The East Carolinian, April 2, 1985






Sire �aat (Earnittrian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.51
Tuesday, April 2, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Legislators Pass Amendment
To End Political Patronage
B HAROLD JOYNER
rhe doors of the SGA
. slature were barred and the
Speaker's gavel echoed
throughout the room as
parlimentary procedures were in
full swing Monday night, allow-
ing legislators to fulfill their
ties and finally agreeing that
an amendment to the ECU
Refrigerator Board Constitution
r�e passed.
Speaker of the Legislature Kirk
Shelley stepped down from his
position and told the legislators,
"Ihis bill does not, in any way,
make any reference to former,
present or future presidents or
managers" of SGA or the
Refrigerator Board.
"However, there have been ac-
cusations made through the
media and the past elections
forum that the Refrigerator
Manager position may oe used by
SGA presidents to &el votes he
said. Shelley's bill states that
future appointments of the
Refrigerator Rental Manager will
be made during a closed session
of the legislature, where
legislators will have the chance to
screen two candidates previously
selected by the Refengerator
Board.
"1 feel that it would be in the
best interest of every student if
the SGA president did not have
so much influence on the selec-
tion of the manager. It should be
a professional relationship,
which is hard to do when they're
such good friends. I think the ser-
vices will be better, as well as in-
creasing student input in deciding
this important position
SGA president-elect David
Brown told the legislators that he
had no objections to the amend-
ment, and he also said he had no
intentions of letting this happen
when he took office. "However,
I would like to have some say in
the final decision
Mike McPartland, SGA vice
president, recommended the bill
be passed, allowing for more stu-
dent input in the selection pro-
cess. Assistant Refrigerator
Rental Manager David Brooks
said after the meeting that, "it is
a good thing this bill has passed,
because it will do away with any
possiblities of political patronage
by the SGA president. It is
definitely a victory for ECU
students
In other SGA action, a recom-
mendation was made to the Dept.
of Public Safety that would allow
them to review a proposal to ex-
pand the parking lot behind the
infirmary, at the expense of
several trees, many of which are
dying.
Legislator Coralie Patterson
told the SGA that she had spoken
with Joseph Caulder, director of
Public Safety. "There is a shor-
tage of parking places behind the
Student Health Center Patter-
son said, "and more spaces could
be made if trees located in the
middle of it were cut down. Mr.
Caulder also said more room
could be made if some trees were
cut down at the rear of the lot
Approximately 30 � 40 new
parking spaces would be created
if the trees were cut down, she
said.
Arguing against the recom-
mendation was Richard Wynne.
"Some students do not want any
more trees cut down on
campus he said. "Other
possibilities should be looked in-
to, such as the removal of staff
parking along the street in front
of the Student Health Center.
Refrigerator rental management and
at Monday's meeting.
This would serve the patients'
needs Patterson said other op-
tions had been considered by
Caulder, but no feasible solutions
were found.
Another SGA legislator, John
Agnew, said, "there is no sense in
us calling for the cutting down of
more trees on campus. Already
the arboretum is scheduled to be
torn up Agnew was referring to
the wooded area behind Rawl
building, where a new classroom
will be located.
MALGOSIA DUBLINSKY - ECU Photo Lit
�l�uii� UUBLINSKT � ECU PhOtO L,
tree preservation were among the topics discussed by SGA legislators
Dennis Kilcoyne said that while
he thought every effort had been
made to preserve natural areas of
campus, he said, "there are a lot
of trees that have died and need
to be removed
Another bill was passed by ac-
clamation that would let ECU's
Chancellor John Howell and
Athletic Director Ken Karr know
that when minor athletic teams
go to out of town meets, alter-
native modes of transportation
should be considered.
Kilcoyne, author of the bill,
said the death of sprinter Erskine
Evans was tragic and the ad-
ministration needs to consider
ways to avoid such an occurrence
from happening again.
Brown said he had spoken to
Howell, who said lack of funds
made it impossible for the
Athletic Department to hire
anyone to drive the teams. "He
was very sorry about the
incident Brown said.
May
Exec
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nnr� MMor
A petition calling for the recall
of SGA President-elect David
Brown is currently being cir-
culated on the ECU campus. The
petition cites deficits in Brown's
leadership abilities and deception
on his part during his campaign.
According to Student Govern-
ment Association documents,
"the power to recall any elected
official shall be vested in the con-
stituency of that official, which
shall be defined as that body of
students who are qualified to vote
for that official The documents
further state that "a petition to
recall either the President, Vice-
President, Secretary or Treasurer
of the Student Government
Association must contain the
signatures of at least 15 percent
of the entire student body
Brown will not be sworn in as
president until April 20.
The petition to recall must be
given to the student attorney
general, who will hold it for ten
days to determine its validity, and
then, if it is valid, direct the SGA
to hold a new election.
Student Attorney General
Scott Sutker said he does not feel
the petition is a good idea. He ad-
ded that, because of the time-
frame involved, it will be difficult
to hold an election before the end
Athletic Department Receives Criticism
of the school year. "We can't
have an election in the summer
he added. "I'd like to work it so
we had a president in the fall he
said.
The petition cites three reasons
for Brown's recall. The first
states that Brown failed "to at-
tain a majority of the votes and
this puts his viability as a leader
in doubt
The petition then goes on to
state that Brown "captured hun-
dreds of votes by deceiving art
and music students of his perfor-
mance in the legislature" on their
behalf.
Finally, the petition states that
Brown has not demonstrated
leadership qualities in the Senate.
"I think we've had one election
and that should be sufficient
Brown said. "If these people are
so interested in the election then
they should have voted the first
time around � that's what an
election is for
Brown went on to add that the
individuals circulating the peti-
tion "do not have the best in-
terests of ECU in mind, rut
rather their own particular self-
interest The candidates elected,
he said, are not biased and "are
willing to work for the
majority
Department Responds To Regulations
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-SporU Editor
After track team member Er-
skine Evans, 21, was killed in an
accident involving an ECU van
driven by a student driver, the
ECU athletic department was
criticized for the policy which
allows team members to drive
athletic vans.
ECU policy allows individual
coaches to designate which
athlete will drive and determine
how often rest stops will be
made.
"The coach is responsible for
the team from the time they leave
until they get back. We leave
discretion to the coaches as to
who will drive and how often rest
stops occur ECU Associate
Athletic Director Bob Helmick
said. "They are there and are bet-
ter able to determine what should
be done rather than me setting
any strict guidelines for them to
follow
In some cases, Helmick said, a
person might get tired after 30
minutes while another athlete
may be able to drive longer.
Evans' girlfriend, Jewel Har-
dy, was quoted earlier as saying
the accident could have been
prevented. "They take care of the
football and basketball teams,
but they need to take care of all
of the athletes Hardy said.
"Maybe by all of us talking
about it, this sort of thing can be
prevented from happening
again
Helmick said school officials
are reviewing the policy. State
law allows student-athletes to
drive the vans, Helmick said.
"Nearly every university in the
nation engages in this practice
(student-driven transportation)
Helmick continued. "I was at a
golf tournament this weekend in
Durham and 24 of the 25 teams
there transported themselves in
vans
Helmick said the university has
logged more than 1.5 million
miles while transporting 30,000
athletes on 3,000 road trips since
he's been at ECU. The March 23
accident is the first to occur dur-
ing this time.
"I feel as bad about the loss of
this young man as anyone
Helmick said. "The thing that
nobody will accept is that it was
an accident. Accidents do happen
and always will, as long as there
are people involved
Evans' teammate Phil Estes
also was quoted earlier as saying
the accident could have been
prevented. "It's unfair that we
have to drive such long
distances Estes said.
Much of the criticism has
centered around the lack of funds
in the athletic department budget
forcing the team to make the long
trip back from Athens, Ga. on
the night of the accident.
Helmick sees no correlation bet-
ween the lack of money and the
"designated driver system
"The rich and poor schools
drive the vans Helmick said.
"It's just the most feasible,
logical way to do it. I don't think
I would change our policy even if
our budget was eight million
dollars. Carolina and State both
have the same policy as we do
and both have much larger
budgets
All ECU athletic teams use the
designated driver system, except
the football and the men's and
women's basketball teams.
Media Heads Selected On Monday
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Three 1985-86 campus media
heads were named by the ECU
Media Board in their meeting
Monday.
Beth Davis will succeed Gary
Patterson as editor of the 1986
Buccaneer. Davis, 20, a
sophomore computer science ma-
jor, said she plans to include
more photography in the 1986
Buccaneer. -
In addition, Davis said she
wants to "make deadlines the
main goal She said she feels
meeting the first deadline is im-
portant for staff morale. "Once
you meet the first one, you know
you can do it again she said.
Davis served as organizations
coordinator for the 1985 Buc-
caneer and said she "learned a lot
from the staff" and wants to ap-
ply the knowledge to next year's
book.
Kate Abbott was chosen as
general manager of WZMB, the
campus radio station. Abbott,
27, is a senior art major. "I hope
to continue in the fine tradition
set by our current general
manager, Susan Duncan she
said.
Abbott added that she would
make some improvements at the
station, but has no immediate
plans. "I want to continue to
provide an excellent alternative
broadcast media to ECU she
said.
At least two major promotions
are planned by Abbott, and she
also plans to obtain information
which will determine exactly who
WZMB's audience is.
Photo Lab will be run by Jon
Jordan, 23, a chemistry major.
Jordan said his major project
would be the institution of an
equipment checkout system
which would allow staff members
to be able to account for all
equipment.
�!� Bv Tracy D�IHii
The Thrill Of Victory
East Carolinian staffer Greg Rideout aided in the oaper's defeat of
WZMB 25-14 in a Sunday softball same.
Abbott
Davis
Jordan
On The Inside
Announcements2 softball and rugby. See Sports,
Editorials4 page 8.
Style6
Classifieds7
Sportsg
�Catch up on the latest in
ECU men's baseball, women's
�What really happened at the
East Carolinian � WZMB
softball game? See Editorials,
page 4.
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I
Hypnosis
Would you like to be hypnotized? Can you be
hypnotized? Dr Daugherty of the
Psychology department will present his In
terestlng and Informative discussion of this
tipic. ending with actual hypnosis The most
talked about presentation on campus will be
Tues April 2 at 7 30 p m In Sprlghf 129
Don't miss itl
Law Society
The ECU Law Society will have it's next
meeting after Easter on Tues . April 9, at 7
pm in room 248 of Mendenhall This will be
an important meeting because new officers
will be chosen and end of the semester ac
'v.fies win be discussed All members and
those interested are invited to come For
more information, call AAike Gardner
7M S672
Batter Up!
Registration for the IRS home run derby will
be held April 9 n The competition will take
place on the Lady Pirate Softball Field adja
cent to the Baseball field Look for the action
April 18 For more info call 757 6387 or come
by room 204 Memorial Gym Bring your own
pitcher
Golf Classic
Registration for the 1985 golf classic begins
April 1 Don T be a fool�come down to room
20-4 Memorial Gym and swing into the golf
classic Registration ends April 2 For more
mfo come by room 204 Memorial Gym or
call 757 6387
Aerobic Fitness
Instructors
Tryouts for the 1985 W school year aerobic
� ,riess instruction begins April 13 The class
is required for anyone interested in teaching
for the In Rec Aerobic Fitness Program On
Apr.l 13 from 11 12 30 in room 108 Memorial
Gym The tryouts will be held For more In
to come by room 204 Memorial Gym or call
'57 6387
Yippie vs.
Yippie Debate
Tne famous Abbie Hoffman rYlPPiEand
Jerry Rubm YUPPlE will debate here at
ECU! The date is Tues , April 16, at8p m in
Hendrx Theatre The topic for this debate
will be YiPPiE vs YUPPIE The
Challenge of the I980's vs The idealism of the
60 s Tickets will go on sale April 2 at the
Central ticket Office Prices will be J2 for
ECU Students, 14 tor Faculty and Staff, and
$6 tor the Public
Society For Advancement
of Management
There will be an organizational meeting
April 3 at 3 m Rawl 104 Members planning to
go to Richmond April 9 are asked to attend
�Ve wi review the activities remaining for
this semester Elections are coming soon!
Memoers �vno cannot attend please contact
Rck at 752 8787
Special Olympics
volunteers are needed to assist with special
Oimpic preparation Thurs April 4 The
meeting will be from 4 9pm at J C Park on
Ceaer lane Volunteers are needed to check
entry forms, sort t shirts, and prepare rib
bons if you have any tree time to share call
758 4731 ext 201, for directons or additional
information
Pi Kappa Phi
All brothers, little sisters and pledges are
reminded of the brothers dinner on Wed at 6
p m The procedes will go towards PUSH
Student Loan Fund
All National Direct Student Loan Borrowers
are reminded of the exit interview require
menf upon graduation or those otherwise not
returning to ECU Fall Semester, 1985, as an
undergraduate or graduate student. The in
ferview is necessary to inform NDSL Reci
pients of the repayment schedule, provisions
for loan conceiiafion, and other pertinent in
formation You are requested to report to the
Conference Room 221 of the Mendenhall Shj
dent Center at 5 30 p m on either April 3, or
April 17 if you connot meet on either date,
then, you would want to call 757 6817 for an
appointment
NIH
The National Institutes of Health is
recruiting for the Fall, 1985 Co-op work
period Positions avilable for students in the
following disciplines Biology, Microbiology,
Computer Science, Chemistry, Biomedical
or Behavioral Sciences Contact the Co-op of
fice in Rawl 313 immediately! Applications
must be in by April 5
Psi Chi
There will be a meeting of ail Psi Chi
members tonight at 6 p m in Speight 129.
Nominations for new officers will be con
ducted People who are now applying are
also invited This meeting is extremely im
portanf
Episcopal Worship
A student Episcopal service of Holy Commu
nion will be celebrated on Tues evening,
April 2 m the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th st (one block from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5 30 p.m with
the Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev. Bill Had
den, celebrating Supper will follow.
Announcements
ECU Racquetball Club
