The East Carolinian, March 21, 1985






Bhe
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.48
Thursday, March 21, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Brown Elected President
In SGA Election Landslide
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Photo Lab
h?yli BtrKOW" e"J�s the fruits of � victory Monday night. Brown defeated two other candidates to
become the SGA president for the 1985-86 school year.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
V� Mlior
David Brown collected 957
votes in yesterday's SGA elec-
tions to become the 1985-86 SGA
president, while his opponents
Mike McPartland and Kirk
Shelley collected 634 and 366
votes respectively. Chris Tomasic
won the vice presidential race,
James Braswell was elected
treasurer and Lisa Carroll won
the secretarial position. There
were 1,957 students voting in this
election.
"We're not the ones that won
today, it's the students at ECU
Brown said, adding that he
"wants to represent the people
fairly and see that they are well
and equally represented
Brown said he was eager to
begin his duties as president �
"I'm ready to roll up may sleeves
and start to work he said.
"I look forward to working
with David during the transition
and smoothing his way into of-
fice said outgoing SGA Presi-
dent John Rainey. "1 want to
congratulate him on a hard-won
victory. He's won the respect of
the student body
Brown received a large margin
of votes at the polling places
located at the top of College Hill.
Central Campus and West Cam-
pus.
Tomasic, Brown's running
mate, received 894 votes. His op-
ponents, Lee Lane and Brvan
Lassiter, received 4
votes.
BraswellS nearer
Dwayne vViseman, rece
votes to Bras well'5 8;
Smith received 304
Carroll won a la
in the race for secretar
ting 974 votes. Mar 5
received 317 and
borough 557
Despite the larg
candidates, the vote' tun
year was lower, V
votes were cast last r
candidates, the i
secretary, r � rig
"I: a- a hard
to win you have I
Brown sa.
Involvement In Atlantic Alliance Discussed At Lecture
B BRETr MORRIS
M�ff Urllrr
The future of the Atlantic
Alliance and U.S. involvement in
the alliance were the topic of
discussion at the second lecture in
the ECU Great Decision series
Tuesday night.
Guest speaker James Leutze,
chair of the curriculum on peace,
war, and defense; department of
history, UNC-Chapel Hill, and
host of the WUNC-TV program
Globewatch, focused his speech
on cohesion within the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Leutze concentrated his lecture
on the relations existing between
the United States and West Euro-
pean nations, specitically West
Germany, concerning the NATO
alliance.
Since NATO's beginnings, the
United States has been the largest
military and financial contributer
to the alliance. West Germany
has been the second largest con-
tributor and at the present time
has the strongest national
economy of any other West
European nation.
According to Leutze, the
United States should not have to
bear the burden of defending
Western Europe from Soviet ag-
gression. The Western Europeans
have relatively regulated
economies, he said, and thus they
do not have the resources to con-
tribute financially to the NATO
defense program. He added
that the value of the dollar is
reflected in much of Western
Europe's financial instability.
Leutze said the lack of finan-
cial support by other Western
European nations in NATO has
left the United States "commit-
ted to the nuclear defense o
Western Europe He also stress-
ed that other Western European
nations should share in the
military and financial burden of
defending Western Europe.
The United States' nuclear
buildup in West Germany has
recieved much negative response
from the younger generation in
Western Europe. Currentlv, all
NATO countries i;i Western
Europe have a mandatory draft
except Great Britain. The West
Europeans feel this is their con-
tribution to NATO defense since
the United States does not have
an active draft.
Another important point
I eutze raised during his speech
the improvement of diplomatic
relations between East and West
Germany. Leutze said, "every
German would like to the the na-
tion unified This would create
a neutral atmosphere between
East and West Germany. Accor-
ding to Leutze, the Soviet Union
would "try and alienate West
Germany from the United
States This would leave the
United States alone in the defense
of NATO.
Leutze stressed that the
"forces to bring about the
disassembly of NATO are very
strong" but that "the Soviet
threat should add some cohesion
within the NATO forces
The NATO alliance is now
over 35 years old and Leutze said,
"historically alliances don't last
that long. There is a love-hate
relationship that exists between
the United States and Western
Europe and both sides have to
find a way to live together
Leutze said
According to Leutze, the
doesn't see the 5
to the NATO all
they do not recall the
which it was tiized I eu
said, "we arc -
very cautious if the altiai
ing to maintain
world "
The next speaker
the ECU Great De
will be D: Henn, R t
fessor of political science and
ternational affairs at Geoi
University. The lecture
Tuesdav, March 26 ar .
��Bdge: Defi I
Do!lar:The Economics
Foreign Policy
ECU Students Show Lower Government Loan Default Rate
By HAROLDJOYNER
Assistant News rdttor
Due to the large number of
students across U.S. College
campuses not paying back their
low-interest government loans,
Education Department officials
have been prompted to recoup
more than $950,000 of defaulted
student loans. However, ECU
seems to be the exception.
"ECU has an excellent rate of
return of student loans acting
Director of Financial Aid Karen
Barbee said. "The percentage
rate for defaulted loans here is
about 5.04 percent, which is very
low considering some universities
have a rate of 60 and 70
percent
Barbee said, "ECU has an ex-
cellent record with the College
Foundation which is responsi-
ble for supplying colleges with
low interest money.
"There appears to be a signifi-
cant number of professional peo-
ple who are not paying off their
loans she said.
The Education Department is
cracking down and turning over
names to credit bureaus and the
IRS, in hopes of recovering the
money. Grace Cannon, ECU
Collection Officier, said students
who do not pay their loans back
on time can expect a law suit. If
the graduated student resides out
of state, their name is turned over
to a collection agency, she said.
"The interest rate will go up
Cannon said, "when there is a
delinquent account. Information
is sent to credit bureaus, which
would make it impossible to get a
loan for a house or car
Graduates who get jobs with
the state may jeopardize their
employment if they don't pay
back loans. "Even state income
tax refunds may be held back
Cannon said.
"ECU has high qualitv
students who take care of their
obligations she said in response
to why ECU has such a good
return of the money. "The best
thing a student can do, who has
taken out a loan, is keep making
regular payments and not get
behind. Also, the student will
have an excellent reference for
credit if he keeps regular
payments Cannon said.
The U.S. Education Depart-
ment has become mo
making colic. than in
past with $90. million co
last year and a projection of more
than SI 15 million this year.
380,000 names have been refer-
to credit bureaus beca
students haven't paid th
money back. Notices
out this summer
graduates th.
Department will send
count to the IRS in December
Seminars Offer Wide Variety
By ELAINE PERRY
Starr Writer
Energy, music and the 1960s
are among the many topics of-
fered in honors seminars for the
fall semester.
The Honors Program is open
to any student with a 3.4 grade
point average. An invitation
from the director, David
Sanders, is a prerequisite for ad-
mission to any of the courses. In-
coming freshmen are required to
have a 1200 on the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test.
The purpose of the Honors
Progam is "to offer superior
students the best education possi-
ble Sanders said. The classes
are conducted as seminars and
kept small, ideally between 12
and 20 students. The format for
the class is discussion with stu-
dent participation encouraged.
There are two types
of honors courses � honors
seminars and honors sections.
Honors seminars are special topic
courses taught by one or more
professors in seminar style. The
courses meet once a week for two
hours. The professors teaching
the seminars propose the projects
because of special interests in the
areas.
"Honors sections of regular
courses provide a small-group en-
vironment for the required in-
troductory courses within the
academic disciplines Sanders
said.
A wide variety of honors
seminars will be offered in the
fall. "Listening to Music In-
telligently: A study of Style,
Form and Content will include
a lot of student involvement. Ac-
cording to Sanders, "individual
attention will be given to a really
important area of study that is
often left out The class will at-
tend concerts, and demonstra-
tions will be given by the instruc-
tor, Henry Doskey.
The honors seminar in
psychology will be similar to
Psychology 1050 and 1051 com-
bined into one semester. Energy
and Environmental Politics will
deal with conservation of energy
resources, and specifically the
world of the future.
"The Sixties, Be There Now
will cover trends of the '60s
generation, including women's
liberation, the sexual revolution,
mystic religions and drug use.
"Dimensions of Knowing: The
Relationship Among the
Disciplines will deal with how
the different disciplines tend to
determine how an individual
looks at the world.
TONY RUMPLE - ECU �wi Bvtl.
Students Protest Aid Cuts
Spring Hath Sprung
Even something as boring as studying can be made somewhat more bearable when it can be done outsit
as ECU freshman Mary Palmer of Richmond Va discovered. e
WASHINGTON (UPI) �
Hundreds of college students �
some in suits, some in jeans, but
all shouting "Books, not
bombs � marched from the
Capitol steps to the Education
Department this week to protest
President Reagan's proposed 25
percent cut in student aid.
Education Secretary William
Bennett refused to meet with the
students but sent Assistant
Secretary Edward Elmandorf to
talk with a delegation privately.
Before the meeting, the
students rallied on the steps of the
department, chanting slogans
and denouncing as unfair and un-
just Reagan's proposal to slash
federal grants and low-interest
student loans.
"We don't want any more
cuts said Christopher Dolan, a
student at Boston University.
Speaking through a bullhorn,
Dolan said, "We want a dream,
we want hope, we want an educa-
tion. Books not bombs
At one point the students
chanted, "Bennett, Bennett
apologize" � in reference to the
secretary's remarks that some
students hurt by the cuts merely
have to give up their cars, stereos
and beach vacations to make up
for them.
Bennett has refused to retract
the remark, saying that he was
only referring to those students
from well-to-do families who
receive federal assistance.
The three-block march follow-
ed three hours of lobbying on
Capitol Hill.
On The Inside
A , For a detailed explanation of
Classifieds9 Jountries' "� Edftortab, page
Sports10
�The Pirates and the
Seahawks split a doubleheader
Tuesday night, while the ECU
Men's Tennis team defeated
Campbell University. See
Sports, page 10.
�P.O. files suit? And what's
really behind USA for Africa,
is it just a corporate showcase?
See Entertainment, page 7.
ECU Registrar Gil Moore an-
nounced Monday that all
students should be aware that any
debts outstanding with the
university will delay the registra-
tion process.
Moore said the computers are
programmed so registration will
not be allowed if it is discovered
that the student has outstanding
parking tickets, library fines, or
other obligations.
&m





I Ht LAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 1985
Announcements
Residence Hall
Housing
Students enrolled Spring Semester 1985 who
plan to return to ECU Fall Semester IVSS and
who wish to be guaranteed residence hall
housing will be required to reserve rooms
during the weeK ot March 18 22 Prior to
reserving a room, a student must make an
advance room payment of $60 These
payments which must be accompained by
housing applications contracts will be ac
cepted in the Cashier s OHIce. room 10S,
Spilman Builung, beginning March 14
Students now living in residence halls should
obtain housing applications trom their
residence hall office Students residing off
campus should obtain applications from the
office of Housing Operations room "U.
Whlcharo Building Applications will oe
ava'iabie beginning March 12
ECU Snowshoe Spring
Break Skiers
Don t torget about tne t,ar rj q at Anne's
place March 31 Bring your own we II cook it
anoBYOB 211 Oak st i Tar Rver Estates!
can ?52 695 it you have anv questions or
need directions
NIH
The Naonai institutes of Health (NIH) is
recruiting for the Fail 1985 Co op work
period Positions available for students m
�he oliowmg disciplines Biology,
M'crobioiogy Computer Science.
Criem.sfrv Biomedical or Behavioral
S ences Contact the Co op office ill Rawl
313 immediately! Applications must be in by
April 5 1985
Guest Poet
caroiira poet and novelisi Fred Chap
oe; will be 'he guest of the Poetry Forum
Thurs March 21 ana Fr; March 22 He was
recent , awarded the prestigious Bolligen
Priw tor 1984 as well as the NEA fellowship
and Rockefeller Grant The UNC G pro
?essor will have a poetry reading Thurs at 4
p m .n Jenmns Auditorium He will conduct
a workshop Fr. at 10 30 am in 221
Mendenhall and critique students
s pts inte'esteo students should
pian on Drmg,ng 12 to 15 copies Of their work
�. the workshop Cnappeli s the author of
Midquest a 'etraiogy utilizing water, air ana
b rtti for rr,0re mfo . contact Dr Peter
Makuck 757 6398 or stop by Austin 313
Early Childhood
Club
The nex' meeting of the Early Ctvldhood
C ut a oe held Tues March 26, in Speight
129 a 5 p n- All Early Childhood Education
majors welcome New officers presiding get
nvolved now
AMA Elections
A �
running for an AMA
- or nei' year turn �
one -nterestea
posi'ion 'or nex year turn your name in the
HJfSide room 22? In Rawl
ECU Marshalls
Appi.ca'ions 'or Marshalls now being ac
ceptec In room 228 Mendenhall Student
Center Must be a iunior at the end of Spring
i985 semester with a 3 0 GPA Last day to file
S March 28, 1985
Sociology, Anthropology
And Economics
On Thurs March 21, Bin nosey will make
a presentation on Alternatives to America's
S'ums Currently the Director of Ft iauder
caie s Housing Authority, Bill is an M A
graduate in Sociology from ECU He has
Oee" called the "Siumbuster' by Time and
Reader s Digest magazines His unique
1 "echnique has captured the nation's
Decause of its low cost and high
Dene'it ration and ;ts creative combination
of private capital anc federal grants.
ECU Frisbee
Me ECU Fr soee Club meets at 3 Tues and
Thurs a' 'he bottom of the hill Business
meeting Tues at 9 in Mendenhall The 1 rates
did a fine job in Florida. This weekend we
travel to Richmond for Sauc tournament
Aatch for the Natural Light Spring uitimax
V March 30 8. 31 Fish and Bisions get
horizontal
Pirate Walk
aoes tnere s a service on campus that is
here for your use. and it's called Pirate
vVaik You have no need now to be scared to
waik at night, oecause we'll escort you and
we want too Please call 757 616 Thank
You!
Alpha Phi Big
Brothers
The sisters and big brothers of Alpha Phi
wish to welcome all the new big brothers
The next big brother meeting will be Sun.
night at 9 30 at the Alpha Phi house.
