The East Carolinian, March 28, 1985






Stye Saat Carolinian
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vo).59 No.50
Thursday, March 28, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Teacher Evaluations
Faculty Senate Approves Shorter Forms
License Lingo
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
One of the more interesting things one can do to pass the time is to search for unusual license plate
messages. As in the case of this ECU staffer's car, it usually doesn't take long to figure out what they are
trying to get across.
The Faculty Senate approved a
shorter teacher evaluation form
along with guidelines for the
form's use during its monthlv
meeting Tuesday. The new four-
question form will replace the
22-question form being used at
present if approved by
Chancellor John M. How ell.
By voice vote, the old form, in
use for four years, was discarded
by the Senate and with a 28-16
vote the new form was approved.
Dr. James L. Smith, chairman of
the Faculty Senate, says the new
questionairre is an improvement
over the old form, but it is still
not "ideal
Most faculty senators con-
sidered the principles guiding the
use of the form more important
than the questions themselves.
The guidelines, passed by voice
vote, state that student opinion
should "be only one of the ways
to evaluate teaching And, that
administrative evaluations of an
ed on student opinion data
gathered over several semesters,
not just one or two.
The guidelines will prevent
misuse of student opinion when
hiring, firing or tenure-tracking
an instructor, an appendix to the
report says.
One difference between the
new and old forms, Smith said, is
that the new form will be used
each semester instead of every
other semester. Student responses
to the four questions will be com-
piled and given to the instructor
and his department chairman.
Smith pointed out that in-
dividual departments can use an
alternative form if it is approved
by the chancellor. An alternative
form may or may not include the
four questions.
A longer form of 15 questions
was also approved by the Senate.
These questions, which ask about
the instructor's speech clarity and
course objectives, will also be
student responses to the this form
will be given only to the instruc-
tor for his own knowledge.
The SGA is expected to take
action on the new evaluation
forms at its weekly meeting on
Monday.
Smith said it will probably be a
v�eek before Chancellor Howell
can review the new form and
make a decision on it.
The four new questions, which
students will answer from one to
five with five being excellent, are:
�The instructor is reliable in
such matters as meeting classes as
scheduled, returning tests and
assignments in a timely manner
and keeping office hours and ap-
pointments.
�The instructor has made the
goals of the course clear and
utilizes assignments and activities
that are relevant to those goals.
�The instructor has created an
atmosphere of respect, fairness
and helpfulness.
Overall, the instructor is ef-
instructor's performance be bas- given each semester. However, fective in teaching this course
- i'�"uuui s nuiiiidiiu uc oiii- veu eacn semester. However, tective in teaching this cours
Student Delegation Charges To Raleigh, Receives Awards
By DALE SWANSON
Staff Writer
The ECU delegation of the
North Carolina Student
Legislature came away with
distinction and increased clout in
the state-wide organization's 48th
annual legislative session in
Raleigh last week.
Eighteen schools debated six-
teen bills, thirteen of which were
passed at the the session. Elec-
tions for next year's officers were
held at the final NCSL meeting of
the year and according to James
CaWwen, �cru delegation chair-
man, ECU was succesful in get-
ting Gordon Walker elected to
the position of Lt. Gov the se-
cond highest position in the state-
wide organization.
Other ECU delegates who
received special recognition at the
session meeting included Kirk
Shelley and John Simon. Shelley
was elected President Pro Tern-
pore of the session's Senate, as
well as being recognized as the
best speaker of the NCSL.
Simon was named chairman of
the Conference Committee, while
Caldwell was named chairman of
the Traffic Committee and he ad-
ded that ECUNCSL expects to
receive three more committee
chairs in the next two weeks.
A bill written by Walker and
intern member Phoebe Caldwell
received honorable mention as
best bill from a large school. The
bill, Child Awareness Protection
Act, could become state law. It
states that children under the age
of 14 would not appear in a cour-
troom for questioning. Instead,
the bill recommends the child be
questioned by the presiding judge
and a special interviewer. The
child would then appear to the
court through a closed circuit
monitor.t
The authors of the bill said that
a young, easily influenced witness
could answer questions more
easily without the intimidation of
the court setting.
Another bill sponsored by
ECU was an act striking down
North Carolina's Crimes Against
Morals Statue. In the more than
two hours of debate, ; arguments
ranged from personal freedom to
animal protection. The bill final-
ly passed both by the House and
the Senate.
Kirk Shelley further increased
his influence in the organization
by introducing an emergency bill
chastising the federal government
for "blackmailing" the states in-
to raising the minimum drinking
age. His bill calls for North
Carolina to resist such an in-
crease on the basis of state
freedom. This act follows several
other student protests such as the
North Carolina Student Govern-
ment Associations' resolution for
state-wide campus debates and
ECL's recent SGA resolution
against federal interference in
state affairs.
The NCSL holds Interim
Councils once a month during the
school year and culminates each
March with the legislative session
held in Raleigh All of the year's
resolutions and the session's bills
are collected into a booklet and
distributed to members of the
General Assembly, the state's ex-
ecutive and cabinet members and
selected political and business
leaders in North Caroling .
A distinction of the annual ses-
sion is that the organization
meets as separate groups in the
House and Senate, rather than as
one body as it does during regular
monthly meetings.
As of Sunday, the new year has
already begun for the NCSL and
the first Interim Council will
meet at UNC-Wilmington April
12-14.
U.S. Economic Situation Explained At Spring Lecture
By BRETT MORRIS
Staff Writer
The debate over the U.S.
economic situation and the im-
pact it is having on the world
economy was the topic of discus-
sion last night at the third lecture
in the Great Decision series.
Topics such as the U.S. budget
deficit, foreign trade and the
value of the dollar were address-
ed in a speech given by Dr. Henry
Nau, professor of political
science and international affairs
at George Washington Universi-
ty.
Currently, the U.S. economy
represents 40 percent of the
world's gross national product in
industrialized countries and 25
percent of the GNP in the free
world economy, meaning "we
draw attention on the world
scene Nau said.
Therefore, he said, the U.S.
budget deficit has caused the
value of the U.S. dollar to rise in-
the international economic arena
and this has resulted in elevated
prices for U.S. goods overseas.
'This means foreign nations can-
not afford to buy as much of our
products and this hurts our ex-
ports Nau said.
The United States exports 10
percent of its GNP. Although
this is a substantial rate on the
world market, U.S. economic
power has declined in the past
two decades due to competition
from foreign producers, Nau
said. "Modernization has caused
nations to become more depen-
dent on each other
According to Nau, the United
States needs to take into account
the condition of the world market
when making domestic economic
policies. "If we can produce our
goods cheaper and they (foreign
markets) produce their goods
cheaper, it will enable both of us
to have a higher standard of liv-
ing he said.
A substantial problem
resulting from the high value of
the U.S. dollar is that American
industries are calling for a high
rate of protectionism to
guarantee their markets. Nau
said, "We shall not protect our
industries if we can avoid it.
When the government gets in-
volved in the economy, it loses ef-
ficiency There is also a great
deal of politics involved in the
relations between the U.S.
government and industry.
Nau went on to state that the
United States needs to adoptsome
domestic policy changes. "We
need to let these changes
reverberate through the interna-
tional economy Nau said.
According to Nau, the U.S.
dollar will start to decline in value
as soon as the budget deficit is
reduced. Great progress has also
been made in price stability in the
Classroom Plans Finalized
By HAROLD JOYNER
Assistant News Editor
Construction for a $14.9
million dollar classroom building
is expected to begin sometime in
August, said Charles Blake, assis-
tant to the chancellor.
"I'm very pleased that
everything is going right along on
schedule he said. "And if the
weather stays nice, we can expect
to see some work begin any time
now
Once completed, the 163,000
square foot building will be the
largest building on campus. It
will be three stories high and
house 60 classrooms and 180
faculty offices, most of which
will be held by the department of
foreign languages and the School
of Business, Blake said.
The classroom is to be built
behind behind Graham and Rawl
Buildings and across the street
from Flanagan. Controversy oc-
curred more than a year ago
when a group of students and
faculty opposed the location of
the facility, which they said
would destroy one of the few re-
maining natural wooded areas on
campus. Blake said arrangements
will probably be made to relocate
the Gazebo and provide other
seating on campus.
Also, the question of parking
has been brought up, and while
no formal plans have been made
to expand ECU's parking areas,
Blake said, "there would be some
parking available near the
building but no final plans
have been made yet.
Bids for work will be advertis-
ed May 1, he said, and decisions
will be made after June 30. The
architects, Little and Associates,
Inc. of Charlotte, recently met
with university officials concern-
ing finalization of plans.
Approval for the building
came last year by the General
Assembly and Blake added,
"everything's on schedule
which he attributes to early plan-
ning by university officials.
SRA Considers Fundraising Project
By HAROLD JOYNER
Student Residence Association
members heard from a local
business representative last night
who would offer a chance for the
campus organization to raise
funds.
Martha West, a representative
of Mid-Eastern Brokers, Green-
ville, told SRA that students
would have the chance to pur-
chase an auto dub membership,
which would offer discounts on
local car repairs.
"This is an excellent opppor-
tunity for students with cars to
take save more than $100 with
this membership West said.
She said out of the $25 member-
ship fee, $2.50 would go back to
SRA. President Debbie Gembicki
approved with the idea and said
clearance from Director of
Residence Life Carolyn Fulghum
had been given.
Services that would be offered
to members of the Mid-Eastern
Auto Club would include reduced
rates of wrecker service, reduced
labor rates for all work done to
the automobile, as well as free
annual state inspections. A
newsletter with various auto tips
and general service reminders will
also be sent. Other available ser-
vices and additional information
may be obtained by calling Gem-
bicki.
Vice president Juan Velasquez
announced that Mike Kleinert of
College Hill was elected new SRA
president. Klienert will assume
his duties as president at the April
10 banquet, to be held at the
Ramada Inn. Also, David Raye
was elected treasurer, Valenquez
said. Both candidates ran for
See FALL, Page 5
JO JORDAN - ECU
Broom Control
Spring has finally arrived at ECU ami these brooms seemed to have
taken the opportunity to enjoy a little sunshine.
U.S. and the world.
"The programs now being im-
plemented are improving the
world economy but there is still
much more to be done overseas
Nau said.
World influence has begun to
decline dramatically. The infla-
tion rate in France, which was
previously in double digits, has
dropped to 6.5 percent. "The
programs that have been im
plemented by the United States
are helping to improve the world
economy but there is still much
more to be done overseas
WZMB Halts
Baseball
Broadcast
Bv SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sport, Etftor
The first ECU baseball broad-
cast by WZMB's Mike Kelly and
Pama Mitchell was their last after
a Marketing Assistant in the
Athletic Department decided to
can the broadcasts because Mit-
chell isn't a student.
"The primary reason (for the
broadcast) was to give the
students a chance and get prac-
tical experience on radio
Marketing Assistant Lee
Workman said. "We wanted to
give the students an
opportunity
Susan Duncan, WZMB general
manager, said the broadcasts
were discontinued because Mit-
chell, the station's advisor, was
terminated by the Sports Depart-
ment. Duncan said there are no
other qualified employees with
the time to do the games.
Workman said it was unfor-
tunate that there won't be more
broadcasts.
"I wish they were able to do
it Workman stated. "They
(WZMB) just didn't have enough
qualified and interested students,
so we had to cancel. If they have
the students, we can work
See CONTROVERSY , Pmge 10