There will be a meeting on Tues , April 2. at 6
p.m. In Memorial Gym rm. 102 You guys
who are going to intercollegiate tourney
need to be there Important practices on
Tuesl Thurs 9 to 12 p.m. and Sat 8 to 10
am All members and anyone interested are
welcome
Phi Eta Sigma
will be having a meeting today at 5 15 in
room 212 of Mendenhall Student Center
Topics for the meeting Include election of
new officers and discussion of Initiation of
new members this Thurs All members are
urged to attend
Attention Everyone
Spring brings the 2nd annual All Sing! Spon
sored by Alpha Xi Delta it is a music televi
slon take off No cover charge April 11th in
Wright Auditorium Be there for free fun and
laughs
ECU Surfing Club & Team
The nexl meeting will be on Tues April 2nd
at 8 in the Mendenhall Cotfehouse Featured
video is the 1984 Stubbies Surfing Contest In
California Everyone planning to go on the
Easter trip to Hatteras must attend this
meeting. New members can still go on the
trip also. ECU Surfing a club for all beach
lovers and a team for competitive surfing.
Testing Center
Due to the fact that the ECU Testing Center,
Speight Building, Room 105 will be closed on
April 10, 1985, the MAT regularly scheduled
for that date will not be administered Ad
ministration of the MAT will resume on
Wed , April 17 at 2 30 p m
Honors Program
Any graduating senior who has taken 24
semester hours in Honors and wants a stamp
on his or her transcript should see Dr
Sanders (212 Ragsdale) by April 15 Any
Honors student receiving any special honor
or getting a job or getting into graduate
school should inform Dr Sanders for
publicaton in the Honors newsletter
English Scholarship
The English Department invites applica
fions for the Russell M Chnsfman Memorial
Scholarship, awarded annually to a iunior
English maior for exceptional academic
achievement, outstanding potential in the
field of English, and significant involvement
in extracurricular activities The amount of
the award is 1500 Applicants should com
plete the Student Scholarship Form
(available from the Student Financila Aid
Office) and send it, together with a brief let
ter descrirbing their academic
achievements, extracurricular activities,
and plans for further study or career goals to
the Russell M Christman Memorial Scholar
ship Committee, co The Department of
English The deadline for applications is
April 121 For further Information contact Er
win Hester, 101 English Department Annex
Video Games Contest
The Student Union Recreaiton Committee Is
sponsoring a video games contest Beginning
Tues . April 9, at 9 am and continuing
through Fri . April 19, at 10 pm during
regular operating hours of Mendenhall Stu
dent Center All ECU students, facuty, staff
and their dependants are eligible to par
ticipate The hlghtest scorer on each
machine at the end of the allotted time will
win a trophy. For further information call
the billiards center at Mendenhall 757 6611
ext 239
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House is offering one hour ses
sions to help you prepare your own resume
Many employers request a resume showing
your education and experience Come to
either session to receive handouts and an
overview They will be held in the Career
Planning room of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m. on April 1 and 9
ECUCouncillOf
Honor Societies
Is having a meeting Thurs April 4, at 7 In
Mendenhall room 238 There will be an elec
tion of new officers! Representatives of all
honor societies are urged to attend
Varsity Cheerleader
Tryouts
Organizational meeting: Wed April 3, 5:30
pm lobby Mmges Coliseum. Practice
Clinics April 4, 9, 10 Final tryouts to be an
nounced We need enthusiastic guys and
girlsl For more Intoramaiton call: 757 0118
or 752 6353
CADP
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program will be
presenting Mr Fobert Braxton In a lecture
on "Addiclton in the 8Cs " This lecture will
be held on April 4 In room 244, at630 p m In
Mendenhall Student Center This lecture is
open to everyone.
Theatre Arts Committee
Become Involved! Applications are now be
ing accepted for a studnet position on the
theatre arts committee Applications can be
picked up in Mendenhall 234 from 8 to 5 And
must be returned to this office by April 19.
r�-�33Vi
DIVE
PENNYKAMP
mm
DIVE SHOP
M�y 5-10 Key Largo, Florida
Dive Pennykamp with Capt. Slate (ECU Class of '71), Atlantis
Dive Center, on the only natural coral reef in the continental
U.S. Five days and nights, a two tank boat dive daily, one
night dive, a dive with the dolphins, includes tanks, air,
backpacks and weights. Lodging at Howard Johnsons, full
breakfast daily, welcome drink, swimming pool, Tiki Bar, on
the bay. Non-diver package available.
For Information Gill 758-1444
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Sierra Club Meeting
"Scanning the Summer Skies" will be the
topic of a lecture and demonstration by Dr
Floyd Matthels, Chairman of ECU Science
Ed at the Sierra Club meeting Mon , AprM 8
at 8pm Dr Matthels will also advise would
be stargaiers on the choice and use of
telescopes In time for observing HaHey's
Comet passing through out skies The Sierra
Club meets at the First Presbyterian
Church, 14th and Elm in Greenville
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning ano Placemen' Service
in the Bloxton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in developing better
Interviewing skills for use in your it seatch
A film and discussion of how to interview on
and off campus will be shared These ses
sions will be held In the Career Planning
room at 3 p m on April 3 and 11 Seniors are
especially encouraged to attend either of
these sessions
Blood Drive
ECU Army ROTC will be sponcermg a blood
drive on Mon , April 1 and 2 from 12 to 6 p m
in Mendenhall Student Ce tr Give as if
YOUR life depended on it!
Epsilon Pi Tau
EPT wi I hold It's Spring initiation banquet
for new members on Fri , April 19 in room
244 Mendenhall and dinner will follow at the
Ramada Inn Initiates must attend m order
to attain membership Banquet reservations
with J8.50 must be received by April 15.
Spring Plant Sale
The ECU Biology Club will have it's
semesterly plant sale on Tues April 2 and
Wed , April 3 ,n the Biology Greenhouse, rm
S 111 There will be an excelent selection of
hearty plants that have been wen taken care
of by our Greenhouse expert. Mrs Ann
Bellis The sale will begin at 7 30 am so that
we may enable those who work to also come
by and make their selections before work
hours The sale will end at 1 p m each day
Please support the Biology Club by coming
by and purchasing your choice of plants for
your home or office Plants also make
beautiful and lasting gifts All lovers of
plants will appreciate this remarkabe sale1
Need A Massage?
"The Physical Therapy Club is having the last
massage chnic of the year it will be held on
the 1st floor Belk Bldg on April 2nd from 7 10
P m The charge will be S2 for 15 mm You
can by as many minutes as you want Come
and enioy!
Public Service Announ
The Eastern Region North Carolina
Rehabilitation Association (a chapter of the
National Rehabilitation Association) is
distributing complementary supplies of Han
dlcapped Parking Reminders on request to
any citizen, business, or organization In
Eastern North Carolina These parking
reminders are designed to be placed on the
windshields of cars that are improperly
oarked In handicapped spaces
When requesting your free supply, simply
indicate the approximate number of han
dicapped Parking Reminders needed and
forward your request to Chaper IV North
Carolina. Rehabilitation Association. PG
Box 797, Greenville, NC 27834
Crabbing With
Paul Gauguin
Thurs , April 11 at 7pm. The ECU School of
Art will present a 50 min performance by
visiting artist David Wheeler, Crabbing
with Gauguin ' Mr Wheeler is a perfor
mance artist, playnght, and sculptor, cur
renfly living in New Orleans The perfor
mance is free and the public is encouraged to
attend ECU Arts Alive
Mascots
The Athletic Department is looking for
athletic, talented and good humored
students to fulfill the position of the Pnate
Mascot for the IV85 86 school iear Anyone
interested In information about this position
should meet at Mmges Coliseum, Thurs
April 4 at 5 30 The responsibilities, excite
rnent a"d advantages of being involved In
Pirate Athletics should be worth our time to
attend the first meeting! See you there!
Sigma Theta Tau
Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Teta Tau (Nrus
mg Honor Society! will conduct its Srping In
duction Ceremony on April 13 at II a m In
the Jenkins Auditorium The speaker wu be
Eldean Pierce, a faculty member at the
School of Nursing Topic Sigma Theta Tau
and you partners m excellence "
Also the annual Spirng Banquet on Apri!
18, at 7pm Regis'ration fee is$ll Dr Ma�
me Loomis from the university of S C win
speak on Practice Relevant Research
Development " Please see an, member for
registration information
Omega Psi Phi
will have a mini skirt contest at the
Unlimited Touch on Thurs April 4 There
will also be a 9 11 happy hour and ail pro
ceeds will go to the Achievement Week Pro
gram Rides will be provided between
9 10 30 at MSC
Air Band Contest
Sigma Nu little sisters will be sponsoring an
Air Band Contest at Beau's Ap'� 4 To
register call 758 2464 Prizes will re award
ed
Club-Cert Entertainment
Attention all ECU student groups and
organizations Club Cert Entertainmer �v
suppi J12000 of concert sound eouipmen'
light and music 'or your event 'o raise
mone,r for the Cancer Society and the hw
Fund To apply for sponsorship can Club
Cert Entertainment 355 6339 or ' t�- p q
Box 842. Greenvlle NC
IBM
American Marketing Association hos's
Steve Murphree from IBM on Wed Ac
3rd at 3 X p m in Mervqenhan 244 The
presentation will cover the marketing of m
formation processing products and sales
management Nor memoers and memoers
please come1 '
Music Department
Scott Sward m Junior reotai on piano 9pm
Tues Apni 2nd, va'n come'
NC Student Legislature
NCSl Will Tee' Mot. t.r� v and Tues
Apr ' 9th at 7 in the Menoenhah r of tee house
Perr-Cie von Apr 8 s a noddar -
memoe'S shou'o consder r.jnmng tor on� �
"�- ?cnowing offices Secretary TrMsurvf
Carao Char man Electionswll 'a�
piace Tues April 9 Also on tna� date ,�
have our picture 'atien for 'he Buccaneer
rearoook and a pari.amer'ar, procedure
workshop to test our delegates anc
Governor s s IS Hopeful. Mor Apr mt
� "ave h� new resolutions The ne�'
be Apr �; 13 a iNC A The ECU ses
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 2, 1985
WASHINGTON (UPD-Thei
Supreme Court Monday let stand
a ruling that state universities
constitutionally may ban students
from soliciting other students
door-to-door to promote their
religious beliefs.
The justices rejected arguments
by a Raleigh student who said his
fundamentalist faith required
him to spread the gospel per-
sonally.
Scott Chapman was a student
Denied Right To Solicit In Dorms
at North Carolina State Universi-
ty in 1980 when he canvassed
door to door in some of the cam-
pus dormitories to invite fellow
students to attend a series of
discussions on scripture. Chap-
man was an active member of the
Boorks Avenue Church of
Christ, an evangelical Christian
church, which conducted the Bi-
ble study sessions.
As a result, college officials
threatened to expel Chapman for
violating the school's no solicita-
tion policy. The only exceptions
to the policy were for students
campaigning for student govern-
ment posts.
Chapman was tried by a stu-
dent body disciplinary group and
acquitted when no one testified
that he was soliciting door-to-
door. But the university con-
tinued to threaten him with
academic sanctions if he con-
tinued his solicitation activities.
Chapman sued university of-
ficials in November 1980, claim-
ing the no solicitation rule
violated his First Amendment
free speech rights. Federal courts
upheld the university policy,
reasoning that it did not prohibit
all solicitation by Chapman in-
side the dormitories. Solicitation
in dorm lobbies and fraternity
houses and in students' in-
dividual rooms was permitted by
the policy.
Seeking More Involvement
NAA CP Elects New President
Chapman asked the Supreme
Court to review the decisions,
saying they barred him from
soliciting fellow students, but
allowed student politicians from
engaging in the same activity.
The rule amounted to censor-
ship of religious and political ex-
pression, Chapman argued.
"A student could knock on a
fellow student's door and request
the student to vote for him to be
student body president, but could
not ask that student to vote for
Ronald Reagan to be President of
the United States
A university "by its very
nature is supposed to be a place
that encourages the free exchange
of all kinds of ideas and view-
points, including those in two of
the areas most precious to a free
society � religion and politics
Chapman argued.
Lacy Thornburg, North
Carolina Attorney General,
responded that university of-
ficials have the right to impose
reasonable restrictions on First
Amendment activities on cam-
pus.
B ELAINE PERRY
SurfH rltrr
I eadership changed hands in
the NAACP recently as Antonio
Grisson took over the job of
president from Wilma Case.
According to Case, "the
NAACP will be off to a good
start. We have a good slate of of-
ficers that have interacted enough
this year to know how to plan
next year Case added that
Glisson's main goal is "to try and
write the black organizations on
campus, which should help get
more people involved
Case said she felt her role as
president "served as a learning
experience She said she ac-
Club Receives Honors
At District Convention
complished personal goals which
she had set for herself. "I learned
more about the organization
she said. "I wish more people
had participated and gotten as
much out of it as I did
Other new officers include:
Eric Hughes, first vice president;
Annette Artis, second vice presi-
dent; Grinder Spencer, third vice
president; Howard Manley,
treasurer; Vivian Phason,
secretary; and Touanda Coley,
assistant secretary.
NAACP activities have includ-
ed a lecture on self-assertion by
Sydney Barnwell, assistant dean
of the ECU School of Medicine
and Minority Visitation Day on
March 30. During Minority
Visitation Day, slide shows and
other activities were presented for
visiting parents and students.
The NAACP currently has a
membership drive in progress.
The drive will end Wednesday.
B HAROLD JOYNER
ulstam Newt Editor
ECUs Circle K Club walked
away with eight awards at the
Carolina District Convention
convention held in Winston-
Saiem recently.
According to Nikki Jardine,
secretary, the club won the most
outstanding award in the Gold
Leaf division category, along
with most improved club in the
state. Currently there are 16
members at the ECU chapter, she
said.
John Minges received the
Governor's Award for Outstan-
ding Service to the District and
the most outstanding district
member award was given to
Greenville
b lower Shop
758-2774
Corner Ean. & ilTn St
Joyce Languell, Jardine said.
John Little, vice president of the
ECU chapter, won the Presiden-
tial Appreciation Award.
Jardine said the Circle K club
provides leadership training and
service to members, as well as ser-
ving the ECU campus and com-
munity. "We also encourage
group activities, fellowship and
scholarship within the club she
said. The club also assists univer-
sity administration officials, she
added.
Other officers of the Circle K
club include, Sue Steiman, presi-
dent and Chris Ackiss, treasurer.
"We invite everyone to par-
ticipate in the club and have the
chance to become active within
the commun;v.
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MARILYN
THOMPSON
Soprano
Tuesday, April 2, 1985 8:00 P.M
Hendrix Theatre �
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Admission � $1.00
Tickets on sale at the Central Ticket
Office � 757-6611, ext. 266
mmm
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a�p���i umiENNEehw. m�i�. � l�f��i � ���� �





