The East Carolinian, March 12, 1985






�ic 3EaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.5 No.45
Tuesday March 12, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Student Candidates Prepare For Elections
B GREG HIDEOUT
Managing Kdltor
- idents will have a field of 12
juiates to choose from in the
larch 20 SGA Executive Elec-
On the ballot will be three
ididates each for president,
ce president, secretary and
tsurer.
v. andidates ended their filing
Friday before spring break,
official campaigns were
i �i ay after Monday
ming's official candidates
leeting.
The three candidates for SGA
president are David Brown, Mike
McPartland and Kirk Shelley.
Brown, 22, is an environmental
health major from Raleigh, N.C.
He is a senior with a 2.8 gpa.
"I want to be SGA president
because it's the best way for me
to serve the students of ECU
Brown said. "I've been here four
years as a student at this universi-
ty, and I've seen a lot of changes
that need to be made. As presi-
dent, I can make these changes
Brown has been a member of the
SGA and is now director of
Pirate Walk, the campus escort
service.
McPartland, 21, is a business
marketing major from Raleigh,
N.C. He is a junior with a 2.4
gpa. "With the experience I have
gained as SGA vice president, I
wish to continue serving the
SGA Candidates
Brown
McPartland
-
Shelley
I ane
I

Smith
ft
9� �mm.� I
h jpr fg-V 1

Wiseman
Carroll
Draper
Scarborough
students of ECU McPartland
said, answering the question of
why he wants to be SGA presi-
dent. "I have enjoyed working
with the SGA and major attrac-
tions committee, and now I'm
ready to concentrate my efforts
toward the position of
president McPartland is in-
volved with the Student Union
and is SGA vice president.
Shelley, 21, is a political
science major from Greenville.
He is a junior with a 3.0 gpa.
Shelley said he wants to be SGA
president "to serve the students
of ECU by using my experiences
in SGA to bring their ideas into
practice. Also, I would like to im-
prove student life by upgrading
the number of parking facilities
and cut text book cost by expan-
ding the book exchange Shelley
is involved with the North
Carolina Student Legislature and
is speaker of the SGA legislature.
Candidates for vice president
are Lee Lane, Bryan Lassiter and
Chris Tomasic.
Lane, 20, is a political science
major from Wilmington, N.C.
He is a junior with a 2.7 gpa.
Lassiter, 20, is a computer
science major from Severn, N.C.
He is a junior with a 2.7 gpa.
Tomasic, 22, is a history major
from Durham, N.C. He is a
junior with a 2.6 gpa.
The three candidates for
treasurer are James Braswell,
Grant Smith and Dwayne
Wiseman.
Braswell, 20, is a computer
science major from Smithfield,
N.C. He is a junior with a 2.6
gpa.
Smith, 21, is a music education
major from Chesapeake, Va. He
is a junior with a 2.5 gpa.
Wiseman, 23, is a finance ma-
jor from Fayetteville, N.C. He is
a junior with a 2.6 gpa.
The three candidates for
secretary are Lisa Carroll,
Maryvonne Draper and Ann
Barlow Scarborough.
Carroll, 18, is a physical
therapy major from Jacksonville,
Fla. She is a freshman with a 2.8
gpa.
Draper, 19, is an English major
from Suffolk, Va. She is a
sophomore with a 3.2 gpa.
Scarborough, 21, is a math and
science education major from
Hookerton, N.C. She is a senior
with a 2.7 gpa.
All candidates are allowed to
spend up to $200 on their cam-
paigns. There is no door-to-door
campaigning allowed in the
dorms.
The East Carolinian will hold a
candidate forum along with the
SGA on Tuesday, March 19 at
12:30 on the mall at central cam-
pus. Students will be encouraged
to ask questions.
New Registration Will End Card Use
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newt Kdltor
Computer cards and long
drop-add lines should be the vic-
tims of a new, computerized
registration system to be used for
the first time this semester.
"Hopefully, we'll never see
computer cards again said
ECU Registrar Gil Moore. He
said at least 54 terminals have
been purchased and tested. These
terminals will be linked with a
Sperry-Univac system to
facilitate on-line registration,
which will take place March 25 to
April 12.
"The students will have to
work along with us" to make the
system work, Moore said.
"We're trying to get them out of
long lines and get them the best
schedule possible
Moore said each academic unit
on campus has a terminal and the
Registrar's Office will have at
least 12. In order to use the on-4
line registration system, students
must fill out a schedule form with
no more than 18 hours of
primary courses and 15 hours of
alternate courses.
Students must also secure any
special permissions necessary
prior to beginning the registra-
tion process.
Upon completion of the
registration form, students may
go to any one of the terminals to
have their schedules keyed in.
Although students are strongly
advised to go to their major
department to get their schedules,
only veterans and petition
students are required to go to the
Registrar's Office.
Students will be allowed to
register by classification, with
graduating seniors registering
first, and then the other students
by class. Students may not go
before their assigned time, but
will be permitted to register at
any time after that point. Moore
pointed out that all registration
will be done by using social
security numbers instead of ECU
ID numbers. "Students will need
to know their social security
numbers Moore said, adding
that those without numbers have
had them assigned and should
obtain them from the Registrar
Office.
Once the schedule is keyed in,
it will be the student's guaranteed
schedule for the next semester,
provided fees are paid. Courses
will be selected from the primary
and alternate selections and if a
student rejects a schedule, he will
not be permitted to take a partial
schedule, but will have to return
and try again. The only exception
will be students who need special
permission to enter a closed sec-
tion of a course.
After registration, students will
be sent tuition bills. When paying
of these bills, students will receive
computer printouts with their ac-
tivity cards, schedules and their
bill on one sheet.
Terminals should be open at
least four hours a day in each
department, Moore said. The
Registrar's Office will have ter-
minals in operation from 7 a.m.
to 7 p.m. throughout the registra-
tion process.
Moore said the schedule of ter-
As Part Of A National Series
minal operation has been devised
in order to ensure that "we allow-
ed sufficient time for everyone to
get familiar with the system He
said the that in test runs the
average student takes only five
minutes to complete the process.
"The big change will be in
drop-add Moore said. Students
will be allowed to change
schedules only if they have failed
a course, not completed a prere-
quisite, or have a medical excuse.
"Once a decision is made, we
won't be able to change the
schedule Moore said.
Provisions have been made for
possible computer failure,
although a failure is not likely,
Moore said. "If the system goes
down, we have been assured it
will not be down for an extended
period of time he said.
Moore said his advice to
students and faculty is to "be pa-
tient. We are continually review-
ing the whole process and it is a
learning experience for all of us
He said he would welcome any
suggestions or criticism.
Lectures Focus On World Relations
By BRETT MORRIS
Staff Writer
In order to inform students
and faculty about foreign policy
issues, ECU will be presenting
The Great Decision series beginn-
ing March 12 and continuing
through the remainder of the spr-
ing semester.
The foreign policy education
program is a 31-year-old series
that has been appearing on cam-
puses throughout the nation. It is
the largest series of its kind and
more than 200,000 people are ex-
pected to participate this year.
The local series is being spon-
sored by the political science and
geography departments, the
Forums Board of the ECU
University Unions and the
Political Science Student Society.
The program is being financed by
appropriations from the SGA
and the campus related organiza-
tions.
Dr. Maurice D. Simon, chair-
man of the political science
department at ECU, is organizing
the series. "I feel this is a signifi-
cant opportunity to consider
some of the major international
issues of our time with a set of
well-known specialists who have
interesting and sometimes con-
troversial points of view he
said.
Students of all majors as well
as the public are invited to at-
tend, Simon said. "We hope that
if university and community par-
ticipation merits, it will become a
permanent feature of the spring
semester calendar of events
The series will consist of six
prominent speakers throughout
the nation and abroad beginning
at 8 p.m. today.
The recent death of Konstan-
tine Chernenko, former General
Secretary of the Soviet Com-
munist Party, will have a great
effect on future United States-
Soviet relations. Dr. Jeffery W.
Hahn, a political science pro-
fessor at Villanova University
will present: "Soviet Leadership
in Transition: What Impact On
Superpower Relations?" Hahn is
the author of numerous articles
on Soviet and East European
politics. Other speakers involv-
ed in the ECU Great Decision
Series include:
�Dr. James Leutze, March 19,
"Future of the Atlantic Alliance:
Unity in Diversity?"
�Dr. Henry R. Nau, March 26,
"Budget Deficit, Trade and the
Dollar: The Economics of
Foreign Policy
�Donald E. Schulz. April 2,
"Revolutionary Cuba: Toward
Accomodations or Conflict?"
�Dr. Jerry Pubantz, April 9.
"Iran�Iraq War: what role for
the U.S. in the Persian Gulf?"
�John Maisto, April 16
(tenative), "The Phillipines:
What Future for Democracy?"
The programs are scheduled to
be held in Brewster C�103.
Orientation Staff Members Needed
I ECU students are encouraged to vote on March 20 in the SGA Ex-
ecutive Elections. A Forum will be held March 19 and students will
'ave the opportunity to hear each candidate state his position as well ty they provide for recruiting new
� answer any questions. members from among the incom
By DALE SWANSON
Staff Writer
Remember that helpful orien-
tation counselor who helped you
through your First experience at
ECU? Well, now is your oppor-
tunity to pass on many of the
things that you have may have
learned about college life to a
new crop of ambitious young
freshmen.
Applications are now available
in the office of the associate dean
of students for positions on this
summer's student orientation
staff. The positions offer a salary
of $800, along with room and
board during freshman orienta-
tion, June 12 through July 11.
According to Ronald Speier,
associate dean of students and
director of student services, posi-
tions on the staff are especially
lucrative for representatives of
student groups and organizations
because of the special opportuni-
ing freshmen. "We are looking
for a good cross�section of
students Speier said. He em-
phasized a desire for students
with strong leadership
backgrounds to apply, people liv-
ing in residence halls, com-
muters, Greeks, as well as student
government leaders.
Students who would like to ap-
ply for the 16 positions must have
completed 24 credit hours, plan
on returning to ECU in the fall of
1985, and not be on any type of
academic or disciplinary proba-
tion, though no minimum gpa is
required.
Orientation counselors will live
on campus and eat in the
cafeteria during each of the seven
sessions, but will not be allowed
to stay in the dorms during
breaks between sessions. There
will be a training program for
counselors in April where infor-
mation such as student activities,
academic requirements, the SGA
handbook, and the new registra-
tion procedure will be covered.
During the orientation ses-
sions, the counselors will be re-
quired to help with checking in
new students in and out of the
dorms as well as giving tours of
the campus, assisting in the
and
stu-
registration procedures,
answering any questions a
dent may have.
For application packets
more information, stop by 210
Whichard Building
and
On The Inside
Announcements2 attend and to submit questions
Editorials4 using the form on page 5 of to-
Styfe7 day's paper.
Classifieds8
Sports10 �For photos of the ECAC-
South tournament, see Sports,
page 10.
�The renowned soprano, Mar-
vis Martin, will be performing
Wednesday March 18 at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
�The East Carolinian will
sponsor a forum for all SGA
candidates on Tuesday, March
19. All students are invited to
�For info on the upcoming
Kinks concert, see Style, page
�Get all the latest editorials
and lettervto-f he-editor on the
E.Cs editorial page � page
4.
� 4,4im.
� ������,�
-���.� -y.4





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 12, 1985
The Kinks
The ECU Student Union Maior Concerts
Committe is presenting Tht Kinks, live in con
cert, March 16. 19S5. in Minges Coliseum
Tickets will be S10 in advance, and $12 for
non students and at the door Tickets will go
on sale today at n 00 m the central ticket of
flee of Mendenhall Student Center Don't
mist Itllll
Officials
Need extra money? We'll let you call the
shots with softbail and team handball Of
ticialsfor mtramurals are needed1 The soft
ball clinics win begin March 12, 6 p m in MG
102 while team handball starts March 11 at A
p m in room 102 Memorial Gym If you have
a question call Willie Ehlirg at 757 4387 No
experience necessary
Graduate Students
Wesley Foundation is now accepting applica
tions for a graduate couple to serve as resi
den! advisors and program assistants for the
1985 86 school year Housing is provided at
'he Methodist Student Center For informa
tion call 758 2030
Rooms Available
tor students at �he Methodist Student Center
Applications for summer school and fail may-
be picked up at 501 East Fifth Street inter
views will be held March li 15 For further
� nformation contact Richard or Sheila
Beeker at 758 2030 after 5pm
All Are Invited
To a special Seminar in Home Economics
Wed 4pm Varch 13 m room 235 Home
Economics Howard Jacobson. M D Direc
tor institute of Nutrition, University of
North Carolina and Adjunct Professor,
Department of Food Nutrition and Institu
ton Management ECU
Catholic Sun. Worship
Mass Is celebrated on Sun at 11:30 a m. in
the Biology Lecture Hall and at 9 p m at the
Newman Center Ail are welcome to attend
The Newman Center is located at 953 E
Tenth St
Catholic Student Center
Newman Center
Tues evenings at 8 pm a course is being of
'ered entitled Catholicism It is open to
cafhohc students faculty and staff who wish
to know more about their fa'th and tor all in
terested parties who wish to become ac
quainted with what being a Catholic Chris
fian is all about The Newman Center is
located at 953 E 10th St
Catholic Student Center
Newman Center
Thurs Evenings at 7 p m a prayer and
meditation group meets at the Newman
Center Its purpose is to provided oppor
tunities for personal growth thorugh the pro
cess of shared prayer, song, and reflection
upon the scriptures All are invited The
Newman Center is located a' 953 E 10th st
Intramurals
Swing with the IRS Intramural tennis
doubles registration begins March 11 13.
