The East Carolinian, May 15, 1985






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(ftamltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.57
Wednesday, May 15, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Woman Seeks $180,000 From
ECU Accounting Professor
Graduation '85
More than 2.500 graduate and undergraduate students received their diplomas at ECU's 76th commence-
ment ceremonies held the Saturday following spring semester exams.
Dole A ddresses Graduates
ECt News Bureau & Slaff Reports
Speaking at ECU's 76th com-
mencement ceremonies and to
more than 2.500 graduates, U.S.
Transportation Secretary
Elizabeth Dole told anxious
graduates to continue to be flexi-
ble, adaptable and creative after
leaving ECU.
"Graduates today have been
prepared for a new and different
world she said. "As you leave
this campus, don't forget why
you came. So long as the books
arc open, minds can never be
closed
A native of Salisbury, N.C.
and the wife of Sen. Robert Dole
(R-Kansas), Dole has been a
member of the Reagan Cabinet
Elizabeth Dole
since 1983. She is a graduate of
Duke University and Oxford
University and holds a law degree
from Harvard University. She
was awarded with an honorary
degree, the cotor of letters, from
ECU. This makes the third
honorary doctorate degree ECU
has given.
Following the graduation, a
reception was held for Dole and
other guests at Chancellor John
Howell's home. "At the first
commencement in 1909, 13 were
graduated from the two-year pro-
gram. Today, we awarded over
2,500 graduate and
undergraduate degrees and the
university's third honorary doc-
torate. That is indeed an im-
pressive advance Howell said.
By RANDY MEWS
Cs-Ncwi Kdilor
A Washington woman has fil-
ed suit in Beaufort County
Superior Court claiming that
ECU accounting professor Gor-
man W. Ledbetter obtained
ownership in a dry-cleaning
business by misrepresentation.
Grace Corbett Leggett said in a
complaint filed through Green-
ville lawyer Sara Krome that
Ledbetter, 56, purposely misled
her into selling what was former-
ly known as Leggett Cleaners � a
family business operated by her
late husband Ashley Grey Leg-
gett.
Ledbetter purchased the
business located at 130 W. 2nd
St. in Washington on Aug. 2,
1983. As part of the arrange-
ment, Mrs. Leggett received
$5,215 in cash, release from a
$9,784 debt and bonds worth
$60,000.
During the course of the
negotiations, Ledbetter said he
would continue to operate the
business on behalf of a corpera-
tion titled Leggett � Merchant of
Cleanliness, Inc. A name intend-
ed to honor Leggett's deceased
husband and to allow Ledbetter
to reap the benefits of the
business.
Ledbetter claimed the bonds he
used to purchase the majority of
the business would be backed by
all assets of his new corperation
(Leggett � Merchant of
Cleanliness). However, according
to the lawsuit, Ledbetter made
"no attempt to open a dry-
cleaning establishment, therefore
he had no intention or ability to
assure repayment of the bonds
According to Ledbetter, the
charges are unfounded.
"Anytime you enter into a
business venture you try to make
a profit. The negative aspect is
suffering a loss some people
will do anything to cut down on
losses
Following the sale of the pro-
perty, the suit claims that Ledbet-
ter reneged on an oral agreement
to retain Leggett's son to perform
necessary cleaning work on
leather items.
Also, Ledbetter failed to make
the last two required nine percent
interest paymetns (on the bonds)
within time, and he has yet to
make the payment due May 2.
According to Krome, Leggett
had been suspicious of Ledbetter
for some time. However, no legal
action was taken until a notice of
forclosure on Ledbetter's
business appeared in the
Washington Daily Sews April 12.
Later in the month the building
was put up for auction and a bid
of $44,369.70 was made, thus en-
suring the assets of Leggett �
Merchant of Cleanliness could
not back $60,000 worth of bonds.
Krome said she contacted
Ledbetter by mail inquiring how
the bonds would be backed, but
none of her letters were
answered. Krome also added that
Ledbetter refused to speak with
her when contacted by phone.
Ledbetter is seeking $180,000
in damages as well as a share of
the property. The suit was filed
April 26, and Ledbetter has 30
days to respond to the allega-
tions.
Med School Graduates Class
Faculty Senate Head Selected
F.CL News Bureau
Dr. Kenneth R. Wilson, a
sociologist who combines both
teaching and research to provide
a new frame of reference for
students, will chair the ECU
faculty during the 1985-86
academic year.
Wilson, 38, was elected
Wednesday at an organizational
meeting of the Faculty Senate.
He will succeed Dr. James LeRoy
Smith, professor of philosophy,
as faculty chair in August.
A native of East Liverpool,
Ohio, Wilson completed both his
undergraduate and graduate
degrees at Purdue University. He
joined the ECU faculty in 1974
upon completion of his PhD at
Purdue.
"My primary interest in
teaching is to provide students
with a new frame of reference
from which they may view, and
better understand, the world in
which they live Wilson said.
He has "experimented" with
lab sessions, games and simula-
tions, team teaching and
cognitive mapping discussion
techniques. "Introductory
sociology is one of the most ex-
citing and interesting courses to
teach Wilson said. He also
uses interactive computer pro-
grams to introduce students to
survey research.
"My early university service
focused on improving campus
computer resources he said.
Wilson served on the university's
computer committee, the com-
puter users advisory committee
and the chancellor's computer
task force.
Of the faculty, Wison said,
"Our job is to create the intellec-
tual future of the university
Wilson holds the academic
rank of associate professor in the
Department of Sociology, An-
thropology and Economics.
Madge Smith McGrath, assis-
tant professor in medical
technology in the School of
Allied Health and Social Work,
was elected vice chair. Dr. Nancy
K. Mayberry, professor of
Foreign Languages and
Literatures, was re-elected
secretary for a second one year
term.
McGrath has been a member
of the faculty since 1978, while
Mayberry came to ECU in 1967.
ECU News Bureau & Staff Reports
Forty-two men and 10 women
were recently graduated from
ECU's School of Medicine,
marking the end of long hours of
study and the beginning of their
journey into the world of
medicine.
The commencement ceremony,
the laiiieii ever, was held at the
Brody Medical Sciences Building
on May 3. Dr. William R.
Laupus, dean of the School of
Medicine, told the crowd that he
was "proud of the students' ac-
complishments and proud that 34
percent of the class will be going
into the primary care field of
family medicine
World-renowed heart surgeon
Dr. Micheal E. DeBakey, from
the Baylor College of Medicine in
Houston, Texas also spoke in
honor of the Class of 1985.
Listing numerous advances in
medicine during the 20th century,
DeBakey said that while some of
those innovations have been spec-
tacular, some economic, social,
moral and ethical problems have
come about. "Can we afford
them?" he asked, while citing
dilemmas such as rising health
care costs, more demands on the
medical profession and the con-
troversy of whether a doctor is
prolonging death or prolonging
life. He told the graduates that it
will be their responsibility to deal
with these problems.
"As physicians, you will face
daily the conflict between the in-
terests of an individual patients
and those of society, a conflict
that remains unresolved except
on an individual basis he said.
"Despite the strongly held opi-
nions for and against costly high
technology health care of the
newborn, the gravely ill, the han-
dicapped and the aged, neither
ethicists nor economists and
neither physicians nor politicians
have devised satisfactory
guidelines for providing every
citizen with optimal, but
economical health care
DeBakey told the graduates.
DeBakey is one of the world's
best known surgeons who
demostrated a genius for medical
innovation early in his career. As
a medical student, he divised a
pump which years later became
an essential component of the
heart-lung machine that made
open heart surgery possible.
Since then, he has developed
more than 50 surgical in-
struments.
Chairmen of the ECU Board
of Trustees, C. Ralph Kinsey,
also spoke to the graduates as
well as former ECU chancellor
Dr. Leo Jenkins who was
recognized with a standing ova-
tion. Jenkins was a leader in the
development of the school of
medicine.
Fourteen of the graduates
received awards at the ceremony,
recognizing students' academic
achievement, community service,
research skills and personal
stature.
This year's class brings the
total number of medical school
graduates to 1.
Career Centers Blamed For Inaccurate Survey
(CPS) � Half of this spring's
college grads won't have jobs
when they graduate, according to
a new survey by a Chicago-based
employment agency.
But college placement experts
caution that the survey � which
has been released to media
around the country � "sensa-
tionalizes" what is a typical oc-
curence in the job market as
many students intentionally leave
campus without employment.
The study takes into account
over one million students at near-
ly 100 colleges across the country,
says James Challenger, president
of the Challenger, Gray, and
Christmas placement service in
Chicago.
Based on an analysis of the
172,000 graduating seniors at the
schools surveyed, Challenger
says, "it is likely that over half of
ECU Trustee Members
Consider A dmissions Rule
Staff &. Wire Reports
SGA president David Brown
recently took the oath as an ex of-
Ficio member of the ECU Board
of Trustees at their May meeting.
Brown, a senior majoring in en-
vironmental health, was sworn in
by Greenville Mayor Janice
Buck.
The Board of Trustees honored
outgoing SGA president John
Rainey, commending his
"outstanding contributions" as
SGA president and trustee
member.
The trustees also approved the
expenditure of more than
$232,000 to renovate the medical
school's family practice clinic in
Bethel and $528,000 to air condi-
tion portions of Scott Residence
Hall.
A resolution endorsing "the
priniciples and objectives" con-
tained in a statement on inter-
collegiate athletics made by the
National Collegiate Athletic
Association's Division 1-A
university chief executives, was
made by the trustees.
The statement on inter-
collegiate athletics itself em-
phasized that "the integrity of
academic institutions rests fun-
damentally upon the missions of
teaching and research and
among other things, recommeded
that "freshmen be ineligible to
participate in those varsity sports
which create substantail threats
to successful academic adjust-
ment, such as football and
basketball
Chancellor John Howell cited
the success of the University
Scholars Awards program fund
drive. He also noted that CD.
Langston of Winterville, has
established four university
scholarship award endownments,
which enables ECU to surpass a
goal of 20.
The endowments of $40,000
each will provide $3,000 a year to For those who don't plan on joggling away their lives upon graduating,
the scholars award recipient. visit one of the many career centers.
all students who will graduate
this spring will not have jobs
when they leave school, and are
entering the job market with non-
business skills
The problem, he feels, is that
college placement offices aren't
adequately addressing students'
job hunting needs.
"Only a little over one-third of
the college graduates were
assisted by their school placement
services in finding a post-
graduation job Challenger
says.
"Of the remainder, 38 percent
did not have the benefit of job
placement services while another
26 percent were involved in place-
ment services but were still
unable to find work he says.
And while the survey shows
that, overall, 62 percent of the
students surveyed use college
placement services, less than two-
thirds of them get jobs.