Prime Time
sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
every Thurs in Jenkins Aud Art Bldg at 8
p m Join us for fun, fellowship, and bible
study
Honors Program
if you have a 3 4 gpe and you want to learn
how to listen to music intelligently, or how to
understand your psychological makeup, or
how environmental policies fry to deal with
energy resource, or what the 60's were like,
or how the various academic disciplines
have their own unique views of the world, or
if you just want to be in a special section of a
regular freshman level General College
course, you want to take Honors courses See
Dr David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale, 757 6373.
Intramurals
12 3 pull The department of intramural
and recreational services will be having
their annual Tug O war on March 28 To
register for this events, go by Memorial
Gym 204 on march 25 or 26 Be part of the
fun!
Pi Kappa Phi
Brothers, pledges little sisters and all In-
terested are reminded that e team softbal!
plays today at 4 on field 6 be there. Next
brotherhood will be Mon at � at Mendenhall
This is the weekend we've been waiting for.
All Pi kapps will meet at the islander Motel
in Emerald Isle this Fri. to get blind all
weekend long during our Rose Ball celebra
tion
All-Campus Table
Tennis Tournament
The Student union Recreation Committee Is
sponsoring a student, staff, and faculty All-
Campus Table Tennis Tournament. The
event will be held on Mon April 1st and
Tues April 2 at a: 30 p.m. at Mendenhall Stu-
dent center Billiards Area. Registration
forms may be picked up and turned In to the
MSC Billiards Center by Fri March 29.
Trophies will be awared to 1st, 2nd. and 3rd
places. For more information call 757 6611
CXt. 239
Student Dietetic Assoc
March is Nat nai Nutrition month! In
recognition of this the Student Dietetic
Association will be giving dietary analysis in
front of the Student Store March 20 & 21 Just
tell us what you eat during an average day
and we will plug the information Into the
computer and In return you will be Informed
on what nutrients you maybe lacking as well
as what foods you can find them In, also If
you're getting too much of some nutrlent(s)
you will also be informed The computer
printout is yours to keep! Cost only 50
Speech, Language
and Hearing Symposium
will be held in the Blue Aud of Brody Medical
Sciences Buildlng(ECU)on March 21 22
Registration Is Thurs , March 21 from
12 30 1 00 p m The speakers are Fred Bess.
Ph D of Vanderbilf University and Jean Ann
Golden PhD o) ECU
Larry Linville
Better known as Frank Burns" of MASH,
will be at ECU on Tues , April 16, 1985, at 8
p m in Hendrix Theatre Tickets for
students will be S2, faculty and staff $4. and
16 for the general public
Student Loan Fund
Ail National Direct Student Loan Borrowers
are reminded of the exit interview require
ment upon graduation or those otherwise not
returning to ECU Fall Semester, 1985, as an
undergraduate or graduate student. The in
terview is necessary to inform NDSL Reci
pients of the repayment schedule, provisions
for loan cancellation, and other pertinent in
formation You are requested to report to the
Conference room 221 of the Mendenhall
Studnet Center at 5 30 p m on either April 3,
or April 17 If you cannot meet on either date,
then, you would want to call 757 6817 for an
appointment
Lectures
Department of Foreign Languages and
Litera'ures and the ECU School of
Busmess Topics Times. Locations by
Dr William R Foids Jr Director of inter
national Business University of South
Carolina 1 Foreign Languages for interna
tionai Business Education BB201 11 am 2
Preparing for Career Opportunities 'n Inter
national Business. BB305 2pm Wed April
3�All are cordially invited. No admission
Charge
New Student
Orientation '85
Five week position in residence as Orienta
tion Assistant for Eas' Carolina's Summer
Orientation Program for new freshmen and
transfers Dates June 12 July 11 Re
quiremenn to apply satisfactory comple
tion of at least 24 credi' hours, student must
not be on academic or disciplinary proba
tion, must be available to live on campus
June 12 July 11, must be planning to return
to ECU in the Fall, must be planning to at
tend summer school $800 Stipend room and
board during orientation dates Application
available now in Office of the Assoscate
Dean of Students room 210 Whichard
Building Completed application applica
tion plus three references) due by March 22
m the Office of the Associate Dean of
Students room 210 Whichard Building
Omega Psi Phi
and Delta Sigma Theta will have their
Omega Delta Ball on March 23 It will be a
tropical evening of enchantment. Tickets are
on sale now
Omega Psi Phi will also have a iam at the
Unlimited Touch on Thurs March 21 There
will be a 9 11 happy hour and all proceeds
will go to the Heart Fund Association Rides
will be provided between 9 10 30 at MSC
Omega Psi Phi will also have a party Fri. at
the Culture Center March 23 from 10 2 All
proceeds will go to the heart Fund Associa
tion
ECU Surf Team
will be sponsoring a Happy Hour from 3 6:30
this Fri at the Treehouse Restaurant Two
surfing movies (Endless Summer and The
Performers) will be shown along with videos
of the ECU team See you there!
PPHA
Professional Health Alliance will have a
meeting Thurs , March 21, in room 221
Mendenhall Student Center Our guest
speaker will be Ms Benson from Co-
operative Education She will speak about
careers in health related fields The meeting
will begin at 5:30 p m All members and In
terested guests are encouraged to attend.
ECU Women's Volleyball
Team
Tryouts will be held for the Fall 1985 season
interested women students should come to
Minges Coliseum March 25, 26, 27, or 28 at
6 30 p m or call Imogene Turner at 757 6161.
Buddhist Study
There will be a meeting tonight in E201 of
The Physics Building at 7 learn about
Taoism Learn to meditate Please bring a
cushion
ECU Biology Club
will have its next meeting on Mon March
25. This meeting will be in the Helms reading
room at 7 p m. Our Scheduled speaker will
be Ms. Betty F line hum from Elon College.
She will be speaking on Cytotechnoiogy and
the training and careers avllavle In this
field The final plans for the Collegiate
Academy of Science trip to Guilford College
In Greensboro will also be finalized. All
members planning to go on the trip should
attend All tickets for the Belk Tyler spen
ding spree must be turned in at this meeting,
also AH Interested persons cordially invited.
NAACP Elections
Elections for a5-M NAACP offices will be
held Mon March 25, at the 5:30 meeting in
the Coffeehouse. If you are Interested in run
ning for an office, the nominating comm irtee
will be meeting with prospective candidates
Wed March 20, in Mendenhall rm. 243, bet
ween 7-8:30. Persons missing this meeting
who art still Interested In running for an of-
fice should schedule to meet with Wllme
752 �20l on Thurs. To vote in this election,
you must join by noon March 25th11
Coping With Stress
A free mini class offered by the ECU
Counseling Center for Students. You can:
identify sources of stress, make positive
changes, manage your response to stressful
situations, learn to relax improve self con-
fidence. Wed, Thrus. Mon, Tues, March
27 2�; April 1-2 � 3-4 p.m. 309 Wright Annex
(attend all tour meetings). No advance
registration is required. Call or stop by the
Counseling Center for further Information
(307 Wright Annex 757 6661)
Sigma Phi Epsilon
On Sat , March 23rd, the brothers of Sigma
Phi Epsilon will be sponsoi ing a 2 mile fund
run and a 10 K road race for The Heart
Association The 2 mile fund run begins at 9
a.m. on Sat , March 23rd and the 10 K run
beginsatv 30 am in the same day Registra
tion and starting points for both races will be
at the intersection of 3rd and Reade St s bet
ween 7 8 45 am
Paragon
Thriller Death Afterlife If I Should Die "
A multi media presentation, March 75 &
26�7 & 9 p m in Wright Auditorium Free
admission
AOPMr. ECU Man
Sign up is outside the Student Store and
registration Is S3 It will be held at T W s
March 28fh and 1st prize is $100 lots of other
prizes too! Come out and register early we
have limited space! Sponsered by Coke and
other area stores
Gamma Beta Phi
Honor Society
Will meet March 21, at 7 00 in Jenkins Aud
You must turn in your tickets and money
tonight See you there!
Non-Credit Computer
Courses
The Small computer, April 27, Introdu. tion
to Progamming in BASIC Apr il 20 In
troduction to BASE II. April 27, Introduction
to Multiplan, April 27 Contact continuing
Educaiton, Erwm Hall or call 757 613
Policy
4-H Collegiate Club
The ECU 4 H Collegia'? Club will have 3
meeting, Thurs March 21 at 5 p m In
Mendenhall All members and interested
persons please attend
Because of limited space and time to devote to
announcements the following guidelines are
heretofore to be followed by groups or depart-
ments submitting announcements:
�All announcements submitted will be printed if
space allows.
�When space limitations exist (as they often do),
the most recent announcements of the following
list (which is in descending order of importance)
will be printed. There will be no deviation from
these rules.
�Campus organization meetings.
�Academic announcements (guest lecturers,
etc.).
�Intramural and club sport announcements.
�Co-op employment announcements.
�Church and religious announcements directly
pertaining to students.
�All-campus parties not devoted to profit.
�Club or fraternity or sorority parties that are
devoted to charities.
�Other announcements not covered under the
above rules but that are group-related.
THERE will be absolutely no congratulation
messages printed in this section. Also, The East
Carolinian reserves the right to edit an-
nouncements for non-essential material, gram-
mmar, punctuation, spelling, obscenity or libel.
This policy is effective Jan. 15, 1985.
Cheerleader Tryouts
Anyone, guys arc. girls Intereste
involved in athletics, traveling and mp-
people, plan o atfent; 'he first meeting for
varsity squad cheerleader tryoo's on Thurs ,
Marrh 21. 1985 at 5:30 in the lobby of Minges
Coliseum if you want to be a part of an
award winning squad, makes plans to tryou
out for ECU Cheer lend'no See ,ou tner�'

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5 Lift w tl
8 Heavy nam
12 Opening -
13 Regret
14 Son of S
15 In music h
16 S'ocs
18 Hoste .
19 Symfc
thallium
20 Partner
21 Heb'ev. ett
23 Compass p
24 Likeness
26 An;ma:
28 Piche-s
29 Spread I
drying
30 Chinese ;ra i
32 Repetit
33 Anger
34 Chickens
35 Mature
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 1985
to
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OF 13 TRIPS
EASTERN
in the con-
3n36a, Mexico,
or Caribbean
M!
EBEAN CRUISE!
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CLOROX
34-OZ BOX
:ss
9
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IFC.S
PONS
IflE WILL DOUBLE 5
fC 50 FACE VALUE)
$0 PURCHASE'
tails m-store i
Disadvantaged Not Informed About Help
(C PS) � Poor and minority-
high school students do not know
about college financial aid, and
many are not enrolling in college
as a result, the authors of a recent
study conclude.
In a broad indictment of col-
Safe and Sound
leges, and federal and state finan-
cial aid officials, authors of the
National Student Aid Coalition
report say the current system for
disseminating financial aid infor-
mation is woefully inadequate.
"There are all kind of pieces
missing from a comprehensive in-
formation system says NSAC
spokeswoman Linda Berkshire.
The 37-page NSAC report,
released Feb. 25, says the disad-
vantaged students who need
financial aid the most don't have
access to information about aid
programs because colleges do not
recruit inner city students.
Even more damning, the report
says available reference guides to
aid frequently are outdated, inac-
curate or difficult to understand.
Highway Patrol Looks After Governor
RALEIGH (UPI) � State
Bureau of Investigation Director
Robert Morgan says North
Carolina governors are getting
more protection than they need.
"1 think the governor needs
some security, but I think they
inerdo it. I don't mean it critical-
ly of anyone Morgan said in an
interview published Monday.
The governor's security detail
is made up of three SB1 agents
and 14 State Highway Patrol
troopers. The SBI supervises the
detail and its agents are most
often at the governor's side.
Morgan was state attorney
general from 1969 to 1974 and
security for the governor was
beefed up during his term in of-
fice. The attorney general's office
supervisors he SBI.
"(Gov.) Dan Moore (1965-69)
rode all over this state with a
highway patrolman and a
driver Morgan said. "When
(Gov.) Bob Scott (1969-73) came
in, we had turmoil at the univer-
sities (and protection was increas-
ed). At that time there wasan't
even a fence around the gover-
nor's mansion. Anyone could go
up and ring the doorbell
This year, Gov. Jim Martin
proposed that the SBI be remov-
ed from the governor's security
detail and the Highway Patrol be
entirely responsible for protec-
ting the governor.
Martin administration officials
later modified the position and
proposed that the Highway
Patrol head the security detail
and that the SBI's role be limited
to intelligence gathering and ad-
vance work.
Negotiations between the Mar-
tin administration and Attorney
General Lacy Thornburg are still
under way.
The negotiations have political
implications because Martin is a
Republican and Thornburg and
Morgan are Democrats. The
Highway Patrol is controlled by
the Department of Crime Control
and Public Safety, which is part
of the Martin administration.
Morgan said he has no idea
why Martin wanted to drop SBI
protection. He noted that as a
Democratic attorney general, he
oversaw SBI security for
Republican Gov. James
Holshouser.
"I provided the security for
Gov. Holshouser and I never had
any hint of distrust or
suspicion Morgan said. "I
think he (Martin) feels more com-
fortable with the idea of Highway
Patrol (security) that is
answerable to him
The systems for telling students
about the oft-changing rules and
funding levels for many pro-
grams can't keep up with all the
changes, the report says.
The report adds nontraditional
students, such as adults who want
to continue their formal educa-
tion, face similar obstacles
because the government counts
on high schools to tell students
about aid.
"Although these nontradi-
tional students are the largest
growing component of
postsecondary enrollments, they
often do not realize their oppor-
tunities for financial aid, prin-
cipally because they are not in
high schools where the informa-
tion is most available the
report warns.
The report faults the federal
Department of Education for
concentrating on telling students
how not to get federal aid.
