The East Carolinian, April 11, 1985






Bllt Rust Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.5 3
Thursday, April 11, 1985
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Admissions
By DALE SWANSON
Fall Applications Increase
Suff Writer
Emergency Transport Serv e
TONY RUMPLE - ECU News Bureau
The KastC are air ambulance flight team begu
Carolina April 8. Based at Pitt Memorial Hosp
two cardiac patients in its first day of operatic
aking emergency medical transports in Eastern North
md the ECU School of Medicine, EastCare transported
The number of applications
and acceptance notices being
received and given this year at
ECU continues to top last year's
figures for the same period by
more than five percent, according
to Director of Admissions
Charles Seeley.
"These numbers are even more
significant because last year's in-
crease in applications cleared
previous year's by over twenty-
five percent Seeiey said. The
only inconsistency with this
year's application process,he
said, is that actual paid deposits
on tuition have remained
somewhat lower than in past
years.
Despite the six percent increase
in applications, the Admissions
Office has not seen a similar in-
crease in paid deposits. "This
may be because of the publicity
of proposed cuts in financial aid
to students Seeley said. Even
though such cuts would not af-
fect loans and grants for next
year, Seeley said he feels the
negative publicity has scared
many students and their parents
into extra caution beti:e making
a financial commhme.i to the
university. "This problem,
though, has begun i u erse
itself in the past couple of
weeks Seeley emphasized.
According to Dan Wooten,
Director of Housing, deposits for
dorm rooms are also down in
comparison to last year's figures
by twelve percent.
"It has been suggested that this
may be the result of the uncer-
tainty that is surrounding finan-
cial aid for next year he said,
though Wooten maintains that
such an assumption is mere con-
jecture.
In conjunction with the in-
crease in freshman applications,
the new University Scholar
Awards were very successful in
drawing exceptional graduating
high school seniors to ECU. The
annually renewable $3,000
scholarships drew more than 150
applicants to fill the seven
scholarships.
All top seven students who
were selected from the field have
confirmed plans to attend ECU
this fall. Seeley also said
Scholar's Weekend will be held
this weekend for exceptional high
school juniors. The program, ac-
cording to Seeley, is an attempt
to display to prospective ap-
plicants the academic possibilities
available to them if thev decide to
attend ECU.
The Universitv Scholar Awards
will be presented to the recipients
this weekend, Seeley said.
Student Government Leaders Protest Higher Tuition Costs
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nfw, fdllor
SGA presidents from the 16
ur;versities in the University of
North Carolina system this
weekend added their voices to
Hhers protesting a proposed 10
percent tuition increase for
schools in the UNC system.
According to outgoing ECU
SGA President John Rainey, the
University of North Carolina
Student Government Association
met this weekend and discussed
the situation. The UNCASG is
composed of the 16 schools' SGA
presidents.
On Thursday, the group's Stu-
dent Advisory Council, which ad-
vises UNC system President
William Friday, met and passed a
resolution opposing the proposed
10 percent tuition increase.
Rainey said N.C. Gov. Jim
Martin has proposed the increase
in his budget and the group
"wanted to be on record as
representing the UNC system and
opposing this
Originally the group had also
planned to meet with Martin, but
he was unavailable. They did
meet with one of his aides. The
aide, Rainey said, "thought that
the extra $45 wouldn't keep so-
meone from going to college
However, Rainey added, "when
added on top of tuition, fee in-
creases and dorm rent increases,
it will catch those at the lower end
of the economic ladder
"We wanted to express our
concern through Gov. Martin's
aide so he would be aware of it.
April 11 Declared Senior Day
We think all the students in the
system would be opposed to this
increase Rainey said.
Among the reasons for stopp-
ing the increase, the UNCASG
resolution states that tuition has
"increased 25 percent over the
last four years for in-state
students; and tuition for out-of-
state students was increased 45
percent over the past four years
It also states that "this tuition in-
crease coincides with proposed
cuts in federal financial aid which
would not only substantially
Senior Night Offers Information
B HAROLD JOYNER
u1iimi Newt Editor
S.I.N. is running rampant
across campus and Chancellor
John Howell has proclaimed
Thursday, April 11 as Senior
Day. But what do S.I.N. and the
chancellor have to do with
graduating seniors?
Simply put, if ECU ad-
ministrators have their way,
graduating seniors will not leave
the doors of ECU without at least
a little knowledge of what the real
world is all about and how to get
along with the business world.
Organized by Senior Class
President Melinda Davis and
vice-president Sven VanBaars,
Senior Info mation Night will in-
form anxious graduates about the
facts of life � the facts of how to
succeed in one's chosen career,
that is.
"We will concentrate on situa-
tions that may not have been
covered in class Davis said.
"It's a short, quick mini-seminar
that's packed full of information
concerning the graduate's future.
I promise it won't be boring at
all
In addition to this special pro-
gram, Howell's proclamation of
Senior Day will "recognize the
accomplishments of the senior
class at ECU He goes on to
declare that since there are ap-
proximately 2,669 members of
the Senior class comprising about
20 percent of the entire student
body, this day will signify the
achievement of endurance and
hard work they have done.
The program will consist of
various individuals from the cam-
pus and Greenville businesses
speaking on topics such as look-
ing for more than just employ-
ment, as well as fringe benefits a
company has to offer.
Davis and Van Baars also said
that students attending the
seminar will hear from Edward
Wheatley, chairman of the ECU
Department of Marketing, who
will speak to seniors about net-
working co-workers as well as
dressing for success. Jim Lanier,
vice chancellor of Institutional
Advancement will tell students
how to recognize good manage-
ment in a business.
Nancy Frazelle, a Merrill
Lynch stock broker, will offer
ways a student may manage new
money received from his new job.
Managing time wisely will be Cin-
dy Kittrell's topic for the evening.
Kittrell is the annual support
director for the ECU foundation.
Immediately following the
seminar, which begins at 6 p.m
a wine and cheese reception will
be held. "Seniors really need to
come on over to Mendenhall
tonight and hear what these peo-
ple have to offer Van Baars
said.
Seniors, take the advice of
your class president and vice-
president, and find out what
S.I.N. is about.
WZMB Baseball Broadcast Resumes
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
WZMB, the campus radio sta-
tion, will resume broadcasting
ECU baseball games next week,
according to Director of Athletics
Ken Karr.
WZMB broadcast one game
this semester with announcers
Mike Kelly and Pama Mitchell.
Following the broadcast, Lee
Workman, a Marketing Assistant
in the Athletic Department,
decided to cancel future broad-
casts because Mitchell is an in-
structor, not a student.
Workman said "the primary
reason (for the broadcast) was to
give the students a chance and get
practical experience on the
radio
However, WZMB General
Manager Susan Duncan said
there were no other qualified
employees to do Mitchell's work.
Kelly, head of WZMB's sports
department, said Workman told
him that he could continue with
the broadcast as long as another
student took Mitchell's place.
Karr, however, said he has
reconsidered after review of the
tapes from the game and "if they
(WZMB) choose to broadcast,
they can simply go on and call
us
Karr added that the Athletic
Department changed its position
because they knew there were not
enough students interested in
broadcasting the games. "We
decided to modify our stance to
help them get off the ground he
said. He added that he hopes
students will get involved next
year and that the department will
reevaluate its position then.
Duncan said games will be
broadcast April 17 and 24 at 6:55
p.m. with Mitchell and Kelly as
the announcers.
"I'm really happy about it
Mitchell said. "I've always
wanted to do the games and I'm
ready to go She added that she
has been a baseball fan for many
years and "this is a great oppor-
tunity.
"We both need advice and help
from the Athletic Deparment
she said. "I hope everybody will
take a positive attitude toward
the broadcasts
Group Presents Ideas For Parking
By HAROLD JOYNER
Aunual Newi Editor
Last week, a proposal was
presented to Chancellor John
Howell offering solutions to end
the serious parking problem on
campus.
This week, another group has
approached the chancellor saying
the only problem that exists is
that students aren't utilizing ex-
isting parking spaces and
measures could be taken by com-
muters, to end the headache of
finding a place to park.
Harvey Bender, organizer of
the proposal, said the problem
could be alleviated if students
would begin to take action. "Our
proposal recommends that
students should start excercising
options that are already available
to them Bender said. Other
supporters of Bender's group in-
clude ECU students Jeff Shipley,
Catherine Smith and Dennis
Ward.
One of the options Bender's
group has suggested is that
students driving to school leave
for school earlier. The com-
muters may also start utilizing
adjacent parking lots to the cam-
pus. "Even at peak times, park-
ing spaces may be found behind
Mendenhall and the library
Bender said.
"Of course other departments
could take action in preventing
the parking problem Bender
said. Believing that the SGA
Transit is not doing an adequate
job in serving the students,
Bender said 51 percent of the
students polled did not use the
SGA buses. "It is very uncom-
mon to see a bus over half full
he said.
"Why, then, are we using these
huge gasaholic monsters. Can we
not scale down the size and in
turn offer more frequent runs,
and perhaps increase the areas of
'Coverage?" he said. "We feel
that students should begin riding
the buses, instead spending more
money to buy additional ones
Bender added that schedules of
bus routes were hard to find, as
well as stopping places of the
buses. "Where can you get a
copy of the bus schedules? Sure
at the Traffic Office, and maybe
at the bus transit office, wherever
that is
SGA Bus Manager Marshall
Tucker said that in addition to
picking up schedules at
Mendenhall, copies of schedules
Continued From Page 1
reduce the amount of aid
available to students, but also
restrict the total amount one
might borrow
The UNC Board of Governors
recently passed a resolution op-
posing the increase, saying "the
denial of access resulting from
any increase in tuition will be
detrimental not only to the af-
fected students but also to the
State, which will be denied the
full talents and increased earning
capacity of these potential
students
Rainey said that the actions of
the presidential selection commit-
tee were also discussed at the
meeting. The committee will pre-
sent a forum at ECU April 16 in
order to obtain input on the selec-
tion of a new UNC system presi-
dent.
"I'd personally like to en-
courage all students interested to
attend Rainey said. "No other
school has had much student
representation and we should put
up a good showing
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Poto Lab
Warped Perspective
The optical illusions created by a camera and available equipment
can be amazing, or slightly disconcerting.
Minority Publication Debuts;
Expresses Variety Format
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK !S MJ AW '
Expressions magazine, former-
ly The Ebony Herald, appeared
on campus for the first time
Wednesday and received a good
reception, according to Expres-
sions Editor Ruben Ingram.
The magazine, he said, is "the
minority affairs publication
redressed for minority students
with the hope that the majority
will find it useful
The 24-page magazine features
entertainment, fashion and
"off-beat" articles, Ingram said.
"We do what The East Caroli-
nian can't do because they are a
newspaper � we can give ex-
panded coverage
Student response has been
"overwhelming" Ingram said.
"A lot of people are really wr-
prised
Ingram dded that the
magazine needs student help to
continue publishing and that he
hopes "more students will get in-
volved because of the improve-
ment
imumm, onwi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 11, 1983
Announcements
Special Olympic Buddies
and Hu99�rs Needed
The Greenville Rec and Parks Oept.
special Olympics CommlttM arc recruiting
Buddies and Hoppers to work at the Special
Olympics on Prl April 1, from a.m2
p.m. at the ECU track behind Harrington fil-
ed on Charles Blvd.