�hi East (Karoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. omerat Manager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. m. b Tom Luvender. a�, .4
Scon Cooper, co, �, Anthony Martin, ����,Mana(�
Tina M aroschak. �&� jOHn Peterson, c� Wflna
Bll 1 MlTCHELl . OmM Manager Bill DAWSON. Product.on Manager
Doris Rankins. s�� RlCK Mccormac. c�w ��
DANIEI MAURER. Emmrmmmm, �� DeCHANILE JOHNSON. Ad r,cnn,aa,
April 2, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Accident
Travel Policies Need Review
The March 23 accident that kill-
ed an ECU track team member
should never have happened. No
death is more tragic than one that
could have been prevented, and
Erskine Evans' could have been.
Ah, but there was money involv-
ed. The athletic department, which
last year raised more than a million
dollars and this year is seeking to
buy out former football coach Ed
Emorv's contract for more than
$100,000, didn't have enough
money to put up a handful of track
players in a motel so they wouldn't
have to drive all the way back from
Athens, Ga after competing all
day.
No, not enough money. Ap-
parently, safety is not the number-
one concern of the powers-that-be.
Now, granted, nothing probably
would have been made of the
policies concerning non-revenue
sports if this tragedy had not oc-
curred, but it did. And, now it is
time to re-evaluate our athletic
policies.
But, the sports administration
doesn't agree. After the accident,
the sports people released
statements saying no changes in
policy would be made at this time.
That reflex reaction to protect the
school's image was unnecessary
and stupid. The people who say
Ah, Spring.
Spring slammed ECU this
weekend. Oh, what a feeling. It's
about time, too. Old Man Winter
was wicked and walloped us with
some of his best snow woes, but we
survived. And now we're getting
even.
The first sign of spring had to be
the Chancellor in shorts (sources
say they saw this, but we couldn't
confirm it). There he was, they
said, sunning himself over by
Wright Fountain. And once Dr.
John got in the act, the rest of the
school followed his lead in a
gracious fashion.
There were shorts everywhere.
Girls, boys, men, women, dog,
cats � even a few new-wavers got
into the act. Sun and warm sum-
mer breezes skimmed off the white
legs of winter, turning them all a
hazy, brownish-red.
Then came the bikinis and tann-
there will be no changes in policy
in fact needed to say, "Hey, this is
terrible and we'll look into it
But, they didn't. And now we
are going to tell them what they
should look into and what they
should do.
First, team members shouldn't
drive. Period. This includes track,
baseball, tennis, soccer � every
sport. People who have been com-
peting all day in a physical activity
shouldn't be asked to drive long
distances. Especially as long a
distance as from here to Georgia.
Hire someone. At $3.35 an hour, a
driver is certainly worth a life.
If you can't afford the money,
which we're sure the athletic
department can come up with
somewhere, don't send the team.
It's that simple. We can unders-
tand maybe not being able to put
up a group of swimmers in a hotel,
but we can't tolerate making them
drive back all the way from
Florida.
We hope the athletic department
wasn't serious when it said
everything is all right the way it is.
Some closer looks need to be taken
and some new perspectives drawn
on ECU athletics. We know there
are a lot of complications, but
nothing should take the place of
safety � nothing.
� �
ing trunks. And then gallons of
every oil known to man. From the
Hill down to Central Campus and
over to Clement and White dorms,
students outdid themselves in the
quest for the look of the
"beautiful people
But, then the second side of spr-
ing hit. Along came the frisbees
and grills. Every spot on campus
had at least two or three ECUers
cooking out and tossing the play-
ing disc. Fun and frolic took the
place of darkness and cold despair.
Studying became harder and
harder to do as the warm calls of
the outside world beckoned us
from our dorms and library
cubicles.
And, alas, on Monday, after the
spring of the weekend, we stomped
to class. In shorts, students proud-
ly displayed the redness of their
days in the sun.
Nicaraguan History
The history of U.S. relations with
Nicaragua is tragic. It is a chronicle of
dominion and colonial servitude, for the
most part. The small country has been
treated frequently as a colony of the
United States since the 1850s when
private adventurers moved out of New
Orleans, New York and Baltimore to
conquer Central America for personal
gain, the extension of slave territory, or
both.
According to Walter Lafeber, author
of Inevitable Revolutions, this script was
repeated in its basic features in the 1920s
when the United States sent Marines into
Nicaragua and named Adolfo Diaz the
country's new president to replace
Emiliano Chamorro. The move was a
reaction to Mexico's revolutionary
movement which threatened U.S. oil in-
terests and to changes which Chamorro
was beginning to make in Nicaragua.
The fear was that revolution would
spread throughout the region, under-
mining U.S. influence there. After Diaz
replaced Chamorro, the United States
promptly began training a native-
national guard force to keep order in
Nicaragua. After U.Ssupervised elec-
tions were held in 1928 resulting in the
election of General Jose Maria Mon-
cada, a popular revolt that had begun in
1927 re-emerged to contest Yankee domi-
nion. It was led by a popular and
charismatic figure named Augusto San-
dino who fought a guerrilla-style war
against U.S. troops and the U.Strained
National Guard until 1934. Though he
had been raised in a wealthy home, San-
dino had worked for Standard Fruit and
U.Sowned mining companies
throughout Central America, shaping
his growing anti-Yankeeism.
After more than seven years of
fighting, he forced the withdrawal of
U.S. troops. Because of the depression
and the ominous cloud of militarism
that was settling in over Europe and
Asia, the U.S. government was less will-
ing to spend the money necessary to
maintain a garrison in Nicaragua. In
1932 Henry Stimson, an American
diplomat, instructed the Nicaraguans to
hold open elections which were supervis-
ed by the 400 Marines still in the coun-
try. Juan Sacasa, a radical in
Washington's opinion, won the election
and the last U.S. troops left the country
on Jan. 2, 1933.
As Sandino promised, once the
Marines left he was ready to negotiate.
Fully sensitive to the National Guard's
new authority, he asked that it be
disbanded and even offered to protect
President Sacasa against it. After a
meeting with Sacasa in 1934, Sandino
was driving to Managua when he was
seized by soldiers and, along with two of
his generals, taken to a nearby field and
shot. The National Guard's com-
mander, General Anastasio Somoza,
admitted issuing the order for execution
and claimed he received approval from
the U.S. minister, Arthur Bliss Lane.
Lane later denied involvement in the
shooting, yet Somoza went on to
militarily seize control of Nicaragua and
establish himself as dictator in June
1936.
From Thn Left
Ja Stone
For 43 years, Somoza and his two
sons ruled Nicaragua as a private fief-
dom. Their rule was marked by cruelty,
brutality and injustice and it was sup-
ported throughout by the U.S. govern-
ment. Finally in 1979, it came to an
abrupt end amid charges that the Carter
administration had "lost" Nicaragua to
Cuban and Soviet expansionism because
it had failed to support Somoza en-
thusiastically.
In fact, nothing was farther from the
truth. As late as May 1979, two months
before Somoza fled his country, the
United States supported his request for a
$66-million loan from the International
Monetary Fund. In addition, the United
States provided $14 million in arms for
the 8,000-man Somoza Guard. And
when it became evident that the Somoza
regime could not stand against a San-
dinista movement that had overwhelm-
ing popular support, the Carter ad-
ministration called an emergency
meeting of the Organization of
American States to urge the creation of
an inter-American force that could m -e
into Nicaragua, stop the fighting and
establish an acceptable regime
The proposal ran into united op;
tion from the other OAS member
remembered earlier examples of
American intervention with sometr
less than enthusiasm.
The final blow to the Carter ad-
ministration's attempts to "save"
Nicaragua came on June 20, 1979, when
most Americans witnessed a nor:
pushed their mistrust of the Sandinistas
from their minds. Somoza National
Guard Soldiers took ABC-TV newsman
Bill Stewart out of his car, made him
kneel in the middle of the street and shot
him in the head. Unknown to the k:i:ers.
Stewart's camera crew caught ever mo-
ment of the murder on film Within
hours after Stewart's death Sorth
American television viewers ;a far
themselves the senseless brutality thai
Nicaraguans had suffered at Somcza's
hands for vears.
Confronted with total failure. U.S.
officials scrambled to make the best
possible deal with the Sandiniv-a Thej
made three demands on the revolu-
tionaries: l)No mass executions be h(
after the revolution, 2)the revolutionary
junta be enlarged and 3elemen of a
"purged" National Guard be preserved
and brought into the government The
Sandinistas readily agreed to the I
condition because they had promised
allow no mass killings, even of the hated
National Guard officers.
The second condition caused strife.
though the Sandinistas showed the
were willing to compromise when they
appointed an 18-member "cabinet"
with only one Sandinista representative;
the remainder were businessmen and
professionals. But the five-member
revolutionary junta was not enlarged
However, the third condition ultimately
brought about the collapse of negotia-
tions. On this point no compromise was
possible.
With the collapse of negotiations with
the Sandinistas, the United States was
forced to live with a revolutionary
government whose authoritv it had
fought to the end.
Uecker Leads Carolinian To Romp Of ZMB
By GREG RIDEOUT
It wasn't just any ballgame. No, not
any game at all.
I had just got into town, you see. I ar-
rived early, on the 8:15 bus. The town,
Greenville, was new to me. It looked like
any other town � you know, trees,
leaves, buses, cars, trash, people. I
wondered why I was here.
Three days earlier, I had received the
weirdest phone call from some guy at a
college newspaper in Greenville. All that
he said was, "Uecker, we need ya' bud-
dy. Grab your gear, pack a suit case
and fill a cooler with Lite Beer and take
the next bus to Greenville
Well, I'm not just any Joe ballplayer.
I demanded that this fella tell me more.
Seems this ECU newspaper, The East
Carolinian, was going to clash with the
campus radio station, WZMB, in an all-
or-nothing, do-or-die softball game. The
gauntlet had been thrown down and the
match to decide which media on campus
was tops was about to be played.
"Bob the guy said, "we need a
ringer. Someone who can hit with
power, run with speed and glove with
goodness. Bob, we need a superstar. So-
meone who can drink and spray paint at
the same time. Bob, you've got to hop
the next Trail ways coach and come on -
to town. There's fifty bucks in it for
ya
Well, I wasn't bought so easy. But the
guy came up to seventy-five, bus fare
and all the Pizza Transit Authority pizza
I could eat. Well, ho, ho, you know
there's now way ol' Uke could turn
down delicious FT A pizza. I raced to the
bus station.
So, now I was in Greenville. Well, not
actually. Somehow, I went to Green-
ville, S.C. I got back on the bus.
So, now I was in Greenville. The right
Greenville. I was supposed to be picked
up at the bus station by a Craig Rider.
Well, he and a friend came a minute or
so after the bus dumped me off.
"Hey, Uke Rider screamed. "You
must have rode on the front seeeeaaaat.
I'm Greg Rideout and this is Rick Mc-
Cormac. We're the Carolinian's one-
two punch. Hell, and with you behind
the plate, we're a cinch to wollop
ZMB
Well, I don't like people using my
lines. Right off I could tell this Rideout
was the cocky sort. (I figured out this
was who "Craig Rider" was.) So I deck-
ed him. He was out cold for a good three
minutes. Me and this McCormac fella
threw some beer on the dude, and
Bingoooo, he was up.
4 Sorry about that Greg I said.
"Now we can be teammates. I did that
to John Madden during the first com-
mercial we did together. Hell, now every
thing's A.O.K
Well, Greg and Rick, who just kinda
nodded a lot, loaded me in a big, white
van and whisked me away to Allied
Health. I thought to myself, "Gee, I
know I'm over that double dose of
Singapore woopie disease. But, if they
want a physical exam before we play.
Hell, it's okay with ol Uke
But, as it turned out, Allied Health
was the name of the field. Me, Rick,
who was still nodding and I began to
wonder if he was really all rightand
Greg set the field up, drank a few cold
ones (Budweiser, but don't tell Bubba
Smith) and ate some PTA pizza.
Soon the rest of the team started to ar-
rive. And so did the opposing team. You
know, the radio station guys.
Greg pointed out the Carolinian
Crunchers to me.
"That there is Sluggin' Tom, the
G.M he said. "That's Brett "knock-
the-shit-out-of-it" Morris. There's
"Too-much" Tommy Pharo,
"Terrible" Tom Luvender, "Thrasher"
Todd Patton, "Bad Boy" Billy Dawson,
"Downtown" Tony Brown and "Jam-
min" Jon Jordan.
And there's the reserves � Tina
"Mauler" Maroschak, "Big Stick" Bill
Mitchell and "Hitting" Harold Joyner.
"Well I said to myself, "This is
quite a team. Heck, I'm kinda proud to
be out here with these terrific guys
Greg. Let's play ball
Well, most of the ZMBers were a
good, but not great, lot. A couple of
them hit pretty good in B.P but their
defense looked like a wad of Swiss
Cheese. Greg won the toss and we took
the field.
Well, let me tell you, it felt great to
strap on the ol gear again. Heck, I was
in catcher heaven. But it didn't last long.
In the top of the first, that stellar defen-
sive alignment of the Carolinian
Cruchers curtailed any hopes the
ZMBers had of taking an early lead.
One, two, three � Bingo, we were up.
That first inning we must of went
through the whole batting order. We
grabbed six runs, with Morris, Patton
and Luvender smacking in a couple. Of
course, I grounded out to the pitcher �-
but it was a power ground-out for sure.
The second inning saw sluggin' Tom-
my Norton slam a triple and Rideout
singling him in. Ail told, we snagged
three runs. WZMB notched up another
goose egg. And even though I made
several errors, we still played stellar
defense.
I
The rest of the innings seem like a blur
to me. Never have I seen such awesome
power hitting. And even though the
ZMB nine ended up with 14 runs, those
Carolinian guys and girl still executed
marvelously on defense. Heck, all 14 of
their runs came on lousy calls. "He
missed the tag. He missed the tag 1
would yell, but to no avail.
All in all, the Carolinian Crunchers
had an easy time of it. The final was
25-14. The newspaper didn't dog the
radio-ites as good as the last time these
two powerhouses met. But, then again,
the last time they didn't have the ol'
Uke.
Of course, it was time to head back to
the bus station. After a round of hand-
shaking and posing for pictures (I didn't
understand why I couldn't be in them),
we departed. As I settled back on the bus
and threw a lady out of the seat I
wanted, I reflected on my trip to Green-
ville. "Heck, both those teams had good
people on them. It was lots of fun I'm
glad I got all their addresses. I just
wonder why all of them put Nome,
Alaska. Oh well, Bingooo, back to the
big leagues
(Editor's Note: Greg Rideout is Bob
Uecker s pen name. He say s he hopes
to come back from Fudge Pudge, Ark
and play again next year.)
Adv
Dehatit
A many
355 29e
$end out
Hone
a
Bunn
ha
B
oc
1 ihni' �
E
t
'?i
Call usfor eye
examination hjth
Doctorof ourCM
reiv-tmumrn
V?U&
�i-a





