The East Carolinian, April 4, 1985






She i�ust Otaroimtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.52
Thursday, April 4, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Parking Problem
Solutions Offered
F.nvironmenlal design students at EC!
of their work at the Willis Building In
En vironmental Design mmvAH NUMT tcu,mm u
etrXfcS Vlr�nmenf Wjthln and eDVlt and � �� elements.
Liberal Groups Benefit From New Organization
By DALE SWAIN SON
St�fl u rtir,
A left-wing student group
being organized on campus as an
outlet for liberal and progressive
student interaction, according to
ECU political science major Jay
Stone. Stone and a handful of
other students establishing
Students for Economic
Democracy are hoping to draw
other liberal campus organiza-
tions into a left-wing coalition.
"There is a vacuum of effec-
tive organizations for student ac-
tivism Stone said. "No one
ever hears about the Young
Democrats, the NAACP or the
Sierra Club except in isolated
cases like national elections or
Martinuther King Day. There is
a need for an organization with
continuity to fill that need
Working on a multi-issue level,
Stone hopes to draw the support
of many single-issue organiza-
tions such as the NAACP and the
Sierra Club.
The group will meet at least
once a month to study and
discuss pertinent issues. "At the
beginning of each month we will
decide on an issue to study, then,
at the next monthly meeting,
there will be a discussion and a
debate, sort of a think-tank set-
up Stone said. In addition to
the study sessions, SED will also
be involved in other special
events.
According to Stone, SED will
hold its first teach-in on April 13.
The event will be open to any stu-
dent and will involve workshops
and lectures on Central America,
South Africa and Third World
development. "We plan to hold a
teach-in at least once each
semester Stone said. "Our
main goal is education on the
issues both for our members,
through study sessions, and the
campus community, through the
teach-ins he said.
In addition, SED has been ac-
cepted as an affiliate of the In-
stitute for Policy Studies, a
Washington-based think tank,
Stone said. The institute was
founded in 1963 by members of
the Kennedy administration's
State Department and operates
the Washington School. Affilia-
tion with IPS allows SED to buy
books at cut rates and also sup-
plies the organization with an IPS
newsletter.
Stone further said of the new
organization's purpose that they
want "to demonstrate that the
Conservative movement is not a
landslide. There is still a liberal
element on campus. SED will at-
tempt to activate it
By HAROLD JOYNER
Four ECU students have pro-
posed a plan that would utilize a
shuttle bus system to transport
students from the unused parking
spaces in the parking lot located
behind the Allied Health Building
to the main campus. A Friday
meeting has been scheduled with
Chancellor John Howell to
discuss the viability of the pro-
posal.
Andrew Joyner, the group's
chairman, said Wednesday the
proposal came about because the
group did not feel ECU was
utilizing its parking facilities to
the full extent during the day.
"Our group realizes that ECU
is only putting a Band Aid on the
current parking situation said
Joyner, 21, a senior majoring in
EnglishWe can offer a much
better solution, costing substan-
tially less and at the same time
solving the parking problem we
have on campus. Our proposal
does not involve any cutting of
trees or spending exorbitant
amounts of money to solve the
problem
Joyner's proposal would cost
the campus $148,000, including
the cost of the buses and opera-
tional costs. "This is quite a sav-
ings considering that just the
building of a new parking lot will
cost around $2 million and will
probably raise the cost of student
parking stickers he said.
Although Howell has not seen
the proposal, he said he thought
it was a good idea. "We arc
always willing to accept any pro-
posals received and it mav work
very well. We will definitely con-
sider the proposal he said.
Joyner said he and the other
four members of the group, Tara
O'Brien a senior business major,
Robert Osswaid, a senior com-
puter science major and Cliff
Steed, a graduate of ECU, con-
ducted a random survey of 100
students and found 95 percent
were not satisfied with the pre-
sent parking system at ECU.
Howell added that he thought
100 percent of the faculty and
staff were also displeased with
parking on campus.
"We should use what we
already have in terms of parking,
instead of clearing space for 20
spaces here and 20 spaces there
Joyner said.
The proposal is also beinc
discussed by the SO A Student
Welfare Committee and will be
written up as a mandate to the
administration, he said.
'This system is not only fai
everybody Joyner said, "and
it's not quite perfect, but it is
definitely better than what we'v
got right now Several test ru
have already been done, he said,
and the shuttle would run every
17 minutes from the Allied
Health Building to the main cam-
pus.
"We are very serious abou:
this. Everything has been done
professionally and we hope the
administration will seriously con-
sider our answer to a problem
that has plagued this campus for
years he said.
Cuban Military Action, Involvement Explained At Lecture
Bv BRETT MORRIS authority on 11 S �fuhan rpb. I TmtH Qtt�c ;c c��;�� � r ,��� .L . . � . .
Suff Writer
The situation in Central
America involving U.S.
economic and military aid to
Nicaraguan rebels and the El
Salvadoran government and the
impact of Cuban military actions
in the area were discussed in a
Great Decisions series lecture at
ECU luesday night.
Donald Schultz, associate pro-
fessor of political science at the
University of Tampa and an
Chances Of Survival Slim
authority on U.S. � Cuban rela
tions, concentrated his speech on
"Revolutionary Cuba" and the
volatile history of U.S. � Cuban
relations.
For the past 26 years, relations
between the United States and
Cuba have been marked by a
hostile deadlock, making Central
America an especially crucial
U.S. foreign policy area.
When the Sandinista guerrillas
overthrew the Somoza regime in
1979, they were backed by Cuban
military support. Now, the
United States is supporting a
group of CIA-supplied contras in
Nicaragua in an effort to over-
throw the Sandinista govern-
ment. According to Schultz, the
CIA-supplied contras cannot ac-
complish this themselves.
Schultz said that if we attempt
an overthrow of the Sandinistas
in Nicaragua, our troops would
be fighting Cubans. Approx-
imately 7,500 Cuban military
men are stationed in Nicaragua,
he said.
In El Salvador during the fall
of 1980, the Cubans and San-
dinistas issued arms to rebels
there to attempt an overthrow of
the U.Ssupported government.
The revolution in El Salvador
failed.
According to Schultz, Cuba
wanted to talk with the United
States about Central America's
fate after Ronald Reagan took
office in 1981. "Even if he
(Castro) were willing to
negotiate, the Reagan ad-
ministration is adamant" against
it. Schultz said
Schultz said the conflict bet-
ween the United States and Cuba
started in the early 1900s. The
United States treated Cuba like a
colony. Aflci even as recent as
1934, the U.S. ambassador was
the second most powerful man in
Cuba. Our control, Shultz said,
resulted in pan from the United
States being a major market for
Cuban sugar.
According to Schultz, impor-
tant decisions about the island's
economy were made in the U.S.
The United States
would use sugar quotas in the
states to control Cuba, he said.
When it came time for revolu-
tion, Schultz said Cuba and Fidel
Castro "needed an external
enemy to rally the Cuban people
behind in order to consolidate
power
"This history of conflict has
been made more difficult w;th
two and one-half decades of bu
terness and there will continue to
be major setbacks in the future
he said.
Escort Operation Declining
(CPS) � In the spring of 1980,
a sophomore woman was raped
near Oregon State University's
Kerr Library. The next day, 20
Finley Hall volunteer organized
an escort service to help women
make it across campus safely.
Today, the service is gone. Few
people know it ever existed.
About 30 miles north of here,
University of Oregon female
students, outraged and frighten-
ed by a rape on the campus last
October, will launch their new
escort service in a week or two.
The object, explains Laura
Romano of Oregon's Women's
Referral and Resource Service, is
to make female escorts available
and, or course, to prevent future
sexual assaults.
But if the experiences of
dozens of other campuses over
the last year are any indication,
Romano's service has only slim
chances of survival.
While many campuses, prepar-
ing for the increased night traffic
of warmer weather, are now for-
ming escort services, the services
in general don't work well. Most
don't last more than a few mon-
ths, are usually ignored by cam-
pus women, and often don't pre-
vent sexual assaults anyway,
campus police around the coun-
try say.
"Generally volunteer escort
services don't work very well
observes Daniel Keller, police
chief at the University of
Louisville and head of the nation-
wide Campus Crime Prevention
Programs.
"Right after a rape or sexual
assault, everyone comes out of
the woodwork he explains.
"They want to help, but the inci-
dent fades, and they lose
interest
At the nation's biggest cam-
pus, Ohio State, three escort ser-
vices typically go begging for
people to escort, despite 62
assaults and ten rapes in the area
last fall.
"We get maybe five calls a
night says Cindi Butler, who
staffs one of the services.
At the University of Wiscon-
sin's Reuter Hall, which began a
service after a 1980 series of sex-
ual assaults, "we get maybe five
calls a night notes Jim
Whitland, the program's direc-
tor.
"We're starting to advertise,
make commercials, in hopes that
it'll pick up he says.
The University of Maryland-
College Park reported six rapes
and 23 assaults in 1983, and can-
pus police expect a variety of
escort services didn't improve the
1984 statistics.
UM police Corporal Kathy
Atwell says a volunteer service,
started in the early '70s con-
tinues, but "because they're
volunteers and they lack the fun-
ding, they're iffy
"We've had escort services
over the years, but, as with
everything else you have to work
at, people get tired, bored and the
thing falls apart says opera-
tions officer Richard Gould of
Oregon State's defunct service.
His department provides an
escort service, he adds, "but they
(students) have to call. I'd say
that we get maybe one call per
night, and that's an average
But OSU, with nearly 3,000
female students living on cam-
pus, needs an escort service,
Gould maintains. Campus police
investigated 10 sexual assaults
last year, a figure Gould says in
high.
A sense of immunity often
keeps students from calling.
"Oh, you hear stories of peo-
ple being chased across the cam-
pus says freshman Tabatha
Somerville. "But it's never hap-
pened to me
"There seems to be a problem
with lack of interest in the pro-
gram notes Greg Colucci of
Kent State's now-folded escort
service. "People just don't want
to get involved
Programs with full-time paid
coordinators seem to do better,
Louisville's Keller says.
"What I've done is divide the
campus into eight main sectors
and position highly visible, paid
students in each sector, working
in conjunction with the campus
police he explains. "It's called
'Night Watch' and it's highly ef-
fective
Sexual assaults fell nearly 100
percent in the first nine months
of 1984 from the same period in
1983, although Keller adds the
number may be misleading.
Hng-Pong Tournament
JOjokd�n
LM
Shown above is a recent ping-pong tournament held at Mendenhall Student Center. Winners were- 1st
place, Joe Caddis, faculty; 2nd place David Herris, student; 3rd place, George Threewitts, faculty.
On The Inside
Announcements2 -The SGA will hold a special
Editorials4 session of the legislature to
Entertainment6 discuss organization budgets
Classifieds7 on Tuesday, April 9 at 5 p.m.
Sports8 in Room 221, Mendenhall. All
legislators are expected to at-
tend.
�The ECU baseball team
defeated Atlantic Christian
College in a doubieheader
Tuesday. For details, see
Sports, page 8. Also included
are updates on recent action in
softball and tennis.
�Students planning to visit
Myrtle Beach for Easter
weekend should be familiar
with city ordinances. See page
3.
�The East Carolinian will not
be published Tuesday, April 9,
doe to the Easter holiday.
�For a review of
Mask and the Mr.
the movie
ECU con-
test, see Entertainment, page
wii win mmmmmmmmm