Read The Classifieds
ACROSS
1 Mast
5 Lift with lever
8 Heavy hammer
12 Opening in skin
13 Regret
14 Son of Seth
15 In music, high
16 Stops
18 Hostelry
19 Symbol for
thallium
20 Partner
21 Hebrew letter
23 Compass point
24 Likeness
26 Animal
28 Pitchers
29 Spread for
drying
30 Chinese pagoda
32 Repetition
33 Anger
34 Chickens
35 Mature
36 One, no matter
which
37 Demise
38 Decays
40 Microbe
41 Sun god
43 Latin
conjunction
44 Await
settlement
45 Near
47 Collection of
facts
49 An Asian
51 Macaw
52 Multicolored
55 Transaction
56 Anglo-Saxon
money
57 Strip of leather
DOWN
1 Quarrel
2 Tadpole
3 Skill
4 Again prefix
5 Talk idly
6 Regulation
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
7 Still
8 Symbol for
methyl
9 Southern
blackbird
10 Resolute
11 Anglo-Saxon
slave
16 Ugly, old
women
17 Hurried
20 Female horse
22 Babylonian
deity
25 Measuring
device
26 Insect
27 Vapor
28 Period of time
29 Attempt
31 Hard-wood tree
33 Those holding
office
34 Flock
36 Room under
roof
37 Coarse cotton
drilling
39 Faeroe Islands
whirlwind
40 Italian seaport
41 Knocks
42 Ox of Celebes
44 Young salmon
45 Seed coating
46 Diplomacy
48 Everyone
50 Greek letter
51 Consumed
53 Old pronoun
54 Hebrew month
s
S
Media Board
now accepting applications for General
Manager for the 1985-86 academic year
for the following: The East Carolinian,
WZMB-FM, Buccaneer, Rebel, Photo
Lab and Expressions Magazine
(formerly The Ebony Herald). Please
apply at the Media Board office, 2nd
floor, Publications Bldg. Phone
757-6009. Applications accepted
through 3-22-85.
3S
ss
Puzzle Answer
sPARPRYMACEl
pORERUEENOs1
ALT 1HALTS 1 1NN
TLMATEPESE
1 'MAGE� 8EAs1
EWERST JEDMTAA
ROTEBlR JE ENS,
AGEANVDEATH
� rolTS GERMl
RAET 1PENDBATl A
ANA1! RAN1AR
POLYCHROMAT1C
SALEORA1BELt
"They put out posters saying
things like the best way not to get
financial aid is not to register for
the draft and not repay student
loans Berkshire says.
States spend less than one-half
of one percent of the aid funds
disseminating information on
what's available, the report
notes.
Leaders of the NSAC's 37
member organizations say they
need new ways of giving students
the word.
Berkshire says that although
the report does not identify
potential ways to pay for such
advertising, NSAC may help
organize a fund drive.
A master calendar to coor-
dinate the timing ot financial aid
programs, and a guide geared to
high school juniors and
sophomores also would help,the
report's author
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THHt AST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 1985
uJije iEafit (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, f� Manner
Greg Rideout, uma&m bum
Jennifer Jendrasiak. m emm Tom Luvender, o.rcor0rfvmm�
& ott Cooper, cb m m� Anthony Martin, bus,� Managfr
Tina Maroschak, svkE&w John Peterson, cmnn
Bll 1 Ml rCHEl 1 , Cimhho htmrng BILL DAWSON, ProJmuon Manager
Doris Rankins, secma Rick Mccormac, co-spom w�
DANIEl MADRER, Emmtmmmmi Editor DeCHANII.E JOHNSON. Ad rechnum.
March 21. 198
Opinion
Page 4
Elections
Congrats To All New Officers �
Well, all the votes are tallied.
The campaigns are over and the
winners are clear. The East Caroli-
nian would like to express its Con-
grats to all the new officers; we're
sure that you all will remember
why vou ran and work hard to ac-
omplish your goals.
Also, the elections committee
deserves a round of applause.
Georgia Mooring and her gang did
g eat job under intense pressure.
SA T Scores
h irawal of the 700
SA1 score bill Tuesday
u sponsor, Rep. Howard B.
ipin, D-Beaufort, is regret-
� ible. A ner Chapin faced stiff op-
n from members of the
teral Assembly's House Educa-
ion Committee, he decided to
withdraw the bill.
iff lobbying came from the
i N C - s y s t em, whose a d -
orators said the bill was un-
and would hamper desegrega-
tion efforts. The university's of-
felt that admissions deci-
sions -hould be left to individual
schools and that tampering with
'his process was an affront to each
school's academic integrity. This is
n right and wrong at the same
What we feel is this: 700 on the
I is pretty low. In fact, it's only
300 above the zero stage. Most
Is would not have a problem
with the standard, but those that
did ould just have to seek harder
and harder to find qualified ap-
ants. Other school systems
have standards; we can, too.
if we already had this standard
in place, recent embarrassments to
system and its individual
!s would have never occur-
� 1. The Chris Washburn incident
(his big 470 on the SAT) proves
U people with very low skills can
manipulate their way (and be
manipulated) into our universities.
If a kid can't score 700 on a test
that is designed to show college ap-
titude, well, he doesn't deserve to
to a university. Someone must
You guys did a good job pulling
off our own little democracy.
And of course the winner, David
Brown, our new SGA president,
deserves a handshake. David, the
job is not easy. There are many
things to do, and you've only got a
year. Just be honest and hard-
working, and the results will speak
for themselves.
Next year should be interesting.
set a cut-off, a point by nature
quite arbitrary. There are always
such points. All kinds of places,
things and ideas have them. What
we are saying when we advocate a
700 minimum is that we want peo-
ple who can do college work. And
even 700 is stretching it a bit.
But, you say, the test is skewed.
And, of course, it isn't really a true
indicator of college performance.
Well, the academic debate will pro-
bably go on for pretty long about
this. We do know one thing. Most
kids that get more than 1400 are
pretty bright and do damn well in
school. And those that score high
and drop out of school usually end
up doing something intellectually
stimulating anyway.
Thus, the scores are valid.
Minorities may score lower, but on
the average they can get into a
UNC-system school. The average
for black students is over 700.
For those that don't get the re-
quired 700, the community college
system is ready to take them in.
And, if the student does well in one
of the state's community colleges,
he can transfer. He has then shown
that his below par score on the
SAT was an abberation, not the
norm. He can then go to a UNC-
system school. No problem.
We applaud Rep. Chapin's ef-
forts, it was a lonely fight, one he
was destined to lose. The minimum
score is acceptable to us. And, we
feel, it is acceptable to the
students. Administrators, here our
voices.
KEUjO.COMRAPenlVe
B6EN IN SB�Cg FDR
amp iVe come, sorrv,
toeeramewi. BRezwev
-BREZHNEV.
C�AP.
BREZHNSV
ISP6AP70H
NO
his mx ANppv hSSSm m
ANiPRORDV m?
PCAP?

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WHO PIP
W8&r?T BBSS6 uvpib�'ds"ft�w'
PRESiDgwr TSrRS jm UP IN W OLYMPICS,
Campus Forum
Yankee, Go Home
Although I've only been in
Nicaragua for four weeks (I'll be here
five more months), I've had the oppor-
tunity to travel fairly extensively in the
northern aas of Nueva Segovia: in
San Juan de Limay, Jalapa, Jicaro,
Quilali, and here in Ocotal. I am sad to
report that the people of these northern
areas are being severly harmed by the
Contra War. Many innocent people
have been killed: bus drivers, forestry
technicians, farming cooperative
leaders, health care workers and com-
munity leaders have been prime targets
of Contra aggresion. All of these are
civilians. In addition, the psychological
damage of the war is considerable:
mothers fearing for their sons who are
in the military; families of civilian vic-
tims; wives and lovers of the men
fighting in this war; isolation of towns
like Quilali and San Juan de Limay
whose phone lines have been cut and
whose population fears to go out on
the roads because of the possibility of
land mines; the lack of food goods in
general because transportation is so
difficult to come by.
I realize that there are problems with
the Sandinista government; these pro-
blems are plainly seen and have been
documented, and yet the fact of the
matter is that in the internationally
supervised elections, the Sandinistas
received more popular support than
President Reagan received in the USA.
But once again, I must admit, the
Frente does have and certainly does
create some of its own problems. And,
in all honesty, what five-year-old
revolution has not had its problems, in-
cluding our own?
But what I am mainly concerned
with is that we Americans do not im-
plicate ourselves in the murder of
civilians by the Contra forces. And so
I'm urging readers to contact their
senators and congressmen. Please put
pressure on them to resist President
Reagan's mistaken notion that more
aid to the Contra will clear up the pro-
blem with Nicaragua.
Ceasing to fund Contra forces will
not stop the Contra War here, but it
will stop Americans from becoming
implicated in the murders of civilians.
More U.S. aid to the Contra will most
likely mean more deaths of innocent
Nicaraguans, and I firmly believe that
most Americans would not like to see
this blemish in our national history.
Mike Hamer
Iglesia San Jose
Ocotal, Nicaragua
Thanx, ECU
This is an informal thank-you to all
the polite and patient people here at
ECU. You see, I'm presently a varsity
cheerleader suffering from a new and
awkward ankle injury which called for
the assistance of two crutches that I
currently call tall and strong.
Having to climb stairs and walk halls
often creates lines behind me, but no
comments have I heard nor have I en-
countered any new Olympians jumping
over my crutches rushing to class. The
doors that have opened along with
over-all concern really gives me the in-
centive to continue clipping to class.
Again, this is a sincere thanks to all
the classy people here at ECU.
Eric Skinner
Cheerleader, ECU
(Editor's Note: Our staff has also
noticed the amazing niceness of our
fellow students. We feel the student
body deserves a round of applause.
That's nice.)
Mills Muddy
In the four years I've been a student
at ECU, Cynthia Mills you have to be
the first person that really got under
Multinationals Cause Misery, Hunger In Third World
my skin about a subject in the Campus
Forum. I am referring to the "No
Mike" letter you wrote on March 19.
As a political science major, you show-
ed the current political thinking
North Carolina politicians by writing a
demeaning letter about a candidate the
day before the election so that the can-
didate cannot protect himself. M
some of your letter is true, but you
showed your ignorance on the Ma
Attractions Committee and the 5
dent Union and the work they try ; :
for the students of ECU. And, these
people do this at no charge to you the
student.
If you don't like the way the MAC
and Student Union programs work for
you, I have one question for you. Why
are you not a member of the Student
Union?
As chairperson of the Special Con-
certs Committee of the Studer I mon,
I know for a fact something that your
letter lacked. Mike has worked hard all
year to get a top act to come to ECL
Bands are hard to book for this area of t
the state. And they could vn ou.t
the Eddie Money and Heart snow, -
here are more facts. That show lost
$20,000 at Clemson last spring and a
lot more at Cumberland County
Arena. You failed to mention the
Kinks concert. I am not the greater.
Kinks fan but it was the best she at
ECU since the Cheap Trick conce" '
spring 1981. If Mike does not win
election, I hope for the students that be
will continue to give his time to there
and this great university.
Thomas Combs
Chairman, Spec. Cone
Sr Business
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Ma
drop them by our office in the Pub a
tions Building, across from the en
trance of Joyner Library.
multinational corporations
are increasingly locating production
facilities in Third World countries in
h oi "good business climates
Problems of hunger, poverty and disease
suing worse in the very countries
v. here corporate activity is increasing.
1 nore telling is that the distribution
of income in these countries is becoming
more polarized and unequal.
From The Left
Jay Stone
Studies conducted by the United Na-
tions and other international agencies
show that during the development boom
of the 1960s, for 40 percent to 60 percent
of the world's population development
brought rising unemployment, decreases
in purchasing power, and thus lower
consumption. In a World Bank survey
of income distribution patterns in poor
countries, Irma Adelman and Cynthia
Taft Morris found that the development
boom of the 1960s produced a striking
increase in incomes, both in absolute
and relative terms, for the richest five
percent, while the share of the poorest
40 percent shrank. (This correlation bet-
ween corporate development and Third
World poverty is even more pronounced
today.)
Though, according to such gross
economic indicators as GNP, Third
World countries develop when multina-
tio 's come to their counties, millions
in the bottom 40 percent of the popula-
tion actually have less food, worse
clothing and poorer housing than their
parents. This is not adequately ap-
preciated by heads of state in developing
nations who zealously seek multina-
tional companies. They narrowly focus
on the GNP bottom line and fail to see
the larger consequences of multinational
involvement in their economies.
As 1 have explained in previous col-
umns on de-industrialization, American
multinationals have been investing more
heavily in Third World countries in re-
cent years to maintain high levels of pro-
fit in the face of foreign competition.
Low wage rates and other advantages
allow them to do this.
Production in developing countries
mostly takes place in "free production
zones According to Richard Barnet, a
state department advisor in the Kennedy
administration and co-founder of the In-
stitute for Policy Studies, these are
enclaves designed to attract foreign
capital by offering a range of incentives
� exemption from duties and taxes on
machinery and raw materials, a five- to
ten-year income tax "holiday freedom
from foreign exchange controls,
preferential financing, cheap labor, a
union-free environment, etc etc.
Barnet gives examples of wage rates in
a few of these so-called "free zones" in
his book The Lean Years. An unskilled
worker in the Bombay free zone makes
$25 a month, fringe benefits and all. In
Bataan, workers were earning $36 a
month in 1975. In the La Romana free
zone of the Dominican Republic, con-
trolled by the U.S. conglomerate
Gulf&Western, the wage in 1978 was 34
cents an hour. In Mauritius in 1975, un-
skilled female workers were paid 70
cents per day.
Another booming free zone is the
Mexican border. More than 450
assembly plants have been located along
the 2,000-mile frontier. General Electric,
RCA, Rockwell, Samsonite and many
others operate twin factories on each
side of the border. Complex operations
requiring technical skills are performed
on the U.S. side. The components are
then shipped across the river for final
assembly by Mexican workers who
receive a fifth to a third of the U.S.
wages. (Whenever wages in a free zone
begin to rise, the multinational simply
moves to another.)
Not only is this corporate activity bad
for American workers who cannot
possibly compete with Third World
wage rates and whose jobs are
simultaneously being eliminated by
automation, but it is bad for the Third
World countries themselves. The in-
dustrialization of the Third World has
destroyed jobs in the countryside as land
has become more valuable because of
corporate demand for it. Nowhere can
this be seen more clearly than in the
agricultural industry.
Land that was once used for sub-
sistence farming is bought up by United
Fruit or a plantation owner who sells to
United Fruit. A cash crop such as coffee
or bananas is grown on the land for ex-
port to the United States. The end result
of this process is that rich and generally
well-fed countries are now importing
more and more of their food from coun-
tries with a high rate of malnutrition.
Most of the food is non-essential �
cocoa, coffee, tea, bananas and sugar.
Poor countries, on the other hand, im-
port staples from the United States �
chiefly wheat, corn and rice.