Individuals and representatives of groups
Interested In helping ere asked to attend a
volunteers meeting at Elm St. Gym, next to
Rose High School, on either Mon April IS
from 7-1 p.m. or Tues April 16, from 3-4
p.m. For additional Information call 752-4137
ext. Ml, Bill Twine.
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Ser-
vice In the Bioxton House is offering these
one hour sessions to aid you In developing
better Interviewing skills for use In your job
search. A film and discussion of how to inter
view on and off campus will be shared. These
sessions will be held In the Career Planning
room at 3 p.m. on April 3 and 11. Seniors are
especially encouraged to attend either of
these sessions.
Crabbing With
Paul Gauguin
Thurs April 11 at 7 p.m The ECU School
of Art will present a SO mln. performance by
visiting artist David Wheeler, 'Crabbing
with Gauguin Mr. Wheeler Is a perfor-
mance artist, playrlght, and sculptor, cur-
rently living In New Orleans. The perfor-
mance is free and the public Is encouraged to
attend. ECU: Arts Alive! i
Aerobic Fitness
Instructors
Tryouts for the BS-oo school year aerobic
fitness Instruclton begins April 13. The class
Is required for anyone Interested In teaching
tor the In Rec Aerobic fitness Program on
April 13 from 11-12:30 In room 100 Memorial
Gym. The tryouts will be held. For more In-
fo, come by room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757-6317.
Bryant Lake Camp
interested in working with children in a
beautiful setting? Bryant Lake Camp
located in the Adirondack Mountains of
Upstate New York will Interview for
counselor positions on April 16 For more In
formation contact Cooperative Education,
313 Rawl.
Graduate Record
Examination
win be offered at ECU on Sat June 9 Ap-
plication blanks ere to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing Service, Box
964 R. Princeton, NJ 0S540. Applications
must be postmarked no later than May 3. Ap-
plications may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Rm 105, Speight Building.
Car wash
Circle K Is having a topless car wash Sat
April 13 at the Exxon on 264. Bring your car
for a good scrub down.
Founder's Day
Program
The brother's of XI Nu Chapter of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraterntiy, inc. cordially invite the
ECU student body to attend our first annual
founder's day program on April 21, in
Jenkins Auditorium at 4 p.m.
Golden Girl Tryouts
Come to the Music Building lobby Sat
April 20 at 10 with lots of energy for Golden
Girl tryouts. Practice will be Sat. from 10-12
and 1-3 and Sun. from 1-3. Tryouts will be
Sun. at 4. Hope to see ya mart. �
Debate
Lambda Alpha Epsllon and Alpha Phi
Sigma are sponsoring a debate on the Exclu-
sionary rule on April IS at 7:30 p.m. room 101
of the Carol Belk Building.
SMRA Yard Sale
The Student Medical Record Association Is
sponsoring a yard sale. Sat April 13 in front
of the Belk (Allied Health) building. From
1:30-2:00. Luggage, stereo, television, ap-
pliances and much more available at very
reasonelbe prices.
Home Run Derby
The IRS home run derby will be held on the
Lady Pirate Softball field on April II.
Reglstaratlon begins April 9 11. Be a part of
this years final event.
Honors Program
Any graduating senior who has taken 24
semester hours in Honors and wants a stamp
on his or her transcript should see Dr.
Sanders (212 Ragsdale) by April IS. Any
Honors student receiving any special honor
or petting a ob or getting into graduate
school should inform Dr. Sanders for
publlcafon In the Honors newsletter.
English Scholarship
The English Department invites applica-
tions for the Russell M. Chrtstman Memorial
Scholarship, awarded annually to a iunlor
English major for exceptional academic
achievement, outstanding potential in the
field of English, and significant Involvement
in extracurricular activities. The amount of
the award is S500. Applicants should com-
plete the Student Scholarship Form
(available from the Student Financial Aid
Office) and send It, together with a brief let
ter descrirblng their academic
achievements, extracurricular activities,
and plans for further study or career goals to
the Russell M. Chrlstman Memorial Scholar-
ship Committee, co The Department of
English. The deadline for applications is
April 12 For further information contact Er
win Hester, 101 English Department Annex.
CADP
There will be a meeting Thurs April 11 at
4 p.m. in Mendenhall. We will also be taking
picture for the yearbook. All members
please attend.
ECU College
Republicans
The ECU CR's will meet tonight at 6 in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse. We will be meeting
concerning the election of our I9t5-e6 club of-
ficers.
Omega Psi Phi
The brothers will be sponsoring a female
"short short" contests April 13 at the
Unlimited Touch. lst-S35, 2nd $15. 3rd 10
JSA Members
Sat April 13 at 6 p.m. In the international
House, we will have the election of all new of-
ficers for next year. (Fall 85, Spring Pi).
Afterwards we will have a great cook-out
with food, music and a lots of fun. Come and
oln. We need your vote)
Banking
Summer position available for finance mi
or in Kinston with major bank. Contact Co-
op Office in 313 Rawl.
B�ol.Elections
The ECU Biology Club will be holding Its
annual elections on Mon, April 15 In BN 107
at 7 p.m. Members: This is a mandatory
meeting and all those Interested in running
for an office are urged to come by the Club at
regular office hours. Also, Dr. Mark M. Brin-
son will be speaking to the club on the
Biology Graduate Program offered here at
ECU.
International Trade
Administration
The ITA has positions for undergraduate
and graduate students in Washingotn, D.C.
For more information contact cooperative
Education Office in 313 Rawl.
Physical Education
Majors
The Departmental Motor and Physical
Fitness Competency Test will be given on
Wed April 24, at t a.m. in Mlnges Coliseum.
All participants must report promptly at �
a.m. A passing score on this test is required
of all students prior to declaring Physical
Education as a major
Any student with medical complaints or
reasons why you cannot participate in the
test must submit a written medical excuse to
Dr. Israel two weeks prior to the testing
date.
INDT
Position available with local manufac-
turer for June-Dec. full time. Students
should be a manufacturing majors and have
a 2.8 GPA. Contact Co op Office in 313 Rawl
Night Auditor
Positions available with local motet for
business students able to work 11 p.m. 7
a.m. sum. Contact the Cooperative Educe
tion Office in 313 Rawl.
Part-Time Secretarial
Student needed with good secretarial skills
and wordprocessing background for part
time position with local law firm, contact Co-
op Office in 313 Rawl.
Concert Photos
Bring your recent concert photos by the
Yearbook office and we'll print them in the
1915 Buccaneer with your credit line. Bring
'em all, rock, country, jazz, and anything
else. Hurry I We can't accept any after May
5. Call 757 6501 for details.
Mon
By DALE SW,
Staff �rkar
Micheal Mott, at
best -selling -iograph
troversiai monk, ill 1
: at ECU Thursday thi
forts of the ECU Pc
Before the biogi
published, Mott
relatively unknc
- writing circles, desj
numerous books
published, as well a
and several essays,
� Makuck, director ofj
Art Si
Matt Mahurin.
DAVID'S
CLOTHING STORE
(formerly Clothing Warehouse)
EASTER SALE
Continued Through Saturday April 20th
Featuring:
cA2c'
by h.l.S
Save on all CfUbCr products � jeans,
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Going on now at
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�Jl 3Eaat fllarnlihian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, gmmmmw
Greg Rideout. m�mni &
Jennifer Jendrasiak, seme Tom Lhvender, 0KMr4m�
Scott Cooper, - srm saw Anthony Martin, �u�w� Ma�aie
Tina Maroschak, s,vrf�,�r John Peterson, cM�Mh�
Bill Mitchell, amUM Mmm Bu i Dawson, production Manager
Doris Rankins. st�mn Rick Mccormac, c� v� &�
Daniel Mairer, &����� em� DeChanile Johnson, Ad m
April 11. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
'Whereas'
Don't Raise Tuition, Guys
The "WhereasV have been in
full force lately as the University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors and the University of North
Carolina Association of Student
Governments broke out the resolu-
tions to oppose a suggested 10 per-
cent tuition increase. The two
documents, both of which support
the current budget request by the
UNC system, bring up valid points
the General Assembly needs to
look at when considering the pro-
posal.
First of all, the state constitution
mandates that state higher educa-
tion "as far as practicable, be ex-
tended to the people of the state
free of expense This means rais-
ing fees for expenses should be a
last resort to finance needed im-
provements. Other means must be
found and used first.
Tuition for in-state students has
risen 25 percent over the last four
years, corresponding with a 45 per-
cent increase for out-of-state
students. Another 10 percent hike
is not fair to students, especially
with the proposed cuts and ceilings
that might be placed on federal
financial aid.
The costs of attending even a
state college are becoming pro-
hibitive � books, room, board are
all going up in price. What we will
Parking
Proposals for solving the park-
ing problem on campus seem to be
the rage these days. Within the last
week, two different student groups
have presented ways to alleviate
the parking blues.
First off, we're definitely glad
that students are getting involved
to help other students with a stu-
dent problem.
But, it is only fair to point out
those ideas that will fly and those
that won't. We've looked over
both proposals and come to a few
conclusions.
The idea that students should
come to school earlier to get a
begin to see is an educational elite.
Students without funds will be left
by the wayside as the future passes
them by.
Education, everyone cries out, is
the backbone to a free society. Be-
ing aware and having the ability to
discriminate between different in-
formation is essential. This will not
be if the cost of learning only can
be afforded by the rich.
With Reagan, and now Gov.
Martin, we are being told that only
the haves can have more. Well, we
at ECU, and we everywhere for
that matter, aren't having that.
We'll have only one thing � and
that's the right to an education as
proscribed by North Carolina law
and by democratic principles.
You shouldn't mess with a
system that works, especially in a
way that puts the system out of
reach for those that need it most.
The East Carolinian supports
along with the Board of Gover-
nors, the system's chancellors and
the SGA presidents all the
"whereasV to keep all North
Carolinians educated.
Don't let tomorrow be taken
away from North Carolina. Write
our representatives in the General
Assembly and tell them � "No
Hike, Pal
N�Mfe-y$ out!
m SVOOUW WR WcGUOCH
nes
Wlm. l�ftR MWWfc W M&XICAK TflDWSTOR

Campus Forum
Secretary Says Thanks
parking space is not a solution. If
everyone came to class earlier, the
same problem would exist.
Under utilization of student
transit buses is not a problem. The
buses are used; sometimes,
students are forced to stand during
peak riding hours. If anything,
more buses and more runs are
necessary, with greater encourage-
ment to use them being a key.
One proposal that we found
sound is greater use of the allied
health parking lot by out-of-town
commuters. A shuttle service could
pick students up and bring them to
the main campus.
Thank you so much for getting in-
volved in the elections for SGA. It was
so good to see that the student body is
concerned about what is going on in
your school.
1 can't express to you how much I
appreciate your support. I am glad to
have the chance to work for you, the
student body. Thank you for electing
me as your SGA secretary. My office is
located in Mendenhall Student Center.
If any of you have any concerns that I
could help you with, feel free to con-
tact me. My door will be open to you.
Lisa Carroll
SGA Secretary-elect
Baseball, Baby
It's a shame the broadcasts of the
Pirate baseball games were canceled.
As a team, Pama Mitchell and Mike
Kelley broadcasted the games.
Yes, Pama is an instructor. Yes, she
is a woman. But, if you talk to Pama
about baseball, you can see she loves
and knows the game. She has attended
major league baseball games as well as
their spring training sessions. She
wrote and produced a documentary on
baseball for PBS television. As an an-
nouncer, she is qualified for the job.