Play begins March 18 Come to 204 Memorial
Gym to sign up or can 757 6387
Pre-Season Softball
ana regular season IRS softbail action will
begin March 15 Registration will be held in
204 Memorial Gym March 12 13 so get the
teams together new! Swing into spring with
iRS softbail For more information call
7 57 6387 Officials the first clinic will be held
Marc i2 at 6 p m in MG 102
Team Handball
Register for regular season team handball
with intramurals March 12-13 in room 204
Memorila Gym For more info call 757-6387
if you need x tra money and want to of
ficiate. a clinic will be held March 11 at 6
p m in BG 102
Co-Rec volleyball
is spiking in your repetoire? If so. register
for intramural corec volleyball March 1819
3 guys and 3 gals are needed to play For
more mfo call 757 6387 or come by room 204
Memorial Gym
Co-Rec Racquetball
Registration for intramural corec raquet
ball begins March 18 20 Play will start
March 25 For more information come by
room 204 Memorial Gym or call 757 6387 Sw
ng into spring with the IRS
ECU Racquetball
Club
will nave a next organizational meeting on
Wed , March 13, at 5 p m in Memorial Gym
rm 102 Meet new members, find out tor our
next events (Eastern Seaboard Inter
collegiate Racquetball Tournament) and
practices on Toe Th 9 to 12 p m and Sat 8
to 10 a m at Mlnges court All members and
anyone interested are welcome
Announcements
Lip Sine Contest
Try-Outs
Greene Hall and the March of Dimes Is soon
soring a Lip Sine contest which will be held
at the Attic on March 29 Tryouts will be held
in the lobby of Greene hall. Wed , March 20
7 9pm One to four people per group The
grand prize will be a weekend trip to Atlantic
Beach Come on out! For more information
call 758 8901
Bikini Contest
Phi Sigma Pi's 8th Annual Bikini Contest to
benefit the Heart Fund will be held Tues .
March 19, at the Elbo Prizes will be award
ed tor first, second, and third places If
you're interested in competing, sign up in
front ot the Student Store Thurs, Fri , or
Mon . or call the Elbo
Best Tan Contest
Work on that tan over spring break! Delta
Zeta is having a "Best Tan contest at the
Elbo on Tues , March 12 There will be prizes
for participants, and the greek trat or sorori
ty with the biggest turn out will win a free
keg! See you there. Aloha!
Illumina Is Coming
The Student Union Visual Arts Committee
will be presenting the 6th Annual Illumina
Art Exhibition All students of East Carolina
are eligible to enter There is no limitation on
the type ot media used, everything from
photography to sculpture will be accepted
There will be cash prizes totatlmg over
SI.000 Entries will be accepted on March 13
from 16pm and March 15 from 16pm So
enter now
Bible Talk
Directed group Bible discussion Everyone
welcome! Tues nights, 9 p m , room 212
Mendenhall
Pre-Registration Issue
is coming out this Thurs March 14th Due to
the large Size of the paper it probably will not
arrive on campus until later than usual
Please do not call the East Carolinian regar
ding extra issues We do not hold any extra
copies!
Pirate Walk
Ladies, spring time is here and the jogging
bug has bitten We at Pirate Walk now have
logging excorts at your use Please give us a
call! Also, if you just need an escort the days
are Sun Thrus from 6 to 12 p m and the
phone number is 757 6616 We're here for
you!
Student Dietetic Assoc
is having a meeting Thes . March 12 5 30 in
the Home Economics dininghall Speaker is
Ms Teresa Lucus owner of Down to Earth
health food srore She will bring free samples
of herb tea and the like, so come join in on
the fun! A photographer from ECU'S annual
will take a group picture of SDA all
membera are urged to attend March is Na
tlonai Nutrition Month! in recognition of this
SDA will be giving personal dietary an
nalyses in front of the Student Store on Wed
and Thurs March 208.21 Don't miss out on
this opportunity to get your diet analysed!
Also, we will be having bake sales Fri
March 15 and Tues March 26 We will be
selling bomemade granolabars, butbreads,
bran muffins, wheat loaves and things of the
nature So don't forget, we'll see you then!
Nursing Majors
Freshmen nursing majors are urged to con
suit their faculty advisors, prior to or during
preregistraflon for summer and fall 1985.
concerning sophomore course changes and
to pick up memo concerning program
changes
All other nursing majors are advised to
seek their advisor's assistance when
preregistering for revised courses for fall
1985
Scholarship
Applications are now being accepted for the
Ledoma Wright Memorial Scholarship Ap
plications may be obtained from members of
the ECU Organization of Black Facuty and
Staff For additional information contact Dr
Joyce Pettis (757 6571) or Ms Jacqui
Hawkins (757 2499)
ECU Peace Committee
The Greensboro Civil Rights Fund will be
sponsoring the PBS award winning
documentary "88 seconds in Greensboro"
March 14 at 7 30 p m in the old Joyner
Library Dr Marty Natham, wife of slain ac
tivist. pediatrician Mike Natham will
answer questions after the movie This is an
opportunity to learn 1st hand what really
happened five years ago at the Death to the
Klan Rally and a chance to learn more about
the up coming trial of acccured klan and nazi
members All are invited to share in this
evening of education and dialog
Buddist Study
We will be meeting on the 14th at 7 in E201 ot
the physics Building Bloteld's Taoism and
Tao Te Ching will discussed Copies of each
can be found in the Student Supply Store
Please bring a cushion.
Planning
a meeting for students interested in pursuing
a major or minor m urban and regional plan
ning win be held Wed . March 20th at 7 p m
in room D 209, Brewster building
Planning faculty members will be present
to answer! questions regarding the planning
curriculum and career opportunities in ur
ban and regional planning
Students considering a planning career
are urged to attend this meeting Additional
information may be obtained by calling Pro
fessors Hankins. Wubneh or Stephenson at
757 6465 or 757 6230 Department of
Geography and Planning
ECU Racquetball
Club
will have a organizational meeting on Wed ,
March 13. at 5 p m in Memorial gym rm.
102 Meet new membrs. find out for our next
events (eastern seaboard intercollegiate
racquetball tournament) All members and
anyone interested are welcome
Yearbook Portraits
will be taken during March 18 29 Walk ins
are welcome, but avoid the lines and sign up
now It takes only five minutes and five
poses are free Sign up at the Buccaneer of
fice (2nd floor publications building across
from Joyner Library).
Spring Break Pictures
the yearbook is looking for candlds of you
and your friends during spring break Bring
us your snapshots and we'll print the best in
the 1985 Buccaneer Call or come by the year
book office (across from Joyner Library)
757 6501
One test where only
you knowthe score.
Yes No
DD
DD
DD
Do you wan1 lobe the
only one who knows
when you use an early
pregnancy test?
Would you prefer a test
that's totally private to
perform and totally
private to read?
Would you like a test
that's portable, so you
can carry it with you and
read it in private?
And how about a simple,
one-step test with a dra-
matic color change that's
easy to read and is 98
accurate?
If you checked "Yes" to
the above, FLPT PLUS is for
you. Use it, and only you
will know your test scorn.
Bingo and Ice Cream
Party
The Student Union Recreation Committee is
sponsoring a Bingo and Ice Cream Party.
Tues .March 12 at 7 p m in the lobby of
Umstead Hall All ECU students, faculty,
staff and their guests are invited Admission
is only 25 Eight games will be played and
the Grand Prize will be a ticket to 'The
Kinks' concert on March 16th
CADP
Hope you all had a good spring break and
glad to be bark We will have a meeting
Thurs . March 14 at 4 p m in Erwin Hall,
room 210 All members and interested per
sons please attend
Omega Psi Phi
and Delta Sigma Theta will have their
Omega and Delta Ball on March 23 It will be
a tropical evening of enchantment Tickets
are on sale now
Also Omega Psi Phi will have a back to
school jam at the Unlimited Touch on Thurs
Marchl4 There will also be a 9 11 happy
hour and all proceeds go to the scholarship
fund Rides will be provided between 9 10 30
at MSC
Recreation Committee
is sponsoring a Trivial Pursuit Contest Mon ,
March 18 Pre register by Fri . March 15 in
the Multi Purpose Room m Mendenhall
Epsilon Pi Tau
EPT will hold it's monlthly mmetmg on
Thurs March 14at the Western Steer on 10th
st at 5 p m The topics of this meeting will in
elude the NAIT accreditation team that will
evaluate the INDT Dept in April Dr
MrPherson will be the guest speaker This is
an important meeting Members as well as
guests are strongly urged to attend
Phi Beta Lambda
will hold a meeting on Wed. March 13 at 3 m
Rawl 342 The speaker will be Mr Bill Sneed
ot Dun Hill Employment Service He will
speak about the id's market Everyone
welcome
Gamma Geta Phi
will have a called meeting on Thurs March
14 at 7 p m in Jenkins Auditorium This is
your last chance to pick up tickets See you
T here!
Ambassadors
Hope all ot iOKj had a fabulous spring break
We will have a general meet.ng this Wed
March 13 at 5 p m m the Mendenhall
Multipurpose room See you there
Tau Kappa Epsilon
10th annual TKE boxing tournament Tonife
in Minges 7 30 show ECU I D and get a
dollar oft regular admission price Don't
miss this sporting spectacular
Concert Photos
The Buccaneer is looking for photos of
musical groups that have played regionally
during the last year, especially In the NC VA
area If you ve got'em we'll pnnt'em in the
1985 Buccaneer and give you the Credit line
Call or come by the yearbook office (across
from Joyner Library) 757 6501
Sin
A mght tha' wrtll .nflueri'p 're � ?s'
lite coming April 11
Photog-aphs
are you a closet photographer have some
party pictures?, or some prints left over
from a photography class' The yearbook is
looking for interesting and unusual photos ot
the campus, students, and Greeny.lie B"ig
them in the 1985 Buccaneer and give youth
credit line For mfo call 757 6501
LSS
Voting for ' rt-r�, ,(A-i-
LSS Duiidmg Come ann .
favorite teacher Dfao �
Social
Scott Ha � �� �� � - �
� I to come a�
Throb a' " � � ��� � '�' �
8 10 Admission � '� �
be serving
for a dime! Don't I
Chris Tomasic
for
SGA Vice-President
Spring Book Sale
Joyner Library Lobby
Thursday. March 14: 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
Friday. March 15: 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
Hardbacks: 50c - $2.00
Paperbacks: 10� -$1.00
Sponsored by: Friends of ECl 'Library
V
Presents
The BEST of the BEACH!
with our
-BEACH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR
and
: J
w BIKINI CONTEST
$300 FIRST PRIZE!
rs?
4f�S n&j
U!
JEWELRY SALE
EXTRAVAGANZA
A wide range of fashion jewelry will be available
for your perusal at the MSC Lobby March 18-22,
1985, from 10 a.m6 p.m. All items 30 to 50 off
usual retail price. From $3 to $40. Checks accepted.
H
Wednesday, March 13th
Doors Open at 5:00 � prices on all beverages
plus free hot hors d'oeuvres 'til 8:00
FREE ADMISSION 'til 6:00
Rock 93's Charlie Byrd spins your favorite dance
music 'til 7:30
plus
Live Beach and Top 40 Soul music with the
� Ol TA CE BRO THERS
'til Midnight
BEAUTIFUL BODIES! Enter the bikini contest free!
1st Prize: $300
2nd Prize: $100
3rd Prize: $50
Leave the DRIVING TO US!
Call the Liberty Ride 758-5570
Private Club - All ABC Perirnts
Gratil
(CPS)
McDonai :
sity in 0 I
McLodge
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spend �
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This ea
360,001
at three large r,
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$3.00
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Coll 7!






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 12. 1985
Graduates Face 'McEducation' Schools
Sin
� e the rest of
VOur
LSS
3's at the
or your
v ' ' '3th
Social
� Ah,te ana Cie
' 'ur� of Heart
Warch 13 from
a Sl atter
Average
"9 your sra
masic
resident
fe Sale
yLobby
:00p.m.
6:00 p.m.
- $2.00
K-S1.00
( 1 ibrarij
on all beverages
es 'til 8:00
til 6:00
3ur favorite dance
nusic with the
ERS
bikini contest free!
(CPS) Students
McDonald's Hamburger Univer-
sity in Oak Brook, 111 live in
McLodges and earn degrees in
Hamburgerology.
But they also work with state-
of-the-art technology, endure
rigorous training in management,
communications and business
skills and can earn up to 18
credits toward a food service
management associates degree.
And slowly but surely, a recent
report on how much companies
spend to re-educate college grads
includes corporate schools like
Hamburger U.