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-?- JHtEASTt AROLINIAN MARCH 28.
1985
IBM
American Marketing Association hosts
Steve Murpnree from IBM on Wed , April
3rd at 3 30 p m In Mendenhall 244 The
presentation will cover the marketing o In
formation processing products and sales
management Non members and members
Please come
ECU College
Republicans
CR s there win be a meeting Thurs April 28
a� 6 in the Mendenhall Coffeehouse Frl the
1st annual Lincoln Day Dinner will be held at
the Ramada Inn at 6 30 p m Tickets are S10
each ana can be purchased from Dennis.
James, or Sandy All are welcome We will
sell Reagan s Gipper
posters Nixon's The Real War political
P'ns and High Fontler Books,
Bumpers'ickers, and pamplets Elections
will be held soon so consider running for of
tice Several Members will be needed to help
�' 'he pre dinner reception Fri Those help
ng will get nfo the reception tree
NC Student Legislature
NCSL will meet Mon April 1st and Tues
April �th at 7 in the Mendenhall Coffeehouse
Remember Mon Apr i 8 is a holiday All
members should consider running for one of
the following offices Secretary. Treasurer,
aman Chanman Elections will take
� ce Tues April? Also on that date we will
lure taken for the Buccaneer
yearbook ana a parliamentary procedure
workshop to test our delegates and Lt.
Governor's Skills Hopefuly Mon April l we
a have the new resolutions The next ic
n be April 12 13 at unc w The ECU ses
By count is 15 and rising UURRR!
PPHA
P'e Profess.onai HealTh Alliance will have a
. urs March 28, at 5 30 in room 221
denhall Studnet Center Our guest
speaker this week will be a vetinary
nedlclne student from NC State All
sers ana interested guests are en
: our aged to attend
ECU Boomerang Club
Kas elated Cliff Scott of Elizabeth City as it's
-iev, president Cliff says the boomerang is
� popu ar In his home town and he hopes
It w - 'ease at ECU Cliff says he
bs a' ECU like the surf ing club
Fee S 'he boomerang club is tor him In
terested persons should call Cliff at 758-410
Concert Photos
The Buc aee Is looking tor concert photos
'�� nave Dlayed in the past year
Espe � -leNCV A area Bnngthemby
the yearbook office (across from Joyner
Sf � and we print them in the 1985 Buc
.aneer with your credit hne Details? Call
�,50l
Mascots
c Department is looking for
a ented and good humored
� ' he position of the Priate
-�86 schooi vear Anyone
�'�ation about this position
' at Minges Coliseum, Thurs ,
30 The responsibilities, excite
Iva 'ages of being involved m
' .5 should oe worth our time to
rst -neeting! See you there!
Circle K
"here
be a mporfant meeting this Sun.
a 7 p m n Menoenhail room 221 All
rs js a tend All new members
are encouraged to come! We will be discuss
r se'vice proiect Don't forget!
Carwash
he Phus cal 'lerapy Club is sponsoring a
II , mi M)g $at from 9 3 at the Hardee's on
Mbypass ar0ss from the Ramada; Bring
i' on out and let us get It squeaky
you'll be glad you did!
PrimeTime
sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
meets every Thors. in Jenkins Aud Art
Bidg at 8 p m Please join us for fun,
'ellowsh.p. and bible study
Housing Available
Rooms available tor Summer School and
Fail We have housing available at the
Methodist Stuaen Center and at Wesley
House for summer school and Fall 1985 Stop
0 the Methodist Student Center for an ap
plicaion or call 758 2030 for more informa
Non
Ulitimax Five
Bofom of College hill. Sat and Sun Come
enjoy the sunshine and watch the ultimate
tournament this weekend See 8 of the finest
teams m the region compete Bring our
cameras for some real action shots Never a
dun moment on the Unfimate fields. Listen
to WZMB for your chance to win a tourna
ment t shirt Special thanks to Natural Light
ancf he Attic for their support See ail fish
ano bison at the bottom of the hill Sat.
Lip Sine contest
Greenhali and The March of Dimes is spon
soring a Lip Sine contest Fri , March 29 at
'he Attic There will be a happy hour from
4 30 7 The contest is from 5 30 6 30 and the
oand Stratus will be playing form a:3 until
7 Admission is 75 so come on out and party
ah proceeds will go to The March of Dimes
CADP
There will be a meeting Thrus , March 28 at 4
p.m in Erwin Hall, room 210 We will also be
taking pictures for the yearbook All
members and interested person please at
tend
Hypnosis
Would you like to be hypnotized? Can you be
hypnotized? Dr Daugherty of the
Psychology department will present his In
teresting and informative discussion of this
tipic, ending with actual hypnosis. The most
talked about presentation on campus will be
Tues April 2 at 7:30 p.m In Sprlght lje
Don't miss It I
Law Society
The ECU Law Society will have it's next
meeting after Easter on Tues Apr 9, at 7
p m in room 241 of Mendenhall. This will be
an important meeting because new officers
will be chosen and end of the semester ac
fivities will be discussed. All members and
those Interested are Invited to come. For
more information, call Mike Gardner
758S472.
Announcements
ECU Marshalls
Applications for Marshalls now being Ac
cepfed in room Ttt Mendenhall Student
Center Must be a Junior at the end of Spring
195 Semester with a 3 0 GPA Last day to file
Is March 28
Med School
We are now accepting applications for the
Ledonla Wright Scholarship Application can
be obtained from any member of
Organlzaton of Black Faculty and staff For
additional Information contact Dr Joyce
Penis at 757 4571 or Res Jacqul Hawkins at
757 2499
Jewish Students
ECU Hlllel and the Jewish Community are
sponsoring a passover seder All are
welcome For more Inforamtlon and or
reservatons please call 754 540
ECU Surfing Club 4 Team
The next meeting will be on Tues . April 2nd
at 8 in the Mendenhall Coffehouse Featured
video Is the 1984 Stubbles Surfing Contest In
California Everyone planning to go on the
Easter trip to Hatteras must attend this
meeting New members can still go on the
trip also ECU Surfing a club for all beach
lovers and a team for competitive surfing
Testing Center
Due to the fact that the ECU Testing Center,
Speight Building, Room 105 will be closed on
April 10, 1985, the MAT regularly scheduled
tor that date will not be administered. Ad
ministration of the MAT will resume on
Wed , April 17 at 2 30 p.m.
Attorney General
The Blue Ribbon selections committee will
be faking applications for the position of At
torney General for the 1985 84 school year
Applications can only be filed between
March 25th ad April 1. To file, go by Dean
Speler's office in 210 Whlchard Building If
there are any questions call 752 5895
GC Humanities Course
Students seeking a unique way to satisfy the
General College Humanities course will be
interested In ASMR 2000 introduclton to
Medieval and Renaissance Studies, to be of
fered Fall Semester 1985 on Mon evenings
from 6 30 to 9 30 This Is an Interdisciplinary
introduciton to the World of Europe from
about 500 to about 1600 The perspectives will
be historical, literary, artistic, musical, and
philosophical The instructor Is Douglas
McMillan of the Department of English who
will be joined by guest lecturers from
various departments and schools across the
campus ASMR 2000 carries three semester
hours of general education humanities
credit
Award To Staff
Residence hall Students and staff are urged
to make nominations for the Reggie Swinson
Service Award for the most outstanding
Head Resident, Programming Assistant, or
Resident Advisor for this year Nomination
forms are In the offices of the Residence
Directors and Residence life Deadline for
making the nominations is April 3
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House Is offering one hour ses
slons to help you prepare your own resume
Many employers request a resume showing
your education and experience Come to
either session to receive handouts and an
overview They will be held In the Career
Planning room of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m. on April i and 9
Squire Club Meeting
There will be a meeting for all Interested
young men who want to be a part of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Squire Club. The
meeting will take place on March 28 at
Mendenhall in the Coffee room at 10 p.m.
AOII
Don't forget the Mr ECU contest this Thurs.
night at T.Ws Door prizes and free beer
Maor prize sponsors are Bordy's,
Budweiser, Coka Cola and Sharp's Formal
Wear
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in developing better
Interviewing skills for use In your job seatch.
A film and discussion of how to interview on
and off campus will be shared. These ses
slons will be held In the Career Planning
room at 3 p.m. on April 3 and It. Seniors are
especially encouraged to attend either of
these sessions.
Blood Drive
ECU Army ROTC will be sponcerlng a blood
drive on Mon , April 1 and 2 from 12 to 6 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center. Give as if
YOUR life depended on Itl
Buddhist Study and
Meditation Group
We will be meeting tonight at 7 In E201 of the
Physics Buidlng Discussion will center on
passages of Tao Te Chlng Please bring a
cushion
Epsilon Pi Tau
EPT will hold It's Spring Initiation banquet
tor new members on Frl April 19 In room
244 Mendenhall and dinner will follow at the
Ramada inn. Initiates must attend In order
to attain membership. Banquet reservations
with USD must be received by April 15.
Spring Plant Sale
The ECU Biology Club will have It's
semesterly plant sale on Tues. April 2 and
Wed , April 3 In the Biology Greenhouse, rm
S"l There will be an excelent selection of
hearty plants mat have been well taken care
of by our Greenhouse expert, Mrs. Ann
Be! i is The sale will begin at 7:30 a.m. so that
we may enable those who work to alto come
by and make their selections before work
hours. The sale will end at l p.m. each day.
Please support the Biology Club by coming
by and purchasing your choice of plants for
your home or office. Plants also make
beautiful and lasting gifts. All lovers of
plants will appreciate mis remerfcabe saiei
Need A Massage?
The Physical Therapy Club Is having the last
massage clink of the year, it will bo held on
the 1st floor Belk B log on Apr 11 2nd from 7-10
p.m. The charge will be S3 for 15 min. You
can by as many minutes as you warn. Come
and enjoy I
Golf Classic
Registration for the I9t5 golf classic begins
April l Don't be a fool come down to room
204 Memorial Gym and swing into the golf
classic Registration ends April 2. For more
Info come by room 204 Memorial Gym or
call 757 637
Aerobic Fitness
Instructors
Tryouts for the 1985 M school year aerobic
fitness Instruction begins April 13 The class
Is required for anyone interested In teaching
for the in Rec Aerobic Fitness Program On
April 13 from 11 1230 In room 108 Memorial
Gym The tryouts will be held For mort in
fo. come by room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757387
Advanced Toning
not recommended for the beginner One full
hour of floor work Tues and Thurs
6'30-7:30. The class belgns April 2 and will
end April is This class Is on a 3 week trial
basis so there Is no charge Come to room 108
Memorial Gym
Support The Ronald
McDonald House
The East Carolina Association of Nursing
students will be collecting donations to raise
money to build the Ronald McDonald house
In Greenvlle for parents to stay who have
terminally III children In the hospital Dona
tlons will be collected Thurs March 28 in the
Nursing Building lobby from 8 a.m. to4 p.m
and Frl , March 29 In front of the Student
Store from 9 a.m. 1 p.m Rattle tickets will
also be sold tor a 195 Isuzu pick up truck
Please come and give generously for this
worthy cause Thank you!
Tryouts for ECU
Women's Volleyball
Tryouts will be held for the ECU Women's
Volleyball team for the Fall 1985 season. In
terested women students should come to
Minges Coliseum March 25 28 at 6 30 pm or
call Imogene Turner at 757 4141.
Summer Camp Jobs
Another location to learn of Summer Camp
Jobs as Counselors, Lifeguards, and Nurses
Is the Career Planning and Placement Of
flee Come In the Bloxton House and look in
the Summer Jobs Notebook and look on the
Summer Camp Board for more Information
Camps from throughout the U S. have an
nouncements there Seafarer, Yellowstone,
Girl Scout Camps, YMCA Camps, Camps in
Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania,
Florida, and more An example of the
estimated 100 and more camps in the 14
boxes is Camp Takaio in Naples,
Maine Apply Now!
Zeta Phi Beta
The sisters of East Carolina's Lambda Mu
Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, will be
sponsoring a minority leadership seminar
along with the Delta Rho Zeta Chapter of
Zeta Phi Beta and the Carrie E Broad foot
Memorial Nurse's Club The date of this
event is Sun , March 31 from 15 All In
terested persons are Invited to attend The
seminar Is being held in the Willis Building
on the corner of First and Reade St
All Campus Table
Tennis Tournament
The Student Union Recreation Committee is
sponsoring a student, staff, and faculty All
Campus Table Tennis Tournament The
Event will be held on Mon , April 1 and
Tues , April 2 at 430 p m at Mendenhall
Registration forms may be picked up and
turned In to the MSC Billiards Center by
Fre .March 29 Trophies will be awarded to
1,2, and 3 places For more Information call
757 4411 ext 239
PrimeTime
if s Prime Time to oln us for our weekly get
together and find out what a good life's all
about! Come on by, won't you? Prime Time
gets going Thurs night at 8 In the
auditorium, Jenkins Art Building
SRA
SRA Semi Formal proofs are inl Order pic
tures In 224 MSC Tues Frl this week only
Tues,Thurs, Frl, 2 5 p.m Wed 2 4 pm
Hurry I
Pirate Walk
The semester Is coming to an end and you
want to start studlng for those finals If you
need an escort to the library, there Is a ser
vice you can call and get someone to walk to
and from anywhere on campus. It's called
Pirate Walk and we'll be glad to escort you
Call this number, 757 44141 Thank you
Student Loan Fund
All National Direct Student Loan Borrowers
are reminded of the exit Interview require
ment upon graduation or those otherwise not
returning to ECU Fall Semester, 1985, as an
undergraduate or graduate student The In
tervlew is necessary to Inform NDSL Reci
pients of the repayment schedule, provisions
for loan concellatlon, and other pertinent in
formation You are requested to report to the
Conference Room 221 of the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center at 5 30 p m on either April 3, or
April 17 If you connot meet on either date.
then, you would want to call 757 4817 for an
appointment
NIH
The National institutes of Health is
recruiting for the Fall, 195 Co op work
period Positions avllable for students in the
following disciplines Biology, Microbiology
Computer Science, Chemistry, Biomedicsl
or Behavioral Sciences Contact the Co op of
flee In Rawl 313 Immediately! Applications
must be In by April 5
ECU Snow shoe
Springbreak Skiers
Don't forget about the bar b q. at Anne s
place March 31 Bring your own we n cook
if B YOB 211 Oak st 4 (Tar River Estates
call 752 4495 if you have any questions or
need directions
Div. of Cont. Education
Non Credit Courses For Personal Develop
ment Ballroom Dancing, April 19, Round
and Texas country Dance. April 19 Sailing
and Cruising Instruction, April 20 Middle
EasternDancing. May 4 Contact Continuing
Education, Erwin Hall Call 757 6143
ECANS
All nursing students interested in becoming
a member of m� East Carolina Ass of Nurs
ing Students are Invited to attend a meeting
this Thurs . 3 28, at 5 p m in room 101 of the
Nursing Building Reminder to all members
to please attend See you there I
Sigma Nu Little Sisters
There will be an airband contest at Beaus on
April 4 To register call 758 2444 Prizes will
be awarded!
All Spring Semester
Graduates
Caps and gowns should be picked up in the
Student Supply Store, Wright Building, Apr.)
2 4 These keepsake gowns are yours to keep
providing the graduation fee has Deen paid
For those receiving the Masters Degree the
fee pays tor your cap and gown, but 'here s
an extra fee of $11 95 for your hood An
nouncements are avllable In the Student Sup
ply Store, Wright Building
SIN
A night that will change the 'est of your te
Coming April nth
ECU Frisbee
Natural Light uitimax v Nrta weekend
Irates practice at 3 bottom of the Hill There
will be a meeting at 9 Tus in MSC the sp�
ing weather is here and anyone interested n
Playing some friz is always welcome
Horizontal bisons
ISA
international Student Assor Sat March x
Mendenhall room 221 4 p m Meeting fo
will be able to get �our money Da' � P a
ing election at ISA Officers held first Sa'
after Easter Dree Please come so rag �
know what s happening
Beta Kappa Alpha
Be m Rawl 101 tor the mee' ng Thu'S i it
Mr Don McGlogor w n spea on Persor
Risk Management Have your psU'S. ,
Questions ready The spr ng bervque' .
discussed An present members and an, one
interested m ,oming s u'ged to attend E
tions are comng jp Witch office a'e �- ,
ing to run tor" Meeting ar 3 see yov 'here
Batter Up!
Registration tor the . p no-e run oe- .
be heic Apr.i 9 11 The compel � ar m
piece on the Lad, p ra'e Scrfte, Fiefe �
cent to the Baset � - 101 for the a
April 18 For -or. Info ecu 757 4.M7 m
by room 204 Memo a Gym B' ng ,r .
pitcher
Larry Linville
Due to the recen' sign.ng of a m - -
tract, me Larr, l mr 'e F-a� Burns
ture has been cancelled for Ap 14 r -
be rescheduled �or the f a
Stu
An EC I
charged
and larcen
vestigation of
puicr equipmj
Biology B
March 18
Winston Dot
Aycock dorm
Public Sa
March 22 App
worth of
was recovered
Walker
sentence
and a ma
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Each of tnese advertisea items
is required to oe readily
available for sale in eacn xroger
Sav on except as specifically
noted m tms ad if we do run
out of an item we wmi off�r you
your moice of a comparable
item when available reflecting
the same savings or a raincnec
whim win entitle you to pur
cnase tne
the adverti
days Only
win be acci
GO KROGERING FOR A HUGE SELECTION
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�cV







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28. 1985
ISA
I �mx Sat March 30
"a - p m Meeting you
able ' ev Back Plann
jr N , er� held first Sat.
i�te' C�ea� Pieaie come �o you will
" � -i aer v
Betd Kappa Alpha
, 'i Tieef'ng Thurs 3H
peafc cm Personal
�ve �ocr insurance
-eao. ' �� spr ng oanquet will be
� -lembers ana any one
pad 'o attend Elec
- yd f a.c �OU go
5 Meeting at 3 see you there
Batter Up!
- B -c run derby will
np�1 Hon iii take
,v � ?id adla
�ie action
' 637 or come
B "8 your own
L nvflle
. H a movie con
- Frank Burns) lee
'6 but will
Student Charged In $6,000 Computer Theft
An ECU student has been
charged with breaking, entering
and larceny as a result of an in-
vestigation of a larceny of com-
puter equipment from the
Biology Building reported on
March 18.
Winston Douglas Walker
Aycock dorm was arrested
Public Safety investigators
March 22. Approximately $6,000
worth of computer equipment
was recovered.
Walker faces a maximum
sentence of ten years in prison
and a maximum fine of $5,000.
of
by
on
Incidents reported to the
Department of Public Safety for
March 20-27 were:
March 20, 8:05 a.m. � A
break-in and larceny of computer
equipment was reported in the
Rawl Annex. 10a.m. � Approx-
imately $500 was reported stolen
from a room on the fourth floor
of Aycock dorm. 11:20a.m. � A
bicycle was reported stolen from
the east side of Tyler dorm.
March 21, 11 p.m. � A resi-
dent of Fletcher dorm reported
that her automatic teller card had
been used fraudulently at
Mendenhali Student Center.
March 22, 11 a.m. � A resi-
dent of Aycock dorm reported
receiving harassing phone calls.
11:35 p.m. � Dennis James
Tripp of Greenville was arrested
for trespassing in White dorm.
March 23, 5:05 p.m. � A resi-
dent of Jarvis dorm reported that
a check belonging to him had
been stolen from the mail and
forged.
March 24, 8:42 a.m. � A
break-in of a locker was reported
at Jenkins Fine Arts Building.
2:07 p.m. � A car cover was
ACROSS
1 Headgear: pi
5 Time gone by
8 Oriental nurse
12 Ox of Celebes
13 Food fish
14 Repulsive
15 Retreat
17 Rubber on
pencil
19 Vapid
20 Chemical
compound
21 Former Russian
ruler
23 Surfeit
24 Couple
26 Part of flower
28 Tier
31 Third person
32 Female: colloq
33 Pronoun
34 Sched abbr.
36 Tag
38 Ancient
39 Walk unsteadily
4 1 Scorch
43 Look fixedly
45 Warn
48 Kettledrums
50 Heavy
hobnailed
shoe
Is ill
Bother
Sharpen
Merriment
Trifle
Emmets
DOWN
Vehicles
Dillseed
Vegetable
51
52
54
55
56
57
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
4 Goes by water
5 High card
6 Proceed
7 Poem
8 Nautical: cease!