"It's not necessarily because
campus placement is poorly
run Challenger says, "but
(they are) simply unable to ad-
dress the needs of many of their
students
"I think (Challenger's) just
blowing smoke counters Victor
Lindquist, placement director of
Northwestern University and
author of an annual nationwide
job placement survey.
At Northwestern, for instance,
"55 percent of our four-year
graduates go on to graduate
school he points out.
"I would be very skeptical of
the way (Challenger) is presenting
his survey results says Judith
Kayser with the College Place-
ment Council. "It doesn't mean
that half of all graduates can't
find jobs, just that half of them
don't have jobs yet. There's a big
difference
"Many students she notes,
"don't even get job offers until
very late in their graduating year,
or well after they graduate. And a
lot of students take the summer
off, intentionally, figuring they'll
enjoy a little time off and avoid
competing with a million other
new graduates who will be look-
ing for spring job offers
Still, Challenger argues those
50 percent who didn't have jobs
when they graduated � by choice
or by default � sooner or later
will need some employment
assistance.
Not coincidentally, Challenger
thinks he has the answe- in a new
program his private placement
agency is offering.
Under the auspices of his new
"Graduplacement Program
Challenger is seeking corpora-
tions to underwrite job placement
programs for new high school
and college graduates.
And despite what some say is
an exaggerated view of the col-
lege grad placement problem,
there are some schools with
"abhorrent" placement services
where programs such as
Challenger's could do some
good, Northwestern's Lindquist
admits.
"But if a student ends up in a
private program like
(Challenger's), it's criminal,
because it means the school
didn't do its job to begin with
Lindquist adds.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 15. 1985
i
Protests Continue From Concerned Students
(CPS) � After a relatively
small turnout for the nationwide
campus "Day of Action" earlier
this year, the student anti-
apartheid movement has
mushroomed abruptly in recent
weeks, attracting media attention
and, in some cases, even provok-
ing college administrators to con-
sider selling university holdings in
companies that do business in
South Africa.
Perhaps more significantly, the
upheavals have been spontaneous
and organized on the grassroots
level.
A protest network seems to be
growing among the
demonstrators themselves, and
exists separately from the off-
campus organizers who con-
cocted the April 4 event.
"We're pleasantly surprised
says Katherine Graetzer of the
American Committee on Africa,
which sponsored the April Day of
Action. "But the possibility for
action was always there
It's been hard to provoke,
however, as ACA activists have
tried to attract wider campus sup-
port in recent years by co-
sponsoring events in conjunction
with protests of nuclear power
and American policy in Central
America.
While their efforts produced a
steady, low-keyed pressure at a
handful of campuses, the protests
this spring are much more vehe-
ment and prolonged, observers
say.
And the action shows no sign
of abating as students at Colum-
bia, Cornell, Rutgers, UCLA,
Princeton, Louisville, Oberlin,
Santa Cruz and San Francisco
State, among others, occupy
campus buildings and commons,
and hold candle light vigils to
demonstrate solidarity with
South African blacks resisting
their segregationist government.
Five Syracuse students are on a
hunger strike, hoping to convince
their university to rid its invest-
ment portfolio of shares in com-
panies that do business in South
Africa and thus, by implication,
help support the South African
government's rigid segregationist
laws.
"Currently, there're 200 to 300
people camped out in front of
Sproul Hall nightly says
George Olson, a student reporter
at Berkeley where demonstra-
tions have continued for more
than two weeks and nearly 200
students have been arrested.
At a forum last week, "5000
people and 13 regents showed
up" to discuss full divestiture and
its options, he reports. "It (was)
so crowded they had to bring in
folding chairs. The place (was)
packed to the gills
And about half the students
enrolled at the nine-campus
University of California system
honored a one-day class boycott
last week, Olson adds. The week
before, 10,000 of Berkeley's
30,000 students joined a class
boycott.
Organizers say the movement
will continue until UC regents
divest some $2.3 billion in South
Africa-related stock, Olson says.
"The protestors have said, 'If
you divest at your May meeting,
we'll quit protesting. If you
don't Olson reports.
"These people are extremely
well-organized concurs pro-
testor Fred Balfour. "They've
got competent people
Indeed, the demonstrators cen-
tralize responses to the media and
have different people handling
newspaper, radio and tv
reporters.
Now other apartheid op-
ponents from campuses nation-
wide are aping the sophisticated
protests at Berkeley and Colum-
bia, where students last week
ended a three week occupation of
a campus administration
building.
"We've been in contact with
Columbia Balfour reports.
"The only thing we don't have
going with them is a computer
link-up. We've also been in touch
with Cornell
"We're in touch with Colum-
bia students says Michael Mar-
tin of the Princeton divestment
coalition. "But no outside
organization is helping
Martin says his group has stag-
ed protests all year, demanding
the university sell the $500
million it's invested in South
Africa-related companies
"You could say we started
because of Berkeley, but we're
not formally supported by
anyone says Sarah Boone, a
Syracuse University hunger
striker. "Students need to take a
stand for solidarity
The informal campus network
provides "direct communication
from student to student and to
spread ideas and issues
observes Keith Jennings of the
U.S. Student Association, a
Washington-based student lobby-
ing group.
"It won't sustain he says,
"so we're planning meetings this
summer to continue the move-
ment. We intend to escalate ef-
forts
But "we're not going to eat un
til the university begins to
bargain in good faith SUs
Boone claims. "We want (SIto
totally divest itself
"We're organized to th �
that we've got a laver tor
coalition in case people ,
jail she adds
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville Blvd.
Announcements
Advertising
Scholarship
The Eastern Advertising Federation
Scholarship Fund has been established at the
School or Art Design Department, by the
Eastern Carolina Advertismg Federation to
support and promote the study of advertising
by deserving luniors and seniors The appli
ca-t must have at least a 3 0 gpa. and must
ntend to pursue a career in advertising or
reiated fields in Eastern North Carolina The
applicant must complete the ECAF form,
and submit a 500 word typewritten essay ex
piam.ng how he or she became interested m
advertising and why he or she should receive
me scholarship Slides of ten works must ac
company the application form An award of
at least 1500 and not exceeding J1000 will be
made Application forms may be obtained
from me School of Art Office The deadline
for all completed application material is
September 16, 1985
Job Opening
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services needs an outdoor
'ecreation employee The person will be
primarily responsible for the rental of out
door recreation equipment with some
responsibility in the organization of recrea
fion trips interested persons should apply m
room 204 Memorial Gym
Benefit
On Friday. May 17th we w.ll hold a benafif
o ra.se money to provide medical a,d to
Nicaragua The benaf,t w,n be held at the
New Del, from 9 00 p m to 2 00 a m
Featured will be The Tommy G Experience
ano ,ghtmng Wells Admission will be a
3 00 donation
National Teacher Examination
A special National Teacher Examination
will be administered Saturday, June 22 Fees
will be the regularly scheduled amounts
payable on the day of the test by check or
money order Cash cannot be accepted Can
didates report prior to 8 30 a m for Core I &
Specialty Area tests and before 12 30 p m
for Core ii and Core Ml Candidates must
contact the testing center prior to June 5,
1985, to register for the test To save travel
time, you should be aware that tests are also
bemg given at Atlantic Christian College
Wilson N C Weslyan, Rocky Mount, Fayet
tev.lle State and New Bern High School
Ice Cream Party
The Student un,on Recreation Committee
is sponsoring a BingoIce Cream Party on
Tuesday May 28th at 7 00 p m ,n the
Mendenhall Student Center Multi Purpose
Room ECU students, faculty, staff their
dependents, and their guests are welcome
Enjoy dehcous ice cream and play Bingo for
prizes all for only 25�. the cost of admission
Aerobics
Aerobic exercise registration will be on
Ma, 13 4 ana )5 Come by Memona Gym
room 204 The cost ,s M forjUyatt and $10
tor faculty ano staff "
Expressions
There will be a meeting of 'all ' staff
Wed Ma 15.(Today) at 4 00 p m in the of
t'ce 'See you there
Intramural
Registration
Reg.straion tor slow pi�ch softball, co-rec
volleyball, tennis singles and the raquetball
tourney will be on May 13, 14 and 15 in
Memorial Gym, room 204 Play begins May
20
Backpacking Trip
The department of Intramural
Recreational Services is sponsoring a
backpacking trip on June 7, 8 and 9 The tr.p
location will be the Uwaharrie National
Forest which .s approximately 4 hours from
Greenville The cost for the trip will be J.28
which will include travel, all equipment ren
tal and meals Friday night through Sunday
morning For more information or
registraion stop by 204 Memorial Gym
PLAY
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600 Greenville Bivd Greenville
OP TO
WZMB
is now accepting applications for
D.Js and Newscasters. Pick up
application forms at WZMB
office, 2nd Floor, Old Joyner
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p.m.
Odds vary depending on the number of Game Tickets you oblarn
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FREE GROCERIES
PREMIUM AND LIGHT
Coors
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EXPRESSIONS
ECU'S MINORITY PUBLICATION
Has Openings in the following
positions:
Writers
and
Sales Representatives
Applications are available at EXPRESSIONS office
in the Publications Building or contact General
Manager Jeff Canady 757-6927.
12 Oz
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Pitt-Greenville Airport is accepting
applications for part-time employment
starting May 15, 1985 and ending May 30,
1985. Duties will consist of aircraft refueling
and airport maintenance. Some type of
previous aviation experience is required �
civilian or military. For further information
call 758-4707 between the hours of 10:00
A.M. - 1:00 P.M Monday through Friday.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 15, 1985
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Dance Benefits Hospital Construction
B JAY STONE
�hrfririim
On Friday May 17, the Pro-
gressive Student Network and
Students for Economic
Democracy will co-sponsor a
benefit concert to help raise
mone to build a health clinic in
Esteli, Nicaragua. The perfor-
mance will begin at 9 p.m. at the
Neu Deli Restaurant and admis-
sion is $3. Bands slated to play
will include Lightnin' Wells and
Tommy G. and Company.
Concert organizer Lisa Hieber
said Esteli is a town that has been
under attack by the contras for
the last three years and has one
health clinic that serves approx-
imately 50,000 people. The
building of the new clinic is being
undertaken as a joint project by
the municipal government of
Esteli and Nuevo Institute de
Centro America, an organization
based in Cambridge, Mass.
Hieber is less than sanguine
about the effects of the contra
war in Nicaragua. She alleges
that the victims of contra attacks
haven't been soldiers in the San-
danista army.
"The contras have specifically
targeted health care workers,
teachers and food co-op
workers Hieber said. "The
have tried to avoid fighting with
the Sandinista army
The money from the concert,
Hieber said, will go to the NICA,
which is supervising the building
of the health clinic and the pur-
chase of medical supplies. A U.S.
delegation, along with NICA,
will begin building the health
clinic in June.
Members of the group will be
paying their own travel expenses
and supporting themselves while
they are in Esteli.