As a consequence, it should not sur-
prise people to learn that 25 to 30 per-
cent of children born in most developing
countries die before their fifth birthday,
and in some, more than half. The cause
is generally related to malnutrition or
hunger. (Francis Moore Happe and
Joseph Collins capture the relationship
between multinationals and world
hunger vividly in their book Food First.)
At the same time industrialization and
modern agribusiness have eliminated the
opportunity for many peasants to sup-
port themselves by farming, they have
failed to create anything approaching
equivalent opportunities inside the fac-
tories. This is because modern technolgy
displaces jobs; automation replaces
labor. Hence, the process of in-
dustrialization destroys self-
provisioning agriculture and leaves
millions of small farmers with neither
land nor job.
This trend occurs at a time when the
number of people looking for work in
the Third World is expected to increase
sharply. According to the Internals
Labor Organization, every year between
now and the year 2000 36 million peop
will enter the labor force � a huge ex-
pansion. Between 1950 and 1975 only
million people a year were looking to;
jobs. About 85 percent of the job
seekers at the dawn of the next centurv
will be in the Third World � more than
1 billion men and women.
Though multinationals hold out the
same promise of investing massive
amounts of capital in a developing coun-
try, that is not, in fact, what they do
They generally use scarce local capital to
finance their local operations rather
than bringing capital from the United
States or Europe.
According to Richard Barnet, from
1960 to 1970 about 78 percent of the
manufacturing operations of U.Sbased
global corporations in Latin America
were financed by local capital. Yet, bet
ween 1960 and 1968, U.Sbased
multinationals reported taking 79 per-
cent of their net profits out of Latin
America.
As poverty and desperation increase
in the Third World, it is likely that
military conflicts and guerilla wars will
erupt. That is when the clarion call will
be sounded throughout our nation for a
war of intervention to protect U.S. in-
terests! Will United Fruit fight this war
or will you and I?
F U 7
(CPS) - The c
sponsored sanctuars
aiding refugees
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powerful new a
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The Golden
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Scholastic Press -
The
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be able to vote
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day of the w g
Dr. Sydnev Barnwd
of ECU's Schcv
missions and student
speak to the group ej
2 in Mendenhall 221
the topic of the meet ml
been decided. et
The last meet in
uill be April 15 and be
by the newly electeo
has been scheduled I
in the Mendenhall G
she said.
Adver
Call
757-6:
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t PftORDV PgUp?
ZHNEV
?cAP ?
6cUSEAN
e clvmrcs,
.�
e
n the Campus
tig to the "No
e on March 19.
?r, you show-
hinking of
b writing a
:andidate the
it the can-
' Maybe
but you
he Major
: :he Stu-
I thc :ry to do
And. these
g to you the
a) the M.A.C.
. ims work for
for you. Why
� the Student
he Special Con-
fident Union.
ling that your
worked hard all
come to ECU.
I for this area of
. d have gouen I
-ieart show, but
That show lost
spring and a
-erland County
: to mention the
no! the greatest
- the best show at
rrick concert in
ke does not win this
ne students that he
� e his time to them
sity.
Thomas Combs
an. Spec. Cone.
Sr Business
rum Rules
nUm welcomes letters
ints of view. Mail or
ur office in the Publica-
from the en-
' I ibran
rid
krty and desperation increase
lird World, it is likely that
inflicts and guerilla wars will
t is when the clarion call will j
throughout our nation for aj
srvention to protect U.S. itt-
' United Fruit fight this warl
and I?
i Tding to the International
aniation, every year between
ic ear 2000 36 million people
- labor force � a huge ex-
letween 1950 and 1975 only 22
jople a ear were looking for
ut percent of the job
lawn of the next century
he Third World � more than
len and women.
multinationals hold out the
investing massive
ipital in a developing coun-
not. in fact, what they do.
rally use scarce local capital to
leir local operations rather
Sing capital from the United
uirope.
ig to Richard Bar net, from
70 about 78 percent of the
knng operations of U.Sbased
Jporations in Latin America
ced by local capital. Yet, bet-
() and 1968, U.Sbased
ials reported taking 79 pe"
eir net profits out of Latin
IHl 1 ASI C AROI.INIAN
MARCH 21. 1985
Questions Raised About Refugee Shelters
(CPS) - The church-
sponsored sanctuary movement,
aiding refugees fleeing to the
I S. from war-torn Central
America, is gaining a potentially
powerful new ally: college
students.
Although still in the embrvonic
stage, efforts are burgeoning to
establish a campus sanctuary net-
work to help harbor El
Salvadoran and Guatamelan
refugees in defiance of federal
authorities:
�At least three university stu-
dent organizations in California
have voted within the past year to
establish sanctuaries.
�Representatives of 12 other
California schools are consider-
ing similar steps following a
Ruerside conference last month
to establish the foundation for a
campus sanctuary network.
�Brown University students,
who last fall approved a referen-
dum calling on the university to
establish a sanctuary, are work-
ing with local churches to set up a
sanctuary after university of-
ficials tailed to respond.
�A University oi Colorado stu-
dent organization aiding Central
American refugees will ask stu-
dent government leaders later this
month to establish a sanctuary.
Combined with the dozen or so
campus-affiliated churches that
are already part of a 200-member
nationwide network of church-
sponsored sanctuaries, sanctuary
movement leaders are convinced
they are beginning to tap a
mother-lode of resources and
support.
"The educational impact alone
could be tremendous says Rev.
Herb Schmidt, pastor of the
Lutheran Campus Ministray at
the University of Arizona, which
runs a sanctuary.
"Some of these refugees have
literally escaped with their lives
and when students hear about
that kind of thing, it raises their
level of awareness about the
whole Central America issue he
says.
A network of campus sanc-
tuaries last operated to protect
draft dodgers during the Vietnam
war.
UC-Riverside graduate student
Deborah Allen, who helped
organize last month's campus
sanctuary conference, is convinc-
ed the sentiments that led to the
Vietnam War era sanctuaries can
be tapped again.
"College students may be a lit-
tle less progressive now Allen
acknowledges, "but while the
progressive students may be a
minority, they're a strong minori-
ty-
"And students will get involv-
ed once they realize they can ac-
tually do something concrete to
prevent refugees from being
deported or killed she adds.
Joan Cardellino, who coor-
dinates sanctuary support efforts
for the graduate student govern-
ment at Cal-Berkely says,
"Students in this county take
their political freedom for
granted. When they realize that
university students in El
Salvador, who are key targets of
repression, get killed for doing
much less than they do, they say
'Maybe I should be doing
something about that
Up to now, the five-year-old
movement to protect refugees
from deportation has been run
almost entirely by churches.
"It's always been thought of as
a religious movement UC-
Riverside's Allen says, trying to
explain why college students have
been slow to get involved.
"But this is a moral and
humanitarian imperative she
says, "and you don't have to
belong to a church to believe the
U.S. government is breaking its
own laws by deporting these peo-
ple
Sanctuary movement leaders
maintain the estimated 600,000
Salvadorans and Guatemalans il-
legally in the U.S. are political
refugees fleeing from the civil
wars in their countries, and are
therefore entitled to asylum.
The Reagan administration,
which backs the Salvadoran
government, considers the vast
majority to be economic
refugees. It has been rejecting all
but a small fraction of asylum re-
quests.
And it is prosecuting people
aiding the refugees.
In January, officers arrested 16
workers, including some nuns
and priests, in Arizona. Last
month, two Iowa sanctuary
workers were convicted of aiding
Salvadoran refugees.
College students who aid
refugees directly face the pro-
spect of prosecution, but campus
sanctuary movement leaders say
that is unlikely.
"We are prepared to take the
risk says UC-Riverside's Allen,
"but there is an awful lot of sanc-
tuary work that can be done that
does not involve risks
The campus sanctuary
members organize food and fund
drives, provide bail money for
jailed refugees, and arrange cam-
pus appearances of refuges who
describe life in their home coun-
tries to campus groups.
Allen says the Riverside group
began its sanctuary work after in-
dications from the Immigration
and Naturalization Service that it
would not raid churches, schools
or hospitals in search of illegal
aliens.
"That planted the seed Allen
says.
The graduate Student Council
at UC-Riverside voted in
February 1984 to establish a sanc-
tuary. Since then students have
housed one refugee and given
various forms of assistance to
others.
The graduate student assembK
at UC-Irvine followed suit in
August, the assemblv at I (
Berkeley in October.
Allen says Riverside students
are establishing a newsletter tor
college sanctuary members, and
are preparing a "how to"
booklet for those interested in
establishing d sanctuarv.
ISUBSTRnoij!
SAND
Cm S m o
Steroid buse Outweighs Benefits
Health
Column
fhe use of anabolic steroids
has gained widespread attention
with the testing of athletes at the
Pan American and Olympic
games. Two gold medals and one
silver medal had to be returned to
the International Olympic Com-
mittee. Anabolic steroids are us-
ed by weight lifters, football
players, pole vaulters and discus
throwers with the hope of enhan-
cing performance. Gymnasts use
them with the deliberate intention
of stunting growth. Most athletes
get these substances from sources
other than medical providers and
use them in doses much greater
than recommended levels.
Anabolic steroids are hor-
mones that resemble
testosterone, a hormone which
accelerates growth in tissues upon
which it acts. Although
testosterone is not considered a
pure anabolic steroid, it is being
used more frequently by athletes
due to its potent anabolic effects
and the difficulty of detecting it
through laboratory testing.
Benefits of anabolic steroids
include increased muscle mass,
euphoria and a sense of decreased
The Golden Circle Award
fatigue � more energy and en-
durance. However, studies have
shown that athletes do not obtain
any aerobic conditioning from
steroid use and that only those
athletes who trained intensively
in heavy resistive activities such
as weight lifting will see any in-
crease in muscle mass. A special
diet must be coordinated with ex-
ercise and steroid use to show anv
benefit.
The trade-off for these
minimally beneficial effects is
possible serious side effects in-
cluding gynecomastia (abnormal-
ly large breasts in men), reduc-
tion of the size of the testicles,
enlargement of the prostate
gland, nausea, diarrhea, and in
women, hirsutism (excessive hair
growth in unlikely areas � face,
chest), and muscularization
which may not be reversed.
Anabolic steroids also may cause
progressive liver destruction;
there is a possibility that liver
cancer may be a result of steroid
use. Also, the increase in strength
and muscle mass disappears once
anabolic steroids are discon-
tinued. Because of the side effects
and the limited beneficial use of
anabolic steroids, the American
College of Sports Medicine has
discouraged their use.
We Have Now
Extended Our
Business Hours
Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday
11 AM to Midnight
Thurs Fri Sat & Sunday
11 AM to 2 AM
Free Delivery
Call 752-2183
Happy Hour 3- 7
60 oz. Draft $1.75
Editor Wins Photo Honors
By HAROLD JOYNER
Vuituai New Kdllor
Buccaneer Editor Gary Patter-
son was recently awarded first
nd third place honors for
photographs appearing in the
1983 annual by the Columbia
Scholastic Press Association.
The senior Industrial
I NAACP
Reveals
A ctivities
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
The ECU chapter of the
NAACP will be holding elections
for officers March 25 at the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse, accor-
ding to Wilma Case, president.
"Only bona fide members will
be able to vote said Case. She
defined those members as "one
who has paid all dues by noon the
day of the voting
Dr. Sydney Barn well, director
of ECU's School of Medicine ad-
missions and student affairs, will
speak to the group Wed March
22, in Mendenhall 221. Case said
the topic of the meeting had not
been decided, yet.
The last meeting of the year
will be April 15 and be conducted
by the newly elected officers. It
has been scheduled for 5:30 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Coffeehouse,
she said.
Technology major won first place
in the Black and White Sports
Action Photo category. The
photograph appears on page 194
of the 1983 Buccaneer, which
shows former ECU basketball
player Mary Denkler maneuver-
ing around a Boston College
player.
"It's the first award I've ever
received 25- year old Pattter-
son said. "I think it reflects the
excellent quality of the annual
and the importance of
photographs
Page 180 of the Buccaneer
shows the photograph that won
Patterson third place in the Color
Sports Action Photo category. It
shows golfer Jon Riddle hitting a
golf ball out of a sand trap. "I
believe photographs are much
more lasting Patterson said.
Upon graduation, he said he
hopes to enter the field of cor-
porate photography.
Sponsored by the CSPA, the
2nd annual Gold Circle Awards
program is the largest competi-
tion for individual achievement
for students working with cam-
pus media. More than 12,000 en-
tries were received from various
colleges across the country, Pat-
terson noted. Applachian State
University was the only other
N.C. university to receive awards
in this competition, he said.
Patterson also added that ECU
students still have time to be
photographed for this year's an-
nual. "This Friday is the last
day to get your picture taken
he said. "We've had a very good
response from the students so far
and I hope everyone would come
by. There is no waiting
The 1985 Buccaneer is schedul-
ed to come out after the Easter
holidays, Patterson said.
NOW ENJOY
A DELICIOUS
SUBWAY
Advertise!
Call
757-6366
208 E. Fifth St.
AT HOME
758-7979
CALL
'THE JOKES ON US
757-1973
IT'S FOR YOU!
Movie: "Revenge of the Nerds"
7, 9 p.m. MSC
Travel-Adventure Film: "Around the Bav of
Naples"
8 p.m. Hendrix
Theatre Arts: Ballet Gran Folklorico de Mexico
8:15 p.m. McGinnis
Applications: 2 Day Student Representatives for
Student Union Board of Directors
rm. 234 MSC
Minority Arts Presentation: Appalachian Puppet
Theatre
8 p.m. room 244 MSC
Movie: "The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai"
7, 9 p.m. MSC
Recreation: All-Campus Table Tennis Tourna-
ment Registration
Billards Center MSC
Sponsored
by
March 21, 22, 23
March 25
March 26
March 26
March 27
March 28, 29, 30
March 29
The Student Union
SNTn,
��� -Urn. � i. .
���
DEADLINE: MARCH is, i p.m.
MTAIl. WIMOCMNklv. ITMtIT CCHTIB � OOM !�4 T�r-��1t (,�
-�� �� "�� .
mmwm " ' ww






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 1985
Conservative Students Shun Interest Group
(CPS) � In what was supposed
to be the first step on a renewed
nationwide march to get Public
Interest Research Groups off
campuses, Syracuse University
students refused to budge.