It's time we broke the archaic tradi-
tion of using only male baseball an-
nouncers. Pama and Mike should be
back on the air to broadcast the Pirate
games.
T. Donohue
Theatre Arts Dept.
(Editor's Note: The athletic depart-
ment has told WZMB that they can
continue to broadcast the games if they
choose with the two original an-
nouncers.)
Day Rep Needed
The Student Union Board of Direc-
tors is currently accepting applications
to fill two day representative positions.
Duties of board members consist of
selecting the student union president
and vice president, approving commit-
tee chairmen and budgets and setting
Student Union policy. The board is
designed to represent all facets of cam-
pus life to better serve student in-
terests. Voting constituents already
represented on the board include SRA,
IFC, Panhellenic, SOULS, SGA and
others.
The applications received thus far
are from students whose organizations
are presently represented on the board.
If no other students come forth and ap-
ply, two qualified applicants will be
selected without regard to organiza-
tional affiliations. We encourage all in-
terested students to apply for these
positions so we can best achieve our
goals as a board of broad representa-
tion.
Todd Patton, Chairman
Student Union Board of Directors
Dave's Okay
This letter is written in response to
the petition that is circulating question-
ing David Brown's suitability for the
position as SGA president. All I can
testify to is what I have seen. I have
supervised David in his resident ad-
visor position in Umstead hall for the
past year. I can truthfully say that
David is a model RA and has done an
excellent job. I have never worked with
a student who is as mature, conscien-
tious, honest, fair and hard working
From day one, he has gone above and
beond the call of duty for the
residents. He has ery high moral and
ethical standard and he stands behind
them no matter what.
David's potential as a leader and his
standard of excellence were
demonstrated to me long before he
became an RA. As a matter of fact, it
was his leadership both on the hall as
well as the news of his work in the SGA
that impressed me enough to hire him
David's first concern has always been
for the students' rights and welfare no
matter what kind of opposition he was
up against. David is definitely willing
to fight for what he believes is right for
the students, and he is committed to
going straight to the students to finer
out what that is.
On the job or off, David's character
has impressed me and is above any
suspicion. From what 1 have seen for
the past three years, I am confident
that the students made the right choice
for SGA president.
Donna DeLuise
Resident Director
Slay and Umstead Halls
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
Nicaraguan Situation Exacerbated By Ron
By 1979, the Sandinistas had suc-
cessfully taken power in Nicaragua. Yet
they found that they needed help from
the United States on an emergency basis.
The country had lost 40,000 to 50,000
people in the revolution. One-fifth of
the population was homeless and 40,000
children were orphaned. Somoza and
the National Guard officers had
plundered the economy, leaving behind
a $1.5 billion debt. The Sandinistas,
therefore, appealed to the Carter ad-
ministration for aid.
From The Left
Jay Stone
The U.S. responded in mid-1979 by
sending in nearly $20 million in aid.
North American businessmen re-entered
the country, welcomed by the revolu-
tionaries. United Brands and Standard
Fruit resumed operations.
The fall of 1979, however, was the
high-water mark of U.SSandinista
relations, according to historian Walter
LaFeber's Inevitable Revolutions.
Decline quickly set in. The Sandinistas
gave the relationship a severe jolt when
they postponed the elections. From
Washington's point of view, the delay
meant that the revolutionaries intended
to impose a Communist-style regime on
the country. From the Nicaraguan
perspetfive, though, the announcement
meant that the Sandinistas were splitting
into factions; any election campaign
could turn into a struggle that would
fragment and even destroy the revolu-
tion.
Another serious jolt to the U.S. rela-
tionship with Nicaragua occured after
the Sandinistas accepted a $100 million
aid package from the Soviet Union after
waiting seven months for the Congress
to decide on a $75 million package for
the war-ravaged country. Finally, the
Congress did pass the aid bill after learn-
ing of the Soviet aid deal.
The reasons for the bill's final passage
were varied, but it involved two primary
considerations: 1) A desire to maintain
leverage on the Sandinistas and to
counter Soviet bloc aid and 2) a desire by
120 of the largest North American,
European and Japanese banks to avoid a
Nicaraguan default on its $1.5 billion
debt. In addition to the $75 million loan
from the United States, the Sandinistas
received $200 million in long-term loans
form the World Bank and other lending
agencies in return for imposing austerity
measures on the Nicaraguan economy
and rescheduling the country's debt
payments to private Western banks.
The importance of this series of deals,
all inter-related, could not be
overestimated. Nicaragua had shown its
willingness to move away from the
Soviet Union and toward the private
money market, thus aligning more
closey with the United States.
Yet, no sooner were these deals com-
pleted when the U.S. and Nicaraguan
governments resumed their collision
course. Mistrust increased. Nicaragua's
economy deteriorated despite the agree-
ment with the bankers. Disillusionment
spread within the country. After
Reagan's victory in November, the San-
dinistas tightened their control. Both
sides, Nicaraguan and North American
were to blame for the breakdown in rela-
tions that followed. Even if Jimmy
Carter had remained in the White
House, it is likely that relations would
have deteriorated. The problems were
historical and ideological, not personal
or partisan.
Nevertheless, the Reagan admin'Ora-
tion did much to exacerbate trends that
were already in place. By late February
1981, economic aid was turned off. In
the summer of '81 Washington officials
accused the Sandinistas of moving closer
to the Soviet bloc. By the end of the year
the president endorsed a CIA plan that
aimed at destablizing the Nicaraguan
government. He also accepted a Pen-
tagon program for rapidly building up
Honduran forces.
Funding for the "contras" was
justified at the time on the grounds that
the Sandinistas were sending weapons to
the revolutionaries in El Salvador. But
since the Nicaraguans need U.S.
economic help above all else, the United
States was holding the high cards in any
negotiations with the Sandinistas
anyway. Only the Americans could pro-
vide the $3 million a day that one top
Nicaraguan official estimated his coun-
try needed to survive. Only U.S. ap-
proval could open doors to international
lending agencies or encourage other na-
tions to help. Hence, funding of the con-
tras was a superfluous measure in
halting the flow of Nicaraguan arms to
El Salvador when economic pressure
would have sufficed.
Secretary of State Alexander Haig
proved this in late January of 1981 when
he announced that he was stopping $15
million in economic aid headed for
Managua, as well as nearly $10 million
of wheat, for 30 days to test whether the
Sandinistas would stop helping the
Salvador an rebels.
In early April the State Department
announced that no arms shipments had
been detected going through Nicaragua
for several weeks, adding that propagan-
da and other activities had been curtail-
ed also. But then came a strange twist in
logic. The State Department added that
because "some arms traffic may be con-
tinuing and other support very probably
continues aid would be canceled
anyway.
Thus, the only clear message the
Nicaraguans got from the Reagan ad-
ministration was it was again the uncom-
promising enemy. As a.consequence, the
Sandinista government moved sharply
toward greater state control and away
from any semblance of rapprochement
with Washington. From these facts,
LaFeber draws the conclusion that
Reagan's policies are actually responsi-
ble for having further alienated
Nicaragua from the United States.
This interpretation stands the Reagan
administration's claim that Nicaragua
was a Soviet-Cuban puppet government
from the beginning on its head.
Reagan's policies are actually responsi-
ble for pushing the Nicaraguans away
from the United States. Even today the
number of North Americans in
Nicaragua (4,000) outnumbers the total
number from Cuba and all Communist
bloc countries combined (3,400), accor-
ding to John Swomley of the Fellowship
of Reconcilliation.
Furthermore, on the subject of arms
shipments to El Salvador � agent David
Mac Michael left the CIA, where he
analyzed political and military
developments in Central America, in Ju-
ly 1983. According to Harper's magazine
September 1984, MacMichael denounced
the Administration's covert aid to the
Nicaraguan contras, stating that "the
administration and the CIA have
systematically misrepresented
Nicaraguan involvement in the supply of
arms to Salvador an guerillas to justify
its efforts to overthrow the Nicaraguan
government. There has not been a suc-
cessful interdiction or a verified report
of arms moving from Nicaragua to El
Salvador since April 1981
Moreover, Amnesty International has
consistently given the Nicaraguan
government much higher marks in the
area of human rights than it has either
the Guatemalan or the El Salvadoran
government � both U.S. supported. No
wonder that in the latest Washington
Post-ABC News poll, 72 percent of
those interviewed are opposed to the
U.S. government's attempts to over-
throw the Sandinistas. Only 16 percent
support it. It will be remembered as a
defining characteristic of the Reagan ad-
ministration that it still continues to
twist arms in an effort to secure funding
from Congress for the contras even in
the last hour.
Illegal
More than 30 mail
forcibly entered in Joi
and Scott dor; di
Easter weekend ian
of mail Ntoiei trom he
recover J h ruohe
fleers in the loom trasl
men's restroorm of the
halls.
Entry was gainec
mailboxes by breaking
glass window in
while oiher K es apj
have been pried jpen
"Thieve who brj
mailboxes in the dormj
usually looking for
which are readily idem
greeting cards said
McAbee, crime pre.e
fleer of the Public Saret
ment. "Relatives often
gifts to students along
cards anu thc bet
targets for ,k
McAbei stated thai I
Inspector. nae been n
will assis in the inve I
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I Hf f AST CAROLINIAN APRIL II. 1985
5 CAN TOWSTS
ffi&s
I can truthfully say that
lodel RA and has done an
I have never worked with
� as mature, conscien-
and hard working.
i oik las gone above and
of duty for the
cr high moral and
iards and he stands behind
hat.
a- a leader and his
excellence were
me long before he
RA -V a matter of fact, it
: both on the hall as
le news of his work in theSGA
ressed me enough to hire him.
ncern has always been
tudents1 rights and welfare no
hat kind of opposition he was
Lnsi. David is definitely willing
t for what he believes is right for
idents, and he is committed to
straight to the students to find
h II 'hat is.
or off, David's character
ed me and is above any
ion. From what I have seen for
1st three years, I am confident
c students made the right choice
A president.
Donna DeLuise
Resident Director
Slay and Umstead Halls
Forum Rules
Eost Carolinian welcomes letters
sinn all points of view. Mail or
hem by our office in the Publica-
hulding, across from the en-
I of Jovner L ihrarv.
Ron
untries combined (3,400), accor-
John Swomley of the Fellowship
tonciliiation.
hermore, on the subject of arms
snts to El Salvador � agent David
lichaei left the CIA, where he
jzed political and military
pments in Central America, in Ju-
According to Harper's magazine
iber 1984, MacMichael denounced
iministration's covert aid to the
Iguan contras, stating that "the
Istration and the CIA have
latically misrepresented
man involvement in the supply of
Salvadoran guerillas to justify
krts to overthrow the Nicaraguan
lent. There has not been a suc-
interdiction or a verified report
Is moving from Nicaragua to El
r since April 1981
cover. Amnesty International has
ently given the Nicaraguan
nent much higher marks in the
human rights than it has either
atemalan or the El Salvadoran
lent � both U.S. supported. No
that in the latest Washington
IBC News poll, 72 percent of
Interviewed are opposed to the
government's attempts to over-
jthe Sandinistas. Only 16 percent
it. It will be remembered as a
characteristic of the Reagan ad-
ation that it still continues to
is in an effort to secure funding
pongress for the contras even in
hour.