Close supervision of the pro-
curement of supplies and the con-
struction of the health clinic by
American and a reputable
American based organization,
Hieber said people attending the
benefit can be certain that their
money will actually be spent on
medical facilities and supplies.
Hieber also added that since
she has maintained close contact
with former ECU graduate stu-
dent Mike Hamer, who has been
living in Nicaragua for four mon-
ths, the issue has been brought
closer to home for her.
"I've been involved with Cen-
tral American issues for three
years, but having a friend in
Nicaragua has brought the
realities of the contra war home
to me Hieber said.
Trustees Select New Home Economics Dean
EXT News Bureau
Dr. Judith C. Rollins, a
department head and associate
professor at Kansas State Univer-
sity, will become professor and
dean of the School of Home
Economics at ECU effective
Aug. 12.
The appointment, approved by
the ECL' trustees and the UNC
Board of Governors, was an-
nounced bv Dr. Angelo A.
Volpe, ECU vice-chancellor for
academic affairs.
"1 am delighted that a person
of the high caliber and excellent
experience of Dr. Rollins is join-
ing East Carolina University
Volpe said. "1 am looking for-
ward to working with her as she
assumes her duties as dean of the
School of Home Economics
Rollins has been at Kansas
State University since 1979, hav-
ing served as assistant dean of the
College of Home Economics un-
til August 1981, when she became
acting head of the department of
family and child development. In
1982, she was named department
head.
Rollins is active in research and
publication with two significant
research projects in progress,
Volpe said.
She succeeds Dr. Eugenia M.
Zallen as dean of the School of
Home Economics. Dr. Edward
(Mel) Markowski has served as
acting dean since Zallen's
resignation at the end of the sum-
mer sessions in 1984.
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, om mo
Jennifer Jendrasiak. uni
Harold Joyner. vwa� Tom Llyender. ftWW,
Randy Mews. o-nm �� Anthony Martin. �u,Wi �,��
Rick Mccormac, sf, John Peterson, cm vf
Bill Mitchell, nmrnm w Bill Dawson. w�� .����
Daniel Malrer. ��i�& DeChanile Johnson, wndtaw
Ma 15, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Happy Hour
More Ineffective Legislation
Prohibition is a classic example of
a law that just didn't work. For-
tunately, lawmakers saw the light
and repealed the amendment. Un-
fortunately, as far as college
students are concerned, the days of
prohibition seem to be returning.
First, it was the drinking age in-
crease, a piece of legislation which
will probably affect 75 percent of
the college population. Sure, it may
deter a few people from drinking
because they are afraid they will get
caught, but for the rest of them, the
danger of getting caught makes it all
the more entertaining.
Now, to add insult to injury, hap-
py hour has been banned in North
Carolina, effective August 1.
Amazingly enough, despite the
fact that this new legislation has the
potential to affect everyone who
consumes alcohol, there has been
very little protest.
Under the new regulations, bars
and restaurants will not be permit-
ted to offer traditional happy hour
specials such as two-for-one drinks.
According to N.C. Rep. Coy C.
Privette, R-Cabarrus, happy hours
encourage drinking and driving and
"glamorize" liquor.
Happy hours don't encourage
drinking and driving any more than
the mere presence of bars does.
What legislators seem to be assum-
ing is that just because something is
less expensive, people will
automatically consume more of it.
In effect, they are saying that the
average adult lacks the judgement
to determine how much he should
drink and will overindulge because
of a special.
Granted, there are some people
who will take every opportunity to
consume large quantities of alcohol.
But these people aren't going to be
affected by the new laws. People
who really want to drink will drink,
no matter what the price.
The N.C. Restaurant Association
proved their awareness of this fact
by supporting this legislation. You
can be sure that if they thought cut-
ting out lower prices would decrease
their sales, they would be the first to
protest. They know people will con
tinue to drink, and their revenues
will go up.
Pitt County District Attornex
Thomas Haigwood says the biggest
DWI problems are with chronic of-
fenders. The people who drive
drunk repeatedly won't be deterred
by stricter laws or higher prices. It's
the people who like to relax with
one or two drinks on Friday after-
noon who will be hurt.
Most people do have good judge-
ment and while it may sound good
theoretically, making things more
difficult for everybody is not the
answer to the problem of drunken
driving.
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A Psychological Ailment
Appeasement Policies "Fatal"
It was forty years ago. To us
youngsters it is merelv a chapter in a
history book or stones repeated bv our
fathers or grandfathers
In World War II American
patriotism and unity peaked. Everyone
was committed to the cause of wiping
out the fascist scourge � hardK a single
family was untouched by this call to du-
ty. For instance. m grandfather built
the bombers my Dad flew in over
Europe.
How many millions died in the war?
Forty million? Fifty million:1 Who
knows? In spite oi the cost, we can pro-
udly say that international fascism is
The Right Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
however, this one was avoidable. It was
brought on not onl) bv the dictates oi a
bizarre fascist ideology but also by the
dangerous instincts oi the still-practiced
liberal foreign policy.
Neville Chamberlain (described b
Winston Churchill as "looking at
foreign affairs through the wrong end
of a municipal drainpipe") was the
prime minister of Great Britain cluing
the latter stages of the emergence of Na-
tional Socialist (Nazi) Germany. Hitler
found him a useful dupe, for
Chamberlain merely wrung his hands in
bewilderment as the National Socialists
violated key provisions oi the Versailles
Treatv Indeed. Chamberlain stood b)
as the German dictator marched into
Austria. And when the Fuhrer demand-
ed that Czechoslovakia cede to Ger-
many its German-speaking area (known
as the Sudetenland), Chamberlain
decided that appeasement would bring
lasting peace. At the Munich con-
ference in 1938, he agreed to hand ovei
the Sudetenland to German) (as if it
were his to give) and Hitler agreed to
lake no further territories
It was one oi history's greatest
betrayals, and the Czechs were enraged
Of course. Hitler's appetite was not Ap
peased; it was whetted, and WAS il was
the result. s Churchill said oi
Chamberlain, "in the depths oi that
dust) soul there is nothing but abject
surrender
One oi the unfortunate consequences
oi the war was that b annihilating one
form oi totalitarianism, we strengthen
ed another. Before the war. the Soviet
Union was a lone, socialist island. Now
its repressive ideologv rules halt the
world. We can't rcalh knock the
Soviets for what thev are doing I ike
Hitler, they are merely following the
dictates of a philosophv which the) are
committed to As Chamberlain did with
the National Socialists, howecr. we are
doing with the communists � making it
a hell oi a lot easier for them to fulfil!
their ideological dreams. I ike
Chamberlain, we are often gripped bv
an unexplainablc sense of guilt about
the actions of tyrants. We feel compell-
ed to please them a:
psychological ailment among
leaders, which even lingei
Reagan, makes th
contemptuous ol oui a
more determined to d I
peasement is a fatal wa
aggressors. Only a 1
sisten and thi
diplomatic
militar) pressure can �;i
( me area where -
applied is in
gressors there are in
three-tiered po
least to some -�
Diplomaticall) I R
lion's approach has
fairl) consistent 1
pressure on the N
has been steadih gi i
economic pressu
until now
Bet ore 1' Reaga
total trade emb United S
was Nicaragua's
currenc) Out
finance th rorist, anti-democratu
wavs The
alwa) s bee
Daniel Ortega otite d " na ,�Vw oo
pose Marxism I eninism .ire as iss m
So now thev must go to
petcers, the Soviets, to beg
Soie; Union, ahead) an
basket case herself, must de
Central mencan empire is
cost.
Republicans Perform Apartheid Volte-Face
By ANTONY J. BL1NKEN
The New Republic
When 35 young Republican represen-
tatives wrote to the South African am-
bassador in Washington last December,
their message argued as persuasively for
a new kind of conservatism as it did
against apartheid.
By ending conservative silence about
South Africa's official racism, they
hoped to convince skeptical liberals and
moderates that their vision of an "op-
portunity society" was more than just a
repackaging of the usual right-wing
themes.
The letter was signed by leading young
Republicans such as Newt Gingrich of
Georgia, Vin Weber of Minnesota and
Robert Walker of Pennsylvania. "We
were disturbed to see conservatives all
lumped into one group, who are sup-
posedly at least acquiescing, if not pro-
apartheid says Walker, who led the ef-
fort. "We decided to define that there is
at least one group of us who are
vehemently anti-apartheid, too
But the realigners failed to foresee op-
position from within conservative ranks,
perhaps because they failed to see the
contradictions in their new position. In
the months since the letter was released,
often vicious criticism from traditional
right-wingers has forced the young turks
to retreat.
The young conservatives claim to have
been surprised by the vehemence of the
reaction to their letter. They should have
known better. Criticism of a pro-
Western, anti-communist regime ran
against decades of conservative theory
and practice. But the young turks had
been unequivocal in their criticism.
"If constructive engagement becomes
in your view an excuse for maintaining
the unacceptable status quo the letter
warned the South Africans, "it will
quickly become an approach that can
engender no meaningful support among
American policy-makers The young
Republicans added a blunt threat. "We
are looking for an immediate end to the
violence in South Africa accompanied
by a demonstrated sense of urgency
about ending apartheid. If such actions
are not forthcoming, we are prepared to
recommendcurtailing new American
investment in South Africaand
organizing international diplomatic
sanctions
The backlash began almost im-
mediately. The magazines of the old
right reiterated the traditional conser-
vative position that criticism of South
Africa, no matter what the intention,
abetted communism. Human Events ran
a withering denunciation of the signers
of the letter in an article on page 1: "In
our view their moral authority was not
enhanced by joining hands with the
lynch mobs of the left National
Review simply dismissed the letter as
"uppity
Old-fashioned bigotry played a role
too. Aides to several of the co-signers
said that their bosses have received an
unusual amount of negative mail. "A lot
of it was racist one aide told me, "but
unfortunately these people are our con-
stituents
The young turks had not thought
through their position, either
theoretically or politically. If it was im-
perative for conservatives to denounce
the sorry human rights record of a pro-
Western regime such as South Africa,
why wouldn't it be imperative to criticize
such regimes in Guatemala or the
Philipines? That clearly would be more
of a break with traditional conservatism
than the young turks wanted. The
realigners also neglected to calculate
whether the liberal and moderate votes
they might gain would outweigh the
anti-black conservative votes they might
lose.
A racist may be more important to
Republican politicians than many care
to admit.
By early January, the retreat started.
In an interview with the Washington
Times, Walker tried to dissociate the
group of 35 from liberal opponents of
apartheid: "I've been somewhat shock-
ed since the whole thing came up to read
conservative publications who are accus-
ing us of sharing the agenda on South
Africa. That's ridiculous
Then in March, Walker, Gingrich and
Weber declined to support legislation
proposed by liberal Reps. Stephen
Solarz, D-N.Y and William Gray,
D-Penn that would have imposed sanc-
tions on South Africa � exactly the kind
of bill they initially seemed to have in
mind.
As an alternative to Solarz-Grav.