McDonald's is one of some 400
corporations spending millions
each year on employee education
programs to fill in the gaps left by
traditional education, and to pro-
vide specialized training for
specific jobs.
"The typical college graduate
has accrued a degree and a good
academic education explains
Donald Conover, spokesman for
AT&T's Corporate Education
Center in New Jersey.
But students "need a transition
from a broad college base to the
more specific applications
necessary to do a job he adds.
Corporate courses range from
high school basics to specialized
operations training, and students
include dropouts and PhDs.
"The age of high-tech has
moved in rapidly says Nell
Eurich, author of the recent
Carnegie Institute study of cor-
porate classrooms. "It's
necessary to educate workers in
advanced information, to give
additional instructon
constantly
"It's an extension of the life-
long learning concept explains
Jim Pavlakis, developer of
Chesapeake and Potomac
Telephone's corporate education
program. "Even if schools are
doing a beautiful job, employees
need opportunities to avoid job
obsolescence
Nearly 8,000 of C&T's 30,000
employees currently use one of
three corporate education plans:
in-hours or home study courses in
specific job training and basic
education, or tuition aid, pro-
viding access to all schools in the
The company expanded its in-
itial tuition aid program 15 years
ago to include undereducated and
entry level employees, Pavalak;s
says.
"In 1969, it became a huge
program attempting to provide
basic skill education to help
employees qualify for better
jobs he notes. "Then affir-
mative action pressure convinced
us to offer non-traditional job
training
AT&T began corporate educa-
tion in 1895, Conover says "ac-
celerating the concept at about
the same rate as knowledge ac-
celerated
This year, the company will log
360,000 student-days of training
at three large corporate education
centers and 12 regional facilities.
Many are stressing basic skills
courses more and more,
Carnegie's Eurich contends.
"It's a questin of getting basic
skills she says. "Corporations
are doing a lot of work in basic
instruction, in reading, writing
math, effective listening and
speaking.
Polaroid's 30-year-old pro-
gram stresses reading, writing,
grammar, and career planning
and counseling, in addition to
management and high-tech
courses, says public relations
spokeswoman Maria Wilhelm.
Nearly 2,500 students per
semester fill over 100 courses,
most tuaght by Polaroid
employees, she adds.
Corporate education's in-
fluence on traditional higher
education is mushrooming as
quickly as the phenomenon itself,
claims Sylvia Galloway,
American Council on Education
spokeswoman.
Last year, ACE performed ac-
creditation evaluations for nearly
150 corporate education pro-
grams, she says, and many "look
comparable to programs offered
in traditional college settings
"It's no reflection on higher
education AT&T's Conover in-
isists. "Universities provide the
fundamentals, foundation and
advanced work in a field at a
theoretical level
The corporations move
"theory into practice, focusing
on applications in the context of
a particular corporation he
adds.
WISHING V0U LIVED AT THE TOWERS? V0U CAN THIS TALI I
CALL TOR VETAILS ON RENTAL OR PURCHASE. 756-8410
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
student condos at ECU campus
sale and rental units
on-site management
night security personnel
fully furnished and accessorized
carpeted & air conditioned
kitchen appliances furnished
laundry facilities
resident parking stickers
WARD PROPERTY BROKERS
lOS COMMERCE STREET
DRAWER 568
GREENVILLE M C 27B35
919 756-84lO
Mike
McPartland
for SGA President
�SGA Vice President
�Media Board Chairman
�Major Concerts
Committee Chairman
Experience The Office Needs!
Vote March 16th
& Delta Zeta
Present
BEST TAN
CONTEST
Tuesday, March 12, 1985 8:30-1:00 A.M.
Prizes' Admission$10� 18yrs. $2.00
1st $75 2nd $50 3rd $25
Come Early!
Present
yrJ DRAFTNITE
Wed. March 13, 1985 8:30-1:00 A.M.
Admission $1.50 18yrs.$1.00
10 DRAFT
ALL NITE
jjj PASTAHA BOBS "Spring Fever- Calendar jj
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si : id ulii-
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10 - I.IMI
CHEERS'
Hew Path
To Learning
This Summer
Summer School at:
UNC Wilmington
the University by the Sea
For a brochure describing our courses
and general information, write:
Office of Special Programs
UNC at Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, N.C. 28403
Or Call: 19191 3K-31tt
East Carolina Student Union's
Major Concerts Committee
Presents:
A Night With
!
if
i
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Time Out Delivers!
We are now DELIVERING Hot Chicken and Biscuits
right to your door. Just grab a friend, get together your
order and call us now.
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IXP 3-31-W
I
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Saturday, March 16th
Minges Coliseum
Tickets: $w Student in Advance
$12 Public and at the Door
Tickets may be purchased at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
frimdjiirttii �due m �'i m �-
-�'� JHtmmmm
J t;






I
�ij East (Earnlinian
Strung thie E.as: Cvrnxuna camptes commttnLr since 1925
K i . . �attm?mf �.
Jensifeji Jekdkasui -v Tom Lavender, am, ��.�.�
S rrC � nth s Vas lMMv
jsa Maoschajk John Peterson mm
� -���- . � R I McC RMAC Gi
'�' HEi � �.��� DeCHANILE J KNSON urota.
V. '
Opinion
Colleges
s 77 Academics or Athletics?
oursP
n � at came first, the NCAA or
Han ard University?
Well, sadly, most people would
ay they don't care, unless their
Ps ream would go on proba-
tion for not answering the que-
This is the world of Athletics v.
Academics, the latest court cae in
town. The evidence for athletics
winning, or at least settling out of
court, is mounting. Just open your
eyes and look. At N.C. State a star
basketball player is admitted with
a Scholastic Aptitude Tet score of
470 At Clemson University, Presi-
dent Bill Atchley resigns because
iphasis on academics ruffled
athletic-boosting trustees. Also at
mson, drug scandal forced
es to resign.
Across the nation, sports-crazed
America has turned our nation's
institutes of higher learning into
minor leagues for professional
sports. Because of the megabucks
involved (heck, the College Foot-
ball Association, which ECU is a
member of, signed two TV pacts
worth S55 million), schools can't
resist. Academics has become the
horse being pulled by the athletic
cart.
Even schools that you wouldn't
think make exceptions do.
Newspaper reports say every
school lowers their standards for
athletes, even Ivy League teams.
Duke University, where the
average SAT is more than 1200,
admits student athletes with SAT
scores as low as a 1000. ECU
makes exceptions, although Dr.
How ell is rumored to have been
tough on Ed Emory, who, accor-
ding to sources, wanted several
below-standard athletes admitted
each year.
But now, with all the furor over
recent events, a movement is
underway to put athletics in
perspective. No one will disagree
that learning shouldn't come first,
but try to tell them that their belo -
ed team can't have this player and
therefore won't be in the NCAA
tournament next year, well, you'll
have a fight on your hands. As you
can see, it's not going to be easy to
put the horse back out in front of
the cart.
The movement, of course,
should start from within. Schools
should just force themselves to ac-
cept only athletes that can cut it
academically. Booster clubs, in-
cluding our Pirate Club, should
not demand winning teams if the
people comprising those teams are
academic losers. The students who
cheer for those teams should be
cheering for fellow classmates, not
a bunch of pros in school colors.
If the conviction is there on the
inside, the movements already
started outside will work. A recent
convention attended by Dr.
Howell in Miami was called to ad-
dress the common problems of big-
time sports colleges. The goal, ac-
cording to Edward T. Foote, presi-
dent of the University of Miami
and the coordinator of the con-
ference, is to make further reforms
that reflect the primacy of a
university's academic priorities.
From outside and from inside,
we can stop athletics from taking
over our campuses. We don't want
big-time sports to go away. No one
does. We just want them a little
less tainted.
COMRAPe CHERNENKQ IS FAI��, HE dUSTHtePS TO BE
WATBRep AMP RBP0TTSP,
Are Aid Cuts Cool?
Did You Know � Colleges con-
tinue to reap financial benefits
from the Los Angeles Olympics.
L.A. community colleges recently
reported that it got $5-million
worth of improvements from the
games.
Also, the L.A. organizing com-
mittee donated sports equipment
to five colleges in the area. Sports,
we guess, just makes money in
every way for colleges.
Campus Forum
B MIC HAH K1NSI F
The Reagan administration regular!)
proposes reforms m student aid. and
regular!) backs down in the face of pro-
tests that are loudei than anything ever
heard in defense of welfare or food
stamps.
As the rules were rather thoughtless!)
amended during the late 1970s, anyone
can now get an interest-free loan of
$2,500 a year while in college dnd a sub-
sidized interest rate during repayment
after graduation.
That deal is worth $6.(XXt to a
J100,000-a-year family with two kids in
college.
Of course it's wrong to judge an
social policy on the basis of horror
stories. But President Reagan's latest
proposed cutbacks in student aid
deserve to be measured against the
reasons we tax some people in order to
help pav for other people to go to col-
lege.
There are two such reasons. One is to
assure all citizens an equal opportunity
to advance themselves through educa-
tion. The other is that each individual's
education also benefits societ as a
whole.
Along with some long-overdue ad-
ministrative reforms, Reagan would in-
stitute two major changes. Students
from families making more than
$32,500 a year would not be eligible for
government grants, bargain loans or
subsidized jobs. (The cutoff for grants
would be $25,000, which is about the
median family income.) Second, no one
would be able to get subsidized loans,
jobs or grants worth more than $4,000 a
year.
Attending the average state college or
university costs about $5,(XX) a year, in-
cluding tuition, books, and room and
board. No state school costs more than
$3,000 a year. B contrast, 2 percent
of private colleges cost more than
$8,000.
Reagan's proposed ceilings, then,
would have little effect on students
state schools, and certain!) shouldn't
den) anyone the opportunit) to attend
one. The bite will be felt at private in
stitutions. Education Secretary William
Bennett and others m the administra
lion have said franklv that the) see the
goal of student aid as guaranteeing
everyone the chance at a good college
education, not guaranteeing all students
the most expensive education the) cue
to buv.
Critics have charged the administra
tion with hypocris) on this point.
Reagan and Bennett ate both ardent ad
vocates of "choice" at the pnmaiv mu
secondary level. Ihev want government
to help parents pav for private schools
through voucher svstems and tuition
tax credits. Yet at the college Icvcjl. ihcv
feel the guarantee of public education is
good enough
Bennett denies anv contradiction.
Unlike students at private colleges,
private primary and secondary students
now get no help at all, "so we're living
to achieveparity ' But this is dis
ingenous. The goal of the vouchci
system is to give parents an absolutely
free choice between public and private
schooling; tuition tax credits actually
would help only private schools
But Bennett's liberal critics arc equal
ly contradictory. While anathematizing
vouchers as a threat to the public
schools, they insist that financial con
strainis should never prevent anyone
from attending a private university. It's
true that public schools are part of Un-
democratic vision in a way that public
universities are not. Ideally, thev ate the
place where people of all classes, races
and abilities start out life together,
wherevei thev might end up fseri
public universities are pan ot the
meritocratic sorting out process
�s a practical mattei. (hough, who is
actual!) going to he denied the oppoi
tunit) to attend the college ot his � hei
choice because ot Reagan's mirs
Oulv about 10 percent ot the 4 v
million student aid recipients get more
than the proposed $4.ixio ceiling now
and most get just a tew hundred dollars
mote All families are entitled to $4,000
in government guaranteed (but unsub
sidiedl loans on top ot am othet aid
Part time and summei jobs, even at the
minimum wage, can bung in anothei
S2.1XX1. toi a total ol $12,200
1 he average private college costs
$10.iXXi i yeat Some lop schools cost
$15.lXHV But these aie also (he ones
with the most generous scholarship pro
y.iyw of thcii �wn ll the same
catwUKton, students from $32,500 plus
families st.ut out with 18.200 .� vr.u
before then families oi colleges need to
cough up .i penn)
Under these rules, man) students and
families will end up saddled with huge
debts Man) ma) decide that the finan
ciaJ burden ot attending .i private col
legc isn't worth it But veiv tevs will he
unable to swing it it thev le.illv think
it's worthwhile iui once the question
is seen as the burden, rathei than the
opportunity itself, it becomes .
distributional issue line. $32,500 .�
vcat isn't rich But it's i lo percent ol
the median income
hy slumUl the .iveragc taxpayei, in
eluding t he college-age gu) who's
ahcadv working, finance an .ihove
average income student OH his w.iv to
becomina even more above average
MuhavlKinsiey is editor a) Ihr rv�
Republic J
ii i. IMV I �n��l Lain s, �i, la.
Brown Education Ed Less Than Accurate
I want to respond to the piece
published in the Feb. 28 edition by
Dairy! Brown.
As a full-time student here at ECU, I
take exception to Mr. Brown's con-
demnation of this university and its ad-
ministration. Mr. Brown implied that
ECU fails to provide its students with
"the irreplaceable advantages of a
liberal education I would offer the
following arguments to prove that Mr.
