The East Carolinian, April 16, 1985






�he lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.54
Tuesday, April 16, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Appropriates $94,000
In Annual Budget Meeting
A.
MARY WELLS � Buccant�r
Members of the Kappa Sigma fraternity placed first in Thursday's All-Sing, sponsored by the Alpha Xi
Delta sorority. The fraternity members sang "We Are The World
Tucker Named As 1985-86 Transit Manager
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News frdilor
Marshall Tucker will begin his
second term as ECU SGA Transit
Manager following his reappoint-
ment last week.
Tucker said the first thing he
intends to do in his second term is
to purchase another bus. The
bus. he said, will be mid-sized
(carrying 25-30 passengers) and
air-conditioned. It is expected to
be in use this summer. The cost
of the bus will be approximately
$30,000, he said. "This should be
the last bus we'll have to buy for
quite some time
Tucker said he also intends to
switch the maintenance of the
buses to the City of Greenville.
"We're looking to cut costs he
said, "and this should cut
maintenance costs in half
The fact that there is no bus
service to the ECU School of
Medicine is currently being ad-
dressed by Tucker, who is look-
ing into a plan which would in-
volve utilizing existing Greenville
city bus service. He said he would
like to devise a system where
students would show the bus
drivers on that route their IDs,
and then the city would bill the
school for the riders. Tucker
stressed that this proposal is "on-
ly in the planning stages
No expansions or cutbacks are
planned in the immediate future,
Tucker said. "We're meeting the
demand now, but that is subject
to change He said the buses
carry 25,000 passengers each
week, up slightly from last year.
By HAROLD JOYNER
Ajahtaal News Editor
After more than a month in
Appropriations committee, the
SGA finally approved the
1985-86 annual appropriations,
which tallied up to be more than
$94,000.
The SGA Transit received
$4,000, half of what was original-
ly requested. Teresa Briley, vice-
committee chairman, told
legislators that money was ap-
propriated for the fall semester
only, because spring expenses re-
mained uncertain.
Totaling more than $39,000,
the Executive Council expenses
are primarily made up of staff ex-
penses, including the SGA office
secretary's salary. Other funds
from that area will be used to fur-
nish supplies to SGA officers,
Briley said.
The area of arts requested to
the appropriations committee
more than $74,000, but only
received $29,477 from the
legislators. Briley explained that
last year's appropriations to the
arts were set at a percentage basis
of 30 percent, making the
1985-86 approximate appropria-
tion $28,376. The arts committee
includes the ECU Marching
Pirates, Student Forum For
Music Organizations, Visual Arts
Forum and ECU Playhouse.
The visual arts forum received
$10,175, the most money out of
the four groups. Appropriations
committee chairman Lisa
Roberts told the legislators that
figures were based on recomen-
dations from reports from the ex-
isting visual arts forum, and the
money will go towards
honorariums, educational sup-
plies, operation of Gray Art
Gallery and matching various
grants.
The NAACP almost lost their
$700 appropriation when
legislator Richard Wynne in-
formed the SGA that it was
against policy "to fund any
political, partisan, or social
organization through SGA
funds
Eric Hughes, a NAACP
member, said that the NAACP is
not a political group. It is an
educational organization with no
political ties. SGA President-elect
David Brown agreed with Hughes
and said, "The NAACP is not
asking for that money. I feel the
legislators should consider ap-
proving the $700. They're here
for ECU
The legislators decided by
voice vote to fund the NAACP.
despite the ambiguity of the fun-
ding rule.
In other SGA action,
legislators voted against giving
their support towards a parking
proposal by a group of ECU
students.
The proposal recommended
that a shuttle bus transport
students parking in the allied
health parking lot to College Hill
Drive. Andrew Joyner, author of
the bill, said the original cost of
$148,000 had been reduced to
$74,000. Joyner also told the
legislators that the plan would
work, because commuters would
have a chance to park on campus,
instead of "buying a chance" to
park through the purchase of a
parking sticker.
Marshall Tucker, manager of
SGA Transit, told legislators that
he did not support the idea and
said he felt many of the existing
bus services would be duplicated.
By voice vote, the SGA did not
approve the idea.
In a closed session, Craig King
was selected to be next year's
Refrigerator Rentals Manager.
David Moyer was chosen the new
Attorney General, who will swear
in the 1985-86 SGA officers April
20.
Student Input Stressed By New Student Union President
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nrw, Kdlior
The ECU Student Union is
under nev leadership tor the first
time in two years. Michael Smith
was sworn in as SU president at
organization's annual ban-
quet Thursday. Smith succeeds
Regina Hardee, who has been
president for the last two years.
"The main thing I want to do
is to help complement the ac-
tivities on campus" with Student
Union activities. Smith said. "I
also want to continue the strong
foundation set by Regina during
her administration
Hardee said she has enjoyed
her time as Student Union presi-
dent and feels she has ac-
complished a great deal. Among
the accomplishments she stressed
were the organization's four new
committees, a vice presidential
position, a new logo and promo-
tional material, and "we've final-
ly had a successful major
concert She also mentioned
popular trips to New York and
the Bahailias and "a lot more
cooperation between staff and
advisors
Smith is well-qualified for the
job, Hardee said, because of his
interest in and experience with
the Student Union. "Michael
came to us first to find out what
SU had to offer. He did a lot of
research to find out what Student
Union is all about she said.
Hardee added that Smith is "per-
sonable" and "he gets the job
done
Smith said he feels publicity
should be SU's major concern.
"Increasing awareness through
more popular programming" is
very important, he said. "We're
here for the students and they
should have an avenue for
deciding what kind of programm-
ing we offer Smith added that
he wants to provide a means for
the students "to have a strong
voice in determining activities
The Student Union is impor-
tant, Smith said, in that it pro-
vides leadership opportunities
and "endeavors to provide a
broad series of programs
Smith is working on two im-
mediate and specific goals, the
first of which is to build Barefoot
on the Mall into an all-campus
event. He said he wants students
to be aware of the event and the
fact that it is sponsored bv the
Student Union. Also, he is plann-
ing to have a series of concerts
during the summer freshmen
orientation program, one each
session.
Above all. Smith said he will
encourage student input. "Stu-
dent input makes the organiza-
tion run he said.
James Brown, Jay Leno
Perform In Minges Sunday
SGA 1985-86 Appropriations
Group Request Appropriation
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News EdHot
Soul artist and legend James
Brown will perform in Minges
Coliseum Sunday in a concert
sponsored by the ECU Student
Union Major Attractions Com-
mittee. The opening act for
Brown's concert will be comedian
Jay Leno. Tickets went on sale
Friday at Mendenhall Student
Center's Central Ticket Office
and will be $8 for students, $10
for non-students and $12 at the
door.
Major Concerts Committee
Chairman Mike McPartland said
he is pleased that there will be
two major concerts this semester.
"Things don't usually work out
on such short notice he said.
McPartland added that the com-
mittee was able to present this
concert because of the profits
earned from the Kinks concert in
March.
Profits of more than $14,000
were earned from the Kinks con-
cert, McPartland said, giving the
committee a good financial posi-
tion. "We did very well with the
Kinks concert McPartland
said, adding that he had expected
the attendance to reach the
break-even point, but had not ex-
pected it to reach the near-sellout
it did.
Part of the revenue from the
Kinks concert will be devoted to
the James Brown concert,
although a promoter is also pro-
viding funding for the event. This
way, McPartland said, the Stu-
dent Union "is not risking any
financial loss.
"We're happy to have him
(Brown) McPartland said. He
added that he felt one function of
his committee is to provide a
"good variety" of entertainment.
"Once we were financially
secure, I wanted to be able to
provide a variety of entertain-
ment
McPartland said he expects
about 4,000 tickets will be sold
for the concert. The profit from
this concert, he said, will be add-
ed to the committee's budget in
order to finance a major concert
next fall.
The Major Concerts Commit-
tee has operated at a deficit for
the past several years. The last
major concert prior to the Kinks'
appearance was the Charlie
Daniels BandMarshall Tucker
concert in the fall of 1983. That
concert lost more than $15,000.
Independent Control Proposed
N.C. Student Legislature$3500
Graduate Business Assoc.2761
Political Science Society-3500
Student Dietetic Assoc.2515
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program.2250
School of Art Grad. Alliance1860
Poetry Forum1500
Senior Gift2500
Phi Sigma Pi1466
NAACP2055
ECU Gospel Choir800
Speech, Language and Hearing Assoc.1135
Arnold Air Society1180
Alpha Epsilon Delta400
Forensics Society7088
Young Home Designers League880
Student Natl Environemental Health Assoc.325
Gamma Beta Phi450
Phi Sigma Tau1125
ECU Marauders425
Leisure Systems Study Society2750
Rho Chi Sigma100
Alpha Phi Omega150
Economics Society500
Rehabilitation Counseling Assoc.500
Surf Club400
Occupational Therapy575
Phi Alpha Theta250
ECU Biology Club1600
Phi Epsilon Kappa690
Interfraternity Council1450
Transit8000
$2035
2222
1500
749
1075
670
500
1500
910
723
675
655
645
400
786
500
325
450
525
375
100
100
150
370
100
200
285
200
525
540
900
4000
Photo Lab Discussed
r
By HAROLD JOYNER
AutHaal Newt Editor
A transfer of management
from ECU'S Photo Lab to the
other campus media was propos-
ed at Monday's Media Board
meeting by 1985 Buccaneer
Editor Gary Patterson. Patterson
is a former head of Photo Lab
"The photo head position
would still remain as it is Pat-
terson said. "Only the duties
would be redirected so he would
be in charge of managing photo
lab procedures and distribution
of chemicals. I think the in-
dividual mediums should be able
to hire and fire staff
photographers, whereas now we
can only complain to the photo
head
In Patterson's proposal, he
suggested two photographers be
under the auspices of the Buc-
caneer and one on the staff of Ex-
pressions, the minority publica-
tion.
The question of whether the
formation of dual roles would
present conficts between the
media and the photo lab was
brought up by Rudy Alexander,
assistant dean and director of
University Unions. Patterson
said The East Carolinian is
presently employing this method
"with no problems
Buccaneer Production
Manager Carla Waters said
"prior to Jon Jordan's appoint-
ment as head of Photo Lab,
many of our assignments were ig-
nored
"The proposals will put pro-
duction of photographs where it
belongs. We feel that if a
photographer is not doing his
job, then we can find someone
who is qualified to do the job
Patterson said.
Expressions Editor Ruben In-
gram said his publication could
have been greatly improved if he
had had some control over staff
photographers.
"I really hope the board will
consider this proposal and I also
want them to know that this is no
reflection on Jon Jordan. I'm
just afraid the quality of produc-
tion of photographs will not im-
prove if each medium cannot
have some control in the
matter Ingram said.
More Color, Commercialism
In 1985 Literary Magazine
REBEL'85
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NcwtlMtar
The 1985 Rebel has arrived,
and according to Editor Ellen
Moore, it is more professional
looking, more colorful and has
more art than previous issues.
The Rebel is ECU'S literary and
art magazine.
Moore said 5,000 copies of the
magazine were printed, 1,000
more than last year, and are
available at Mendenhall Student
Center, the library, the art
building and Austin building.
"It's a little more commercial
this year she said. "We had a
lot of help from the commercial
art department and that is
reflected in it Moore added
that this is best demonstrated by
the differences in layout and
design this year.
Last year's Rebel had a
plagiarized poem in it, but Moore
said she does not expect that pro-
blem this year.
"I'm very pleased with all the
poetry she said. "However,
there were some things in 1984
that I thought were pure gems
and there are not as many pure
gems this year
Moore said there were more
problems with space limitation
this year. "We tried to fit in as
much as we could without it be-
ing overwhelming but some good
things got left out she said.
CU-
"Technically, though, it is bet-
ter than last year's
The editor of the 1986 Rebel
will be Tim Thornburg, an
English major. Moore said she
expects Thornburg to continue
the commercial art trend.
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JHE EAST CAROL IN IAN
APRIL 16, 1985
Announcements
On-Line
Graduate Record
Examination
Will be offered at ECU on Saf June 8 Ap
plication blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing Service. Box
966 R Princeton, NJ 08540 Applications
must be postmarked no later fhan May 3 Ap
plications may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center Rm 105. Speight Building
Founder's Day
Program
T he brother's of XI Nu Chapter of Phi Beta
a Praterntiy, Inc cordially invite the
ECU student body to attend our first annual
founder s day program on April 21. in
Jenkins Auditorium at 4 p m
Golden Girl Tryouts
Come to the AAusic Building lobby Sat .
Apr,i jo at 10 ith lots of energy tor Golden
Girl tryouts Practice will be Sat from 10 12
and l 3 and Sun from 1 3 Tryouts will be
Sun at 4 Hope to see ya there
Gamma Beta Phi
Move A Thon sponsor sheets are now
available in Dr Dunlops office. Brewster A
317 Ail new members must have a sheet to
rase their funds The Move A Thon is sat
April ?0 A reminder the 2nd Gamma Beta
Phi party is Arpii 19 at 9 p m at the Kingston
e Clubhouse Members and guests are
welcome tor SI each
Video Games Contest
Tne Student Union REereaton Committee
sponsoring a video Games Contest, going
,w until Fn April 19, at 10 p m during
ar oper?ing hours of MSC All ECU
s'udents Faculty staff and their dependents
We t0 participate The hightest
scorer on each machine at the end of the
snorter! time will receive a trophy Contact
'he billiards Center in Mendenhall for more
�rtton
Summer School Employment
Employment is avaiiaDle to qualified per
sons enrolled in summer shcool who are in
teres'ed unbecoming Personal care atten
dants to students in wheelchairs. Readers
Proofreaders, Tutors For further deatiis
contact Office of Handicapped Student Ser
� es 212 Whichard Building, ECU. Green
NC 27834 919 757 6799
LSS
s -av.ng a meeting Wed 7 p m room 221
� pr�� ge there
INDT
Position available with local manufac
turer for June Dec full time Students
should be a manufacturing majors and have
a 2 8 GPA Contact Co op Office in 313 Rawl
Banking
Summer position available for finance ma
ior In Kinston with major bank Contact Co
op Office in 313 Rawl.
Biol. Elections
The ECU Biology Club will be holding its
annual elections on Mon. April 15 in BN 107
at 7 p m Members: This is a mandatory
meeting and all those interested in running
for an office are urged to come by the Club at
regular office hours. Also. Dr Mark M Brin
son will be speaking to the club on the