Gingrich, Weber and Walker introduced
their own bill, which they grandilo-
quently call the "International Human
Dignity and Opportunity Act of 1985
This bill is really aimed at communist
countries, not at South Africa. Among
other things, it would withhold IMF
loans to nations that "cooperate" in in-
ternational terrorism or illegal drug traf-
ficking, and deny most-favored-nation
trade status to countries that limit
emigration or restrict the press.
Walker explains his change of heart
by arguing that this country needs an
evenhanded approach to human rights
problems. "It is inconceivable that the
United States simply address human
rights abuses which are currently gaining
media attention without simultaneously
addressing human rights situations
everywhere in the world
Yet consider the economic sanctions
already imposed by the United States.
Congress has placed restrictions on trade
against 20 countries, most oi them com
munist. Virtually no communist coun-
tries receive U.S. foreign aid, and few
may purchase high-technologv products
made in the United States. Many oi the
same nations have been the targets of
periodic trade embargoes. South Africa
has been singled out, but only in the
sense that it is one of the onlv American
allies not penalized by Congress for its
human rights abuses.
In his pitch to fellow Republicans for
the "Human Dignity" bill. Walker com-
pleted the surrender of the group of 35.
He circulated a "Dear Republican Col-
league" letter that warns that "once
again House Republicans are in danger
of being overwhlemed by an issue,
caught as we too often are without any
kind of constructive alternative with
which to oppose, in this case, attempts
to punish South Africa
In December, ot course,
preciseh what the J5 claimed
readv to do.
The �'Dear Colleague" letl
clear that Republicans now want
a safe distance from liberals or 5
Africa. As the vote on the Solai I
bill approaches. Walker and Webei f�ae
hinted that thev max take yet anol
approach and support an administrat
bill that would impose sanctions
"significant progress' in dismantling
apartheid has not been made b ls"
The spirit of the December letter ha-
long since evaporated
By reverting to the traditional
Republican line on South Africa,
would-be-realigners have settled foi
politics as usual. Putting Pretoria
notice was an impressive-sounding
gesture. Voting against the Solat Guo
bill confirms that it was onlv a plo
Scient
H I N�� Hum �i
Scientists from at i
tions will meet it E I
month for an intefl
geologic field workshop
posium on phoxphi
mineral resource
tion of world hunger
A principal ol
ongoing project, tl
tional Geological (
Program
156-Phosphonte
research effort
tists on maior depos
mineral and their
distribution
Phosphorite; �
dient in chem
neceassarv
on a scale suffice?
panding populations
countries, esp
parts ol Asia and i
South Ameri
Just last ai
ed to the IGCP Pre
tified target areas oi p
deposits in food
India. Thailand
Objects oi the project
only locating dq
geologic survevs 3r.
tions. but also the I
geologists in Thud Wc
in methods ol m
and making it ii
During th J
IGCP p- I
tracked into some
remote corners
conduct their
teams hae been ir i
oi Australia.
Vunan province in Cli
edges ol the Gobi
Mongolia, across
Dail
Lar
and a
"� ��"�! wiium





Fatal
ng Western
n President
ts evei more
�'� of life and
' AP-
ng with
nt, con-
polic) of
ecessary,
Sgressors.
� sdom is being
a. The ag
igua. The
sed here at
since 1981.
tdministra-
intense and
M litarily, the
?mmunists
()nl
lacking,
enacted a
Unii sd States
source of trade
e helping to
mti-democratic
. - -emmen: has
is strongman
�nce said, All who ojf
eninism are assassins.
to their pup-
beg. But the
economic
� decide if a
worth the
Face
� e, that is
I the were
etter makes it
��� a ant to keep
ral on South
the SolarGray
and Weber have
may rake yet another
rt an administration
e sanctions if
in dismantling
ade h 1987.
.� 1 ei letter has
'he traditional
x nth Africa, the
�tied for
Putting Pretoria on
impressive-sounding
I iray
, ,i pjov.
IAN,
me,
rt"
'�H
)
IHL I-AS I C AROl lUS
MAN 15, 19X5
Scientists Seek Possibilities of Phosphorites To Solve Hunger
I- 1 1 1 V U r-
ECU News Bureau
Scientists from at least 40 na-
tions will meet at ECU early next
month for an international
geologic field workshop and sym-
posium on phosphorites, a
mineral resource vital to the solu-
tion of world hunger.
A principal objective of the
ongoing project, the Interna-
tional Geological Correlation
Program Project
156-Phosphontes, is to focus
research efforts of world scien-
tists on major deposits of the
mineral and their strategic
distribution.
Phosphorites are a key ingre-
dient in chemical fertilizers
neceassary for crop production
on a scale sufficent to feed the ex-
panding populations of many
countries, especially in Africa,
parts of Asia and in Central and
South America.
Just last year, scientists attach-
ed to the IGCP Project-156 iden-
tified target areas of phosphorite
deposits in food-scarce Ethiopia,
India, Thailand and Colombia.
Objects of the project include not
only locating deposits through
geologic surveys and explora-
tions, but also the training of
geologists in Third World nations
in methods of mining phosphate
and making it into fertilizers.
During the past seven years,
IGCP project scientists have
tracked into some of the most
remote corners of the globe to
conduct their studies. Project
teams have been in the outback
of Australia, to the remote
Yunan province in China, to the
edges of the Gcbi Desert in
Mongolia, across the mountains
of the Soviet Republic of
Kazakhstan in Central Asia, to
the Himalyan kingdom of Nepal
and to Ethiopia, Senegal and
Morocco in Africa.
Two volumes of research data
and reports produced by project
studies in Asia and Australia
have been compiled for publica-
tion by the Cambridge University
Press. Other volumes are in
various stages of preparation as
the global research continues.
In 1984, the IGCP
156-Phosphorites project was
renewed for an additional four
years and Stanley Riggs of ECU
and William Burnett of Florida
State University were named co-
directors. With the change of
directors came a new emphasis
shifting the prime geographic
areas of research and education
to the Caribbean Basin, Central
and South America and Africa.
Last year, A Caribbean Basin
and Central American Phosphate
Short Course at ECU set the
stage for the larger, more
elaborate program which began
here May 5. A preliminary
phosphate short course spon-
sored by the IGCP project, the
U.S. Geological Survey and ECU
was conducted April 29-May 4.
Riggs, an internationally-
known geologist whose world-
wide research and interest in
phosphorite geology have won
wide acclaim, has been involved
in the IGCP 156-Phosphorites
project since its inception.
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"It's solid science says
Riggs. "It is also science on
which the future well-being of
mankind, the whole human race,
may depend
Riggs is a recognized authority
on coastal zone and seabed
distribution of phosphorite rock
formations and weathering. He
discovered one of the world's
largest phosphorite deposits in
the Atlantic Ocean off the North
Carolina coast several years ago.
In 1984, Riggs received the
University of North Carolina's
O. Max Garner award for con-
tributions to knowledge for the
service and betterment of
mankind.
Riggs believes that through
publication of certain other scien-
P
lific data which may come from
the Ma symposium here, scien-
tists may add immeasurably to
the present knowledge of
oceanography.
"We could open a new book of
25 to 35 million years of
geological history he said.
Another objective of the Ki( P
Project 156-Phosphorites pro-
gram is being achieved because
the world's leading geologist
have been cooperating and con-
tributing to the project in the
name of science, putting political
and other differences of their
governments aside.
In effect, all of the nations ol
the world arc participating and
pooling their collective
knowledge, Riggs said.
For example, he cited the fact
that UNESCO decided to support
the Carribhean Basin and Central
American project in North
( aroihna and Florida this spring
despite the fact that the United
States government has announc-
ed its intention to withdraw from
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THE EASTCAROI 1NIAN
Lifestyles
MA 15, !9K
Page 6
Eastwood Discusses His Return To The West
A name,�s stranger rides into the com.n, h ���� - V I K, V V & I
A ruTn Tssssrand,exp,os,ve goid
the praver of a young �irl who s h ' , amv1 "� with
sudden and random. violent ?n .1 Pg �F a m'rade to end the
Megan qu.et.v� 2X kK-STv!?
pale horse: and his name h r t ' l��ked and behdd a
followed with him " " h'm Was Death- and Hell
pr S&tSJ? tHe l3teSl �" fr�m
the western genre Fas wT AMer a n,ne 'ear absen from
shooter. 8 ' EMtwood rctur"s to the rawhide and the six-
film S'cat'Idth"01 E"�0d Jl� ��
career. ' " the rolc westerns have played in his
MM: Since the "Rawhide" days, your image has been identified
Zt'srLTi, WhQt lS V�Ur em�ti0nal b�d 3? 7n inre
that s played such an important role in your career?
vnJn.f1 VCrV u�Se� ,he WCStern That's where m roots are. I.
SSWaafriarhblg, tar,0r m thC earl �f m �. both in
television and the Italian-made westerns. In recent years they've
been out quite a bit. I'd hate to see the genre complete! disappear
though that's not really why 1 made Pale Rider.When I'm asked
why! decided to do a western at this time I have to explain that
mere really isn t any correlation to time or place. It's not like I'm
trying to ride to the rescue of any genre. I just liked the story and
wanted to tell ,t. Maybe there were other motivating factors � me
but at the onset, I hked the script and fell moved to do it I don't'
believe in market research or popular wisdom. I trust my instinct.
MH: How was the project developed' understand you had been
contemplating it for quite some time.
CE: I started on it about four years ago. Michael Butler and Dennis
Shryack had written The Gauntlet for me. The often talked
their love tor westerns, so one das we just sat down and ossed
around various ideas. They came back with the concept for Pale
Rider. , ended up making it a little more supernatural hen t was
written, getting into the parallels with the Bible.
TwingpZJ hUk' m�re SPeCifiC QbOUt y�W ibution to
CE: They came uP with the conflict between the independent
miners and the big corporation as they had done someTeTeSch on
n� h n hSh CrH "? fr�m ���. 'hev w rote a trLtm.n
�en the) brought my character in, the preacher. 1 felt he needed a
Relationship with an antagonist, the marshal. That wouWgive
he Pale Rider an added dimension. It also tied in with the image of
horseman from the Apocalypse. I'm not a Biblical scholar bu
: ays been fascinated by the mythology of those Biblical
stones and how they relate to the mythology of the western
MH: Did you yourself do some research on that period?