Illegal Mailbox Entries Reported During Holidays
Morf than f m�;ik�
More than 30 mailboxes were
forcibly entered in Jones, Belk,
and Scott dorms during the
Easter weekend large amount
of mail stolei from he boxes was
recover d by ruolic Safety of-
ficers in the loom' trashcans and
men's restroorm of the residence
halls.
Entry was gained to the
mailboxes by breaking the small
glass windows in some cases
while other boxes appeared to
have been pried open.
'Thieves who break .nto
mailboxes in the dormitories are
usually looking for envelopes
which are readily identifiable as
greeting cards said Lt. Gene
McAbee, crime prevention of-
ficer of the Public Safety Depart-
ment. "Relatives often send cash
gifts to students along with these
cards ana the become easy
targets for �hwes
McAbe. stated that U.S. Postal
Inspectors have been notified and
will assist in the investigation.
Belk dorm was hit hard by
thieves over the Easter break.
Along with the mailbox larcenies,
four rooms were burglarized on
the second and fourth floors and
thefts of stereo equipment,
money and personal items were
reported.
Public safety officers arrested
14 persons for various offenses
during the past week.
One arrest not reported last
week was that of James Scott
Faulkner who was arrested on
two counts of possession of
stolen property. Faulkner
reported to campus public safety
that he was incorrectly identified,
but this was not the case. He was
released from Pitt County Jail on
$500 bond and his trial has been
set for Tune 16.
Incidents reported to the
Def�rne�t of Public Safety for
Apri 3-5 nclude:
Apt j, 1:25 a.m. � David
Frederick Feast of Scott dorm
was arrested and charged with
DWI and a one-way street viola-
tion at Jones dorm. 6 a.m. �
Michael M. Straine and Gregory
J. Aroneo of Jones dorm were ar-
rested by Greenville City Police
for larceny. 10 a.m. � A video
cassette recorder was reported
stolen from Scales Fieldhouse. U
a.m. � A vehicle was reported
vandalized in the 3rd and Reade
St. freshman lot. 3:35 p.m. � A
resident of Fletcher dorm
reported that a money order had
been stolen, the endorsement
forged and the money order cash-
ed at the Student Bank. 7p.m. �
A break-in of a chemical locker
was reported in the Flanagan
building. A student from Aycock
dorm was identified as the
suspect in the incident as a result
of a follow-up investigation. 8:20
p.m. � A wallet was reported
stolen from the snack bar area of
Slay dorm.
April 4, 7 a.m. � David
Frederick Feast of Scott dorm
was arrested for larceny in con-
nection with a case investigated
by the Greenville Police Depart-
ment. 4 p.m. � A larceny of a
check from a mailbox was
reported in Clement dorm. The
check was later determined to
have been forged and passed at a
local business. 5 p.m. � Jeffrey
Morris Britt and William James
Britt both of Umstead dorm were
arrested for simple assault. 5:45
p.m. � A bicycle was reported
stolen from the west side of Jar-
vis dorm. 9p.m. � Reginale Fit-
zgerald Boyd of Greenville, a
non-student, was arrested for the
larceny of two tires and wheels
from a vehicle parked in the 14th
St. and Berkley freshman lot.
The incident was reported on
Feb. 28 and the arrest resulted
from a continuing investigation.
On April 9, Boyd pleaded guilty
to a reduced charge of tampering
with a motor vehicle and was
sentenced to two years probation
and required to pay $384 in
restitution to the victim.
April 5, 1:45 a.m. � Norman
Michael Hatfield of Jones dorm
was arrested for DWI on the
south side of Memorial Gym.
2:40 a.m. � Phillip Scott Stanley
of Dunn Apartments was ar-
rested for DWI on the south side
of Belk dorm. 1:10 p.m. � A
third floo resident of Umstead
sorted the larceny and
traudulen ise of an automatic
Clli V.UIU.
Did your Eosfef break
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PLAZA
SHELL
COVIPIETK
ArrOMOTIVF.
SERVICE
�10 ' ;tji�- t iJ
'4 hn.jr t() Service
I Haul RMtoh
The Senior Council invites all
members of the Senior class to
SIN
(Senior Information Night)
on April 11, 1985� 6:00 p.m.
in Room 244 Mendenhall Student
Center
SIN will be a mini-conference designed to
help seniors make the transition from student
to professional. It will include Information on
Time Management, Planning Your Career
Search Strategy, How The New Professional
Should Make Financial Investments, as well
as other ideas on how to make it in the "real
world
Join your classmates for this special
information-packed night and for the wine
and cheese reception that will follow. (Please
bring your ID).
Sponsored by
The Student Government Association
anc
The ECU Alumni Association
"BIKINI
April 21
First Prize:
$15(P
THE
VERANDA
L) J and TOP 4(T
Hanpy Hour
1
10.
KAMAIJA INN;
RECORD BAR'S
IT'S FOR YOU!
CODE NAME: Music Intelligence Prefect
MISSION: Track down Vital New Releases
OBJECTIVE: Expose New Albums Through
Special Pricing & Inside Information
CONTACT: Any Record Bar Agent
2 RATTLESNAKES
� LLOYD COLE AND THE COMMOTIONS
� Debut from bright new British band
� Warm and melodic pure pop impressionism
VULTURE CULTURE
ALAN PARSONS PROJECT
Challenging and riveting musical adventure
State of - the art sounds from major rock force
SECRET SECRETS
K JOAN ARMATRADING
Top - secret appearance by Joe Jackson
Rock s best-kept secret is out!
EACH
CASSETTE OR LP
SALE PRICES GOOD THROUGH MAY 8TH
Record Bar
The Plaza Carolina East Mall
Recreation: Video Games Contest
During regular operating hours MSC
Movie: "The Natural"
7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. MSC
Visual ARts: Graphic ARt Show
MSC
Forum: Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin debate,
"Yuppie vs. Yippie: The Challenge of the
1980s vs. the Idealism of the 1960s"
8:00 p.m. MSC
Movie: "Michael Kohlhaa
8:00 p.m. 1 drix
Program Board: Barefoot oi. the Mall
12:00 Noon University Mall
Sponsored
by
April 9-19
April 11, 12, 13
April 14-27
April 16
April 17
April 18
The Student Union
oitis
&
THE "
ON VMIO TRIPOLI STEEL BAND
CfMM OF
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pmi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL II, 1985
Solutions May Offer Savings
See SOLUTIONS, Page 6
are availble at most off-campus
housing complexes, as well as the
Allied Health building and
medical school.
"Most students know the buses
run every half hour Tucker
said, "and where the bus will
stop He also said rider surveys
are constantly taken as well as
rider counts. "The buses are run-
ning at full capacity. Out of three
buses, we have two that run the
same route. We are definitely car-
rying more people now than
we've ever carried he said.
Lack of money is preventing
the SGA Transit to expand its
services right now, Tucker said,
"there's a lot of things we'd like
to do, but don't have the money
to do them
Bender's proposal began ap-
proximately two months ago
when his group realized that
spending more money was not
the answer to the parking pro-
blem. He also supported SGA
Speaker of the Legislature Kirk
Shelley's proposal to make adja-
cent streets one-way, thus pro-
viding more parking spaces.
Shelley said the proposal would
take months of preliminary
studies before anything could be
brought before Greenville City
Council members.
Last week a different group of
students talked with the
chancellor and told him of a plan
that would use shuttle buses from
the allied health building to the
main campus to transport
students parking in unused park-
ing spaces. Andrew Joyner said
the proposal would cost around
$148,000 the first year, but added
that a considerable amount of
money and land would be saved,
justifying its cost.
"Chancellor Howell seemed
very receptive and willing to work
with us. I think he has a fair
grasp of the situation and is open
to any possible solutions
Joyner said.
At next Monday's SGA
meeting, Joyner will present his
proposal to the legislature and is
optimistic that the proposal will
be approved. "We've got
everything in place he said.
Former Social Activists
Battle Utopia, Reality
ECU News Bureau
"Yuppie vs. Yippie: The
Challenge of 1980's vs. the
Idealism of the 1960s" will be
debated by two former 1960s ac-
tivists at ECU Tuesday, April 16.
The debate, between former
youth leader Jerry Rubin (a "yip-
pie" turned "yuppie") and
counterculture leader Abbie Hof-
fman � still a dissident and critic
of the "Me Generation will
begin at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. The program is spon-
sored by the ECU Forum Com-
mittee.
"Abbie and Jerry will battle it
out in a debate to show how the
idealism of the 1960s stands up
against the reality of the 1980s
said a Forum Committee
Spokesman.
"The leaders of the youth of
the '60s have a message to deliver
to the youth of the '80s and in the
yippieyuppie debate both will be
heard
This Summer
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HENDRIX THEATRE
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OAKMONT
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One and two bedroom garden apartments.
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Values to $79.95
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Russell Hooded Pullovers
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Youth & Juvenile Sweatpants
Tennis Rackets
Long Sleeve Hooded T-Shirts
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Baseball Undershirts
3 Button Placket
Softball Uniforms Buy as Set
Lettering & Numbering Extra
All Ladies Herman Survivors Shoes & Boots
Bib Overall Closeout
Boys' Camo Hunting Clothes
One Group Men's & Women's Chamois Shirts
Nike, Converse.
New Balance, Etonic
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SaleS65
SakS7.65
Sale $8.65
Sale $7.65
Sale $7.65
One Group $25.00 Strung
Reg. $9.95 Sale S3.95
Reg. $7.95 Sale$2.95
Reg. $5.95 Sale U.95
Reg.i7.95 Sale S3.95
$99.95 per set
Reg. $55.95
�lOn Off
Sale $35.95
30 Off
40-o Off
Spring Values On The Inside
BASEBALL
All Adirondack Little League Bats
All Softball Bats
Baseball Bats
Softball Bats
All Baseball & Softball Gloves
Batting Gloves
BASKETBALL
DP Aquatite Backboard & Goal Set
DP Adjustable Pole
Wilson Institutional Rubber Basketball
Wilson Official 'Scorer' Leather Basketball
TENNIS
Tennis Balls
Pro Kennex Golden Ace
Pro Kennex Composite Dominator
Pringe Woodie
Heavy Hands
Reg. $7.95
2000 Off
20�o Off
20ro Off
Sale $6.95
TENNIS SHOES
Sugg. Ret. $89.95
Sugg. Ret. $89.95
Reg. $17.95
Reg. $45.95
Reg. $83.95
Reg. $109.95
Reg. $149.95
Reg. $19.95
Sale $69.95
Sale $79.95
Sale $12.95
Sale $29.95
$2.49 Can
Sale $62.95
Sale $89.95
Sale $119.95
Sale $16.95
Asahi Men's Leather
Asahi Men's Canvas
Asahi Ladies Leather
Asahi Ladies Canvas
Asahi Children's Canvas
Nike Delegate i
Reg. $42.95 Sale $36.95
Reg. $24.95 Sale $19.9
Reg. $40.95 Sale $34 9
Reg. $19.95
Reg. $38.95
Sale $15.95
Sale $25.95
218 Arlington Blvd.
756-6001
I HI
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�n Blvd.