� �" 1985 "
Sav on
�y eights Reserved
sold To Dealers �
� It
f
OCERIES
OF 13 TRIPS
9 Title of respect
10 Toward shelter
11 German title
16 Harvest
18 Actual
22 Royal
23 Transactions
24 Article
25 Damp
27 Flap
29 Night bird
30 Marry
35 Fit for plowing
36 Condescending
look
37 Shakespearian
king
38 "The Beaver
State "
40 Worn away
42 Hawaiian
greeting
43 Antlered animal
44 Caudal
appendage
46 Stunted person
47 Golf mounds
49 Posed for
portrait
50 Lad
53 Fulfill
.5 in the con-
Canada, Mexico
s or Caribbean
SH! I
RIBBEAN CRUISE!
3. OR MORE
ICAN SALSA OR
ho Cheese
� 1984 United Feature Syndicate
$299
ne 16-Oz. Bag
JNacho Chips
f

cREShlv MADE
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Strawberry
Pie
$
349
I
ASSORTED VARIETY
FROZEN
Jeno's
Pizza
99
IDOUBLE
MFCS
OUPONS
WEEK WE WILL DOUBLE 5
S (UP TO 50 FACE VALUE)
EVERY $10 PURCHASE!
see details m-store
l
�� - THE SPA $,
Shape Up For Spring!
SPECIAL STUDENT OFFER
Monthly Term Membership
No Contracts!
No Initiation Fee!
LIMITED TIME ONLY!
� Enjoy Our Recently Renovated Coed Facilities, Including:
�Two Weight Rooms with Dynacam Machines & Free Weights
� Aerobics Classes at 6:30 am, 10:00, 12 noon, 3:00 & 4:00
� Wet Area with Whirlpool, Steam Room & Sauna
votfet
S?
,c
Southpark Shopping Center
(Next To Food Lion)
756-7991
$9
L
reported stolen from a vehicle
parked on College Hill Drive.
March 25, 11:50 a.m. � A
bicycle was reported stolen from
the west side of Jones dorm. 3:30
p.m. � A bicycle was reported
stolen from the north side of
Tyler dorm. 3:40p.m. � A male
student reported being assaulted
by three males on the north side
of Greene dorm on Sunday,
March 24. 8 p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the west
end of Belk dorm.
March 26, 1:30 p.m. � Several
record albums and singles were
Puzzle Answer
reported stolen from WZMB.
4:16 p.m. � A small amount of
money was reported stolen from
an office in the Flanagan
Building. 5:40 p.m. � Bobby
Ray McLemore of Slay dorm was
arrested for a stop sign violation
and DWI.
Funeral Services For Erskine Evans, the ECU
sprinter who died Sunday, will be held today at
3 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhali Student
Center.
,ime
Out
Greenville N
Chicken
Biscuits
OPEN 24 HOURS
� 758-2098
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
Mon. STEAK 'N CHEESE
FRENCH FRIES
Happy
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James
Rankins
$1.89
Tues. CHICKEN
& FRENCH FRIES
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& FRENCH FRIES
$ 1.89
$1.89
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Come By 6 Try The Best
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Located Corner Of 10th & Cotanche Streets
Offering The Best Food On The Corned
5
ULTIMATE FRISBEE TOURNAMENT
All Day Saturday and Sunday
Bottom of College Hill
Come by the Hill Saturday and Sunday to watch eight of
the finest Ultimate teams in the region compete in their
favorite Frisbee team sport. We enjoy spectators. Fish
and Bison compete horizontally!
SPOrVSMZD BY
tnwfc�iwXM
1 m� 'vNwr �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28, 1985
�I?c Eaat (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. �rrrfmi
ClREG RlDEOL'T. Managing Idilor
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK, v � TOM LUVENDER. ��,�,�,
Scott Cooper. , span, �� Anthony Martin, bus, �anage,
Tina Marosc hak. ��, JoHn Peterson, c i
Bu i Mitcheli � w, bill Dawson. �anager
Doris Raskins. RlCK Mccormac. c
Danii i Mai rer, c �, DeChanile Johnson. m no
March 28, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
MX Vote
Money Down The Drain
The House of Representatives
voted Tuesday to authorize spen-
ding SI.5 billion for 21 more MX
missiles, signaling to Americans
that once again the defense of our
nation is not the primary reason
for building weapons. What the
House did, along with the Senate
before it, is give the go-ahead for
President Reagan to waste billions
and billions of dollars on useless
missiles while the deficit continues
to spiral out of control.
Obviously, the strong-arm tac-
tics used by the White House have
paid off. the 219-213 vote came
out in the president's favor largely
because of last-minute arm ben-
ding by Reagan. The president
probably promised more than a
few representatives a little
something special for their
districts. And, by flying back arms
negotiator Max Kampelman from
Geneva to do a little politicking,
Reagan grabbed a six-vote victory.
The main argument used in the
last few days was the MX, or
peacekeeper as Reagan lovingly
calls it, is needed as a bargaining
chip. Whew, there is definitely
nothing more ludicrous than using
a nuclear weapon capable of kill-
ing hundreds of millions of people
as a poker stake. And, as some
lawmakers in Washington pointed
out, the situation is probably the
opposite. The Geneva arms talks
are probably being used as a
bargaining chip for the administra-
tion to get the MX missile.
Well, apparently, enough sensi-
ble people went along with the
president's logic to approve the
missile But, what good is this
billion-dollar baby? Not much.
The $1.5 billion price-tag
doesn't include the tab to harden
the silos that the missiles will sit in.
In fact, there is considerable
evidence that the MX could never
be made invulnerable, thereby los-
ing its value as a weapon. In fact, a
Soviet strike could take all the
missiles out in a few minutes. So,
in effect, the darn thing is useless
� oh, except as a "bargaining
chip
Our folly, really, is academic.
The vote is cast. But, because of
the vote to build more MXs are we
any safer? Would the Soviets have
packed their bags if Kampelman
came back without the MX?
The answer to both these ques-
tions is no. The Soviets have their
own reasons for negotiating. They
are there because their interests
dictate that they be there. Not
building the MX would, maybe,
have signaled to them that it's time
to stop escalating the arms race.
But, no.
And, of course, we aren't any
safer. Our retaliatory capability in
a nuclear war is the same that it
was before the new money for
more MXs was awarded. In fact,
the only thing we can be assured of
now is more debt.
The catastrophic effects of a
nuclear war for the planet are all
very well-known. The repeating of
them isn't necessary. Yet, hopeful-
ly, this is the high-water mark for
the die-hard missile, like some con-
gressmen have indicated. The
bargaining chip has been won, let's
hope that's all it's used for.
NO 0N5 TOOK US LEPRECHAUNS SERKXJSW UN776 W&OT
SMARTANP FORMEPA POUTICfii fipnON COMMIE
Hey, Jesse
Press Left, But Unbiased
One of the funniest comic strips I've
seen blasted our beloved Sen. Helms.
Recently, the Bloom Beacon, the
newspaper in "Bloom County was
under seige from a wall-scaling Jesse.
The editor waited by the window,
sword unsheathed, trying desperately to
preserve the Beacon's left-wing biases.
The strip, of course, is a jocular swipe
at Helms' attempt to takeover CBS.
But, Berk Breathed does raise some im-
portant questions.
Viewpoint
GREG RIDEOUT
No Baseball
The decision by an athletic
department official to remove
Pama Mitchell, the faculty advisor
of WZMB, from the broadcast of
Pirate baseball games just because
she is not a student is wrong. And,
WZMB General Manager Susan
Duncan is right in canceling the
broadcasts because of Mitchell's
removal.
First off we must say that we
recognize the right of the athletic
department to regulate who broad-
casts any Pirate athletic contest,
but the reason stated by Lee
Workman of athletics is not suffi-
cient. If the department was
displeased by Mitchell's perfor-
mance, which members of WZMB
say it was, then that is a legitimate
reason for her removal. But,
Workman denied this and thus
took the easy way out in removing
Mitchell.
Workman told WZMB that he
and the athletic department want
students involved in the broad-
casting of the games. All total, five
were supposed to be beamed over
the airwaves to WZMB listeners.
With five games, many students
would have been working to bring
the games to ECU listeners. There
are technicians and support staff,
all getting a chance to learn
valuable skills in broadcasting live
events.
The reason, then, is shoddy at
best. In fact, it seems a cop-out.
General Manager Duncan was
right to react adversely to it.
The athletic department should
consider giving a better reason for
halting the broadcasts, and, if a
better reason is given, it should try
to work out a compromise and get
the games back on the air. No one
else wants to do the games; after
all, baseball is not a sought-after
sport by broadcasters in the area.
So, if professionals can do
Pirate football and basketball
games, why can't an advisor to
WZMB do Pirate baseball games.
If the next advisor to WZMB were
Vin Scully, would the higher-ups at
Minges and Scales feel the same?
We doubt it.
Jesse Helms' reason for taking over
CBS is that the network, in particular
the evening news with Dan Rather, is
biased towards liberal views. His con-
demnations are not without validity,
but his explanations for press liberalism
are wrong. In fact, the studies he cites
in his diatribes against the press don't
use the word "bias They term stories
"negative for" or "negative against" a
candidate or issue, even if it's true.
I will be the first to admit that the
working press at most newspapers
espouse liberal views. Studies show that
85 percent of major media stars (print
and broadcast) consistently vote for the
Democratic presidential candidate.
And, yes, their liberalism sneaks into
their story judgement, but as conser-
vative columnist James J. Kilpatrick
says, nine stories out of 10 a conser-
vative and liberal editor would agree
on. And even though the 10th story is
different, Kilpatrick believes that is
what freedom of the press is all about.
One theory why the press is liberal
(and this could account for liberalism in
academia, too) is that journalists are
paid diddley-squat. Most people who
wish to make money are more
Republican in their views. People who
go into journalism don't do it for the
money because there isn't any. I would
venture that almost every junior
businessman in Rawl voted for Reagan
and calls himself Republican. Until you
reach the top in journalism, you don't
make any money, and by the time you
do, you are set in your ways.
But, Jesse, just because the press
votes Democratic doesn't mean it pur-
posefully distorts the news, and just
because President Reagan had more
bad press than Walter Mondale during
the campaign, shouldn't lead to conclu-
sions that the press is liberal. In fact,
the stats from years past show that the
press is always harder on the incumbent
because a sitting president provides
more copy by virtue of his position.
And, Jesse, the studies you cite in-
clude anything which is negative �
even if it is true � as a piece of "bad
press Scientifically, you have no
ground to stand on. A lot of Reagan's
bad press, one study shows, came from
Beirut. Now surely the bombing of the
Marine bases in Lebanon were
legitimate news stories, but they were't
very helpful to the president. This is
scientific "bad press
Almost all evidence points to two
conclusions about the press in America
today: Yes, its members are liberal
And no, the liberalism does no:
substantially affect the way the nev is
portrayed. Sure, there are exceptions,
but exceptions aren't the rule.
Jesse, news by nature is bad. Houses
burning, people dying, buildings ex-
ploding. You helping a lady get her
Social Security check is not news. You
voting against (or for) Social Securit)
reductions are. The press is a watchdog
on government; by design, an instru-
ment to find fault and bad tidings. It is
important to remember that the greatest
of our Founding Fathers. Thomas Jef-
ferson, chose to place the press higher
than government. He knew that even
the best men have weaknesses, and
when these men serve in government.
they must be watched � you included.
The Firsl A.metdmeti dictate. �xi
we can all say what we please. That in-
cludes you. In fact, if you could get
your hands on CBS. you could do what
you want with impugmty. for the First
Amendment does not require objectivi-
ty. The people who do require objectivi-
ty are your fellow Americans, who wish
to be informed so as to participate in
their democracy. They want no stifling
of bad news, news you call unpatriotic.
No, they want it straight from the hip.
And that's what CBS does.
I hope as you are scaling the Bloom
Beacon's walls a bolt of lighting hits
you, making you realize you're just
dead wrong. The press is not out to get
you or America; it's out to save it.
U.S. Buys Slave Goods
Ww
BWM.
PQ!
BEST ACTOR
NON-SUPPORTING
PLACES INTHE
HEARTLESS
HJa
JLi.
r- ft
1&L
By PAUL D. K AMEN AR
Should the United States import
goods from the Soviet Union made by
slave or convict labor? Should the
American consumer be forced to sub-
sidize the Soviet Union's use of slave
labor? Should American companies
and workers be forced to compete with
slave-made goods?
The answers to these questions ob-
viously are no. Indeed. Section 307 of
the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act prohibits
the importation of such goods into the
United States. Unfortunately, however,
the law is not being enforced against the
Soviet Union despite the overwhelming
evidence of the use of forced labor by
the Soviets.
In order to compel the enforcement
of this law, 84 members of Congress,
both Republicans and Democrats,
represented by lawyers for the
Washington Legal Foundation, a
Washington-based public interest law
center, recently Filed a formal legal peti-
tion with the U.S. Customs Service to
prohibit the importation of slave-made
goods into the United States from the
Soviet Union.
Soviet goods that have been iden-
tified by the Central Intelligence Agen-
cy as being made by slave labor include
lumber, plywood, automotive parts,
parts for agricultural machinery,
potash and urea for fertilizers,
limestone, construction stone and
gravel, clothing, gold, iron, petroleum
products and chemicals. American con-
sumers in just the past few years have
unknowingly purchased over $250
million worth of these goods.
The Soviet Union has the world's
largest system of forced labor � some
four million Soviet citizens in some
1,300 camps. Soviet forced laborers in-
clude thousands of men, women and
children whose only crime was to at-
tempt to exercise basic human rights
such as freedom of speech, assembly
and religion.
The conditions of the Soviet's prison
camps make life on death row in the
United States seem like paradise. At
congressional hearings on this issue,
former Soviet political prisoner Georgy
Davydov described in graphic detail the
brutal prison camp conditions and said
that many prisoners are driven to com-
mit suicide.
Despite these clear violations of inter-
national law and basic human rights,
while many Americans are out of work,
we are importing products made by
slave labor � products that are also
manufactured in the United States by
U.S. companies.
Several congressional resolutions
have passed overwhelmingly by both
Republicans and Democrats calling for
the enforcement of the law against im-
porting goods made by slave labor.
Thus far, they have not resulted in
any final action, although the commis-
sioner of customs has made a
preliminary finding and admission last
year that some three dozen products im-
ported from the Soviet Union are made
by slave labor.
It is difficult to understand, then,
why the Customs Service refuses to en-
force this law. It appears that officials
in the State Department and Commerce
Department do not want to take any ac-
tion against the Soviets that might of-
fend them and cause trade retaliation.
Their concerns are unfounded and un-
justified.
In the first place, the Soviets need our
wheat � which they cannot produce in
sufficient quantities � more than we
need their slave-made products
Secondly, the Soviets will act against
the United States if it is in their interest
regardless of what we do. Last year, the
United States barred the importation of
nickel from the Soviet Union when it
was learned that the nickel from the
Soviet Union was originally from Cuba.
a country with which we may not trade
directly or indirectly. The Soviets kept
buying our wheat despite our detection
of their violation of our trade laws.
Finally, the fact remains that we have
both a moral and legal duty to refrain
from subsidizing such forced labor.
Gorbachev
The American government's lack of
responsiveness to this challenge has
long-term implications in the worldwide
fight for human rights.
(The above is a substitute submitted
by Mr. Dennis Kilcoyne for his "The
Right Word" column. The author, Mr
Kamenar, is director of litigation fo
the Washington Legal Foundation.)
I
Lac
(CPS) � Orgj
opposition to the
in federal financu
. will fall well short
tionwide mobili;
similar cuts in pr
last week's first pi
curate indication
National Studer
organized by the
Association, al
estimated 1,000
Washington, D C
about one-fourth
nout.
Student lea
-whether the I
curate gauge of
USSA, whicl
the massive protest
posefully dec
emphasize mass i
in favor of person-
bying, says I I
Director Katrn I
"Whether it
a rally or five
students talking I
in their offices,
that the congres!
response from si
says
Resided
Position
Continued
each office unc I
cant offices of via
secretary will be fi
either bv elec
ment.
Election n
Dorm were not av
wTiting. Green. W
ing Dorms had m
for office, and
these elections wou
in the spring
Area Council r
follows:
Central Cam: I
Thomas Denton. vi
vacant; secret ar
Bizzel; treasurer.
College Hill; pr
Johnson; vice
IF �
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ide
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N
iorbache
- crnmcnt '� lack of
- challenge has
- in the worldwide
lan rights
u a substitute submitted
is Kilcoyne for his "The
u mn The author, Mr.
: rector oj litigation for
egai Foundation.)
Lack Of Support Diminishes Aid's Future
(CPS) Organized student
opposition to the proposed cuts
in federal financial aid this ear
will tall well short of the huge na
tionwide mobilization against
similat cuts in previous years, if
week's first protest is an ac
curate indication
ionaJ Student I obb Day ,
red by the is Student
Association, attracted an
mated 1,000 students to
Washington. D C on March 18,
out one-fourth the 1982 tur
dent leaders disagree
whether the turnout was an ac
ol student opinion
SSA, which helped organize
the massive protests of 1982. pur
pose fully decided to de-
emphasize mass rallies this year
�: oi person to person lob
is USSA 1 egislat
Kathv Ozer
�Whether it's 5,000student
i l or five well-infom
i . gressmen
he fl ces, what counts
ngressmen have
" �m studeri
'They're getting that
response she adds
But Jeff Pandin, deputy direc
tor of the College Republicans,
sas the protest isn't there
because students aie more willing
to accept cuts this year
"We haven't seen anv kind of
a revolt from out members as a
result ot these proposed cuts
Pandin savs
'This is the kind of thing
students ev pet. ted Ad
ministrators and faculty members
are up in arms, but students
realize thev will have to make a
contribu the defl
he savs
It w � � .
anv vhether
President Reagan's support
am' � ge students (he won
59 percent among
those betv� - 24 in 1
post