Clint Eastwood stars as a mysterious horseman who answers a
$Bioom
X. nSS�rJSdTK ThJd btv"affecIed hi 'he GM
on m Sonera Th't d aS Whe" "e "lm� '�� �" s,a
rtre vl ' t up "orth ,0 X(�� locations in Idaho
e ri,P���l� Him "Pale Rider scheduled (or sunder
County kls
the land.
tna. s all that s reallv onginal anything in the world is origii
See (I IN I paje 7
Bv GREG RIDEOlIT
pcl�l in �( f Asrolinian
My mother never asked me
what I wanted to be when I
grow up, but if she did, I'd quick-
ly give her my answer. "Mom I
would solemnly intone, "I want
to be Steve Dallas, who lives the
quintessential lawyerly life in
Bloom County, USA. He is a
man to be admired
"Steve who?" you sav. Why,
Dallas, Steve Dallas. My main
man, totally unrelated to
anything Ewing. The narcissistic
attorney heads up a band of pun-
dits and ponderers of life in
Berke Breathed's Doonesberryes-
que cartoon strip "Bloom Coun-
ty Since its beginning in 1980,
the strip has climbed into the na-
tion's hearts and minds just as
Doonesbury did before it, and
after Trudeau's gang went on
vacation, Opus, Dallas's penguin
Mdekick, has led the gang into
6700 newspapers.
But, why am I telling vou this?
Well, because Little, Brown and
Company has produced a collec-
tion of our dear strip, the third
such endeavor for our home
libraries. All wrapped up and
packaged under the heading
Penguin Dreams and Stranger
Things, strips from the past year
are presented to be re-religiously
read by Bloom faithfuls or seen
for the first time by those who
knew no better. So, to put it
bluntly, it's worth the seven
bucks. Hell, it's worth $8.50.
It tingles your jocular bone and
stimulates your social satire sen-
sors. The funnier strips are even
more fun the second rime
around.
Breathed scores homers witn
all the gang � Opus, the pudgv
penguin; Binkley, a neurotic
philosopher; Milo, the average
Bloomite, whose penchant for
editing does the First Amend-
ment wonderous good; Oliver
Wendell Jones, a precocious
computer wiz with a crush on
Einstein and a knack for sublime
N
comedy; and, of course, poor
dead Bill the Cat, whose quest for
the presidency under the Meadow
Party banner was as smashingly
successful as Walter Vvnat's His
Name.
The placing of pen to paper to
be funny more often than not
gets you laughed at, not laughed
with. Satire succeeds even less so.
But with the gang zeroing in on
the world's peculiarities, Breath-
ed makes us 'augh not only with
him, but at ourselves. There's
Steve Dallas, my bar hopping
barrister hero, who, along with
the rest of us, found out in Time
the Sexual Revolution was dead.
But with characteristic self-
serving motives, he plays along
with his female prey at Bob's Bar
and Flesh Market, finally bellow-
ing to a girl who loned for a rela-
tionship instead of a one-nighter,
I care for you Hot Mama
Well put, Steve.
Then, there's Opus's dream in-
to Michael Jackson land. Breath-
ed makes us both care for and
laugh at the fairy-tale prince.
After a trade-off with Michael
for one day, our gallant Opus
waves goodbye, magically
beckoning these wistful words of
wisdom: "Farewell, dancing
prince. May your jockey briefs
forever sparkle! Give my best to
Brooke! And Wilbur! Give my
best to your accountant Wilbur'
And your brothers! Randy
Marlon. Jackie, Geranium and
Fr.to Ah, Opus. A classic.
And can you believe it, there's
Ever
sT
VI
d
a
actually tons of this stuff
Breathed takes us from stars 0
bars, from triads to TV ads (lt
slices, it dices) and on to whale
boats and music videos. He rolls
out our culture and shocks us
with it. It is no wonder so manv
01 my comrades wish to be Opu-
or Bill the Cat, for in all of us
there is a little of each Bloom
character.
And me. es, I am mostlv Steve
Dallas, with witt) one-liners and
ax-wielding clients. So, run out 10
your nearest book store, and buv
a copy. Then, when your mother
calls to inquire about your
future, you'll have an answer.
Summer Movie Schedule
All shows begin at 7p m
DATE TITLE TIME RATING
HO teAUY, -MfflUQir
15 5MWN& HCM AT MY PlfiCl
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YOWmYPAST-SONOf
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COm IN. CeNTRAL.
THIS IS R6PLeAP�K
wr$neoN6Heg�w
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S6NP OVEX "600P FAIRY
SIX' FOR
ESCORT.

WHO1
I MPEYXm 1
FeerMP 7
FOUMME,
PLEASE. � r
May .?Risky Business96 min.R
May 15Bonnie & ClydeIll min.R
May 161letch (Sneak Preview)PG
May 20VictorVictoria133 min.PG
May 22Barbarella98 min.PG
May 2710123 min.R
May 29T'ddie and the Cruisers92 min.PG
June 3Fating Raoul87 min.R
June 5Shampoo112 min.R
June 10The Jerk93 min.R
June 12 June 18 June 19Dr. Strangelove orth by orthwest Brimstone & Treacle93 min. 136 min. 85 min.PC, PG R
June 25The Pope of Greenwich Village122 min.R
June 26Alien124 min.R
July 2Stripes105 min.R
July 3 July 9Kelly's Heroes The Blues Brothers145 min. 133 min.PG R
July 10Dirty Harry101 min.R
July 15 July 17 July 22The Graduate The Cars That Ate Paris American Gigolo115 min. 90 min. 121 min.PG PG R
July 24Casablanca102 min.G
Clint
'
F01 ex a
was take.
irn bo I
I '
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to '
( I

Ma

MH
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gre
MH
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of a
like �
has -
thout
make
hate :
dience
this all �
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audience
film and 1
wanted :
picture. I c
could have
have ruined
would pav �
ty. I guesv �
and poll pe
proached PU R
ing the star. .
pseudo
thousands
the audience
you start thi
MH: Wet
dealing u
when it can
ty'sfam
isn 7 m
the pop
CE: .
Pale Ridi
thai
and 1 a
thro i
luck. High Plain
Halt- -
on S
L. -
re
the
t'
audience 5
of 1 eir 1
cai
the
like
MH:
drt c �
CE: M
prayer a
mountains The
To m
super .
plane, rn i
who a
Man-O-Stick
1 w-
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7
fAlt A
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foil AM�. � -
rf&p V' ri � - i
Y





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 15, 1985
est
R
PC
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PG
PG
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atic
ha
nan o IS.
V'UD-
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Steve
�ne-liners and
1 So, run out to
1 � 'ore, and buv
nen your mother
lire about vourt k
an answer.vere
es it
:eep
uth
tra
TING 1te her
:ion
R Iif
in 2
1 R I17.
has
PG
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ing
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Clint Calls For New Western
Continued From Page 6
For example, there are parallels between Euro-
pean and Oriental stories. Mv first Italian picture
was taken from a Samurai story, Kurosawa's Yo-
jimbo. Then, when I first saw that Japanese film
1 thought I was watching a western! So there's
realK nothing new on the planet.
MH: When you were a youngster were vou
fascinated by westerns? Do you feel that anv of
them have been influential on vour own approach
to the genre? For instance, Anthony Mann's
westerns with James Stewart?
CE: 1 don't know. I liked them a lot, but I wasn't
totally obsessed by them. I don't reallv recall one
particular director that stood out. In those days
filmgoers weren't very conscious. You went to the
vics because you wanted to see John Wayne or
Gary Cooper. You didn't know who directed the
picture. Maybe there were some film buffs, but 1
didn't know too many people who were really
educated as to the whole background of films.
Maybe Hawks and Ford were the ones who got the
most recognition as directors, the name above the
title sort of thing.
MH: Did you find it more difficult in 1984 to im-
plement a project like Pale Rider than you did 10
vears ago when vou undertook The Outlaw Josev
Hales?
CE: No, maybe because Josey Wales did really
well. It wasn't like the last picture I'd done had
been soft at the box office. I have to give the
studio credit, they liked the idea, or maybe it just
grew on them!
MH: But then why didn't you make it when you
were approached originally? Were you committed
to other projects or did you feel that the moment
was not quite right?
CE: I'd like to say I picked the moment, but I'm
not that smart! I did it on instinct. At that time I
had other projects and I put Pale Rider aside. All
of a sudden, a year or so ago, it just hit me that I'd
like to see a western. Everything I've always done
has been that way, something I'd like to see. I
thought. 'Gee I'd like to see a western, time to
make that script I've got in the drawer here I
hate to play to a preconceived idea of the au-
dience. I like to jus' make the project. I've done
this all the way along. If you go with a preconceiv-
ed idea you get into a bind of second-guessing the
audience, which is dangerous. It would affect the
film and the way you make it. I'm sure if I had
wanted to make Bronco Billy a more commercial
picture, I could have found all sorts of ways. I
could have tossed in action scenes, but that would
have ruined the film. Somewhere down the line I
would pay for it since it wouldn't be as good quali-
ty. I guess the studios feed stuff into computers
and poll people, but that's nonsense. If I ap-
proached Pale Rider that way, I would be sacrific-
ing the story the a eel and the soul of it, for
pseudo-commercial reasons. Bigger shoot-outs,
thousands of extras There is a soul and heart in
the audience and they are going to feel cheated if
you start throwing things out to them like that.
MH: Weren't you also going against the trend in
dealing with the subtleties of mature relationships
when it came to the preacher and Michael Moria, -
ty's family? The rich emotional texture of the film
isn 't necessarily geared to the younger segment of
the population.
CE: Yet, they were my second reason for doing
Pale Rider. There is a whole youthful audience
that hasn't seen me in a western for nine years,
and whose only exposure to the genre has been
through television re-runs. I've had very good
luck; High Plains Drifter and The Outlaw Josey
Wales keep getting good ratings every time they're
on. So somebody out there wants to see westerns.
Look at the so-called space movies. Aren't they
really just spin-offs of the westerns? In Star Wars,
they talk about the Force, but westerns all use
those same elements. Now the question is, if that
audience is a more mature one, will they step out
of their homes and come visit us, or wait with their
can of beer in hand for it to go on TV? I think if
the picture is good on its own merit the audiences
will come. If it's no good maybe they won't. I'd
like to think that, whether it's true or not.
MH: Going back to the supernatural elements you
stressed in the narrative, was it your intention to
suggest that the whole story might have been
dreamed by the young girl?
CE: Maybe it's a dream, maybe it isn't. She says a
prayer and the preacher is sent down from the
mountains. There's a lot of ways to interpret it.
To me, it's just the spirit. Whether the hero is a
supernatural being or an emissary from a higher
plane, he brings spirit to these discouraged people,
who are ready to leave the camp. But it turns out
Man-O-Stick
that the preachei has another reason for being
there as well. He had a whole other life with the
antagonist that has to be settled. It's the basic jux-
taposition of the forces of good and evil, as the
conflict between the big corporation and the
miners develops.
MH: A common thread in the three westerns you
directed is a feeling for people who have banded
together in some sort of informal community. Be-
ing disassociated from society and unorthodox in
his methods, your character always shows a
natural sympathy for the underdogs, outcasts, or
marginal elements.