Biology Graduate Program offered here at
ECU'
ECU Racquetball
Club
Will have a last organizational meeting on
April 16, Tues , At 5 p.m in Memorial gym
room 102 Election for new officers for 85 86
year All members are require to attend and
anyone interested are welcome
Summer Jobs
Thomas Nelson inc has summer positions
still available tor the summer $250 per
week students interested may attend an in
terview on Wed , April 17 at 1, 3:30 or 7 p.m
The interview will be held in Brewster D
room 103 A 2 5 GPA is required All majors
and general college students will be con
sidered Please be prompt'
Alpha Beta Alpha
Library science is not dead yet on the ECU
campus! Alpha Beta Alpha, the library
science honor society, will be selling buttons
and baked goods during Bartfooi on the Mall
this Thurs . April 18 to raise money for new
proiects. all providing more from joyner
Library for the ECU Community Stop by
and tmd out what's going on with Joyner and
Alpha Beta Alpha we'll be looking for you on
the mall'
ECU Campus Crusade
For Christ
It's high time rather, a 'Prime Time' for
you to join this Thurs, night! Campus
Crusade will be meeting this Thurs night at
8 p.m in the auditorium, Jenkins Art
Building Come by and meet your neighbors
and fmd out how lives rave been changed for
the better See you there'
Finally!
f
Physical Education
Majors
The Departmental Motor and Physical
Fitness Competency Test will be given on
Wed April 24, at 8 am in Minges Coliseum
All participants must report promptly at 8
am A passing score on this test is required
of all students prior to declaring Physical
Education as a major.
Any student with medical complaints or
reasons why you cannot participate in the
test must submit a written medical excuse to
Dr. Israel two weeks prior to the testing
date
Aerobic Classes
Drop in and shape your exam blues away
with intramural aerobic fitness classes
Beginnning April 23 May 1 the classes will be
held in room 108 memorial gym at 4 p m and
5 15
Greenville Choral Society
Spring Concert
On Thurs evening, April 25, at 8 p m the
Greenville Choral Society under the direc
tion of Ms. Carolyn Greene ipock, visiting
conductor, will present its final concert of
the 1984 85 season at the Memorial Baptist
Church, Greenville, NC The concert will
feature Violin soloist, Ms Joanne Bath,
orgainst Mark Gansor and a number of
soloists who are members of the Society
Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship
Is there more to college lite than just final
papers and final exams? Looking for a little
peace of mind? Come join us this Wed. night
at 7 Inter Varsity Cahristian Fellowship of
fers fun, friendship, and faith, and maybe
even a little more! Take a break make a
break tor the Jenkins Art Building
auditorium this Wed night and ioin us, won't
you?
Quakers
Friends University Fellowship will hold an
unprogramed meeting for Worship on Sun ,
April 21 at 1030 a m in the Gazebo Area of
the ECU campus Very informal Bring
blanket or lawn chair to sit on In case of rain
it will be held at 107 n Meade st Visitors
welcomed
Summer Jobs
Summer jobs in Raleigh if you can Type
OOwpm) and take telephone reservations
full-time and part time summer positions A
few aplications are available at ECU'S
Career Planning and Placement Service
These jobs are for Freshmen, sophomores
and juniors at the Holiday inn Raleigh
Reservation Center
ACROSS
1 Wager
j Fragment
e p
. - y,
name
13 Angry.
14 African antelope
"�5 Small waves
17 River m France
19 Urge one
20 Entrance
2 1 Nimbus
23 Estimate too
highly
27 Body of water
29 Verve
30 Reichsmark
abbr
3 1 Possessive
pronoun
32 item of property
34 Capuchin
monkey
35 Therefore
36 Football kick
37 Build
39 Argument m
writing
�i? War god
43 Undergarment
44 Inclined
roadway
46 Fundamental
48 Young ladies
51 Native metal
52 Entertain
54 Negative
55 Evil
56 Boundaries
57 Plaything
DOWN
1 Prohibit
2 Actor Wallach
3 Indulges in
liquor
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
4 Farm building
5 Set of professed
opinions
6 Ethiopian title
7 Near
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8 Harangue
9 Greek
marketplace
10 Hostelry
11 Owing
16 Malay canoe
18 Musical
instrument
20 Erase printing
21 Raise
22 Performer
24 Waistcoats
25 Delineate
26 Sends forth
28 Pertaining to
navigation
33 Cut
34 Snake
36 Buddhist dialect
38 Male sheep pi.
40 Ancient chariot
41 Wipe out
45 Site of Iowa
State College
46 Cut short
47 Macaw
48 Press for
payment
49 Game at cards
50 Pigpen
53 Mile: abbr
Date
Thursday, April 18
Time
7:00 P.M.
Place
Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church
510 S. Washington St.
Greenville, N.C.
In Concert
THE
DIXIE
MELODY BOYS
You'll not want to miss this nationally
renowned group back for another fantastic
performance!
Voted the No. I
Gospel Band in
1983 and 1984
Downtown � Next to Greenville Police
Station
the
&"
E.C.U.
GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Playhouse
is looking for uihers for the play Hamlet
Dates of performances are April u 70 Come
by Messick Theater for more information
Ambassadors
We had a great trunoot at our final
meeting, newly elected officers are Andy
White President Reggie Mcctrn vie
President: Pam Harrington Secretary
Kathy Edgerton Comptroller Marta Rand
Student Contact Roseann Blum Telefund
Coordinator Brain Burke Tours coor
dinator' cngratulations! Please don't forget
Alumni Day April 20 We need everyone's
participation End Of Year party is April 2?
Call Teresa for more information
Full Time Jobs
General Supply Specialists, Budget
Analyst, Personnel Management Specialist,
Cost Analyst. Public Affairs Specialist
Opening Date Aprins. losing Date April 26
Applications from Headquareter. Air Force
Logistics Command, Wright Patterson AFB,
Ohio 45433 Job description on the Govern
mental Opportunities Shelf at the Career
Planning and placement Office
Gamma Beta Phi
Honor Society
Will hold Induction Ceremonies at the
Ramada inn on Thurs , April 16 at 7 p m All
members are urged to attend There will
also be a meeting on April 18. 7 p m in
Jenkins Audiotium
Honor Board
There will be a meeting Thurs . April 18th
at 4 in Mendenhall rm 244 for all students in
terestd m being on the Honor board for
1985 8� school �ear
DWI's
in Pitt County will be the topic of a meeting
open to the public on Wed . April 17 at 7 15
p m at the Tar Landing Seafood Restaurant
The meeting .s sponsored by the Greenville
Pitt County Phoenix, an organization for
criminal justice Jim Landon, Coordinator of
the Alcohol, Drug Education Traffic School
will be the speaker There will be a no host
dinner beginning promptly at f 30 p m
before the meeting
ECU Fnsbee Club
Feesh and Bison beware The mens ana
the newly formed womens Irate Ultimate
teams will be competing at ASU this
weekend Practice Tues ana Turs at 3 at
bottom of college hill The irey Force did a
fine job m Blacksburg Anyone into Ml s
welcome to come on down ana play Be tnee
ana get horizontal!
ECU Newt Bureau
When ECU inauguarated its
long-awaited on-line registration
system last month, most of the
people involved expected some
minor problems to occur.
After all, the system was total-
ly new, meaning that all students
and faculty members were un-
familiar with the process of using
a computer to determine what
classes to register for.
And the software, designed
specifically for on-line registra-
tion by ECU staff, had been
tested but not used during an ac-
tual registration period.
After the first two weeks,
however, a few computer
malfunctions have been the only
complications to occur. But then
Registrar Gil Moore said he
wasn't expecting anything major
to go wrong. "We've been testing
this system for two years now
he said. "So far, the software has
not created any problems at all
Some students were inconve-
nienced when the computer went
down, Moore said, requiring
them to come back at another
time. "The reaction has been fan-
tastic from everyone so far
"All the students are very
pleased to have their schedule in
hand said John Rainey, SGA
president. "They don't have to
worry about it again until classes
start next fall
Under the old registration
system, students had to wait
weeks while computer cards were
processed to find out if they got
the classes they wanted. If they
didn't, they had to go from one
building to another on campus to
pick up the appropriate cards,
then wait in long drop-add lines.
With the new computerized
registration system, students car,
register for classes in less than
five minutes. Students simply go
to their advisors' offices and
make out schedules. Computer
operators in the offices enter the
schedules into the mainframe
computer. Within minutes,
students can find out if ar.
classes they want are filled,
allowing them to make a substitu-
tion immediately.
Another advantage of on-line
registration is the ability of the
students to register anywhere or.
campus. "This is a decentralized
system Moore said. "Before.
every student had to go to a cen
tral site. Now a student can do it
in his or her advisor's office or ��
any one of 54 terminals located
across the campus
ECU registers more than
13,500 students each semester
Registration will continue
through this week, Moore said
ECU's computerized on-line
registration system is believed I
be the first by any major unive-
ty in the Southeast to go into
operation.
JOMSUV 8 ZZI
�-cge' sa. on
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items and Pnces
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BUY ONE
GET ONE
LIGHT N' LIVELY
Cottage
Cheese
IN THE CHEESE SHOPPE
BUY ONE LB OR MORE
SPRINGDALE BEEF
Summer Sausage
GET ONE 6-OZ JAR
Ductch Garden
Hot Sweat Mustard
12 Oz
Cup
SLICEB SIZE
Fresh
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SAVE IN THE KROGER
PHARMACY
GET
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The Price of any new prescription in th� r�� w
Limrt one coupon per custome? Transfer! St ,ms COu�X)0
CUP sffi�"
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WE
University Scholars Honored
ECl' New, Bureau
ECU formally introduced and
presented plaques to its first
University Scholars Sunday at a
banquet highlighting ECU's
traditional Scholars Weekend
Seven outstanding high school
seniors chosen in natiowide com-
petition for the coveted Universi-
ty Scholars awards attended the
banquet with their families and
the families of several of the
donors who have established the
privately-funded scholarship pro-
gram which is based on academic
achievement and leadership
potential.
Each of the seven was
presented a plaque by ECU
Chancellor John Howell, identi-
fying his or her selection. The
University Scholars program was
established last fall and the first
recipients were slelected in
March.
"This is a very special
evening said James Lanier, vice
chancellor for institutional ad-
vancement, in introducing the
University Scholars. Collectively,
he said, the students chosen are
members of academic honor
societies, officers, delegates,
leaders and active in extracur-
ricular activities. Six of the seven
belong to foreign languages clubs
in their respective high schools.
Three are Latin scholars, Lanier
said.
Lanier also introduced the
University Scholar Awards
donors attending including Mr.
and Mrs. W.R. Roberson and
Mr. and Mrs. Riley Roberson of
Washington; Mr. and Mrs. John
Minges of Greenville, Mrs. Ruth
McLawhorn W7itherington of
Minority Difficulties Subject
Of Georgia State Meeting
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
N�s Editor
The many difficulties for black
students on white campuses were
the subject of a meeting attended
by Annette Artis, second vice
president of the ECU chapter of
the NAACP. The meeting was
held last weekend at Georgia
State University in Atlanta.
Artis said, as a result of the
meeting, she feels "we (minority
students) need to become more
assertive and get involved in all
aspects of campus life She said
minority students "have the
tendency to self-segregate and
they should not do that
Among the speakers at the
meeting were Andrew Young and
Coretta Scott King.
Artis said one speaker stressed
that students "have to put more
into a college career to get
anything out of it � they have to
be better-than-average students
Another speaker, she said,
stated that there should be more
black faculty on white campuses
and that they should be more
supportive of students, but
students should be more asser-
tive.
The challenges and rewards of
attending a white college was the
topic of another lecture. The
speaker, Artis said, said the
challenges are rewarding because
they build character.
Artis said the NAACP plans to
be much more active last year
than they have been in the past.
She said they intend to have more
speakers and fundraisers, as well
as increased involvement with
other organizations and
augmented membership.
The NAACP will have a table
with membership information at
Barefoot on the Mall Thursdav.
Vanceboro, representing the
family of the late Helen
McLawhorn and N.C. Court of
Appeals Judge Gerald Arnold of
Raleigh, representing the ECU
Alumni Association.
Other donor families who were
unable to attend were Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Jones of Raleigh,
two awards; and the family of the
late Helen Snyder of Greenville.
The privately-established
University Scholars Awards "are
family affairs Lanier said. He
said the original goal of
establishing a minimum of 20 en-
dowments of at least $40,000
each to fund the program has
been met.
Also attending the banquet
were 65 selected high school
juniors from across the state and
a number of high school prin-
cipals.
Lanier announced that engrav-
ed plates embossed with the ECU
seal and bearing the name of the
University Scholar will be
presented to each of the reci-
pients' high schools "for
display" in the school's trophy
case.
Howell told the group that the
University Scholars program
adds "the excitement of a new
dimension" to ECU's Scholars
Weekend.
"We hope that you juniors will
be inspired and challenged to
seek an ECU scholarship next
year he said. Runnerups in the
University Scholars competition
were offered $1,000 and $1,500
academic scholarships. The
University Scholars receive full
tuition and expenses scholarships
valued at $3,000 a year,
renewable for four years.
Howell said colleges and
universities are "facing a number
of dilemmas at the present time
but he said, ECU has "steadily
resisted" a trend of the late 1960s
and early 1970s to eliminate, or
water down, the general educa-
tion requirements for graduation
� "basic core subjects such as
English composition, literature,
college math, courses in the social
sciences and natural science;
some exposure to art and music
appreciation and the
humanities
ECU "feels vindicated today
as other schools scurry back to
these basics Howell said.
"A college education must
enable the student to become a
wholly educated being � not just
a vocational specialist he said.
"I urge you to savour these
liberal arts courses
Announcing:
the
"no enzyme "
Contact
Lens
cytOMenuc
�Y�CAA�C�WT�R.C.
Dr. Peter W. Hollis
Dr. John R. Scibal
We are happy to
introduce a new daily and
extended wear soft
contact which provides
� better visual acuity
� easier handling
� excellent comfort
� longer lens life
� needs "no enzyme"
cleaner
This lens is especially
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problems.
Call NAN CHAUNCEY for
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The Tipton Annex
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 16. 1985
mmmwmwmHwf�����mMt��jhw
2Z53
Classifieds For Africa
All proceeds from classifieds of the
April 23rd paper will be donated to
aid famine victims in Ethiopia.
Buy A Classified
Feed A Child
MVMVMMMW,
1985-86 Honor Board
There will be a meeting
Thursday April 18th at 4:00 in
Mendenhall Student Center Room
244 for all students interested in
being on the Honor Board for the
85-86 school year.
�1




