In '
itei
mark oi student lobbyii .
lent kiovcrnment
i 5
Residence Officers Elected;
Positions Still Remain Open
Continued from Pajje 1
e uncontested. The a
ice president and
retary will be filled next sear,
election or appoint-
n Fletcher
vvere not available at this
reen. White and Flem
s had no one running
ind Valenquez said
se elections would also be held
m the spring.

�- . presidei
nas Demon; vice president,
secretary, Mary Dale
rer, Da
resident, Ke
resident, Mack
Jones, secretary, Chris d-

Wesl Mr f it, Shetrv
Ba t c h e 1 o r, vice president;
secretary, Betsv Buell; treasure.
Ellen Vat
Presid
iiows .
Belk. Marcie Gret
Clement, Tamnn la
ten, Denise Johnson, Mem
Judy Jameson. Creerv. nille
Barden; K as'
Debra
Rr i Bro
� 1 McGehee
The last meet -
will �� v � Gembi
stressed that all men
beca the m
. JRA m �
issued declarations oi rhetori
and electoral war thai yeai I here
were rallies on scores oi cam
puses nationwide, complete with
lettei writing campaigns and pen
tions.
I he combined efforts
USSA, several congressmen and
an administrators' group called
the Actionommittee foi k
Education managed to at 11
7,000 students to Washington I
mass lobbying against the cuts
Ihev were successful, gene
defeating administration efl
to cut back student financial
eac I
But b
opposition lea I
hardei i
students the threa
real
1 i
expected

dei budget
proving Preside)
This
limiting studt
$4,00
dents from

getting anv
program
when the Sei -
tinue funding
"It's a lit! �
Conj
educ ation looked w ith a )
.�� i in lobb: .
akin in marketing and advertis
ing, whi h thev didn'1 thinl
should be involved in a B
Aaron, former public
r for the Amerii
; on
st without
ig essmen
roposed
! too extreme -
ity stafl
the h
higher
-
� en pla
-
,
NOW ENJOY
A DELICIOUS
SUBWAY
GRAND OPENING
Friday, March 29th
For The Man Who Wants To Dram To I mprets
20 Of Entire Purchase
Stop In And Check Us Out
We Have Got It All
ThoPtoio Mkhm 355-5222
AT HOME
20H t ' it;h St
CALL
'THE JOKES ON US'
757-1973
r
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Kv
kGSTON
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� �
KINGS'I ON
PLACE
AT KINGSTON PLACE you will find a great studs environment ,iv well as ih best
student life atmosphere available More than 100 students presently love living at
(ireenvtlle's only student orientated condominium village!
FV'KRY UNIT is total electric, total comfort, and total tun' Wh hassle vc ith older
places, high utility bills, congested areas, arid incompatible neighbors' V(can
move in today . . rents start nearly as low as dormitory rates'
We are also now taking reservations for summer sessions (limited space available).
C all our rental office today for an appointment to see the ultimate in student housing
at ECU.
For More Information on Purchase or Rental CAM tdllH I or S I1 H N( tt '
TELEPHONE (919) 757-1971
Kingston Place � PO Rox 2579 � 2820 b Tenth st � Greenville N . - X
4 t
-1 ?








T 'S FOR YO VI
Movit I tu Vdventures of Buckaroo Banzai"
� p.m. MS(
Recreation: tl Campus Fable Tennis
I ournament
Bi Center MSC
Minority rts: Marilyn I hompson, soprano
i Hendi
Mo He Miht Hear V'ou"
n. MSC
Recreation: Bino Ice (ream
n. MSC
nation: Video Games Contest
Dunn operating hours Mm
Chamber Festival: Composers String Quartet
H� p.m. Hendrix
Sponson
March 28, 29, 30
March 29
April 2
April 3
April 9
April 9-10
April 10
Ihe Student Union
plus:
�?oc
ov
tva�
WL
TRINIDAD
TRIPOLI STEEL BAND
CHI�M4N QF
THE 8OAR0
JIM hi
CHIE AND BE JAE FLEMING
y Ho��o p





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 28, 1985
Corporations May Donate More Money
Colleges Changing Course Outlines
(CPS) � Some colleges actual-
ly may be weighting their course
offerings towards math and
science to lure larger corporate
contributions, according to a new
study by a Boston investment
firm.
"For many universities and
colleges, selling their programs to
corporations and other philan-
thropic agencies and individuals
is key to economic viability
says the Franklin Research and
Development Corporation study.
"But the desire to create
greater corporate (contributions)
can change a school's policies
and practices the report warns.
Many schools are becoming in-
creasingly dependent on financial
support from the private sector
because the public sector � the
federal and state governments �
are giving less aid to colleges.
Corporate contributions to
education � the highest category
of corporate giving � reached an
estimated $1.29 billion last year,
up 3.2 percent from the previous
year.
But while contributions in-
crease, the report points out,
"the diversification of support
may narrow" as corporations
"seek greater control over
universities in order to access the
best minds and technology for
their own corporate goals
And with the high demand for
scientists, engineers and com-
puter experts, more corporate
support goes into high tech areas
and less into liberal arts pro-
grams.
Already, the report says, there
is evidence that arts and
humanities courses are suffering
as colleges rush to create new
math, science, and engineering
courses to attract corporate
givers.
But others disagree with the
study's warnings. "It is true that
business and industry tend to
make grants in areas that are of
interest to them acknowledges
Arthur Kammerman with the
Council for Financial Aid to
Education.
"And since corporations in-
volved in manufacturing and
energy are the largest givers, they
are naturally going to give more
money to improve things in their
interest areas like enginering and
science Kammerman says.
But such support hardly means
corporations can control college
course offerings, he argues.
For one thing, Kammerman
says, nearly 40 percent of cor-
porate contributions are
"unrestricted gifts" that can be
applied to virtually any discipline
or department.
In addition, "only 1.3 percent
of higher education's needs are
met by corporation contribu-
tions he adds. "And if that
means colleges are controlled by
corporations, it's a classic case of
the tail wagging the dog, which
just isn't true
Corporations support science
and engineering departments
because they want their techni-
cians trained on the latest and
best equipment, he asserts and
because they want some students
to stay in the field as teachers.
Besides, Kammerman adds
every dollar of corporate sup-
port, even if it is designated for a
high tech discipline, "means the
school has that much more
money left for humanities and
non-technical courses
Still, the Boston report advises
"the extent to which corporate
donations have strings attached
to their gifts may actually limit
the diversity of thought" on
some campuses, and schools
should guard against tailoring
courses strictly to draw addi-
tional corporate support.
May A void PMS
Each month, one out of every
three women suffer from a vary-
ing group of symptoms related to
their menstrual period known as
Premenstrual Syndrome. These
symptoms include, but are not
limited to: mood swings, ir-
ritability, depression, fluid reten-
tion, breast tenderness,
headaches, food cravings and
fatigue. Women may experience
these symptoms 1-2 days before
their period or for as long as two
weeks from mid cycle until the
day their pericd starts.
Causes of PMS are unknown,
but may be related to the hor-
mones that cause menstruation
and may appear as early as
puberty or as late as menopause.
PMS seems to begin following a
shock to the endocrine system,
such as menstruation, childbirth,
going on or off birth control pills
or other major life stress.
Most causes of PMS can be
treated by simple measures you
may implement yourself before
seeking medical assistance. Daily
vigorous exercise such as
aerobics, running, swimming or
brisk walking helps to increase
circulation and decrease stress.
Be sure to get 7-8 hours sleep
each night. Eat six small meals a
day instead of three regular meals
to help maintain an even blood
sugar level. It is important to at-
tain or maintain your ideal body
weight. Your diet should include
45 grams of protein daily as well
as foods high in Vitamin B6
(corn, wheat, unsalted sunflower
seeds, peanuts, yeast and liver)
and magnesium (whole grains,
dried beans and seafood).
Fluid retention (swelling) can
be reduced by using a natural
diuretic (one lemon in a glass of
water daily) as well as avoiding
salty foods, especially fast foods
and canned foods. Carbonated
beverages contain sodium and
should be restricted to 1 per day.
Sugar, caffeine and alcohol can
increase irritability. Fruits are
good for snacking, especially
bananas and oranges. It is equal-
ly important to allow some time
for yourself to relax and do
things that are fun for you.
None of these things are easy
for a college student to fit into
her life style, but it can be done
and it may make a difference in
the way you feel each month.
If you have any questions oi
need additional information
about PMS, talk with a health
care provider at the Student
Health Services.
Date Set For UNC President Hearing
ECU News Bureau
The search committee charged
with finding a new president of
the University of North Carolina
will hold a public hearing on the
campus of ECU on Tuesday,
April 16 at 7:30 p.m. The meeting
will be in the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center auditorium.
This meeting is part of a series
of hearings that the search com-
mittee and its advisory committee
will conduct on various campuses
across the state. They are design-
ed to give the citizenry of North
Carolina "particularly those who
have a special interest in the
University � an opportunity to
say where they think the
statewide University should go in
the years ahead and what kind of
leadership should be sought for
those years according to Philip
G. Carson of Asheville, chairman
of the UNC Board of Governors
and chairman of the search com-
mittee, and George M. Wood of
Camden, chairman of the ad-
visory committee.
"Everyone who is interested is
cordially invited to the meeting in
Greenville Carson and Wood
said.
Persons wishing to speak at the
meeting are requested to call the
Office of the Chancellor at ECU
by Friday, April 12. The exact
amount of time to be allowed
each speaker will depend upon
the number of persons who re-
quest to be heard.
RIVER BLUFF
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Monday Thru Thursday
5-9
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We Buv Gold & Silver
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Free Concert
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Friday March 29
Doors Open At 8:00
Concert At 9:00

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SAT.
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ROTC SPECIAL
uiinncR of
AC AD! fTlY AWARDS!
Including Best Picture � Director
and Best Actor