Brown is less than accurate in this:
Incoming freshmen are (with few ex-
ceptions, as in Nursing) assigned to the
General College, where they remain
until they complete 6 semester hours of
English Composition, one semester
hour of library science, eight semester
hours of either biology, chemistry,
geology or physics, 13 semester hours
in the social sciences � choosing at
least three of the following disciplines:
anthropology, economics, geography,
history, political science, psychology
or sociology; three semester hours of
mathematics � college algebra or
logic. 10 semester hours of humanities
and fine arts � literature, philosophy,
theatre, speech, music, and three
semester hours of health and physical
education (undergraduate catalogue
84-86).
These requirements are designed to
give the student a general and varied
background in the traditional liberal
education. The idea is, I believe, to
allow the student to find a discipline
which interests him.
In order to minor in English, a stu-
dent must complete 24 semester hours
(exclusive of freshmen comp.) in
selected English courses, with each stu-
dent's courses planned by him after
consulting the director of
undergraduate studies in the depart-
ment (undergraduate catalogue 84-86).
There are three areas of concentration
for English minors: the general English
minor as above, a journalism minor
and a literature minor. Each requires
more than simply one course in
business writing.
My final point has to do with what
seemed to me to be an attack on Dr.
Angelo Volpe, the vice chancellor for
academic affairs. 1 quote Mr. Brown,
"Their betrayal (Dr. Volpe and Dr.
Howell) of liberal education is a tragic
form of apostacy I have had the
good fortune to be employed by this
university for a year in the Office of
the Vice Chancellor for Academic Af-
fairs and have worked in Dr. Volpe's
office frequently to fill in as recep-
tionist. I know Dr. Volpe to be con-
cerned with and dedicated to the
students at ECU and to those students'
acquisition of a full, complete and
well-rounded education � in the tradi-
tional sense of the liberal arts educa-
tion. Mr. Brown's vague and un-
substantiated attack runs completely
contrary to the concern I have witness-
ed during the past year.
I would offer this to one and all: The
opportunity to acquire a first-rate
education in either a liberal arts or a
professional discipline is here at ECU.
It rests with the student to take advan-
tage of the opportunity. The decision
about which direction to take in life is a
personal responsibility and cannot be
transferred to another � not even to
one's academic advisor � and the con-
sequences of the choices one makes are
his own.
Sarah Duncan
Sophomore
Kilcoyne Confused
Dennis Kilcoyne's column of Feb. 21
alludes to a letter I wrote to Campus
Forum Feb. 4, critical of his position
on abortion. Mr. Kilcoyne found
"astonishing" the statement "abortion
should remain a legal option until
viability of the fetus is proved I, too,
am astonished, for my letter made no
such statement. Rather than assume
Mr. Kilcoyne intentionally
misrepresents his critics in order to ap-
pear more reasonable, I assume he is
genuinely confused. What I did say
was, "until viability from conception is
proved, abortion should remain a legal
option in early term pregnancies I do
not claim the fetus is not at some point
viable; rather, the entire question is
whether the point of viability is reach-
ed at conception or closer to the onset
of a pregnancy's third trimester.
Viability is an important term here,
and one with which I assumed Mr. Kil
coyne was familiar. However, his
response to the word was "whatever
that's supposed to mean If he was
unsure, he should have done what Bill
Green (a Forum-writer who also ob
jectcd to its use) did and look it up.
Mr. Green cited Webster's as his
authority and chose definition
lacapable of living with which to
substantiate his criticism. Had Mr
Green more perseverance, he might
have found his way to Webster's
definition lbof a fetus: having at
tained such form and development of
organs as to be normally capable of liv-
ing outside the uterus; 'a 7-month
viable fetus
I raise this point for the benefit of
readers who might have been left
believing, as Mr. Green and Mr. Ki!
coyne may have intended, that I used
the word "viable" in some strange,
new way. My use of it in the context I
chose was neither new nor unusual, as
its acceptance by Webster' (Mr.
Green's authority) indicates. Indeed,
the concept has existed since the Mid-
dle Ages in English Common Law.
Challenging its use as the basis of an
argument against abortion is grasping
at straws.
As for Mr. Kilcoyne, he has said of
his column, "its most important func-
tion is not only to inform but
entertain Without more carc, it will
cease to do what little it has done of
cither
David I ewis
(irad. Student
Art
Kirk's Kool
In my time, I've seen many can
didatcs for SGA office come and go
On most occasions, the smooth
talking, do nothing candidate has won.
and the SGA has suffered.
ortunatcly. students this year have
a fabulous ehoice. Kirk Shelley, can
didatc for president, is heads and
shoulders above his opponents Un
questionably, his experience in student
government exceeds that of his op
poncnts combined. And not only has
he taken on many SGA responsibilities
� he has, atypically, fulfilled those
responsibilities tn a very professional
and efficient manner.
Kirk is a first-class choice, a real
man of ideas If you want your next
SGA president to be serious about
tackling major issues. Kirk Shelley is
your man.
Richard Glasgow
Jr Pols
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
pressing all points of view. MaU or l
9 �vME4�
Texas S
Guns
tva a c � � j,
V � � A TV ft, k
� v ess i
I eadc i i
0i pnati x
"s foi a vote
k Kandj
Sos n an .�
� � �
�m iuc!ea �� �

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b in top
in mid CVt
pci ccti
Professor
M� icd
OTt'i 7 V :v.
Itwr �-i he -
Universal Press iM k.r:
Septemba lS5
assistant pi ofessc
ment .m Politic v
been affiliated w I
WS0 He served as � Pi
Scholai x. �-� ,v k 1
during thr summei ol
isiting V-v-vv.a l ndowj
he rlumamtics I r I
Universits ot v a
llei kr!r and .?�� .i t
.t. Ih- BrookmgN hm t
(list hook . 1 he '�
lMptimac (vftit i at
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now onl S I (
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match outfits
MidEa
Next
Ca
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Free Al
$1.0
for La





THE EAST CAROLINIANMARCHJ2. 1985 5
WPS W BE
Even
� the
igh, uho is
oppor-
riis or her
i
� the 4.5
et more
I $4 �� :eiling now,
mdred dollars
� ed to $4,000
� bui unsub
' am ther aid.
bs, even at the
bring n another
' SI 2.200.
lege costs
;OSl
1 the ones
Bv
narship pro-
le same
! -2 500-p!us
with -a year
need to
I
I
:nts and
huge
the t'inan-
i pri ate col-
fe� will be
the) really think
nee the question
rather than the
bee mes a
$32,500 a
� percent of
: payer, in-
gu who's
ance an above-
n his vay to
E average.
' I he New
rate
David Lewis
Grad. Student
Art
irk's Kool
ime, I've seen many can-
SGA office come and go.
.asions, the smooth-
-nothing candidate has won,
DA has suffered.
ktelv, students this year have
Is choice. Kirk Shelley, can-
r president, is heads and
above his opponents. Un-
bis experience in student
it exceeds that of his op-
mbined. And not only has
M- many SGA responsibilities
atypically, fulfilled those
llties in a very professional
pnt manner.
a first-class choice, a real
eas If you want your next
Sident to be serious about
lajor issues. Kirk Shelley is
Richard Glasgow
Jr Pols
orum Rules
Y Carolinian welcomes letters
all points of view. Mail or j
5
V
Texas Students Propose
Guns Instead Of Pills
(CPS) � Conservative
students at the University of
Texas are trying to undermine a
"suicide pill" anti-nuclear
weapons referendum by submit-
ting a plan they acknowledge is
only slightly less absurd.
Leaders of the Texas Review
Society say they have collected
500 signatures on a petiti' ail-
ing for a vote on a proposal to
stock handguns for use in case of
a Soviet invasion.
They drafted the petition after
anti-nuclear weapons activists
circulated a petition seeking a
vote on a plan to stockpile suicide
pills to dramatize the conse-
quences of nuclear war.
"We're hoping these two pro-
posals will cancel each other
out says UT junior John Col-
yandro, editor of the conser-
vative journal, Texas Review.
The proposal to stockpile
suicide pills is at least the third of
its kind to be drafted since
students at Brown University
originated the idea last fall.
Brown students endorsed the
plan by a 60 to 40 percent margin
in mid-October.
Later that month, however, the
idea was rejected by a 58 to 42
percent margin in a student
referendum at the University of
Colorado.
Leaders on both sides of the
debate at UT expect that backers
of the suicide pill referendum will
be able to gather sufficient
signatures to put the proposal on
the March 5-6 ballot.
Still, the leader of the suicide
pill referendum, graduate student
Bernard Roth, says he resents the
attempt by the conservatives to
thwart his proposal.
"They have no constructive
goals Roth told the UT student
newspaper, the Daily Texan.
"They just want to confuse peo-
ple, misdirect them.
'They're taking a kindergarten
kind of attitude and they're play-
ing kindergarten games
Colyandro contends the pro-
posal to stockpile handguns
makes more sense because a
Soviet invasion is more likely
than a nuclear attack.
Moreover, he says, the han-
dguns would demonstrate that
UT students "are not so coward-
ly so as to resort to suicide pills
He acknowledges, however,
that the purpose of the proposal
is to undermine Roth's.
Professor 's Book Published
Mohammed Ahari's book,
OPEC � The Decline of Oil
Power?, will be published by the
University Press of Kentucky in
September 1985. Ahari, who is an
assistant professor in the Depart-
ment of Political Science, has
been affiliated with ECU since
1980. He served as a Presidential
Scholar at New York University
during the summer of 1979, as a
Visiting National Endowment for
the Humanities Fellow at the
University of California at
Berkeley and as a Guest Scholar
at the Brookings Institution. His
first book, The Dynamics of Oil
Diplomacy: Conflict and Con-
sensus, was published in 1980 by
the Arno Press.
Ahari's articles and book
reviews have been published in
international and national pro-
fessional journals such as Inter-
national Affairs, The
Washington Quarterly, Middle
East Review, American Political
Science Review and Presidential
Studies Quarterly. He serves as a
reviewer for a number of profes-
sional journals, and holds profes-
sional membership in numerous
international and national
organizations. Ahari is a
specialist in the American policy
process and the Middle East.
Sea Shell Belts
Ear Ring, Etc. for Vi Price
Belts reg. up to $34.00 in are stores
now only $10 to $20.
This Week Only!
Also Custom designed for those hard to
match outfits.
MidEastern Brokers
Next to Scott s Cleaners on 10th St.
Call 757-1117
or 752-2579
or 756-0058
The
Tree
House
Tuesday -
Ladies
Night
featuring
Robbin Thompsor
Free Keg for Ladies
and
$1.00 Highballs
for Ladies All Night
Forum Questions
This a question form for students to submit questions for the up-
coming SGAEasl Carolinian Executive Candidates Forum to
be held Tuesday, March 19 on the mall. If you have a question
for the presidential candidates, fill it out and drop it n The Fast
Carolinian offices in the Old South Bid across from Joyner
Library. All questions should be submitted b noon, March 18.
Students Vote
DAVID BROWN
For SGA President
Four years of experience in
serving your campus.
Thank You
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 12, 1985
Low-Level Radiation Disposal
Rules Concern Researchers
(CPS) � A number of colleges
in recent weeks have said they're
worried governmental footdragg-
ing could leave them holding a
radioactive bag by the end of the
year.
Rising costs and the lack of a (
place in which to dump the low-
level radioactive waste they
generate in campus research
could mean some colleges will
have to halt all their nuclear
research after Jan. 1, 1986, some
college officials fear.
"We don't want to shut down
research says Charles
Bockelman, Yale's deputy pro-
vost, "but it's a threat
About 40 campuses that have
some sort of nuclear engineering,
nuclear medicine or licensed
nuclear research are facing the
same threat.
The number of students and
faculty members affected may be
much larger. Stanford, for exam-
ple, has some 300 nuclear lab ex-
periments going on at any one
time, the Stanford News Service
estimates.
Even some biology and
chemistry classes that use and
need to dispose of some low-level
radioactive isotopes could be
threatened.
The reason is a new law meant
to force states and regions to set
up their own radioactive waste
dumping grounds, and to stop
shipping all their wastes to
Nevada, Washington and South
Carolina, which host the nation's
only large nuke waste dumps.
But if the states and Congress
don't start moving more quickly
toward creating new dump sites,
colleges conducting nuclear
research will have no place to
dispose of radioactive waste.
"Universities don't have large
areas to store waste like nuclear
power plants do explains Sue
Gagner, spokesman for the
Typing Course
Keeps Up With
ComputerAge
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Sf� Kditor
Students who have a hard time
programming computers because
of their lack of typing ability-
have been offered a solution this
fall with the scheduling of a
keyboarding course by the ECU
Department of Business Educa-
tion.
The course, BUED 1000, will
be offered three times a week for
seven weeks. It carries one
academic hour of credit. Accor-
ding to Bill Durham, chairman of
the Department of Business
Education, the course is designed
"for somebody who has never
had any typing classes
Durham said the course is
designed to teach students to type
approximately 30 words per
minute.
"We don't intend to produce
speed demons he said. "We
think it's very utilitarian for so-
meone who is not interested in
being a typist
Durham added that the course
was titled keyboarding because it
is designed to relate to computer
use. Instead of teaching
secretarial skills, he said, it is
structured to aid students who
will be using computers or
typewriters in jobs or classes.