SU students last week voted to
keep devoting part of their stu-
dent fees to the New York state
PIRG chapter, a self-styled con-
sumer group that often organizes
voter registration drives and pro-
tests of tuition increase and utili-
ty rate hikes.
Conservative groups have long
opposed the PIRGs, claiming
they are overtly political, and
that student fees should go only
to nonpolitical groups.
Some conservatives reportedly
promised Syracuse would be the
first of some 40 other campuses
to be "de-PIRGed" in a renewed
escalation of their opposition to
the groups.
"Local groups have been
working in states like Montana,
Idaho, Colorado,
Massachusetts" to disrupt the
groups, says Jeff Pandin, deputy
director of the College
Republican National Committee,
which supposedly has been
leading the anti-PIRG move-
ment.
"The focus of conservatives'
objections to PIRGs is our fun-
ding mechanism and many of the
issues PIRGs work on says
Gene Karpinski of USPirg, the
Washington, D.Cbased clear-
inghouse for campus chapters.
"We're not looking to
eliminate PIRGs CRNC's Pan-
din argues "but to stop man-
datory student funding. If they
can support themselves through
voluntary contributions, that's
fine with us
Indeed, last fall conservative
student groups challenged the
traditional PIRG "negative
check-off" funding procedure on
at least three Michigan campuses,
New Mexico and at Duke, where
PIRG funds were frozen pending
a financial audit.
Under the "negative
check-off" system, a student
must indicate at registration that
he or she does not want to con-
tribute to the local PIRG.
Syracuse PIRG leaders say
they won because the conser-
vatives' opposition was
disorganized.
"STOPirg (the local opposi-
tion group) didn't have its act
together says Karen
McMahon. chairwoman of the
NYPIRG's board of directors.
"They were not organized and
they didn't have the resources
STOPirg members blame the
media.
"The Daily Orange (the stu-
dent paper) considers (itself) the
most objective paper on
campus argues STOPirg
member Troy Smith. "They
don't understand that they are so
pinko, commie and leftist it's
unreal
NYPirg supporters expected a
much tougher fight after the
Village Voice newspaper quoted
former College Republican leader
Steve Baldwin as saying Syracuse
would be just the first of 40 cam-
puses the conservative groups
would try to "de-pirg" this year.
But Baldwin, who left CRNC
more than two years ago, denies
that there's any 40-campus hit
list.
"I've heard about this article
from two or three sources, but
the only time I talked to Village
Voice was two and a half years
ago he says. "I don't recall
saying it and when I was with
CRNC we never had such a list,
although we did work against
PIRGs
College Press Service reported
last year that Baldwin had written
an advisory to College
Republican groups, suggesting
ways to disrupt local PIRG
chapters with campus funding
referenda and even surreptitious-
ly running conservative can-
didates for local PIRG leadership
positions.
Conservative students won
control over the Minnesota PIRG
last year, but College Republican
head Jack Abramoff denied his
group was involved in the effort.
"I wouldn't say we've targeted
anyone CRNC's Pandin says.
"It's more grassroots. (PIRG op-
ponents) use us and we work as
an information source
But he does concede local
CRNC members in
Massachusetts, Idaho, New
Jersey, Colorado, California and
New York are active this spring.
"The College Republicans
have some sort of problem with
our ideology says Eve Brown
of the University of California-
Santa Barbara PIRG. "There's a
rumor they're trying to get a
referendum on the ballot to
change our funding system or to
oust us
In Colorado, USPirg's Karpin-
ski says conservative students are
criticizing COPirg's contribu-
tions to USPirg, though he ad-
mits there's no proof the College
Republicans are involved.
Massachusetts and Idaho
PIRGs also are battling conser-
vative efforts to strip them of stu-
dent fee funding, Karpinski adds.
In a recent Idaho State referen-
dum, Karpinski says "the vote
was either a tie or it lost by one
vote. Anyway, the conservatives
are not very successful in Idaho
At least eight state legislatures,
including New Jersey, New York
and Massachusetts, are debating
bills to defund PIRGs or rear-
range their funding procedures.
The bills could limit PIRG ac-
tivities by refusing to release stu-
dent fees for political lobbying
Meanwhile in New Jersey, a
potentially pivotal lawsuit is
nearing another resolution, say.
Ken Ward of NJPirg.
Nine Rutgers students sued in
1979, claiming PIRG's negative
check-off funding forced
students to contribute to a
political point of view they didn't
necessarily support.
The Federal District Court rui-
ed in favor of the PIRG last spr-
ing, but Ward says the conser
vatives have appealed, and a new
decision is expected sometime
this summer.
I HI
u
?i
STEP
OUT OF
LINE
Assaults And Larcenies Among Crimes
Crime
Report
Campus crime at ECU was
light this week. Incidents
reported to the Department of
Public Safetv for March 13-20
were:
March 13, 2 p.m. � A vehicle
was reported vandalized on the
north side of Aycock dorm. 2:25
p.m. � A hit-and-run which
caused property damage to a
vehicle occurred at Belk dorm.
The operator of the suspect vehi-
cle was located in Belhaven, N.C.
5:30 p.m. � A vehicle was
reported vandalized on the north
side of Scott dorm. 6 p.m. � A
portable stereo was reported
stolen from a room on the third
floor of Belk dorm.
March 14, 11:50 a.m. � Wray
Carlton Bobbitt of E. 12th St.
was arrested for assault inflicting
serious injury. The arrest stemm-
ed from an incident which occur-
red during an intramural basket-
ball game in which Bobbitt is ac-
cused of striking an official.
March 15, 6:55 p.m. � A
bookbag was reported stolen
from a room on the second floor
of Garrett dorm. 2:17p.m. � An
employee of the School of
Governor ublishes Column
RALEIGH � (UPI) � Gov.
Jim Martin has started asking
newspapers to publish a monthly
column that his office is
distributing in a move to com-
municate directly with his consti-
tuents, aides say.
Martin's press office has mail-
ed a four-page news release to
160 North Carolina newspapers
outlining the governor's plans for
making state government more
efficient.
"This is the first of a series of
monthly columns from Gov.
Martin for publication in the
state's newspapers the mailing
said. "We hope you are able to
use it in any form you see fit
Martin is reviving a strategy he
used during the 12 years he
represented the 9th Congres-
sional District in the Charlotte
area. Many congressmen mail
columns to newspapers in their
home states but Martin is believ-
ed to be the first North Carolina
governor to try the technique.
Martin's abilities as a com-
municator worry state
Democrats, who fear he will win
public support for his tax-cut
package and help the Republican
Party. The governor recently
staged a series of briefings for
reporters and editorial writers
statewide to boost his budget and
tax proposals.
Martin's press secretary, Tim
Pittman, said the column will let
the governor communicate
directly with the public. Pittman
said Martin does not write the
column but he decided the con-
tents.
This Summer
IF VOW RE COMING TO SUMMER SCHOOL AND NEEV A PUCE TO LIVE, CALL US.
A FEW RINGGOLV TOWERS UNITS ARE AVAILABLE TO SUBLET TOR THE SUMMER.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
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No matter what tney say, she Knows he
THE LAST DRAGON
BERRY GORDY'S
PG13
Written by LOCHS VENOSTA Produced by RUPERT HITZIG Directed by MICHAEL SCHULTZ
IF JASON STILL
HAUNTS YOU
YOU'RE NOT ALONE
1:10 - 3:10 - 5:10
7:10 - 9:10
mitrmar
new
iv beginning S
S&k'X .���xttyifev.v.viy
Medicine reported receiving
harassing phone calls.
March 17, 3:30p.m. � A van-
dalism to a vehicle was reported
on the north side of White dorm.
3:47 p.m. � A break-in was
reported on the fourth floor of
the Biology Building. Several ar-
ticles of computer equipment
stolen during the incident were
recovered at University Towers
on E. 4th St.A student was im-
plicated in the incident and
charges are pending. 2p.m. � A
bicycle was reported stolen from
the west side of Aycock dorm.
2:23 p.m. � A vehicle parked
north of Tyler dorm was reported
vandalized.
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students � Rent an apt. by May 1 st &
keep your apt. RENT FREE for June & July!
For details call or come by Tar River Estates
Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1. 752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the dorm tfofdrumi
behind �there is an alternative Your own place at Tar River Estates
Select a one-bedroom garden apartment or two-or three-bedroom townnouse
Enjoy fully equipped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the river
Conveniently located near Eat. Carolina University Come by today w can
752-4225
1400 Willow St.
Office Hours
M-F 9:00-5 30
Sat & Sun 1 00-5:00
Managed by U S Sfcrtei topiatiM
TarTftvery
Dan
(UPI)-It's taken Je'
exactly three movies
stardom � top billing
Farrow in Woody All
film, The Purple Rose oi
Jeff Daniels0
Millions of movieg
remember the lanky,
character he played i
Winger's husband in
Endearment, his second j
But only a trivia bu
recall his screen debi
policeman in Ragtime
only other movie
However, the 30
has had the good f
directed by master
PIRATE'S
COVE
t

t
t
t
9
e

c
.(FORMERLY KNOWN AS GRUMPYS,ETC.)i
PRE-
GRAND OPENING
PARTY
Kinks
B KEMN I)fj
Mafl�nur
I could imag.r.e
father put on
obnoxious colored
jacket, strap on r.
string, and bang oi
chords. In essence I I
Ray Davies, a ho 1
years younger than m
has been doing for oi
years. The Kinks a:
the original British
bands of the earh j
by front man Ray D
Kinks have contnbutjj
than their share of
classic records to
scene. And now, ifj
twenty-odd albums,
seem to have iandec
successful collage of
vinal.
The Kinks' nev.
Word of Mouth
down in pace lo:
rockers. W ord of Moi
little bit of sometn
everyone. Humor, hi
ballads, and a pop ral
called "Do it Again
qualities of the recon
Ray seems to ha
his head of all th
yellow men" that c
paranoia ipr�K-
However, some lMlgl
album refect a negf
titude towards relati
The broken love af
ween Ray and
girlfriend Chrissie
Kerr has left Davies w
sour notes. After meet,
pie Minds lead singet
while on tour, Hynde
swept off to New Yor
get married in Centi
Davies' songs "Gou
and "Sold Me Out
there was a bit of
from her departure.
lyrics as "You sold
get a better deal for
you get the idea thi
got the raw end of t
"Massive Reducti
"Summer's Gone
they could have
back in the davs
Budget" and "Misl
"Massive Reductioi
Friday
5 to closing
35 Draft
5(K Draft
t
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Open Sat at 11:00 for lunch I
50-DRAFT 5-CLOSING
Grand Opening
to be Announced
i


i rr i � "� " "���m mo ��� �.w �i� iW�' �" .ti�-�� �� in .o
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I
roup
ties by refusing to release stu-
h: fees tor political lobbying
S lean while in New Jersey, a
tcntially pivotal lawsuit' is
ling another resolution, savs
In Ward of NJPirg.
line Rutgers students sued in
. claiming PIRG's negative
it k-off funding forced
Icents to contribute to g
incal point of view they didn't
Jessanlv support.
ic Federal District Court rul
I fas or of the PIRG last spr
but Ward says the conser-
ves have appealed, and a new
sion is expected sometime
summer.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 2 1985
Daniels Rosy Over 'Cairo9
P
IF

he Summer
or The Foil?
Ii mer special for
I t by May 1st &
PE for June & July!
ar River Estates
No 1 752-4225
the dorm doldrums
fit R'ver Estates
�droom townhouse
5 n seme apartments.
area by the river.
ne :v today or call
752-4225
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Speller Corporation
(UPI) � It's taken Jeff Daniels
exactly three movies to attain
stardom � top billing with Mia
Farrow in Woody Allen's new
film, The Purple Rose of Cairo
Jeff Daniels?
Millions of moviegoers will
remember the lanky, laid-back
character he played as Debra
Winger's husband in Terms of
Endearment, his second feature.
But only a trivia buff would
recall his screen debut as a
policeman in Ragtime, Daniels'
a only other movie.
However, the 30-year-old actor
has had the good fortune to be
directed by master craftsmen in
his brief career, in order, Milos
Forman, Jim Brooks and, of
course, the inimitable Allen.
All three directors, in fact,
have won Academy Awards: For-
man for One Flew Over the
Cuckoo's Nest, Brooks for
Terms of Endearment and Allen
for Annie Hall.
In The Purple Rose of Cairo,
Daniels plays a dual role. He is
seen first as a dashing, romantic
character in a pith helmet in an
old black-and-white movie (Circa
1936) who comes off the screen to
romance film buff Mia Farrow.
About mid-movie he is also seen
as the actor who plays the off-
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ING
Kinks Kick Up Storm
By KEVIN DILL
Staff Writer
I could imagine seeing my
father put on his most
obnoxious colored sports
jacket, strap on his Gibson six
string, and bang out a few
chords. In essence this is what
Ray Davies, who is only a few
years younger than my father,
has been doing for over twenty
years. The Kinks are one of
the original British Invasion
bands of the early sixties. Lead
by front man Ray Davies, the
Kinks have contributed more
than their share of untrendy,
classic records to the music
scene. And now, after some
twenty-odd albums, the Kinks
seem to have landed another
successful collage of songs on
vinal.
The Kinks' new album
Word of Mouth is no slow
down in pace for the veteran
rockers. Word of Mouth has a
little bit of something for
everyone. Humor, hard licks,
ballads, and a pop radio tune
called "Do it Again" are all
qualities of the record.
Ray seems to have cleared
his head of all the "little
yellow men" that caused his
paranoia isr�wh� paf
However, sornelgsWltte
album reflect a negative at-
titude towards relationships.
The broken love affair bet-
ween Ray and one-time-
girlfriend Chrissie (Hynde)
Kerr has left Davies with a few
sour notes. After meeting Sim-
ple Minds lead singer Jim Kerr
while on tour, Hynde and Kerr
swept off to New York City to
get married in Central Park.
Davies' songs "Going Solo"
and "Sold Me Out" suggest
there was a bit of pain felt
from her departure. With such
lyrics as "You sold me out to
get a better deal for yourself
you get the idea that Davies
got the raw end of the deal.
"Massive Reductions" and
"Summer's Gone" sound as if
they could have been written
back in the days of the "Low
Budget" and "Misfits" era.
