Conference Final series if
his Philadelphia 76ers can beat
the Boston Celtics tonight at the
Boston Garden.
The 76ers beat the Celtics
115-104 here Sunday, and averted
being swept in a post-season
series for the first time in the
franchise's 24-year history. A vic-
tory in this evening's contest
would force a sixth game Friday
night in Philadelphia.
Cunningham is aware of, but
not awed by, the 76ers' chore to
become the first team in National
Basketball Association history to
come back from a 3-0 deficit and
the fifth team to rebound from
3-1 in a seven-game series.
"This team has had its back to
the wall many times Cunn-
ingham said. "You know we've
been in the reverse situation that
Boston's in right now. We've
been up 3-1 on Boston and lost.
"That's why I emphasize to the
players that I believe if we can go
up and get the next one, which we
have the ability to do, then we're
talking about a seven-game
series
Since 1979-80, when Larry
Bird joined the Celtics,
Philadelphia is 3-15 in Boston
during the regular season, and
5-8 in playoff games.
In 1981, the 76ers went up 3-1
in the Eastern Conference finals,
but lost the next three. In 1982,
the Sixers won the seventh game
of a series from the Celtics in
Boston.
The Celtics, however, have
won 19 of their last 20 home
playoff games, losing only to Los
Angeles in the first game of last
year's finals.
Cunningham held a meeting
during Monday's practice in
which he discussed "little con-
cerns of ours, that we have to im-
prove on in certain areas, how we
can play better basketball
The coach said he was pleased
with the offense Sunday,
especially in the final period
when Boston made a belated ral-
ly.
"I still think that in the second
half we could have done a better
job defensively. We haven't been
able to sustain it as long as we'd
like to in the third and fourth
periods against Boston he said.
But Cunningham was happy
with the rebounding in the only
Sixer victory. "We didn't allow
as many easy second shots as we
have. We still gave up some easy
opportunities to their big
people he said. "It's just going
to boil down to those little things
that we have to make sure we cor-
rect
ATTIC
THUR.
Maxx
Warrior
Ladies Night
SAT.
The Point
Fleetwood Mac Videos
Friday in Concert
NIGHYHAWKI
Sunday Tentative Memorial Day Special
K.tt
� rSgk
1 v
I I t 1 .
vOOGO
I l � 1 I
I i I
VAV.Y w
& tk
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Classifieds
SALE
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is
available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 756-9222
ioocoooeocooocoocoocosoooocccoco!
MAGAZINE
EXPRESSIONS
Publication Schedule
SUMMER 1985
First and Only IssueJune 14th
Submissions are welcomed. Deadline for all
pubUshabJe materials 5 PM Wednesday May 29
Send Expressions your stories, photos, and adver-
tisements. All material is submitted at the Expres-
sions office in the Publications Bldg.
EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE
THE BETTER ALTERNATIVE . . .
Production Days are May 30, 31, June 1,2,3.
FOR SALE: Men's 23 " Univega
10 Speed. 9 Months old excellent con
dition, $120. Call 757-3517 after 3.
WANTED
ROOMATES NEEDED: 1 or 2
female roomates needed to share
2-bdrm apt. at Stratford Arms Apts.
Call Karen at 756-3766 or 758-2730.
ROOMATE WANTED: Seeking
responsible roomate to share B unit
at Ringgold Towers for the summer.
Completely furnished, air-
conditioned, accessories included.
Call 757 6366, ask for Dan.
SUBLET: A professional couple
coming to Greenville for a month,
June 15- July 15, to work for the
University. Desire to sublet a nice
house, will provide deposit.
References. Call 752-0306.
ROOM FOR RENT: One block from
campus. Available after June 1. $75
a month and � utilities. Call 758 9856.
ROOM FOR RENT
nished apartment
752 7212 or 756-0174.
; Two room fur
for rent. Call
PART-TIME HELP: Pitt-Greenville
airport is accepting applications for
part-time employment starting May
15 and ending June 15. Duties will
consist of aircraft refueling and air-
port maintenance. Some type of
previous aviation experience is
required-civilian or military. For
further information, call 758-4707
between the hours of 10 AM and 1
PM, Monday through Friday.
ROOMATE NEEDED: Two
bedroom apt. one block from cam-
pus. Furnished and you get to sleep
in a waterbed. Needed for second
session. Call 757-3666 after 11:15.
MISC
SAVE THIS AD: If you plan on go-
ing to Charlotte any data throughout
the summer, I'm desperate, so five
me a call at 7S2-22S. Ask for Rich.
�ICYCLES PAINTED: If you want
to make your old bike look sharp or
simply change the color, call Jim for
more information. 758-3861.
�p






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 22, 1985
Boone, Hardison Combine To Dump N.
t
Continued from Page Fight
Sullivan let one run in. Mike
Chesney singled to right, scoring
one more before Pirate
rightfielder Jay McGraw's throw
to the plate caught another Tech
runner at home for the third out.