4-








iSlsnmm
S A N O � I C M t M O �
Enjoy Music Under The
Sun With Your Favorite
Beverages � On Our
Patio
215 East 4th Street
Happy Hour 3-7

Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday
11 AM to Midnight
Thurs Fri Sat & Sunday
11 AM to 2 AM
Free Delivery
Call 752-2183











































a
East Carolina University Major Concerts Committee
& Music Media
proudly present
The Godfather of Soul"
James Brown
with Special Guest
Comedian, Jay Leno
Sunday Night, April 21 � 8:00 P.M.
Minges Coliseum
ECU Students - $8:00; Advance Gen. Public - $10.00;
At The Door -$12.00
Ticket Locations:
ECU Students � Mendenhall Student Center
Greenville � Apple Records, Pirate's Chest
Ayden � Gotcha Covered
Tarboro � Blanchard's Jewelers
Goldsboro � Roadies, Mac Stewart Music
Kinston � Sound Shop
Jacksonville � Tree Frog Records
Washington � Mall Record Shop
Jt
m
� a s
0ft" �
ii W�ti� �' �iiiii�iinwfiii'n ii� miti
-I0fep- f





Qtye East OlamUniati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM NORTON, Central Manager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mm mm Tom Luvender, m �,�
Scott Cooper, 0-55 ��, Anthony Martin, ��.��, �an,�r
Tina Maroschak. m John Peterson, cm, Mmflw
BILL MITCHELL. Ofrw�o� Aft BILL DAWSON, Production Manager
Doris Rankins, m, Rick Mccormac. cm ��
Daniel Maurer. &frl(,�,ww �or DeChanile Johnson, Ad Technician
'AtfiUptejafte Jz;fi4� f.otege Piesi 'jervK
April 16, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Guess
You Fill In The Ed
In honor of the examination
period that is about to thrust itself
upon us, The East Carolinian in-
itiates a new tradition. Beginning
today, April 16, in the year of our
Lord One Thousand Nine Hun-
dred Eighty Five, we present the
first annual multiple choice
editorial. This editorial is to be us-
ed as a pedagogic tool to prepare
one's self for the multiple choice
exams ahead.
So, in the following editorial,
pick the best answer, or the one
that suits your style, or whatever.
1 am AJopposed BJindifferent
CJfor the legalization or continua-
tion of legalization of AJmarijuana
BJabortion C)windsurfing
Djfinancial aid E)both A and C.
For the past 10 years, all we have
seen on campus is AJblatant
disregard or B)wonderful
disrespect for the AJgood Bjsilly
CJracist DJLithuanian laws that
govern this. We want it Ajcon-
tinued Bjstopped and the stuff that
goes along with it AJburned Bjcon-
demned C)sold to K-Mart
DJsacrificed at the Altar of Pele.
Statistics show that this is harm-
ful. Every A)man Bjwoman
CJchild DJdivorce lawyer has had
at least some contact with this
deadly thing. One out of 10 has ac-
tually AJdied Bjlived CJfell off the
side of a cliff because of it. One
out of seven has reported loss of
AJhearing BJsexual drive C)car
keys after being exposed to it. In
fact, we even have evidence that
two out of three have AJgonorrhea
BJdiarrhea C)a cup of tea in the
morning because of it.
Many students are AJmad
BJglad CJstill in bed and don't
know about it. They are insistent
that AJsomething BJnothing be
done about it. But being mad, glad
or still in bed about it doesn't solve
the problem. We must AJunite
BJdisband CJget drunk and think
Penthouse
Words
By JOE BOB
First off, let me say that my parents
read this paper. So, everyone, just
remember that I did this because of the
"public's right to know Okay, gang,
here goes.
I know there are a lot of you fellow
students out in ECU land frustrated like
me. You don't know what to do. Heck,
you've just had this wonderful, fan-
tastic experience with six sorority girls
(or fraternity guys or whatever) and a
gallon of Crisco, but you're not sure
about writing "The Letter You
know, putting all this glorious sex down
on paper for the whole world to read.
I'm talking about Penthouse.
array (lower case; bnt, U.S. Amy)
anbole
bea-wah
bhag (-pot, marijuana; see "bong")
blond (male or female)
Nowjob
bong (water pipe used for smoking bask or pot)
boyfriend
(male or female)
butt-fuck (verb or noun)
cockbead
cock-teaser
cockaacker
come (aevcr "cam")
cutoffs
daisy ckaia
dama it, goddamn it
deep-tkroat, deep throating
or Frtachtag
about it in the morning DJdisband,
get drunk and unite in the morn-
ing. Only then can we A)get even
B)be revenged upon CJget an "A"
in history of sport.
So, students of ECU, gather all
your AJdrugs BJsmall firearms
CJcourt documents DJspiral
notebooks and go into battle
against the forces that might
AJtake it away BJleave it here. We
must storm AJWashington BJthe
capital CJcity hall DJthe Croatan
EJBattlecreek, Mich. Once there
here is the plan: We grab every
A J mayor BJpresident CJdrug-
crazed "Family Feud" player and
hold them hostage.
Students of ECU, our demands
will be simple. AJEverything
BjNothing CJA lust for things sex-
ual can stop us. First, we demand
that a statue of AJJerry Falwell
BJJane Fonda CJDavid Letterman
DJMamu the talking whale be put
up in front of the AJ White House
BjBlair House Cjthe chancellor's
neighbor's condominium. We will
succeed.
We see Ajno Bjall kinds of
arguments against what we are say-
ing. In fact, many are against us.
But all of us AJwindsurfers
BJabortionists CJmarijuana-ists
Djfin-aidists will stand tall. We are
like AJtrains BJdog food cans
Cjthe Great Wall of China �
nothing can stop us. So all of the
opiods out there who think we're
wrong can take a AJhike BJback
seat CJpowder DJall of the above.
In fact we won't even give in to
AJthe president BjFrank Sinatra
CJGary Trudeau DJNone of the
above. Our plan is ready.
The AJEast BJWest CjWho
Gives A DooDah Carolinian urges
you to support our cause. Because
students, the future is AJyours
BJmine C) theirs DJnone of
anyone's business.
m, tan njjto f w& & k mitm mm twaae, ru & &a&
to ms our w Tn&sam vv races,too
Patients