CE: I feel that it adds to the drama if the hero is
not just a loner, but you have these conflicts and
relationships. I also think the bureaucratic work-
ings of nations and corporations have encouraged
people to form counter-societies. It seems like the
growing complications of our life have made us
wonder if there isn't some way to cut out all of
that. Unlike High Plains Drifter, where the hero
lets everyone fend for themselves, the people in
Pale Rider are brought together by the preacher;
they are willing to defend themselves and fight for
their rights.
MH: Being fairly similar in structure, with the
hero as a catalyst in a micro-societv, High Plains
Drifter and Pale Rider offer an interesting con-
trast.
CE: They both have elements of the classic
western in them, mythological characters who
drift in and have an effect on the people. In High
Plains Drifter, he is the bereaved brother who
comes back and persecutes the people for their
apathy or corruption. In Pale Rider the stranger
comes to the aid of hardworking people, who are
trying to seek out a living and are being harassed
by the major corporate concern. It's a classic pat-
tern that's been played out hundreds of times,
whether it's cattlemen against sheep men or land
barons against settlers.
MH: In High Plains Drifter as well as in Sergio
Leone's westerns, moral values were totally con-
fused. In Pale Rider, the line is drawn clearly, as it
used to be in classic westerns, between right and
wrong, between the little guys and big business,
between the individuals and the establishment.
CE: It was a different era. In that period of the
60's cynicism was more prevalent. The westerns I
made in Italy were strictly entertainment. But I
hope people now are reaching out beyond
cynicism and are interested in ecological and other
modern day concerns.
MH: Could Pale Rider be seen as a reconciliation
between the baroque elements that marked Sergio
Leone's westerns and the classical tradition from
which the Italian westerns had departed.
CE: The westerns I made with Sergio Leone were
great fun to do at that particular time. After 1 did
three of them I felt it was time to move on and do
something different. I don't think it would be
good for me or anybody to go back and do those
kind of satiric forms unless it was something new
and special. I like the more traditional western,
but when we did the Leone films in the 60's, that
genre was in a dormant state. So his highly stylized
westerns came as a breath of fresh air. When I
came back to the States, I was offered a part in
MacKenna's Gold, a huge production. But I turn-
ed it down and went for Hang'em High, which
was a much smaller film but which analyzed the
pros and cons of capital punishment, an issue that
concerned people on a deeper level.
MH: Like the best classic westerns, Pale Rider is
affirmative and inspirational. You feel the power
of human solidarity and you care for a community
that is vibrant and alive.
CE: To me, in a film, whether it's a western or
not, you have to be wanting something to happen.
Watching a film like The Good, the Bad, and the
Ugh you just sit there like a voyeur and take in a
lot of different ways of shooting people. It had
great entertainment value, but in Pale Rider, you
really want somebody to wipe out the villains, you
build up steam. It gets you in the classic vein.
MH: So does the dignity of the characters. There
emotions are understated but are as poignant as
they were in the cinema of John Ford or Anthony
Mann.
CE: Michael Moriarty's character evolves through
his contact with the preacher, eventually becoming
the leader of the community. They all learn
something, including the mother and the
daughter. I added these elements that were not in
the script, because I felt that people in the com-
munity had to grow.
BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
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� i' t -� .� m





liiEEASTCAROI INIAN
Sports
MAY 15, 1985
Pirates Win in 13 Inninps
Page 8
By TONY BROWN
Aulilanl Sports hditor
It went down to extra innings
of the last conference game of the
regular season for the Pirate
baseballers, but they finally took
the ECAC-South regular season
title April 24 at Harrington Field.
ECU didn't back in, either.
They defeated season-long league
leader UNC-Wilmington 8-4 in a
game which saw Pirate
right fielder Jay McGraw smash a
grandslam homerun in the bot-
tom of the 13th inning to secure
the victory and conference cham-
pionship.
It took three ECU pitchers to
hold the Seahawks to four runs,
while UNC-W hurler Kenny King
had the misfortune to go 12 inn-
ings only to be relieved in the last
frame by Scott Altman, who took
the loss with the homer by
McGraw.
The Pirates scored once in the
first on a walk, two outs and a
wild pitch, but the Seahawks
took the lead with three runs in
the third, the main blow being
McGraw
Gary Hall's 19th homerun of the
year.
ECU loaded the bases in the
bottom of the frame on two
singles and a walk. One run
scored on an out, then Winfred
Johnson doubled in two runs to
give the Pirates a 4-3 advantage.
An error led to a UNC-W run
in the fourth, which tied the score
at four apiece until McGraw's
game-winning homer in the 13th
inning.
Daniel Boone started the game
for ECU, then gave way to Jim
Peterson in the fourth after three
runs had scored for the
Seahawks. Peterson was tagged
with one run in the five frames he
threw. Mike Christopher pitched
the final five innings and picked
up his ECU record-tying 10th
consecutive win, striking out six,
walking none and only giving up
two hits.
The Pirates finished the
ECAC-South regular season with
a 12-4 record. UNC-W fell to
10-5 in the conference with the
loss.
Campbell University had the
Pirates number at the end of the
regular season, beating ECU in
the last two games 5-4 and 3-2.
One of the biggest casualties
was Pirate hurler Mike
Christopher's attempt to take
sole possession of the consecutive
pitching victory record for ECU.
Christopher ironically suffered
his only two losses of the season
in this pair of games.
In the May 2 game at Buies
Creek, Campbell used the long
ball to good advantage. Roy Hill
hit a solo shot and Rodney
Stovall a two-run homer in the se-
cond to pace the Camels to a 4-0
lead.
ECU picked up a run in the
fourth and two in the fifth, but
another Campbell run in the top
of the fifth proved to be enough
for the win. Winfred Johnson
singled in a run for the Pirates in
the eighth, setting a new single-
season hitting mark of 65 for the
Pirates, but that closed out the
scoring for the game.
The Camels again bested ECU
May 11, this time at Harnn
Field by a 3-2 margin. Pirate
starter Mike Christopher gavs:
only one run in six innings, then
was tagged for four hits and two
runs in the seventh before be .
relieved by Jim Peterson.
ECU opened the scoring in the
fifth when Greg Hardison walked
and came home on an error. The
Camels then evened the score m
the top of the sixth with a walk.
hit and an error.
Campbell took a 3-1 lead in the
seventh on a walk and four
singles, which proved to bt
enough for the win. The
Pirate run came on a long drive
to left by Mark Cockrell.
Campbell went to 30-15 with
the wins, while ECU finished the
regular season at 31-12. The
Pirates now enter the ECAC
tournament at Harrington F
tomorrow as the first needed
team. ECU plays George Ma
at 7 p.m while the first garni
2 features New York Tech ven
Iona.
I
ECU assistant coach Bills Best (.3) waves Mark Cockrell (23) around
third in a Pirate gaim earlier in the season at Harrington Field.
Pirates Host EC A C Baseball Tourney;
Winner Receives Automatic NCAA Bid
ECAC Tournament Pairings
1 hursday 2:00 New York lech vs Iona
7:00 ECU vs George Mason
Friday 2:00 Loser's Bracket
7:00 Winner's Bracket
Saturda 2:00 loser's Bracket
7:00 Championship Game
Sunda 2:00 Championship Game (if necessary)
A book of tickets for the entire three day tournament
veils for $10.00. Tickets for a single da of action are
$4:00. Tickets may be purchased at the ticket office in
Minges Coliseum or at the gate at Harrington Field.
B TONY BROWN
Dublin Sport t diior
ECU's Harrington Field will be
humming with excitement for the
next few days as Coach Gary
Overton and the baseball Pirates
host the ECAC tournament
beginning tomorrow.
Tickets will cost $10.00 for the
entire event or $4.00 for each two
game session and Sunday's possi-
ble single game. Since it's an
ECAC sponsored event, these
prices apply to ECU students and
staff also.
New York Tech and Iona open
the tournament play at 2 p.m.
Thursday in the double-
eliminaUpn affair ECU and
fellow ETACSotf member
George Mason meet in the second
game of the day at 7 p.m. The
Lady Softballers End Season
Pirates defeated the Patriots in
two of three regular season con-
tests.
Friday's 2 p.m game will oust
one of the first day losers, while
the 7 p.m. game in the winner's
bracket will either determine the
champion or necessitate a final
game Sunday at 2.
The champion will receive an
automatic bid to the NCAA
regional playoffs. The Pirates are
the defending champions and are
the first team other than James
Madison to host this ECAC
event, which is in its seventh year.
ECU, GMU and NYT sport
the best overall records, each
twinning, at leat 31 games, while
ECAC-Metro champ Iona set a
new school record of 23 wins for
the season. It had been expected
that UNC-Wilmington would
make the tournament, but a poor
second half of the season drop-
ped them out of consideration.
Pirate coach Overton believes
the season records don't mean
that much at this point though,
because when tournament time
comes, all the teams which make
it that far are good. "Each of the
four teams have an equal shot at
winning the tournament he
said. "You have to go out and do
what it takes to win every time
you play
The pair of season-ending
losses to Campbell University
which closed out the Pirates'
regular season will have no bear-
ing on ECU's chances in the tour-
nament either, according to
Overton.
"The team's in good spirit
he stated. "Those losses won
affect us. Everybody's readv to
play their role. I don't think we
have any particular advantage
being the hosts, either. We're g
ing to play as we have all sea-
using the team concept that g
us here.
"Each team member has to do
his own job and they all know
what they're responsible for
Overton added. The team is look-
ing to improve on last year's
post-season play, but since the
Puaies narrowW mistd winmng
the NCAA regional in Florida
last year, it won't be an easy goal
to attain.
By RICK McCORMAC
Sport t-dilor
The Lady Pirate softball team
came within one game of tying
last years 25-win season in only
their second year of NCAA Divi
sion I fast-pitch competition.
The Lady Pirates had won five
consecutive games until they
dropped three in a row to the
University of Virginia to end the
season at 24-17-1.
Although ECU didn't win as
many games as they did in their
initial season of fast pitch play
ECU coach Sue Manahan felt the
team did show improvement.
"We had a more difficult
schedule than last year, and
finished with almost the same
record Manahan said. "So I
would say that we improved
Among the highlights of the
season was a 7-3 win over then
No. 1 ranked in the region South
Carolina. Also the Lady Pirates
got a no-hitter from senior Pam
Young against Methodist. Young
fanned 10 Methodist batters as
the Lady Pirates downed the
Lady Monarchs 3-0.
Young's no-hitter put the
finishing touches on a double-
header sweep over Methodist on
April 18. ECU then swept a twin-
bill over Liberty Baptist the next
day by the scores of 2-1 and 3-2.
The Lady Pirates got their final
victory of the season by downing
Virgina 7 2 in the opener of a
double-header. The Lady
Cavaliers battled back to take the
nightcap by a score of 12-9.
The Lady Pirates closed out
their season on April 24 against
Virginia. ECU lost both ends of
the twinbill, dropping the first
game 5-3 and the last game 3-2.