H
THE FAST c AROI1NIAN
Entertainment
APRIl , I9h Page
Playhouse Presents 'Hamlet
Craig Dudly prepares for his leading role in William Shakespeare's
' Hamlet. April 16-20 at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
Ghosts, actors, lovers, grave
diggers and fools will all
come alive on the stage of
McGinnis Theatre on April
16-20, at 8:15 p.m as the East
Carolina Playhouse presents
William Shakespeare's volatile
and powerful drama of revenge,
Hamlet. This production of
Hamlet has been in development
for the greater part of the Univer-
sity's academic year. Almost
every element from the text of the
play itself and the actors, to the
scenery, costumes, music and
lights has been selected and
developed to make this produc-
tion the capstone of the theatrical
season.
Produced as part of ECU's
celebration of the 400th anniver-
sary of our English heritage,
Hamlet is a high drama of
murder, revenge, love and death
revolving around one of
Shakespeares most complex
characters. Played by an im-
pressive list of notable actors in-
cluding Edmund Kean, John Bar-
rymore, Laurence Olivier, John
Gielgud, and Richard Burton, the
character of Hamlet is one of ver-
bal magic, macabre humor, pas-
sion violence and philosophical
reflection. His is the story of a
young man not able to forgive his
mother and uncle for their crimes
against his father. In addition to
containing some of the most
magnificient of all poetry, such
as the famous soliloquy "To be
or not to be Hamlet is a
melodrama brightened with a
Easter Sucks Eggs!
f
By PAT MOLLOV
p�lI To Tfc Last t arolinun
And so another Easter vaca-
:ion passes us by like so
many strands of imitation grass
Nucked up by my Hoover 2000.
This Easter was different,
however, due to the severe apathy
m part. I guess I'm getting
too old (or is it too drunk?) to
carry out the tedious task of sear-
ing 'he house for the eggs with
my little sister, Dana.
"Pat, won't you please help
me find the eggs this year?" I
couldn't help but yawn in her fif-
teen year old face and reply
hoarsely,
"Dana, don't you think you're
getting just a bit old for this silly
ritual? Shouldn't you be out van-
dalizing something or getting into
.�Kdine?"
h e pleaded" P! e e .j a e
pleeease get out of bed and
help
"Forget it � go play in traffic,
will you? I've got a massive
headache. I lost a bet last night
and I had to shave my
moustache; right now I feel bad
enough to bite the dog. God only
knows what damage I'm
prepared to inflict upon you
Somewhere, amidst the anger
and pain I was feeling, a sense of
morality took hold of me, and I
assured Dana that if she allowed
me two more hours of sleep, I
would help her in her quest for
the all elusive eggs. Satisfied, she
set out to do some searching on
her own. I slipped back into quiet
oblivion to the sounds of pots
and pans clanging together � she
was looking under the sink � a
standard for the true amateur egg
hunter. Every expert like myself
knows that the first place you
look is in the clothes dryer � it's
just Easter egg etiquette.
From the death-like daze I was
in, I heard her move into the liv-
ingroom. What followed was an
excruciatingly loud yelp emitted
by the dog, and I knew she was
looking under the couch. At that
moment, my father cilippity-
clopped down the stairs and in-
quired as to what all the noise
was about.
"Oh, I'm just looking for the
eggs, dad Satisfied, my father
climed back up the stairs mumbl-
ing something having to do with a
dream about Barbara Eden.
Before he shut his door, he told
Dana,
'tjtl your brother out of bed to
help, he's less noisy Joyously
she burst into my room with the
ultimatum: "Dad said get up or
die I didn't believe her.
"C'mon Pat, it's been two
hours Another lie.
"Dana, I hope you die with
festering boils on your body. Get
out of my room, or I swear to
God I'll cancel your subscription
to Teen Beat
Surprisingly, Dana held her
ground and started laughing. She
said, "Patrick, if you don't get
out of bed and help me Find those
eggs, I'm going to show all of
your friends the picture I have of
you behind the tool shed giving
ugly Margaret Mead a hickey
I Finally did get out of bed that
Sunday morning, and I found all
of the Easter eggs, too. The fami-
ly ate all but one of them. That
one egg, my friends, has a hole in
it, and it's sitting in an old tennis
shoe in my sister's closet. I may
have the last laugh now, but
soon, Dana will realize that she
still has the picture of me and ug-
ly Margaret. I have but one ex-
cuse � "Lord forgive me; I knew
not what I was doing
'Mask' Proves Powerful Flim
By LINDA CHAPIN
Staff Writer
Mask is a powerful film. It is
well-done while entertain-
ing and moving at the same time.
Based on the true story of
Rocky Dennis, Mask is about a
young man with a rare genetic
disease that causes the bones in
his face to grow abnormally
large. Since the time 15 year old
Rocky was born, doctors had
been telling his mother (played by
Cher) that his life expectancy was
three to six months due to the
pressure on his spinal cord.
Rocky (played by Eric Stoltz)
enters the ninth grade to find
stares and rude, thoughtless com-
ments. Once his classmates begin
to see beyond his looks and into
his true personality, he becomes
accepted and makes a lot of
friends.
Rocky is a very intelligent
young man. He has a way of
sharing his knowledge without
sounding conceited or making
others look stupid. This quality
makes him charming and im-
possible to dislike. For instance,
his explanation of the beginning
of the Trojan War brought him a
well-deserved round of applause.
The love between Rocky and
his mother glows off the screen
right into your heart. Cher plays
a motorcycle riding, drug loving
woman who is crazy about her
son and puts him ahead of
everything and everybody. The
expression on her face when she
looks at Rocky is magic. You
Movie
Review
cannot help but be touched.
The motorcycle gang Rocky
and his mom hang around with is
a special group of people, their
love for Rocky and each other is
obviously strong and sincere.
They take care of each other and
share in each others problems.
Cher's lover, Gar (played by Sam
Elliott) helps Rocky plan a
motorcycle trip across Europe.
His love for Rocky is like that of
a father for his son.
Toward the end of the movie,
Rocky shares his love with a
special girl (Laura Dern). He
pulls all the pieces of his life
together and at the close of the
Film, he feels happy and com-
plete.
Eric Stoltz plays the part of
Rocky Dennis with great care and
what appears to be ease. He
makes you believe in his pain and
share in his triumphs. He sort of
crawls his way into your heart
and you cannot let him go.
Cher's ability as an actress is
much more apparent in Mask
than in Silkwood. She plays a
strong, loving, caring woman.
There was an obvious bond
created between she and Stoltz.
For the most part, the transi-
tions from scene to scene were
clean, but at one point time seem-
ed to move a little too quickly. At
the beginning of the movie,
Rocky is starting ninth grade at a
public junior high school and
before you know it, he is
graduating.
Peter Bogdanovich did an ex-
cellent job directing this special
movie. He and the actors convey
a strong message of love and ac-
ceptance. The film makes you
look at yourself and at others in a
different way, beyond the surface
appearance. The movie will leave
you with a lasting impression.
Mask is a tribute to Rocky Den-
nis.
Mask is rated PG-13 and is now
playing at Buccaneer Movies.
good deal of comedy.
"From the beginnig, we
thought of Hamlet as an extraor-
dinary event said director
Cedric Winchell. Even the text of
the play is new and controversial
he said. According to Winchell:
"We are using a modern adapta-
tion of the play as conceived by
Dr. A.L. Rowse, a leading
scholar of the Elizabethan age
and author of more than 40
books on the period
In an article for the Wall Street
Journal, Rowse wrote, "The
language of Shakespeare is 500
years old, and naturally some of
it � obsolete words and gram-
matical forms � stands in the
way of our appreciating and
sometimes even understanding
him. We need the whole enor-
mous text of Shakespeare �
almost as large as the Bible � rid
of obsolete words and forms,
while at the same time retaining
every line, giving the modern
equivalent and not changing
anything more than necessary
Rowse regards his adaptation as a
convenience for people who are
uncomfortable with Elizabethan
idioms and sentence structure.
The modern text is not the only
story from the ECU Playhouse
production of Hamlet. The title
character, the most coveted role
in world drama, has gone to
Craig Dudley, a New York-based
professional actor who will be,
with this production, performing
the part for the second time in
his career.
Selected from more than 50 ac-
tors during the New York audi-
tions, director Winchell singled
out Dudley "for his power, his
intensity, and well, he simply
blew away all the competition
Craig Dudley is no stranger to the
Bard's works, having appeared in
New York productions of
Othello, Macbeth, and Measure
for Measure. A graduate of the
American Academy of Dramatic
Art and former student of Philip
Burton (father of the late Richar
Burton), Dudley has also been
seen on the CBS TV series "Love
is a Many Splendored Thing
The famous scenes on the bat-
tlements, the interior of Elsinore
Castle and in the nearby
graveyard have been designed by
Theatre Arts faculty member
Robert Alpers. It is an unusually
large set with numerous levels
and playing areas that jut out in-
to the audience some 20 feet
beyond the normal curtain line.
"This is the easily the largest
set we've ever had in the newly
remodeled theatre, and we've lost
about 20 audience seats because
of its tremendous size, but it is
such a magnificent set, the trade-
off is well worth it said
Playhouse General Manager
Scott Parker.
The more than 40 "stylized
Rennaisance" costumes have
been rented from the Denver
Center Theatre and designed bv
noted Hollywood costumer War-
ren Travis. The Ghost of
Hamlet's father, at one time
played by Shakespeare himself,
will be 8 feet tall, coverd by chain
mail weighing more than 45
pounds and illuminated from
within the costume by an in-
dependent power source which
allows the actor to move freely
about the castle set.
Original music for the produc-
tion has been composed on an
electronic synthesizer by Susan
Baird, a graduate student in the
ECU School of Music, and will
be reproduced on a 4-channel
sound system using speakers that
completely surround the audience
area.
Lighting designer David
Downing has also planned a
number of special effects for the
Playhouse. Using more than 175
lighting instruments, Downing
will take advantage of black as
well as strobe lights and three
separate fog effects that range
from the standard dry ice fog that
hugs close to the stage floor, to a
newly purchased fog machine
which is identical to that used in
the Broadway musical Cats. The
colors in the stage light will range
from fully saturated ambers to
shades of cold blue for the grave
digger scene.
Reserved seat tickets to Hamlet
are currently on sale at the
McGinnis Theatre Box Office,
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets in Greenville. The box of-
fice is open Monday through Fri-
day from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Reservations can be made bv call-
ing 757-6390.
Collins' Solo LP
Has Mass Appeal
No Jacket
Required
Phil Colins
J� JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Albums available for review courtesv of
Apple Records
By ERIC SANDBERG
Surf Writer
Wth the number one song, and the number
n� album, on music charts all over the
world, Charlie Brown has defini ely arrived as a
solo artiste. Whoops, I mean Phil Collins. Please
forgive my error. It's just that on the cover of his
new solo album, No Jacket Required, Phil looks
uncannily like Charlie Brown right after seeing
Peppermint Patty in her slip.
How did this balding, little cartoon character
make it all the way to the pop heap? It all started
in late 1970 when a young part-time actor and
drummer for a group called Flaming Youth,
answered a small advertisement in the back of
London's Melody Maker Magazine that was
soliciting drummers to try out for an almost
established group called Genesis.
Phil swam in the pool at Peter Gabriel's
parent's mansion while a series of hopefuls ego-
bashed themselves out of a job. Phil sensed the
subtleties of Genesis' music right away.
"I'm not going to do that he said to himself.
He was in, and as the years passed, he found that
he was in for more than he ever imagined.