:
GREA1
.fvik:
H MAJOR
.VIIIKYDIKNT'
IWEAhTS
aoiMHir
"SIMlTIoiS'
iHpJi.UNir
1'iiisu.Airs
BKSTFILM"
I HEAtDtsS�
c �-��
OAXl
Weekdays at 3:00 & 7:30 only.
Sot. & Sun. at 2:00 & 7:30 only.
Weekdays 3:00 - 7:10 - 9:00
Sat. & Sun. 2:00 - 3:50 - 7:10 - 9:00
Starts
Tomorrow!
A love story about two of America's
favorite pastimes.
STEWART
tt EVERETT
THEATRES
t
Johnson has ma
Soa
(UPI) � Thorn
lot of time watchii
� but not just to
Jill will spill her sea
Brooke will final
together.
Skill, a Universal
assistant professor
tioo am, was
academics to tal
seriously, researci
serials treated
women, the elder!
jects.
"We're also intel
the audience thii I
the programs and
loyal, because the
ting some kind 1
participating Skf
think it's because
Jagge
Who'
� � i
Albums u
Somehow. M
and record
Mick Jagger has
album, She's 77i
roll is host to a
Jeff Beck, Nile
Hancock, and (I
albums upbeat
Boss is not a SI
than two decade
can expect that
ger's LP. He 1
voice behind the I
ference, between
You can make q
unique Jagger sc
same slurred voij
Jagger's lyrics
six of the nine sc
songs. He co-wrij
Richards and tw;
known for his wi
"Lonely at th
Richards. It's a
song that gets u
nodding. The so
it. Michael Sa
J agger's powerf f
Mick sounds
"Atlantic City I
to win it back,
pistol to my
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:
THE EAST CAROI IN1AN
Entertainment
MARCH 28. 1985
Fdgc
'Miami Vice' Star Prepares For Film Role
From 'Miami' To Vietnam
�Br
Johnson has made it big in TV, but how will he fare in film?
By JAY & ELLIOT KRAVETZ
lalcrastioaal Photo Newi
From 1968 to 1972, the United
States fought the most
destructive phase of the Vietnam
War. While radicals protested the
War, the men and women who
returned to the United States
were treated as criminals.
Nobody cared about the inner
feelings these soldiers suffered
from.
Since the end of the Vietnam
War, Hollywood has degraded
the Vietnam Veteran by portray-
ing him as the savage hit man
with a total lack of moral
character. Now, Cease Fire, a
film which tells the true story of
how the Vietnam veteran strug-
gles with the ghosts of his past, is
set for release.
"I spent the better part of three
months at the Veteran's center in
California Don Johnson, who
plays the lead role of Tim Mur-
phy, told us during a recent inter-
view at a ceremony sponsored by
the Vietnam Veterans of
America. "I read every book
known to mankind written of
Vietnam, from dispatches to
Private Garwood's book about
being a Vietnam War prisoner for
13 years.
"I read everything that was in
print the star of the hit NBC-
TV series "Miami Vice" con-
tinued. "In fact, I was so involv-
ed in the research I started wak-
ing up having combat dreams.
My lady, Patti D'Arvanville, at
one point started getting very ner-
vous about my doing this role
because I would wake up in the
middle of the night in a cold
sweat and I would be talking
about combat things because I
was so involved in the project.
"I felt that was the only way
that 1 could possibly do justice to
the heavy demands of this role,
Johnson added.
Cease Fire is so realistic that
before it's released to the general
public, it is being used as a train-
ing film for doctors and nurses
who are working with real Viet-
nam veterans. Johnson's role in
the movie prompted the Vietnam
Veterans of America to make him
an honorary Vietnam veteran,
their highest and rarest honor.
"I was moved by the project to
the point that I realized that, like
so many other Americans, I had
not understood or 1 was ignorant
to the plight of the returning
Vietnam War vet Johnson ex-
plained. "In so many cases in this
country what was done to the
Vietnam War vet was criminal.
"They came back to this coun-
try having given their lives, wat-
ching their buddies killed, seen
atrocities that no man should
ever have to see, and were treated
as if they were the enemy he
continued. "When I realized this
I said, 'This is a film that has to
be made. It's a film that has to be
made and has to be seen. I still
feel that way
Johnson was born in Wichita,
Kansas and has been acting pro-
fessionally for 16 years. In 1967,
at the age of 16, he was one of
eight midwest students chosen for
the University of Kansas Summer
Repertory Company.
He went on to join the
American Conservatory Theatre
in San Francisco. He is a veteran
of eight feature films including
The Harrad Experiment, The
Magic Garden of Stanley
Sweetheart and A Boy and His
Dog, 17 made-for-TV movies in-
cluding "Beulah Land" and
"First You Cry and many
guest-star television appearances.
He arrived in Miami, Florida
in early 1984 for the production
of Cease Fire. While there, he
was taped for the staring role of
Sonny Crockett in the NBC
TV Universal series "Miami
Vice Johnson believed in Cease
Fire passionately.
"My character, Tim Murphy.
has been ba.k for 12 eai s
has a family not
plained "iic has
children and the gi , thai h�
in love v,ith when he was in
nam He's married he:
they've started a fan
a sudden he lo vl
a vei nmon thing i
Vietnam vets.
"He starts having PTSD, F
1 raumatic Stres . isordei
he starts having vivid anil
tional flashbat k
and some oi the ati
his case, one pat ticulai inc .
that happened in
him he
"It is buried so d
of the events and ii
happen to the . men
fought in Vietnari
"They bur then
they're so unreal,
that thej can't relate to thet
you put them in a place that tl
don't have I I
David Nutl
screenplay h G ge Fen
predicts the fil
rating be a use ' gra
violence and
with Don Joht
stars L is a
a Gentleman), Rol . i
(Death Wish i! 4 � . In
and ku hai . (
Soap Opera Research Still Young, Gro wing
(UPI) � Thomas Skill spends a
lot of time watching soap operas
� but not just to learn whether
Jill will spill her secret or Tom and
Brooke will finally get back
together.
Skill, a University of Dayton
assistant professor of communica-
tion arts, was among the first
academics to take soap operas
seriously, researching how the
serials treated health issues,
women, the elderly and other sub-
jects.
"We're also interested in what
the audience thinks and does with
the programs and why they're so
loyal, because they must be get-
ting some kind of reward from
participating Skill said. "We
think it's because it's good drama,
and we like good stories. That's a
part of human nature
Skill began researching daytime
serials as an undergraduate at
New York State-Buffalo in 1978,
a time when almost nothing
academic was being published
about the dramas.
"In Sickness and In Health"
looked at how the soaps treated
sickness and dying, Skill said. The
dramas in their early stages in the
1940s and '50s invented fictional
diseases, using sickness solely as a
plot device.
Modern soaps, however, are
much more realistic (and even in-
formative) in portraying illness,
he said. Latter-day serials are less
likely to kill off characters and in-
stead offer hope, Skill said.
He also studied how soap
operas portrayed the elderly, who
often are seen as crime victims,
poor, and weak duringprime-time
TV. Old people on soaps,
however, often are "tentpole
characters the "moral fiber" of
the story. They are seen as
respected and influential, he said.
The research on soap opera im-
ages of the elderly was included in
Life on Daytime Television:
Tuning-in of American Serial
Drama
In his dissertation at Buffalo,
Skill analyzed the reasons why
college students watch soap
operas and how this related to
their personalities. The majority
watch as a social activity and to
enjoy the drama, he said.
But a small percentage � about
8 percent �- watch because they
are insecure, having problems
with relationships in their lives
and seeking some answers, he
said.
Skill, however, contended,
"You can't really say soaps pre-
sent real answers
But he did note that generally in
soap operas, good is rewarded
and evil is punished � although
not always right away.
Skill's research on soaps led to
a consulting position with Proctor
& Gamble Productions Inc
sponsor of four soaps that began
to do poorly in the ratings several
years ago. The firm wanted to
know why college students were
turning away from "One life to
Live "Another World "As
the World Turns" and "Guiding
light
Skill said the serials were
thought of as "frumpy old ladies
shows" and needed some
changes. His suggestions included
simplifying the plot somewhat to
avoid scaring away new viewers;
using "teasers" of subsequent
plot actions to entice viewers, and
spicing up graphic- and introduc-
tions.
"All My Children "As the
World Turns" and "Guiding
Light" were cited by Skill as the
highest-quality daytime serials.
Although all the soaps have good
points, the actions of characters in
those three shows in particular
consistent ren .
form. Skill aid
"It's much more
drama than people are willing
give it credit for I
of soa But. he n
"It's a popular ait
a lot of the common ,
that people identify witn p
arts.
"It tends to repeat itself
sionally, it tends not to offei
of wisdom and
great undersianding of beaut-
the time Skill said.
Studying the seriah
in academic populai
but acceptance didn't i ome qi
ly
Jagger Shows
Who's 'Boss'
MICK JAGGER
She's The
Boss
Mick Jagger
m
Albums available for tevten courtesy of
Apple Records.
By KEVIN DILL
Suff Writer
Somehow, between writing his autobiography
and recording a new Rolling Stones Album,
Mick Jagger has found time to record his first solo
album, She's The Boss. The bad boy of rock V
roll is host to a slew of musicians. Such names as
Jeff Beck, Nile Rodgers, Pete Townshend, Herbie
Hancock, and Chuck Leavell are all part of the
albums upbeat and forceful sound.
Boss is not a Stones clone. However, after more
than two decades of rocking with the Stones, you
can expect that something has rubbed off on Jag-
ger s LP. He will always be remembered as the
voice behind the Stones, but there is a major dif-
ference, between Boss and recent Stones albums.
You can make out all the words. He still has the
unique Jagger sound, yet he doesn't sing with the
same slurred voice that has dominated in the past.
Jagger's lyrics are smooth and poetic. He wrote
six of the nine songs on his own. Of the remaining
songs, He co-wrote one with old time friend Keith
Richards and two with Carlos Alomar, who is best
known for his work with David Bowie.
"Lonely at the Top" is the work of Jagger and
Richards. It's a steady, hard driven, upbeat, dance
song that gets your feet tapping and your head
nodding. The song has an element of energy about
it. Michael Shrieve's drums pounding and
Jagger's powerful voice give the song vitality.
Mick sounds raspy in "Lucky in Love
"Atlantic City I lose at craps, Back in London try
to win it back. And late night I lay in bed with a
pistol to my head With lyrics like this you would
imagine that Mick has listened to his share of
Grand Master Flash records.
There is definitely some concept that binds Boss
together. The songs reflect on a manwoman rela-
tionship. However, the question is who is in con-
trol of the relationship, man or woman. At some
points Jagger seems to be in total control of the
situation and sometimes he is in total submission.
"Secrets" is the story of a tainted love affair
that has left a man under total submission where
as, "Hard Woman" is about a man trying to
make the decision to leave his lover or not because
he can't please her anymore. This twist and turn
relationship is very apparent throughout the
album.
"Hard Woman" is the only slow groove on the
album. It bears a resemblance to "Love In Vain"
that appeared on the Stones classic Let It Bleed.
The melodies are strikingly familiar and Jagger
goes so far as to mention "love in vain" in the
songs' lyrics.
Another reason why Boss differs from the
Stones style of music is Jeff Beck. Becks' solos are
too power-driving to be confused with the
overlapping twang of Richards' or Ronnie
Woods' guitars. Becks' work on Boss is similar to
his recent work with Rod Stewart.
Boss is full of dance songs, raging guitar solos
and a rock 'n' roll vocalist that just can't quit. The
different influences (ragge, rock and jazz) that ap-
pear on the album are what makes it so exciting.
It's not a Stones rework, but it definitely has some
Stones influences. She's The Boss has opened
another door for Mick Jagger. If things go his
way, "Old Rubber Lips" could be a very suc-
cessful Stone, alone.
Jagger is still 'The Boss
Prince struck a blow for outrageous musicians everywhere when he won an Oscar for best song score, bu?
best original song catagory took a beating when the show's producers failed to let the artists perform trieir
own songs.
Awards Show Comes Up Lemons
By LINDA CHAPIN
SUff Writer
To say award shows are over-
done and overrated is a
gross understatement. In the past
they have been extremely long
and drawn out. The 57th Annual
Academy Awards on Monday
night were no exception.
Twenty-four oscars were given
away during the slightly over
three hour long program. Jack
Lemon proved his talent as a host
and was assisted by ten co-hosts
including Jeff Bridges, Michael
Douglas, Amy Irving. Glen
Close, Diana Ross and William
Hurt.
To try to keep the length of the
program to a minimum, winners
were to keep their speeches within
a 43 second time limit. This did
make a difference, but only a
slight one. The show was still
much too long.
The extensive introductions of
each award compromised a ma-
jor part of the program. I felt like
I was watching a mini-
documentary every time they
started to give away a new award.
For some (make-up, sound,
special effects, costume, and art
direction), the introduction went
beyond a speech into short pro-
ductions explaining the meaning,
importance, and history of the
category. These were unnecessary
as well as too long and elaborate.
Things went way overboard when
an elephant came out on stage
during the costume award.
The music segments of the
show were more than disappoin-
ting. There were five nominees
for best song. All five were per-
formed, but only two by the
original artists that made them
famous (Ray Parker Jrs
"Ghostbusters" and Deniece
Williams' "Let's Hear It For The
Boy"). Diana Ross sang the win
ning song, Stevie Wonder's "1
Just Called To Sav I I ove You"
(from The Homen In Red ).
Fame's Deboie Allen sang a
funked-up version of Kenny I og
gins' "Footloose Her dancing,
although good, seemed unap
propriate for the song. Phil Col-
lins' "Against All Odds" was
mutilated by actress Ann Reink
ing Unfaithfully Yours). Not on
ly did she sing out of tune, she
was out of sync with the tape at
the end of the song. Having the
original artists sing their songs
would definitely have improved
the show.
This year's Academy Awards
proved to be just as long, boring
and overdone as they have been
in the past.
�WM
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 28, 1985
Actress Publishes New Book
(UPI) � Actressauthor Joan-
na Barnes has written a novel titl-
ed Silverwood, a Literary Guild
selection that tells some disguised
but previously unpublished
Hollywood tales.
The heroine of Barnes' book is
a woman who becomes a society
matron by marrying a
multimillionaire after inventing
her own background and assum-
ing a fictitious family history.
"I can't tell you how many
times that has been done by some
of Hollywood's biggest stars
said Barnes, who recently guest
starred in segments of "Trapper
John, M.D and "Remington
Steele
"You'd be surprised at the
number of actors and actresses
who change their names and
family backgrounds, including
such major stars as Merle
Oberon.
"The big problem with writing
novels about movie and TV peo-
ple is the truth is far more
outrageous, absurd, bizarre and
pornographic. If I put them in a
book people would say, 'Such
things couldn't happen
"I mean, who would believe
the very true story of a male star
anxious to divorce his wife but
who had no legal claim. So he of-
fered his press agent a life-time
guarantee to represent him if he
would seduce the wife and allow
the actor to catch them in the act.
"The press agent agreed,
although he didn't particularly
care for the wife. He did seduce
her, the actor caught them as
agreed and he got his divorce.
But not long after he committed
suicide. Who would believe that
in a novel?"
"Then there's the true story of
a studio head who caught his wife
in bed with one of the actors
under contract to the studio. In-
stead of firing the well-known
star, he kept him under contract
for seven years, paying his salary,
but never putting him in a picture
until the town forgot all about
him
Another prominent western
star lived happily with his wife
and child until his mother-in-law
moved in. Many months late, the
wife discovered her mother and
husband were lovers. She divorc-
ed the star who subsequently
married his ex-mother-in-law,
much to the fury of the discarded
wife.
"The stories go on and on
Barnes said. "If you want to use
any of them in fiction, they have
to be toned down
"I personally know about
another studio head who stole the
Paragon Has Come
Christian Presentation a Success
Bv MATHEW GILLIS
S�mff Wrttt
Dying � it's a fact of life
r T,e of us wants to face,
but v.e is human beings have to
deal v h it soone; or later. Many
peopk' have tried to understand
havinc o die, and along the way
they a o attempt to answer one
panic tr ;restior�; "Is there life
after deal'What develops are
differen? nervations, different
conclusion , and no one can say
that any one is the exact answer.
But recently on campus, a unique
presentation was offered to make
people aware of dying and to
hopefully, piovide an answere to
the possibility of life after death.
The presentation, called
"Paragon: If I should Die was
shown at Wright Auditorium this
past Monday and Tuesday. Some
nearly 200 students, many of
them from ECU, attended the
four nightly shows. "If I Should
Die" featured a multi-screen slide
presentation along with accom-
panying musice and narration,
explaining the grim reality of
death and the concept of life after
death according the teachings of
the Catholic Church.
Before each presentation,
those who attended were warned
that the show would be very
graphic dealing with death. Some
moments later, the audience
found it to be all too true, as a
horrifying car crash and the
aftermath made them painfully
aware of death occuring at any
time in their lives. Yet, when
many of those who attended were
surveyed, they stated that it was
the grim portrayal of death in the
presentation that reminded them
of that fact, and made it a power-
ful presentation for them indeed.
"Many of those who came ex-
pressed that they were really hit
hard by the film said Terry
Moore, an ECU student and
coordinator with the ECU Cam-
pus Crusade for Christ (which
presented "If I should Die"). I
think we had a great turn out,
and the response was tremendous
from all the students we had,
both from ECU and even
students from area high
schools she continued.
The presentation was made
available to ECU through
Paragon Productions, which pro-
vides flims for high school and
college students in conjunction
with Campus Crusade for Christ.
The presentation is currently on
route to Clemson, where it will be
shown sometime next week and
making audiences there as aware
as many were here.
DONNA DAVIS
Call Dan Maurer
757-6366
Leave Number
Keeping the Pirates Afloat
In Style
The Casual Shoppe
at
Sailboards & Stuff
Brentwood Center, Wilson, NC 237-SAIL
Bring this ad in for 20h off Men's � Women's Clothes.
GOOD THtU AftM. �, IttS
wife of one of his leading men.
The actor not only gave up his
wife but allowed the mogul to
adopt his daughter. The leading
man changed his name and took
another job at the studio where
he continued to work the rest of
his life.
"There are the pitiful stories
about would-be actresses put
under studio contract by ex-
ecutives solely for sexual pur-
poses, but the young women are
led to believe they were hired as
actresses.
"It happened alot when I was
under contract to a major studio.
One of the girls, who was at the
end of her string, committed
suicide in utter desolation when
the studio dropped her
Barnes asked if anyone would
believe the story about a young
actress who was mistakenly
thought to be black-listed. She
took her case to the president of
the Screen Actors Guild, married
him and he later becomes presi-
dent of the United States?
"Impossible?" she asked. "It
happened to Nancy Davis. When
she was under contract to MGM
another actress, also named Nan-
cy Davis, was black-listed for her
political activities. But MGM's
Nancy thought her career would
suffer in the confusion.
"She went to (producer) Mer-
vyn Leroy who told her the Guild
could help. He introduced her to
Ronald Reagan, president of the
Guild. They fell in love, got mar-
ried and everyone knows the rest
of the story. But what author
would have the guts to put that in
a novel? It's just too implausible.
"There is some basis of truth
in Silverwood. It is a generational
story about entrenched Los
Angeles society and the movie
crowd. Actors still can't get into
the Los Angeles Country Club
and the gulf between the two
groups is still very wide
Silverwood is Barnes' fourth
novel. She already has embarked
on a fifth.
She continues to work as an ac-
tress but finds it less satisfying
and not as financially rewarding
as turning out bestselling fiction
such as The Deceivers and
Past or a.
"Acting is more fun Barnes
said. "Writing is a solo activity
and harder work with greater
risk. If you fail in an acting role,
blame can be placed on the direc-
tor, writers or even other actors.
But if a book fails, you go home
and look at yourself in the mir-
ror
Doonesb
Michael O'Keefe is a slugger who tries to hit a home run with rock
singer Rebecca Ie Morna in Neil Simon's "The Slugger's Wife"
-ft,