Junior Lisa Zmuda overtook
teammate Wendy Ozment in the
final game to pace the Lady Bucs
in hitting. Zmuda finished the
season with a .321 batting
average, while Ozment ended the
year at .319.
Robin Graves and Carla
Alphin, who anchored the right
side of the infield were named
defensive MVPs by Manahan.
Man. han is excited about next
year as the Lady Pirates will
return a number of players and
will have another year of fast
pitch experience behind them.
ECU will, however, suffer
losses up the middle as catcher
Sandy Martin, pitcher Pam
Young and centerfielder Tamara
Franks will all have used up their
eligibility.
"We had some outstanding
performances this season
Manahan said. "I just wish we
had been more consistently
outstanding. Still I am looking
forward to next year with a great
deal of enthusiasm and op-
timism
Lady Pirate Catcher Suzanne Martin makes a play on an opposing baserunner at home plate.
Barrise, Pendergraft Resign Coaching Jobs
Fullback Reggie Branch (32) signed a free agent contract with the Washington Redskins recently
By RICK McCORMAC
Sports Editor
Since the last edition of The
East Carolinian on April 24,
various events have taken place
concerning Pirate athletics.
Among the newsworthy items:
Art Baker completed his first
Pirate coaching staff with the ad-
dition of two assistants; ECU
basketball coach Charlie Har-
rison is now looking for assistant
coaches after two members of his
staff accepted other positions; in
addition Harrison had one player
transfer but is bringing in five
new faces for next season; the
NFL also conducted its annual
signing of football talent with
two Pirates being drafted and
two others signing free agent con-
tracts.
Below is a more detailed ac-
count of these events:
BASKETBALL ASSISTANTS
LEAVE: Basketball assistant
coaches Tom Barrise and David
Pendergraft have both resigned
to accept positions at other
universities.
Barrise, a native of Patterson,
NJ, accepted a similar position at
Fairfield University. Barrise
coached at ECU for six seasons,
and prior to that was an assistant
at Jacksonville University for
three seasons.
Pendergraft, a native of Cary,
resigned to accept a job at UNC-
Charlotte under new head coach
Jeff Mullins. Pendergraft began
coaching at ECU in 1979 as a
graduate assistant. From 1982
until his resignation, he was the
chief recruiting coach on the
Pirate staff.
ECU head coach Charlie Har-
rison was disappointed to see the
two assistants leave, but said they
would not be forgotten. "Their
loyalty to the program and the
work the did for the program was
tremendous Harrison said.
"The results of their hard work
may not have shown up right
away, but it definitely will in the
future
Both coaches reportedly receiv-
ed substantial pay raises in their
new positions.
W'ith the resignations of the
two, Harrison's staff is currentlv
comprised of part-time assistant
Al Walker and student assistant
Tony Robinson.
BASKETBALL RECRUITS:
ECU basketball coach Charlie
Harrison has announced the sign-
mgs of four incoming freshmen,
who along with Marcel Henrv
will give the Pirates five new
faces for next season.
Henry, a 6-6 player who
becomes eligible this season after
transferring to ECU from St. An-
drews last year, is capable of
ST" �� guard position
and either of the forward posi-
tions. He was an all-conference
selection both years at St. An-
ZC1S S Was Div��on III Player
of the Year as well.
��Marcel has good basketball
"wtmcts and is capable of playing
cither inside or outside Har-
rison said. "He is extremlv ver-
� BAKEK, P. Nla
Fac
In a statement o
concerns, the fa
Carolina Unnersitv
mended that freshmen!
ble to participate
such as football and
, "wh.ch create substanJ
to successful aca
ment
The proposal is conj
list of suggestion
Faculty Senate com j
dorsed by the Senate,
the 11 Division
the NCAA Preside:
sion to develop
for consideratio:
1-A convention.
It proposed tr
tion with new aui
as soon as pos?-
in conjunction v.
scheduled special convl
the NCAA in New
Baker
Adam
Continued from Pai
satile and ever.
guard some la j
team
The rema
were all high scfc
past season and .
winning progra-
ed record for their
�5 94-1 with all four j
on conference cl
teams.
Al Clark, a 6
Flint Hill High Scho
and Manual Jone a
ingarn Hieh S
Washington, D.C. are
performers who .
; next season. Both play
ly 17 years old and �
until next December
I could conceivably g
more.
ECU also sig
John Williams is a 6-
from Atlantic City H:g
in Atlantic City, NJ. " AS
a very fine shooter and!
Harrison said. "He
against al"� of the zoi
been seeing because not
i some opportunity
! well
Jeff Kelly, a 5-9 ; i
rounds out the P
- Kelly is also from New
�T, is a hard-nosed player
; to Harrison. "Jeff is
- . kids you don't find ver
: is a basketball junkie
said. "He plays eem
-� and hopefully his w rec k.
don will be contagk
Harrison feels that thel
faces will give next year's
different look. "1 fee!
very good recruiting clasl
rison said. "We wa f
front court player,
not to take anyone who
good person and plave:
BAKER FILLS ST 1
football coach Art B
nounced the final two
on his coaching stai
Johnson. ?4, will
recruiting coordinat-
coaching the linebackc
Hemn, 37, will coach th
linebackers.
Johnson comes to Ed
serving as defensive cool
at Appalachian State la
The Apps moved from h
in the Southern Confeij
third place in only one vej
Cheerlei
The 1985-86 ECl dx
' squad has been announq
i below are the member
'squad.
Senior J.K. Elkins is
fourth year on the scjuadl
Mhe most experienced retuf
Junior's Chuck Ingl
"Leigh Brown are both eJ
�into their third year on the)
Sara Kelly, Eric Sk
�Judy Martin, Susanne Bar
Morris and Susan Hartlev
�n their second year
Cheerleaders.
There will be six meml.
�he squad in their first seas
cheerleader. Mark Moore
tlerningway, Jennifer B
Snd Myra Almond are
JPear performers.
j Mary Thaxton and
?alrymplc will botl
leerleader mascots in th
�ial campaign as
Iteerleaders.
Ijhe ECU cheerleading.
�niposed of 15 members
i�m;imh0m
- m�
MVMK
immummm





1
T
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 15, 1985

� -
r�� j
' JW
'�.V" , . ,
ler at home plate.
Jobs
'ions.
th the resignations of the
larrison's staff is currently
'ised of part-time assistant
lalker and student assistant
Robinson.
pKETBALL RECRUITS:
basketball coach Charlie
on has announced the sign-
f four incoming freshmen,
long with Marcel Henry,
tlve fhe Pirates five new
Jor next season.
v- a 6-6 player who
fes eligible this season after
-mng to ECU from St. An-
�ast year, is capable of
the off guard position
Ither of the forward posi-
"He was an all-conference
n both years at St. An-
ind was Division III Player
Year as well,
ircel has good basketball
ts and is capable of playing
Iinside or outside Har-
old. "He is extremly vcr-
BAKER, Page Nine
Bucs
Camels again bested ECU
1, (his time at Harrington
b a ; - margin. Pirate
c Mikehristophcr gae up
e run in six innings, then
ts and two
seventh before being
Peterson
the scoring in the
b Hardison walked
� i on an error. The
: the score in
nth with a walk,
k a 3-1 lead in the
walk and four
roved to be
The last
a iong drive
I ell.
- - 50-15 with
e ECl finished the
a )1-12 The
the ECAC
gton Field
the first-seeded
c rge Mason
� firs! came at
?s N rk fech versus
ourney;
A A Bid
d spirits
sses won't
ready to
on't think we
advantage by
ler. We're go-
ive all season,
icept that got
ember has to do
they all know
risible for
led. The team is look-
nprove on last year's
:a�on play, but since the
I narrouiv mi.vtfd winning
K AA regional in Florida
pr, it won't be an easy goal
u n
Faculty Releases Concerns
In a statement of academic
concerns, the faculty of East
Carolina University has recom-
mended that freshmen be ineligi-
ble to participate in varsity sports
such as football and basketball
"which create substantial threats
to successful academic adjust-
ment
The proposal is contained in a
list of suggestions drafted by a
Faculty Senate committee and en-
dorsed by the Senate, calling on
the 11 Division 1-A members of
the NCAA Presidents' Commis-
sion to develop recommendations
for consideration by the Division
1-A convention.
It proposed that such a conven-
tion with new autonomy "be held
as soon as possible preferably
in conjunction with the already
scheduled special convention of
the NCAA in New Orleans June
21-22.
In addition to freshman in-
eligibility for football and basket-
ball, the ECU faculty suggested:
�That there be no weakening
of the requirements governing in-
itial eligibility of student athletes
in Division 1A. "While we sup-
port the efforts of the NCAA
working with other associations
to recast their grade point
average and test score re-
quirements into a predictor of
academic success, we believe
minimum standards as to test
scores and grade point average
should be required the state-
ment said.
�That no playing seasons be
lengthened further, and that con-
sideration be given to shortening
the length of playing seasons and
reducing the number of ccatests
to provide student athletes with a
more appropriate balance bet-
ween academic and athletic ac-
tivities.
�That the recruiting practices
permitted by the NCAA be revis-
ed with the purpose of relieving
the pressure on prospective stu-
dent athletes.
�That the constitution, bylaws
and rules of the NCAA be
simplified to promote clarity and
good sense and to provide for en-
forcement procedures with the
spirit of the rules.
That consideration be given to
establishing some form of
periodic audit by which athletic
programs are reviewed to achieve
greater compliance with the ex-
isting rules and to ensure that
presidents, faculties and govern-
ing boards are better informed of
the problems within their own
athletic programs and aware of
the possibilities for improvement
based on the accepted principles
of good practice.
Dr. Tom Johnson, professor
of Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety and chair
of the faculty's educational
policies and planning committee,
said the statement contained no
timetable "but apparently
something will be done in June in
New Orleans
He said the statement "is
essentially a substitute" for a
resolution proposed by the
psychology department last
month which would have barred
students with SAT scores of less
than 700 from participating in in-
tercollegiate sports during their
freshman year.
Baker Completes First Coaching Staff;
Adams, Nichols Selected In NFL Draft
Continued from Pf e Eight
satile and even played point
guard some last year on the scout
team
The remaining four newcomers
were all high school seniors this
past season and all come from
winning programs. The combin-
ed record for their teams was
94-17, with all four players being
on conference championship
teams.
Al Clark, a 6-6 forward from
Flint Hill High School in Virginia
and Manual Jones also 6-6 of Sp-
ingarn High School in
Washington, D.C. are two inside
performers who could contribute
next season. Both players are on-
ly 17 years old and will not be 18
until next December, so they
could conceivably grow some
more.
ECU also signed two guards.
John Williams is a 6-3 off guard
from Atlantic City High School
in Atlantic City, NJ. "Williams is
a very fine shooter and player
Harrison said. "He will help
against all of the zones we've
been seeing because not only is he
sh�Qt�f but he akito. wiU.create
some opportunites for us as
well
Jeff Kelly, a 5-9 point guard
rounds out the Pirate signees.