In 1976, after Genesis was through conquering
the world with the Lamb Lies Down on Broadway
album and tour, Peter Gabriel, the enigmatic and
visionary leader of Genesis left the flock to
reevaluate his status as a rock star. "I can sing
Phil told the guys. They laughed all the way to the
bank.
With Phil fronting the act, each new Genesis
album out-stripped the previous one in sales.
Their music changed, also. It became more
streamlined and accessible to the masses. The
group has retained its progressive edge all the way
up to its latest release, but it is still music geared
for radio play and big sales.
With his third solo work, o Jacket Required,
Phil has eclipsed the success of the band that gave
him his big break.
Peeleep, as his friends often call him, has cross-
ed the line, almost completely into the realm of in-
consequential bubblegum pop. Selections like
"One More Night and "Sussudio" show Phil to
be an agile songwriter. Several of the songs on the
album are as phony and contrived as A World
Federation Wrestling bout.
"Who Said I Would and "I Don't Wanna
Know as well as "Don't Lose My Number"
come off as just silly exercises in pop songwriting.
They are, in the vernacular of the biz,
"throwaway songs There are some gems among
the clunkers, however. "Long Long Way To Go
"Inside Out and "Take Me Home" are tracks
that will stand up over the years and most likely be
included on future Greatest Hits albums and an-
thologies.
Another problem with this album, is the boring
way in which it was producud and arranged.
Those chores were held by Phil, himself, and
noted Police knob turner, Hugh Padgham. The
arrangements of the instruments on all the tracks,
are virtually identical.
The guitars of Genesis' utility string plunker,
Daryl Stuermer are kept to the minimum, and the
melodies are carried by a sparse arrangement of
synthesizers that are almost drowned out by Phil's
patented big beat sound. This is not even mention-
ing all the monotonous "Beep Beeps' and 'Blat
Blats' from the omnipresent Earth Wind and Fire
Horn section.
Phil Collins' solo music is loaded with instant
appeal and nominal staving power. One only
hopes that his pop success won't convince him to
cash in his Genesis chips.
The ECU Show and Jazz Choir (directed by Eddie Lupton) and the Jazz bawl (directed by'scottwlltleV)
presents "A Night of Jazz" on Sunday, April 14 at 8:15 p.m. in the Fletcher Recital Hall.






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL II. 1985
Classifieds
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Seeking
responsible, non smoking roommate
to share B unit at Ringgold Towers
for both summer sessions. Com
pletely furnished, air conditioned,
accessories included, $170 per
month Call 752 0998, ask for Dan.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Behind
Belk dorm, Uth St. Rent $135.
Private room Call 758 7470 after
4:30 ask for Jane.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Do your
career goals include working with
people? What are you doing to learn
effective people skills? Earn and
Learn: valuable life experiences,
leadership abilities and personal
growth Camp Kanata (Coed resi
dent camp), Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, N.C. 27587. (919) 554 2661.
2 ROOMMATES WANTED: For
summer. Starting first week in May.
$100 per month � '�� utilities. Large
house with central ac, dishwasher,
yard. Call 758 5953. Across from
Overton's.
PART TIME WORD PROCESSOR
NEEDED: For law firm. Program
ming experience helpful. Call Kim
at 758 6200
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE NEEDED: To share 2
bedroom fully furnished apt. for
May Aug. Located directly across
from Jenkins Art Building. Rent$120
� 12 utilities � lease. Call 758 9527.
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES: Needed
for summer 1985. 3 bedrooms, air
conditioned, pool, close to campus.
$125 per month � '3 utilities. Call
758 9385
FOR RENT: "B" unit for rent this
summer at Ringgold Towers. Fully
furnished, low rent. Call 757 3757.
NICE HOME: To share with serious
older student for fall 1985 Female,
nonsmoker. Call 758 5946
ROOMMATES NEEDED: For sum
mer school, 612 Ringgold Towers
$150 a month, utilities included, com
pletely furnished air conditioned.
Call John at 757 3640.
WANTED: I or 2 roommates to
share apt. at Riverbluff this summer
and possibly the fall. $96 a month �
V3 utilities. Call Tommy at 752 0335.
ROOMMATE WANTED: $160 per
month. All utilities pd. Day's
756 2020, night's 756 3939 ask for Jim.
Oakmont Sq. Apts.
COMING HOME AND LOOKING
FOR A SUMMER JOB?: Full and
parttime waiter, waitress and cook
positions. Call or write- Pizza Hut,
3407 S. Wilmingtion St Raleigh,
N.C. 27603 772 8107.
ALL THE BEER YOU CAN DRINK
THIS SUMMERI: I live close to a
store, you could too. Share 2 br. apt.
wfemale- $140. 758 6814.
NEED A SUMMER JOB?: Located
in Raleigh. Perfect for the college
student who needs to make money
over the summer. Five days a week.
Easy work. Great Pay! Send name,
local address and phone number,
major and G.P.A. to: F.D.L. Inc
1608 E. 5th St. Greenville, N.C. 27834.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
And specialist positions available.
Looking for a few junior, senior, or
graduate students to complete our
staff at an exclusive, private, co-ed
summer camp in the scenic moun
tains of Pennsylvania. Openings for
General Counselors, one male tennis
instructor, and male and female
canoeing, nature, and landsport
counselors. If interested contact:
Camp Starlight, co Hy Schmeckrer,
18 Clinton St Malverne N.Y 11565
Phone (516)- 599-5239 or Elaine
Shuman at 758 8129.
WANTED: Certified experienced
lifeguards for the Greenville area,
call 355 5602 for an interview.
COLLEGE REP WANTED. To
distribute "student rate" subscrip-
tion cards on campus No selling in-
volved For application, send sase
to: CMS, 251 Glenwood Dr
Mooresville, NC 28115.
TUTORING: Experienced biology,
math, stats tutor accepting new
students. Reasonable. Get help for
your finals now Call for your ap
pointment Sandi 758 7224 or leave a
message at the Biology Grad Office.
r
l
�$ir
50
OFF
Process G� Print
Wittl This Coupon
From 110. 126. 35mm or Disc Color Print Film
13V.C per print reg 27c and $1 49 dev chg I reg $2.98)
Example 24 exp reg $9 46 NOW $4,731
Limit 1 roll per coupon Not valid with other offers
E�. m 4 24 8
CAROLINA EAST MALL 756-6078
(North entrance � Near Belks)
Open Mon-Sat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sundays 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concert
Frontrunner
Friday April 13, 1985
Doors Open At 8:00
Concert At 9:00
Announcing:
the
"no enzyme"
Contact
Lens
owoKcrwc
�TCCAfl�C�HT�R
IOC
Dr. Peter W. Hollis
Dr. John R. Scibal
We are happy to
introduce a new dairy and
extended wear soft
contact which provides:
� better visual acuity
� easier handling
� excellent comfort
� longer lens life
� needs "no enzyme"
cleaner
This lens is especially
effective for people with
comfort or protein build-up
problems.
CON NAN CHAUNCEY for
more Information:
756-6709.
Tho Tlpton Annex
22S Greenville Blvd.
HELP WANTED: College student to
do yard work. Small yard but lots of
work. $3.35 per hr. Call Tony at
757 1849 anytime before II p.m.
PERSONAL
SCARECROW: Happy 19th Birth
day! The yellow brick road has been
long & bumpy but we'll get to see the
wizard this weekend. Maybe you'll
find your brain and me my heart.
Remember there is no place like
ECU love ya! The Tinman
SHERI ROSEN: Happy 19th Birth
dayit's about time Just thinkin
approximately 12 hours you can go
out and USE YOUR OWN I.D.I
Love the Brothers, Pledges and
Golden Hearts of Sigma Phi Epsilon.
RANDALL JAMES: Happy 21st Bir
thday Luv Ya- Gina
F.P The Save The Sheets Founda
tion would like to hold another
organsensatioal meeting. Your par-
ticipation is needed, (and desired.)
f6 ITK'S: The beach was great and
ya'll are super iThank's again for
everything! I-Lynn.
TRI SIGS: All Sing is tonight! Go for
it and break a leg. Thanks Wendy,
you've done a great job!
PHI TAUS: Thanks for the fun in the
sun last Thursday. Love The
Sigmas.
HEY BABE: You're doing pause
pause pause great, and it was. The
smile is back on my face thanks to
you. I can't wait for another nap-
FLIPPER SEZ: Thanks Laura, San
dra, Kelle, 7, Dan, Arch, Bubba,
Jay, Ken, Alan, George, Ben, Jen,
Dave, and all 4 a lderful time last
Thursday!
MAKE MONEY, MONEY,
MONEY Be flooded with offers
Offer details rush stamped address
ed envelope � 25 cents service fee
P. Yassini, Dept. M, 4417 Towers
Complex WVU, Morgantown, W.Va
26506.
SALE
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert.
TYPING: Experience, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive, 758-5301.
FOR SALE: General Electric por
table air conditioner. Very good con-
dition. Call 752 1989.
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates call 355 2510 after
6:30.
FOR SALE: '73 Datsun 240Z
Michelen tires, mag wheels, air
dam, driving lights, AM FM
cassette, runs well, needs paint.
$2,300. Call Todd 757 3347 weekdays
after 5 or weekends.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
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FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, 212 bath
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THEfcASl CAROLINIAN
APRIL II, 1985
1
1
Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
(XANHOmU B jy upNABL&INES6 -m w6 ��' � 0R1A, � i k -

m
uV 4 ' �1 X i l i
&&NHZR2 not Mu. sir. it
ZEK5 BRENNER SEEMS THEY'VE
I THOUGHT THEY HAPAREEON
MERE MORTAL EN OUATION
APPARENT! MR BRENNER HAS MAX
QUITE A NAME FOR HIMSELF SO MR
PUKE. DECIDED ITUA6 TIME TO
LE T BYGONES BE BYGONES'
DEAN -
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WATSk ���'
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I HI I M i K( H INI N
Sports
U'kil ! I, 1985 Pag(
Four Bucs Hit Homers
f
V
n an attempted pickoff in a
le 'traits nil! entertain . . Weslevan toda
'oung
inn
ftb
B TONY BROWN
The Bucs finally tasted victory
against the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference this year � and it was
sweet-tasting indeed. The final
score uas ECU 18, N.C. State 6.
A homerun derby was the
ordei of the day in Raleigh as the
Wolfpack hit three and the
Pirates' four. Alex Wallace,
Mick Billmeyer and Andrew Fava
did it for NCSl . while Mont
Carter. Chris Bradberry, Jay
McGraw replied for ECU � plus
Winfred Johnson's single-season
record 19th of the year.
Johnson also drove in six runs
to increase his recently-set 1(1
single-season record RBI total to
57. Mike Christopher kept his
unblemished pitching record in-
tact in gaining his seventh win of
the ear.
The Pirates blasted out to a
tour-run lead in the top of the
first behind a three-run shot b
Johnson. A homerun by the
Wolfpack's Fava cut the margin
to three, but Chris Bradberr
solo homer in the third made it
5-2 ECU.
NCSl scored a run in the I
lom ol the inning and then tied it
up with three more in the fifth.
the main damage coming on a
two-run homer by Wallace.
The Pirates responded to the
challenge quickly, scoring two in
the top of the sixth on a RBI
single by Mark Cockrell. He then
came in on a wild pitch to give
ECU a 7-5 lead.
They added to that lead with a
two-run Jay McGraw roundtrip-
per in the seventh, then turned
the game into a rout with six runs
in the eighth. Johnson's two-run
single was followed later by a
double by Jim Rilev that scored
two more.