Two sections of keyboarding
have been scheduled for the fall
semester. The first will meet Aug.
26 to Oct. 9, the second from
Oct. 14 to th end of the
semester. An attempt will be
made to schedule more sections if
there is enough interest, Durham
said.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
"They want to get rid of it as
quickly as possible
But no one has actually
established new dump sites for
the schools.
State legislators have yet to
find new radioactive waste sites
for the universities of Arizona
and West Virginia, despite in-
tense lobbying from educators
there.
"There's no place where peo-
ple won't be upset by (having a
dump next door). Radioactive
waste is a most unwelcome
neighbor Bockelman said.
In Texas, where the University
of Texas system produces 70 per-
cent of the state's low-level
radioactive waste, a two-year
legislative study has just narrow-
ed the site location to South
Texas.
Nationwide, nuclear power
plants generate about 60 percent
of the waste. College and govern-
ment labs and industry produce
the rest of it, Gagner says.
If the three current dumps in
Beatty, New, Richmond, Wash
and Barnwell, S.C. do turn away
waste from other states, "states
without compacts or sites of their
own will have no place to go with
their radioactive waste Gagner
warns.
"We're concerned about what
will happen if these sites are clos-
ed to us Yale's Bockelman
says.
"The federal government is
trying to set up the regional
pacts, but the politicians worry
about it he notes. "Radioac-
tivity is a frightening concept to
people
There's a lot with which to
scare people. Yale produces 500
30-gallon drums of liquid
radioactive waste and 750 drums
of dry waste per year, Bockelman
says, largely through the medical
school and the biological science
department.
"Disposal has been a problem
since the first radioactive ex-
periments began at Yale 20 years
ago he adds.
"It's a big business declares
William Properzio, the Universi-
ty of Florida's director of en-
viornmental health and science.
"Any research institute has to
deal with this. When a researcher
designs an experiment, the cost of
disposal has to be written into the
proposal
While the NRC regulates most
campus nuclear reserach, it leaves
disposing of the resultant waste
� and the payment for it � up to
the schools, Gagner explains.
The NRC also grants licenses
to campuses, adds Donald
Turner, West Virginian Universi-
ty's radiation health technician.
"The licenses specify disposi-
tion of radioactive waste, and
we're sent a list of companies that
handle the waste he says.
Other waste-handling com-
panies can process the waste for
transport, Turner comments,
but, for the time being, they can
bury it only at one of the three ex-
isting dumps.
Some schools get around the
current regulations by storing
certain kinds of radioactive waste
themselves.
"With a half-life of 65 days or
less, we decay it here Turner
says. "After we wait 10 half-
lives, the radiation is one-one
thousandth of what we started
with, and we can just put it in the
trash without violating EPA stan-
dards
Nevertheless, it still costs West
Virginia $20,000 to transport and
dispose of the 68 55-gallon bar-
rels of radioactive waste it sends
to the South Carolina dump,
Turner notes.
"In recent years, cost of
disposal has increased by a factor
of three adds James
Mclaughlin, UCLA's radiation
safety officer. "Cost varies
depending on the burial cost, and
goes up becuase of federal regula-
tions on burial sites
Federal regulations change
rapidly, he continues, "because
of the terrible misbehavior of the
industrial sector.
COLLEGE
HILL
DINING
HALL
T V
: Let
Classifieds
: Do The
I Work
NON-MEMBERS
&&&
�-�-�-�-�.�-�.�.�.�
S
ADVERTISED
ITEMPOIICY
Each of these advertised items �s required to be readily available 'or
sate at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store ecept as
specifically noted m this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT , MARCH 16 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, NC ITEMS OFFERED FOR
SALE NOT AVAIl ABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
i
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SEE YOUR LOCAL A&P IN (TOWN NAME) FOR COMPLETE DETAILS
Savings -
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NAUTILUS I
1002 Evans St.
758-9584
�x
Let our Aerobics and all now Tanning Cantor get you reody for summer
I Come in and try a free class in our newly ex- jj
i panded, air-conditioned Aerobics Room.
I We have lowest rate in town. Only $20.00
per month, unlimited class schedule.
�:� x
i $
I Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday:
I 3:15,4:30,5:45,7:00,8:15
I Thursday: 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00
I Friday: 3:15,4:30
I Saturday: 11:00, 1:00
1 Sunday: 4:00
X-
�:� �:�:

Try our new tanning center with the best
1 rates in town.
Rates
1 visit - $3.50
10 visits- $30.00
20 visits - $50.00
$105
2 Liter Bottl
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RATIO MEN
tDDITIONAI
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riMES

m I
The kinkN ill be app
March 16 at 8 p.m Ii
Office in Mendenhall
S12 for the puhlu
heinu sponsored hv r
C ommittee
Group To T
(UPI) i
Frisbe�
plae:
tossing
Tie-v R
mer
The pla i
team.
events in
demons
sports1 '
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Th
Ron Kaufn
and I
ticipated in tl
Triv
1, ho pla � �
M onderland
2 Who was
without los i
3 Which three c
4 Which quiz s
"Lightning Round
5. Who portrayed
Treasure IslamP
6. What seen si
earthquake oot -
7 What language
8. Who played the r
9. Who was the Rn
10. What was the grl
"�� � �� ���
S -i
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lead available tor
I ire eiceptas 1
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PLETE DETAILS
a
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THF EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
MARCH 12, 1985
�K"
Beating Blubbery Build- Up
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
And ROBIN HAMRICK
With warm weather quickly approaching, it's time to shed those
thick wool sweaters, oversized coats, and mavbe a few extra
pounds. Come on, admit it, we all tend to gain a few during the
winter months. B
Suddenly we are hit with spring fever, and the natural instinct is
to throw on a bathing suit, T-shirt and shorts. But, for some odd
reason, those favorite pair of shorts don't seem to make it past
sour hips. And the bathing suit that looked so great last summer
somehow accumulated a few extra bulges while tucked away in a
drawer. '
Well face it the problem is probably not vour clothes but your
body. Several Greenville health clubs offer various types of weight
toss and body building systems. With regular exercise and a balanc-
ed diet, your body can get in shape again.
Nautilus of
Eastern Carolina
DAYS OPEN: Every dav
TIMES: Mon. - Thurs. JO a.m. - 9 p.m Fri. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m
Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m Sun. 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
FEATURES: Complete line of nautilus equipment which works
every muscle in the body. Aerobics classes - Mon - Wed 315
P.m 4:30 p.m 5:45 p.m 7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m Thurs. 3:15
p.m. 4:30 p.m 5:45 p.m. and 7 p.m Fri. 3:15 p.m 4:30 p.m
sat. 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
PRICE: $100 weights only; $75 aerobics only; $150 weights and
aerobics
DRESS: Comfortable clothing; shirt and shoes required
RATIO MEN WOMEN 50:50
ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Showers, nutrition guidance
sauna
Aerobic Workshop
DAYS OPEN Mon Sat
FEATURES: Aerobics
TIMES: Mon. - Thurs. 3:15 p.m 4:20 p.m.
p.m Fri. 9:30 a.m. and 3:15 p.m Sat. 11
5:30 p.m. and 6:45
a.m. and 1 p.m.
The Kinks
The Kinks will be appearing in Minges Coliseum this Saturday,
March 16 at 8 p.m. Tickets are still available at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Center and cost $10 for students and
$12 for the public; tickets will cost $12 at the door. The concert is
being sponsored by East Carolina Student Union's Major Concerts
Committee.
Group To Toss Its Way To China
I. PI) - A group of American
1 risbee and "hacky sack"
players, ready to show off their
tossing talents, will tour the Peo-
ple's Republic of China this sum-
mer.
The players will travel as a
team, appearing at scheduled
events in tour cities to
demonstrate and play "disc
sports from July 19 to August
1.
The tour is being organized by
Ron Kaufman, a tour promoter
and Frisbee player who par-
ticipated in the 1984 Frisbee and
Hacky Sack Festival held at the
Smithsonian Museum, in
Washington, D.C.
The two-week tour package in-
cludes round-trip airfare from
California to Beijing, land travel
between Nanjing, Suzhou,
Shanghai, Guanzhou and Hong
Kong, and First-class hotel ac-
comodations and meals.
The cost: $2,400.
For more information, contact
Ron Kaufman, Discovering the
World, P.O. Box 125, Davis,
Calif. 95617.
Trivia, Trivia, Trivia
1. Who played the Mad Hatter in the 1933 film version of Alice in
W onderland!
2. Who was the only heavyweight boxing champion ever to retire
without losing a professional fight?
3. Which three currencies are United Nations stamps issued in?
4. Which quiz show, emceed by Allen Ludden, featured a 60 second
"Lightning Round?"
5. Who portrayed Long John Silver in the 1934 screen version of
Treasure Island?
6. What seven states are most likely to be affected when a major
earthquake occurs along the New Madrid fault line?
7. What languages are spoken in the Republic of Djibouti?
8. Who played the role of the prizefighter in Let's Do It Again!
9. Who was the first U.S. woman pilot?
10. What was the gross purse for the Kentucky Derby last year?
Sec Aaswen Ob P�f e t
PRICE: $25 per month
DRESS: Comfortable clothing
RATIO MENWOMEN: 30:70
The Spa
DAYS OPEN: Mon. Sat.
TIMES: Mon. - Thurs. 9 a.m - 9 p.m Fri. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m Sat. 9
a.m. - 5 p.m.
FEATURES: Dynacam Equipment; Aerobics and Exercise
equipment
PRICE: $25 per month; Corporation and student discounts
DRESS: Comfortable clothing; shirts and shoes required
RATIO MENWOMEN: 40:60
ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Whirlpool, sauna, steamroom
Greenville
Athletic Club
DAYS OPEN: Every day "
TIMES: MonFri. 6 a.m. - 10 p.m Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
FEATURES: Aerobics; indoor track; free weights; body
maintenance; racketball courts
PRICE: $225 initiation fee, $38 per month; Corporation fee- 4-9
members 25
percent off initiation fee and 5 percent off monthly fee
DRESS: Comfortable clothing; shirt and shoes required
RATIO MENWOMEN: 50:50
ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Volleyball and basketball gym,
walleeball, juice bar, steam room, sauna, whirlpool, fitness con-
sultation, nutrition seminars, aerobic self defense, nursery
The Body Shoppe
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Photo Lob
Shaping Up!
Over the years, aerobic exercise has gained tremendous popularity.
ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Two steam cabinets
United Figure Salon
DAYS OPEN: Mon. - Sat. "
TIMES: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. - 8 p.m Sat. 9 a.m. - noon
FEATURES: Aerobics and exercise classes; Basic exercise equip-
ment K
PRICE: 1 month � $24; 3 month � $72
DRESS: Comfortable clothing
RATIO MENWOMEN: All women
DAYS OPEN: Mon Sat.
TIMES: MonThurs. 10a.m. - 7:30 p.m Fri. 10a.m6pm �
Sat. 10 a.m. - noon
FEATURES: Aerobic classes � Mon. - Sat. 10:IS a m � Mon -
Fri 3:40 p.m 4:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m Mon. - Thurs. 6:30 p.m
PRICE: $23 per month; $36.95 two-month special
DRESS: Comfortable clothing
RATIO MENWOMEN: All � nen
ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Sunning booth, sauna, stationary
bike, free weights.
School Offers Tour To Great Britain
Imagine watching the Chang-
ing of the Guard at Buckingham
Palace in London, strolling the
streets of the old university towns
of Cambridge and Oxford, kiss-
ing the Blarney Stone, watching
craftsmen make Waterford
Crystal, sketching or
photographing old castles and
spending a few days visiting in
Dublin and Edinburgh. Infagine
spending 16 days touring the
British Isles by motorcoach this
summer, and perhaps even earn-
ing three semester hours of col-
lege credit for the trip.
For a small group of travelers,
this vision will become more than
a daydream July 10 to July 25,
1985. The 16-day trip, Great Bri-
tain Passages, is being coor-
dinated by Mindy Machanic,
assistant professor of en-
vironmental design, and optional
undergraduate or graduate-level
college credit will be offered
through ECU Continuing Educa-
tion. The trip price of $1895 in-
cludes round-trip airfare from
New York, all transportation and
tours within the British Isles,
hotels, all breakfasts and some
dinners, a complimentary flight
bag, and admission to some
special sightseeing locations, as
well as tourguides. All tour ar-
rangements are being handled
through Passages, Inc a San
Francisco agency. For those who
wish to earn college credits, three
semester hours of either
undergraduate or graduate credit
are available through ECU Con-
tinuing Education for ART 5500:
Independent Study in Art. Fees
for registration and tuition are
separate from trip fees, and cost
$155 for undergraduate credit or
$185 for graduate credit. There is
no difference in price for in-state
or out-of-state residents.
The trip is open to anyone over
16; teenagers 12-15 who are ac-
companied by an adult are also
welcome to travel. Efforts will be
made to find roommates for
those traveling alone who do not
wish to pay a single supplement
of $160 for a private room.