I HI I ASIAROI INIAN
Pkii ik
'RAL
:ons
7b
ild move
fighting and
m ted opposi-
Xs members that
tmples of
mething
Carter ad-
"save"
: 1979, when
a horror that
Sandinistas
a National
T newsman
. made him
treel and shot
to the killers,
ighl every mo-
m. Within
ith, North
saw for
itality that
at Somoza's
; lure, U.S.
ike the best
istas. They
the revolu-
ecutions be held
1 the revolutionary
iements of a
be preserved
he government. The
�:ed to the first
had promised to
even of the hated
:aused strife,
showed they
mise when they
r "cabinet"
ta representative;
nessmen and
five-member
noi enlarged.
I ion ultimately
ipsp of negotia-
t no compromise was
I negotiations with
United States was
a revolutionary
authoritv it had
ZMB
eem like a blur
en such awesome
even though the
?d up with 14 runs, those
- and girl still executed
fn defense. Heck, all 14 of
Ime on lousy calls. "He
k He missed the tag I
to no avail.
I Carolinian Crunchers
It:me of it. The final was
lewspaper didn't dog the
pod as the last time these
es met. But, then again,
they didn't have the ol'
t was time to head back to
After a round of hand-
ling for pictures (I didn't
iv I couldn't be in them),
ks I settled back on the bus
iady out of the seat I
beted on my trip to Green-
xnh those teams had good
i. It was lots of fun. I'm
II their addresses. I just
1 all of them put Nome,
Jell, Bingooo, back to the
e Greg Rideout is Bob
tame. He say s he hopes
'om Fudge Pudge, Ark
next year.)
Advertisers Aim At Responsible Drinking
" (1 PI) Beer
Jers arc turning their atten-
is from college students as the
: federal governments
utting the heat on drinkers
i c youngei than 21.
tigress decided last year that
state that had not raised its
ige to 21 b 1986 would
leral highway funds.
the state House passed
raise North Carolina's
ig tor beer and wine
vi;o 21 (it is already 21 for
bill would $.o into ef-
. 1986, saving the state
n in highway money.
vernmental cogs
i dealers are mov-
i hange then image and
1 - college-age chug-
Debating Club
Among Other
B El AINEPERR1
suff Writer
ECL Forensic Society
I) 'raveled to Shippensbury
mpete in its first
urnament. Thirty-three
and universities, in-
enn State. St John's and
I Richmond, par-
he event.
pants from ECU
: the tournament, which
events such as public
. oral interpretation.
per, the club's ad-
lid 'the F rensic Society
. for the university to
ration. It is a means of
n
a. ophy was won
Viai Kate Cunningham in the
Im a Interpretation
ai category . a con-
355-2961
end Your
Honey
a
Bunny
h. : . iter Basket and
' uquet. lOtfaDiscoui
ECU Students.
ril -April 7
5 Memorial Drive
gers. During a fraternity's annual
three-man chug contest on the
North Carolina State University
campus this week, the sudsy brew
was provided by a local
nightclub, not the beer
distributor.
"We have taken the majority
of our presence off the campuses
in an effort to get the point across
to the kids that we don't want
them abusing our products said
John Saputo, a beer distributor.
'The object is not to get smash-
ed. The object is to promote
sociability and a gregarious at-
mosphere in a campus setting
Another beer dealer, Willie
Hunt, said, "This whole thing of
seeing how much we can hold and
how fast and how much we can
Participates
Competition
testant was handed a story and
then expected to give an inter-
pretation of the piece involving
change of voice and look and
conveying to the audience the dif-
ference in characters and events.
"It is difficult to do on the spur
of the moment Schreiber said.
"Anyone can join the club
Schreiber said. "The team will be
picked according to those who
have worked the hardest on get-
ting speeches and readings
Schreiber said she would like to
see the club expand. "Since this
year will be our fist year in full
swing, we would like to stay
within the North Carolina,
Virginia and South Carolina
area she said, adding that she
would like to see the team com-
pete in national tournaments
"but you have to compete in a
certain amount of tournaments
to go
ECU Discount
Call us for eye
examination with
Doctor of your choice.
$15 Off Single Vision Lenses
$20 Off Bi-Focal Lenses
20 Off Ray Ban Sunglasses
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription eyeglasses
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Open? 5:30
AAon. Fri.
pllCianS 752-1446 Jg
hurt ourselves is out
What is in, several distributors
said, is a more conservative at-
mosphere on campus and a more
cautious attitude around alcohol
now that the state has stiffened
its drunk driving laws.
Saputo said the Raleigh market
usually buys about 33,000 kegs of
all brands of beer a year. Uast
year, it was down by 6,000 kegs
� an 18-20 percent decrease.
"The pendulum has swung
Hunt said. "We don't as an in-
dustry necessarily agree with
some of the laws that have been
passed. We don't think we're
dealing with something that can
be legislated. But we think that
the preferred route is education,
awareness. Maybe the industry
has been slower than it should
have been in coming around to
this position
Beer sales pitches are concen-
trated on drinking more sensibly,
DAY STUDENTS
DO YOU WANT TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative
on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for operation of:
WZMB The Rebel, Buccaneer,
The East Carolinian, Expressions &
THE PHOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office 757-6009
Filing Dates 4-2-85 thru 4-1 1 -85
215 East 4th Street
Greenville. NC 27834
919-752-2808
After Happy Hour Special
Every Tuesday
FREE Nachos with
Purchase of 60 oz. Pitcher
$2.50
Delivery hours
11 AM-12 Midnight
Mon, Tues, & Wed
11 AM-2 AM
Thurs, Fri, Sat & Sun
FREE DELIVERY
.�

