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l EAST C AROI.INIAN
APRIL 4, 1985
CM
Announcements
Testing Center
Due to the tact that the ECU Testing
Center Speight Building. Room 105 will be
closed on April 10. the MAT regularly scheal
ed tor that date will not be administered Ad
ministration of the WAT win resume on Wed,
April 1, at30 p m
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement ser
vi�:e in the Blc UM IOffwlngORhoot
sessions to hem voi: prepare your own
resume Many employers request a resume
showing your education and experience
Come to either session to rerieve handouts
and an overview They will be held in the
Career Planning Room ot he Bloxton House
m on Apru i and 9
Mascots
Trie Atlel'ic Department is loKlng for
athle � ec'ec; and e�c" h.mo'ed
students to tultill the position ot the P.rate
Mascot tor ?he 'S5 84 school year Anyone
interested in information about this position
should meet at Mmges Coliseum Thurs
April 4 .it 5 X The rsponsolbllltles em te
men' and advantages or bemg involved in
Pirate A" ,io be worth your time to
s'vna me flrsl see you rherel
Borrowers from the Nation
Direct Sutdent I can Fund
eel Student Loan tier
r�i-� s a-e rertt noed of the exit interview re
quireent upon gi � oi those other
ise nit 'eturning to ECU Fall Semester.
i"�85 as an undergr.io. a'p or graduate stu
dent The interview s necessary tg nforrr
NDSL Hei schedule.
provisions for loan cancei'atio' anc! other
pe � e - formation You are requested to
-eixif' � the ce room 221 of the
all Student Center a' 5 30 i m on
Aerobic Fitness
Instructors
Tryouts tor the 85 86 school year aerobic
fitness instruclfon begins April 13. The class
is required for anyone Interested In teaching
for the in Rec Aerobic fitness Program on
April 13 from 11 17:30 In room 108 Memorial
Gym The tryouts will be held. For more In-
fo, come by room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757 6387
Debate
Lambda Alpha Epsllon and Alpha Phi
Sigma are sponsoring a debate on the Exclu
sionary rule on April 15 at 7 30 p.m room 101
of the Carol Belk Building. The exclusionary
rule is a rule that makes Illegally obtained
evidence inadmissible In court Speakers In
elude the chiefs of police of Greenville and
Washington AM students and faculty are
welcome
SGA Refrigerator
Rentals
Applications now being accepted thru
April 10. for SGA Reflgerator Rentals
Manager You may apply In room 278 of
MSC
SMRA Yard Sale
The Student Medical Record Association Is
sponsoring a yard sale, Sat , April 13 In front
of the Belx (Allied Health) building, Prom
8 30 2 00 Luggage, stereo, television, ap
piiances and much more available at very
reasonalbe prices
PPMA
Prl Professional Health Alliance will hold
their regular meeting Thurs , April 4 at 5 30
p.m. In room 221 Mendenhall Student Center
Nominations for new officers will be taken
So all members should make it a point to at
tend.
Buddist Study and
Meditatio Group
We will meet tonight at 7 In E201 of the
physics Buldlng Further readings from The
Way of Life' will be done Please bring a
cushion.
Ambassadors
We will have our final general meeting on
Wed April 10 at 5 p.m In the Mendenhall
Multipurpose room. Or Volpe, Vice
chancellor of Academic Affals, will speak
Elections will also be held We will discuss
the end of the year party and alumni day ac
tivlfles. This is a most Important meeting I
All ambassadors should attend If you can
not please call Teresa (757077)
Summer Jobs
Do you need a good Summer? Need some
experience (to put on your resume) Need
$2000 or S3000 for school next year? If you are
a hard worker and want to do something dur
Ing your college summers to better your
chances of getting a good job when you
graduate, then come to one of our interviews
on Thurs April 4 at 3 30 or 7 in Brewsfer D
room 107 Required 2 5 GPA or mall name,
phone, address and past summer lob ex
perience to 'Summer Jobs' P O 3361, Green
vllle, NC 27836
NC Student Legislature
NCSL will meet MM , April 1 and Tu�
April 9 at 7 in Mendenhall Coffeehouse
Remember Moo . April � Is a holiday All
members should consider runlng for one of
the following offices: Secretary, Treasurer,
V Chairman, Chairman. Elections will take
place Tues April?. Also on that date we will
have our picture taken for the Buccaneer
yearbook and a parliamentary procedure
workshop to test our delegates and Lt
Governer's skills.
Blood-Pressure Clinic
Have hypertension? You may not know It.
Have your blood pressure checked free by
trained medical personnel Sat 6 April from
11 1 a.m. at West Greenville Recreation
Center, corner of West Fifth and Nash St.
Refreshments served. Sponsored by pledges
of lota Kappa Omega Chaper, Alpha Kappa
Aplha Sorority
Student Athletic Board
The SAB will meet on April 9 (Tues) at 4 In
room 748 MSC All Interested persons should
attend
An Alpha Evening
of Elegence
The brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha trat. and
the ladies of black and gold, present a
fashion show and reception, on Wed April
10, MSC, 7:30 p.m. Admission 81 Come out
and enoy this special evening with the
Alphas.
Lecture
Dr. Brian L. Harris Department of
Foreign Languages and Literatures
'Humane Literacy and Foreign Language
Education' Tues April 9, 6 30 p m in MSC
Coffeehouse All are cordially Invited A
reception follows
either Ac 3 or April 17 if .
1 e �?
1 � In ent
Gamma Beta Phi
Honor Society
hold -1 t- v' friurs
at 7 p f
members are urgeo1 totend
ieet
call
April 4 in
i All new
PLAZA
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
Mo C.r�r fttvd
m-jtJj 24 Has
24 hour Towing Scimcc
I -Haul Rental,
This Summer
IF VOU'RE COMING TO SUMMER SCHOOL AND NEED A PLACE TO LIVE, CALL US
A EEW R1NGG0LV TOWERS UNITS ARE AVAILABLE TO SUBLET FOR THE SUMMER.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus East Carolina University
student cortdos at ECU campus
sale and rental units
on-site management
night security personnel
fully furnished and accessorised
carpeted & air conditioned
kitchen appliances furrushed
laundry facilities
resident parking slidren
4ls
WARD PROPERTY BROKERS
105 COMMERCE STREET
DRAWER 56S
GREEMVILLE N C 2783S
919 756-8410
215 East 4th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
919-752-2808
After Happy Hour Special
Every Tuesday
FREE Nachos with
Purchase of 60 oz. Pitcher
$2.50
Delivery hours
AM2 Midnight
Man, Tues, & Wed
11 AM-2 AM
Thurs, Fri, Sat & Sun
FREE DELIVERY

�i
50
OFF
Process &� Print
With This CoMBjon -
I sc Color Print Film
. 2? uid $1.49 dev. chgreg $2 98
: , NOW $4.73!
Not I with other offers.
cPhotoWryttd E44
CAROLINA EAST MALL 756-6078
(North entrance - Near Belks)
Open MonSat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sundays 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
COCV'gnr "MS
xrrvger Sav
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Hone so a - a 3ej t

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and Prices
:ive Thru Sat

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UP TO

131 �c per print
� H
1 Hour Photo Lab
Just in time for Easter from
Foto Express

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ODDS CHART
OOOB TO WIN
300s �� 3�(�nC'ng Ofl !� rjrDOm O CiarT TicM�
The rTKW� ickm y coHi tn� -�� foul c�no��
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n
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a FREE extra set of prints.
For a limited time at Foto Express
you'll get an extra set of color
prints free with every disc or roll
of color print film you bring to us
for processing.
That's right! You'll receive two
sets of color prints for the price of
one. So take advantage of this
special offer and share your Easter
memories with family and friends.
Offer expires April 13,1985.
Polo
Ehjmc�?
"The Specialists"
STORE ADDRESS
PRODUCTS 8'
Kodak
WE WILL BE
Open Normal
Hours
EASTER SUNDAY
Pharmacies closed
REGULAR OR
LIGHT
from the folks at Kroger Savon,
PEPSI FREE. DIE"
PEPSI OR
Pepsi
Cola
KROGER GRADE A
Large
Eggs
Coors
"v.
2 Ltr
N.R.B.
Doz
LIMIT 2 PLEASE
LIMIT 2 DOZEN
12 Oz.
ans
REGULAR
Wise Potato
Chips
r
ASSORTED VARIETIES
(EXCEPT ANGEL FOOD)
Duncan Hines
Cake Mix
�n