According to Machanic, an ex-
perienced group leader, "The trip
will be a leisurely and interesting
way to see the British Isles,
because we will be driving
through it rather than flying over
it. We'll have lots of time for
both sightseeing and shopping.
Because the group will be con-
tained on one bus, there
shouldn't be the problem of over-
crowding that there is on some
tours Worth Worthington of
ECU's Continuing Education
feels that "for those who need a
few extra units toward their
degree, or for professionals such
as teachers who need Continuing
Education credits, this trip is a
wonderful opportunity. It's also
a good way for people to visit
'the old country since so manv
people in this region have
ancestors who came from some
part of Great Britain
For more information about
the Great Britain Passages trip,
write Mindy Machanic, ECU
School of Art, Greenville, NC
27834, or call Worth Wor-
thington, ECU Continuing
Education, at 757-6143.
Bob Hope � Healthy, Wealthy And Very Wise
By JAY & ELLIOTT KRAVETZ
latcraatioaaJ Photo New
With 62 films to his credit, Bob Hope, the master entertainer
who has become a legend in his own lifetime and has been called
America's only walking national monument, would like to make
another feature film.
"My last film was a cameo in 'The Muppet Movie Hope told
us during a recent interview. "I signed to star in 'The Walter Win-
chell Story' a few years ago. We hope to begin filming soon. I will
be playing Walter Winchell. I'm looking forward to doing it
He is currently extending his humanitarian touch with perfor-
mances for "Fight For Sight the Cancer Society, USO, The
Leukemia Society, and Youth Clubs. He'll also participate in
benefit golf tournaments for the Einsenhower Medical Center and
various other charities.
"I do about 32 charity events a year he said. "Usually I do
them in sets. This weekend, I did cancer last night, I do a dinner for
a hospital tonight and I'll be doing the Parkinson's Dinner tomor-
row night. I've been doing that dinner for 25 years
"Hope has been hailed as the "only performer who has triumph-
ed in all five major show business media: vaudeville, stage, radio,
motion pictures and television. His first film was Big Broadcast of
1938 which catapulted him to fame along with his Academy Award-
winning theme song, "Thanks For The Memory
"After my parents came to the United States from England,
where I was born, I worked as a delivery boy, a soda fountain
clerk, a shoe salesman, an amateur boxer under the name Packy
East and a newspaper reporter he recalled.
"When I left high school I earned enough money to take dancing
lessons from a couple of local instructors and was so good I was
even able to substitute for one of my teachers when he was ill he
continued. "My mother, Avis, was a concert singer
"I decided on a singing and dancing career and made my first
professional stage appearance in a Fatty Arbuckle show with
George Byrne he recalled. "I inherited my singing voice from my
mother.
"I discovered I liked entertaining and between numbers it was
necessary to do a monologue and I discovered I was very funny
he continued. "The comedy was natural to me. After my first pro-
fessional stage appearance, George and I were booked into a show
called 'Hurley's Jolly Follies After our second season with
Hurley, we broke into vaudeville in Detroit
Hope came from modest beginnings. He was born Leslie Towns
Hope in Eltham, England, May 29, 1903, the fifth of seven sons.
From his appearances in vaudeville, he moved to the stage.
"Months after we started in vaudeville we auditioned for 'The
Sidewalks of New York Hope recalled. "After 'Sidewalks' clos-
ed, George and I split up and I decided to go solo. My first hit
Broadway play was 'Ballyhoo After that I appeared in 'Roberta
�Say When 'The Ziegfield Follies and 'Red, Hot and Blue
With all his stage successes Hope soon decided to move into the
new medium of radio, which led to television. He was also busy
making films.
"My radio career was launched when I was a guest on Rudy
Vallee's Thursday night program he recalled. "I got my first
radio show in 1938, and made mv television debut on Easter Sun-
day, 1950
Hope's radio show led to his USO tours which started before
World War II and continued through the Vietnam War.
"I did my first radio show for servicemen in March, 1941 at
March Field, California he recalled. "After that we did a regular
Pepsodent radio show at army, navy and marine bases until June,
IV4o.
"We did the show throughout World War II and continued it
throughout the Korean and Vietnam conflicts he added. "I think
I've entertained more than 10 milion troops
See BOB, Page 9.
Bob Hope
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cessing mail at home' if nation
send self addressed sta
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SUMMER CAMP cOUNitl O-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
mouiI 'sesubjv '9
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in the con-
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BEAN CRUISE!
JETY
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Little Havana Welcomes Andy GarciaHome READ THE CLASSIFIEDS
It is a Saturday in early March. It is warm in
Miami, but not as hot, humid and sultry as the
days depicted in The Mean Season. It is the begin-
ning of "Carnaval Miami a week long Mardi
Gras type celebration which began three years ago
in the Little Havana section of this city, but now
encompasses the entire city.
For actor Andy Garcia this is a homecoming.
He is being inducted into a Celebrity Hall of Fame
by citizens of the Little Havana community and
the future looks bright for this 28-year-old Cuban-
born actor who, with his family, moved to Miami
in 1961.
I've got some things working Garcia told us
before the "Carnaval Miami Spirit of '85 Celebri-
ty Luncheon "I am working on a project with
Steve Bauer (ScarfaceThief of Hearts). We are
working out in Los Angeles together Bauer and
Garcia grew up together in Miami.
Garcia's latest film is The Mean Season, in
which he co-stars as Homicide Detective Raymond
Martinez. The film was shot entirely in the Miami
area, with locations chosen to integrate the script
and reflections of a changing city.
"I just auditioned for the part Garcia ex-
plained. "1 live in Los Angeles now, but I grew up
here in Miami. I always wanted to be an actor. I
was into basketball and sports in high school.
When I got out of high school I drifted into
theatre and studied acting. I couldn't develop into
a professional basketball player so I needed to
find something to do
His early work in theatre was done in Florida,
though his roles in film and television have all
come since his move to Los Angeles.
"I've done a lot of stage work in college and a
little in Los Angeles Garcia said. "The role is
important. A good role is what I want. I look for
dimension, color, and depth in a role Garcia at-
tended Florida International University in Miami.
He has appeared in the films The Lonely Guy,
directed by Arthur Hiller, A Night in Heaven,
directed by John Avildsen, Blue Skies Again and
Guaguasi.
"If you want to be an actor you have to study
Garcia explained. "You have to get the proper
training and assistance. A lot of people on many
different levels have helped me. People I've
studied with, my family, my wife, my friends. Just
general positive support all the way around
On television, he has been seen in the movie,
"Murder of Sherlock Holmes" and the pilots of
"For Love and Honor" and the hit series "Hill
Street Blues He also appeared in a number of
subsequent episodes of "Hill Street Blues "Que
Pasa, U.S.A.?" and the series, "From Here to
Eternity
"I am looking for more positive stuff like Ray
Martinez he said. "Well-drawn characters that,
in the process of doing them, I can grow from. I
enjoyed being in 'The Mean Season' very much.
They were a good group of people and a talented
group of individuals. I was very fortunate
He has received extensive training in classical
theatre, comedy and mime including his work with
David Perry of the Royal Academy of Dramatic
Arts and with David Proval. His theatrical ex-
perience is as diverse as to include performances in
"Lovers and Other Strangers Chekhov's classic
"The Cherry Orchard" and improvisational com-
edy at Los Angeles' famed "The Comedy Store
"My goals are to risk Garcia proudly explain-
ed.
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Directions: 10th Street Extension To River Bluff Road Next To
Rivergate Shopping Center.
PHONE 758-4015
OoYbu
Jay FiUoit KraveU
85 And Still Going Strong
Continued From Page 7.
For those services, Hope has received awards from the USO,
Fraternal Order of Eagles, The American Legion and the Presiden-
tial Gold Medal of Freedom from President John F. Kennedy who
called Hope "America's most prized ambassador of goodwill
throughout the world
With 62 films to his credit, Hope does have some favorites.
'They are all realy my favorite, but the ones that really stand out
are all the 'Road' pictures with Bing (Crosby) and Dorothy
(Lamour). I also enjoyed 'The Lemon Drop Kid Hope said.
The "Road" pictures include: The Road to Bale which had Bob
and Bing saving Dorothy from an evil princess and jungle perils;
The Road to Hong Kong with Bob and Bing as con men who
become involved in international intrigue and space travel; The
Road to Morocco with Bing selling Bob to a slave-trader in
mysterious Morocco and both going after princess Lamour; The
Road to Rio which has Bob and Bing as musicians trying to wrest
Dorothy from a sinister aunt; The Road to Singapore which has
Bing and Bob swearing off women and hiding out in Singapore
where they meet saronged Lamour; The Road to Utipia with Bob
and Bing in the Klondike; and The Road to Zanaibar with Bob and
Bing as circus performers traveling through the jungle with Lamour
looking for a diamond mine.
The Lemon Drop Kid stars Hope as a racetrack tout who owes
big money to a gangster and must pay or else.
, At 81 years old, Bob Hope says as long as his health holds out he
will not retire. t t -imu am . ,
"A few years ago, when my eyeswere giving me troubfe-f-
thought about it he said. "But I love to work and I enjoy what
I'm doing. As long as I am enjoying myself and my health holds
up, I'm not going to retire.
The
Tree
House
Tuesday � Lasagna Special
ALL YOU CAN EAT
for $2.99 from 5-9
Wed. � Salad Bar Special
ALL YOU CAN EAT
from our
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for $1.99 from 5-9
SOPHOMORES
Time is Running Out!
Apply for the Air Force ROTC 2 Year
Program before March 18 to be eligible
for:
� Scholarships
� $100 per Month Tax Free
� Full Academic Credit
� Challenging Future
For information contact:
MAJOR DAVID PATTON
757-6597
204 Wright Annex
ROTC
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MARCH 12, 13, 14
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�MMHHHMP
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10
I HI I ASI CAROl IN1AN
MARCH 12, is�8�;
5
I
I HI I ASI CAROl 1NIAN
Sports
MAR(H 12. 1985
PaK- l"
I H
H t Phoin 1 ah
Xlma Bethea (30) and I isa Squirewell (31) celebrate after the Lady
Pirates' Championship season. Squirewell was named all-conference
for the second consecutive year.
First Round Action
In ECAC Tourney
In other first-round action
Clutch shooting b Kelvin
Johnson and John Newman led
the University of Richmond to a
tough 74-68 victory over
American University.
Johnson finished with 25 and
Newman scored 22. John Davis
added 12 points and grabbed a
game-high 11 rebounds lor the
Spiders.
The game was close
throughout as American even led
60-58 with 4:39 remaining to
play. A pair of Greg Beckwith
jumpers gave the Spiders a lead
they would not relinquish.
For the Eagles, Frank Ross was
outstanding as he hit 10 of 17
shots from the field for 20 points.
He also grabbed 10 rebounds.
Freshman Center Eric White was
eight of 10 from the floor for 16,
while Steve Nesmith added 10
points on five of seven field-goal
shooting. The Eagles finish their
season with a 9-19 record.
American head coach Ed
Tapscott believes the "ECAC
South has more talent and better
athletes" than that of last year's
East Coast Conference
(American University's con-
ference affiliation last year).
A balanced scoring attack
from William & Mary paced the
Tribe to a 68-61 victory over
James Madison University.
Tony Travel had 16, all-
conference selection Keith
Cieplicki scored 15, Kevin
Richardson added 14 and center
Matt Brooks chipped in nine for
the Tribe.
Despite scoring the first 10
points of the game, William &
Mary only led by three (27-24) at
the half.
The Dukes were close early in
the second half, as they cut the
Indian to 42-36 with 11:36 re-
maining to play on an Eric Brent
jumpshot. However, sharp
shooting by Cieplicki and good
free-throw shooting enabled the
Tribe to escape with a 68-61 vic-
tory.
For James Madison, second-
team selection John Newman had
23 points and seven rebounds.
Darrell Jackson added 12 points
and eight boards. Brent chipped
in 10 for the Dukes. JMU finishes
their 1984-85 campaign with a
14-14 record. This is the worst
record for the Dukes' in their
school's history.
In the final game of the open-
ing night, Carlos Yates led
George Mason University to a
70-67 victory over UNC-
Wilmington.
All-conference selection Yates
scored 18, while Rob Rose added
14 points and 10 rebounds to
pace a balanced GMU attack.
All-league second-team selction
Ricky Wilson and Brian Miller
each chipped in 11.
Desite a Wilmington halftime
lead, 27-20, the Patriots got their
running game going and took the
lead for good on a Yates 15-foot
jumper with 12:58 remaining.
From that point, Wilmington
could get no closer as GMU built
up as much as a 12-point lead.
The Seahawks were able to cut
the GMU lead to 68-65 on a
George Durham slam dunk with
:06 seconds remaining.
Second-team conference selec-
tion Brian Rowsom led Wilm-
ington with 24 points and nine re-
bounds. Durham added 11. The
Seahawks finished the season at
12-16.
Manwaring Honored
Lady Pirates Win Tourney
By RICK McCORMAC
t o Spurt, r dllor
The Lady Pirate Basketball
team successfully defended their
ECAC South Tournament cham-
pionship by defeating George
Mason and James Madison over
the break.
ECU received a bye into the
semifinal round by winning the
regular-season championship.