��










$200 REWARD
COMPUTER THEFT �
REWARD OFFERED
1. For information leading to the return of
the Apple lie computer stolen from Rawl An-
nex March 19 � up to $100, depending on
condition.
2. For information leading to the arrest and
conviction of the thief or thieves � $100.
If you have information that may qualify
for either or both rewards, please call Detec-
tive Wiggins at 757-6294 or Mr. Franke at
757-645?. Arrangements will be made, if
desired, so that information can be provided
and payment made anonymously. The
rewards are being offered by Robert H.
Franke, Director, Office of Sponsored Pro-
grams, whose office suffered the loss.
????????�?.�,��
��





��


























not drinking more, dealers said.
One wholesaler recently set up
tables in the food areas on the
state campus to push the "buddy
program" that calls for organiza-
tions to set up telephone banks so
students can call for a ride when
they are too drunk to drive.
Other beer dealers give out
pamphlets on how to dea) with
alcohol and urging moderaton in
drinking.
m
$5
V
P
Apple Records
204E. 5th St758-1427 'vJ
TOP 100 u.98List LP's & Cassetes ON SALE
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Artists A More'
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REO
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& Sigma .Nu
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday April 2, 1985
8:30- 1:00A.M.
Admission $1.50
18 Yrs. SI.00
10DRAFT
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& Sigma Tau Gamma
Present
Ladies Draft Nite
Wed. April 3, 1985 8:30-1:00 A.M
Guys$1.50 LadiesSl.OO I8yrs.$1.00
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
Plus a free keg to the sorority with the most attendance.
SHAKESPEARE
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lHt AS1 iAROl 1NJAN
Style
APR1I 2, 1985 Page
Bauer's New Passion