IRS Snags Bucks
New Structure Needed
I'm talking about "Forum the lus-
ty letters section.
You used to think, "Hey, no way,
these things aren't true But now you
know it's true. You've experienced a
letter.
But, like your English 1200 teacher
told you, all spelling, grammar and
punctuation need to be correct. You
find that you're not sure about certain
words you must use in the letter to get
your story across.
Well, never fear. The East Carolinian
has been on the ball (so to speak).
We've uncovered the Penthouse style
sheet, the magazine's guide to the cor-
rect spelling of words often used in the
letters section. So, to help all you letter
writers out, we present it here for you.
(Honest, this is the real sheet, guys and
gals.)
The following is to be read only by
students over 18.
homy
jack off, Jacked off, jacking off
Jerk off
jism (never "gism")
Joystick
lovemaking
love-tube, love-sack, etc.
Mound of Venus
multi orgasmic
mushroom-bead
OK (caps, ao points)
panty hose
pantyless
peehole
redhead (bat as adjective, red-beaded or red-
haired)
rest room
SAM (caps, ampersand, ao pouts)
69 (sexual position; doa't spell oat)
skinny-dipping
skintight (adjective)
sport shirt
T-shirt
three-way (adjective; ao hyphen as
"We had a threeway)
��!�
ton oa (verb)
(adjective)
tv (lower case)
Yesterday was the deadline for sen-
ding in your tax forms to the Internal
Revenue Service and, if you failed to
meet that duty, your situation is fluid.
That is, you're up the creek.
Why do so many people pro-
crastinate? Most likely because the tax
system is complicated to the point of in-
timidation. Let's face it, people get con-
fused and frustrated, and they put off
their tax computations as long as possi-
ble. It's time for a change, folks � with
a capital "C
The Right Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
In his typical timely fashion, Presi-
dent Reagan announced he was gearing
up for the big push on major tax reform.
He described the present tax system as
"a complicated, frustrating, unfair
mystery of legalistic gobbledygook and
loopholes Well put. Overhauling the
tax system will be economically
beneficial to the nation and politically
good for the president.
There are four major tax reform pro-
posals: 1) the Treasury Department pro-
posal, with a top rate of 35 percent, 2)
the Kemp-Kasten plan, with a top rate of
25 percent, 3) the Bradley-Gephardt pro-
posal, with a top rate of 35 percent and
4) the Siljander plan, with a flat rate of
10 percent. The president should opt for
Kemp-Kasten.
Congressman Jack Kemp (RepN.Y.)
and Sen. Bob Kasten (RepWis.) are
two of the earliest proponents of tax
reform. Kemp, a congressman since the
early '70s, is considered a top contender
for the GOP presidential nomination in
1988. Kasten was a congressman before
being swept into the Senate by the first
Reagan landslide. Probably the most
tempting feature about their proposal,
known as the Fair and Simple Tax
(FAST), is its inherent advantages for
lower and middle income people. The
ultimate goal of FAST is to spur long-
term, stable economic growth and job
creation.
FAST is basically a progressive flat
rate tax. Here are its high points.
�FAST will double the personal ex-
emption to $2,000.
�FAST will index the tax code to pro-
tect everyone, especially the poor, from
being pushed by inflation into higher tax
brackets.
�FAST will remove more than 1.5
million, poor households from the tax
rolls. For instance, a family of four will
not start paying taxes until its income
reaches $14,375. Income tax liability will
gradually increase as income rises and
approaches 25 percent for those earning
over $100,000.
�FAST will eliminate most of the
loopholes used by the wealthy to escape
paying taxes. However, it would main-
tain deductions which promote charity,
home ownership and retirement savings.
It also provides deductions for
catastrophic medical expenses.
�FAST has its tax rates set up to favor
small businesses, which create the most
jobs, technology and economic growth.
FAST is clearly the superior proposal,
yet any one of the four plans would be a
marked improvement over the present
tax labyrinth. Let's hope Congress
agrees.
a 0 a a �
Y'all missed a gxd debate last Tues-
day night. Lisa Hieber of the Greenville
Peace Committee accepted my challenge
and debated me on the war in Nicaragua
and other related items. We slugged it
out for two full hours, trading blows
and counter blows. Of course, my scin-
tillating presentation and hard-nosed
performance left her swamped under the-
evidence and begging for mercy, and the
audience gawked and gasped in amaze-
ment at my triumphant victory,
andoh, heck, she's probably saying
the same thing about me. Anyway,
thanks Lisa, for a most enjoyable even-
ing.
� � � � �
There is another debate on ;ap for
tonight which you should see. The con
testants are two left-wing agitators from
the '60s. One. Abbie Hoffman, recently
left prison after serving a sentence for a
cocaine crime � poor oV Abbie is still
caught in the '60s time warp and has vet
to realize that America is grown up. The
othei ferry Rubin, was a political com-
rade of Hoffman's who eventually
realized that one cannot make a career
out ol rock-throwing, pot-smoking and
slogan-chanting. To Hoffman, left-winj
chaos is still the focus of life � it
Rubin, it's just a hobby
Actually, there's not much dr encj
between the two. They are trying 19
duplicate the phenomenally, succ
Gordon Liddy-Timoth) Lear) D
Show, but the won't do as well. But
you should go and tr to find out what
mysterious forces mold their off-thd
wall ideas, it should be great entertain
ment.
Campus Forum
New Age Unfair
The federal government demands
that the states raise the drinking age for
wine and beer from 19 to 21 years of
age or be deprived of about $20 million
in highway funds. The constitutional
amendment on prohibition was remov-
ed after years of fruitless failure and
this is a resurrection that should de-
mand public voting and approval
before it could become law because it
has become a partial involvement that
is definitely misplaced.
Without any argument pro or con on
this age-old issue, it is not a matter of
drinking or not drinking but definitely
the age that is permitted. If an 18-year-
old person is capable, in the eyes of the
law, to marry, vote and to be drafted,
in any event, it is ridiculous to say this
same person cannot handle a bottle or
drink of beer or wine.
This plan is not a sure cure for
highway reduction of deaths because
the matter of getting a driver's license
fails to get to the nitty gritty of the sub-
ject in that all future and present
drivers should be shown the hazards.
pain and hurt of the mangled bodies.
bloody victims and guts thrown across
a highway before he can be considered
properly informed on what is before
him and his responsibility. These are
every day occurrences, and the
morgues, undertaking parlors.
hospitals and doctor offices can give
the true picture. Gruesome, yes. It also
makes one recoil and think. Thb
should be done before hand, not after
when the gong has been hit. This sug-
gestion seems appropriate and certain-
ly saves face for those concerned.
Dr. Ralph Shell
Kinston, N.C.
THIS IS BOBBV:
B0BBVS PAP lOVeS QUN5. M� L0VSS
THE SPORT OF 5HOOJ7NG. HeWES
THE TRAPTTION OF GUNS ANP BElflES
He has a oimmmStfSrrm
OWN AS MAW GUNS AS HgTEnTS
BOBBUWIlLNeVERBEfN

The serious
organs and tissue
is documented ail
stones in the
media. The stones
lmponance of j
Donatio. Awarent
claimed this year
Officials at the
Medicine, which
recovery and place
organs and tissue
North Carolina, ar
citizens to learr
donation to
shortage
Nationally, 1 �i
are on the -
kidney i trail
Carolina alone, 3?
waiting.
New
By ELA1NI
"East Ch-
added a
students not
matherr .
with a .
statistics sa.i
Statistics area .
Math Departmer
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N'OVPRES - 1
SLNGLA
� 20
! OFFER EXPIRE:
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SENIOR CmZfrSJ
� Ej� l t�rr I
for oi G�
T w sa� Da-
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IF YOU'RE
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k. aJ
ded
up. I he
jl com-
centually
career
�king and
left-win
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lifferenct
rying ic
tccessful
Debati
well. But
out what
ottthe
entertainl

fair
license
� trie stib-
d present
n the hazards,
odies,
wn across
;onsidered
before
hese are
and the
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can give
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N.C.
IfcVOORPlCK,
IAN �(TK5R
THR6EWISH6S.il.
�0PTW�S�
'ACTS,
Patients Await Transplants
Organ Donors Needed
IHMASh AkOllMAN -PKII � 9tJ 5
ECL' Ne�j Bureau
The serious shortgage or
organs and tissues for transplant
is documented almost daily in
stones in the national news
media. The stories underscore the
importance of National Organ
Donation Awareness Week, pro-
claimed this year as April 21-27.
Officials at the ECU School of
Medicine, which supervises the
recovery and placement of donor
organs and tissues in Eastern
North Carolina, are encouraging
citizens to learn more about
donation to help alleviate the
shortage.
Nationally, 7,000 Americans
are on the waiting list for a
kidney transplant. In North
Carolina alone, 350 patients are
waiting.
"The lives of patients who
receive an organ transplant are
altered dramatically said Bren-
da Melton, a registered nurse and
organ procurement coordinator
at the ECU School of Medicine.
"Before the transplant they are
typically sick individuals who
usually can't work, enjoy a nor-
mal lifestyle or participate fully
in family activities. After the
transplant the majority are
restored to full, productive
lives
Last year 23 patients received
kidney trasnsplants through the
medical school transplant pro-
gram. But Melton said the
number would have been higher
had more donor organs been
available.
The need for organ donation
encompasses more than just
kidneys, Melton said . In North
Carolina, patients are also on the
waiting list for heart and liver
transplants. Approximately 100
North Carolinians are awaiting
cornea transplants. And at North
Carolina burn centers, the need
for skin increases daily.
Melton said only one in every
100 people who die is identified
as a potential heart, heart-lung,
liver or kidney donor. But
everyone can donate their eyes,
skin or bone marrow to help
others.
For more information about
organ and tissue donation or to
arrange for a speaker on the sub-
ject, contact the Organ Procure-
ment Agency at the ECU School
of Medicine at 757-2620.
New Statistics Minor Offered
By ELAINE PERRY
SUff Wrtlrr
"East Carolina has recently-
added a statistics minor for
students not majoring in
mathematics and a math major
with a concentration in
statistics said John Daughtry,
Statistics area coordinator for the
Math Department.
According to Daughtry, who is
chairman of the committee which
developed the statistics minor,
"the program gives students who
have a major in something other
than math the chance to show
they are strong in statistical
areas
Daughtry said he feels that
"the need for statistical training
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tool
Required courses for the
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II, Applied Statistical Analysis
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i HI FAST( ROI !�
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HEALTHV
column
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He she v annot see how
, pei son
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means maintaining a weight
below the level compatible with
resisting disease and coping with
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About 95 percent oi anorexics
treated are female betweeen the
ages of 14 and 25; however, men
may also suiter from anorexia,
rhe high female percentage ma)
be due to the importance oi "be-
ing thin to be sew" that is placed
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Reptiles, Amphibians Discussed
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Other pre entations at e
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Anorexia is characterized by
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ability : i self control and the
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Exercise becomes an obsession,
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rewa
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Symptoms oi anorexia include
�Fear oi weight gain.
�Obsessive dieting or fasting
�Prolonged periods of exei
in spite of exhaustion.
�Weight loss oi 25 perceni
body weight that is unexplained
by illness.
�Absence of menstrual pe:
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Anorexia nervosa noi a
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�"yy!