A single by Johnson in the
ninth added a Pirate run. then
Mont Carter finished the ECU
scoring at 18 with a two-run
homer NCSU's Billmeyer had a
solo blast to make the final score
18-6.
For the Pirates, Johnson went
5-for-6 in the game, with a homer
and a double, while Carter had
three RBIs on four hits, including
a two-bagger and a homerun.
McGraw added two RBIs on
three hits, including a homer.
The Wolfpack wa paced by
the roundtnppers of Wallace,
Billmeyer and Fava, while Fava
Smash Wolfp
and Jim McNamara went 3-for-5
in the game.
The win raises ECU's season
mark to 24-9, while the Wolfpack
fell to 25-14.
April 5, 1985
ECU bounced back from the
loss to UNC to defeat PC AC
South rival American University
twice in a doubleheader last Fri-
day.
Pirate pitcher Mike
Christopher allowed only three
singles and one run in the opener,
while striking out six and walking
none. His season record went to
an unblemished 6-0.
Christopher had plenty of sup-
port from the ECU bats as the
Pirates bunched four runs in the
third and three in the fourth.
ECU got on the scoreboard in
the third with plenty of help from
American. A walk and two errors
loaded the bases, then Jim Riles
doubled to right to drive in two
runs. Mark Cockrell singled
score Robert Langston and
another run came in on a ground
out for a 4-0 Pirate lead.
ECU got the rest of their runs
in the fourth. Greg Hard)
knocked a homerun. then Win-
fred Johnson followed (
Bradberrv's single with u
homer to mak'
-merii.ai. un
the fifth on tw
sacrifice fl
In the
were pushed to the lin
ed American 9-8 in i .
saw much improved hit
numerous errors b r
took three ECl hurlers
overcome the AI fc
pounded out eight h I
two doubles and a h
Pirate
was tagge:
American run- before g
relieve! . .
with two out in
Deventer gave up
ended the AI
a strikeout.
M ike (
starter
came
two batters
ireless.
.
1
aves
me R
e a
We
md
� the
ei 'ed.
ther
ikes
'cam.
i r
e v -
m's
-�nee
e of
� I Vs as anv
campus.
han feels the same
eel?
both
innate
as
ard
Ma . "She's not
deal of
i ei at
in Fern-
- svas selected
all � and '81.
Elei ree county
me regional
;econd in
In college,
:i � O, all-
ite.
Ifish " oung
the individual
� focused her way.
SK- fee he credit should be
��d the team, instead
in individual.
Good In 1985
,4

.�
.S. -
Pam oung has been a I ad Pirate mainstay with her 12-4 record.
Young and the I ad Bucn will next see action at Methodist College.
Pirates Add Three Additional Players; 1
Baker Feels Quarterbacks Strong Point
"Everybody's got to w .
hard and want to win Y
said. "We've also got to believe
in each other. If we can d
we will do well.
"Y e've come along wa fi
iasl vear Young contii
think we can be unto .
everybody's goi to wan:
In sotbaJl action
1 he 1 ads Pirate sol
fell short against Nortl Cat
but spin a twinbill wit rginia.
In the opening game n Chapel
Hill. I orae Roukema
the winning run with the
loaded in the eighth inning I .
UNC a 2-1 victory. Tarheel �
ch-r Virginia Augusta pitched
four hitter to get the win. R
Graves took the loss for the
Pirates, making her 2-4 on the
year.
The Lady Pirates scored their
only run in the fourth inning
Sandy Kee doubled and moved to
third on a wild pitch. Lisa Zmuda
then sacrificed for the sole Pirate
run. Other hitters were Wend
Ozment, who was 1-3 and Stacev
Boyette was 1-4.
In the second game, the Lad)
Pirates couldn't deliver with the
bat as ECU managed just four
hits. ECU's Pam Young got the
loss. She is now 12-4 on the
season.
The Pirates got their only run
in the fifth inning. Tamara
Franks was hit by a pitch and
moved to second on an error. Oz-
ment s base hit moved Franks to
third, where she later scored on a

Zm
V
la was 1-1
Kee
1 a- .
pril 5. 1985
V
the Pent Si
Lady Ca
In i r, two La
runs in the fifth inning was
enough to defeat t'V A 2 nd
arm of Pam You .
In the fifth, after Jea


rd Murra
I amara Franl ing
sec

Franks ft
The I adv Pirates f
the se
10-8. Young
ECU.
Stacev Boyei
mound for the Pira
eight innings
ed bv "
er six innii .
tied. 4-4 Both teams -
run in both the e
innings, n the UVA
countered wit
a 10-6 advantage E( I
hot in the bottom ol
but fell short bv twe
The Ladv Pirates art
19-12-1 and will be in actioi
the road against Methodist
lege on Thursday April I �
OKM4(
I �;
re plas ti s
I signing
ital number
! v�,as an-
d, Baker said that he was
ing his remaining scholarships
.1 the defen-
e line a ide receiver posi
ns, are.i it needed some ad-
ded depth.
I ao of fhe three were exaetlv
what Baker wanted, as the
Pirates signed a wide reciever and
a defensive lineman as well as a
linebacker-fullback.
Heading the list is 6-1,
i90-pound wide reciever Harry
Howard. Howard a native of
Miami, Fla caught 28 passes for
495 yards during his senior
season with six of his receptions
going for scores. He was named
all Inter-City Miami and was
named his team's most valuble
receiver in his senior year.
Todd Drugac also fills a need
in the defensive line area.
Drugac, a 6-2, 255 pounder from
Danville, NJ was a three yea.
letti � Boonton High
During his senior year,
Drugac had 6j tackles, with 18 oi
'hem being unassisted, and five
quarterback sacks.
The third most recent addition
to the Pirate told is Rob Robin-
son. Robinson is a 6-1,
220-pound linebacker-full back
from Mt. Olive, N.C.
Baker, despite getting a late
start on the recruiting trail this
vear due to the coaching change,
has added players who can help
the Pirate football program in the
ire.
"We signed a number of quali-
ty people. We helped ourselves in
some areas Baker said. "I feel
we've signed two exceptional
quarterback prospects
ECU added three players who
are listed as quarterbacks with all
of them having an impressive list
of past accomplishments.
Heading the way is Berke
Holtzclaw, a 5-10, 165-pound
quarterback from Valdosta, Ga.
Holtzclaw quarterbacked the No.
1 high school team in the nation,
as voted by the USA Today. As a
two year starter, Holtclaw led
Valdosta high to a 15-0 mark his
SPr- r M (1jt while passing for
1,400 yards.
Another bright prospect for
the Pirates at the quarterback
position is Brad Walsh. Walsh,
who guided his Summerville High
School team to three straight
state championships, amassed a
40-2 record as a starting quarter-
back. Walsh was the starter for
the South Carolina team in the
1984 Shrine Bowl and was highly
recruited by Clemson and North
Carolina. During his senior year,
Walsh threw for 13 touchdowns
and passed for 1,150 yards.
Travis Hunter is the third
signal caller the Pirates' added in
the 1985 recriuting campaign.
Hunter hails from Winter
Garden, Fla where he earned
team MVP honors two-
consecutive seasons. As a senior,
he passed for 732 yards and seven
touchdowns while rushing for
eight more scores.
Hunter, along with Holtzclaw
and Walsh comprise a promising
trio of quarterbacks for Coach
Baker to work with.
The following is a list of the
rest of the 1985 recriuts, with
their height, weight, position,
home town and a brief summary
about their high school careers.
All players will be freshmen
unless otherwise noted.
Terrel Britt, 6-1, 221,
linebacker, Hampton, Va �
Britt joins his brother John, who
was a freshman linebacker for the
Pirates last year. He earned all-
district, all-region, all-Tidewater
and honorable mention all-state
honors. Was his team's most
valuble defensive player, and
captured his school's headhunter
award seven of the 10 times it was
given in 1984.
Carl Carney, 6-2, 235, defen-
sive lineman, West Columbia,
SC, � Carney was selected to
play in the 1984 Shrine bowl and
was a consenus all-State pick his
senior season.
David Carr, 6-5, 220. tight
end, Reisterstown, Md � Carr
was named all-Baltimore and all-
county his senior season. He
holds his high school's record for
most receptions in a season with
30 and TD's with 11.
Steve Englehart, 6-1, 224,
linebacker, Cuyahoga Falls,
Ohio, � Englehart was named
all-state, all-city, all-district, all-
See BAKER'S, page 12.
Hopefully some of Art Bakers recruits .ill hJlhwT!S
ssrr?0ike fo�r def� ��-�
IRS To
Bv It ANNF 111 kom
nee
Pirates Sv





'
-
t



Johnson
Player Of
��
TREAT YOUR
PI
Dip lc
() mr-mm
2 for 1 I Jii
Ice Cream
after 1 P
AT
FRIDAY
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32 oz. Cups Draft
Corner o5tk4 EVan
Hrs 10 lOa r : a
7 DH A efk
Phdne 732-497





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL II. 1985
11
fpack
ed Chris
� with another
came in
g es and a
he Pirates
but edg-
a game that
A hitting and
sides. It
to finally
en, who
ncluding
nerun.
B V
el Boone
ghl of the
giving uay
De enter
ixth. Van
lgle, then
g threat with
er, ECU's
game, then
g to fan
hold AU
5
985
he Lady Bucs,
Ozment went
and Phyllis
pril 5. 1985
Nrm cancelled
ational Tour-
Sue Manahan
eheader with
if the L'niver-
ner, two Lady Pirate
the fifth inning was
to defeat UVA 2-1 behind
Pam Young.
tfter Jeannie Mur-
le second,
ed her to
d then scored on
ngie. Franks
it Murray did and stole
as well. Young
ingle that scored
rid.
ady Pirates fell short in
nd game b .he score of
ung nicked up the loss
Boyette started on the
or the Pirates. She went
. rore being reliev-
. the score was
Both teams scored one
3th the eighth and ninth
In the tenth. UVA
h four runs to take
age ECU came out
le bottom of the frame
hort by two runs.
Pirates are now
and will be in action on
id against Methodist Col-
Thursda April 18.
ill be able to help replace
?r defensive lineman Chris
IRS To Honor Standouts
ByJEANNETTEROTH
Surr � nirt
The intramural department
needs your input in deciding this
ear's Player and Employee of
the Year.
Each month an outstanding
player and employee are selected
from the mass number of people
involved with intramurals. They
represent the department and are
honored in Tennis Shoe Tidbits.
During the IRS year-end pic-
nic, the Player and Employee of
the Year will be recognized. You
can help by dropping by room
204 Memorial Gym with your
nomination. The following is a
list of the year's Player and
Employee's of the month:
Players: Scott McCarrolI, Nan
George, Garry Allmon, Chip
Bunn and Scott Powers.
Employees: Toni Kenney, San
Gore, Kevin Williams, Rick
Barham and Paul Moore.
Aerobic fitness instructor
tryouts for the intramural depart-
ment fitness program will be held
April 13. Anyone interested in
changing the shapes of his-her
fellow East Carolinians is urged
to attend.
The clinic will take place in
room 108 Memorial Gym at
11-12:30 pm. Instructors are re-
quired to attend in order that
they may participate in the
1985-86 program.