Steen Bauer
By JAY& KLLIOTT KRAVETZ
Inlrrnatloaal Pholo Se�
Steven Bauer, who electrified movie audiences
with his screen debut in Brian De Palma's Scar-
face and his starring role in Thief of Hearts, will
be seen next in a special film presentation of
Alfred Hitchcock Present's The Man From The
South.
"I just finished a show for NBC Bauer told us
during a recent interview. "It is a special movie
which is a remake of an 'Alfred Hitchcock Pre-
sent's' series. It's a special that stars John Juston,
myself, my wife Melanie Griffith (Body Heat), her
mom Tippi Hedren (The Birds), and Kim Novak.
It's a great show
Bauer is the son of a Cuban airlines pilot who,
with his school-teacher wife and three-year-old
son, fled their Cuban homeland in 1959, never to
return. The family came to Miami and joined the
burgeoning Cuban expatriate community.
"I was born in Havana and I grew up in Miami
until I was 20 Bauer recalled. "We were all
hungry for American culture when we arrived here
and movies, especially musicals, were an impor-
tant part of our lives
With his parent's encouragement, Bauer studied
guitar and trumpet, joining both his high school
choir and the Foreign Studies league, whose stu-
dent members spend their summers in Europe.
"I came from a musical family the 28-year-
old actor recalled. "As a child I played violin and
trumpet. I switched to the guitar so I could sing
because my original passion was singing.
"I made some records, but they have yet to be
released he continued. "I am looking for a
record deal out West. I really didn't always want
to be an actor. I really wanted music, rock'n'roll.
After high school, after I went to Europe and
traveled, I started acting in college.
"I started at Miami Dade South and then 1
transfered to the University of Miami he added.
"It's a good school
It was while attending Miami Dade Community
College that Bauer became interested in acting.
Cast in a small role in Summer and Smoke, he
soon enrolled in any courses he could connect with
theatre � drama, ballet, voice, and modern
dance.
His commitment deepened when he won a role
as one of the Jets in a University of Miami produc
tion of West Side Story. Impressed with his poten-
tial, the school's drama department helped cut the
red tape to enroll him as a full-time student.
'The program at the University of Miami gave
me the training Bauer explained. "It was a com-
bination of their program and their theatre. I
spent all m free time at the theatre. I was there
for about three years
Studying with Actors Studio alumnus Robert
Lowery brought Bauer his first formal training
and his first leading role - I enn in a production
of Of Mice and Men Roles in university produc-
tions of Okalahoma andandide followed, and
they led to his breakthrough a continuing role
in the 18-episode series tor public television, "One
Pasa U.S.A
The unusual Miami-based television show
caught the eye of Hollywood, and Bauer soon
found himself signed with Columbia Television
"When I went out to Hollywood and needed a
manager, a teacher from the University of Miami,
Norm Freiberg, served as mv manager Bauer ex-
plained. "He reallv introduced me to the film
business and television
Moving to California, the young actor made his
television debut on "The Rock ford files, follow-
ed by a guest-starring role on "Doctors Private
lives Bauer then spent six months as a series
regular opposite William Devane in "From Here
to Eternity
"It is important not to focus on results a
dreams of glory and stardom Bauer explain
"Someone should only get into acting if they have
a passion for that form of expression and for the
love of telling stones and ol being a part of story
telling, which acting is
After amassing further credits with the hit series
"Hill Street Blues" and "One Day V Time"
and starring in the television films "She's in the
Army Now "Nichols and Dymes" and "An In-
nocent Love Bauer moved to New Yorl :dy
with famed drama i Stella Adle
The actor also renewed his commitment
theatre, appearing in Off-Broadway produci
of Hailing for lefty dnd Mozart and Salien
"It's hard work Bauer explained. "It's i
road and you can find satisfaction only if you I
it to begin wnh. not if you're looking f
and fame "
At the end ol his year worl : .
New York, Bauer was cast in the c itarrii .
o Manny Rivera in Brian De Raima's Scarface
"Al Pacino is great Bauer sa;d. He's
man and just a wonderful human being. He
very good natured and generous p
great actor. So w was a learning experiei
besides all the fun "
For his brilliant portrayal ol the funny, flashy,
volatile lieutenant to Al Pac
king, Bauer was honored w I :en G!
nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He
ed good reviews for his role as Scott Mulle:
Thief of Hearts, a role which has billed him as j.
sex symbol of the 1980s.
"1 am looking for quahtv m mv work.
quantity he said. "However the audience thinks
of me is alright as long as they recognize the qn.
tv in mv work
For Those Who Need Another Spring Break
Hv KHITI M Al 1 (,S
, :mn
e fe1 ei is jump-
. and the only
; sun, sand
val need pounds
the beach! Just
behind and
B ' arise. Florida
beyond your expenses. How
ut Myrtle Beach? No. I ike
Bea t's sinking under
Virginia
V
:h?
i v ho wants to go
time oi year? It ain't
yet.
Where then to expunge
winter's clammy
i ike Botticelli's Venus ris-
im the waves, an old TV ad
V I I HI I IGHTHOUSE
� youi mind.ape
Hal 'twixt sound and sea.
� Nothing but miles
I miles ol white pristine
But 1 � gel there. Drag out
ad map. Route 264 is a
k red line all the wav from
Greenville to Manteo, and it's
only from there to there. Just
three inches, maybe four. Make
that in no time at all.
Grab the supplies and load the
car. Towel, blanket, surfboard,
sun tan oil, munchies, and beer.
Especially beer, need plenty of
suds. Wait a second. Remember
DWI? Let's not get carried away
with the beer. Just a half-case,
right0 Okay, make 'em tall boys.
Maybe they'll last.
Everything's loaded, so head
down Tenth Street to the bypass
and turn left at Hastings Ford.
Cross the river and turn right at
the first stop light. Can't you
hear the surf already? After a few
miles, the highway switches from
four lanes to just two. But don't
worry. After all, the PR boys in
Raleigh do call this "The Good
Roads State don't they? So
crank up the stereo and watch the
farms, forests, Pactolus, and
Wharton whi by.
The next wide spot in the road
is Washington, a.k.a. The
Original Washington (what the
city fathers prefer) and little
Washington (what everyone calls
it). Its 25 m.p.h. speed limit
demands that you take your time.
Just relax, the beaches aren't
eroding away that fast. They'll be
waiting for you. Can't you smell
the salt air?
Pop anothei top and bid
farewell to Washington in your
rearview mirror. Put a few more
decibels on the stereo and watch
Down East roll by. Trees, fields,
utility poles, and a rare house.
Buzz through Bunyan and bypass
Bath; Yeatesville goes by in a zip.
Take it slow through Pantego,
mind the sharp curves. Then on
to Belhaven and a 90-degree left
turn. They've got to find some
way to make people slow down.
Back to the open road and
watch the miles click by. There
certainly isn't much else to
watch. Cross the Intercoastal
Waterway between Leechville
and Scranton. Can't you feel the
sand between your toes? Bypass
Swan Quarter and the likewise
named national wildlife refuge.
Forget the toll ferry to Ocracoke.
Too expensive. Anyway, on the
road you command your own
destiny.
Swing south of Lake Mat-
tamuskeet and another national
wildlife refuge. Zip through New
Holland and Lake Landing. By
the time you reach Engelhard,
you'll be plenty sick of one-horse
towns. You'll also realize the beer
ran out in Belhaven. That's no
problem though. Can't be much
further, right?
Wrong. At Engelhard, you
jump off into the Great Void.
Thirty-eight miles of the bum-
piest, loneliest road east of the
Mississippi. A few miles into this
desolation and, like civilization,
any semblance of a buzz is long
gone. By now, even Van Halen
stopped jumping. Thirty-eight
miles of country fit only for
growing pine trees, bears and rat-
tlesnakes. Enough to make you
wish you had never heard of Rod
Serling, or beer, or your bladder.
Don't turn back. Suffer
through it. Remember what lies
waiting at the end of your trave
Just think of those blue combers
rolling onto the beach. Can't you
hear the foam hiss?
Manns Harbor is welcome
relief. Civilization at last. There
is something out here besides the
edge of the earth. Then onto
Roanoke Island and slip through
Manteo. And beyond lies the ho-
ly of holies: the Outer Banks.
Salvation.
At last you have made it. All
those miles, those rinky-dink
towns, those beer-emancipating
stops. You're here. Cape Hat-
teras. 'Fraid not. This is Bodie
Island; Hatteras is the second
island south of here.
But that's no problem. Turn
right onto Route 12. Disregard
the sign welcoming you to Cape
Hatteras National Seashore. This
is Bodie Island. Remember you
did say Hatteras, so keep driving.
Cross over to Pea Island and,
you guessed it, another national
wildlife refuge. This refuge takes
up an entire island, almost.
Another bridge and you're finally
on Hatteras Island . an
believe it? four hours of drr-
and you've reached the prom:
land. Sun. sand and sea. It's
yours. But don't stop now It's to
the lighthouse or bust, rig1
Through Rodanthe. thro
Waves, and on to Avon. Above
the dunes, you finall) see your
objective. The Cape Hatter.�
Lighthouse. Forget Venus; hang
Botticelli; this is paradise Turn
left just before Buxton and
can't miss it.
But something is still wrong
Not much partying happening at
a national historic site, is there1
Where you really wanted to go
was Nags Head. Not to worrv
Just head back through A
back through Waves, back
through Rodanthe. back across
Pea Island, back onto Bodie
Island, then through Whaler
and there is Nags Head. Relax.
it's only an hour's drive from
Cape Hatteras. And what's in
hour when you've alreadv wa
most of the dav?
Hannibal Celebrates Twain's Birthday
(l PI) The quiet Mississippi River town that gave birth to the
fictional characters Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn hasn't
changed all that much since Samuel Clemens was born 150 years
ago.
The population has increased from the 2,000 of Clemens' day to
its present 19,000, but the man who took the name Mark Twain
would not get lost walking through today's streets.
Hannibal is expecting about 500,000 visitors for Twain's 150th
birthday celebration. A series of events have been planned from
May to November to commemorate the author who puts this small
river town on the international map. This vear also marks the 100th
anniversary of U.S. publication of Huckleberry Finn.
Twain was born in nearby Florida, Mo on Nov. 30, 1835, but
it's Hannibal, where the family moved five years later, that holds
claim to Missouri's most famous author.
Hannibal is still very much the river town of Twain's boyhood.
Warehouses and docks line the Mississippi. The railroad tracks
that run along the river's banks were in place when Twain first
returned home as an adult.
Then it was the Hannibal-St. Joseph line. Today it's owned by
the Burlington Northern and Wabash railroads.
And, although Hannibal residents enjoy the amenities of 20th
century living, the physical appearance of the downtown area has
not been seriously altered. Many of the structures built while Twain
roamed Cardiff Hill, a playground later attributed to Tom and
Huck, still stand.
Gone are the cattle and hogs that were slaughtered for shipment
downriver to St. Louis. And the town's once-thriving lumber in-
dustry is bust.
But what particularly hasn't changed is the neighborly, natural
charm of a small Midwestern river town.
Twain's nostalgic view of his boyhood home was that of a refuge
from the disappointments of modern America; a village where the
best in the nation's tradition was presumed to thrive.
In a sense, he wasn't all that far from the truth. Hannibal is still
an uncomplicated town where a child can grow up with few cares,
where everyone knows everyone else, and where one can go to sleep
at night without locking the door.
The Mississippi still flows as wide as ever, but the river is no
longer the town's biggest industry. There is a meat packing com-
pany, a cement plant, a prefabricated steel manufacturer, a shoe
factory and a rubber company. Although they all contribute to the
town's economy, Twain is Hannibal's biggest moneymaker.
Thanks to his novels, Hannibal is one of America's bestknown
small towns. In the summer months as many as 250,000 people
from all over the world come to Hannibal to relive Mark Twain's
carefree boyhood.
In fact, Kristen Lokemoen, director of the Hannibal Tourism
Commission, readily admits that if it weren't for Twain, "Han-
nibal would be just another river town, like hundreds of others up
and down the Mississippi River
The Clemens family's small white clapboard house, in which
Twain spend his ,4Tom Sawyer" boyhood, has been restored and
furnished with furniture from the period.
David Levin�
Mark Twain
Adjoining the home is the Mark Twain Museum. It is filled
Clemens memorabilia such as a desk at which Tom Sawver has
written. y
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THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 2. IV8
I �
Pirates Down Madison In EC AC Action
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Winfred Johnson (25) steps on home plate in action against James
Madison oer the weekend.
By TONY BROWN
Sun Writer
On Sunday, a Greg Hardison
double in the ninth inning enabl-
ed ECU to take an 11-10 win over
the visiting Dukes of James
Madison.
Hardison's double scored
Robert Langston from second
base with two outs in the bottom
of the ninth.
ECU led 10-6 going into the
top of the ninth, but JMU's Eric
Metzger smacked a three-run
homer over the rightfield fence
against Pirate reliever Winfred
Johnson. Later in the inning,
Scott Mackie delivered a solo
shot to tie the score at 10.
The leading hitters for ECU
were Mont Carter, who went 2-5
with a home run. Hardison and
Jay McGraw both were 2-4 with
three RBI's apiece.
Winfred Johnson picked up
the win, increasing his record to
6-1 on the season.
March 28, 1985
Number twelve was the
charmer for the Ohio University
baseball team Thursday at Harr-
ington Field. The Bobcats
defeated ECU 6-5 for their first
win in twelve tries against the
Pirates since their rivalry began.
ECU opened the scoring in the
bottom of the first on two
straight doubles by Chris
Bradberry and Winfred Johnson
to take a 1-0 advantage � the
first of many lead changes in the
game.
In the top of the fourth, Ohio
took a 2-1 advantage as Wes Har-
Feisty Pirates Beat 'Cocks;
Salvage Split Of Twinbill
B JFANNKTTEROTH
Miff r1lef
It might as well have been the
f'nal game of the national tour-
nament for the Lady Pirate soft-
all team because the smiles
mid not have been brighter as
ECU split a doubleheader Satur-
with the Gamecocks of South
arolina.
Ranked third in the region,
USC came out hot in the first
j me scoring a devastating five
runs in only their second time at
II Their game plan was simple
hit, bunt, score and count on
All-America pitcher Darlene
I owrey to keep ECU from doing
e same.
I owrey allowed only two hits
hich came from freshman Susie
lerce and "Muffin" Zmuda.
Pierce scored on a pick-off error
in the third, giving the Pirates
their only run. USC continued to
execute perfectly, totalling eight
runs to ECU's one. ECU pitcher
Pam Young dropped only her se-
c nd game and holds an 11-2
overall record on the year. Depite
the Pirate loss, South Carolina
. oach Lou Piele called the Pirate
squad "fiesty
In the second game, a scoreless
pitching duel between ECU's
Stacey Boyette and USC's Gret-
en Koemg was finally broken
in the fourth inning. The
Oamecocks' Cindy Long tripled
to drive in Shirley Burton. Se-
cond baseman Lisa DaCruz then
put the Gamecocks on the board
again with a sacrifice, scorings
Long from third base.
Two runs ahead of the Pirates,
it looked as though USC would
maintain their winning ways until
ECU broke loose with a barrage
of base hits. First baseman Robin
Graves started the rally with a
shot to left field. Three Pirate
players followed suit as Carla
Alphin, Wendy Ozment and
Suzanne Martin punched in
singles, loading the bases with
two outs.
The Gamecock defense
tightened, but the Pirates manag-
ed to score a run on their second
out. ECU's Jeannie Murray
followed with a triple to right
field, scoring Alphin and Oz-
ment.
Immediately, USC began war-
ming up ace-pitcher Lowrey.
Koenig, obviously shaken up,
threw a wild pitch enabling Mur-
ray to score from third. Going in-
to the fifth, ECU led 4-2.
USC got back into the swing of
things and threatened to score in
the fifth as Karen Sanchelli tripl-
ed to center field. DeRose flied to
rightfield in an attempt to
sacrifice, but ECU freshman
Susie Pierce picked Sanchelli off
at home on an excellent throw.
USC walked away from the fifth
empty handed.
All-America Lowrey, now
back on the mound, received a
rude awakening as ECU con-
tinued to surge. After a walk to
Pierce, Zmuda was safe at first
on an attempted sacrifice bunt.
But the bottom fell out for USC
as ECU's Sandy Kee tripled to
center field, scoring pinch runner
(for Pierce) Patti Hook and
Zmuda. Alphin's sacrifice bunt
brought in another Pirate run,
giving ECU a 7-2 advantage.
USC added one more run in
the sixth as hitting sensation
Long tripled to centerfield, scor-
ing Diener.
The seventh inning went like
clockwork for the Lady Bucs as
only four USC batters made it to
the plate before the game was
over.
The ECU defense backed a
strong pitching performance
from Boyette as she improves her
record to 5-6. The loss gave
highly ranked USC a 16-5-4
record, while moving the Pirates
to 18-10 overall.
"I've been telling them all year
that they could play with the best
of them said coach Sue
Manahan. "And that's what they
did
The next game for the Lady
Pirates will be at the the Penn
State Invitational on April 5-7 in
University Park, Pa.
Get A Grip Dude!
rington continued to plague the
Pirate pitching staff with a two-
run homer off starter Craig Van
Deventer � his third homer in
the three-game series.
The Pirates tied it up in the
bottom of the frame. Johnson
walked and moved to second on a
Mike Sullivan single. Jay
McGraw tried to sacrifice the
runners up with a bunt, but
Johnson was forced out at third.
With two outs, catcher Jim Riley
singled through the middle to
score Sullivan.
The Bobcats loaded the bases
in the sixth on three straight
singles with one out, then Tom
Webb came in to relieve Van
Deventer. Leftfielder Mark
Shank caught a line drive and
pegged a fine throw to the infield
to prevent a score. Ohio failed to
score when an infield out ended
the inning.
The Pirates went ahead in the
fifth on Chris Bradberry's homer
with one on to make it 4-2, but
Ohio battled back in the seventh.
Echstenkamper again singled
Adams in from second and Brian
Luce followed with a single to tie
the score.
ECU responded with a run on
a Jay McGraw sacrifice after a
walk and an error helped load the
bases, but the Bobcats rallied
again in the eighth. Danny
Culpepper came in to relieve
Webb, but with two outs Brian
Ritter's homer knotted it at 5-5.
Ohio scored the winning run in
the ninth. Harrington got on with
a walk, then Daniel Boone came
in on relief as the fourth Pirate
pitcher. Two singles by
Echstenkamper and Luce scored
what proved to be the winning
run for a final 6-5 score.
On Saturday, the Pirates split a
twinbill against ECAC South op-
ponent James Madison at Harr-
ington Field.
James Madison won the first
game 9-2, but ECU came back in
the nightcap to win 11-6.
After errors allowed JMU to
take a 1-0 lead in the initial frame
of the first game, Winfred
Johnson's 13th homer of the year
tied the score, but that was the
closest the Pirates came to taking
a lead in the contest.
Madison tallied five runs in the
third on three singles, two
doubles, a walk and a balk to
take a 6-1 lead that was never
seriously challenged the rest of
the way.
The only other ECU score
came on a Chris Bradberry
homer in the bottom of the third
inning. The Dukes came right
back in the fourth with two more
runs on a walk, single and a liner
to right for an 8-2 margin.
A sacrifice fly brought in the
last Duke run in the seventh to
make the final score 9-2.
Winfred Johnson was tagged
for his first pitching loss of the
season, with his mark going to
5-1.
In the second game of the day
the Dukes raced to a 3-0 lead in
the top of the first when Mark
Cockrell slammed a three-run
homer. ECU rallied quickly for
five runs in the bottom of the
frame to take a two-run ad van-
JOH JORDAN - BCU Pf Lafe
Pam Young (7) dropped only her second game in 13 decisions against
South Carolina on Saturday.
tage.
After two walks and a single
loaded the bases, Johnson laced a
single into left, which brougfr
two runs in. An error on a Ja
McGraw grounder added ti
more. McGraw then tallied the
fifth run when Jim Riley boun,
the ball over the fence for a
ground-rule double.
Madison tied it up in the se
cond on a homer by Scot:
Mac key, two singles, a stolen
base and a dropped throw to tl
plate.
The Pirates put together tl
second consecutive five-run
ing to squash James Mad:
comeback attempt.
Two walks, these off the
cond JMU pitcher, and an en
scored Chris Bradberry McGraw
followed with a single to load the
bases. Cockrell walked,
forced Johnson in. R;ie 'hen
doubled to right but wa thi
out trying to make it to third on
the play.
The last ECU run came in
third on a walk, a single by Gi
Hardison and an out.
A homer by the Duke' Carev
Nemeth in the fifth closed
scoring at 11-6.
Mike Christopher raised
pitching record to 5-0, giving u 3
10 hits and striking out t-o
ECU is currently 17-7 jv
and 3-2 in the ECAC -
Madison drops to 8-10 ovc
and 1-2 in the conference.
The Pirates will be on the :
today as they travel to Wilson,
N.C to take on Atlantic Chi
tian College in a dcublehea
Outdoor
Season
Starts
By BILL TATE' MITCHELL
The ECU women's track learn
has made its presence known in
the first two outdoor meets of the
1985 season.
In the N.C. State Invitational
on March 16, the lady tracksters
had two first place finishers. Lin-
da Gillis, a sophomore from
Fayetteville, N.C, took firs:
place in the 100-meter dash with a
time of 11.8 seconds. Freshman
Carolyn Martin gave ECl
another first place in the triple
jump with an effort of 36 feet, 10
inches.
The Lady Pirates also scored
with two fourth place finishes tn
their opening meet. Freshman
Wanda Havthe was fourth in the
discus with a toss of 128 feet.
Sonya Staton took a fourth place
finish in the 400-meter dash with
a time 61.0 seconds.
At the Florida Invitational if�
Gainesville, Fla on March 2
the Lady Bucs also fared well by
placing sixth in two separate.
events.
Carolyn Martin once agais
placed in her triple-jump eve
Her leap of 35 feet, three inches:
gave her a sixth place finish.
Linda Gillis, the only returning-
runner on a young Lad Pirate
squad, finished sixth in the
See TRACKSTERS. Page 10
Ruggers Thrash Seahawks;
End Season On Good Note
ECU ruggers shown In earlier season action, finished 6-4-1 and second in the state.
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sjort. Etflor
The ECU Rugby club ended
their season on a good note
Saturday by thrashing the UNC-
Wilmington Seahawks, 18-3.
One should note that in last
year's match, the two team's bat-
tled before Wilmington won a
hard fought match 10-8. This
year's match was different, ac-
cording to team president Bill
Zimmerman.
"We got revenge Zimmer-
man said. "The game was a
grudge match, we were at each
other's throats the whole game.
"A couple of fights broke out
during the game and the referees
almost had to call the game'
Zimmerman added. "They took
a lot of cheap shots on us, they
were really bad sports
However, a combination of
ECU muscle and the 90 degree
heat must have been too much
for the Seahawks as ECU battled
to a 9-3 halftime lead, before
dominating the second half 9-0.
Fortunately for Wilmington,
ECU started the game with just
13 players (two less than re-
quired). The other two players
joined the squad after the first 10
minutes of action.
The Seahawks took advantage
of the Pirate shortage as they
took an early 3-0 lead on a penal-
ty kick.
The Pirates wasted no time in
retaliating as Alan Blankenship
darted 35 yards through the
Seahawks' defense and scored the
only try of the game. Mike
Brown's two-point conversion
was perfect as ECU took a 6-3
advantage.
The Pirates began to take con-
trol of the game. Shortly before
the half, Ted Williams scored on
his third drop-kick of the season
while giving ECU a 9-3 lead at the
intermission.
The Pirates came out in the se-
cond half to dominate play, keep-
ing the ball in Wilmington's ter-
ritory throughout play. Brown
added three more penalty kicks td
the Pirate scoring, while holding
the Seahawks scoreless.
Brown was 4-4 on the dav for
11 points. This is the highest in-
dividual scoring total all vear as
well as a career high for Brown.
With the Pirates 18-3 whipping
of UNC-W, ECU ends their
season with a 6-4-1 record, while
being recognized as the No. 1
team in the state. However, Zim-
merman believes that next year's:
team could prove to be even bet-
ter. :
"We're not losing anybody
from this year's team Zimmer
man said. "We're going to be a
lot stronger next year We're
��� good n�� '� H
Classi
WANTED
COUNSELORS For
;o ed 8 wee summer al
reals, launar sa;a
owance aro i
redit Experience
iut mus enicw oM
hildren Only non 9
idents neec ape .
nd brochure " '
inewood. 19006 Bot '
iami. Fior aa 33
-ROOMMATE WANTE
responsible, nor .
to share B r a' R ng
for DOtn sume' sesi
pietely him she a r
lccessor es
month Cat T5Z
ROOMMATE MfANTE
fceik oor �tt Si
private room Co
4 30 as for . ane
SUMMER POS'TIOHS
career goats r
people'5 Aa' are
effective oeoc e s�
"Learn va jat
leadership ac ties
growth Ca-z �
cent camp Rl
Forest, N C 2-S
FEMALE ROOMMATE
3 bedroom a Eastt
utilities Stan
758 9334
FEMALE ROOMMA
FOR SUMMER
mon1" " - :roc
duple MtH
758-5323 One m
FEMALE ROOVV.A"
S'art.ng ' a-
Eastb'oo 5 4
utilities C
FEMALE ROOMMAT
FOR THE SUMMER
May very c cs
FURN'SHED
den, kitchen bat!
yard $135 a mo" CM
time
HARD WORKING ST
work part time I
VICE, inc The .vi
skilled anc �s
ABOVE minumun Aagf
make your ov
tor Ben or please ea.
WANTED: Respc
ing roommate s for
course near At �n1
Mary at 752 m
ROOMMATE NE
oeautitui 2 bedroom i
fireplace poc
time. 757-1737
2 ROOMMATES N
SUMMER: S?a-
May. $100 per m
Large house with a
yard. Call 75fi -
Overon's
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 2, 1985
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Note
Jirates came out in the se-
lf to dominate play, keep-
)all in Wilmington's ter-
iroughout play. Brown
Iree more penalty kicks to
Je scoring, while holding
aks scoreless.
as 4-4 on the day for
s This is the highest in-
coring total all year as
career high for Brown
he Pirates 18-3 whipping
;W, ECU ends their
fun a 6-4-1 record, while
cognized as the No. 1
N state. However, Zim-
believes that next year's
lid prove to be even bet
P not losing anybody
'eam'Zimmer.
"Ue're going to be a
iger next year. We're'
a good name tor rjv
Classifieds
wanted
COUNSELORS: For western N.C.
o ed 8 week summer camp. Room,
�eals, laundry, salary, travel
.lowance, and possible college
edit Experience not necessary,
but must enjoy working with
children. Only non smoking college
students need apply For application
and brochure write: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
v ami. Florida 33015.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Seeking
responsible, non smoking roommate
�-hare B unit at Ringgold Towers
� r both summer sessions. Com
Jetely furnished, air conditioned,
essories included, $170 per
-onth. Call 752 0998, ask for Dan
ROOMMATE WANTED: Behind
k dorm, Uth St. Rent $135.
Private room. Call 758-7470 after
i 30 ask for Jane.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Do your
areer goals include working with
people? What are you doing to learn
effective people skills? Earn and
eam: valuable life experiences,
radership abilities and personal
growth Camp Kanata (Co-ed resi
camp), Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, N.C. 27587. (919) 556 2661.
'EMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
bedroom at Eastbrook, $113 �
utilities. Starting in May. Call
'589334
'EMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR SUMMER: Only $130 per
onth. Own bedroom, furnished
piex on Brownlea Dr Call
758-5323. (One mile from campus.)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
acting in May. 3 bedroom apt. at
Easfb"OOk $106 Der month � "3
ties. Call 752 2648 or 757 0016
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR THE SUMMER: Starting in
May Very close to campus, totally
FURNISHED, large private room,
kitchen, bath and hall Big front
. 3rd. $135 a month Call 758 1404 any
me
HARD WORKING STUDENTS: To
work part-time for WRIGHTSER
v'ICE. INC The Work: various
skilled and unskilled jobs The Pay:
ABOVE minumun wage. The Hours:
make your own Call 756 2719; asK
tor Ben or please leave a message
WANTED: Responsible but party
ing roommate(s) for house on golf
course near Atlantic Beach. Call
Mary at 752 9926

ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
beautiful 2 bedroom apt 2 full baths,
'replace, pool, etc. Call Holly any
' me 757 1737
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
SUMMER: Starting 1st week in
May $100 per month � '� utilities.
. arge house with ac, dishwasher,
yard. Call 758 5953. Across from
Overton's.
PART-TIME WORD PROCESSOR
NEEDED: For law firm. Program-
ming experience helpful. Call Kim
at 758 6200.
STUDENTS: Lose those extra
pounds before summer! Swimsuit
season is upon us, so feel better
about yourself this year! Simple
easy to follow plan that shows you
how to lose weight nutritionally and
keep it off! Only $6.95 P.P.J. In-
dustries, P.O. Box 59 Carrboro, N.C.
27510. Satisfaction Guaranteed or
your money back!
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE:
Episcopal Summer Camp looking
for college students to fill counselor
positions. Dates. July 19 to Aug. 14.
For information write: Edward M.
Hodges, Jr Episcopal Camp
Manager, 101 E. 10th St Washington,
NC 27889
NEED A SUMMER JOB7: Located
in Raleigh. Perfect for the college
student who needs to make money
over the summer. Five days a week.
Easy work. Great Pay! Send name,
local address and phone number,
major and G.P.A. to: F.D.L. Inc
1608 E. 5th St. Greenville, N.C. 27834.
3rd ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
summer at Wilson Acres. $123
month. Mary 758 7292.
3rd ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
summer and or fall at Wilson Acres.
$123 month�call Cary 758-7292.
RIDE NEEDED TO MYRTLE
BEACH: Would like to leave on
Thurs April 4th any time after 5.
Call 752 7879.
GOT THE SUMMER JOB SEARCH
BLUES?: NEED RESUME EX
PERIENCE? INTERVIEWS WED.
AT 1 OR 4 OR 7 MENDENHALL
238 FULL TIME POSITIONS.
S1411MONTH AVERAGE. 2.5 GPA
NEEDED. BE PROMPT.
PERSONAL
SIG EPS: Parents Weekend was a
successGood job Scott Short! -The
Golden Hearts
MOE: it was quite a weekend and I
enjoyed every minute of it! Thanks
for everything. Love- Jennifer
TO THE PERSON(S) WHO
REMOVED THE COMPUTER
FROM RAWL ANNEX 2 WEEKS
AGO: You did a truly professional
job, so I suppose congratulations are
in order. But see my display ad
elsewhere in this issue. RHF
THE VIOLENT FEMMES: Want to
contact Monika, Stephanie, Karen,
Laurel, Jim & Tom. Write: Juan C.
Esteves 726 Commonwealth Ave.
number 4S, Boston, MA 02215. (617)
267 8406.
STUDENTS: The heat is on and
everyone should get fired up to go
see Maxx Warrior April 19 and 20.
Greenville, let's show Norfolk we
can party hearty!
SOFT CONTACTS
D'AfLYWtAR 140.00paii
EXTENDED
WfcAH $60.00pair
TINTED $70.00Pal'
(blue. aqua.
green, brown)
STUDENT ID REQUIRED
I hf�UKr prfces do not mtludt- tees tor professional mtms
Proft-ssnAl lees depend imi lens type and ftir pr�-KMis soil
Jt-ns tMtriviu,e
information � 756-9404.
.
OfTOMCTlUC
CHECAA�C�NT�R
Drs Hoilis �C Subal
1 ipion Annex 2H (ireenville Kivd
�oe
BUSINESS, FINANCE,
MARKETING MAJORS: Position
open for full-time summer employ-
ment $4,000�. interviewing now.
Rush name, phone to P.O. Box 4052,
Greenville, NC 27834.
SALE
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert.
TYPING: Experienced professional
woman will provide all typing ser-
vices. (IBM correcting typewriter)
Call Debbie at 756-6333 for a well
typed paper.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Sum
mer or longer. Close to campus.
Swimming pool and tennis court.
758 3676.
FOR SALE: General Electric por-
table air conditioner. Very good con-
dition. Call 752 1989.
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates call 355-2510 after
6:30.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bedrooms,
living room, dining room. Near
university 113 E. 9th St. $255. Call
758-5299.
ERIC CLAPTON: Tickets will be
available next week at Apple
Records. Start planning now to see
Slow Hand in Durham on April 18th.
BE THERE.
FOR RENT: Spacious, fully furnish-
ed 2 br. apt. available tor summer
months. Mid May mid April or any
time in between. Rent is $275 per
month- low utilities, convenient to
campus � pool privileges. Call after
5 p.m. 756-9104.
FOR SALE: '73 Datsun 240Z
Micheien tires, mag wheels, air
dam, driving lights, AM FM
cassette, runs well, needs paint.
$2,300. Call Todd 757 3347 weekdays
after 5 or weekends.
FOR RENT: 509 Ringgold Towers.
Want to rent 1st session summer
school through May. 1 bedroom with
twin beds, I bathroom, kitchen and
den. $340 monthly. 752-0416.
FOR SUBLEASE: One bedroom
apt. for sublease May, June and July
-may take over new lease. $225
month, 2 blocks from ECU. 758-6712.
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8 a.m.
5 p.m.) 17 years experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters.
READY TO MOVE IN: 2 bedroom
corner duplex with appliances,
drapes, fireplace � gardening. I
year lease � security. Near
hospital. Available April 1st.
7569349.
LOST AND
FOUND
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
DataWorks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes and more. All work
is computer-checked against 50,000
work electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper. (Call for specific
rates.) Call Mark at 757 3440 after
5:30 p.m.
FOUND: Bracelet outside of Cotton
Dorm. Call and identify any time
after 6 p.m 757)37?
REWARD OFFERED: For the
return of or any information leading
to the return of the black Peaugot
Earth Cruiser stolen from 110 S Jar
vis St. (across from Overton's) late
Fri. night or Sat. morning. Call
758 5953. Thank you.
Malpass Muffler and Parts
With this coupon your choice
of Valvoline or Castrol oil (up
to 5 quarts) and Fram oil filter.
$11.99 �
(Thru April)
2616 East 10th Street Greenville, NC 27834 758-7676
A VyVjAlJ OF A MEAL
ESTAURANTS
Monday Thru Thursday
5-9
SHRIMP DINNER
served with
F. Fries, Slaw
Hushpuppies
$3.25
105 Airport Rd.
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 758-0327
Just Opened!
au6
3006 E. 10th St. � 758-4880
Open 6 Days A Week At Night By Appt
t 20 percent off all haircuts
Offer good through April 28 I
Put vour entire family's hir in ow
esnert cure dnd be deliuhted (n the resufti
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring.
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert CargUl
University Professional Center
608 E. HkhSt. Greenville, NC
75S-4W7
"i
-JJpftoW 50
Process 6� Print
With This Coupon
Prom 110,126, 35mm or Disc Color Print Pilm
13Vs0 per print (reg. 27) and 149 dev chg. (reg. $2.98)
Example: 24 exp. reg. 19.46 HOW $4,731
Limit 1 roll per coupon. Not valid with other offers.
Jm cPhottflAGdd E4.2
CAROLINA EAST MALL 7564078
(North entrance � Near Belks)
Open MonSat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sundays 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
One test where only
you know the scora
Yes No
DD
DD
DD
DD
Do you want to be the
only one who knows
when you use an early
pregnancy test?
Would you prefer a test
that's totally private to
perform and totally
private to read?
Would you like a test
that's portable, so you
can carry it with you and
read it in private?
And how about a simple,
one-step test with a dra-
matic color change that's
easy to read and is 98
accurate?
If you checked "Yes" to
the above, EPT PLUS is for
you. Use it, and only you
will know your test score.
A