In the semifinals the Lady
Pirates stormed to a 44-18 lead at
the half against George Mason.
ECU displayed a balanced scor-
ing attack as 11 players scored in
the 77-54 drubbing of the Lady
Patriots.
Leading the way for ECU was
junior guard Lorainne Foster
who had 15 points. Also in dou-
ble figures were Sylvia Bragg and
Alma Bethea with 12 and 10
points respectively.
The ECU defense limited
GMU to 30-percent shooting for
the contest, and ECU outre-
bounded the Ladv Patriots 60 to
41.
In the finals ECU faced James
Madison in a battle of the two
top teams during the regular
season.
The Lady Bucs opened up a
35-26 advantage at the half and
went on to win 65-59.
ECU used full court pressure
to disrupt the taller Dukes offen-
sively. Rebounding once again
told the story as ECU outre-
bounded JMU 41-36.
Lisa Squirewell led a balanced
ECU scoring attack, finishing
with 17 points and a game-high
12 rebounds. Foster added 16
points while senior center Anita
Anderson contributed 14. Bragg
was the final Lady Pirate in dou-
ble figures with 12 points.
ECU, who finished 20-9 on the
season, swept the majority of
post-season awards.
Head coach Emily Manwaring
won ECAC South Coach-of-the-
Year honors, while three Lady
Bucs were named to the all-
conference squad.
Junior guard Sylvia Bragg was
named to the all-league squad at
the guard position. Junior for-
ward Lisa Squirewell was a repeat
performer on the all-conference
team. Freshman forward Moni-
que Pompili was the final Lady
Pirate to receive all-league
honors.
The Coach-of-the-Year award
for Manwaring marked her 11th
time receiving such honors in on-
ly 13 seasons of coaching. Man-
waring attributed her team's suc-
cess to their balanced attack.
"We have good individual
players Manwaring said. "But,
also I think we had the best blen-
ding of talent into a team. We
were the most balanced team in
the league, and didn't have a
weaknesses "
Manwaring was espec a
pleased with her team's seasoi
despite not receiving am po i
season tournament bids
"The team reached our goals
she said. "We said we were g
to win the conference, have a
20-wm season and pla a '
paced exciting stle ol basl
and we did Manwaring c
tinued. "A post-seasoi
would hae been the icing on 1
cake, but I'll settle for the c
ference championship
Also named all-conference
Jody Thornton, a sophom
guard from American !
and Gwen Austin a senioi :ei
from I N( Wilmington. Ausl
who was the league's leading
scorer and rebounder.
named Player-of-the-Yc
Naval Academy Downs Bucs
By SCOTT COOPER
( o-Sports Kdllor
The Midshipmen, led by
ECAC South's Player-of-the-
Year David Robinson, knocked
off ECU 94-73 eliminating the
Pirates from the conference tour-
nament.
The 6-11 sophomore sensation
set a Naval Academy record by
scoring at least 30 points eight
times during the season. He con-
nected on 12 of 12 shots from the
floor to set a tournament record.
Robinson also grabbed a game-
high 11 rebounds and blocked
three shots.
Navy had three other players in
double figures. Junior forward
Kylor Whitaker scored 20 points
and Vernon Butler added 16 and
snagged six rebounds. Freshman
Cliff Rees connected on five of
six shots from the field and was
four of five from the line for 14
points. Doug Wojcik only scored
two points, but set a tournament
record by dishing out 14 assists.
Although the Pirates outre-
bounded Navy 17-15 after one
period of play, the Middies' in-
side game proved to be the dif-
ference � according to ECU
coach Charlie Harrison.
Charlie Harrison
"Their inside game really hurt
us Harrison said. "We had to
rebound with them as much as we
could. But they controlled the
boards
The Midshipmen responded
with tough inside play as they
grabbed 20 rebounds, while
holding ECU to 14 in the second
half.
After a Robinson short-
baseline jumper, William Grady
netted a 12 footer from the cor-
ner to make it 2-2 with 19:24 re-
maining in the first half. During
the next four minutes, Navy took
command by scoring seven-
consecutive baskets and moved
ahead 16-2 with 14:59 left in the
First half.
The Pirates would not fold.
After long-range jumpers by Curt
Vanderhorst and Keith Sledge,
Herb Dixon's three-point play
with 12:24 left in the first period
chopped the Navy lead to 22-11.
The Pirates knew they couldn't
match up very well with the Mid-
shipmen's inside game, so they
began to utilize the quickness of
their guards. The Pirates began a
slow but sure comeback.
With 7:46 remaining in the
period, a Vanderhorst steal and
layup cut the Navy advantage to
31-25. Vanderhorst repeated his
thievery one-minute later, and
missed the layup but Scott Hardy
was able to make the follow shot,
cutting the Navy lead to 31-27.
ECU was able to get as close as
three points (38-35) on Roy-
Smith's follow-up shot in the lane
with 3:00 left until intermission.
After Butler and reserve Carl
Liebert scored to opan the Navy-
lead, Peter Dam's follow shot
before the buzzer pulled ECU to
within five (42-37) at the half.
Although Robinson finished
with 33 points, he only had 13 by
halftime. The key to the Pirates'
first half success was their double
and even triple-teaming of David
Robinson.
"They played tough defense
Robinson said. "I didn't feel to
offensive in the first half. They
were playing real physical and
took me out of the game
In the second half, Rees hit a
pair of free throws and Grady
and Vanderhorst answered for
ECU with jumpshots, cutting the
Midshipmen lead to 44-41.
Some Controversy occured
with about 17:30 left in the game.
The Pirate bench was hit with a
technical foul after there was
some contact during a Grady shot
attempt, however no call was
made by the officials. Whitaker
converted the two free throws
and gave Navy a 48-42 advan-
tage.
Coach Harrison felt that he
had a legitimate right to argue the
call.
JOHNSON
HI Pfcolo I �r
Herb Dixon (21) attempts to shoot over Navy's Daid Robinson
ECAC South Tournament action.
in
"I thought William was hit on
the arm Harrison said. "I've
got a right to protect my players.
I'd rather go down fighting, than
let them have it easy
Robinson then began to turn it
on as he struck for seven of
Navy's next nine points, putting
the Middies up 62-50 with 13:29
remaining to play.
When Vanderhorst cut the lead
to 62-52 on a 15 footer, the Naval
Academy broke the game open
by scoring the next eight points
� despite missing two front end"
of one-and-one's.
The Pirates kept fighting but
were unable to dig into the large
Navy lead. The closest ECU
could get was 16 points (76-60),
which came with 7:30 left when
Vanderhorst scored from the
right wing.
Robinson built up his statistics
in the latter part of the second
half. He scored nine of Navy's
last 14 points as the Misdhipmen
cruised to a 94-73 victory.
Navy coach Paul Evans was
pleased with his team's perfor-
mance, particularly in the second
half.
"We played better in the se-
cond half Evans said. "We
were also able to get the ball to
David easier � his concentration
was unbelievable
For the Pirates, Yanderhors:
led with 24 points and had four
assists. Dixon scored 18 and also
had four assists. Sledge was six ol
nine from the field for 12 points
Dam had five points and grabbed
a team-high six rebounds.
ECAC South Conference Basketball Awards
Paul Evans of the Naval
Academy was named ECAC
South Coach-of-the-Year by a
panel of broadcasters, sports
writers and coaches.
Evans, whose 67-24 record
over the last three years tops all
ECAC South coaches, guided the
Midshipmen to a 22-5 regular
season mark and the regular-
season conference championship.
Navy, a fifth-place preseason
pick in the ECAC South after
losing three starters from last
year's 24-8 club, is the only ser-
vice academy in history ever to
post consecutive 20-win cam-
paigns.
David Robinson, Navy's 6-11
sophomore sensation, has been
named the 1984-85 Player-of-the-
Year in the ECAC South by a
vote of the media and coaches.
Robinson, a three-time Player-
of-the-Week pick in the ECAC
South as well as Sports Illustrated
Player-of-the-Week, attracted
national attention in leading
Navy to the conference cham-
pionship.
Robinson leads all NCAA
Division I sophomores and
freshmen in scoring (24.0), re-
bounding (11.6), field goal
percentage (64 percent) and
blocked shots (4.3), ranking in
the top 15 nationally in each
category.
A native of Woodbridge, Va
who played just one year of high
school basketball, Robinson
broke John Chine's 31-year old
single season scoring record of
634 points at the Naval Academy.
Peter Woolfolk, a 6-5,
225-pound centerforward for
ECAC South All-Conference
First Team
Guard Carlos Yates 6-5 Sr
Guard Keith Cieplicki 6-4 Sr
Center David Robinson 6-11 So
Forward Vernon Butler 6-7 Jr
Forward John Newman 6-7 Jr
Second Team
Guard Ricky Wilson 6-3 Jr
Guard Kelvin Johnson 6-2 Sr
Center Brian Rowsom 6-9 So
Forward John Newman 6-5 So
Forward Rob Rose6-5 So
George Mason
William & Mary
Navy
Navy
Richmond
George Mason
Richmond
UNC-Wilmington
James Madison
flBBi Mason
the University of Richmond, has
been named ECAC South
Rookie-of-the-Year.
A three-time Rookie-of-the-
Week selection during the
1984-85 season, Woolfolk led all
conference newcomers in re-
bounding (6.1) in addition to
averaging 10.1 points per game.
A reserve for the Spiders' first
ten games, Woolfolk came on
strong during the Final two-thirds
of the season as UR posted a 13-4
record in games he started.
Richmond's leadng rebounder
in 10 games, Woe .oik Finished
the season as the top board man
in the Spider's last five regular
season contests and averaged
12.6 points and 6.8 rebounds as a
starter.
The ECAC South Conference
athletic directors have selected
George Mason University in Fair-
fax, Va. as the site for the 1986
men's basketball championship
The semi-finals and champion
ship game will be held on Friday,
March 7 and Saturday, March 8
Times for the contests will be
determined at a later date.
In a move which differentiates
from past tournament history, it
was decided that all first-round
games for the 1986 conference
championship will be played at
on-campus sites. The tourna-
ment's four higher seeds will
serve as hosts for those contests.
The first-round games will take
?lace on Saturday, March I.
19
f
�. ��� - jiiiiiiw urn��-��?�-
-
Bu
B Rltk
The Naval
tournament
Butler's 17 seJ
defeated Richnj
ECAC Sout'rl
game Saturdav
Hall.
The quicker
manv as eight
played opening)
hit 64-percent
attempts, but
bounded the ta
nine to take a
lockerroom.
Kelvin Johi
Newman inflicl
damage, with h
First-half poinj
netting 11.
In the secon
side game begar
the Spiders, ant
switched to a
defense to lii
Newman.
With Richmc
with 12:10 to
Robinson and
Navy run to givi
a five-point leaj
Robinson st





mrney
n in
am
r
ucs
I
� F.C1 Phi I b
avj 's David Robinson in
nd

lj
2 points
� I
wards
( S tuth Conference
ive selc
�n University in Fair-
V a as the site lor the 1986
s basketball championship
semi-finals and champion
p game will be held on Friday
:h 7 and Saturda. March 8
I s for the contests will be
termined at a later date.
a move which differentiates
Dm past tournament history, it
ls decided that all first-round
Imes for the 1986 conference
lampionship will be played at
)-campus sites. The tourna-
mt's four higher seeds will
re as hosts for those contests
ie first-round games will tak
i�eon Saturday, March 1.
IHMAM AROI INIAN MARCH 12, 1985 11
1985 EC A C South Tournament Highlights
MM JOHNSON
M I PhH. 1 � ?
MIC HUI SMITH Kl Photo I b
From UPPER LEFT clockwise � Herb Dixofl off ECU is surrounded h I)aid Robin:
(50) and Doug Wojcik (10) in the tournament opener. UPPER RICH! Rich mo n
John Newman (20) slams one home in the tournament final against Navy, LOW1
RIGHT � The ECU cheerleaders perform at halftime of Thursda afternoon's
against Navy. LOWER LEFT � Tournament MVP Vernon Butler shoots ovei J
Newman (20) in the Midshipmen victory.
N'EII JOHNSON - ECC Pliolo I �h
Ml Ht I SMITH K I Phi. 1 ,f
Butler Leads Navy To EC AC South Crown
By RICK McCORMAC
( o-Sporti hditor
The Naval Acaademy, led by
tournament MVP Vernon
Butler's 17 second-half points,
defeated Richmond 85-76 in the
ECAC South-Championship
game Saturday at Williani&Mary
Hall.
The quicker Spiders led by as
many as eight points in a well
played opening half. Both teams
hit 64-percent of their field goal
attempts, but Richmond outre-
bounded the taller Middies 18 to
nine to take a 44-39 'cad to the
lockerroom.
Kelvin Johnson and John
Newman inflicted most of the
damage, with Johnson scoring 21
first-half points and Newman
netting 11.
In the second half, Navy's in-
side game began to take its toll on
the Spiders, and the Midshipmen
switched to a triangle-and-two
defense to limit Johnson and
Newman.
With Richmond leading 62 57
with 12:10 to play in the game,
Robinson and Butler led a 10-0
Navy run to give the Midshipmen
a five-point lead.