:i-
Country Style
Minute
Maid
ORANG�
-JU�CE
MINUTE MAID
CHILLED
COUNTRY STYLE
Orange
Juice
WHOLE (19-23 LB
AVG WGT)
Smoked
Ham
Lb
V.
LN
Y
H
ASSORTED VARIETY �
KROGER
Brown 9N
Serve Rolls
V� Gal
Ctn
Pkgs
Over :) locations in the Carolina and Virginia.
LIMIT 2 PLEASE
VERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacn of tnese advertised items
is required to tie readily
avauaoie for sale in eacn Kroger
Sav on except as specificaiiv
noted in tms ad if we do run
out of an item we win offer you
your cnoice of a comparable
item wnen available reflecting
tne same savings or a ramenee
wnicn will entitle you to pur
cnase tne advertr
tne advertised pncf
days Only one vendor
win oe accepted
GO
or a rdim.Mr.n
e you to pur .
tised item at
nee within JO
pndor coupon
per item
W&i BeoH5
KROGERING FOR A HUGE SELECTION
of Easter Candy
is Vbuk AjcuKab v Condi
s �odtot Imp v VHbWtol
is Cupcoket - (Mkm Bodfecb
Zm Dye & fCib And mock mmi
DOUBLE
MFCs
COUPONS
for SjESLTS ��FACE va�-ue)
FOR EVERY $10 PURCHASE'
Ptease see details irvsiore
For Ea.
As Easter v
its extra da
majority of stu
mg town, and
be heading t
SC.
J. Stanley Bi
Chief of Pohcel
see many stua
Beach, but he
aware of mar.
dinances that
Included amor
South Caxohn,
hibits the poss
or wine in an o
moving vehicle
ing age in Sout
for beer or -
Myrtle Bea.
specify that it a
consume alcohol
it is illegal to wj
and consume
consume alcoj
premises where
test is beii.
For those stu
might be
beach, this is ai
9 p.m. and sunr
If you're ph
the boua
Myrtk Bea.
any portion
designated for
don't try to sleej
ween 9 p.m tin
If you have w
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sday
s with
z. Pitcher
Hdnight
Wed
f
t
ai A Sun
ERY
J
Copyright ims
-ojer sav on
:uant!tv frights R�Mrv�
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sar
April 6 1985
OCERIES
r Savon.
GER GRADE A
Large
58
2 DOZEN
WHOLE (19-23 LB
AVG WGT)
Smoked
Ham
69
ASSORTED VARIETY�
KROGER
Brown 9N
Serve Rolls
$
gs
119
UBLE
MFC.S '
UPONS
(UP TO 50 FACE VALUE)
fc-RY $10 PURCHASE!
details in-store
For Easter Visitors
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 4 1 MH 3
As Easter Weekend arrives with
its extra day of vacation, a large
majority of students will be leav-
ing town, and many of them will
be heading for Myrtle Beach,
�JSt?ie)Bird' B�ach
Chief of Police, said he hopes to
see many students visit Myrtle
Beach, but he wants them to be
aware of many state and local or-
dinances that may affect them.
Included among these is a new
South Carolina law which pro-
hibits the possession of any beeer
or wine in an open container in a
moving vehicle. Also, the drink-
ing age in South Carolina is 20
for beer or wine, 21 for liquor.
Myrtle Beach city ordinances
specify that it is illegal to publicly
consume alcohol (in other words
it is illegal to walk down the street
and consume alcohol), and to
consume alcohol upon any
premises where an athletic con-
test is being conducted.
For those students who think it
might be fun to sleep on the
beach, this is also illegal between
9 p.m. and sunrise.
If you're planning on cruising
the boulevard, remember, in
Myrtle Beach it is illegal to ride in
any portion of a vehicle not
designated for passengers. Also,
don't try to sleep in your car bet-
ween 9 p.m. and sunrise.
If you have weapons you want
Beach Rules Explained
to carry on the beach, that's not a
good idea either. It is unlawful to
carry, concealed or not, any
pistol, dirk, slingshot, metal
knuckles, razors or other deadly
weapons used for the infliction of
injury to person or property.
Be sure to behave after a night
of drinking � in Myrtle Beach
it's illegal for any person "to
commit any breach of the peace,
conduct himself in a disorderly
manner, be publicly drunk or
under the influence of intox-
icating beverages, be loud or
boisterous or conduct himself in
such a manner as to disturb the
peace and quiet of the public
One problem Myrtle Beach
property owners have is with
trespassing. City laws state that:
�No person shall enter upon
the lands or premises owned or in
possession of another after notice
from the owner or person in
possession prohibiting an entry.
�No person shall enter upon
the lands or premises owned or
occupied by another for any
other than a legitimate cause.
�No person shall fail or refuse
to leave lands or premises owned
or occupied by another, after be-
ing requested to do so.
�No person shall enter in or
upon private or public property
for the purpose and design of
creating or inciting a distrubance,
or when any entry might be
calculated to create or incite a
disturbance.
In the event that you have
made a complete fool out of
yourself and want to conceal
your identity the next time you go
out, wearing a mask is not a good
idea. It is illegal for a person
older than 16 to appear on any
lane, walk, alley, street, public
road or highway while wearing a
mask or other device which con-
ceals his identity.
The final limitations concern
drug paraphernalia. According to
a Myrtle Beach ordinance, drug
paraphernalia "means all equip-
ment, products and materials of
any kind which are used, intend-
ed for use, or designed for use in
planting, propagating,
cultivating, growing, harvesting,
manufacturing, compounding,
converting, producing, process-
ing, preparing, testing, analyz-
ing, packaging, repackaging stor-
ing, containing, concealing, in-
jecting, ingesting, inhaling or
otherwise introducing into the
human body a controlled
substance
If drug paraphernalia is found
in an individual's possession, he
may be subject to imprisonment
of not more than 30 days, a fine
of not more than S210 or both.
BEAU'S
NIGHT CLUB
�a
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Presents Thursday
Air Band Contest
with
Sigma Nu Little Sisters
FREE DRAFT BEER
ALL NIGHT LONG
Daddy Cool Will Be Playing
All Your Favorite Hot Hits
Admission: Guys $4.00 Girls $3.00
(Slightly more for non-members)
Beou's is a private club for members and guest.
All ABC Pfmin. Located in Carolina East Centre
X-
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IT'S FOR YOU!
Recreation: Bingo Ice Cream
7:00 p.m. MSC
Recreation: Video Games Contest
During regular operating hours MSC
Chamber Festival: Composers String Quartet
8:00 p.m Hendrix
Movie: "The Natural"
7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. MSC
Forum: Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin debate,
'Yuppie vs. Yippie: The Chalienge of the
1980's vs. the Idealism of the 1960 V
8:00 p.m. MSC
Program Board: Barefoot on the Mall
12:00 Noon University Mall
April 9
April 9-19
April 10
April 11, 12, 13
April 16
April 18
Btf'
Sponsored
by
The Student Union
TRINIDAD TRIPOLI STEEL BAND
JIM RITCHIE AND BE JAE FLEMING
Yuppie vs. Yippie
'The Idealism of the 1960's
vs.
The Challenge of the 1980s
with
Abbie Hoffman
and
Jerry Rubin
'u A
Tuesday, April 16, 1985 8:00 P.M.
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
ECU Students and Guest � $2.00 ECU FacultyStaff �$4.00
Public and at the door � $6.00
Presented by: Student Union Forum Committee
Tickets on sale at the Central Ticket Office � 757-6611, �t. 266
�M
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Qttfe �aat (Earnlittfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, GeneralManager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Eduor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, nm �� Tom Luvender. onm �mmm�
Scott Cooper, cmspm ��" Anthony Martin, a� wa�a�
Tina Maroschak, Sfv�aHar John Peterson, nm �m.
BILL MITCHELL, Circulation Manager BILL DAWSON, Production Manager
DORIS RANKINS, Skmw? RICK McCORMAC. C�m Mtor
Daniel Maurer. g.w.wmi.wm td�or DeChanile Johnson, Ad rechmaan
April 4, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Defense
Caught Up In The Complex
Twenty-four years ago Dwight
D. Eisenhower, in his farewell ad-
dress, gave us a warning. He, the
president-general, had seen it com-
ing, displaying a keen awareness
very few possess.
"We must guard against the ac-
quisition of unwarranted in-
fluence, whether sought or un-
sought, by the military-industrial
complex Ike said. Well, we have
let our guard down, and our
defense is no better, but our red
ink has multiplied thousands-fold.
With the passage of the MX
missile, we have seen the ultimate
fulfillment of Ike's prophecy. We
are having a weapon that is literal-
ly no good. We've got no place to
hide it, and believe us, it needs to
be hid. Plus, there are other, more
economical weapons we could
have purchased, but, caught up in
the complex's web, we chose the
most expensive and the least pro-
tective.
President Ronald Reagan, a
Soviet paranoid, is just what the
defense contractors ordered.
Because of him they are lapping up
the bucks � about 69 billion of
them to be exact. But, it's not only
the president, it's Congress, too.
The big defense contractors know
how to keep our representatives
happy, too bad they do it with tax-
payer's money.
Which brings us to the rip-offs.
Rip-offs. Contractors asking for
ludicrous sums to pamper ex-
ecutives � one even asked for
money to store a pet. Coffee pots
and chairs that cost a thousand
bucks a shot, hamers worth hun-
dreds and bolts and nails for $10 or
$20 � all this leads us to believe
that building weapons and buying
them are not done for purely
defense reasons. No, it's done
because a complex dynamic
demands that we buy for no other
reason than to just buy.
What a shame. The ways out are
not simple, and simply not easy.
To seek care in buying weapons is
too ask to be labeled a communist.
Where will it all end? Maybe only
General Dynamics knows, unfor-
tunately.
Execs Thank Campus
Thank you for your encouragement,
thoughts and prayers during the recent
student government elections. Your vote
made possible the election of an executive
staff dedicated to working for the
students of ECU. We are currently plann-
ing our initial objectives for SGA
together, as an executive staff. Any input
concerning those topics affecting our
university is welcome. Thank you for
your time.
David Brown
SGA President-elect.
I Vice President
I would like to thank you for electing me
as your SGA treasurer. As 1 stated during
my campaign, I will carry out the duties
which have been assigned to me to the best
of my ability. I am looking forward to
working with all student organizations
that will need my assistance. Serving you
as individual students is also among my list
of priorities. I welcome all constructive
ideas that I may use to make this SGA one
of the best ever. Feel free to drop by my
office located in Mendenhall at any time
that I may be of help. Thank you again for
your support!
James A. Braswell
SGA Treasurer-elect
Treasurer
I would like to thank you for electing
me as your next SGA vice-president and,
also, for being so nice to me before and
after this election. I promise to work for
the best of the students and to always
listen to your needs. I'll have office hours
starting April 20 and I just hope that you,
the students, stop by and talk. Once again
thank you for your support!
Chris Tomasic
SGA Vice President-elect
Wi W IF AN MX COMES OUT OF W GROUNfVWP SEES ITS
SHAPOWmWefr HAVE TEN MORE �RS OF NUCLEAR WINTER,
Campus Forum
Brown Petition Unfair
What does losing an SGA Executive
election leave one with? I doubt too
many people would know; not too
many people run. Also, I doubt too
many people would care. After all, it's
only the sentiments of a loser. I should
know: I ran for SGA president last
year � oh YeaI lost.
Still, for a little clarity in evaluating
recent events: mostly it's a sense of
relief, because there are a lot of things
that have to be put off during the cam-
paign � catch up time. Too, you're
depressedafter allyou did lose.
Eventually you kind of get over it, get
on with school and try and realize all
the .uluable things that the experience
provided you. You learn a lot about
yourself and other people, about in-
tegrity, self images and public image.
Basically, if you're awake at all during
the process, you learn a lot. Thus, it's
all finally over.
Oh, I think I've forgotten
somethinglet's seeyeaI did: em-
bitterment. Yup, you get bitter � to a
degree you almost have to. You blame
yourself, after all, you spent so much
time and money � maybe if you'd
have worked harder. Speaking of work
� what about the workers that
"helped" you work? How about those
apathetic students � if they'd only
voted, believed in you for a minute �
aw, what do those jerks know anyway.
Oh, and speaking of jerks, what about
the jerk that won � why he must have
cheated � how else could he have
won? Yup, bitterness � nasty stuff.
Usually, such bitterness just fades
away like it should. Sometimes,
though, it gets the best of you before
you get embarrassed enough to wish
you'd let it pass by properly. I think
that's what the ECU campus is witness
to in the form of a petition to oust
SGA President-elect David Brown even
before he takes office.
Not only does it seem like bitterness
� I simply don't trust the nature of the
petition itself as put forth in The East
Carolinian. I know David, and I've
had chances to work with him in and
out of the Legislature � sometimes
I've been on his side and sometimes
I've been against, but I always found
him fair. During my time in the
Legislature, I was always impressed
with the reports that his committee
chairman gave and with David himself
as committee chairman of the Student
Welfare Committee � a committee of
fine achievement.
Too, I'm an art major � I know he
didn't deceive the art school � I know
what things he did in the Legislature
and why: he did what he thought best
for the welfare of all students equally.
It would be a loss to ECU not to have
David Brown serve his term as presi-
dent.
Greg Shelnutt
Sr Art
No Funds?
The tragic accident on March 23 that
killed ECU track team member Erskine
Evans raises some unanswered ques-
tions.
No Funds? Who pays for elaborate
meals at one of the most expensive
restaurants in Greenville for ECU
recruits? How much money is needed
to pay for one recruit's meal � $30,
$40, $50? Why New Ydrk strip, Filet
Mignon and Alaskan King Crab legs as
opposed to McDonalds Big Mac and
fries?
On several occasions we have
witnessed ECU recruits and athletes
being entertained at a very expensive
restaurant, then in dismay find out that
the athletic department picks up the
tab. We have witnessed individuals run
up a personal tab near (and possibly
over) $40. This happens to be within
$1.75 of the price of a room for over-
night accommodations in a major hotel
chain.
What docs all this gourmet talk have
to do with Erskine Evans' death? The
sad truth is that the ECU athletic
department makes money available to
treat recruits and players to a fine meal
on the town but does not provide funds
for a second-rate motel (or competent
driver) for tired athletes.
We understand the importance of
recruiting athletes; however, the cur-
rent athletic policies for the appropria-
tion of funds should be re-evaluated.
What is the best way to spend S401
Dinner for one possible recruit or a bed
for some of our tired Pirates?
Richard A. Cook
Sr. CSCI
Steve K jcera
Sr. EHLT
Hamer, Jay � Okay
I would like to commend both Jay
Stone and Mike Hamer for their con-
tributions towards increasing
awareness of American actions in
regard to the underprivileged in other
countries. "From the Left" is an infor-
mative column, which often disturb-
ing evidence of injustices '�tech so
many of us feel safely apart from, both
physically and morally. Yet as Mr
Stone points out, we cannot continue
to ignore the fact that we, the in-
dividuals who make up this large
populace in the collegiate ivory tower,
are indeed the ones who will reap the
results from what was sown before us
My admiration goes out to Mike
Hamer for his courageous sojourn
through Nicaragua. I hope everyone
who has the opportunity to read his let-
ters in the Greenville papers will do sc
I am increasingly convinced that soon
we as a nation will meet with reciproca-
tion for our aggression and what I see
is the truly subversive force of
American interest in Nicaragua. So
let's follow Mr. Hamer's advice and
begin by contacting our congressmen
to protest the blood on the nation's
hands. It is, after all, only a matter of
time
Margaret Shearin
Grad Student. An
Conservative Contemplates Conundrums
Weil, our president has done it again;
he snatched another congressional vic-
tory from the jaws of defeat. While the
voting on the MX missile was shown live
on television, we could almost imagine
Ronnie and "Tip" slugging it out, with
Ronnie flooring his opponent in the
final round. Approximately $1.6 billion
was released for the construction of 21
MX missiles. The liberal Democrats,
suddenly budget conscious, tried to per-
suade their colleagues that a "no" vote
would not weaken our position at the
Geneva arms talks. They failed. So now
the Reagan policy is "speak softly and
carry a big MX
The Right Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
It's too bad the president wasted his
coalition-building talents on such a
boondoggle. Granted, the MX is a
highly capable weapon, but it has one
serious flaw � where are we gonna put
the dern thing? Apparently, we're going
to drop it in some old Minuteman silos
which are already vulnerable to nuclear
destruction. Consequently, the MX will
be a sitting duck for Soviet warheads,
and the commander-in-chief will be fac-
ed, in the event of war, with the pro-
bable necessity of "launch on warning
the down home description is "use 'em
or lose 'em
Doubtless, the MX is a first-strike
weapon, and that fact may motivate the
Soviets to give a little at the arms talks.
But if we are building weapons just for
the sake of arms control, there are other
alternatives cheaper and more effective
than the MX. The Stealth bomber has
broad congressional support. So does
the Midgetman missile, which is a
mobile, three-warhead ICBM similar to
the Soviet SS-20. With so much money
being dumped on the MX, these other
weapons' systems, cheaper and more
survivable, are delayed even further. Pi-
ty for national security.
Murder occurred in East Germany last
week, behind the Iron Curtain. An
American military observer, Major Ar-
thur Nicholson, was shot by a Soviet
guard, who allowed the soldier to bleed
to death for over an hour. This tragedy
accents the constant harassment of
American military observers in East
Germany since 1980, which have includ-
ed near-shootings, vehicle-rammings
and even frequent beatings. Here is what
the Soviets say and what really happen-
ed:
l)"The major was spying in a
restricted area The Soviets later ad-
mitted this was false and that Nicholson
was in an unrestricted zone. Besides, is
picture-taking worthy of being
murdered?
2)"The major attempted to flee, so
the Soviet guard had to shoot
Nicholson was shot in the chest. If he
was fleeing, he must have been running
backwards.
So now we hear the standard rhetoric
from Secretary of State George Shultz:
"Murder "Callous "Brutal
"Echoes of KAL 007 All true,
especially the last phrase (concerning the
269 civilians killed when the Soviets shot
down a Korean airliner), in that, as with
the KAL tragedy, the Soviets are getting
away with it. The liberals, and even
some of my Republican buddies, are wr-
inging their hands and whining, "But
what can we deeouu?" I'll tell you what
� there are many options, some sym-
bolic, yet powerfully so. Such as l)recall
the American ambassador from Moscow
for a brief period, 2)declare Poland in
default on its loans, 3)get serious about
Soviet violations of the Helsinki Human
Rights Accords and 4)expel a number of
Soviet diplospies from the UN, which is
the secret headquarters for the Soviet il-
legal agent network.
Of course, nothing will be done. And
so, the Soviets can continue the beatings
and vehicle-rammings and maybe even a
random slaying or two. I'm glad I didn't
join the Army; I'd like to think my life is
worth more than a few harsh words
from George "All bark and no bite"
Shultz.
Let's turn away from cosmic matters.
ECU recently suffered a tragic loss when
a van carrying the track team back from
a meet in Georgia and driven by a tired
athlete in the early morning hours over-
turned, killing Erskine Evans and
seriously injuring Kevin Daughtry,
Julian Anderson, Walter Southerland,
Jon Lee and Chris Brooks. The weary
driver had dozed off at the wheel.
As a student at Rose High, I knew Er-
skine Evans; we were not close friends,
but acquaintances. He was a good guy.
His death stunned those of us who knew
and liked him.
The reaction of Chancellor John
Howell was insensitive, as a letter writer
to the Greenville paper put it. When ask-
ed about the long, night trips and their
dangers, Howell evinced little concern.
He snapped, "They're adults; they have
their driver's licenses That pontifica-
tion is like the dismissive remark of
Queen Marie Antoinette. When told that
the population of her country was starv-
ing and had no bread, she replied,
"let'em eat cake We all know what
happened to that lady. I'm not sug-
gesting that the chancellor's height be
shortened by a head, only that he con-
sider the welfare of the students more.
In another incident, when asked to
make a statement on the substance of
the lawsuit of former football coach Ed
Emory against the administration,
Howell replied, "no comment In the
Evans case, he said too much; in the
Emory case, too little. Isn't a university
a place where opinions and ideas can be
exchanged freely? Then why the
mysterious silence from the Spilman
building? If the case ever gets into open
court � and don't you bet money on
that being permitted to happen � many
fascinating revelations will surely ap-
pear.
The press has already published one
enlightening document; the kiss-off let-
ter from Howell to Emory. The coach
one day innocently walked into the of-
fice of the chancellor on routine
business, but he was handed a letter say-
ing in essence, "You're fired No
reasons given. It's the sign-off of the let-
ter that gets me: "Sincerely
SINCERELY � after a pronouncement
of execution. Blows the mind. So that's
how they do things over in Spilman.
?k16'? idc for coat-of-arms for
tfte administration: An ax crossed with a
doth gag; below, the motto, "No Com-