Now Taking
Applications For
Transit
Manager

�preteritt
k - m ft
Apply 228 Mendenhall
w
&r 4�kken3F � feculy staff-
A�ri -S �� B 5.0r It. Morfa
nalll. "Tusfr brWvg pur Easter
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10
I HI I M K(1 I Man
M'KIl
Js
Intramurals
H IK NFI TE KOIH
I his weekend, the outdoor
recreation center held Us annual
backpacking trip to the I wharne
National forest The expedition
nas led bv two IRS staff interns.
John Savage and 1 isa Ireland.
1 he group left ECU Friday at 2
and returned safe and sound
Sunday a: 2:30 p.m. The
. irgeous weather aided in the
cess of the trip as the seven
pants camped out in the
derness Friday and Saturd.n
ghts.
ke ail wilderness adventures,
he bac kpackers had to 'rough it'
what Peanut butter and jel-
sandwiches, showering in
eek and enjoying
( snakes and lizzards)
- � the three da event.
Overall, the trip was verv sue
tnd enjoyed b all who
pariake in next year's
backpacking excursion.
doubles competition is
sw g along after the
ar round o play. The
mrnament begins this week
op-notch competition.
an undefeated record
tyetta and Al King
d No 1 in the
b racket The
defeated Fecho
" 0, (-4 and Render-
k -J ftei soundK
�cse wo the ran into
ch competition but pull-
out in the end
md Rampersaud
nisi :ops in
are Jefl echo and
Kem Burke fecho. one of last
ling champions, ac-
't'w partner m Burke
are swinging into the
.rnament.
port-club action, a
i-quetballers par-
98! State 'B'
:nament. Raymond
�v ok Yang went head-
the nest in the
B early in the rounds,
� .� � 'ought back
�ake
n win in the men's
e 'B' d
the Tennis Shoe
the latest IRS soft-
tnd team handball action.
da ind Thursday at
: ; 3 i WZMB � controU-
� md roll on 91.3
u Stephanie Luke
he Tennis Shoe Talkshow.
Tracksters
(Ontinued from Page Fight
��-meter dash with a 12.01
clocking
"I've been very pleased with
run first year coach
Miller said "I usually on-
girls to a meet, so I
re how we'd do, but we
een very, competitive. I was
happy with our first
outdoor me
� �������
itionaJ facilities will clo i
in accordance with the following
iuie on Friday, April 5.
SUIMMINf, POOLS
Memorial Pool
lay 1:30 p.m.
Minges Pool
Closed
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Friday 1 p.m.
Minges
Closed
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Friday 3 p.m.
EQI IPMFNT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
Friday 3 p.m.
OITDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
Friday 3 p.m.
All facilities will resume nor-
mal hours of operations on Tues-
day, April 9.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 noon-l:30p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat 1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1p.m5 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
SatSun. l p.m5 p.m.









m
tiV
WANTED: Enthusiastic Guys & (.iris
ECU VARSITY CHEERLEADER
TRY(H IS
V V- � Organizational Meeting: Wednesday, April 3, 1985 iiL
5:30 p.m Lobby Minges
� Practice Clinics: April 4, 9, & 10

"
v.
Don't Miss The Opportunity For:
Travel! Meeting People! tun!
For Further Information Call:
757-0118 or 752-6353
Ca
( � Final Tryouts: To be announced

C
u-a
d
i
?�?���,����
? ????���44)fj,
Swift- Sliced FREE!
FOOD LION
� �
Vfl
4 Lb.
These prices good thru
Sunday. April 7 1985.
12-30 P.M. -
9 P.M.
v
nb.
Grade A Fresh - 10-14 Lbs. Avg.
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef Loin
Sirloin
Steak
Whole Or Shank Halves - Sliced FREE! 09-2$ lbs. A��.l
Full Quart
rt
�il�Vi
W
298
USDA Choice Beef Loin
T-Bone Or
a , � Porterhouse
Strawberries; steak
499
Red Ripe
v '


Grapes 99
32 Ounce
Dove
Liquid
Lb.
Thompson Seedless
�. �-
t
Greenville
Greenville
2 liter Die! Coke Caffeine Free Die! Coke
Caffeine Free Coke
Pk? of 12 -12 0i.CMtRt9.au
Coors
5 Liter Ret1 B.r,u.�t Rki��. White Chahlit
Ntettr Via Rote
Almaden
Wine
8 Oz. - Frozen Chicken Turkey Pies
Crozet
Kitchen
Beautiful
Easter Plants
Orchid
Corsages E.e, 1.99
Easter
lilies neh 5.99
Hydrangeas e� 5.99
Tulips EleN 4.99
Hyacinthscek 4.99
Colorful Mums Each 3.99
.





Title
The East Carolinian, April 2, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 02, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.402
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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