"Massive Reductions" has the
quirkiness of "Low Budget"
and "Summer's Gone" has
the sensuality of "Misfits
The two gems on the album
belong to Ray's brother Dave.
"Guilty" is the hardest rock-
ing song on the album. Daves'
pounding guitar and high
pitch howl inject high voltage
into the listener. It's the type
of song that sends you into a
three minute frenze thrashing
about capsizing furniture.
"Living On a Thin Line" pro-
mises to be the best song writ-
ten about the British way to
life since the Clash wrote
"Lost in the Supermarket
The haunting introduction
leads to an ear perking sound
that hypnotizes listeners.
"Thin Line" sounds like a
very successful stab at creating
the eerie, neopsychedelic
sound of such bands as Green
On Red and The Dream Syn-
dicate.
On the slower track, "Miss-
ing Persons a ballad about a
missing child, Ray puts forth
the emotion in his voice
necessary to put a frog in your
throat. The somber melody of
an acoustic guitar backed with
soft piano makes you realize
that he can still write them like
hetjsedto.
Ray seems to incltfde
humor on almost every album,
but "Too Hot" is one of the
funniest songs he has written
since "Hayfever It's a song
about the necessary struggles
and pains of physical fitness
paralleled with problems of
urban blight.
Word of Mouth is the
straight-up rock 'n' roll that
has securely established the
Kinks in the music industry.
Although the album does bid a
farewell to long time drummer
Mick Avory, there is no end in
sight for the band. After more
than twenty years of pumping
out albums and touring every
suitable country in the world,
the Kinks have another album
under their belt and hopefully
plenty more to come.
Albums available for review
courtesy of Apple Records.
d
the-screen character.
A native of Georgia, reared in
Michigan, Daniels became a New
Yorker in 1976, choosing the
theater over Hollywood and the
perils of teenage epics and rites of
passage movies.
He covered himself with glory
on stage in Summer and Smoke,
Minnesota Moon and Johnny
Got His Gun, for which he won
an Obie Award. He received a
Drama Desk Nomination for his
performance in Fifth of July.
Now he is in the movie major
leagues and says, "I've been set
up nicely in quality projects
Because Farrow and Allen are
both publicity shy, Daniels was
elected to stump the country
plugging The Purple Rose of
Cairo, a task about which he is
not overwhelmingly enthusiastic.
The question put to him most
often by the media: "What was it
like working with Woody?"
Daniels seems almost relieved.
He would rather talk about the
brilliant director than himself.
"Woody is very quiet on the
set he said. "He doesn't do his
club routine and he doesn't come
on like the nebbish he plays in
movies. He's not on parade. He
may not even talk to you before
he shoots a scene. But I work that
way, too.
"I brought my own ideas to
each scene and that's the way
we'd shoot it the first or second
take. Then we'd discuss what I'd
done. Seventy percent of the time
he would go along with me.
"If my input was wrong, he
would cut it in the editing room.
The harshest thing he said to me
was, 'OK, it probably won't
work' or 'We probably won't use
it.
Woody wrote the script but
told me not to treat it like the Bi-
ble. He encouraged the cast to ad
lib if it felt right, but we never
abused that freeeom, which was
great. It's hard to improve on
Woody Allen dialogue.
"Sometimes he seemed
satisfied with a take and would
say, 'OK, we've got it. Now let's
try to experiment a little bit
Once he scribbled some dialogue
on the set and it became one of
the high points of the film. It was
exciting to see a man of his
stature work off the top of his
head
Daniels said he was the only
stranger on the set. All of Allen's
stage hands and staffers have
been with him for a decade or
longer. Mia has been his constant
companion for a few years.
Allen has virtually no fund of
small talk and a less secure actor
than Daniels might have thought
of himself as an interloper.
"Woody is very impersonal on
and off the set, but then so am
I Daniels said. "I wouldn't
have known what to talk to him
about during lunch anyhow.
"But I don't mean to say he's
detached even if he is an extreme-
ly private person. Woody is very
concerned about performances
and is always right there to
answer questions. By the end of
the picture we were comfortable
with each other
Daniels, grateful to Allen for
casting him in his first starring
role, said, Terms of Endearment
was my first big break but it
wasn't as important to my career
as The Purple Rose of Cairo.
"It's a big leap from obscurity
to starring for Woody. I just
didn't want the picture to lag in
my scenes � and it didn't. And
that's what I tried to
accomplish
USA For Africa
Just A Corporate Showcase?
MAiaOSIA OUBINSKY - �CU
The latest Kinks LP proves Ray Davies hasn't lost his touch
By JEFFRY JONES
Staff Wrttar
The famine in Ethiopia has
prompted a revival of War-
Bond-Drive-style relief efforts.
The British Band Aid single "Do
They Know It's Christmas?"
raised millions of dollars for
African famine relief. The
number eleven song on the na-
tionally syndicated radio pro-
gram "Weekly Top 40" with
Rick Dees, was USA for Africa's
"We Are the World
Frank Rabey and Charles Sune
work at the Record Bar in Green-
ville. They are, if nothing else,
front-line troops of the record
business. They know what sells,
and what doesn't. They know
their customers, and they know
their music. Rabey and Sune were
asked about the USA for Africa
charity record. Both said the
record supported a fine cause.
Both said the title song, "We Are
the World" was a musical
failure.
"This is one of the most poorly
written, repetitive songs. I was
severely disappointed Rabey
said. "It's worthwhile � the
cause he laughed, "but the best
thing that's come out of the
whole effort is the Doonesbury
satire
Sune agrees. "Musically they
have a lot of people who have
nothing to do with one another.
I'd like to know who determined
the lineup. Why is each one of the
Jackson brothers given a separate
credit? Michael and maybe Jer-
maine are the only real musicians
of the family
"We Are the World" features
46 artists, an uneasy blend of
styles ranging from the bubble-
gum pop of Diana Ross, Lionel
Richie, Kenny Rogers, and
Michael Jackson, to the raspy
soul of Ray Charles, and the
ironic, off-key blues of Bob
Dylan. Bruce Springsteen is
featured; Prince is not. Waylon
Jennings, and even Saturday
Night Live alumni Dan Ackroyd
sing backup. Paul Simon has a
brief bit, though he is without
Art Garfunkel. Willie Nelson
sings (apparently), but Julio Ig-
lesias had other committments.
The song was written by Lionel
Richie and Michael Jackson.
Rabey questions the writing of
the song. "I don't tike the 'We
are the world, we are the
children he said.
Sune added, "The main refrain
istrite. Trite, that's the word
"With all the talent they had, I
think they could have gotten a
better songwriter. I mean, they
had Dylan, but didn't use him.
Bob Dylan's the best thing on the
album Rabey said.
"Musically it's so boring. It
doesn't pick up at all. Dylan's got
about the only life in the song.
The music is set there so the
vocals can go over it. Musically it
goes nowhere Rabey con-
tinued.
Sune believed the record would
do well, and that the local Record
Bars would sell out their initial
stock of 200. He said that Record
Bar as a chain had committed
$50,000 to Ethiopian relief. Sune
also believed that the eclectic
mixture of musicians may have
been chosen to plug CBS
Records' artists as much as to br-
ing in money for the Ethiopians.
"CBS Records is clearly one of
the giants, along with Columbia.
Most of the solo artists on the
song are CBS artists; Jackson,
Bob Dylan, Cyndi Lauper, etc.
Don't underestimate the cor-
porate aspect of it Sune said.
Rabey, comparing "We Are
the World" to Band Aid's "Do
They Know It's Christmas?
said that the British 43 was much
better. "The flip-side of the other
one (BandAid) is a lot more
human. The ilip-side of this one
has a Quincy Jones instrumental.
I really don't understand that
choice
Rabey added that plans have
been made to expand the USA
for Africa 45 to a full length
album. He said the album would
contain the single "We Are the
World" as well as songs recorded
by individual artists and groups.
He fears that a album would be
even more tasteless musically,
and would destroy much of the
credibility of the American
record companies' relief efforts.
Sune bought a copy of the 45.
"Only for the cause he explain-
ed. Rabey said he would get the
record because he supports the
cause and because of Bob
Dylan's bit.
"I think a lot of people will
buy it to support the cause. Only
real Michael Jackson fans, or lit-
tle kids who want to get a popular
song would buy it for any
reason Sune said.
Ex-ECU mascot, P.D. Pirate, gears up for a length legal battle.
P.D. Files Suit
P.D. Pirate filed suit to-
day in District Court,
asking $2.1 million and
reinstatement as E.C.Us Of-
ficial Mascot.
P.D. claims in his suit that
the defendent, Greg Rideout,
The East Carolinian, the stu-
dent body of ECU, Ken Karr
and Chancellor John M.
Howell "did willfully and with
malicious forethought and in-
tent deprive him of his dignity,
his honor, his status as Univer-
sity Mascot, even his very
body As a result of the
carelessly malicious and
heinous actions of the
defendents, P.D. now finds
himself disembodied, depress-
ed and literally a shadow of his
former self, the suit contends.
P.D. claims that his ter-
mination was without cause or
warning and, furthermore,
that it was based on Rideout's
petty jealousy of P.Ds "per-
sonality, wardrobe and swar-
thy good looks P.D. claims
that his dismissal was due in
part to misleading results of
audiometer readings from the
1984 football season when
compared with those of the
noisier 1983 season. Further-
more, P.D. says he had been
assured as late as Halloween,
1984, by Karr and Howell that
his position was safe, that they
were pleased with both the
audiometer readings and the
success of P.Ds goodwill
ventures, and that they still
stood firmly behind the voices
of the children who had given
him his name.
As a result of his dismissal,
P.D. says he has been forced
to don the foolish and ill-
fitting costume of a riverboat
gambler, and without compen-
sation, so that he has been
derided as an "amateur
showboat
P.Ds suit asks for damages
from the defendants for libel
and defamation of character,
loss of revenue from public
school appearances, summer
mascot camps, and compensa-
tion for his lost wardrobe and
body. He asks for reinstate-
ment as mascot "before the
Shad Festival parade
Announcement of P.Ds
suit was made by P.D. with his
attorney, Bland Blunt Suggs,
at his side. Suggs gave no
reason for the suddenness of
the announcement and
asserted that the dismissal was
linked somehow to rumors
that P.D. had nearly joined
the ranks of the Tampa Bay
Bucaneers after the unex-
pected retirement of their
mascot The Bucaneer (former-
ly known as T.B.)
As exhibits in the suit, P.D.
placed numerous articles from
the East Carolinian, most
authored by defendant
Rideout; results from a
"railroad student election
and a copy of his letter of
dismissal, which read:
Dear P.D. your name's a
disgrace
To the school and the whole
human race.
So take a walk off the plank
Your name's now a blank.
P.D get out of our face.
Thank you for your service
to the University.
� John M. Howell
P.D. appeared at the press
conference holding his head,
which displayed that stoic ex-
pression so characteristic of
his personality, under his arm.
But his slouched posture
revealed abject humiliation,
and a complexion gone pasty
pale. He was dressed in a plain
gray sweatsuit, brown socks
and P.F. Flyers, rumored to
have been considering hiring
P.D. as their new mascot after
P.Fs retirement at the end of
this year.
P.D. said, after announcing
his suit, that he was sorry to
have to resort to this means of
redressing the wrongs he felt
had been done him, but he felt
he had no alternative. He con-
tinued: "It's not really the
money at all. But to have seen
the way the ECU mascot has
been depersonalized broke my
heart. I collected a bucket of
purple blood and sweat
agonizing over this before I
decided to go through with it.
But in essence, they've made
the mascot generic, and that's
the behavior of an outlaw
school
P.D. also said that the pre-
sent use of his image "in this
nameless being" is an affront
to his dignity and to that of his
profession, and that it keeps
him from sleeping or being
happy.
"All I've ever wanted to be
is P.D. (the) Pirate P.D.
said, choking back tears. "I
gave everything I had to ECU,
the best years of my life. And
at the whim of a few disgruntl-
ed and jealous individuals, I
was tossed aside. I've been
disgraced in my profession
and I may never find another
paying job. Sure I could go to
Pungo Academy. They'd be
glad to have me, but it just
wouldn't be the same. If
they'd just given me one year,
I'd have shown' em, too
None of the defendants
were available for comment.
EDITOR'S NOTE: This
Parody was submitted
anonymously to The East
Carolinian. If the author is in-
terested, there is an East
Carolinian T-shirt waiting for
him.
�MHMMMWWV
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� ii f m





8 1 HI t; AST CAROLINIAN MARCH 21. 1985
Doonesbun
Mexican Ballet Showcases Culture March 26

b lisa McDonald
Staff Writer
The spectacle of Mexico's
Ballet Gran Folklorko de
Mexico will be the concluding
program of the ECU Theatre
Arts Series. The program will
take place Tuesday, March 26 at
8:15 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
The company, which has been
described by Dance Magazine as
"a sort of Mexican Ice Follies,
featuring high energy dancing,
spectacular costuming, and sure-
fire pacing presents ensemble
works based on various eras in
Mexico's history, and various
regions of the country.
The company, under the direc-
tion of Theo Shanab, will begin
its performance with the polka,
chottis, redova and waltz as
danced by people in the north of
many Mexican states. The dances
were brought to Mexico by the
French and Spaniards, but it is
the humble people of the villages
who have put the life into them
that will be shown Tuesday night.
Expressions of love, suffering,
and happiness will be shown in
the dances of the Chiapas, which
are a mix of Spanish and Indian
cultures. The music of the state
of Chiapas is ancient, and its
dances come from the center and
coastal regions of the state.
The dances of the state of
Michoacan will reveal the
greatness of its customs and
legends, for the state is rich in its
folklore of music and dance.
The company will show the joy
and merry spirit of the Jarucho,
the natives of Veracruz. The
natives' happiness is characteriz-
ed in the "Fandango primarily
done during the patron saints'
feasts, and complicated dance
steps are shown during the
famous "La Bamba where a
couple tie a bow with their feet.
"The Dance of the Quetzales
(multi-colored bird)" will show
movement and creation, a sym-
bol of the bird that is considered
a cosmic messenger and symbol
of the Catholic culture. In Cuet-
zalan, a village in the mountains
of Puebla, the dance is of a pure
nature.