Helm
RALEIGH (i
Helms, R
vative followers
CBS stockholders i
to drum up support
pajgn to take contr
work
Helms appet
conservator for
donations for
pledged that his gr
m Media.
SRA le
April R
B HAROi i) j
Alt ho if
dent Re-
president Deb'
for a
mem be-
taken A �
the m
membc
nou;
In
other ofl
be eligible I
Swenson A .
residence a :
in office.
In other SRA
said the der �
Cat
Stul
Hol
Holy Thursday A
Mass '
Good Friday Apn
� . � ��
Ne vr �
EASTER SUNDA
5:30 am -
1 I.JO a.m. � A
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9:00 p.m -
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Filing
affordable tal
the plaza
ONSOUDAT
HEATRES
BUCC
756-3307 � G
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4. 1985
IP SEES ITS
fair
t (01 competent
ithletev
the importance of
vever, the cur-
the appropria-
� � evaluated.
) �pend $40?
ecruit or a bed
X Cook
Si CSC1
Ste c nik era
Sr. EHLT
lav � Okay
nend both Jay
their con-
i ncreasing
actions in
cged in other
eft" is an infor-
offers disturb-
ces which so
part from, both
Yet as Mr.
annot continue
we, the Bl-
ip this large
iory tower,
a ill reap the
vn before us.
o Mike
sojourn
hope everyone
read his let-
papers will do so.
nvinced that soon
il meet with reciproca-
�n and what I see
' srsive force of
in Nicaragua. So
Harrier's advice and
Ictmg our congressmen
1 blood on the nation's
I r all, onl a matter of
Margaret Shearin
Grad Student. Art
S
head, only that he con-
e of the students more.
lcident, when asked to
rnt on the substance of
rmer football coach Ed
t the administration,
"no comment In the
said too much; in the
little. Isn't a university
nnions and ideas can be
ely? Then why the
ce from the Spilman
i case ever gets into open
n't you bet money on
itted to happen � many
Rations will surely ap-
already published one
tument; the kiss-off let-
1 to Emory. The coach
itly walked into the of-
khancellor on routine
was handed a letter say-
'You're fired No
's the sign-off of the let-
me: "Sincerely
after a pronouncement
)ws the mind. So that's
lgs over in Spilman.
for a coat-of-arms for
m: An ax crossed with a
, the motto, "No Com-
Helms'Followers Contact Investors
RALEIGH (UPI) - Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-N.C, says his conser-
vative followers intend to contact
CBS stockholders in an attempt
to drum up support for his cam-
paign to take control of the net-
work.
Helms appealed Tuesday to
conservatives for $150,000 in
donations for the effort and
pledged that his group, Fairness
in Media, will "proceed rapidly
and aggressively" against CBS.
A spokesman for Fairness in
Media said the group is trying to
decide whether there is enough
backing among the stockholders
for a proxy fight to elect sup-
porters to the network's
10-member board of directors.
"FIM must raise at least
$150,000, $32,000 in the next two
weeks, if the project of contac-
ting CBS stockholders is to sue-
SRA Leaders End Year;
April Reception Planned
By HAROLD JOYNFR
Although Wednesday was the
last official meeting of the Stu-
dent Residence Association,
president Debbie Gembicki called
for a special session next week so
members may get their picture
taken. Also, members voted on
the most outstanding SRA
member award, which will be an-
nounced at an April 16 reception.
In addition to the SRA award,
other official SRA members will
be eligible to recieve the Reggie
Swenson Award. Swenson was a
residence advisor who died while
in office.
In other SRA action, Gembicki
said the department of residence
BBBBBgEEBBaHB
life had changed the policy con-
cerning the color of paint a resi-
dent could use. "Now if someone
wants to paint his dorm room
two different colors, he may do
so with the university approved
paints She also added that two
additional colors were available
to those wishing to paint their
room.
s
Vice president Juan Velasquez
announced that Scott Residence
Hall had won the March energy
contest. "They did an excellent
job this month he said, "and
all of their ideas for conserving
energy will probably be carried
over into next semester. Next
year I hope all the dorms will par-
ticipate in the contests
:
CR
:
Catholic Newman
Student Center
953 E. 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Holy Week and Easter Services
Holy Thursday, April 4 - 5:15 p.m.
Mass of the Lord's Supper - at the Newman Center
Good Friday, April 5 � 5:15 p.m.
Liturgy of the Passion of Our Lord and Holy Communion at the
Newman Center
EASTER SUNDAY, April 7
5:30 a.m. � Sunrise Mass at the Gazebo on Campus
1130 a.m. � Mass at the Biology Lecture Hall
9:00 p.m. � Mass at the Newman Center
We wish you a happy Easter.
Worship at the church of your Faith today.

Now Taking
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Filing Deadline April 5th, 5:00 p.m.
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late might
SHOWS
ri.H PIPPIANDERSSEN.
y
cecd said Helms, who started
the campaign in January to end
what he called the network's
liberal bias.
"When the necessary funds
have been raised, Fairness in
Media will contact the
stockholders to determine who
and how many agree that CBS
reporting has been unfair to
President Reagan Helms said
in a statement.
Helms mailed letters in
January asking one million con-
servatives to buy CBS stock and
"become Dan Rather's boss" but
the campaign has since shifted
toward a possible proxy fight.
Fairness in Media went to
court seeking a list of CBS
stockholders and obtained the list
last week in an agreeement with
the network.
FIM spokesman Carter Wrenn
said the group mailed more than
25,000 letters Monday asking for
donations to pay for contacting
the stockholders and expects to
decide within six months whether
to conduct the proxy fight.
"FIM intends to proceed
rapidly and aggressively Helms
said. "Obviously our next goal is
to invite CBS stockholders to
decide for themselves whether
CBS has a record of biased, un-
fair and anti-Reagan reporting.
"One thing is certain: FIM
believes that when CBS
stockholders are given the truth,
no amount of slick, promotional
advertising by CBS, claiming ob-
jectivity and accuracy on the part
of the network and Mr. Rather
will succeed. CBS may as well get
ready: We believe their days of
misleading the public are nearing
an end the senator said.
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
�J
i
VILLAGE
Easter Special on
Rabbits and Reptiles
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies �
and financing is h
Card and Visa are accepted
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Monday Thru Thursday
5-9
SHRIMP DINNER
served with
F. Fries, Slaw
Hushpuppies
$3.25
105 Airport Rd.
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 758-0397
A WHALf OF A MEAL
The Senior Council invites all
members of the Senior class to
SIN
(Senior Information Night)
on April 11, 1985 � 6:00 p.m.
in Room 244 Mendenhall Student Center
SIN will be a mini-conference designed to help seniors make
the transition from student to professional. It will include Infor-
mation on Time Management, Planning Your Career Search
Strategy, How The New Professional Should Make Financial In-
vestments, as well as other ideas on how to make it in the "real
world
Join your classmates for this special information-packed night
and for the wine and cheese reception that will follow. (Please
bring your ID).
Sponsored by
Tht Student Government Association
and
The ECU Alumni Association
S ST.
8 GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
� PHONE 756-9222
���tttttIMMI . �
ARLINGTON
SELF-STORAGE
ECU STUDENTS I
Need Storage Space for
the Summer?
Mini-Storage-Specials
Limited Offer
At Arlinton Self Storage
Pay for 2 Months Get 1 Month Free :
Call for Details 756-9933
? �����
DAY STUDENTS
DO YOU WANT TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative
on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for operation of:
WZMB, The Rebel, Buccaneer,
The East Carolinian, Expressions &
THE PHOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office 757-6009
Filing Dates 4-2-85 thru 4-11 -85
NOW ENJOY
A DELICIOUS
SUBWAY
AT HOME
208 E. Fifth St.
758-7979
CALL
'THE JOKES ON US
757-1973
If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.
mm� v J CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills.
It s a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian otters
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O
Box 7715, Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY BAND.
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.
MM�Mff
� l 1 W �� ��� W
l(lll