Pirate shortstop Greg Har-
dison closed the gap to 3-1 in the
bottom of the third on a homer,
but Tech quickly matched that in
the top of the fourth. A bad-hop
single over first started the frame
off, then after the runner moved
to second on an out, Gianelli
singled to make it 4-1 Tech.
Pirate hurler Daniel Boone
began bearing down in the fifth,
striking out the side. It seemed to
fire up the ECU hitters, as they
narrowed the gap with two runs
Intramurals
To: All faculty, staff and summer
school students
Re: Summer intramural recrea-
tional programs
The staff of the East Carolina
Department of Intramural
Recreational Services cordially
invites you to participate in any
or all of this summers exciting ac-
tivities. Included in the first ses-
sion alone are seven intramural
events from putt-putt golf to
slow-pitch softball.
Although registration for the
first four events has already pass-
ed, you can still be a part of 3 on
3 basketball, putt-putt golf and
the Ayden Country Club Golf
Classic. The last day to register
for 3 on 3 basketball is today so
make your way to 204 Memorial
Gym and give us your name. Se-
cond session has 6 activities for
your enjoyment so prepare now
for all the action.
Aerobic exercise classes are
also being held this summer.
Classes will meet Mon.thru Fri.
at 5:15 p.m Tues. and Thurs. at
4:00 and 6:00 p.m and Sat. at
11:00 a.m. Registration for se-
cond session aerobics will be held
June 19,20,21. Tune and tone up
with intramural aerobics.
The outdoor recreation center
is also alive this summer and full
of activities. Not only are you
eligible to ride the range at Jar-
mans Stables but you have the
opportunity to backpack and join
the IRS Whitewater rafting crew
for these two fabulous summer
adventure trips.
As you can see, the intramural
department is packed full with
adventure, fun and competition.
For more information regarding
this summers activities, pick up
the summer recreation packet
calendar, come by room 204
Memorial Gym, call 757-6387 or
listen every Thursday to the sum-
mer edition of the Tennis Shoe
Talk show hosted by Stephanie
Luke. WZMB is your contact
with intramurals and rock and
roll.
Sincerely,
ECU Intramurals
P.S. Participate rather than spec-
tate.
IRS
Hours
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12noon-l:30p.m.
Minges Pool
M-F 4 p.m7:00 p.m.
Sun. l p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:00 p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
T-Th 10 a.m12 noon
T-Th 1 p.m4 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th llp.m7:00p.m.
Friday 11 p.m5:00 p.m.
SatSun. 1p.m4 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 11 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 11 a.m5:00 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m4 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
MF 1:30 p.m5 p.m.
T-W-Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
M-Fl 1:30 a.m3 p.m. (in person)
M-F 12 noon-3 p.m. (phone in)
� Operational hours adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
in the bottom of the inning
Greg Hardison doubled down
the third baseline, Chris
Bradberry got on with a weak in-
field single and Winfred Johnson
walked to load the bags. One run
scored on a double-play, then
Mark Cockrell singled to bring
Bradberry in, closing the margin
to 4-3.
The Pirates rallied again in the
sixth to tie it up. Langston walk-
ed and was pushed to second by
Mark Shank's sacrifice bunt.
Mike Conklin came in on relief
for Tech, but after getting one
out, gave up a run scoring single
to Johnson.
NYT got a hit from Tom Boyce
in the bottom of the frame, but a
good defensive play by center-
fielder Bradberry kept him from
going to second. Boyce was then
cut down trying to steal second.
The Pirates finally took the
lead 5-4 in the eighth with what
proved to be the final run of the
game. With one away, Johnson
singled to centerfield. Jay
McGraw and Mark Cockrell
walked and Mike Sullivan hit a
run-scoring single over the short-
stop's head, but the inning ended
with three ECU runners strand-
ed.
Boone's pitching victory gave
him a 5-1 final record for the
year. Hardison led the Pirate hit-
ters with a double and homer,
while Bradberry, Johnson,
Cockrell and Sullivan had two
hits each.
ECU loaded the bases on two
walks and a single in the seventh,
but left the runners stranded, as
the Pirates continued to miss
crucial scoring opportunities.
"It seemed we were playing
our best after we beat UNC-
Wilmington Pirate coach Gary
Overton said. "We maintained
our intensity and drive, but we
just didn't get the right hits at the
right time in the tournament.
"We also failed to maintain
our starting pitching staff he
said. "In a tournament situation
you have to be on top of your
game and we weren't.
"Winfred Johnson hit ex-
cellently for us and Bradberrv
continued his good season per-
formance also the coach said
"Daniel Boone was excellent in
relief and I thought Robert
Langston did a fine job as well
"Overall ve had a very fine
baseball year Overton added
"Any time you win more than 30
games in a season you have to be
pleased. I believe (freshman) Jav
McGraw lived up to what I ex-
pected of him in his first year He
dropped a ball in the tournament
that cost us a run, but he threw
runners out at home twice also
"I'd like to thank the fans who
supported us throughout the
season stated Overton. "We
really appreciate their support
fill -ggss- Birljif WITH
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DIET PEPSI � MTN. DEW
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 22, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 22, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.408
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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