The IRS is recruiting students
to assume leadership roles as ad-
visory council members. The ad-
visory council is comprised of a
president and various represen-
tatives from the participation
divisions within the department.
Interested persons may obtain
advisory council applications at
the IRS office in room 204
Memorial Gym.
Drop-in and get into shape
with exam time fitness classes.
Mark Brunetz, Kathleen Moore,
Kim Boyles and Lucy Mauger
will take you on a fit trip beginn-
ing April 23 through May 1. The
classes will be held in room 108
Memorial Gym at 4 pm and 5:15
pm. Shape your exam blues
away!
Don't forget to sign up for this
year's home-run derby to be held
on the Lady Pirate softball field.
Registration ends tomorrow for
this year's 'slugfest You still
have time to beat the defending
champions in this all-or-nothing
affair. Registration will be held in
room 204 Memorial Gym.
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Monday Thru Thursday
5-9
SHRIMPDINNER
served with
F. Fries, Slaw
Hushpuppies
$3.25
105 Airport Rd.
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 758 0327
A WHALj OF A MEAL

Pirates Sweep Twinbill From American
Continued from page 10.
American seemed headed
toward a win several times, but
the Pirates refused to fade. AU
took the lead with two in the top
of the first. A hit batsman, a
single and a double brought in
one. then a double steal gave AU
a 2-0 advantage
ECU came back right away in
the bottom of the frame. Mark
Shank walked, Greg Hardison
doubled, then Chris Bradberry
singled in both runners to tie it
up.
L went ahead with a run in
the second on a double and an er-
ror for a 3-2 lead, but Bradberry
and Johnson once again hit con-
Johnson
Player Of
ECU's Winfred Johnson was
named the first EC AC South
Player of the Week for the week
ending April 7.
In six games during the week,
Johnson batted .500 by going 10
for 20 including four home runs,
two doubles and 18 runs batted
in.
The junior from
hlizabethtown. NC. broke the
secutive homers in the third to
put the Pirates in front. Mike
Sullivan then doubled and came
in when Mark Cockrell
deliberately got hung up between
first and second to increase the
ECU lead to 5-3.
The lead changed sides again in
the fifth, as AU scored four runs
for a 7-5 advantage. The main
blow was a three-run homer by
Richard Vile. American added
what appeared to be an insurance
run in the top of the sixth. Van
Deventer relieved Boone with two
on, then gave up a run on a
single, but struck out the only
other batter he faced to end the
rally. Christopher held AU
scoreless, which was just enough
Selected
The Week
school's previous single-season
RBI record of 46. With his 19th
homer of the year, he broke
ECU's single-season home run
mark of 18 � which he set last
year. And in just his junior
season, Johnson has already sur-
passed the career total bases
record for any Pirate baseball
player.
as it turned out.
The Pirates then tallied four
runs in the bottom of the sixth to
take the win, 9-8. Cockrell open-
ed with a walk, then Shank
doubled. Greg Hardison slapped
a single up the center for two
runs. Then after Winfred
Johnson was intentionally walk-
ed, Mike Sullivan knocked in the
winning run with a single.
Bradberry paced the Pirate of-
fense, with a homer, double and
single, plus a stolen base � while
driving in four runs. Hardison
and Sullivan went 2-4 in addition
to Johnson's homer.
Van Deventer's one-third of a
inning was enough to give him
the win to raise his season mark
to 2-0. Chustopher was credited
with a save.
The Pirates return to action at
Harrington Field on Thursday,
hosting N.C. Wesleyan in a 7
p.m. contest.
r, qr Apple Records
Jp J 204 E 5th St. - 758-1427
- TOP 100 5 swiwLP's & Cassetes ON SALE
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Includes Lutes
ROCK
John Fogert
Tom Petty
Eric Clapton
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Bruce Springsteen
Wham Cars REO
Madonna
Bryan Adams
Don Henley
Chicago
Mick Jagger
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Huey Lewis
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Luther VanDross
Teena Marie
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Prince
Lionei Richie
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The Time
Phillip Ba ley
Kool & The G
Ashford & S � . .
Diane Robj
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Midnight Star
Gap Band
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Commodores
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Check Our Daily Specials
Philadelphia Style Cheese Steaks i Our Specialty)
And Now. Big Daddy's Big Dipper
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Good thru Wed
April 17. 1985
at Big Daddy's
ATTIC
FRIDAY
DOC HOLIDAY
SATURDAY
BLUSHING
BRIDES
(Rolling Stones Tribute;
SATURDAY 13th
& SUNDAY 14th
North Carolina State
Foosball Championship
Afternoon and Evening)
:
CUBBIES ANNOUNCES
Nachos 8:00 p.mClosing
Late Night Happy Hours 12:00a.m2:00a.m.
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00!
Old Fashioned Hamburgers80C
Old Fashioned Cheeseburgers90$
Old Fashioned Hot Dogs70r
Philadelphia Style Cheese Steak$1.50
Shrimp Burgers $110
Shrimp Salad Sandwich$1.45
Longnecks
32 oz. Cups Draft
60
$1.00
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Corner of 5th A Evans St.
Hrs 10:30 am to 2 am
7 Days A Week
PHdne: 752-6497
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GENERAL ELIGIBILITY
FOR SCHOLARSHIPS
Graduate ScholarshipsUndergraduate ScholarshipsVocational ScholarshipsTeacher of the Handicapped ScholarshipsJournalism Scholarships I
Educational RequirementsBachelor's degree or equivalent prior to commencement ot scholarship studiesTvvo vears' univei sity work prior to commencement of olarship studiesSe � : . gr.j luati lent at I � 1 ippli cation. May not be eligible for Gradu ite or Undergrade ate Scl irshipSecon ��. � ool : juateo- . . . : lent minimum it time o application.Sec � gi jduatf � lent minimun it time of applica:
Work Experience as of 1 October 1 1985None requiredNone requiredAt ieast 2 vearsAt leas' 2 ye ms of teaching the ha- � � ist �� irs is ! a profeiou"a st
Age as of 1 October 198518 through JO inclusive18 through 24 inclusive21 tin � 50 inclusive21 through 50 inclusive21 thi inclus
I Marital StatusMay be marriedMay not be married for duration of scholarsh,pMav be married . unedMay bt
Rotary Foundation International Scholarships.
For applications and additional information contact
the Rotary club in your area.
ROTARY
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS
1986-87
The Rotary Foundation of
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For More Information Contact
the Rotary Club in Your
Community.
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;JM &





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 11, 1985
Baker's Initial Recruiting Class Profiled
Contiuned from page 10.
summit and all-league for his
play in his senior season. He
played on two state champion-
ship teams in four years.
Joe Holmes, 6-4, 220, defen-
sive end, Manteo, NC, � Let-
tered four years in football, three
in basketball and two years in
track. He was all-conference and
all-Albemarle in both 1983 and
1984.
Mike Gainey, 6-0, 210, tight
end, Suffolk, Va � Gainey is
the only junior-college player the
Pirates signed this year. While at
Ferrum junior college, Gainey
was a second team all-conference
pick and was a first team all-
regional all star.
Willie Lewis, 5-9, 175, running
back, Valdosta, Ga � Lewis
was the starting halfback on the
No. 1 high school team in the na-
tion at Valdosta High School
where he was a teammate of
Berke Holtzclau. Lewis gained
over 800 yards his senior year and
was named a first team all-state
selection by the Atlanta Journal-
Constitution.
Compton McCurry, 6-1, 220,
linebacker, Summerville, SC, �
McCurry along with teammate
Brad Walsh, played on three
straight state championship
teams. McCurry was named all-
state, and captained the South
team in the North-South all-star
game.
Reggie McKinney, 5-10, 185,
running back, Mt. Olive, NC, �
Mckinney rushed for over 2,000
yards as a senior at Southern
Wayne High School. Was named
both all-state and all-east and
played in the North Carolina-
South Carolina Shrine bowl
game.
Lynn Porcher, 6-2, 189, defen-
sive back, Rembert, SC, � Por-
cher played quarterback and free
safety in high school but will be a
defensive back at ECU. He
played in the 1984 Shrine bowl
and was named all-state and all-
area in addition to being named
to the all-southern team by the
Orlando Sentinel.
Cedric Ray, 6-3, 215,
linebacker, Fayetteville, NC, �
Ray was all-conference, all-
county and an honerable mention
all-east selection in 1984. He was
a three-year starter at E.E. Smith
High School.
Steve Salva, 6-3, 235, lineman,
Dunwoody, Ga � Salva was
picked as one of the top fifty pro-
spects in Georgia, and was
selected to play in the Georgia all-
star game. Started both ways in
leading his high school to their
first two playoff appearances in
(jreenille
Honer Shop
his junior and senior seasons.
Stewart Southall, 6-1, 248, of-
fensive line, Milledgeville, Ga
� Southall earned all-city honors
his senior year and was selected
as one of the top-15 prospects in
central Georgia.
Ricky Torrain, 5-9, 170, defen-
758-2774
( .ur.ci I vj t
JOBS!
Students interested in applying for
Refrigeration Managers for the
coming year may pick up applica-
tions in room 207 or 228
Mendenhall Student Center and
return them no later than Friday,
April 12th, 1985 at noon.
Phi Sigma Pi & The Heart Fund
would like to thank the following
sponsors for their help in the
success of the 8th Annual Bikini
Contest:
Elbe
Coca Cola
Budwiser
TW's Nitelife
Burger King
Wendy's
Aerobic Workshop
Tar Landing Seafood
Beef-n-Shake
Consolidated Theatres
Fosdick's Seafood
sivc back, Rougemont, NC, �
Torrain was an all-mid-state
selection both his junior and
senior year at Orange High
School, where he helped the pan-
thers to a conference co-
championship.
Tim Wolter, 6-3, 190, defen-
sive back-punter, Wendell, NC,
� Wolter holds the state record
for most interceptions in a season
with 13 in 10 games. Was an
Associated Press first team all-
state selection, and was an
honorable mention all-America
pick by the USA Today.
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
It wasn't enough that
you had an eight o'clock
class, you missed lunch
and your three o clock
class turned out to be a
surprise quiz, but now
it's ten o'clock and
you're still studying
This calls for an official
study break This is how
to take an official study
break
1. Close your books
2. Call the Domino's
Pizza location nearest
you and order your
favorite pizza
3 Put your feet up
4. In less than 30 minutes
the Dommo s Pizza
delivery professional will
deliver your pizza to
your door
5 Return to your desk
and sink your teeth into
a delicious slice of hot.
freshly made pizza
6 (Optional) Return to
studying when finished
Call America s favorite
pizza delivery people on
your next study break
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YOU
1
A MESSAGE FROM THE RECORD BAR FAMILY
The music community has
come together in a fight to
save lives and relieve suffering.
You have given your, time,
talents, and resources to the
cause of African Relief. And
you have shown the world the
Dower of music to benefit
Tumanity.
To the artists who
spearheaded this vital project,
to CBS Records, and to the
many people whose support
and generosity have made it a
reality�thank you. All of us in
the Record Bar family are
proud to be part of this effort.
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
RECORD BAR
LICORICE PIZZA
RACK MERCHANDISERS OF AMERICA
ADVENTURES
DOLPHIN RECORDS
MID-AMERICA DISTRIBUTORS, INC
NAPOLEON'S GROCERY
� ��





Title
The East Carolinian, April 11, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 11, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.403
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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