IHK EAS1AROI INIAN
Entertainment
Doonesburv
APRIL 4, 1985
Page ft
The Composers String Quartet concludes the '8485 Chamber on Wednesday, April 10 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Composers
String Quartet
Heading For Hendrix
By ROBIN WHALEY
Staff Writer
If the musician functions as the composer's instrument, the
Composer's String Quartet is a sweetly tuned example.
The renowned Quartet will appear in ECU's Hendrix Theatre
April 10 at 8 p.m. Part of the Chamber Festival 48485, the perfor-
mance is sponsored by the Department of University Unions and
the ECU School of Music.
The New York Times has applauded the Composer's String
Quartet, saying, "Its players combined precision, musical
understanding and expressive warmth in their winning interpreta
tions The Times assessment has been echoed throughout the
world; the Quartet has toured frequently for the U.S. State Depart
ment and the International Communications Agency, pcrformii
in China, Bulgaria, Russia, India, Zambia, the Ivory Coavt, In-
donesia, the Phillipines, Columbia, Australia, Fgvpi, Syria,
Romania, Norway, Denmark, Israel, France, England, rmam
and Canada.
Founded in 1966, the ensemble has been Quartet-in-Rcsici , i
Columbia University since 1975. The musicians are violinists M
thew Raimondi and Anahid Ajemian, violist Jean Dane and ellist
Mark Shuman. At First dedicated to playing contemporar comp
tions, the ensemble has grown to embrace classical selection
well. The planned program for the Quartet's ECU performance in
eludes selections by Debussy, Hindemith and Beethoen
The Composer's String Quartet has recorded for Columbia,
CRI, Golden Crest, Musical Heritage and Nonesuch R- ords
Their recording of Elliot Carter's First and Second Quartets eai I
them a Grammy nomination and designation as one of the "Fil
Greatest Albums of the Decade" in High Fidelity
The Quartet's performance here is made possible in pan
grant from the National Endowment for the Art- rickets are
available at the Central Ticket Office; public admis-u�n is S4 and
ECU students' is $2.
Howard Writes Home
Love On The Rox
Dear Mom,
1 realize my request for $500 in small unmarked bills was a bit
out of line, but is that any reason to rent my bedroom to a family of
illegal aliens? You could have at least turned it into a half-way
house for wayward college students.
You were joking, weren't you?
If you recall, in my last letter, 1 told you how my roommate
fj loyd had been missing for a week. Well, I found him. You see,
there was this smell coming from his side of the room. Well,
naturally I thought is was Floyd's dirty laundry, but I was wrong. It
was Floyd! 1 found him in the corner buried beneath three feet of
dirty clothes, an Econ exam, half a tunafish and sardine sandwich
and four empty pizza boxes.
The coroner established the cause of death as a foul slice of pep-
peroni pizza. Apparently, poor Floyd slipped on the stray slice, was
plunged into the pile of filth, and smothered to death. I shudder at
the thought of it. What a way to go!
How am 1 getting along with my new roommate, Robert? Great,
I have no complaints, except of course when he has Roxanne in the
room. As a matter of fact Robert and Roxanne are going at it this
very minute, right in the middle of the floor! He said he likes to
"ride" her every chance he gets, but this is ridiculous. I hate it
when he does it right in front of me. It makes a mess of the carpet
and he knows that irritates me.
I suppose I wouldn't mind it if she didn't make so much noise,
but she's always squeaking and groaning. Rob say the noise doesn't
ibother him, but it annoys the hell out of me when I'm trying to
jstudy. Thank God he has started using some lubrication. It seems
to have quieted her down a little.
Rob is obsessed with Roxanne. Even when they're not together
he's always talking about her beautiful curves and her (not to men-
tion his own) graceful moves. To be honest, I'm kind of jealous.
Fortunately Robert has agreed to show me some of his moves. He
even let me "ride" Roxanne. He said she wouldn't mind, and ap-
parently she didn't. I did pietty well for my first time, but I'm still a
little sore.
Rob suggests I wear pads and a helmet until I get the hang of it,
otherwise I might really hurt myself. Skateboards can be quite
dangerous at times, especially when you ride them indoors. Learn-
ing to ride a skateboard is tough enough. Learning to ride a
skateboard like Roxanne takes a lot of skill and plenty of practice.
Well Mom, I really must be going. You know how busy we col-
lege students are (snicker, snicker). I'll try to drop you a line
sometime next week.
Love,
Howard
Looking For An Alternative?
By PAT MOLLOY
Special lo Th EmI CaroMaiaa
Premiums, Greenville's
newest nightspot, is located
at 109 E. 5th St. It's in the same
location where the Piquant Alley
and Rathskeller used to be. On
Saturday morning, Ben Barryhill,
the twenty-two year old owner,
was up to his ankles in beer cans
and cigarette butts; he was clean-
ing up after the crowd who came
to see the Usuals Friday night.
"Drunk people can really trash
a bar, can't they?" He said. His
lips curled into a "yep, yep, yep"
expression as he sighed. He stroll-
ed over to the bar, where there
stood a cardboard cutout of
Gumby, he was saying "I'm
Gumby, damnit I cut on the
tape recorder, and found that this
man was really intelligent,
especially when it came to his
business.
PM: How long have you been in
this business?
BB: About six weeks. I started it
because nobody would do what I
wanted to do � which was to
start an alternative music bar.
PM: What is meant by alterative
music as opposed to new wave?
BB: Basically, we won't play
anything you'll hear on F.M. 106.
We play pretty much what's be-
ing played on WZMB. The Nails,
Ramones � we play beach music
also.
PM: How much was your invest-
ment in the bar?
BB: 14,000 dollars. I put my car
in hock. I put my life in hock, ac-
tually.
PM: Why this location? The bars
before you were obviously not
lucrative �first the Rathskeller
folded, and then the Piquant
Alley. Why do you feel you'll do
better?
BB: Those bars folded because
they didn't have the right ideas
about people. The music scene is
constantly changing, and so are
the tastes of the people. You've
got to change with the times to
stay alive. We're trying to get
Susie's Pizza to let us sell their
pizza in here. Nobody in Green-
ville has tried it; it's new.
PM: Do you have a bar band �
one that plays here more than the
others?
BB: Not really. The Usuals have
played here twice, and both times
they have really brought the
house down. They just seem to
play what the people wanted to
hear.
PM: Who's playing this Friday?
BB: Friday, Corrosion of Con-
formity and Unicef. Like I said,
this is your alternative music bar,
and we never charge cover unless
we have a band. We have a new
album preview and then
WZMB's permanent wave on
Thursdays from ten to twelve.
It's for people to come in and
listen to an album they may have
been thinking of buying. Friday
and Saturday we'll always have a
band, always. And we keep our
beer prices down, too � 95 cents
for a Natural tall boy.
PM: What sort of clientele are
you looking for?
BB: I want a good clientele. One
that's not destructive. We're try-
ing to promote a good time.
PM: Do you serve any liquor?
BB: No, just beer and soft
drinks. We try to push the soft
drinks at closing time so that the
people will have a little caffeine
in them when they drive home.
Plus, not all alternative music
people drink beer. Some people
come in here to listen to some
tunes, get wild, and have a Coke
or two. You have to listen to the
people The idea to serve pizza
wasn't even mine. Some guy
came in the door and asked if we
served pizza with the beer. I told
him no, and then the idea hit me,
"hey, listen to they guy, he's on
to something Listen to the peo-
ple, they're going to keep you in
business.
11
PM: What music is played �h
there is no band here?
BB: Albums. Anything alt-
native that you want to he.
Sam, my brother, works in i
booth. That works out we
because he's in there all nigh'
long, just jamming and dancing:
The people really get into him.
PM: Any final thoughts?
BB: This is a people's bar, it
what you make it. There's gocxi
times, good music, and good peo-
ple � come on by.
Premiums, Greenville's alternative nightclub
JON JORDAN - ECU Ptmto L�b
Glenn Close stars in "The Natural"Ucb weekend in Hendrix
T W's Hosts First Mr. ECU Con test
By Elaine Perry
SUIT Writer
The line outside T.Ws was
filled with excited people as
they anxiously awaited entrance
to the first Mr. ECU Contest.
Once inside, people crowded
towards the bar before finding a
table as close to the dance floor
as possible. There, they had an
excellent view of the contestants
and Deke Penicnak as he won the
title of Mr. ECU.
Throughout the week, the
Alpha Omicron Pi's had been
collecting votes for the con-
testants at a booth in front of the
Student Supply Store. Students
had the opportunity to cast pen-
nies for votes which were includ-
ed in the final vote tabulation.
The contest began at 9:30. The
crowd of excited females surged
towards the dance floor where
they gathered around as each
contestant appeared in casual
dress. The men modeled their
casual attire while being judged
on sincerity, applause, and at-
titude by the sorority presidents.
After the initial voting, the
contestants mingled with the
crowd. The dance floor was filled
with couples while the Spontanes,
a band based in Charlotte, enter-
tained. A variety of top forty
songs were played ranging from
Huey Lewis's "I Want A New
Drug" to "Panama" by Van
Halen.
Everyone was on their feet,
caught up in the excitement.
Susan Boone thought the contest
was "a great idea adding that
she was having "a terrific time
Terry Strickland felt that "the
band was really lively with a lot
of spunk
While the contestants changed
into tuxedos, a somewhat lenghty
intermission was held. Various
prizes from area shops such as
Frank's Pizza, Aerobic
Workshop, UBE, Gandolfs and
the Budweiser Corp. were given
away. Each person was given a
ticket upon entering giving
patrons the chance to win a prize.
After the intermission, the con-
testants appeared in tuxedos to
the delight of the every female
present. Each was asked a loaded
question that had been written by
the sororities. Questions such as
"What are you the most guilty of
right now "What makes you
most happy and "What is your
best activity?" all drew laughter
from the crowd.
The applause given aided the
judges in choosing a winner but it
was not a determining factor.
Cheers accompanied the depar-
n
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ture of the contestants leaving the
judges with a difficult decision.
While the votes were being
tallied, the Spontanes appearing
as Harley Hogg and the Rockers
gave a floor show for nearly an
hour. When the votes were
tallied, once again everyone rush-
ed to the dance floor to get a bet-
ter view of the contestants. Deke
Penicnak of the Kappa Sigma.
Fraternity won the title of Mr
ECU. Along with the title, htw
also won a cash prize of $100.
After the announcement of the
winners, the dance floor was once
again filled with people. The
crowd was still going strong, dan-
cing and crowding the bar. The
Mr. ECU contest was a tremen- 1
dous success thanks to T.Ws,
the Alpha Omicron Pi's, the con-
testants and of course a lively and,
enthusiastic crowd.
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the announcement of the
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as still going strong, dan-
crowding the bar. The
contest was a tremen-
:cess thanks to T.Ws,
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md of course a lively and
stic crowd.
Doonesbury
TJjEEAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 4, 1985 7
II M I
MARCHTJ iNOTiCe I i
WGH1 mi I 5EQM
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BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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OAKMONT
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Two bedroom townhouse apartments. 1212 Red-
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disposal included. We also have Cable TV. Very
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. , 756-4151
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One and two bedroom garden apartments.
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center and schools. Located just off 10th Street
Call 752-3519
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B. j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 4.
1985
Patty Duke For Prez!
Political Soap Opera
(UPI) � If you liked
'Soap you'll love the first
episode of "Hail to the
Chief
The premiere confronts the
first woman president of the
United States with a lunatic ar-
my officer who has taken over
a missile launch command and
threatens to bomb Moscow
unless his demands are met.
The president, played by
Patty Duke, relays the
demands to the premier of the
Soviet Union � they include
demilitarization of the
U.S.S.R freedom for Poland
and Fidel Castro's head.
"Will he settle for Castro's
ead?" the Russian asks?
Other characters in "Hail to
the Chief to debut on ABC
pril 9, 9:30-10 p.m include
he president's philandering
istronaut husband, her gay
ut tough secret service aide,
ind national security adviser
Helmut Luger, who has slight
foreign accent and a date with
i star of "Dynasty
Her advisers also include a
general who sees nothing
vrong with destroying the
hird world and a black U.N.
imbassador who breaks into
gospel cadence without wani-
ng.
The president also has a
nother with frizzy blond hair
vho staggers into breakfast in
equins, craves a Bloody
vlary, and says, "Who'd have
bought at my age I'd have to
vorry about herpes
Anything this wild and ir-
everent has to come from
Susan Harris, the woman who
ave us "Soap" and
Benson
Harris, who created the
.cries and wrote the script for
he first episode, has collected
i raunchy bunch of lunatics,
idd together by the starch
:ommon sense of the first
woman president, who came
o the Oval Office via the vice
residency.
This show moves along at
nachine gun pace, the jokes
ire satirical and often risque,
md for those who don't mind
naking fun of people in high
laces it is also very funny.
It puts poliitcians in their
proper perspective- as per-
brmers in a global soap
pera.
New Series Sucks
"Me & Mom another new
�VBC series, poses a different
ort of question. How is it that
fames Earl Jones, who wowed
Broadway audiences in
It hello, can get meatier roles
)n commercials than he can in
eries television?
The series, to debut April 5,
10-11 p.m has Jones playing
second banana to Lisa
Eilbacher and Holland Taylor
in a show about a mother-and-
daughter private eye team.
Eilbacher is a beautiful
criminologist, Taylor is her
scatty and fabulously wealthy
mother (also beautiful) and
Jones is a tough ex-cop turned
private detective.
The plot of the first episode
was so musty it might have
been excavated from Perry
Mason's file cabinet, faded
and yellowed with age.
It starts with a woman com-
ing to Eilbacher's office. She
suspects her accountant-
husband of having an affair
and keeping his mistress in an
apartment he has rented. The
case, of course, turns out to be
much more complicated than
that, involving blackmail,
murder and money.
As so often happens in
television, all the performers
do their jobs � acting com-
petently and, in the case of the
women, looking decorative.
The script, which lacks wit,
suspense and even coherence,
lets them down.
Economy Mini Storage
New Edition
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The ECU Frisbee Club and the
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their help in making Ultimax 5 such a
successful tournament: George Elliott
and Natural Light (without whom the
tournament couldn't be held), The At-
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You
Mark CockreU (24) shoi
at Harrington Fiel
Pirati
For S
By RICK McCOR!
c� tgtm iMim
The ECU men's let
won four of the six su
ches. and all three
ches in defeating
University 7-2 in a
Tuesday in Buies Creek
This was the second v
Pirate netters over Q
spring. ECU defeated
5-4 on March 19, with
doubles match of
deciding the outcome
ECU's Galen Treble s
Atch off on a good n
irates. After losing thj
-6, he fought back
nice Eickoff 3-6, 6N
venge an earlier loss
In the number-tw a
ampbell's Arturo
efeated Greg Lloyd 6-i
Greg Willis continue
ell for the Pirates
umber-three positioi
efeated Brendan McSl
�2. Willis improved
esp
By SCOTT COO
Earlier in the week,
rate softball team
rouble by losing to O
flege 3-0 on Monday aft
ECU could only mi
its against the pit
'anisius' Colleen
.r
this type of
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THE EAST UIOI INIAN
Sports
APRIL 4, 1985 Page 9
Johnson Goes Five For Six
MiAUXMlA Dl BINS, fXl Pkolo Ub
You Make The Call
Mark Cockrell (24) shows his speed by beating out an infield hit in a
game at Harrington Field against Ohio l-niversity.
By RICK McCORMAC
&
SCOTT COOPER
SporU tdlinra
The ECU baseball team, led by
the clutch hitting of Winfred
Johnson, swept both games of a
doubleheader from Atlantic
Christian on Tuesday in Wilson.
The Pirates took the opener
10-4 and won the second game of
the twinbill 10-5.
In the first game, the Pirates
started their scoring off in the
first inning. With one out, ECU
shortstop Greg Hardison reached
on a walk. After a fielder's choice
advanced Hardison to second,
Johnson singled to left field scor-
ing Hardison. The Pirates were
unable to do any more scoring in
their half of the opening frame.
The Bulldogs were able to tie
the score at one apiece in the bot-
tom half of the frame on a homer
to right field by Greg Fulton.
After a scoreless second inn-
ing. The Pirates exploded for
four runs in the third inning.
Hardison got on base by an error
which was followed by a walk to
Chris Bradberry. ECU's Johnson
then responded with his second
hit of the contest to drive in Har-
dison. Both Bradberry and Har-
dison scored when Jay McGraw
singled to put the Pirates ahead
5-1.
There was no more scoring un-
Pirates Sweep 'Dogs
fifth inning when Atlantic Wells single. Mark Shank was scored on a single bvMik
an scored three runs to then walked. Harriin 9hnu,c
Pirate Netters Top Camels
For Second Time This Year
By RICK McCORMAC
to E�oru Edhor
The ECU men's tennis team
won four of the six singles mat-
dies, and all three doubles mat-
ches in defeating Campbell
University 7-2 in a match on
Tuesday in Buies Creek, N.C.
This was the second win for the
Pirate netters over Campbell this
spring. ECU defeated Campbell
5-4 on March 19, with the final
doubles match of the day
deciding the outcome.
ECU's Galen Treble started the
atch off on a good note for the
f rates. After losing the first set
3-6, he fought back to defeat
Bruce Eickoff 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, to
enge an earlier loss.
In the number-two singles,
ampbell's Arturo Ibarguen
defeated Greg Lloyd 6-2, 6-4.
Greg Willis continued to play
ell for the Pirates at the
number-three position. Willis
defeated Brendan McSheehy 6-2,
-2. Willis improved his record
for the spring to eight wins
against only one defeat.
Dan Lamont defeated the
Fighting Camels' Octavio Hor-
casitas in straight sets 6-2, C 4,
for his fifth win of the spring
season.
Sophomore Davis Bagley ran
his spring record to 8-1 by winn-
ing a tough three-set decision
over Brad McRae 6-7, 6-4, 6-2.
Tom Maynor won Campbell's
fifth and final match of the day,
defeating David Turner 6-2, 7-5
at the number six singles posi-
tion.
In a exhibition singles match
that had no effect on the outcome
of the match, Campbell's Derrick
George downed Kevin Plumb
6-3, 7-6.
In the earlier meeting between
the two schools, the doubles mat-
ches proved to be the deciding
factor in the outcome. Campbell
won the first two doubles mat-
ches before ECU took the
decisive final doubles match.
til the fifth inning when Atlantic
Christian scored three runs to
make the score 5-4. AI Hardison
and Gary Kendall both were
walked and advanced on an in-
field out. Rick Olivere then
reached base on an error, scoring
Billy Godwin (courtesy runner
for catcher Hardison). Kendall
scored on a sacrifice fly by Kenny
Moore. A Pirate error on the
relay throw allowed Olivere to
score as well.
ECU added five more runs in
the sixth to take the wind out of
any ACC comeback attempt.
With one out, Hardison singled
and scored on a triple by
Bradberry. A Johnson sacrifice
fly then scored Bradberry. Mike
Sullivan singled and McGraw
followed with another. Mark
Cockrell got three RBI's when he
hit a towering shot over the left-
centerfield fence.
The leading hitters for the Bucs
were Johnson, who was 4-4 with
three runs batted in. Hardison
and McGraw each had two hits in
the opening game.
In the nightcap, the Pirates
jumped out to an early lead
pushing one run acroos in the
opening frame. After Hardison
doubled and Bradberry singled,
Johnson then singled to score
Hardison.
In the second inning, the
Pirates added two more runs.
Cockrell got on base with an in-
field hit, followed by a Mike
single. Mark Shank was
walked. Hardison's
grounder to second was
misplayed, allowing Cockrell to
score. With the bases loaded, a
walk to Bradbery forced in Wells
ACC retaliated with four runs
in the bottom of the third to take
their only lead in the game, 4-3.
After loading the bases, a barrage
of singles resulted in what was the
biggest inning of the game for the
Bulldogs.
The Pirates were not to fold.
ECU responded with three runs
in the top of the third. McGraw
started things off with a double
and advanced to third on Jim
Riley's bunt. Cockrell then walk-
ed but was forced out at second
on a grounder by Wells, scoring
McGraw. An ACC error enabled
courtesy runner Mont Carter to
score. Robert Langston then
followed with an infield hit, mov-
ing Wells to third. Wells later
scored on Shank's sacrifice fly.
The Pirates were not through
as they added one more in the
fourth inning. Bradberry tripled
and scored on Johnson's second
sacrifice fly of the day.
ECU scored again in the fifth.
After Wells reached base on an
infield hit, he moved up on a
passed ball. A Shank single was
deep enough to score Wells from
second.
Atlantic Christian's final run
came in the bottom half of the
fifth when Fulton doubled and
scored on a single by Mike
Shows.
The Pirates' showed their con-
sistency by scoring in their sixth
straight inning Johnson's walk
was followed by a Riley single
which went through the out-
fielder's legs, allowing Johnson
to score from first base.
The last Pirate run came in the
seventh inning. Hardison hit into
a fielder's choice and then moved
to second on a stolen base. He
advanced to third on an error on
the play. Hardison then scored
on Johnson's third sacrifice fly
on the day.
Bradberry led the Pirate attack
with three hits. Shank, McGraw,
Wells and Riley all had two hits
as every member of the ECU bat-
ting order got at least one hit as
they Pirates scored in every inn-
ing.
Craig Van Deventer got his win
of the season, with relief help
from Tom Webb in the opener.
Jim Peterson took the win in the
second game, increasing his
record to 3-2 on the year.
With the win, ECU improves
to 19-7 on the season while Atlan-
tic Christian drops to an even
16-16-1.
Today the Pirates will travel to
Chapel Hill to try to avenge an
earlier loss to the Tarheels,
before returning home to face
EC AC South opponent
American University in a
doubleheader on Friday April 5.
This time Campbell was unsuc-
cessful in doubles play, as the
ECU netters swept all three
doubles matches.
The No. 1 doubles team of
Galen Treble and Greg Willis
won a three-set decision over
Bruce Eickoff and Arturo
Ibarguen.
Pat Campanero and Davis
Bagley were winners at the
number two doubles position
Campanero and Bagley defeated
Octavio Horcasitas and Brad
McRae 3-6, 6-4, 6-3.
In the final doubles match, the
team of John Anthony and David
Turner swept Tom Maynor and
Brendan McSheehy 7-5, 6-3.
The win gives the Pirate netters
a 5-4 record on the Spring season
and a 9-9-1 mark on the year.
Their next match will be after
the Easter break, on Thursday,
April 11 when they take on St.
Andrews at the Minges tennis
courts.
' 0 � -K. &
V
yf
"�? �fif
MALGOSIA Dl BINSKY - Etl PVMo iM
� -v4
io a iv-7 mark thus far thi� wacnn
Despite Loss; Softballers Looking Powerful
By SCOTT COOPER
Co tfmm MMo
Earlier in the week, the Lady
Pirate softball team ran into
trouble by losing to Canisius Col-
lege 3-0 on Monday afternoon
ECU could only muster three
hits against the pitching of
Canisius' Colleen Sandor.
Canisius managed to get three
runs on seven hits and no errors.
The Lady Bucs, on the other
hand, committed five errors.
Sandor got the win for
Canisius, while sophomore
Robin Graves picked up the loss.
Graves is now 2-3 on the year.
Canisius got all three of their
runs in the fifth inning. The three
runs were unearned as the Lady
Bucs made two errors during the
costly inning.
For ECU, senior Pam Young
continued her fine hitting with a
1-1 performance. Lisa Zmuda
and Wendy Ozment also
answered by getting a hit in two
'?��
Si
JON JORDAN � ECU
The Lady Pirate softball team has won games by being aggressive on the basepaths. This ECU player ex-
amplifies this type of hustle against the Gamecocks of South Carolina.
at bats.
For the season the Pirates are
18-11-1 going into the Penn State
Invitational Tournament on Fri-
day March 5-7.
Taking a look at some of the
Lady Pirate statistics, ECU's
junior outfielder, Wendy Ozment
leads the team with a .379 batting
average. Ozment, through the
first 22 games of the season, was
hitting at a George Brett clip with
a .404 average. Ozment's 22 hits
is second best on the team behind
junior Lisa Zmuda s 24.
Zmuda is currently hitting .300
on the year. Zmuda is also
leading the squad in at bats (80),
RBI's (15), doubles and triples(4
of each), and total bases (39).
A pleasant suprise for coach
Sue Manahan, freshman Susie
Pierce is batting .255 dropping
from a .297 mark earlier in the
season. Pierce has provided some
added power to the Pirate lineup
with three triples and two home
runs.
Senior Pam Young has been
contributing with her pitching as
well as with the bat. Her .242
average is fourth best on the
squad. She also shows a good eye
as she leads the team in walks
with 15. However, Young's 11-2
record on the mound is tops
among the Lady Pirate throwers.
Her 10 complete games is also
tops as Stacey Boyette is just
behind with 10. Young has pitch-
ed in 94.2 innings and has the
highest ERA at 1.03.
Junior Stacey Boyette has had
a bit of tough luck on the mound
as she has fallen in four one-run
ball games. She has pitched very
well with an ERA of .82. She has
had no trouble with her control
as she has given up only eight
walks in 76.1 innings pitched.
Boyette also sports a .226 batting
average with five RBI's.
Patti Hook is the Pirate's fifth
played very inspired defense. We
had several game-saving plays.
Defense had been a problem spot
earlier in the season
In the upcoming tournament
for the Pirates, ECU will battle
Maine, Rhode Island and power-
ful Ohio State in opening round
action. The top teams from this
bracket will then battle with other
powers such as host team Penn.
State, Colgate, Virginia and
Sacred Heart.
"The team is finally coming
together We know we can
play with the big teams. M
Sue Manahan
leading hitter with a .231 average,
despite just 13 plate appearances.
As a team, the Lady Bucs are
batting .207 and have scored 155
runs with 76 RBI's. Coach Sue
Manahan feels that the squad is
starting to play better and that
the defense is certainly coming
along.
"The team is finally coming
together Manahan said. "In
the VCU games (March 26) we
Coach Manahan feels that the
Lady Pirates are confident and
are looking forward to playing in
the tournament.
"The win over South Carolina
(Saturday) gave us some con-
fidence Manahan said "We
know that we can play with the
big teams - like Ohio State and
Penn. State