,

Good Luck On Sunday
WZMB
You'll Need It!
rJ Send Your
DELIGHTS Honey
355-2961 a
Bunny
Includes Easter Basket and Balloon Bouquet. 10Discount to
ECU Students. April 1-April 7. 3105 Memorial Drive
















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(I
YOU!
Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUUbAU
1ST1UCAN1B6-
JEVE IT EXCEPT
HJR PRINCE MOT
SHOHim. ITIAENT
OFF WITHOUT
X A HITCH'
mm
QUITE A
HIOHTiH
OUNCE

c
IN Ad MY YEARS IN THIS
BUSINESS I VE NEVER
SEEN SUCH GENEROSITY
ANP COOPERA VON BE
TWEEN MAJOR ARTISTS
WELL. QUINCE. ITHINKUH
ALL JUST REALIZED THAT
Olhfcl "WEARETHECHlPREN"
W� IS A LOT BI60ER THAN
f THE SUM OF ITS PARTS
(: V) j&
IT'S PRINCE HE SAYS
HE'LL PO IT NOW IF
YOU CUT OUT MICHAEL
JACRSON, PARTS
SPEAKING
OFCHILPREN
I
WE&SVOUR
�A M6 MAN.
JOANJB? I
I'MAFRAIL
HES ON
ST A
lACEY -
jot N6us.
THE PAPER HAS ASKED'HIM TO
WRITE A QAlLY PlARY ABOUT
HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH
APPARENTLY, THERE'S A LOT
OF INTEREST IN THE NEW
BREED OF INVDLVEP, HAWS- -�
ON FATHERS
II I
NOT NOW,
SON.PAPPYS
OADVY? BUSy.
'AT 3-30AM, JEFFREY
CRIES OUT IN HIS SLEEP Oil
FROM UJHAT JQANIE rtAS TnT
TOLD ME. I KNOW THIS
PROBABLY MEANS HES
WET"
"SO AS NOT TO WAKE HIM UP WITH
THELI6HT, I TRY TO CHANGE HIS
PIAPERSIN TOTAL OARKNESS, A TASK
R0U6HLY EQUAL IN DIFFICULTY TO
TAK1N6 APART AND REASSEMBUU6
ANM-lblNA
GUNNY
SACK"
Man-O-Stick
'Sr-icK Wac? AJAv) ON
HAP letFr PBVia to
TAKBT CARE OF M�
BEAfNj POESA'T ,
iaa rt vc3 ou rsPE 7b
HE Afi'T �Top
IaSHL-E tVE-AAlA0
THf$ Atffi-MAQtC Suit.
Va!kin' The Plank
WALKM jfo fl4NK � � Mck ?�atf?5 Q�y tis offPBAi- A3 ffESp&M?:
AND HEN UC5L TWO
ALIENS HH&O'WK'U&K
CAME- DOWN fO AK� ttE. OH
YEA, AND I M0J6rK WEL'D
CRU15E. UKE 0�4 5TM? YRE.K oR
SOMETHING, 6iX NO. THE-Y
BEAnet) rUL to I5URE.KID-
BM?KeEPHORE.
AfER -HA, 2 SMD WANTED
0 BE PRE5I0EAK, 50 KCY
SEAMED HE.ro V.C. WKE.RE-
i WA5 ALHof K�UUD BV A
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EPEC-T ME A BUY 4A
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TOOTH or Consequences
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28, 1985
�� THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar �
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer.
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O Box
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
If you re
7713,
BEAU'S
NIGHT CLUB
presents
Thursday
Alpha Sig
ALL GREEK
CHUG-OFF
4 men & 4 women from each fraternity and
sorority will compete for their organization
to win a keg and the Chug-Off title!
Free Draft Beer all nite long �
Come party with the Greeks and Daddy Cool,
the King of Jam at your favorite party place. Beau s . . . of course!
Doors open at 8:00.
Admission: $4.00 guys, $3.00 girls
Phone 756 6401 Beau's is located in the Carolina East Centre
B- .m s is a pmati- club for members and their ut-st IS j: i ver
All ABC Permits Memberships available at the door
Guests are welcome.
MARILYN
THOMPSON
Soprano
Tuesday, April 2, 1985 8:00 P.M
Hendrix Theatre �
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Admission � $1.00
Tickets on sale at the Central Ticket
Office � 757-6611, ext. 266
4HRHflhfltaMte
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10
JHE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 28,
1985
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 28, 1985
Page 10
ECU Sweeps Doubleheader

MALGOS1A DIBINSKY - ECl Photo Lab
Greg Hardison tags a Ohio University runner out who didn't quite
make it to second base, as teammate Mark Cockrell (23) looks on.
Controversy Stirs
Around WZMB
Continued from Page One
something out at a future time
Workman came to YYZMB's
Kelly a month ago and proposed
the idea of doing the games. They
agreed to do five games with Mit-
chell and Kelly as the an-
nouncers.
Mitchell, who was obviously
Workman and felt bitter about
the way the situation was handl-
ed.
"I feel that he is using the fact
that Pama is a professor as an ex-
cuse for trying to get a control
over our broadcast Duncan
said. "I feel that it is the decison
of the station on how to broad-
displeased with the decision, said cast the baseball game. This in-
there was a lack of communica-
tion between herself and
Workman. "I put in a lot of time
� with the pre-game show and
the interviews Mitchell said.
"We couldn't have even found
anybody to have done the show
by Saturday. They (the athletic
department) gave it to us to do,
and we did all the work, then they
gave us all this negativity
Mike Kelly, head of WZMB's
sports department, said
Workman told him that he could
continue with the broadcast as
long as another student took Mit-
chell's place.
"He (Workman) told me that
we needed to have her off the
air Kelly said. He also said that
the athletic department received
critical phone calls from listeners.
One caller said "get that girl off
the air
Mitchell said Workman told
her that her performance was
fine. The problem, he told her, is
that she is not a student.
According to Mitchell,
Workman said only a profes-
sional from his staff could help
with the broadcast.
Duncan, the general manager
of WZMB, disagreed with
eludes who will broadcast, which
games we cover and how we pro-
mote the games.
"Regardless of whether Pama
is a professor or not, it is still a
non-professional effort by the
college-radio station Duncan
continued. "We felt that we had
given the students the chance.
They helped in preparation and
before going on the air
Duncan went on to say that the
athletic department doesn't have
the right "to put stipulations on
us concerning broadcasts
WZMB provided all necessary
funds for the broadcast of the
games.
4,I personally was quite
satisfied with the broadcast and
resent the fact that the athletic
department took advantage of
our time, facilities and
resources Duncan declared.
"We will not succumb to their ef-
forts to control what we do on
the air. Therefore, the Pirate
baseball broadcast is now a thing
of the past.
"I feel that's unfortunate for
the students and the team Dun-
can added. "After all, that's who
we were doing it for in the first
place
McNeil Qualifies
ECU freshman Lee McNeil
and junior Chris Brooks fared
well in the Georgia Relays in
Athens, Ga on Saturday.
McNeil qualified for the
NCAA National Championships
by taking first place in the
100-meter dash. He surpassed the
qualifying time for the nationals
with a blazing run of 10.23
seconds.
Junior long jumper Chris
Brooks was also successful for4
the Pirates. He took first place in
the long jump with an effort of
25 feet, three inches.
The Pirates also had two relay
teams finish in the top six. The
mile-relay team finished in third
place with a time of 3:09.91. The
4 X 100-relay team finished in the
sixth slot with a time of 41.00
seconds.
By TONY BROWN
Stafl Writer
It took quite a bit of effort, but
the baseball Pirates finally pulled
out a 7-6 win in the opening game
of a doubleheader against Ohio
University yesterday. ECU went
on to take both ends of the twin-
bill, winning the second game
9-1.
The chances for the Pirates
looked dim when the Bobcats
took a 1-0 lead on a Wes Harr-
ington homer in the first, then
another homerun by Harrington
� this one a grandslam � in-
creased the Ohio lead to 5-0 in the
third.
ECU started a comeback in
their half of the third when
Robert Langston opened with a
single to center. Mark Shank
followed with a walk, then Greg
Hardison bounced a double off
the left field wall to drive in
Langston. Chris Bradberry
sacrificed Shank in and Hardison
went to third. Winfred Johnson
walked, then a Mike Sullivan
sacrifice fly made it 5-3. Johnson
moved up on a wild pick-off
throw, but was left stranded.
Pirate starting pitcher Jim
Peterson struck out the lead-off
batter in the fourth, but walked
Andy Doll. Doll was then tagged
out trying to steal second on a
fine play by shortstop Hardison.
The Pirates pulled one run
closer in the bottom of the
fourth. The Ohio third baseman
threw Mark Cockrell's grounder
over the first baseman's head,
which put Cockrell on second.
He went to third on an out and
scored on a wild pitch.
Harrington got his third
Nine Downs
straight hit for Ohio in the fifth
and two errors loaded the bases,
but a ground-out ended the
threat.
ECU managed to tie it up in
the sixth. Jay McGraw singled to
centerfield and moved to second
on a sacrifice. A double by Jim
Riley between the right and
center fielders made it 5-5.
Ohio didn't give up though.
After one out and a single, Mark
Adams' double to center gave the
Bobcats a one run lead in the top
of the seventh.
The Pirates rallied again in the
bottom of the seventh to even the
score. Bradberry walked with one
out, then stole second. Johnson
lined out, but a last-gasp single
by Mike Sullivan tied it up and
sent the game into extra innings
� with an emphasis on the
plural.
Mike Christopher came in on
relief for ECU in the eighth and
set Ohio down in order, helped
by an excellent catch by of a liner
toward right by Jay McGraw.
Jim Riley singled in the bottom
of the frame, but the courtesy
runner was picked off first by the
pitcher. Langston beat out a
single, but was left on base.
Both teams left runners strand-
ed through the top of the thir-
teenth inning. ECU blew a golden
opportunity to win the game
when they loaded the bases with
no outs in the twelfth but were
unable to score.
Hardison got a single to open
the inning. Bradberry beat out a
bunt, which Johnson followed
with a single to load the bases.
Two consecutive put-outs at
home and a ground-out ended the
Softballers Sweep
Pair Of Twinbills
threat.
Mike Sullivan finally ended the
scorekeeper's nightmare with a
single in the bottom of the thir-
teenth inning, which scored Greg
Hardison from second for the 7-6
Pirate win.
Danny Culpepper, who came
on in relief in the tenth and threw
four innings of no-hit ball, pick-
ed up the win and evened his
record at 1-1.
ECU powered to a 9-1 victory
in the nightcap to sweep the twin-
bill. Chubby Butler picked up the
win with a complete game, strik-
ing out six, walking three and giv-
ing up five hits.
Ohio loaded the bags in the
first but Butler got Mark
Eckstenkamper to ground out to
end the inning. The Pirates put a
runner in scoring position in the
bottom of the frame when Mark
Shank lead off with a single and
went to second on a walk to Greg
Hardison. A double play got
Ohio out of the jam, giving the
Bobcats a temporary reprieve.
Both teams failed to score in
the second. Ohio went ahead 1-0
in the third when Brian Ritter
singled, stole second and scored
on two errors.
ECU struck back quickly in the
bottom of the frame. Shank
started it off with a walk and a
stolen base, then moved to third
on a passed ball. Chris Bradberry
walked, then left first too early
on an attempted double steal and
was hung up off first base. It
worked out well for the Pirates
though. Not only did Bradberry
manage to get back to first safely,
but Shank scored in the process
to tie the score 1-1.
Bradberry didn't lose his con-
fidence over the near pick-off
and promptly stole second. He
then came all the way home on a
two base error on a grounder,
which proved to be the winning
run. Mont Carter lined a single to
left to drive in Sullivan and stole
second himself, but the Bobcats
got out of the inning with no fur-
ther damage.
With two outs in the fourth,
Shank and Hardison walked and
were doubled in by Bradberry.
Winfred Johnson's single raised
the Pirate margin to 6-1.
ECU closed the scoring out in
the sixth. Bradberry got on with
an error and a two-run shot by
Winfred Johnson � his twelth
homer of the season � made it
8-1. Mike Sullivan walked, then
Carter was hit by a pitch. A pass-
ed ball moved the runners up and
a wild pitch brought in the last
Pirate run.
The pair of wins pushed ECU's
season mark to 15-5, while Ohio
fell to 0-5. The Bobcats have had
a rough week in North Carolina,
having lost their previous three
games to N.C State.
Ohio has another chance
against the Pirates today at Harr-
ington Field, beginning at 3 p.m.
ECU then hosts James Madison
for an ECAC South twinbill
Saturday starting at one. The
Pirates play Madison in a single
game Sunday at 2 p.m
The series with JMU could
prove crucial in ECU's quest for
a conference title, with their cur-
rent record at 1-1.
By SCOTT COOPER
C o-Sporti Kdltor
Over the past two days, the
Lady Pirate softball team racked
up four victories over Virginia
Commonwealth and N.C.
Wesleyan.
On Tuesday, strong pitching
from Pam Young and Stacey
Boyette helped the Lady Bucs
sweep a pair from the Lady Rams
of VCU 2-0 and 3-1.
Head coach Sue Manahan call-
ed the victories a "revenge to a
loss and tie earlier in the year at
Virginia Commonwealth
Manahan saw, on six separate oc-
cassions, the Pirates make
outstanding defensive plays.
"It's (the defense) been there
all year long Manahan said.
"One play inspired another, and
it kept getting better
In the first game, with the
game scoreless going into the
sixth inning, Lisa Zmuda led off
with a triple. After Robin Graves
managed to get on base, Tamara
Franks got the winning hit as she
knocked both Zmuda and Graves
in. With the win, Young extended
her perfect record to 10-0.
In the second game, Boyette
got her third win in eight tries.
Once again the Lady Pirates
struggled for four scoreless inn-
ings. In the fifth inning, ECU
responed with three RBI singles
by Phyllis Willis, Boyette and
Young. On the day, Willis was
2-3 and Zmuda went 2-2.
In yesterday's action,
dominating pitching spelled
doom for N.C. Wesleyan. ECU
outscored Wesleyan 14-0
throughout the doubleheader.
Boyette and Young combined
for a no-hitter in the first game.
Boyette went the first four inn-
ings while Young controlled the
last three. With the win, Boyette
is 4-5 on the season.
In the 8-0 rout, ECU scored
two runs in the second inning on
an RBI single by Boyette. The
other Buc run was unearned. In
the fourth, Suzanne Martin's
single scored two as ECU opened
a 4-0 advantage. The inning was
not over yet as Eva Hughs singled
in another run. The fourth Lady
Pirate run of the inning was
unearned. In the fifth inning, the
Lady Bucs got two more unearn-
ed runs to close out their scoring.
Aside from the other Lady Pirate
offensive stars, Sandy Kee went
2-3.
Hughs was starting in left field
due to a leg injury to Wendy Oz-
ment.
In the Lady Bucs final shutout
See SOFTBALL, Page 11
.�
-Jf. s
-