THE EAS1 CAROI INIAN
APRIL 12, 1985
page 8
Graduate Models To Success
Cheri Cameron-Newell
By JENNY MEADOR
'The Southerners are taking
oer the world and 1 think it's
great! I'm really proud of being
from the South said Cheri
Cameron-Newell. And what's so
great about that"1 Well, it's not
easy being a North Carolinian in
California.
The successful model can look
hard or soft, but the 1977
graduate of ECU from Winston-
Salem still "comes home twice a
year and calls every week con-
firmed Mrs. Cameron, Cheri's
mother.
One might think the bright
lights of glamour, fame and high
society would have gotten to the
heart of the 5'7" blonde model.
But for her, it was a let down to
find out that eating fettuccine
and wine at noon is not a party
but simply "lunch" for the
residents of Beverly Hills.
It all began when Cameron was
trying on clothes at a store in
Winston-Salem. The sales lady
spotted her and asked her if she
eer thought of modeling.
"You've got to be kidding, not
me she said. But before long
she was modeling for small
businesses � Wrangler, R.J.
Reynolds � and soon became the
Winston Queen for drag races.
Having never flown but once, she
found herself taking off everv
week to places like Seattle,
Miami, Atlanta. Portland, and
New York City. "Doing the drag
races was more like PR work.
And it finally hit me, 'Hey 1 can
travel and do things. I can see the
world said Cameron. And
from there the adventure began.
After three months of touring
with Winston. Cameron went to
New York to see agents from
Tokyo. "They would come and
look at girls. They booked me a
flight and a room. Our pay was
what was left over after they had
taken our room and flight
money. In Tokyo, I worked every
Jav for five months and did
billboards and magazines like the
Japanese logue cover. 1 was
never that successful in New
York and the money was so good
there (Japan)
Japan, you could say, is
Cameron's favorite country. "I
just love traveling and I love the
Japanese culture, although the
men are real chauvenists. One
time a group of men about ran
me over to get in and out of the
elevator before 1 did because I
was the only woman. But they
really are in awe of the Western
civilization and I think they are
trying to change. Everything over
there is very neat and clean.
Everyone is so honest there. The
architecture is also very
beautiful
She is in high demand in other
countries such as Spain where she
did a Winston commercial. "I
had to have my hair up and drive
a Rolls Royce convertible. I had
to gun the engine, go 50 feet and
practically stop on a dime. It was
really kind of dumb, but it was
fun she said laughing.
Cameron is pleased with her
work and confidence shines
through every photograph.
Whether dazzling in diamonds or
rampaging in capes and jeans,
she is always soft and cheerful.
The appeal caught the eye of
Richard Avedon, famous
photographer for L'oreal. She
has done commercials and ads
for such products as Agree, V05,
Redkin boxcover. Arid Extra Dry
and appeared in magazines like
Seventeen, Mademoiselle, Self,
Time and Harper's
And according to her, taking
pictures is not all that easy; there
is more to it than the picture.
"One nice thing about seeing the
finished product is that 1
remember all the work that went
into it. On a shot in Tahiti, I was
doing lingerie � kimonos and
teddies � but it was in the jungle.
We were bitten so badly by the
mosquitoes that we were begging
the photographers 'to slop. We
finally did and also got a couple
of days to play tourist. So it's
fun, but it can be tough
Cameron's latest interests lie in
acting and designing clothes. "I
just finished 'Sunset Strip' in
which 1 have a leading role she
said. The chase film should be
released sometime this year. 'T
wish everything was like it was in
the old days. Everyone thinks I'm
such a prude because I wear
shorts and a slip instead of being
naked. I won't allow body
doubles either. I still look naked
in the film, but 1 know I'm not
and my family knows so it
doesn't matter Cameron also
did a spot on the "Young and the
Restless" last summer in which
she played a model for the
character Jack Abbot.
Cameron fell into fashion
designing when her daily schedule
ran thin. "1 always have to be do-
ing something she said. Now
specializing in capes and jackets
of leather and lamb suede,
Cameron sells to 10 different
boutiques in Beverly Hills and to
Designer Norman Marcus.
"Even in school I made my
own clothes, but I always chang-
ed the patterns. I love to be
creative and it's exciting to see
how these creations grow said
Cameron.
'There are still so many things
1 want to do. I remember doing
my student teaching with Jane
Hartly at Wahl Coates Elemen-
tary. She was fun and worked
well with the kids. I still love kids
myself and will probably work
with under-privileged kids when I
stop modeling. And soon, my
husband and I plan to adopt a
child from World Vision
As for her days at ECU,
"W hen I look back, it was such a
great time. I was more indepen-
dent than ever. I just went to
class. I was never in any clubs,
which I think is funny to me now!
But really, days at East Carolina
University were great
Anthony Edwards portrays Johnathan Moore in Universal Studio's newest movie, 'Gotcha
'Gotcha Grabs Audience With Several Nice Surprises
By MATTHEW GILLIS
Staff Wrtitr
This past weekend the crowd at
Hendrix Theatre was hardly
disappointed. What was the at-
traction? The sneak preview of
Universal Studio's newest
Elease, Gotcha a flick filled
th surprises and action.
Gotcha! features Anthony Ed-
irds (Revenge of the Nerds) as
Johnathan Moore, a young col-
lege student who happens to be
�aught up in one of today's big-
est crazes � the game
�Gotcha "Gotcha of course,
an assassin-type game where
layers try to "kill" their op-
ponents with special pellet-firing
istols while trying to avoid being
'killed" themselves. Johnathan
Just wishes it was as easy to get a
girl home with him as it is playing
games.
Spring Break finally comes
around, and Johnathan and his
friend Manolo (newcomer Nick
Corri) head for Paris. There
Johnathan finds the woman of
his dreams, the mysterious Sasha
Banicek (played by Vision
Quest's Linda Fiorentino).
Johnathan falls into a whirlwind
affair with her and even follows
her to Berlin where she takes care
of some "business
The two wind up in East Berlin
and suddenly Johnathan becomes
involved in a game of interna-
tional intrigue. In fact, he even
gets pursued by a mysterious
stranger. Suddenly, Johnathan is
forced into a real-life game of cat
and mouse, using all his skills to
get out of Europe and back
home. Still, the danger is there
for Johnathan, even back home
in California, not to mention a
few surprises (maybe even one of
his own).
The film is a bit long on
relating the storyline, but the sur-
prises and suspense that come up
do reach out and grab you, put-
ting you right into the thick of it.
There also happens to be enough
comedy to relate the overall pic-
ture.
Gotcha produced by Paul
Hensler and directed by Jeff
Kanew, is not a great film. But
there are enough twists and turns
in a fairly decent storyline to
make the film okay. In fact, once
you see it, Gotcha! will getcha!
� v irtm- .
"� to
v
. 1
Cheri Cameron-Newell
For now, Chert is enjoying the beach and relaxing atmosphere of her new house in Marina Del Ra
Gearing Up For Graduation
By DONNA DAVIS
Staff Wrhar
So graduation is in sightYou've been x-ing off
the days since you began all those semesters
agoOr maybe you have a year left and are plan-
ning your schedules down to the minute. Well,
now is the time to consider, "Have I done
everything I need to do before I leave this
campus?" It sounds like I'm referring to making a
list of things you'd want to do after you find out
you have six weeks left to live. No, its not that
drastic, but almost. (By the way, as a warning, this
article is going to be full of cliches.) Haven't you
ever thought back to high school days and said,
"Wow, if I could go back I'd really get involved in
things. I'd try out for the basketball team and play
in the marching band � instead of letting time
slide idley by As they say, hind sight is 20-20
(cliche 1 and title of popular song). College is the
same animal f cliche 2 and subject of the ever-
popular film epic Animal House). We are comm-
missioned to do more than merely explore the
virgin regions of our gray matter. We are compell-
ed to become well-rounded (pleasantly plump? �
cliche 3) individuals.
There is probably little to no danger of any
ECU grads never having experienced "Downtown
Greenville (If this article had been oratory, I
would have uttered the word in hushed tones of
reverence.) No one is knocking it, mind you, but
as cliche 4 goes � 'all work and no play �
there's not much chance of any "dull boys" com-
ing out of ECU. However, just "not being dull" is
not exactly the same as glistening with a wide
realm of experiences. There are a few things that
you've just GOTTA do before you leave this
place.
(1) You must attend at least one sports event.
Are you howling at the absurdity of this sugges-
tion? Don't. There actually are students who have
never attended a game even though it's included in
tuition fees.
(2) You must attend at least one of the "Artist
Series" events. Maybe you think that "culture" is
"not your thing" (cliche 5). First of all, every
educated person should develop a taste for the
arts, even if you think the taste reminds you of the
spinach you used to have to eat as a kid. In a way
the parallel is good; when you grow up you realize
they're both good for you.
(3) If you managed to elude Music and Art Ap-
preciation classes, you should go to Fletcher
Music Hall and listen to a student recital, and
walk up to Jenkins Art Building to Grays Art
Gallery and get an eye-full. (Don't go to Gray's
Art Gallery in mixed company if lack of clothing
embarasses you). Just being in the proximity of
music and art formation sort of makes you feel
like you're on a "Fame" set.
(4) There are a lot of little things you should do.
Little things mean a lot (cliche 6). You need to see
a "free flick" in Hendrix Theatre and witness
first-hand total audience participation (especially
during moving love scenes). You need to go to one
of the Bingo and Ice Cream parties and stuff your
face with Rocky Road. Although it may not be in-
tellectually stimulating or artistically rewarding,
you might win a Mendenhall T-shirt (oh boy!).
You need to go to Memorial Gym, and if exercise
is personally against your religion and you avoid it
at all costs as 1 do, you can experience it there
vicariously. You need to eventually walk around
in all or most of the classroom buildings. Just to
see how strangely different all of the professors
are is an incredible experience that shouldn't be
missed.
There's one more thing I'd like to do before I
leave this campus. Maybe we can crouch in the
bushes on a moonlit night for this oneI'd like to
see the individuals who decorate the trees and
yards of the local sorority houses in the actual act
of draping stands of toilet paper over the bran-
ches.
Ohthere is one more thing you should pro-
bably do before you leave this campusgo to a
class or two.
Famous Comedian, Jay Leno, To Visit ECU On April 21
By HAROLD JOYNER
Not really thinking he's made
it big, Comedian Jay Leno still
believes that being able to relate
to his audiences, and therefore
gearing his material towards
them, is an important step in be-
ing a true professional. Leno will
have the opportunity to try out
his philosophy of humor for
ECU students Saturday night in
Minges Coliseum.
"This isn't my first visit to
North Carolina Leno said in a
telephone interview Monday.
"I've played for Duke University
and I really liked playing for the
folks in Raleigh. The only thing
different I'll be doing here is pull-
ing from my bag of college jokes.
People are not interested in hear-
ing about New York or L.A.
unless they're from there. I like
to do material people know
about
A major difference in Leno's
act and other comedians who
have made it big seems to lie in in
the fact that he doesn't rely on
vulgarity to get laughs. "I don't
do a lot of it Leno says. "With
the popularity of cable television,
more people are aware of that
kind of humor. Commercial
television has managed to keep
the comics clean, though
Leno likes his work, though he
says he really doesn't think what
he is doing is work. But as with
any job, some nights it takes a lot
more motivation to do a show.
"I've been doing this for a long
time. It's my job and you learn to
work the room. You may get
laughs all the time and then again
you may not get any at all. You
may have nights that are better
than others, but you never have a
horrible night. I can remember
having A nights and F nights.
I See FUNNY, Page f.
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udent recital, and
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of makes you feel
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experience it there
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you should pro-
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April 21
managed to keep
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png this for a long
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Classifieds
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 16, 1985
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Seekmg
esponsible, non smoking roommate
to share B unit at Ringgold Towers
for both summer sessions Com
pletely furnished, air conditioned
accessories included, $170 per
month call 752 0998, ask for Dan
ROOMMATE WANTED: Behind
Belk dorm, uth St Rent $135
Private room Call 758 7470 after
4 JO ask for Jane.
2 ROOMMATES WANTED: For
summer. Starting first week in May
$100 per month � '4 utilities. Large
house with central ac, dishwasher
yard Call 758 5953 Across from
Overton's.
PART TIME WORD PROCESSOR
NEEDED: For law firm. Program
ig experience helpful. Call Kim
at 758 6200
ROOMMATES NEEDED: For sum
mer school, 612 Ringgold Towers
$150 a month, utilities included, com
pletely furnished air conditioned
Call John al 757 3640.
COMING HOME AND LOOKING
FOR A SUMMER JOB?. Full and
parttime waiter, waitress and cook
positions. Call or write Pizza Hut,
3407 S. Wilmingtion St, Raleigh
N.C 27603 772 8107.
WANTED: Person to share nice fur
nished 2 br. apt w female for sum
-ner sessions. Close to ECU $140 ' 2
utilities. Call 758 6814.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For fall �
spring semesters. Oakmont Square
Apts. $142.50 per month, ' 2 utilities.
Female Smoker, neat. Serious stu
nt. Call 752 1127 ask for Jan.
WANTED: I male roommate to
share large 2 bedroom apt 2 pools,
color TV w cable. Private room �
$125 month. 758 2392
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
May 6 to July 31 Senior or grad. No
furniture needed! Within walking
distance of campus. Call Norma
355 7365
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
To share nice 3 bedroom house Will
have own bedroom 2 blocks from
campus Rent is $100 each Available
1st of May. Call 752 3103.
2 ROOMMATES WANTED: To
share 3 bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates $94 rent '4 utilities
Call 757 1103.
ROOMMATES NEEDED. To
share 3 bedroom duplex. AC. SlOO �
jtilities. Call 758 1893
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
And specialist positions available.
Looking for a few junior, senior, or
graduate students to complete our
staff at an exclusive, private, co ed
summer camp in the scenic moun
tains of Pennsylvania. Openings for
General Counselors one male tennis
instructor, and male and female
canoeing, nature, and landsport
counselors. If interested contact-
Camp Starlight, co Hy Schmeckrer,
18 Clinton St Malverne N.Y , 11565 �
Phone (516) 599 5239 or Elaine
Shuman at 758 8129.
SUMMER JOBS: It's not too late to
get a summer job. We have positions
still available. $250 per week. Inter
views will be Wednesday April 17 at
I 00, 3.30, or 7:00p.m. in Brewster D
room 102.
EARN MONEY: And work on For
tune 500 Companies' marketing pro-
grams on campus. Part time (flexi -
bie) hours each week. We give
references. Call I 800 243 6679.
PERSONAL
NEED A SUMMER JOB?: Located
1 Raleigh. Perfect for the college
" dent who needs to make money
over the summer. Five days a week.
Easy work. Great Pay! Send name,
local address and phone number,
�aior ana G.P A to F.D.L. Inc
1608 E 5th St. Greenville, N.C. 27834
HEY! ALPHA DELTA PI CUTIE
FROM VA.): If you're single,
bright, lovable and carefree, you're
forme! Let's have dinner sometime.
What do ya say? Infatuated 2x a
week.
D.W.E.E.B.S Sex, suds, and fun in
the sun. Myrtle Beach days catching
the rays, Myrtle Beach nights enjoy
ing the sights. Preoccupied with get
ting laid, the boys thought they had
it made. Sluttin' was their fascina
tion and they searched in despara
tion. Easter Sunday came to pass, in
final hopes they went to Mass. Pray
ing for such a need, it was a wonder
they did not succeed. Being so word
ly in their ways, they taught the girls
me successful plays. The girls put it
to the test and to their surprise they
were a success. Next time boys
listen to what we have to say, then
you'll know the proper way to play.
Never brag of past conquests if in
action you can't pass the test. K.C.
and Rich we had a blast, it was a
shame it couldn't last, j & b. P.S.
Truth or dare? Did you boys finally
scoreor did you shuck your corn?
KAPPA SIGMA: The Brothers of
Kappa Sigma would like to apologize
for the problems caused by a few of
our members at Pi Kapp Field Day.
Good luck to everyone for the re-
mainder of the week.
SIGMA NU BROTHERS: The tug
was tough but we pulled through. We
beat Kappa Sigs, Sig Eps, and Alpha
Sigs too! We love you Your Little
Sisters
HEY! SKEPTICAL BASEBALL
PLAYER Surprises are in abun-
dance around the 25th! Be prepared'
A.L M
SIGMA NU LITTLE SISTERS:
Don't forget our softball game,
Tuesday night on field 2. Call the
house for the time.
&
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Monday Thru Thursday
SHRIMP DINNER
served with
F. Fries, Slaw
Hushpuppies
$3.25
105 Airport Rd.
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 758-0397
A'vAjJOfAMEAL
NEED SUMMER
WORK?
HEY! EARTH PUPPIES: Maxx
Warrior will be here April 19 � 20!
Congrats Lisa � Marty!
JAMES: Luau was a blast! The
ping-pong balls, strip shows,
chandelier earrings, ham in-the
pocket, and van rides were just TOO
MUCH! We'll make it a date for next
year also!
SALE
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert.
TYPING: Experience, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive, 758 5301.
FOR SALE: General Electric por
table air conditioner. Very good con-
dition. Call 752-1989.
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates call 355-2510 after
6:30.
FOR SALE: '73 Datsun 240Z
Michelen tires, mag wheels, air
dam, driving lights, AM FM
cassette, runs well, needs paint.
$2,300. Call Todd 757 3347 weekdays
after 5 or weekends.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
DataWorks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes and more. All work
is computer-checked against 50,000
work electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as SI.75 per page, in-
cluding paper. (Call for specific
rates.) Call Mark at 757 3440 after
5:30 p.m.
ROOMS FOR RENT: 2 blocks from
campus, bath, kitchen, $95 per
month � split utilities. Call Charlie
Board 758 7056.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 756-4664 evenings or
752 6106 days.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs; 758-8241 or
758-5488.
FOR SALE: Beautiful Oriental
Couch. Less than a year old. Call
758 4382 ask for Cheryl.
TYPING: Experienced professional
woman will provide all typing ser
vices. (IBM correcting typewriter)
Call Debbie at 756 6333 for a well
typed paper.
FOR SALE: 1980 Suzuki GS 550, four
cylinder, 6 speed transmition, new
tires, good condition. 758 0675
Barry.
FOR RENT: Furnished 2 bedroom
apt. with pool one block from cam
pus for the summer. Call 758 4987.
FOR SALE: Black Earth Cruiser
One year old $100. Call 752 4379 ask
for Phil. EASE UP, GUSSIE!
NICE HOME: To share with serious
older student for fall 1985. Female
non smoker. Call 758 5946.
LOFT FOR SALE: Desk and shelf
attached, stained wood, ladder, safe
ty bar. $$ Negotiable. Call 758 8973
now!
FOR SALE: 1979
$500. Call 752 4039.
Yamaha IT 175
FOR SALE: HONDA CB 400T only
5,200 miles. Asking $900 Call
756 5837ask for Rich.
ERIC CLAPTON: Tickets for his
Duke performance are now
available at Apple Records. Don't
miss this slow hand perform
"Layla "Crossroads and all you
other favorites. BE THERE.
STUDENTS: Five guaranteed
sources of scholarships loans
fellowships; you can qualify! For
free information write- Academic
Resource Associates, Box 123 Green
briar Road, Tarboro, N.C, 27886.
FOR SALE: Kabuki 10-speed with
center pull brakes. Contact Michael
at 752 6502.
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARD: For the return of a red
satin Miller High Life jacket. Lost at
the Elbo Room. Sentimental value
Please call 752 3508.
LOST: In D.T. G'ville area: gold
men's Seiko Watch. REWARD OF
FERED. Contact 758 6224 or 2506 E
10th St. no. 3.
Join the Z- Team
WZMB is now accepting applications for
the positions of:
Promotions Director News Director
Program Director Traffic Monoger
Business Monoger Production Manager
Pick up application form at WZMB office, 2nd
floor, Old Joyner Library Monday-Friday 10 a m -3
p.m. Deadline: April 26.
Make $286 A WEEK
For an Interview
Call 757-3737
SALE
srONSOftiD
�Y
� Don't Miss It �
EAST COAST PRINTS
7Ac
A Funny Guy
favorite hobby and often helps
him take his mind off the
headaches of show business.
Now one of the most sought-
after comedic personalities on the
TV talk show circuit, Leno made
his first appearance on "The
Tonight Show" with host Johnny
Carson and has since appeared
on the show numerous times. He
has also been a frequent guest on
"The Mike Douglas Show
"The Merv Griffin Show" and
"The David Letterman Show
At last, Leno does not bave to
resort to staying in flea-bag
hotels, nor riding the bus as he
did in his earlier days. Now he
can enjoy the finer aspects of life,
while at the same time keeping his
perspective of what it's like to
make it big.
Continued From Page 8.
Right now, 1 think I'm having B
nights
Probably the worst time in his
life, Leno says, was when he per-
formed for an audience while two
strip teasers bathed in big cham-
pagne glasses.
Though he played the night
club circuit two and three times a
night, Leno says he feels the stage
experience is the best thing a
beginning comedian can do to get
started in the business. "You're
going to take a big chance in do-
ing so he says, "but it'll just
teach you to just get up and start
all over again.
"I have no regrets in the career
I've chosen. I work for myself,
basically have all my days off,
and work until 11 at night. It's
very relaxing to know that I don't
have to sell anything. I know a lot
of guys who get ulcers from their
jobs. I'm happy to know that my
career is honest. Besides, what
I'm doing won't give cancer to
anyone or pollute anything. So I
figure the worst that can happen
is that no one will laugh, which to
me, isn't half as bad as having a
boss
Leno found adequate ac-
comodations sleeping in the back
seat of a 1955 Buick Roadmaster
he had bought during his first
visit to Los Angeles. He still owns
the car, he says, along with
several other vintage
automobiles. He affectionatelv
refers to his Buick as "Mr.
Buick He also says that collec-
ting old motorcycles is his
TREAT YOURSELF TODAY
DELIVERS
m In our delivery area)
Lunch M-F 11-2
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758-6372
Check Our Daily Specials
Philadelphia Style Cheese Steaks Our Specialty I
And Now Big Daddy's Big Oipp�r
Dip Ice Cream at Big Daddy s 304 E. lOtfc St.
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CAROLINA EAST MALL 756-6078
(North entrance � Near Beiks)
Open MonSat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sundays 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
1 'If you have to do laundry
do it in style"
Get ready for a long hot
summer with cotton
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pants and shorts.
Specializing in Natural Fiber
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116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 100-5:3�
Next Door to Book Bare 757-3944
"�iiWHWU
m iniii i