The mountainous territory
called Oaxaca will bring to the
performance an appealing touch
of melancholy and gentleness
that is characteristic of the In-
dians of the area. "The Dance of
the Feathers danced during
religious festivals and fiestas, is
reminiscent of the conquest of
the Spanish, led by Cortez, over
the natives, led by Mom.ezuma.
The world famous "Zandunga"
is a dance that means charm. It
typifies the grace and gaiety of
the Tehuana women.
The fight between good and
evil will be shown in "The Dance
of the Deer one of the most
Classifieds
PERSONAL
WANTED
SALE
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: The
Sigma Phi Epsilon 10 K run is THIS
SATURDAY There is a Happy
Hour at the house beginning at 3 on
Friday! Come by as much as possi
ble and give the brothers your sup
port! We have a meeting Sunday
night at 9Everyone Be There!
PI KAPPS: This is the party we
have been waiting for. Roseball is
this weekend at the Islander Motel in
Emerald Isle, it's going to be a great
one Lets all get wild. (Hey Lude,
have you found a date yet?) "Hey,
Heylet's be careful out there!
Don't break too much stuff.
SANDI, SUE, & MICKEY: 'The Old
mans (oops) is down the road (burp
(excuse me)) "O.K. guys, Ceasar's
head awaits us! Good God! it was
fun! See ya next Spring Break.
Wemie
GRATEFUL DEAD TICKETS: Still
available at Apple Records Last
chance to see the sold out Dead show
in Hampton. Fri March 22
ATTN. PARTY ANIMALS: Come
join the AOPi's for "Crazy Shorts"
happy hour this Fri. from 4 7 p.m. at
the Old Town Inn!
SIG TAUS: We're really sorry about
the mix up with the social date and
we're psyched to party with ya'll
next week! The AOPi's
TO KNIGHT: Today you'll see the
last of your teens- what's your new
excuse gonna be? Have a great bir
tnday Ed Love, Nina and Sis.
PI KAPP PLEDGES: Will have a
car wash at Texaco Station on Con
tanche St. across from PTA at 3 on
Thursday, March 21.
PHI TAUS: There will be a car wash
at Time Out on Sat from 9 a.m. til 2
p.m! Be There!
JILL T. AND KIM M My sincerest
apologies for a big misunderstan
ding and my rudeness. G.L.
TAKE MY PICTURE: Yearbook
portraits are now being taken. This
is your last chance to be included in
the 1985 Buccaneer. March 29th is
the LAST DAY. It's all free and
walk ins are OK. Pictures are taken
at the yearbook office. Call 757-6501
for more info.
PSSSSSST Pass the word, Year
book Portraits are now being taken
at the Buccaneer Office (across
from Joyner Library). March 29th is
the last day so, hurry. Walk-ins are
OK. Call 757 6501 for more details.
WANTED: 30 35 women and men to
work as OPC's this summer in
Atlantic Beach N.C. & N. Myrtle
Beach S.C. You will be working with
the largest resort company. If
you're WILLING to work, have an
outgoing personality and can have
FUN working, the money will follow.
For more info, send replies to Mike
Bartos, P.O. Box 872 N. Myrtle
Beach, S.C. 29597.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
WANTED: To share neat house 2 V
blocks from campus. Call 758-6708 at
night. 757-0664 days. Ask for Kyle.
Leave a message
SUMMER JOBS AT THE BEACH:
Johnny Dollar's On The Beach, a
new night club opening at Atlantic
Beach, M.C needs managers, assis
tant managers, bartenders, security
personnel, door personnel, and
D.Js Phone 919 726 1258, 85
weekdays or 919 726 8216 after 5 pm.
weekaays and weekends
"Remember students drinking age
in Myrtle Beach, S.C. is 20 years of
age and in Atlantic Beach, N.C. it's
only 19 years of age
SUMMER JOBS: Wanted: hard
working students willing to relocate,
full time work Great resume, $315
per week, 2.5 GPA needed. Send
name, number etc. to Summer Work
'85, Box 4052, Greenville, N.C, 27834
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: Starting in May.
3 bedroom apartment at Eastbrook.
$113 per
752 2648
month & "3 utilities. Call
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Set of keys of brass teddy
bear key chain with red Charlotte
Country Club tag. If found, please
call Maribeth at 758 2381 or 757 1999.
FOUND: Pale yellow dog, long hair
with blace canvas collar. Call
758 6802
COUNSELORS: For western N.C.
co ed 8 week summer camp. Room,
meals, laundry, salary, travel
allowance, and possible college
credit. Experience not necessary,
but must enjoy working with
children. Only non smoking college
students need apply. For application
and brochure write: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Florida 33015.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For both
sessions of summer school. Loca
tion: Tar River Apts. Call 758 5787.
$104 per month.
FEMALE STUDENT WANTED: To
rent room with private bath. $120
month &. V2 utilities. Non-smoker
and responsible please. Call 752-1568
before 2.
HELP WANTED: Full and part-
time. Flexible hours. Clean, neat
dependable person. Apply in person
at Sam &. Dave's Snack Bar, N.
Greene St. See Don or Dave.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
br. townhouse. Only $150 per month,
noutil Call 756-8428!
ROOMMATE WANTED: Seeking
responsible, non-smoking roommate
to share B unit at Ringgold Towers
for both summer sessions. Com-
pletely furnished, air conditioned,
accessories included, $170 per
month. Call 752-0998, ask for Dan.
STUDENTS: Lose those extra
pounds before summer! Swimsuit
season is upon us, so feel better
about yourself this year! Simple
easy to-fol low plan that shows you
how to lose weight nutritionally and
keep it off! Only $6.95 P.P.J. In-
dustries, P.O. Box 59 Carrboro, N.C.
27510. Satisfaction Guaranteed or
your money back!
� All You Can Eat BEEF RIBS $6.95 plus tax
� All You Can Eat SHRIMP $5.95 plus tax &
beverage
� All You Can Eat VEGETABLE & 1 meat $4.07
plus tax
� All plates served with all you can eat vegetables
and homemade bread.
� Daily Specials $2.25 plus tax
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM - 8 PM
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt. I05C N.
Summit St. $190mo. Call 758 5299
FOR SALE: 1984 Pontiac Fiero
Sport package. Too small for grow
ing family. $1000 and assume loan.
Call 758 0780 after 6 p.m. for details
FOR SALE: Desk and a dresser. Ex
cellent condition. Ask for Beth
7586975.
TYPING: Experienced professional
woman will provide all typing ser
vices. (IBM correcting typewriter)
Call Debbie at 756 6333 for a well
typed paper
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bedrooms
Near university. 402 E. 4th St. Living
room, dining room, den, natural gas
heating Mature party only! $420 per
month. 758 5299
ROLLERSKATES FOR SALE:
White leather boot, yellow precision
wheels, good condition, size 7, ask
ing $50 Call Linda after 1 p.m.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 21, 1985
Page 10
Netters Comeback To Defeat Campbell 5-4
By RICK McCORMAC
( o Spofij Editor
The ECU Men's tennis team
defeated Campbell University 5-4
on Tuesday in a match played on
the tennis courts behind Minges
Coliseum.
ECU won in the final doubles
match of the day after trailing
four games to one in the third set
and 5-3 in the tiebreaker, before
rallying for the win.
Campbell won the number-one
and two singles matches with
Bruce Eickhoff defeating ECU's
Galen Treble (6-4), (7-6) in the
number-one singles. In the
number-two singles, Arturo
Ibarguen defeated Greg Loyd
(6-2), (5-7), (6-1) for the Camels
only other win in singles competi-
tion.
Greg Willis contiuned his fine
play for the Pirate netters down-
ing Octavio Horcasitaf (6-0),
(6-0).
"Greg Willis has been playing
exceptional tennis for us ECU
coach Pat Scherman said. "He
won (6-1),(6-0) for us against
N.C. State, and won (6-0), (6-0)
against Campbell
At the number four singles
position, ECU's Dan Lamont
defeated Brad McRae (6-1), (6-3).
Davis Bagley also won for the
Pirates, beating Tom Maynor
(6-2), (6-2).
In the final singles match,
ECU's David Turner turned back
Campbell's Derek George in
three sets. George won the first
set (7-6) by winning the
tiebreaker 7-1. Turner took the
second set (7-6) also in a
tiebreaker by the score of 7-5.
There was no tiebreaker in the
final set as Turner crushed
George 6-1 to win the match and
put ECU up four to two going in-
to doubles play.
Campbell won the first two
doubles matches just as they did
in the singles. The team of
Eickhoff and Ibarguen downed
Treble and Willis (6-4), (6-4).
In the number-two doubles
match, Horcasitaf and McRae
defeated Pat Campanero and
Bagley (6-1), (2-6), (6-4) to tie the
score at four apiece going into the
deciding doubles match.
The team of John Anthony
and David Turner came from
behind to defeat Maynor and
George (6-2), (5-7), (7-6), 7-5 in
the tiebreaker to win the match
for the Pirates.
The win evens the team's
record this spring to 3-3 and puts
them at 7-8-1 on the year.
Despite the win, ECU coach
Sherman was not pleased with
her team's performance. "I was
happy we won, but I wasn't
pleased overall she said. "I
thought Campbell played well,
but we didn't play as well as
we've been playing.
"It came down to the third set
of the third doubles match, and
we were down 1-4 at one point in
the final set she continued. "I
was impressed that we were able
to comeback and get the win
Sherman feels that the play in
doubles has hurt her team
somewhat, due to the unexpected
loss of her top doubles team from
the fall.
"We lost David Creech, who is
out of school this semester an
Scott Avery who is concentrating
on his studies she said "We've
been weaker in doubles plav and
it (the loss of Creech and Avei
has hurt our depth � now.
everyone has to play well in eve-
match
Both the men's and women'
tennis learns will be in action o.
the weekend. The men'v team w
face Old Dominion on Fndav
Greenville before going �
Virginia Commonwealth or
Saturday. On Monday the Pi:
men will return home to face I
Harvard-B team. The women w i
play at Old Dominion on i
and plav host to Pfeiffei
Saturdav.
Pirates, Seahawks Split Doubleheader
Sophomore Davis Bagley, from Durham, shows the proper form to
hit a backhand. Bagley won his singles match against Campbell's
Tom Maynor in straight sets. The tennis team will play two matches
over the weekend against Old Dominion and Virginia
Commonwealth.
By RICK McCORMAC
&
SCOTT COOPER
Spotli hdilon
The ECU baseball team split a
doubleheader with UNC-
Wilmington yesterday, in the
Pirates' first conference games of
the season.
ECU struck first, as they won
the first game 3-2, but the
Seahawks came back strong as
they rolled to an 8-3 triumph.
In the opener, the Pirates took
the lead in the third inning on an
RBI double by Chris Bradberry.
Jay McGraw followed with an
RBI single which scored
Bradberrv and gave ECU an earlv
2-0 lead.
In the bottom of the third,
UNC-Wilmington scored on an
RBI single by Tommy Griffin.
The Seahawks tied it in the sixth
on a fielder's choice bv Reggie
Redd.
ECU won it in the top of the
seventh. Greg Hardison doubled
down the left-field line.
Bradberry then doubled over the
rightfielder's head, scoring Har-
dison and picking up the game-
winning RBI.
ECl 's Wmfred Johnson wen
the distance in getting h
win o the season. It
fourth complete game
starts, with one � n ming
relie:
UNC-Wilmington -
their ability in the nightca
ing from behind to dcfe
Pirates 8-3.
See PIRATES, pauell
Brooks, Throckmorton Resign Posts
Baseball On WZMB;
ECU Battles Tarheels
The first play-by-play broad-
cast of a baseball game in the
Greenville area will take place to-
day on WZMB � 91.3 fm.
Mike Kelley and Pama Mit-
chell will begin their pre-game
show at 2:45 pm with live play-
by-play action of the ECU-North
Carolina game beginning at 3
pm.
"I'm really looking forward to
it Kelley said. "I'm really ex-
cited for the station � it should
definitely give us more recogni-
tion
Lee Workman and the athletic
staff approached the station
because they wanted to have
coverage of the ECU baseball
team.
Pama Mitchell said she is hap-
py to be broadcasting a sport
which she enjoys so much,
"I've always enjoyed baseball
and I've always wanted to know
what it would be like to do play-
by-play Mitchell said. "I'm a
little nervous, but i'm more ex-
cited.
"I know a good deal about
baseball Mitchell continued. "I
think i'll be able to handle it.
We'll try to get better and better
with every broadcast
The two broadcasters will be
alternating between play-by-play
and the color commentary. There
will be four other Pirate games
broadcast during the remainder
of the season.
The second broadcast will be
March 30, the opening game of a
doubleheader with conference
foe James Madison University.
The next broadcast will be the
following day (March 31) also
against the Dukes of JMU. The
final two games will be on April
18 and April 24 against William
& Mary and UNC-Wilmington
respectively.
Kelley said it may be a bit uni-
que, in that a male-female broad-
cast team is somewhat unsual.
However, he likes the idea and is
especially happy that the athletic
department is giving he and Mit-
chell this chance.
WZMB's Jim Hickmon will be
taking care of all the engineer-
ing procedures for the broadcast.
So tune in to 91.3 fm WZMB
this afternoon at 2:45 pm to hear
all the action of the ECU-North
Carolina baseball game.
Defensive coordinator Tom
Throckmorton and recruting
coordinator and defensive-end
coach Waverly Brooks have both
resigned their positions on the
ECU coaching staff, Pirate head
coach Art Baker announced
Monday.
Throckmorton, who has held
the title of defensive coordinator
for the past two years, will be go-
ing to Virginia Tech as linebacker
coach.
Baker also announced the Don
Powers, who joined the ECU
staff in January as the defensive-
secondary coach, will assume
Throckmorton's duties as defen-
sive coordinator. Powers came to
ECU from Western Kentucky,
where he served as assistant head
coach and defensive coordinator
during the 1984 season.
The 41-year-old Throckmorton
came to ECU prior to the 1983
season. Joining the Pirates after
three seasons as a defensive and
strength coach at VMI. Prior to
VMI, the Richmond, Va native
also had collegiate stops at N.C.
State, Randolph Macon and the
University of Richmond.
Throckmorton will replace Dick
Biddle on the Virginia Tech staff.
Biddle resigned last week for a
position with another school.