By RICK McCORMAC
Co-8oti Editor
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams each concluded ex-
cellent seasons with both squads
finishing with winning records
for the second year in a row.
The men finished with a overall
record of 9-4, while the women
were 8-5, with both teams facing
difficult schedules.
This is our second outstanding
season in a row ECU swimm-
ing coach Rick Kobe said. "Last
year was incredible but this year
topped that.
It was truly an incredible year
for both the men and women
tankers. The men set seven new
varsity records and five freshmen
records, while all 19 ECU swim-
mers who qualified in the
Easterns scored points. In the
Easterns, the Pirates placed
third, finishing ahead of schools
such as Villanova, Maine,
Rutgers and St. Bonaventure.
The women set four new varsi-
Swimmers Conclude
Pam Young (7) ran her record to 11 -0 on the season with wins on Tues-
day and Wednesday over Virginia Commonwealth and N C
Wesleyan.
ty marks and three freshmen
records, as they swam their way
to five straight dual meet wins on
their way to their fifth con-
secutive winning season.
The two teams combined for
17 victories, the most ever at the
school. 11 varsity records were
set as well as eight freshman
marks.
Leading the way for the men
were Bruce Brockschmidt and
Keith Kaut. Brockschmidt set
new freshmen and varsity records
in the 200-yard individual medley
with a new record time 1:52.79.
He missed qualifying for the
NCAA's, which has the fastest
times in swimming, by only a se-
cond. Kaut missed qualifying by
only a half of a second in the
100-yard freestyle. Kaut holds the
varsity record in the 100 free with
a time of 45.81.
The relay teams were also a
strong point for the men tankers,
setting four new varsity marks.
The relay team of Kaut,
Brockschmidt, Kevin Hidalgo
and Chris Pittelli set new varsity
records in the 200-yard medley
relay and the 200-yard freestyle
relay with times of 1:38.50 and
1:25.82 respectrivelly.
A new varsity record was also
set in the 400-yard backstroke
relay by Al Smith, Scott Robin-
son, Brockschmidt and Hidalgo
with a time of 3:43.02. The final
varsity record for the men in the
relays was set in the 400-yard
breaststroke. Lee Smith, Pat
Brennan, Brockschmidt and
Smith set the new record with a
time of 3:59.69.
"Chris Pittelli, Bruce
Brockschmidt, Keith Kaut, Lee
Hicks and Pat Brennan all did
outstanding jobs Kobe said.
"Everyone did really well this
year. It was a total team effort.
We took 19 swimmers to the
Easterns and everyone scored
points for us
Diver Scott Eagle set the
seventh varsity record for the
men in one-meter diving. In 11
dives Eagle scored 522.45.
Brockschmidt and Brennan
each set new freshmen records in
the individual medley,while
Hicks set two freshmen marks in
the breaststroke. Diver Luke
Durkin set the final frosh mark in
three-meter diving.
With so many freshmen
records being set Kobe was
especially pleased with the per-
formance of his first year swim-
mers. "This was the best
freshman class in the history of
ECU he said. "Next year the
goal is to have somebody qualify
for the NCAA's
. While the men had a good
season, the women were equally
impressive.
Diver Lori Miller led the way
for the lady Pirates setting two
new varsity marks. From the one-
meter board Miller set her new
ECU mark with 413.18 points in
11 dives. In three-meter diving
she also set a new varsity record
with 252.15 points in six dives.
Also setting new marks for the
women was Lori Livingston in
the 200-yard backstroke with a
time of 2:13.98. The 400-yard
medley relay team of Caycee
Poust, Jessica Feinberg, Ellen
McPherson and Chris Holman
set a new varsity mark with a time
of 4:07.60.
Holman also had a hand in
three new freshmen records. She
set individual marks the 100-yard
backstroke and 100-yard
freestyle, while participating on
the record setting 400-yard
medley team. Also on the record
sitting relay with Holman were
teammates, Joelle Ennis, Jill
Gorenflo and Jennifer Pierson.
"Caycee Poust and Scotia
Miller swam really v A for the
women Kobe said. 'So did all
the freshmen
Diving coach John Rose was
also pleased with the perfor-
mance by the divers. " We had
the best year ever in diving
Rose said. "And although we are
sorry to see Scott Eagle leave, we
are looking for bigger and better
things next year, from both the
men and women
Next year does seem to look
very bright for the swimmers as
the men will loose only three
seniors, while the women will be
in even better shape losing only
one.
Coach Kobe is also looking
forward to next season and can't
wait for the next campagn to get
underway after such a successful
year this season.
"Everybody had to perform
weU for us to have a winning
season. When you face the type
of schedule our teams did this
year, you really have to earn a
wmnmg season Kobe said.
With so many fine swimmers
coming back I'm really excited
about next yew ����
i

EC
The ECL Rugby C
to Boone, N.C,
where they tied a a
Mountaineer squad
playing 10 matches
are 5-4-1.
ASU took an eai
with a drop-kick froi
center However, fij
later the Pirates retaij
Campano scored c
try on a loose
freshman rugger Pr,j
Mike Browr. then sp
on the point-c
making the score -
The Mountaineer
finished Once
center, also kn
Co-R,
By JLASMTr
SMfl
IRS co-re
first week of play
take to the c
mixed action.
Sneaker Sam
top-notch squads I
championsh p
year's all-can
The Enforcers, a:
and are hungry fc . an
ing season. Sam
forcers at the top. Ge
for this week, The En
unable to she -
talents.
Number two or
Good, The Bad anc
Softh
Continued from PJ
of the day. Your
hitter through f
Graves came ir.
the save. The victory
improves her unb.
to 11-0.
ECU scored three
third inning. Zmuda
for two when her ti H
two RBI's. Graces ha
RBI on a single.
In the fifth inning, the
got two more rui
knocked one in on an
The otherTirate run
ed. Boyette'� vac-
inning closed oul
ECU.
Coach Manahan p
team for their fine
Wesleyan.
"The team play
well Manahan -
have been hard tc
we did in yesterdav f
game
The Lady Pirates a
17-7-1 on the year ar
host at 2 pm to Ohio
in yet another doub il

: Also

: Equi
I Weig
I Spao
: Timen
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? ��
M
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Page 10
Ohio
le the score 1-1.
radberry didn't lose his con-
e over the near pick-off
romptly stole second. He
ame all the way home on a
ase error on a grounder,
h proved to be the winning
nt Carter lined a single to
to drive in Sullivan and stole
id himself, but the Bobcats
M t of the inning with no fur-
k image.
li h uo outs in the fourth,
k and Hardison walked and
doubled in by Bradberry.
ed Johnson's single raised
rate margin to 6-1.
closed the scoring out in
Bradberry got on with
or and a two-run shot by
Johnson � his twelth
the season � made it
k Sullivan walked, then
was hi! by a pitch. A pass-
moed the runners up and
h brought in the last
run.
of wins pushed ECU's
irk w 15-5. while Ohio
5. The Bobcats have had
week in North Carolina,
lost their previous three
N.C. State
has another chance
t the Pirates today at Harr-
Field, beginning at 3 p.m.
en hosts James Madison
ECAC South twinbill
starting at one. The
la Madison in a single
v Jay at 2 p.m:
nes with JMU could
ruciai in ECU's quest for
ference title, with their cur-
ord at 1-1.

season with wins on Tues-
�mmonwealth and N.C.
Ever
1st year ever in diving
id. "And although we are
see Scott Eagle leave, we
Iking for bigger and better
next year, from both the
d women
year does seem to look
light fo: the swimmers as
n will loose only three
while the women will be
better shape losing only
jh Kobe is also looking
to next season and can't
the next campagn to get
ay after such a successful
s season.
'body had to perform
us to have a winning
When you face the type
dule our teams did this
)u really have to earn a
season Kobe said.
so many fine swimmers
hack I'm really excited
wet year