18STCAROUNlANA
ECU STUDENT UNION
FRESENTS
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F.MCEE:
. EDWARD TOSHACH
JIM
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CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
OCcy
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STUDENT SUPPLY STORE SPRING SIDEWALK SALE
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I HI ASI (. AROI INIAN
Sports
M'KIl lh. �vh� Pdc 1
Bucs Defeat Wesleyan Twice
I
j4jfc
Jim Peterson focuses on home plate in an earlier game. ECU now
stands 25-9 on the season and will face William & Marv in a ECAC
South twinhill on Vednesda.
By TONY BROWN
Sl�ff Writer
The Pirate baseballers took a
disputed 6-5 win over the Battling
Bishops of N.C. Wesyleyan last
Thursday, then followed that up
on Saturday with a resounding
9-1 win over Virginia Wesleyan.
In the N.C. Wesleyan game,
ECU began the scoring in the
bottom of the first with one run
as Mark Shank doubled and
eventually came in on a ground
out after advancing to third on a
sacrifice.
The Bishops tied the score at
1-1 in the top of the second. After
Pirate catcher Jim Riley picked a
Wesleyan runner off second, a
walk and two errors allowed one
run to score.
Jay McGraw hit one out of the
park in the bottom of the second
to give ECU a one-run lead
again, then the Pirates added
three in the third. Shank walked,
moved to second on a sacrifice
and came home on Chris
Bradberry's double. Winfred
Johnson singled Bradberry in,
then a walk and a single by
McGraw filled the bases.
Another walk forced in a run for
a 5-1 Pirate lead.
The Bishops scored on a walk,
two singles and a ground out in
fourth inning to cut the margin to
5-2, but ECU scored what turned
out to be the winning run in the
bottom of the fifth. After a walk,
Mark Cockrell doubled to up the
Pirate lead to 6-2.
ECU needed every one of their
six runs as it turned out. The
Bishops really began "battling"
in more ways than one in the top
of the ninth. With one on for
Wesleyan via a walk, John Hag-
gerty homered to cut the ECU ad-
vantage to 6-4. An off-target
throw to first forced Johnson to
tag the runner for the first out of
the frame.
Winfred Johnson
The Wesleyan coaching staff
disagreed rather firmly with the
call. Assistant coach Mike
DeLeone bumped an umpire,
quickly earning an ejection from
the game. Head coach Mike Fox
was also ejected for continuing to
argue the call.
The significance of the call in-
creased dramatically as the next
batter, bteve Druelli, hit a home
run to right field. This would
have tied it up it the runner had
been on. The next batter filed out
to give the win to ECU.
Jim Peterson picked up the pit-
ching decision for the Pirates,
raising his season mark to 5-2. He
only allowed six tuts, with two of
those in the ninth Johnson and
McGraw led the Pirate hitters,
both going 2-for-4.
In Saturday's game against
Virginia Wesleyan. the Pirates
left no doubt as to who the win-
ner should hae been as the
pounded the VW pitching staff in
a 9-1 win.
VW opened the scoring in the
top of the first. With one awa.
Mike Mustain singled to center.
Glen Pizanello followed with, a
two-bagger to give Weslean a
1-0 lead.
The Pirates quicklv responded
in the bottom of the frame. Greg
Hardison got on with the help of
an error by the VW third
baseman, and then moved all the
way to third on an attempted
pick-off throw b pitcher Chuck
Kumkey. Chris Bradberr walk-
ed, then Pirate hurler Winfred
Johnson hit what proved to be
the winning runs with a three-run
blast to left centerfield for a 3-1
lead.
ECU added a run in the bot-
tom o the third on two singles,
then began to pile it on in the
sixth. Johnson singled and Mike
Sullivan walked and Jay McGraw
sacrificed both runners up. Jim
kilev singled to left to sore one
run, moving Sullivan to third.
Markockrell's single to left in-
creased the Pirate lead to 6 1
With one out and runners on
first and second, reliever Mike
Mungin came on in rei I
Kumkev, but II continued
score Robert I angston walked
to load the bases, then M i �
Shank got a hit to make it 8-1
Greg Hardison then tapped one
over the first baseman's glove to
bring in what proved o he the
last run of the game.
In addition to leading He
Pirate hitlers, Johnson picked
the pitching decision to better his
mark to 7-3 on the ear Johnson
also set the single-season �
for total bases with 119. H I s
record improved with this pair of
wins to 25-9.
The Pirates return to a.uon
Wednesday at Harrington field,
hosting William &. Mary in an
ECAC-South twmbill, beginning
at 4 p.m.
It's been announced that 1
i arolina will host the E( V
South tournament Mav 16-19
The field will include the winner
of the ECAC-Metro, EC At
South, ECAC-N NJ and an
large team.
"We're delighted to have the
tournament here jid Pi:
head coach Gary Overton. "The
home field advantage sho .
really help us a great deal
Bv RICKMcf ()RMA(
o.sprt, tdllor
The ECU Lad) Pirate Basket-
ball team wrapped up their verv
successful 1984-85 season with an
awards banguet on Sunday night.
The awards ceremon) was held
on Sundav at the Riverside
Steakhouse. where about 150
people attended. The event was
hosted bv Jimmv and Billie Ter-
vvn� tiic soon to be
opened re I :it, who donated
their goods and services to the
I adv Pirate basketball program.
The I adv Pirates, who com-
pleted the season at 21-8 overall,
and 11-1 in the ECAC South.
were conference regular season
and tournament champions.
Junior Sylvia Bragg was voted
bv her teammates as the Daily
Reflector 's Most-Valuable-
Player. Bragg, who has earned
all-EC AC South honors in each
r! her past two season's, played
her first vear at the point guard
ition. She led the team in
- 4s with 153 while scoring 11.8
ppg. It was also the second year
m a row that Bragg was selected
team MVP.
"It took Sylvia a little time to
Hoopsters Hold Awards Banquet
adjust to her new position,
ECU head coach Emily Manwar-
ing said. "But she reallv learned
to like it and became an excellent
floor leader out there
Anna Anderson, the team's
leading scorer with 13.3 ppg and
second leading rebounder, was
the recipient o' the Coaches
Award.
"Anita reallv matured and
grew into the type ol team leader
we needed Manwarmg said o'
the senior center from Raleigh.
forward Annette Phillips
received the defensive player-of-
the-year award for her outstan-
ding defensive plav during the
Lady Pirates' championship
season. "Annette was a good
consistent performer Manwar-
ing said. "She always guarded
the other team's leading scorer
and rebounder and kept them out
of the key (lane area)
Comeback player of the year
award went to junior gaurd
Lorainne Foster. Foster came
back after missing her junior
season due to an injury. She
returned to average 12.9 ppg
mostly on long range jumpshots.
Freshman forward Momgue
Pompili was chosen as rookie-of-
the-year, in addition to earning
all-conference honors. The
freshman forward from Fayet-
teville shows unlimited promise,
and could possibly be the second
women's college player to dunk
in competition, according to
ECU coach Emily Manwaring.
"Monique has dunked since
the end ot the season, and were�-
hopeful that she will be the se-
cond player to dunk in women's
basketball she said. "Monique
is really quick for her size and did
an outstanding job as a
freshman
Junior forward Lisa
Squirewell, the leading rebounder
for the Lady Bucs' this season,
was the third member of the team
to be selected as all-ECAC South.
This was the second year in a row
Squirewell was chosen to the all-
league team.
In some special awards that
were given out by Manwaring,
Joanne Bly and Laurie Sikes were
chosen assistant coaches-of-the-
year, while Diane Leary was
named secretary-of-the-year.
Sylvia Bragg (left) receives the Daily Reflector Most Valuable
at the Lady Pirate basketball banquet on Sundav.
Plaver trophv from coach Emil Manwaring
McNeil, McCorkle
Still Running
For Track Team
B BILL MITCHELL
sitff Wnlft
ECU's sensational freshman
�sprinter Lee Vernon McNeil
troke the NCAA record for the
J'K)-meter dash on April 5th at
'the UNC Relavs
k
Lee McNeil
McNeil's time of 10.34 seconds
outdid that of Elliot Quaw, a
vorld class sprinter from Rutgers
University.
Coach Bill Carson was pleased
ysith McNeil's performance, but
tscpecially pleased that Lee was
able to defeat the N.C. State run-
ners.
"We have never beaten all the
N.C. State sprinters Carson
said. "I'm glad that Lee was
finally able to do it. Lee put in a
very, very fine sprint for East
Carolina
This past weekend McNeil,
along with teammate Nathan Mc-
Corkle competed in the Seven-
Eleven Invitational in Dallas, Tx.
The two are the only two track
team members currently com-
peting in meets, due to injuries
and other complications facing
the track team at this time.
McNeil placed second in the
100-meter dash, behind Neil
Cockney. Cockney is a profes-
sional and owns the fastest
recorded time in the world in the
100-meter dash. McCorkle
wasn't far behind as he Finished
in sixth place in the same event.
"I was really pleased with how
both Lee and Nathan did coach
Carson said. "They ran against
some of the fastest sprinters
around, and did real well
Next on the agenda for the two
tracksters is the ECAC South
Championships in Fairfax, Va
which is scheduled for this
weekend.
Hagler Knocks Out Hit Man In 3rd
It was billed as the one of the
greatest fights of the century.
Super-welterweight champion
Thomas "the Hit Man" Hearns
against middleweight champion
Marvelous Marvin Hagler.
RANDY MEWS
At Ringside
The two men entered the ring
with a combined record of 102
wins, three losses, two draws and
84 knockouts. Hagler had last
been defeated in 1976, while the
only loss of Hearns' career came
at the hands of Sugar Ray
Leonard in 1981.
Boxing fans from Japan, Ger-
many, Argentinia, the Phillipine
Islands and many other nations
across the globe had paid a hand-
some price to view the Fight on
closed-circut television. Here in
Greenville, $20 a head was the
going rate at TW's Nitelife.
Before the Fight, Hagler had
complained of never receiving the
exposure he felt he deserved.
Despite establishing himself as
one of the great boxers of the
1980's, he was an uncelebrated
champion atop a weak mid-
dleweight division.
Hearns, on the other hand, had
gained big-money and fame early
in his career when he was
dethroned as welterweight cham-
pion by Leonard.
But all that didn't matter last
night in Las Vegas � both men
had reached the pinnacle of their
careers. Hagler wanted to use this
fight to establish himself as one
of the great middleweights of all
time. Hearns hoped to use the
match as a stepping stone to an
unprecedented fourth world
championship.
This was also the second
richest fight of all-time behind
that of the first meeting between
Leonard and Roberto Duran.
Prior to the fight, both men
had proclaimed their opponent
would be the victim of a
knockout. Hearns was as bold to
say he would floor Hagler in
three rounds. However, as fate
might have it, Hearns was the one
sent sprawling to the canvas in
round three.
With Hagler's middleweight
crown at stake, the two boxers
fought at a furious pace in the
first round. It was a war as
Hagler had predicted, but it was
he who lost the first battle.
Hearns used his three inch
height and reach advantage to
keep Hagler at a distance. It was
the marvelous one's plan to get
inside and wear down his
challenger with body punches.
Yet this seemed almost impossi-
ble against the power-packed jab
of Hearns who only allowed the
champion to get close on several
occasions on his way to a decisive
first round victory.
After regaining his composure
between rounds, Hagler was able
to settle down and try to execute
his strategy. He was successful to
some degree, but it was Hearns
who dictated the tempo o the
fight b the use o his jab and
great ring mobility.
Bv the third round, the Hit
Man's jab had done its job by
opening a gash below Hagler's
right eve. After a brief examina-
tion by the ringside physician just
under a minute into the round.
Hagler was quicly sent back to
battle.
Seconds later, with blood
streaming from his recently ac-
quired wound, the champion
unleashed a savage right hook
that caught Hearns square on the
side of his head. He reeled back
several steps, but before Hearns
could regroup himself. Hagler
landed another right hook that
sent Hearns down and out.
The Hit Man was able to strug-
gle to his feet before the count of
ten. but the fight was immediate-
ly awarded to Hagler as Hearns
could barelv support himself on
the ropes after suffering the
blows to his head
ECU Netters Victorious
In Azalea Tournament
The ECU men's tennis team
won all four of its matches to
take first place in the UNC-
Wilmington Azalea Classic Ten-
nis Tournament over the
weekend.
The Pirate netters defeated The
Citadel 9-3, Campbell 7-5, UNC-
Wilmington 7-5 and UNC-
Greensboro 9-0.
ECU finished with the tourna-
ment with 32 points, narrowly
defeating Campbell who had 31
points. UNC-W was third with 24
points, The Citadel finished with
22 points while UNC-G was
shutout during the competition.
"They played fantastic against
some really tough competition
ECU coach Pat Sherman said.
"This was a very demanding
tournament. Each match was
very tough and required a great
deal of endurance and concentra-
tion
Galen Treble, Davis Bagley,
and David Turner each won all
four of the singles matches they
played.
Coach Sherman felt that the
whole team did a good job in
winning the tournament.
"We had to have everybody
play well Sherman said. "The
team proved they could play well.
They were very happy with their
accomplishments
Here are the results in the
Azalea Tournament:
ECU vs. The Citadel
Treble (ECU) d. Govette 10-6
See BL'C, page 12
r�-
� n
,





LITHEEAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 16
1985
Continued from page 11
Greg Loyd (ECU) d. Strecan-
sky 10-8
Greg Willis (ECU) d. Crouch
10-7
Dan Lamont (ECU) d. Blyth
10-2
Bagley (ECU) d. Weekly 10-6
Turner (ECU) d. Wallace 10-2
Bricklemeyer (Cit.) d. John
Anthony 10-7
Pat Campenaro (ECU) d.
Anderson 11-9
Strecansky-Crouch (Cit.) d.
Willis-Treble 10-7
Blyth-Bricklemeyer (Cit.) d.
Turner-Anthony 10-8
Netters Take Wilmington Azalea
Campenaro-Bagley (ECU) d.
Govette-Weekly 11-9
Kevin Plumb-Loyd (ECU) d.
Wallace-Anderson 10-6
ECU vs. Campbell
Treble (ECU) d. Eickoff 10-6
Ibarguen (Camp.)d. Loyd 10-8
Willis (ECU) d. McSheehy 10-4
Horcasitas (Camp.) d. LaMont
10-4
Bagley (ECU) d. McRae 10-4
Turner (ECU) d. T. Maynor
10-5
George (Camp.) d. Anthony
10-8
Campenaro (ECU) d. K.
Mavnor 10-4
Eickoff-lbarguen (Camp.) d.
Willis-Treble 10-7
Horcasitas-McRae (Camp.) d.
Campenaro-Bagley 10-7
Anthony-Turner (ECU) d. T.
Maynor-McSheehy 10-7
Plumb-Loyd (ECU) d. George-
C. Maynor 10-7
ECU vs. UNC-W
Treble (ECU) d. Gratz 10-5
Maurer (UNC-W) d. Loyd 10-8
Nixon (UNC-W) d. Willis 11-9
LaMont (ECU) d. Rock 10-7
Turner (ECU) d. Bowen 10-5
Allen (UNC-W) d. Anthony
10-6
Campenaro (ECU) d. Thomp-
son 10-6
Treble-Willis (ECU) d.
Maurer-Gratz 10-6
Bagley-Campenaro (ECU) d.
Bowen-Thomspson 10-8
Rock-Cheers (UNC-W) d.
Anthony-Turner 10-3
Allen-McGee (UNC-W)
d.
Plumb-Loyd 10-8
ECU vs. UNC-G
Treble (ECU) d. Kleis 10-4
Loyd (ECU) d. Lewis 10-0
Willis (ECU) d. Walton 10-3
LaMont (ECU) d. Dorman
10-8
Bagley (ECU) d. Garett 10-1
Turner (ECU) d. Bigh 10-2
Treble-Willis (ECU) d. Kleis
Dorman 10-7
Campenaro-Bagley (ECU) d
Lewis-Walton 10-3
Anthony-Turner (ECU) d
Garett-Bigh 10-3
SUMMER JOBS
College Students $250. per week
Interviews, Wednesday 1:00, 3:30, or 7:00 p.m
Brewster D room 102. Please Be Prompt.
at
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
DMIKC A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Q�rps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer, f you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities P.O Box 7713
Clifton, XI 07015. Or call toll tree 1-800-US A-ARMY
UtMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAM BE
ATTENTION RETURNING
STUDENTS
If you plan to live off campus in the fall, will you
need lights, water or heat?
If so, eliminate one long line by arranging your utili-
ty service in advance.
At your parents' request, utility service can be put in their name. Just pick up
an application in Room 211 in the off-campus housing office. Whichard
Building or at Greenville Utilities main office. 200 W. Fifth Street.
Have your parents complete the application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to Greenville utilities, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville, N.C. 27835-184
Attn: Customer Services.
Remind them to attach a letter of credit from their power companv
� � �
If you wish to have the utility service put in your name, a deposit will be re-
quired.
with �4�ctric oc without electric or
90s spoco hoot 90s spocc hoot
EloctricOnry $100 $75
Electric & Wotor $110 $85
Elecrnc, Woter & Gas $110 $85
Electric & Go $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance. You must include sour
name, where service will be required, when service should be cut on and a
phone number where v.e may reach you this summer.
� � �
A cut on service charge will be included in your first billing. Service charee are
as follows:
Electric ond of water - $10
Electric, 90s andor water - $30
For further information, contact Customer Assistance
(919) 752-7166
22!Lc
Greenville 5
Utilities
� co'
Rain Date
Friday X
April 19 Grob Bog$ lj
tilled with
Books
99C
New
Remainder
Books Up Tox
75 Off
Pub. Suggested