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Registration
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I Fa ilities will close
,i ith the following
Friday, April 5.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
1:30 p m
Minges Pool
( losed
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Friday 3 p.m.
Minges
Closed
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Friday 3p.m.
PAR
NEEDED y
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I

MIKE HARRIS: 4 years
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i
Lively Guide to
Springtime Hikes
f
STING
ANNIE LENNOX
KAREN ALLEN
RICHARD GERE
Celebrity Pix by
mm
JL
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STUDENT WINNERS-National Freeze Frame Contest





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soon be a memory. Catch them before they're
gone on Kodak films. Films so sharp so
sensitive, theyll capture all the faces
and places that fill your college years
So you won't forget the way you were.
tyJakfiftn. Because time goes h





4 High Plains Drifter
f �bi rrs
8 Lynn Goldsmith
BY LINDA F.Kl IJ
1 1 Low Light Photography
B I Rl( f STRIN
13 Posters On the Wall POW1
! 4 National Freeze Frame
Contest Winners

ere - - 1 ������
t he head 1 � great �-
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3 Freeze Frame
6 Student Photo Essay
12 Calendar
FRAME

ADVERTISIG OFFICES
CORPORATE OFFICES
Break





HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER
A Smart How-To For Spring Hiking
BY DON ROBERTS
� �� had th tour walls, winter's
md Erika on All my Children
I i - premature burblings,
� i re ready 1 ;t a pack to strive for
' g' I th wild including such clas-
th : i les m Oregon, the High
erra i California the Olympic Rain
��� i � ngton the Rocky Mountains
tana t C 'iorado. the Grand Te-
��� � n � and the Appalachians
rg . � Vermont Well you d best
At day's end, it's satisfying to look back
on the trail miles you ve covered.
forget it The best spring hiking is in the
foothills and flatlands close to where you
live
Neither leremiah lohnson. nor the Dalai
Lama, nor even Sasquatch could be per-
suaded to roam the ridges during the
spring flush Spring is worthless in the
mountains Some years winter refuses to
make room, other years lusty winds and
ram turn the highlands into runoff soup
For spring hikes, accessibility determines
quality Consequently, the cultivation of
good local hiking trails is a regional pas-
sion Consult l -al libraries, bookstores
and outdoor columns in statewide news-
papers and magazines for smart local guid-
ance When you're ready to roll here's how
to get started
The Pre-Amble
When you're keyed up enough to start
packing, think long and hard about the
pounds-to-pleasure ratio When carrying a
fully appointed pack - food, clothing, shel-
ter, bedding - you are in effect carrying a
furnished studio apartment on your back
Thoreau, the most astute of supertramps.
counseled When I have met an immigrant
tottering under a bundle which contained
his all � looking like an enormous wen
which had grown out of the nape of his
neck - I have pitied him, not because that
was his all. but because he had all that to
Hiking can introduce you to new friends.
carry If I have got to drag my trap. I will
take care that it be a light one and do not
nip me in a vital part
Lay out everything that you are consider-
ing for your trek, then ask yourself Will the
ecstasy warrant the agony of carrying that
extra ration of marshmallows? that vintage
1969 Cabernet Sauvignon? those mono-
grammed paiamas? that framed portrait of
mother? Let your back do the answering