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28, 1985
11
ECU Ruggers Battle Appalachian To A Tie
The ECU Rugby Club traveled
to Boone, N.C, last weekend
where they tied a a tough ASU
Mountaineer squad 19-19. After
playing 10 matches the ruggers
are 5-4-1.
ASU took an early 3-0 lead
with a drop-kick from their inside
center. However, five minutes
later the Pirates retaliated. Ralph
Campano scored on a 50-meter
try on a loose pass from
freshman rugger Philip Ritchy.
Mike Brown then split the posts
on the point-after coversion,
making the score 6-3.
The Mountaineers were not
finished. Once again their inside
center, also known as "Poison
Dwarf scored with a drop-kick
from a loose play. This tied the
score, 6-6.
After a long battle between the
two scrums at midfield, the
Pirates pushed the ball to the goal
line where Campano picked it up
and carried it over for his second
try on the day. The conversion
was missed.
With the score at 10-6, ASU
took control of the ball and
began a 13-point streak by scor-
ing a try and a conversion with
only three minutes left in the first
half. Unable to score, ECU broke
for halftime down 12-10.
As the second half began, ECU
was forced to play one man short
due to injuries. The Moun-
taineers continued to control the
ball early in the second half.
Then their inside center car-
the ball 15 meters down �
sideline for a try. The coversion
was missed and the score was
16-10.
The Pirates then began to rally.
The rally ended abruptly as
ASU's inside center (Poison
Dwarf) split the uprights with a
drop-kick, making the score
19-10.
The Pirates would not give up.
Only minutes later, ECU's Mike
Brown returned with a drop-kick
from 35 meters to cut the Moun-
taineer score to 19-13. With only
two and half minutes left to play
in the game, ECU rugger Alan
Blankenship made the play-of-
the-day. In a scries of penalty
plays, he caught the ASU ruggers
offsides three times, moving the
ball thirty meters. Then on the
fourth play, he (Blankenship) ran
the ball from 10 meters to score
the try. Brown split the uprights
again with the coversion, tying
the game at 19-19. The Pirates
continued to rally but time ran
out.
The Pirates are ranked No. 2 in
the North Carolina Rugby Union
Collegiate Division.
ECU played without club
president and hooker Bill Zim-
merman, who suffered a
dislocated neck in the squads
previous match against the Dan
River Rugby Club.
"We ended up with a winning
season and are ranked second in
the state Zimmerman said. "I
think we had a pretty successful
season but its hard in 'he spring
to keep everybody interested
The rugby club will play a
home match Monday April 1, at
4:00 pm. against Cortland State
University


i
By JEANETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
IRS co-rec volleyball is in its
first week of play as 41 teams
take to the courts of Minges in
mixed action.
Sneaker Sam has chosen three
top-notch squads to take the
championship in 1985. Last
year's all-campus champions,
The Enforcers, are back on track
and are hungry for another winn-
ing season. Sam puts The En-
forcers at the top. Getting the bye
for this week, The Enforcers were
unable to show their early season
talents.
Number two on the list are The
Good, The Bad and Ugly who
Softball
Continued from Page 10
of the day, Young pitched a no-
hitter through four innings, while
Graves came in to finish and get
the save. The victory for Young
improves her unbelievable record
to 11-0.
ECU scored three runs in the
third inning. Zmuda accounted
for two when her triple gave her
two RBI's. Graves had the other
RBI on a single.
In the fifth inning, the Lady Bucs
got two more runs. Graves
knocked one in on another single.
The other Tirate run was unearn-
ed. Boyette's sacrifice in the sixth
inning closed out the scoring for
ECU.
Manahan praised the
their fine effort over
recently trounced, pounded and
spiked Impact 15-5, 15-3. Look
for this muted group to give The
Enforcers a run for their money.
Kevin Williams and Kim Swinson
are just a sample of this year's
newest spectaculars on the IRS
volleyball scene.
And finally, Sam likes Sig Ep
and Friends, who year after year,
find themselves in the running for
the championship. Volleyball
against the Kingstons in this
week's action, Sig Ep and Friends
showed their winning colors by
defeating their opponent 15-6,
15-12.
In recent team-handball ac-
tion, Life's A Beech came close
to missing the water as The En-
forcers hit the complete trail in
Tuesday night's action. Leading
10-2 at the half, The Enforcers
staged a comeback and ended on-
Underway
ly four goals short of Life's A
Beech with a 12-8 final.
In the men's independent divi-
sion, No. 1 ranked Impulse
pounded the Army ROTC 18-5.
Third Regiment, also picked top
in the polls, pulled out a close vic-
tory over The Clash, winning by
a 10-8 score.
And look who's on top in the
men's residence-hall divison.
McGarrett would have been pro-
ud as Garrett Five-0 beat Sigma
Phi Epsilon "D" 24-6. Five-0
seems to come out ahead in a lot
of IRS events, as of late. Also in
the men's residence-hall division
are Jarvis'LAGNAF, who stunn-
ed Scott Slammers 10-4.
Phi Kappa Tau and Sigma Phi
Epsilon are presently winning in
the fraternity division, but win
just one week left in the season,
anything can happen.
Don't forget the Golf Classic
next week. Registration will be
held April 1 and 2, with the
strokes taking action on April 3.
Be at the Ayden Country Club as
the IRS swings into spring. Each
particpant must be at the par-
ticipants meeting on on April 2 at
7 pm in room 105-B Memorial
Gym. A six dollar green fee will
be charged.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
s.
OFFER GOOP
MONFRl
8 AM TO 12 NOON
V
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�mum m i
24 hour Towmg Servict
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'asfi Pu
2610 East 10th Street � 752-5222
Coach
team for
Wesleyan
'The team played pretty
well Manahan said. "It would
have been hard to spark 'em like
we did in yesterday's (Tuesday's)
game
The Lady Pirates are currently
17-7-1 on the year and will play
host at 2 pm to Ohio University
in yet another doubleheader.
STEP
OUT OF
LINE
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students - Rent an apt. by May 1 st &
keep your apt. RENT FREE for June & July!
For details call or come by Tar River Estates
Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. I. 752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the dorm doldrums
behind-there is an alternative Your own place at Tar R.ver Estates
belect a one-bedroom garden apartment or rwo-or three-bedroom townhouse
Enjoy fully equ.pped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the river
Conveniently located near East Carolina University Come by today or call
7524225
1400 Willow St.
Office Hours
M-F 9:00-5.30
Sat & Sun 1:00-500
Managed by u S Shelter Corporation
TarlQvei)
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GYM
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FOR MORE INFO CALL
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12
I Hh I AS I i AR()UNANMARCH 28, I
985
Classifieds
wanted
SUMMER JOBS: Wanted hard
working students willing to relocate,
full time work Great resume, S315
per week, 2 5 GPA needed Send
name, number etc to Summer Work
85 Box 4052. Greenville, N.C 27834
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: Starting in May
3 bedroom apartment at Eastbrook
$113 per month & Va utilities Call
752 2M8
COUNSELORS: For western N.C
co ed 8 week summer camp Room,
meals laundry salary, travel
allowance, and possible college
credit Experience not necessary,
but must enjoy working with
children Only non smoking college
lents need apply For application
and brochure write: Camp
Pmewood, i9006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Florida 33015
ROOMMATE WANTED: Seeking
responsible non smoking roommate
to share B unit at Ringgold Towers
for both summer sessions Com
�ely furnished, air conditioned,
accessories included, $170 per
month Call "52 0�98. ask for Dan
ROOMMATE WANTED: Behind
Beik dorm uth St Rent $135.
D- vate room Call 758 7470 after
4:30 ask for Jane
WANTED: Roommate to share half
utilities, rent Ringgold Towers
Completely furnished air condition
ing. May Ma rent Call Matt
752 9317
PARTTIME
WANTED: Appi
The Plaza
SEAMSTR ESS
af The Style Shop.
ITOR(S) NEEDED ASAP FOR
FRESHMAN LEVEL COURSES:
'57 6729 or come by Brewster
A 14
IER POSITIONS: Do your
eer goals include working with
people? What are you doiny to learn
He � e people skills? Earn ano
irn valuable life experiences
leadership abilities and personal
wth. Camp Kanata Co-ed resi
j Tip Rt. 3 Box 192, Wake
est N.C - 9 556 2661
EMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
1 bedroom at Eastbrook, $113 � -
ties Starting in May Call
134
'�EMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
i share one bedroom apt ' j ex
�nses with 18 yr. old Working stu
dent Convenient to ECU Call
? SB 9363
ROOMMATE WANTED IMMED:
Share 3 BR Townhouse Only $150
per m - es Cad 756-8428
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
�R SUMMER: Only $130 per
onth Own bedroom, furnished
lex or Brownlea Dr. Call
J 5323 fOne mile from campus.)
'�DENTS: Lose those extra
r�ds before summer! Swimsuit
sop is upon us, so feel better
ut yourself this year! Simple
easy to follow plan that shows you
� to lose weight nutritionally and
ep it off! Only $6 95 P.P.J. In
lustries, P.O. Box 59 Carrboro, N.C.
27510. Satisfaction Guaranteed or
r money back1
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE:
"piscopal Summer Camp looking
for college students to fill counselor
positions Dates July 19 to Aug 14.
or information write Edward M
ages, Jr Episcopal Camp
Manager, ioi E 10th St Washington,
27889
NF.ED A SUMMER JOB?: Located
Ral Perfect for the college
st jdent who needs to make money
�r the summer Five days a week
sy work. Great Pay! Send name,
local address and phone number,
major and GPA. to: F.D.L Inc
1608 E 5th St Greenville, N.C 27834
PERSONAL
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS HAND
BALL: Congratulations on a job well
done! We deflnately DUSTED the
DUSTERS!
G.D.E I'm so glad that our paths
crossed amongst all these ECU kids!
I think you're absolutely terrific and
l truly enjoy your company You're
one in a million Gary! Love, S.L.D
LOUISE: NHS requests your confes
sion of P.H.S. with a "stranger"
Wednesday night Report to Head
quarters, Laura and Bridget. PS
Friends don't let friends hobble
drunk.
WHERE'S YOUR DATE CLUB:
Congratulations on a great weekend
of avoiding your dates. Honorable
mention goes to: Bill, Jeff, David,
Hank, Kevin, Barry, Tim, Elvy and
Lyn. Don't put those skies away. We
will meet Sat night at PB's to plan
next years Roseball. Everyone plan
to be there Make a date, and of
course, leave her at home
EMBARRASSMENT IS: Riding
around in a filthy car Come get it
washed this Sat from 10 3 p.m. at
Texaco on Uth and Charles.
SIG TAUS: Thanks for a radical
time Tues night AOII
F.P I hope I will soon be your
epicurean delite. I know a cookie
that needs dusting and heels that
need to be thrown back.
Scrumptuously, F.P
PI KAPP LITTLE SISTER
PLEDGES: Will have a car wash on
Sunday March 31 at Time Out. It
starts at 10 come out and get that
car clean!
MELISA C: With only her glance,
the pulse quickens. Her eyes staring
to the heart, seeing all Nothing
escapes her gaze She escapes no
one's THAFA
DARRYLE MABE: Here's an early
Happy B day message to wish you
the best one yet Happy B day!
Love, your lil sis, Suzan!
ATTENTION: Spring brings "All
Sing" April Uth, Wright
Auditorium. General Public
welcome, free admission.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS: The
Attic, along with Sigma Phi Epsilon,
are presenting the 7th annual "Spr
ing Zing wing Ding Fling Thing
Featuring 'Theatrics' 85c
admission 85� cans. Over 50 door
prizes. Come on down and get wild!
8:30 pm.
DISNEYWORLD, DAYTONA �
TIM GREENE: Linda, Please con
tact me! Tim Greene, Box 1608 Car
son Newman College Jefferson City
TN 37760.
FEESH: I'm going to the Natural
Light Ultimax 5 Ultimate tourna
ment this weekend. I love
strawberry shortcake. A Bison
SALE
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt I05C N
Summit St. $190mo. Call 758 5299
FOR SALE: 1984 Pontiac Fiero
Sport package Too small for grow
ing family. $1000 and assume loan.
Call 758 0780 after 6 p m for details.
TYPING: Experienced professional
woman will provide all typing ser
vices. (IBM correcting typewriter)
Call Debbie at 756 6333 for a well
typed paper.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bedrooms
Near university. 402 E. 4th St. Living
room, dining room, den, natural gas
heating Mature party only! $420 per
month 758 5299
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Sum
mer or longer Close to campus
Swimming pool and tennis court
758 3676
FOR SALE: General Electric por
table air conditioner Very good con
dition. Call 752 1989
215 East 4th Street
Greenville. NC 27834
919-752-2808
COUPON j
50C j
OFF i
On Delivery !
For Our
LARGE No. 19 I
Super Special Sub j
Good Thru 3-31-85
Remember Our Happy Hour
3 to 7 PM Draft 60 oz Pitchers
$1.75
We Now Have Nachos
Delivery hours
11 A Ml 2 Midnight
Man, Tues, & Wed
11 AM-2 AM
Thurs, Fri, Sat & Sun
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates call 756 8934
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs. 758 5488
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 756 4664 evenings, or
752 6106 days
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bedrooms,
living room, dining room Near
university 113 E 9th St $255 Call
758 5299
WORD PROCESSING Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8 am
5 p.m.) 17 years experience m typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters
FOR SALE: 1981 Honda Prelude
5 speed, AMFM Cassette, sun roof,
55,000 miles, $5,800 Call after 5 30
p m 747 2107
LOST Set of keys of prass teddy
bear key chain with red Charlotte
Country Club tag it found, please
call Manoeth at 758 23S1 or 757 1999
2 ROOMS FOR RENT
or 756 0174
Call 752 7212
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: 3j month old g c a e r
retnever puppy named Moison
Wearing small link ha r
Light golden color with a-on tip
of tail, chest, ana on eacr pa
REWARD1 Call Joel at 758 1712
HERBALIFE: Lose weight feel
great! All natural diet vitamins in
eluded I will deliver anywhere on
campus or off! This really works!
Call Sheila for details 756 4878
ERIC CLAPTON: Tickets will be
available next week at Apple
Records Start planning now to see
Slow Hand in Durham on April 18th
BE THERE
FOR RENT: Spacious, fully furnish
ed 2 br apt available for summer
months Mid May mia April or any
time in between Rent is $275 per
month low utilities, convenient to
campus pool privileges Call after
5pm 756 9104
FOR SALE: 79 Yamaha RD400
Daytona Special One of the classics
of 2 strokes $650 Phone 758 HOI 8 10
or after 5
ROOMS FOR RENT Maleonly two
blocks from campus Unfurnished,
with kitchen plus large den. $160
monthly inclua ng , es Depos
yr. lease Call 752 5778 after 5 30
p.m or 758 5783
FOUND: Pale yellow dog, long hair
with blace canvas cellar Call
758 6802.
LOST: A pair of presc ptioi jla
a th lavender - ms s-ae mar
case The were lost ias? wee
ly St if found, please call ?57 �-
rrrr
�' �� �����
"W
� �����"� :��������
PET
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Fresh W ater Fish ; Price!
�.Fnda�& Saturday Only
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Sble 8nd VISa are aCCePled 8nd finandn is
I 511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 756-9222
TheSpontanes
Featuring HaHey Hogg & The Rockers
FR�E BEER FOR EVERYONE 'TIL 11:30
Free all nite for members!
$1.00 membership to nite only!
Happy Hour 11:30 'til closing
Mr. ECU Contest PriiM: 1 st-$100.00, 2nd-$50.00,3rd-2
DON'T DRIVE! Call the Liberty Ride
758-5570
Private Clvk - Ail AiC PfmiH
Tourney (
(8 - Ball)
Trophy's Prizes
MEMBERS
ENTRY FEE PER PERSON
Singles $5 00
Mixed Doubles $2.50
APRIL
2nd & 3rd
(Tues & Wed)
PANTANA BOBS
V- �
r
Ladies! Clip this coupon for $1.00 off
admission to Peter donis Traveling I
Fantav sow Fridav. March 29th. I
1 Band of Oz follows the show!
i1
ARLINGTON
SELF-STORAGE
ECU STUDENTS
Need Storage Space for
the Summer?
Mini-Storage-Specials
LimitedOffer
At Arlinton Self Storage
Pay for 2 Months Get 1 Month Free
Call for Details 756-9933
Watch Outs
They've got to
clean up the
wont crime district -
in the world.
But that's no problem
They're the wont
police lorce
in the Universe.
Ml
THEIR FIRST ASSIGNMENT
wvLntv mnmu xubow �r�iw Hummer tvwsSjJn.zL J? J21
Weekdoys
7:30-9:15
cHO
Get Discount Tickets
At Mendenhall






Title
The East Carolinian, March 28, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 28, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.401
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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