Retail
One Table
j New Assorted
Books
Reduced
40

iMFMMMfMF
On SidewalL �
Outside Student
Supply Store Lobby
Thursday April 18th
r � � � 8:30 a.m4:00 p.m?
Save Up To 30 & 70 on
Selected AAprrhnnHic
JtaCp.l.U.lJ.I.JJ ij.ri.� ' � ' ��� i ���
SPECIAL VALUESSPECIAL VALUES I SPECIAL VALI IK
' m
-Popcorn-
-Cotton Candy
-Candy Apples-
and
15$ Pepsi
T-SHIRTS
SWEATSHIRTS
CHILDRENS WEAR
KNIT SHIRTS
RAIN HATS
COWBOY HATS
ECU NAPKINS &
MATCHES
CAMPUS LIFE POSTERS
JACKETS
MEDICAL BAGS (2)
COMPOSITION BOOKS
PAINTING MEDIUMS
HIP CURVES
AVERAGE FINDERS
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
ffrHTTTTriTTrrnnnrnnTroH
WRIGHT BUILDING
OWNED AND OPERATED BY EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Pur
By SCOTT C (
The second an
Pirate Purple
Pigout Party is schedl
day April J9 and Sat
20 and open to the pj
charge
Appearances b MJ
stars Boog Po
Davidson will hca J
events Both il! h
affordable f.
the plaza
Pi
is o
as
Men's IZOI
$16 95 re
j& wwwrrT?i


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vasH

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�ft� RECREA1
� rtNNIS
� PRIVAT1
� b UT11
� CONVENES
� AMPLE TARM
� A SPACIOUS

AT KING
4�student li
GreenvilU
EVERY 1
place, hi
move in i
We are J
' Call our
atEX.ul


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lassie
d Garetl 10-1
d Bigh 10-2
- ECU) d Kleis-
i Baglc (ECU) d
I ECU 1 d
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 16. 1985
13
NG
will YOU
our utili-
ier Assistance
I
j
LUES
S (2)
BOOKS
UMS
ERS
Purple-Gold Pigskin Pigout Party Schedule
By SCOTTCOOPrn ui:� J . . .
By SCOTT COOPER
The second annual Great
Pirate Purple-Gold Pigskin
Pigout Party is scheduled for Fri-
day April 19 and Saturday April
20 and open to the public free of
charge.
Appearances by Miller Lite all-
stars Boog Powell and Ben
Davidson will headline this year's
events. Both will be meeting the
public Friday night under the
lights of Ficklen Stadium. Powell
will be featured in the golf classic
to be held at 9 am at the Brook
Valley Country Club. He will
then speak, along with ECU head
coach Art Baker, at the golf lun-
cheon at the Sheraton Inn at 2:30
pm, admission is $12.50 per per-
son. Davidson will be on hand
throughout the day on Saturday
to speak with all intersted people.
Beginning at 2 pm will be the
tennis tournament on the varsity
courts. Other events will be the
intramural softball competition
behind the north stands of
Ficklen Stadium. The special
Olympics also will take place on
the Bunting track. In addition,
the Lady Pirate softball team will
take on Liberty Baptist in fast-
pitch action.
At 6 pm, the mini-carnival will
open on the parking lot beside the
Pirate Club building. A country
music band will also begin play-
ing under the stadium. Also at 6,
the Aerobics Workshop will con-
duct an aerobic class in Minges
coliseum. There will be football
players as well as other local per-
sonalities on hand.
The pigs will then arrive at 7
pm for all the talented chefs who
wish to try their luck in the pig-
cooking contest. WRQR-FM will
also begin their live radio
coverage at this time.
The fires will then begin at 9
pm. However, the real fire begins
at 9:15 pm with the fireworks
display in Ficklen Stadium. This
spectacular is open to the public
free of charge, compliments of
Pepsi Cola of Greenville.
The pigs will later be placed on
the fires as the public is invited to
walk the "midway" under
Ficklen Stadium, where Boog
P6well and Ben Davidson will be
eagerly awaiting to talk to all.
held amongst the tailgators. Also
at this time, there will be bands
performing in the tailgate areas,
Pirate football players will be
available to sign autographs and
contest winners will be announc-
ed and awarded.
The annual Pirate Purple-Gold
football game will begin at 3:30
pm. Admission is $1.50 in ad-
vance and $2.00 at the gate.
The Miss Hawaiian Tropic
Suntan Bikini Contest will begin
at 2 pm in Ficklen Stadium. The
ten finalists from this competi-
tion will be chosen to compete in
the Bahama Mama festivities on
April 23, 1985. The finals winner
will receive a one week, all ex-
pense paid trip to Daytona Beach
and the chance to represent ECU
in the Miss Hawaiian Tropic
Contest. Contestants should ar-
rive at Minges Coliseum Gym by
12:30 pm. All entrees will receive
$35 in Hawaiian Tropic products.
For more information call
757-6417 or 757-6491.
At 2:30, the best dressed
purple-gold competition will be
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat. l p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
Picture Yourself
Making z
$1240
Must be a hard worVer
Call for appointment 757-3737

���mttmttoHt��,tttt��tttmHh��ttt�t�tttt�tt�t��
affordable fashion eyewear &. contact lenses
tinted contact lenses
the plaza 79.00pair 756-9771
CUTEST
T THE
Pirate Walk
is officially ended
as of April 22nd.
PRIZES
1st $100 cash
2nd S25 cash. Keg
3rd Keg
Tuesday 8:30 p.m.
April 16
Adm. $1.00
18 yrs. $2.00
Moch Surr A Wo � -
MorattHM Rwtoyront April 16, 1984 - �
7X222 M Sponsored by - PRC-LSS ScJT
m hw � ow Sign Up A t The Elbo �� ��
'��'� ����c�n RMtourant o Far!
Cotol Oil Co. a RkliiMMa Va.
T - & Pi Kappa Phi
p UM
Wed. April 17, 1985 Resent 8:30-1:00 A M
Adm. $1.50 Guys DRAFT NITE $1.00 Ladies �fe 18 yrs
10C DRAFT ALL NITE
Entries can sign up at the Elbo 9:00 P.M. TuesLimit 15 Bands
NO ADVANCE REGISTRATION
Bkycto Port
ShooTioa


t:

11

WINNER TO RECEIVE CASH PRIZE AND COMPETE ON CBS TV
ANNOUNCING THE 1986
MISS NORTH CAROLINA USA and MISS NORTH CAROLINA TEEN USA
PAGEANTS
NORTH CAROLINA'S ONLY
PRELIMINARY TO THE
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and MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANTS
NO PERFORMING TALENT REQUIRED
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THE 1986 MISS NORTH CAROLINA
USATEEN USA PAGEANTS
co TEL-AIR INTERESTS. INC.
1755 NE. 149 STREET
MIAMI. FL 33181-1099
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PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION ON THE 1986 MISS NORTH CAROLINA USA
TEEN USA PAGEANTS
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103 TRADE ST. 756-1003
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�IHEEAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 16,1985
2 Days Only
SIDEWALK
Wednesday & Thursi
April 17th & 18th
inU.B.Es
parking lot
Cards
for all
Occasions
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Selected
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Vi Price
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 16, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 16, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.404
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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