On Tuesday, Dr. Ken Karr,
director of athletics, announced
the resignation of Brooks � ef-
fective in June of this year.
Brooks, who has coached
defensive ends at ECU, while also
holding the title of recruiting
coordinator during his two
seasons with the Pirates, will be
leaving to enter private business.
He feels that it is just time to
move on.
"I've enjoyed it here, and the
people have been great Brooks
said. "I've just come to a point in
time when I need to get out of
coaching.
"I wish the program well, I
hope Art Baker does a fine job
Brooks continued. "I have
wrestled with the idea for a long
time � and decided that it's time
to settle down
Brooks, also a Richmond, Va
native, came to Greenville in 1983
from Marshall University of the
Southern Conference, where he
served as recruiting coordinator
while aslo working with the
Thundering Herd' defense from
1979-82.
Prior to his stop at Marshall,
Brooks had worked in the
Virginia high school ranks from
1969-72. He then served as chief
recruitor and defensive end coach
at the University of Virginia for
two seasons.
With the resignation of Brooks
and Throckmorton, only three of
the five holdovers from Ed
Emory's staff remain. They are
Ken Matous (receivers), Don
Murray (offensive coordinator
and running backs) and John
Zernhelt (offensive line).
Waverly Brooks (left) and Tom Throckmorton (right) have both
resigned from coach Art Baker's coaching staff.
ECU Softball Team Extends Winning Streak
Bv SCOTT COOPFR RnTttP RnvPttP hoc nit.i,n j.�. hlmbeht , set p. Uk , , .
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Storu Editor
The Lady Pirate softbail team
swept a pair of doubleheaders
from the University of Vermont
and UNC-Wilmington, giving
ECU a seven-game winning
streak and a 16-4 overall record.
Senior pitcher Pam Young
picked up her sixth win of the
year with a 3-1 decison in the first
game against Vermont.
In the game, two of the three
Lady Pirate runs were unearned.
However, Robin Graves led the
way for ECU as she went 2-2 with
a walk. Lisa Zmuda was 1-3.
Wendy Ozment was also 1-3 with
one RBI.
The Lady Bucs finally put
together some fine hitting behind
the pitching of junior Stacey
Boyette. Boyette has pitched well
all year, but has taken some
losses due to poor Pirate hitting.
This wasn't the case Monday as
ECU won big, 8-1.
Zmuda went 1-2 with a double
and junior in fielder Sandy Kee
was 1-1 with a triple, walk and
one RBI. Freshman Susie Pierce
went 1-2 with two RBI's.
On Tuesday the Lady Bucs
continued their winning ways as
they sweep a pair from UNC-
Wilmington. Robin Graves pick-
ed up the Pirate victory as she is
now 2-1 on the year.
Graves helped herself at the of-
fensive end as well. She went 2-2
with two walks and one RBI. Oz-
ment was 2-3 with a triple and
freshman shortstop Julie Farrow
"We've got good overall team
defenseOur concentration is there
now, and we've become more of a
'team9.99
�Sue Manahan
Pam Young (7) picked up her start win this season earlier this
had a sacrifice RBI.
ECU won the second game 6-1
as four hitters combined for
seven hits. Senior Tamara Franks
had one RBI as she went 2-4.
Graves also had an RBI with a
1-3 hitting performance. Zmuda
went 1-4 with two RBI's. Ozment
continued to swing a mean bat as
she was a perfect 3-3 at the plate.
With the recent Lady Pirate
success, head coach Sue
Manahan is pleased with the way
things are going for her squad.
"We've got good overall team
defense Manahan said. "With
our seven-game winning streak,
we've got more confidence too.
"Up until Tuesday, our execu-
tion was a bit weak Manahan
added. "But our concentration is
there now, and we've become
more of a 'team
Next for the Lady Pirates is the
Florida Invitational Tournament
in Tallahassee. It is a 15-team
tournament with three separate
pools.
The Pirates will matched
with the likes of Bradley, Georgia
State, Michigan State, South
Florida and Southern Mississip-
pi. The top two teams in each
pool will then advance to the
single-elimination finals on
Saturday (March 23) and Sun-
day.
Some other powerful schools
in the tournament are Nickel
State and Florida State. Nickel
St. is currently in the top 20 in the
nation, while Fla. St. was No. 3
in Eastern Region last year.
Coach Manahan says the team
is excited and is looking foward
to playing in the tournament.
"We're ready to play against
the competition, but we really
don't know what to expect
Manahan said. "They (the op-
position) don't know anything
about us, and we don't know
anything about them. It's a no
lose situation.
"We're hitting the tournament
at a good time Manahan con-
tinued. "We're playing well and
have confidence
Manahan also said that in
order for her squad to be suc-
cessful at the tournament, they
would have to play good defense
and be consistent offensively
With the Pirates' seven-game
wmning; streak and a 16 4 record,
fcCU should prove to be suc-
cessful this weekend as well as
throughout the 1985 campaign
Mo
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Athieiu Im-
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 1985
11
5-4
and get the win
. 'eeK that the play in
is hurt her team
! due to the unexpected
op doubles team from
ivid Creech, who is
school this semester and
Vven w ho is concentrating
?s she said. "We've
in doubles play and
;h and Avery)
hur depth � now
i well in every
and women's
ill be in action over
"he men's team will
inion on Friday in
e going to
nwealth on
VI iday the Pirate
me to face the
he women will
minion on Friday
Pfeiffer on
header
: fred lohnson went
getting his fifth
It was his
6 ime in as many
n coming in
gton showed
he nightcap, com-
d to defeat the
Set PIRATES, pagell
Posts
'
M
. � �-
)ckmorton (right) have both
ing staff.
Streak
Igle-elimination finals on
lurday (March 23) and Sun-
bome other powerful schools
the tournament are Nickel
te and Florida State. Nickel
lis currently in the top 20 in the
ion, while Fla. St. was No. 3
Eastern Region last year.
oach Manahan says the team
pecited and is looking foward
laying in the tournament.
I'We're ready to play against
competition, but we really
i't know what to expect
nahan said. "They (the op-
inion) don't know anything
Sut us, and we don't know
thing about them. It's a no
i situation.
fWe're hitting the tournament
"a good time Manahan con-
led. "We're playing well and
fe confidence
lanahan also said that in
ler for her .quad to be suc-
Vul at the tournament, they
lid have to play good defense
be consistent offensively.
Vith the Pirates' seven-game
kmng streak and a 16-4 record,
JU should prove to be suc-
tul this weekend as well as
ughout the 1985 campaign.
More Controversy Concerning Clemson
FoRrmEV,LE SC" (UPI) �ach. Stan Narewski and
Clemson University strength coach, Sam Colson ad-
McLellan mitted giving a prescription drug
Athletic
pressed for an internal investiga-
tion a month after a prosecutor
told him the school's drug scan-
dal should go to a grand jury.
And Clemson President Bill
Atchley, whom some trustees
blamed for initiating a formal
probe, was merely announcing
what already was planned and
iid not even know of two
to track st?r Augustinius Jaspers.
Jaspers, a Dutch runner, was
found dead in his Clemson dor-
mitory on Oct. 19. An autopsy
showed he died from a congenital
heart defect, but revealed traces
of phenylbutazone � an anti-
inflammatory drug used to
reduce swelling in joints.
Jaspers did not have a prescrip-
2r2 Ic�nfcss,ons until ,on8 tion for the drug, and McLellan
after McLellan.
McLellan's early contact came
m an investigation that crossed
state lines. The investigation led
to resignations and guilty pleas
from two Clemson coaches and
the indictment of another, and
produced the resignations of both
McLellan and Atchley, the pro-
secutor told The Greenville News
in a copyrighted story.
"He (McLellan) basically told
me what had happened said
13th-Circuit Solicitor Bill Trax-
ler. explaining his first knowledge
of possible problems in the drug
case.
Traxler said the athletic direc-
tor called him at home on a
weekend in early November and
told him that the men's track
wanted to know if the coaches
should provide written confes-
sions.
Unfamiliar with the substance,
Traxler said he contacted a state
drug inspector. The solicitor said
McLellan called him later to say
the coaches had given university
police oral statements.
"But he said the police wanted
written statements from them
and he asked if they should do
that Traxler said. "Since what
he was telling me could possibly
be leading to a criminal matter, I
had to tell him that they should
consult an attorney First
Traxler said it was then he told
McLellan the matter should be
taken before a grand jury.
"I did not view it at the time to
Pirates Win One
Continued from page 10
After UNC-Wilmington picked
ip a run in the first, ECU scored
two in rhe top of the second.
ftei Mike Sullivan walked,
Mark Cockrell singled and the
ball rolled between the center-
fielder's legs, scoring Sullivan
m first base. Cockrell, who
Ivanced to third on the error
then scored on a sacrifice fly by
; hm Riley.
From then on, it was all Wilm-
ington. With the Pirates scoring
List one more run, the Seahawks
kicked up three in the third and
one in both the fourth and fifth
innings. Wilmington then added
to in the sixth to close out the
scoring.
ECU'S Jim Peterson took the
Jloss after going two and two-
khird innings, evening his record
tat 2-2. M;ke Christopher went the
tesi of the way in relief for the
Bucs.
Wilmington's Kenny King
picked up the win for the
Seahawks, making him 6-0 on the
year. Scott Altman finished up
for King, picking up his fifth save
of the season.
"After winning the first game,
we had the momentum ECU
coach Gary Overton said.
"Especially after we took the
lead in the second game, but
Wilmington came back nicely
with some timely hitting
The Pirates stranded 18
baserunners throughout both
games. However, ECU did
manage to pick up 14 hits in the
doubleheader. Bradberry was the
leading hitter for ECU, going 4-7
in the two games.
ECU is currently 13-4 overall
and 1-1 in the conference. Wilm-
ington is now 17-4 overall and 6-2
in league play. The Pirates return
to action tomorrow at Harr-
ington Field, to play host to the
Tarheels of North Carolina.
Advertise
In
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Trivia Answers
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be of a serious nature the pro-
secutor said. "But there was no
question a criminal offense had
occurred because they dispensed
a prescription drug without
lawful authority
Clemson University police
brought the case to Traxler Nov.
16, and he said, "we began to
prepare it for presentation to the
grand jury
Traxler's estimation of the
case's seriousness changed about
two weeks later.
"Two things happened that
cause me a great deal of
concern he said. "One was the
pathologist's (expanded) opinion
thatdrugs might have con-
tributed to the death and could
not be ruled out.
"About the same
timeanother (Clemson) runner
came into the police department
and told them of an incident
where he had been given
phenylbutazone when he was
recovering from mononucleosis
and he had gotten sicker
Traxler decided he wanted help
from the State Law Enforcement
Division to conduct interviews in
the case. He said he met with At-
chley Dec. 7 to inform him of the
plans, not knowing hou much
the president already knew.
Traxler said when he became
officially involved, he had told
the school's chief investigative
officer, lames Brummitt, "to
make sure he was keeping his
superiors aware
But a high administration
source told the newspaper that
Atchley was not told of the
coaches' statements until Dec. 3,
17 days after Traxler entered the
case officially and almost five
weeks after the confessions.
Brummitt and his superior,
Vice President for Business and
Finance Melvin Barnette, Loth
declined comment. Barnettc said
"we have been essentially
threatened with oui jobs ii we
make any statements
Atchley immediately met with
McLellan, associate thletic
Director Bobb) Robinson and
then superior, Vice President foi
Student Affairs Waiter Cox.
During that Dec 7 meeting,
Mel ellan "begged" foi an int �
nal probe.
"1 begged to do the investiga-
tions and then do the firing or
releasingat the conclusion he
toid Atchley, according to a
statement issued through the
Clemson sports inform ti ol
ECU Sports Trivia
ECU sports trivia is provided by the Student Athletic Board c
plimentsof Dr. Jimmie Grimsley of the Physical Education depart
ment.
Answers appear at the bottom of the page.
1. What was the first intercollegiate sport a EC1
2. What year did ECU pla) its first game of
ball?
3. Where on campus was the first basketba
4. Who were the supervisors o the firsl I
5. The 1933-34 season marked the first tin . was
charged at a game. How much was the admission?
6. When was the name "Pirates" adopted is tl k
nickname?
7. What were the teams called prior to the ado Pirates"?
8. Who was the first paid facuitv memb
basketball team?
9. What local resident became the second basketball coach of
ECU basketball team?
10. When and against what team did II firsl sure ov
points in a game?
11. What former ECU basketball and baseball coach was the se
cond leading scorer on the 1937-38 squad?
12. What was the name of the trophy that went to the winnei ol die
yearly ECU-Atlantic Christian basketball game? -
13. Who was the first post W;orld War II basketball coach at FCl ?
14. What and when was ECU's first conference affiliation in
basketball?
15. Who was the first ECU player to be recognized as an all North
State conference selection?
16. Who were the first two athletic scholarschip recipients in ECU
athletic history?
17. When was East Carolina Teachers College changed to Last
Carolina College?
18. When did ECC win their first North State conference cham
pionship?
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TAKEOUT
ORDERS
fice Jan. 29.
But Atchley, who had angered
McLellan's friends on the board
of trustees in 1982 when he tried
to restructure the athletic depart-
ment because of football
recruiting violations, denied the
request.
Atchley suspended coaches
Narewski and Colson the next
day, and they resigned three days
later. Traxler said he allowed the
president to announce the in-
vestigation as a courtesy.
Student and faculty groups
have protested Atchley's subse-
quent resignation, effective July
1. This came after a marathon
meeting of the trustees on March
1 Opponents say the board shov-
ed i he president out because of
his personal feud with McLellan
that began back in 1982.
McLellan, a former Clemson
toothall player, has a faction of
support on the board that credits
him with leading the university's
growth into athletic prominence.
Mel ellan also stepped down at
the March 1 meeting, but only
from his director's duties. He will
be reassigned to another post
within the school.
Students and faculty have
decried the situation as proof that
the board places more stock in
athletics than academics.
McLellan, now on indefinite
leave of absence, has refused all
contact with reporters.
Narewski and Colson pleaded
guilty to misdemeanor drug
charges in Pickens County March
11. They were fined, placed on
probation and ordered to per-
form community service. A third
ex-coach, former graduate assis-
tant Jack Harkness, says he will
return later from his Canadian
home to face similar charges.
Sports
Writers
Needed
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 21, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 21, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.399
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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