Kelly is also from New Jersey and
is a hard-nosed player according
to Harrison. "Jeff is one of those
kids you don't find very often, he
is a basketball junkie Harrison
said. "He plays extremely hard
and hopefully his wreckless aban-
don will be contagious
Harrison feels that the five new
faces will give next year's squad a
different look. "I feel this is a
very good recruiting class Har-
rison said. "We wanted another
front court player, but decided
not to take anyone who wasn't a
good person and player
BAKER FILLS STAFF: ECU
football coach Art Baker an-
nounced the final two positions
on his coaching staff. Ellis
Johnson, 34, will be the
recruiting coordinator while also
coaching the linebackers. Les
Herrin, 37, will coach the outside
linebackers.
Johnson comes to ECU after
serving as defensive coordinator
at Appalachian State last season.
The Apps moved from last place
in he Southern Conference to
third place in only one year's time
during his stay there.
"Ellis Johnson is an outstan-
ding defensive football coach and
recruiter Baker said. "We have
worked together in the past and I
know what he can do. We needed
sDmeone with coordinating ex-
perience, and in Ellis we have
somebody with both coor-
dinating and head coaching ex-
perience on the collegiate level
Iln 1983, Johnson was head
coach at Gardner-Webb College,
where his team won the District
26 NAIA championship.
Johnson served with Baker at
The Citadel in 1982 and was in
the high school ranks from
1976-81 in South Carolina.
Herrin, who comes to ECU
from Clemson, coached
linebackers during his four-year
stay with Clemson and brings
with him a reputation as one of
the best recruiters in this region.
"This was the most extensive
search of any of the positions I've
filled Baker said. "I feel he was
one of the finest assistant coaches
in the ACC and is no doubt one
of the best recruiters in this part
of the country. I recruited against
him and he rarely loses a kid.
"He will add leadership and
class to our program Baker
continued. "I could not ask for
someone better than Les
Herrin
Herrin and Johnson's hirings
brings to six the number of
assistants Baker has hired since
being named head coach on Dec.
10, 1984. The others are: Mike
O'Cain, Assistant Head Coach
Quarterbacks, Don Powers,
Defensive Coordinator, Wally
Chambers, Defensive Line, Jeff
Farrington, Defensive Secon-
dary.
NFL SELECTS PIRATES:
Stefon Adams and Ricky Nichols
were both selected in the NFL
draft May 1 while Reggie Branch
and Damon Pope both signed
free agent contracts.
Adams was selected in the third
round by the Los Angeles
Raiders, while Nichols was
chosen in the eighth round by the
Indianapolis Colts. Pope signed a
free agent contract with the
Dallas Cowboys and Branch sign-
ed a free agent contract with the
Washington Redskins.
Adams, a native of High
Point, was a wide receiver until
the middle of last season when he
was switched to defensive back.
Adams finished his Pirate career
tied for tenth on the reception list
with 47 catches for 676 yards.
Nichols ended his career with
the fourth highest number of
career receptions and is now the
third leading receiver in terms of
yardage. He finished his career
with 63 receptions and 1,203
yards.
SMITH TRANSFERS.Roy
Smith, a 6-8 forward-center, has
transferred to High Point Col-
lege. Smith played sparingly in
both his freshman and
sophomore seasons and will be a
junior eligibility-wise at High
Point. All of the remaining Pirate
basketball players are eligible and
are expected to return next year.
CM
& Pi Kappa Phi
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wed. May 15, 1985
Adm. Guys $1.50
Ladies $1.00
9:00 -2:00 AM
18 yrs. $1.00
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
Presents
COLLEGE NITE
Thur. May 16, 1985
Adm. $1.00
9:00-2:00 A.M.
18 yrs. $2.00
ALL CANS 60C TIL 12:00
85 TIL CLOSE
Cheerleaders Selected
The 1985-86 ECU cheerleader
squad has been announced, and
below are the members of the
squad.
Senior J.K. Elkins is in his
fourth year on the squad and is
the most experienced returnee.
Junior's Chuck Ingle and
Leigh Brown are both entering
into their third year on the squad.
Sara Kelly, Eric Skinnner,
Judy Martin, Susanne Barr, John
Morris and Susan Hartley are all
in their second year as ECU
cheerleaders.
There will be six members on
the squad in their first season as a
cheerleader. Mark Moore, Ricky
Hemingway, Jennifer Brooker
and Myra Almond are all first
year performers.
Mary Thaxton and John
Dalrymple will both be
cheerleader mascots in their in-
itial campaign as ECU
cheerleaders.
The ECU cheerleading squad is
composed of 15 members and can
be seen next year as they perform
at all Pirate home football
games.
MJWMWMWAWMWW
&ke Sfarf Jfoutato
k Sandwiches A Salads
"MADE FRESH BEFORE
Y0UREYES"
We're Open
Every Nig.
ate
11 AM-2 AM
208 E. I
758-7979
Street
Delivery Available
thru
"THE JOKE'S ON Vi
757-1973
!
�SSSSSWSWSMSSSSSSS'sS'SSSSSSs.A � ���,���
The Aerobic
Classifieds
SALE
YARD SALE: Curtains, Shoes, Bed
Frames, Cloths, Sm Tables,
Matresses, nick nacks�YAR D
SALE, May 19, 402 Rotary 12�?
FOR SALE: 2 Role Away day beds,
2 pillows and table. All are in good
condition. Call 758 3228
WANTED
ROOMATE WANTED: To share ex
penses in nice 3 bedroom apt at
Eastbrook. Rent $110 and one third
utilities. Call 758 0364. Please keep
trying.
vxxx-xxxwx.xx
TENANT NEEDED: 6 bedroom
house near university, 305 E 14th St.
Summer or long term rental. To be
renovated, $350, 758 5299
ROOMATE NEEDED: Walk to
class, pool, cable TV. $115 per
month, plus utilities One bedroom
I'm moving August first Call Gary
at 752 0435 or 757 6501
ROOMATE WANTED: To share 2
bdrm townhouse mile from ECU
with one person $145 per month plus
utilities. On 5th St Call 830 1306
ROOMATES NEEDED: 1 or 2
female roomates needed to share
2 bdrm apt. at Stratford Arms Apts
Call Karen at 756 3766 or 758 2730
:�:��:�:�:�:�:��: -x-x-x-x-x-i-x
CUBBIES
ANNOUNCES
Daily Dinner Specials
Old Fashioned Hamburgers, Cheeseburgers Hot
Dogs, Philadelphia Style Cheese Steak, Shrimp
Burgers, Shrimp Salad Sandwich
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00
Serving Until 2:30 a.m.
Daily Happy Hours
Late Night Happy Hours 12 a.m2 a.m.
Longnecks, 32 oz. Cups Draft, Wine Coolers
AW with Air Conditioning!
Corner of 5 th & Evans St.
Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m.
7 Days a H eek
Phone: 752-6497
0J � ��.� ������� -�����.
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) w�fl"GU C7
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V
PIRATE SPECIAL $1.99
LUNCHEON SPECIAL $2.45
SUNDAY BUFFET $3.95
NEW MENU EVERY WEEK
DINNER SPECIALS
Seafood
with Chinese
Vegetables
$6.95
Sealeg and Beef
with Chinese
Vegetables $5.95
(Specials come with: hot and sour soup, chicken corn soup, or
house special soup, steamed or fried rice, hot tea and fried
banana.)
MonThurs. 11:30-9:30
100 E. 10th St. FRI. 11:30-10:30
SAT. 5:00-10:30
SUN. 12:00-9:30
757-1818
TAKE OUT
ORDERS
50 OFF
Process & Print
wtt h tin
From 110. laa. 35mm or ti.se co.or print film
13 �P per pr:r.t i r�g 27 a 1 I 4t- fc cbutfi $2 96
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417 Evans St. - 757-1
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Special Summer School Rates
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May 13th thru July 25th $45.00
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Su days 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
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-��m iifffniiM �-�-�





!
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 15, 1985
Knicks Win In Ewing Lottery
NEW YORK (UPI) The
New York Knicks, missing a
dominant pivot man since Willis
Reed retired 11 years ago, Sun-
day won the NBA draft lottery
and the rights to Georgetown
center Patrick Ewing.
In gaining the No. 1 selection
for the June 18 draft, the Knicks
captured the so-called "Patrick
Ewing Sweepstakes which was
telecast live at halftime of game
one of the Boston-Philadelphia
playoff series.
Ewing, a 7-footer who took the
Hoyas to the NCAA title game in
three of his four seasons, will be
most welcome by the Knicks.
They lost their top two centers to
injuries last season and finished
with a 24-58 record, third worst
in the league. New York was last
in the NBA in rebounding.
"We've had our share of bad
breaks but hopefully this is the
start of a new regime said
Knicks executive vice president
Dae DeBusschere who
represented the club at the
ceremony. "Ewing's a player
that's got to help us. I hope all
the bad breaks are behind us
The lottery replaced the two-
team coin flip for the No. 1 selec-
tion that had been in effect since
1966. New York and the six
other clubs that failed to make
the playoffs participated.
Awarded the number two pick
was Indiana, followed by the Los
Angeles Clippers, Seattle, Atlan-
ta, Saearamento and Golden
State.
NBA commissioner David
Stern concluded the six-minute
drawing at the Waldorf-Astoria
by opening the last of seven
envelopes and revealing a card
displaying the Knicks' logo.
DeBusschere held his head in
his hands as the number two
envelope was opened. When
Stern announced the Pacers,
DeBusschere raised his fist and
wiped his brow as the crowd of
about 150 screamed approval.
"I'd rather be taking the last
shot in a game then waiting for a
card to be opened said
DeBusschere, who starred for the
Knicks' championship teams in
1970 and 1973.
"When you sit there and have
no control over anything, it's
murder. There's no strategy, no
mental preparation, nothing.
You just sit there and hope
you're lucky. I sure hope I'm
never in one again. It was no fun
sitting up there
Minutes after the announce-
ment, DeBusschere unveiled a
Knicks No. 33 jersey � Ewing's
number in college � with the
7-footer's name on the back.
Ewing, often shielded from the
media in college, said he is not in-
timidated by the pressures of
playing New York,
"I think I'm capable of handl-
ing any challenge he said from
Washington, D.C. "Coach
(John) Thompson has prepared
me well for anything.
"I wasn't particularly hoping
for one particular team. I just
wanted to get it over with
Cards bearing the logos of the
seven clubs were placed in sealed
envelopes. Stern plucked the
envelopes from a plexiglass con-
tainer and placed them in slots
numbered one through seven.
The commissioner then opened
the envelopes, beginning with
number seven.
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CHECK-Ol T CENTER
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was $1()00
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 15, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 15, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.407
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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