Ov
Some vistas, some kinds of happy solitude, are only delivered by foot power (right).
(Below) Glance through the fence rails and you'll notice these hikers in the Great Smokey
Mountains have discovered the pleasures of a rest stop.
Because of the space race and the spin-
off of lightweight, resilient materials, back-
packing has gone from the primordial to
the posh in less than a decade The bewil-
dering assortment of adiustable metal-
frame packs, flexible but fixed plastic-frame
packs and convertible internal-frame packs
can cause the rookie to consider taking up
bocce ball or water polo instead Don t be
intimidated Shop around, not only for the
pack itself, but also for a knowledgeable
outdoor store proprietor Insist on trying
the pack with an improvised load Hike
around the shop sit down bend over
climb up and down stairs If the pack follows
you. providing freedom, flex and float la
pack properly suspended from the hip
should feel as if it is floating slightly away
from your back), then you have a fit
smoother than Betty Grables nylons
Eating Out
Most freeze-dned food tastes like saw-
dust and contains little in the way of ani-
mal octane Instead of some fluff in foil,
take along pemmican. butter cheese
beans, oatmeal and dense-as-a-brick brown
bread In other words, stock up on the
same type of high-fat high-protein grub
that fueled Admiral Peary's crazed assault
on the North Pole Real food never goes
out of style
Do not leave anything in rigid contain-
ers, use zip-lock bags for repackaging ev-
erything, even mulligan stew, and plan
meals so that you order from the luxury
menu first As burger emporiums recede
into the dust, you get less picky, and as
your pack gets lighter your consciousness
climbs higher
Depth of Vield
Backpacking ventures, by their very na-
ture are unforgettable Images imprint
deeper into your memory because there
are no civilized distractions no murderous
machines, no Threes Company reruns fog-
ging up your skull But those outdoor inter-
ludes committed to film are indisputably
indelible Personally. I would rather leave
behind half my provisions and all of my
fresh Hanes than my 300-millimetre lens
Fortunately one need not forsake protein
nor hygiene for photography The prudent
selection of camera equipment will easily
put your field research in clear focus
Wilderness light is a fickle phenomenon,
requiring both fast and slow film Koda-
chrome 64 and Kodak Ektachrome 400 films
cover every vagrant light But outdoor pho-
tographers with tenacity and a certain mad
glint in the eye may prefer the color satura-
tion qualities of Kodachrome 25 film For
black and white photography there is no
quandary. Kodak Tn-X pan film is the most
facile film that ever went for a dip in devel-
oping solution
A small well designed tripod is a must
Marginal light and movement are forest
factors which call for a mechanical assist
Trust only a sturdy expensive model as it
is a gut-wrenching experience to watch a
cheap drugstore tripod suddenly lurch
earthward and drill your beloved camera
into the landscape
With the capabilities of contemporary
single-lens-reflex cameras most strobes
meters filters cable releases and the like
become superfluous gadgets A basic selec-
tion of high-caliber lenses on the other
hand, provide an indispensable window on
the outdoor world Though not the last
word the following set of lenses promise
trail-tested performance 50 mm f 1 4 a
compact high-speed all-purpose lens par-
ticularly useful for scenic and candid shots
100 mm f 4 macro, a wildly versatile lens
ideal for zeroing in on the cosmos at your
feet as well as standard nature study and
portraiture 300 mm f 4 a truly portable
telephoto so fast and crisp that it provides
a range of handheld shooting possibilities
from the journalistic to the romantic
nside JraK
Of the many vows that 1 took I have
found the one about travelling on foot to
be the most beneficial � Gandhi
Because it requires less strength than
state of mind backpacking is as much a re-
ligion as it is a recreation That does not
mean it is a somber or mystical affair After
all backpacking is not really a faith but a
small fervor And it is a blessed j phys
as well as mental endeavor whicf
worldly concerns and clocks and concrei
and digital devices far behind stress
no strain no interfacing What better Rx fof
psychic paralysis than to get ofl . r tail
and hit the trail0
Doc Bucolic's List of
Backpacking Gear
It is far better that the pilgrim make a
U-turn for the provinces than head M the
hinterland ill-prepared Doc Bucolic sug-
gests that you bash a fev fc ks brain-
drain backpacking acquaintances and
browse outdoor stores But the quick si
most pleasant way to become an expei
enced timber rat is to enlist with a fc a �
packing dub then accompany them
a shakedown cruise In the meantime .
Bucolic preaches the following n : nscon
cerning smart hiking hardware
continued �� page 7
u
U.v





&M
A
s he looked at a book with photo-
graphs of prehistoric cave paint ' g
it occurred to Edward Heins a stu-
dent at The Cooper Union School of Art th.it
humankind has always relied principally on
three particular colors for expressions of
drama Perhaps early humans were limited
because red and black pigments � from I i
lies from ashes and carbon � were the
prime materials at hand Or perhaps these
colors also the colors of blood and of mid-
night are inherently stirring Along with
Student
Essay
white which increases drama by adding con-
trast red and blad are still favorites todav
Whatever must be bold whatever must be
noticed is likely to use some or all of this
trio Change black to dark blue and you have
the re ip for an American flag tor iust one
example
Acting on his humh Heins went looking
around New York City for exemplars of these
three prominent al ns on the color spec-
trum The result is this photo essay i state-
ment in red black and white the colors that
cannot be ignore I





?
ATTENTION!
We need Student Photo Essays for
future issues of Break and we
pay S100 for each essay published
Your essay can be any group of photos �
whether color or black and white � that
hold to a certain theme Each photo essay
should be accompanied by a note o expla-
nation � where you took the pictures any
interesting technical notes
Be sure to sena your essay along with a
stamped, self-addressed return envelope
Print your name on every photograph and
tell us your address phone number age
and college affiliation
The S100 fee covers fist-time North
American rights, you retain ownership of
your photos Color slides or black-and-white
prints are preferred Deadline for our next
essay is June 28 1985 Please send your
submission to Break Essay 303 North
Glenoaks Blvd Suite 600. Buroank. CA
91502
Doc Bucolic's List
continued from pajc 5
Footwear Boots are weights which must
be lifted and relifted continually breaking
the grip of gravity Most hikers take approx-
imately 2 000 steps a mile averaging about
ten miles a day That's 20 000 steps if your
boots weigh even one pound each that s
20 tons of overlooked freight Choose foot-
wear that weighs mere ounces High-
arched running shoes are an inexpensive
alternative to the costlier heavier trail
boot Buy only footwear which fits the
first lacing Breaking-in shoes went out
with corsets
will serve admirably as rain gear ail pur-
pose outdoor wear and stylish about-t �r
garb In Gore-Tex you can go from tromp-
ing the back country to stomping at the
Savoy, no sweat (literally)
Sleeping Bags Poly is jolly Every manu-
facturer has his own name from PolyGuard
to Hollowfil for the polyester insulation
used in nylon shell sleeping bags Poly-
ester is less expensive more durable and
more versatile than goose or duck down
Wet or dry poly retains its loft and does
its job
high-tensiie alloys for the sh :k-c rd
polesi and computeea-ie stress-
tested designs have ed I ��.�� ght
roomy efficient shelters They cost a : t . I
mazuma Thev re worth it
Stoves Mar
xxJ stoves from simple a
cohoi burners to self-prim rig wh te gas . ar-
leties are available and affordable Though
its heavier than some Doc Bucolic kes
the solid dependable Coleman Pea I re-
cause it behaves in a blizza'c never br� iks
down and does not require a Master's De-
gree in engineering to operate
Backpacks You won't find what you want
at a discount store Stick to the dedicated
outdoor stores Remember that there is a
correlation between quality and cost Your
spine will resent you for every penny you
pinch
Rain-menl Comfort warmth and quality
can be summed up in one word � Gore-
Tex a fabric which is windproof water-
proof, light weight and breathable A dou-
ble stitched seam-sealed Gore-Tex parka
Sleeping Padi Undoubtedly the easiest
choice in outdoor equipment the Ther-
marest is a combination air mattress tself
mflatablei and open cell foam pad It rolls
to half the size of conventional trail pads
and provides an elevated zone between
you and cold hard terra-firma
Tents The Space Age has been the shin-
ing light of the tent industry Such labo-
ratory developments as Gore-Tex fabric
Honest Host- A good hiking sock - ke
motor oil without it you gc any-
where Doc Bucolic gets very impat ent
with backpacKg c rr.c - ��- pend a
fortune on marvy gear then skimp on sc I -
Hiking socks come in silk pohj nylon . I
ton wool and blends thereof Re: ird ess
of composition there is no such thing as a
lake sock for less than five bucks Tna b .
trail will determine mst what hose hum rs
uour toes
r-jr � ft ' i 9 8 5 � 7
U.A





hick in New York's Garment District
teres a studio loft where the pace
nearly matches the frenzy on the
ets outside That's where Lynn
:mith photographer and musician,
n edienne record, video, TV producer
: rector stock agency owner talent man-
ager image consultant, song- and
scriptwriter and photographers rep. is plot-
ter roadshow to American colleges
I want to stay in touch with what 1 know
. e the future, she explains Not content
et her photographs, records and videos
: ill the talking Goldsmith has organized
lege lecture tour On that tour, she will
assume the gufcc o! a man named Wil
a guy who's here to make cham-
pions out of us all In fact Goldsmith plays
several different characters in order to
prove that success is within everyone s
reach
Ambitious? Yes. absolutely She doesn t
demur at success
There aren't many photographers as
successful, especially women, as I am And
I'm not saying that in a braggart way I feel
like a jerk sitting here saying so. but I could
tell anyone how to do the same thing she
says, intending to do just that
1 didn't perform any magic! If there was
a door closed. I figured out a way to get
around it
"Who am I to call up and get a story on
the President0 Who doesn't want to photo-
graph the President0 You figure it out
Goldsmith figured out she could get a
session with then President Gerald Ford if
she sold a story on his personal White
House photographer. David Kennerly. to a
photography magazine Now former Presi-
dent Ford is one of several thousand celeb-
rities among her one million color trans-
parencies and two million black-and-whites
neatly filed, ready for shipment to maga-
zines who print her with utter regularity
Within seconds of my arrival at the loft
she has set up her VCR to play videos of
singles from the album she did last year
Dancing for Mental Health plus a register-
and-vote commercial for MTV her own
publicity tape and a motivational tape for
the (fictional) Will Powers Institute The
room goes dark. Lynn goes to retrieve cof-






?
fee, the tape starts and there s Meat Loaf
spitting beer on himself while Will Pow-
ers' chants. You are an important person,
a rare individual There has never been
anyone just like you
"You can make it happen It's you Only
you the tape keeps saying It spins
through Adventures in Success, Oppor-
tunity. Smile and Kissing With Confi-
dence and constructs a world in which the
bald grow hair, the fat get thin the wrink-
led smooth out and adversity is true op-
portunity � all over a soundtrack helped
along by Robert Palmer. Sting and Todd
Rundgren
A child of Detroit and Miami Beach High
School (where she joined 14 clubs) and
the University of Michigan, where she took
two degrees in three years (a teaching cer-
tificate plus radio and TV direction).
Goldsmith never figured she would be a
photographer
I thought I would either be a singer-
songwriter or a director she remembers
She was in a band in college, living next
door to future film director Larry Kasdan
(The Big Chill) Eventually. Goldsmith co-
managed the rock band Grand Funk Rail-
road She also did national publicity for
Elektra Records, helped invent the video
magnification system used to project rock
concerts at Madison Square Garden and
the Hollywood Bowl, and started to direct
the first late-night television rock show.
ABC's In Concert
"1 was using stills to storyboard my
ideas The record company came to a
The setting sun and geometric paving
4 patterns, distorted by a wide angle lens,
add a surreal air to this portrait of Sting.
A Rolling Stone, Keith Richards,
gathers backstage rest time.
Chuck Berry concert and wanted to buy my
stills of Chuck Berry When the photos
earned more than she got for directing
the show, she took a surprised look at
photography
1 was the youngest director in the Di-
rectors Guild of America she says, and I
was tired of proving myself There was a
lot of proving to be done too for a young
woman in that fraternity
Photography was something 1 could do
alone It was simpler it paid more, and 1
could get more satisfaction because of
the connection 1 had with the subiects 1
photographed
The rest is hardworking history though
Goldsmith claimed her share of the fa-
mous-photographer market with blister-
ing speed
I didn t wait for assignments 1 got to
the people 1 wanted to shoot shot and
sold the pictures For celebrities who rel-
Meet Donna, an aquamarine-headed
charmer, who also happens to be photog-
rapher Lynn Goldsmith in character for
one of her own videos.
ished the publicity she often sh I fre� re
tamed all rights and got permission to
market the results wherever she could She
not only made her cut-line ubiquitou- r
the U S UK lapan and elsewhere but set
up a stock agency and began to represent
about 30 far-flung photographers wti &
tend the reach of LGI - Lynn Goldsmith
Incorporated - considerably
Popularly known as a rock photograph -
Goldsmith is quick to point out that her
range is far greater than iust rock & roll
She nods to last weeks � rt I i Hi
Bazaar and an on-going Faberge cor
You don t get those kinds of obs if they
see you as a rock photographer she cau-
tions though Us Ptvpie Hevsmeek . v ar 1
-vv.
k-