Robinson started the Navy
spurt with two consecutive slam
dunks off of feeds from Butler.
Butler then hit a five footer that
was followed by another Robin-
son basket. Butler then converted
on both ends of a one-and-one to
put Navy up 67-62.
Navy led 69-66 with 5:33 re-
maining when Newman hit a
12-foot bank shot to pull the
Spiders within one. After a Navy
miss, Greg Beckwith hit both
ends of a one-and-one to give
Richmond their final lead at
70-69.
After Robinson scored on a
goaltend, Butler took over to put
the game away for the Middies.
Two consecutive layups by the
powerful junior-forward put
Navy up 75-70.
From that point on, it was a
foul shooting contest as Rich-
mond was forced to foul in hope
of a comeback. Navy hit most of
their free throws and went on to
win by nine.
"The key was (Vernon)
Butler Navy coach Paul Evans
said. "He was a man amongst
boys out there in the second
half
Richmond Coach Dick Tarrant
agreed that Butler was an impor-
tant factor. However he thought
the key was Navy switching to a
triangle-and two defense, with
three people playing in a zone
while the other two guarded
Newman and Johnson man-to-
man.
"Butler was a strong, detrmin-
ed player in the second half. He
got a lot of stickbacks Tarrant
said. "The triangle-and-two
defense hurt us. We hadn't seen
that before
Butler led Navy with 29 points,
while Robinson, who joined
teammate Butler on the all-
tournament team added 24.
Freshman guard Cliff Rees and
freshman sixth-man Carl Liebert
each contributed 10.
Johnson led Richmond with a
game-high 31 points, while
Newman added 23 before fouling
out. Both players were all tourna-
ment selections for their play
over the three-day tournament.
Rounding out the all tourney
team was senior guard Keith
Cieplicki of William & Mary.
The final was a rematch of last
year's championship game, with
Navy gaining sweet revenge for
last season's defeat.
Navy, who despite finishing
24-8 last season was overlooked
by both the NCAA and NIT
Tournaments, will get an
automatic bid to the NCAA tour-
nament.
"It's (winning the tournament
and automatic bid) a lot better
than waiting until 5:30 Sunday
for a phone call which never
came Evans said. "You cant
explain the feeling of disappoint-
ment last year when we didn't
even get a postseason bid
Richmond, who finishes at
20-10, has now won 20 games in
two consecutive seasons. This is
the first time a Richmond team
has had back-to-back 20-win
seasons in 31 years
"I'm very proud of that 1 .
rant said. "That's someth
thats unheard of at Richmond
Tarrant wait for the phu
call was a much happier one, as
the Spiders were invited to par-
ticipate in the National Invita-
tional Tournament.
Richmond Blasts George Mason;
Navy Upends William & Mary
In the Semifinals.
Despite a outstanding perfor-
mance by senior guard Keith
Cieplicki, Navy eliminated
William & Mary 89-83, in the
opening game Friday night.
Kylor Whitaker, picked up the
slack when Robinson was
hampered with early foul trouble.
Whitaker was eight of 13 from
the field and finished with 25
points. Junior forward Vernon
Butler was a perfect six of six
from the field and scored 20 on
the evening. Robinson added 14
despite jioing scoreless in the
opening period.
The Tribe had the lead 57-55
with 11 00 remaining in the
game, when Navy went on an 8-0
run to take control of the game.
Cieplicki kept the Indians close,
scoring 16 of his game-high 31 in
the last eight minutes of play.
The Middies managed to ice the
game by hitting 11 of their last 12
free-throw attempts.
Kevin Richardson contributed
23 points and 10 rebounds for the
Indians who finished their season
with a 16-12 record.
In the nightcap, John Newman
scored 27 points to lead Rich-
mond to a 77-64 drubbing of
George Mason University.
Peter Woolfolk contributed 15
12
and Kelvin Johnson added
points. John Davis scored sever
points but grabbed a team-lvgh
10 rebounds for the Spiders
Richmond, who led 34-27 at
the half, scored the first 10 points
of the second half to blow QMU
off the court. The Spiders built
up as much as a 25-point lead
before coach Tarrant emptied the
bench.
Mason, who shot 29 rerrn,
from the field in the secona ha"
(37 percent for the game), was !I!
by Carlos Yates' 20 points rh
Patriots finished their -1
with an 18-11 record. 0n
� Mi
���





12
THE: EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 12, 1985
Softball Registration Today
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Stafr Writer
With everyone getting back in-
to the swing of things after spring
break, the IRS will follow suit by
starting March with a bang.
Registration for 1985
preseason and regular season
softball begins today. Grab the
gang and head for the diamonds.
To sign up today through
Wednesday, come by room 204
Memorial Gym. The preseason
tournament will once again be
sponsored by Miller High Life.
Winners receive t-shirts and
trophies for their efforts, so prac-
tice for the regular season by
entering this weekend's competi-
tion.
Team handball tops the list in
March with registration on
March 12-13. Action begins
March 18. If you would rather be
on the safe side of the court and
earn some extra cash, contact
Willie Ehling at 757-6387 and of-
ficiate team handball. The first
clinic was Monday but ar-
rangements can be made to get
you involved.
Tennis doubles registration
concludes tomorrow so be sure to
grab your partner and start sw-
inging. The competition begins
March 18. Enjoy the spring with
a little swing!
To register for all the upcom-
ing March events, stop by room
204 Memorial Gym or call
757-6387.
All-campus basketball finals
begin this week. Sneaker Sam
predicted the women's-divisional
champions to the tee as the action
concluded before spring break.
In the ladies residence hall divi-
sion, Umstead Jockettes con-
tinued their winning ways in a
game against Fleming Flashers.
Final score 31-23. The indepen-
dent title matched up two
seasonal powerhouses in the
Thrillers and Enforcers.
Thrillers, picked No. 1 for the all-
campus championship, defeated
Enforcers 30-20.
The sorority dual between
Alpha Delta Pi and Alpha Phi
ended in a rout for the sisters of
ADPi as they defeated Alpha Phi
32-17.
In the men's league,
Unknowns shocked the Sultans
of Swat out of the all-campus
championship 33-32. Omega Psi
Phi took it to the men from
Alpha Sigma Phi in the 'A' divi-
sion. Final score 44-23.
Totally dominating the men's
residence hall division are the
newly formed Road Warriors.
Blowing Umstead Sky Force out
of the championship. The Road
Warriors head to the all-campus
finals after a sound 50-37 win.
The faculty staff finals ended
with the Blue Knights robbing the
Steelers 45-35.
In the 'B' fraternity league, Phi
Kappa Tau defeated Alpha
Sigma Phi 34-25. Good luck in
this weeks all-campus finals.
20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
Call us for eye examination with a doctor of your choice.
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
'ce
pucians
Open 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446
Baseball Win Streak Ends At Five Games
Bv TONY BROWN
St�f f � ril�
The ECU baseball team took
advantage of spring break and
the warm temperature to post a
4-2 mark during a flurry of early-
season activity at Harrington
Field.
The Pirates added four straight
after their first win to total a five-
game victory streak before bow-
ing to a powerful pitching perfor-
mance by N.C. State's Paul
Grossman in a 6-0 shutout on Fri-
day.
ECU started the break with a
5-1, 6-2 double-header sweep of
St. Augustine. Winfred Johnson
had another two-run homer in
the first inning of the opener to
again pace the Pirate offense. He
also pitched his first game and
picked up the win, though giving
up a homerun to James Quick in
the third inning.
In the nightcap, Chris
Bradberry opened the Pirates
scoring in the first inning with a
solo homer, which was followed
by three unearned runs. Jay
McGraw's two-run double closed
out the frame with a four-run
lead.
Mike Sullivan doubled in the
third, and scored on a Mark
Cockrell single to make it 5-0. St.
Augustine got two runs in the
fifth, including one homer. The
Pirates closed out the scoring in
the sixth with a bases-loaded
walk. Jim Peterson picked up the
win in his first start of the season.
ECU had the dubious distinc-
tion of taking a record breaking
27-15 win over Atlantic Christian
College on Wednesday March 6.
Winfred Johnson came on in
relief to finally quell the ACC
coring with innings of hitless pit-
ching, to pick up the victory.
ACC watched unbelievably as
their 9-1 lead disappeared in the
bottom of the third under an
11-run blitz by the Pirates. The
Bulldogs responded with two
runs in the fourth. The Pirates
then responded with one run of
their own, giving ECU a 13-11
advantage in the fourth.
ACC retook the lead with four
runs in the top of the fifth for a
15-13 lead. Jim Riley then tied
the game (15-15) with a two-run
homer in the bottom half of the
frame.
The Pirates closed out the scor-
ing with an ECU record of 12
runs in the sixth inning. The total
of 27 runs is also a Pirate high.
Each team used five pitchers and
gave a combined total of 33 hits
and 31 walks for 42 runs. The
teams left 12 runners apiece
standed in this non pitchers duel.
ECU gained a dramatic extra-
inning win over Virginia Com-
monwealth University Thursday
with a Mark Cockrell homer in
the bottom of the tenth inning.
Mike Christopher posted a com-
plete game in picking up his se-
cond win against no losses. Win-
fred Johnson slammed his fourth
home run in the fifth and went
four for five on the afternoon.
The Pirates did most of their
scoring in the first, pushing three
over. A bases-loaded walk
followed by a two-run John
McGraw single. Johnson's homer
made it 1-0 through six innings of
play, but VCU rallied for two on
a Chuck Downs homer in the
seventh. The Rams then added
two more in the top of the ninth
to tie the game, 4-4. Cockrell
then ended the game with a shot
over the fence in the bottom of
the tenth.
The ECU win streak abruptly
halted Friday with an excellent
pitching performance by Paul
Grossman. Grossman handcuff-
ed the Pirate batters, giving up
only six singles in throwing a
complete game. ECU starter
Daniel Boone gave up three runs
and was relieved by Danny
Culpepper after two outs in the
first inning.
Culpepper did his job well.
However, a number of Pirate er-
rors, including a wild pitch, add-
ed two unearned runs to make the
Wolfpack's total of six.
In blanking the Pirates,
Grossman only allowed three hits
in the First eight innings and gave
up just three walks throughout
the contest.
The Pirates had 10 hits of their
own, including a run-scoring
double by Winfred Johnson.
ECU could only collect one more
run while being charged with five
errors. Greg Hardison went three
for four and Johnson batted .500
for the game to highlight ECU's
efforts. The loss drops the Pirate
season mark to 5-2.
Hillcrest
Bowling Lanes
Is now taking applications for employment
as a Pin Chaser.
Must inquire in person between 9:00 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m.
1829 Memorial Drive
The
Aerobic
Workshop
$25 Monthly
Unlimited Classes
Q We have the largest Aerobic Workout room in
Greenville
V We have wall to wall carpet
Q We have mirrors
V We have a great sound system
We have great music
We have instructors that Motivate, Enthuse,
& Excite!
We make fitness Fun1
We Specialize In Aerobics!
You Need To Check Us Out!
Conveniently located
Downtown Greenville
417 Evan St757-1608
David Brown
for
SGA President
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
W7
vm�
610 ietiiiUt 8lvd
nun m �as
J4 hoar Towi.ng Service
I Haul Rental
iVuiintT
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concert
Sweet Release
Saturday March 16
Doors Open At 8:00
Concert At 9:00
Co-Sponsored by Society of Physics Students
This is the start of your dream date !
(lettg help uou finish your dream )
Introducing
sew &TM.S
NX-
v:v :�:�:�; �-�-�:
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Let us help you find your dream date.
Membership Only ECU students can participate
Cost first 500students-$5.00,501 to 1000 students-$7.00 , 1001 up - $900
Applications will be available by mailing a self-addressed
stamped envelope to: Computer Dating, P.O. Box 3746,
Greenville N.C, 27834. For more information call 752-9667
(weekdays between 6:30 pm and 11:30 pm or all day Satur-
days).
Formation of C64 Computer Club. Call 752-9667.
IT S FOR YO U!
i
Recreation: BingoIce Cream Party
7 p.m. Umstead
Illumina Competition Entries
1-6 p.m. MSC
Artist Series: Marvis Martin
8 p.m. Wright
Movie: "Indiana Jones and
the Temple of Doom
7, 9:30 MSC
Recreation: Trivial Pursuit Contest
Preregistration
6 p.m. MSC
Major Concerts: The Kinks
8 p.m. Minges
Movie: "The Return of Martin Guerre"
8 p.m. MSC
Movie: "Revenge of the Nerds"
7, 9 p.m. MSC
Applications: 2 Day Student Representatives for
Student Union Board of Directors
rm. 234 MSC
Sponsored
by
March 12
March 13, 15
March 13
March 14, 15, 16
March 15
March 16
March 20
March 21, 22, 23
March 26
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The Student Union
DEADLINE: MARCH 25, S pm
MTAILS: MfMMMUl �Ttf�fHT CtHTIft MOOM �
� An UBm ife iiflan Aw
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wltlti' iiW





Title
The East Carolinian, March 12, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 12, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.396
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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