G
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ght 5h(
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: �
Among the many celebrities who have
been on the business end of Goldsmith s
lens are actor Richard Gere deft I. new
wave songstress Annie Lennox l above I
and actress Karen Allen (below)
Will Powers,
as played by Goldsmith,
is a guy who won't be held back.
Lynn Goldsmith
and Will Powers:
Two of a Kind
Will Powers is photographer Lynn
Goldsmith transformed into a play-acting
character. He's also a man who seems to
be taking over her life, starting with a col-
lege lecture tour.
The tour took shape when Lynn did a
story on G Gordon Liddy and discovered
the college circuit through Liddy's booking
agency, Brian Winthrop International
She'll talk about photography and show
her motivational videos. Ironically, her
photos of rock stars are her ticket to talk
at colleges, but her goal is to demystify
success.
"You realize in photographing the stars
that everybody is vulnerable, even the
people you think are immune to such
things College kids want to know how ! got
next to their heroes. Well, guess what?
Sting is no better than you. That's my
basic approach
"College is a halfway house. I want to
add reality to it, help them learn how to
operate in the real world.
"I want to be with the audience for my
photographs and videos. 1 want to interact,
answer questions, participate without TV
or a magazine in the middle. It's a dif-
ferent world out there now and unless
you communicate with it you don't know
what it is





. ; .� : ���.�
LOW LIGHT
PHOTOGRAPHY
BN R1C 1 STRIN
� ���. � � � � . � h igr A
e market thesi i ;
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Evei ' . lr lei i t that fasi n the reading i i
i! � taki .�. ght photograpi meter and undere)
Votive candles provide even, warm
light, as well as an unusual frame for
the subject.





QgI&H&G
Northwest
COLORADO
Larkspur

503�
MONTANA
Bozeman
md ei
OREGON
Grants Pass
1!

WASHINGTON The commu-
f Westport is known for
' � a halewat hing trips and
th( � it ; ison in the area is
ate April through May
Charterboat: take watchers
out for four-hour scenic trips
often spending much of the
time drifting through hun-
� Is if migrating whales
C : 206) 2s.8-s422 for more
it ion
Michael Thirkill
Southwest
CALIFORNIA The San Fran-
I � iminer s Bay to Break-
' Race n juires almost as
' ei Iuranee to refer to
i t does t participate in
' ' t race � the largest
n the world irgesl race not
irgesl feet i � winds through
San Francisco and culminates
turned near the 1 each with a well-
� MSU :� s rvi i festiva May 19 For
in inf rmation packet send a
� ' iddn ssed stamped en-
pe t Bay to Breakers
� 110 5th Street - in Fran-
03
ARIZONA . : Sun-
I :� rl � entof White Castle
irgers Fountain Hills
i ' 28 will not be brought
��'�� -� " m the Windy
'�� - me from the
several I i iths set up once a
� � :r sell the little square
I � � which are flown in
�� m the midwest Enioy this
culinary treat while listening to
the music of various bands
: � � led by the city that
: asts the highest fountain in
the world Free admission and
parking 1602) 837-2371
Doug Eicholtz
Northeast
MAINE Tall tales, fables and
yarns are the order of business
when the North Atlantic Fes-
tival of Storytelling comes
to Rockport in iate lune
Storytellers from all over
will enthrall audiences with
their ancient art Informa-
tion 207) 236-9721
NEW HAMPSHIRE The skies
over the Mt Washington Valley
will be a sight to behold when
hot air balloons their pilots
and their enthusiasts converge
on the town of North Con way
in early lune Information
(603) 271-2666
MASSACHUSETTS Meet
those logging feet at the Bos-
ton Marathon, which occurs in
and around the town on the
third Monday of every April If
you decide to leave your run-
ning shoes home and cheer on
the marathoners instead why
not bring your camera and
capture the action from the
sidelines? Information The
Boston Athletic Association
16171 227-3210
CONNECTICUT Sailing
craft will race in the annual
Kahlua Sunfish Connecticut
Classic in early lune The race
course starts at Riverside
Park in Hartford, and mean
ders south on the Connecticut
River to the Pettipaug Yacht
Club in Essex. Information
12031 756-7091 Paul Rosta
East Central
NEW JERSEY Waterloo Vil-
lage, Waterloo. This restored
colonial village is nestled in
the wooded Sussex mountains,
sprawling acres that play host
to a summer of outdoor musi-
cal events from classical to
bluegrass Working mills make
it historic lush grounds make
it picturesque and the local
pub makes it merry A popular
hideaway for public-shy lovers
Call now for summer schedule
(201) 347-4700
New (ersey Folk Festival
Music Pier Ocean City. Early
May weekend All-day seaside
music fair Call (609) 399-6111
NEW YORK The Ninth Avenue
International Festival 35th-
57th Streets Manhattan. This
relatively new annual event
has become a popular hit
by roping off 22 city blocks
for an orgy of food, games,
shops crafts and ethnic de-
lights, stretching from below
Times Square through Hells
Kitchen and up the West Side
Theatre District A weekend
fest May 18-19
PENNSYLVANIA Raft Regatta.
luniata River Huntingdon. The
last Saturday of April is the
traditional date for this im-
pressive white water com-
petition Only rafts, many
homemade, may participate
and those homegrown models
are proud floating showcases
Get your feet wet Information
(814)643-3577
Devon Horse Show and
County Fair Devon Fair-
grounds Devon, May 24-
lune 1 One of America's
most prestigious equestrian
events of leaping, speed and
style Many former Olympic
equestrians ride here And
the County Fair is a bonus �
rides, games, sideshows, food
and drink For information
(2I5 964-0550
VIRGINIA Wolf Trap Farm Park
for the Performing Arts, Trap
Road Vienna. Daily tours
available Call now for upcom-
ing slate of summer events
Enioy jazz, dance, musicals,
theatre and opera in an
outdoor setting Informa-
tion (703) 255-1916
17th Annual Reenactment
of the Battle of New Market,
12
� - �





New Market. Over 1000 mock
soldiers in period dress re-
create the famous Civil War
battle Sometime in mid-May
Information 1703t 740-3101
Tony De Sena
Southeast
FLORIDA Traditional skills
will be tested at the Scottish
Highland Games in Dunedin
ADRt ISLAND TOURIST BUREAU
I April 201 and Jacksonville
lApril I2-I4i These annual
games carry on competitions
in the tug of war. sheaf and
hammer throws drumming,
dancing and bagpipes
ALABAMA Fifty fire-breathing
stock cars take the starting gun
in the Winston 500 NASCAR
Grand National Stock Car
Race May 5 at Talladega.
SOUTH CAROLINA The
Spoleto Festival held May 24-
lune 9 in Charleston, ust
might be the best and most
comprehensive arts festival
anywhere in America The
two-week slate of events
includes theatre dance
and music
Bob Andelman
I D W E S T
IOWA The Drake Relays held
April 26-27 at Drake University
in Des Molnes annually attract
top collegiate tracksters from
all over the U S World re-
cords have been known to
fall For information call
I515i 271-2102
ILLINOIS The Chicago Cubs
Home Opener takes place
on April 16 at Wngiey Field
Chicago. It has become al-
most cliche to say that Wngiey
Field is the best ballpark in the
country but well, it is The
friendly confines are the per-
fect setting for with the
Cubs you never know But the
vines are nice and at this time
of year the beer is cola - it
better way to forget about San
Diego Steve Garvey and 1984
WISCONSIN Brown Bach It
every Tuesday ana Thurs : .
in April at the Performing
Arts Center Milwaukee.
Free noontime classical mu-
sic concerts will feature loca
and regional musicians Ca
(414) 273-3121
Over 90 colorful hot-air bal-
loons will brighten the Wis-
consin skies as they compete
in various events at the Great
Wisconsin Dells Bailoon Ra .
from May 31 to lune 2 For the
earthbound the Dells are
about as enioyabie a place
to drink a beer as anywhere
Call 16O81 254-8088
Richard Levinson
BY ERIC ESTRIN
re you inspired by the sight of a
beautiful sunset, a snow-capped
i mountain top or the perfect wave? Do
you find yourself sneaking peeks inside
your wallet during dull moments in the
classroom, just to glance at a favorite pic-
ture of your boyfriend or girlfriend? Have
you ever been captured on film in a truly
memorable scene � maybe posing with
someone you admire, or sliding into home
plate with the winning run?
Well, wallet-sized snapshots are great,
but for your really special images, maybe
it's time to think big. Kodak Processing
Labs have now made it simple to blow up
35-millimetre color negatives and slides to
poster size � a whopping 20 x 30 inches �
at a price usually associated with prints
less than half as big.
Thanks to new printing technology.
Kodak is able to produce these massive
megaphotos at a list price of only $17.95.
while smaller color blowups of 16 x 24 typ-
ically list for around $36.50. In order to
keep costs down, there are some restric-
tions, however, which apply specifically to
poster-size prints.
First of all. the blowups can be made
only from 35-millimetre color negatives or
slides. Anything smaller than that would
require too great a magnification and the
resulting print might appear out of focus or
too grainy. Secondly, no customized work
� such as touch-ups or cropping � can be
done on the finished product. And finally,
the posters are available on textured paper
only.
George Bears. Marketing Director for
Kodak Processing Labs, says the poster
service has been booming since its na-
tional introduction toward the end of 1983
(the product had been test-marketed re-
gionally for about a year before that). Sur-
veys show that about 42 percent of the
posters made are scenic shots; another 28
percent are people pictures; and the re-
mainder fall into pets and other categories.
According to Bears, more than 90 percent
of the people using the service say they are
delighted with the print quality. Problems
tend to arise only when the original nega-
tive or slide is of poor quality.
The first rule of thumb is to make cer-
tain your photo is completely sharp. Check
it with a magnifying glass. Any blurring
will be greatly magnified.
The same goes for graininess Often, a
small picture will look okay with some
grain in it. but when enlarged to 8 x 10, the
grain becomes conspicuous. Well at 20 x"
30. you can bet the phenomenon will be
intensified: so unless that effect is your in-
tended goal, be sure that your slide or
negative shows as little grain as possible.
To do this, you'll want to start by using a
fine-grained film. Kodacolor VR 100 film is
recommended if you're shooting color print
film, but Kodacolor VR 200 film is also ac-
ceptable. Any of Kodak's low-speed slide
films � Kodachrome 25 or 64 films and
Kodak Ektachrome 64 film � are ideal, but
Kodak Ektachrome 160 or 200 film can also
bring good results ��
Another tip: select a photo that is well-
exposed, neither too dark nor too light,
with pleasing colors. -
When you've decided which picture you
want to cover your wall, make sure there
are no scratches or marks on the film, for
these aberrations will surely be magnified
on the final print. Then take it to your
photo dealer and ask him to send it to
Kodak. You should see the finished results
in about one week.
As with any piece of artwork, you
should select something you want to see a
lot of. Because now you can see more of it
than ever before
w










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n Invitation '�. ' editors and �.�. hw ' mv
PHOTOGRAPHER
12 issues for$99
Ma t(
PHOTOGRAPHER





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Lite isn't always rosy. But you can capture the
color of any mood with Kodachrome 25 and 64
films, the best color slide films ever from Kodak.
Films that deliver clean, crisp, saturated colors.
Excellent flesh tones. Extremely fine grain. And
sharp detafl in both highlight and
shadows. With Kodachrome 25 and
64 films for color slides, your moods
wont lose a shade of their meaning.
becausetime aoes&y.





Title
The East Carolinian, April 4, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 04, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2795
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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