The East Carolinian, February 28, 1985






�he
(Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.44
Thursday February 28,1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
American Problems Discussed
At ECU Honor Symposium
Circulation 12,000
:x�jsm.
From Suff Reports
Ten ECU professors and two
students presented
papers at the Phi Kappa Phi
honor society symposium Tues-
day and Wednesday. Themes
centered around the topic of
"What's Right With America �
What's Wrong" and papers were
heard from the various cur-
riculums, including journalism,
foreign languages and the
sciences.
The two ECU students presen-
ting their papers were Susan
Tacker, a senior majoring in
English, and Ted F. Cash, a
senior medical student. Tacker's
paper, entitled, "Westmoreland
v. CBS: Modern Media and
Traditional Freedom of the
Press" contained information
concerning the recent $120
million lawsuit filed against CBS
by General William
Westmoreland, head of
American forces in Vietnam from
1964-68. The case was dropped
by the Westmoreland Feb. 18,
but many questions remain
unanswered.
"Today's press faces opposi-
tion from the public it ostensibly
protects Tacker said Tuesday.
"Those in power have resented
press criticism since before the
Revolutionary War in this coun-
try The Supreme Court has
managed to balance basic rights
of individuals, she added, but the
.press can not be exempt from
publishing false information,
though it may be a protected
right of the press. Only the jury
can award damages of
"malicious intent or
recklessness she said.
"Public juries don't seem to
understand the idea of malice;
the Libel Defense Center recently
reported that more than 60 per-
cent of juries return verdicts
favorable to the plaintiff, but
over two-thirds of these are
reversed on appeal Tacker said
while quoting from U.S. News
and World Report.
In a joint statement released to
the press and public 18 weeks
after suit had been filed, CBS
said "CBS never intended to
assert, and does not believe, that
General Westmoreland was un-
patriotic or disloyal in perform-
ing his duties as he saw them
"The case settled none of the
issues it raised since it never went
before a jury Tacker said.
"The old unreconciled difference
is still irreconcilable: how can we
protect a strong, free, vigorous
press and also protect an in-
dividual's right to clear his
name?"
Ted Cash's presentation
Wednesday concerned the effects
of choosing the proper method of
curing a sick patient. Like
Tacker, Cash received a
monetary award for his paper,
"A Broken Heart: Caring and
Curing in American Medicine
"I am merely a humble
medical student whose hand-
writing has not yet become illegi-
ble Cash said, "and I think
there is more to curing a patient
than doping him up with medica-
tions
He cited an example of a young
woman and her comatose
mother. The woman asked Cash
what she could do to make her
mother comfortable during her
last days. He suggested that she
record her mother's favorite song
and play it by her bedside. Even
though the terminally ill patient
could not communicate in any
fashion, a tear ran down her
cheek as she heard the song. The
daughter knew she had succeeded
in making her mother comfor-
table and possibly relieving the
pain she was going through.
"The point is Cash said,
See LECTURERS, Page 5

-mm
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Dr. David Glascoff, associate professor of ECU's
Business, was one of many faculty members that spoke Tuesday
and Wednesdays Phi Kappa Phi Symposium, sponsored bv the
honor society and ECU. '
Candidates
File For
Positions
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
N�� Editor
W i t h S G A elections
scheduled for March 19 and
the candidates' filing deadline
set for Friday, eight can-
didates have already filed to
run for office.
For the office of SGA presi-
dent, David Brown and Mike
McPartland have filed; Lee
Lane and Chris Tomasic have
filed for vice president;
Dwayne Wiseman for
treasurer and Lisa Carroll,
Maryvonne Draper and Ann
Scarborough for secretary.
Candidates for all SGA of-
fices must have a 2.0 gpa and
be in good academic standing
with the university. In addi-
tion, candidates for the offices
of treasurer, vice president
and president must have at
least 48 hours of academic
credit.
Howard Lipman has resign-
ed as chairman of the Elec-
tions Committee, and has been
replaced by SGA Treasurer
Georgia Mooring, according
to SGA President Rainey.
SRA Plans Reorganization of Councils; Input Continues
By HAROLD JOYNER
Assistant Non Editor
Input was given by ECU dorm
residents Wednesday night con-
cerning the restructuring of the
Student Residence Association's
Constitution and other
reorganization within residence
hall structure.
Discussion centered on a pro-
posal to reorganize or abolish the
Area Residence Councils.
Elizabeth Page, president of
West Area said the ARCs should
be abolished for several reasons,
the main one being financial.
Students will also be able to have
more time be involved in the
dorm, she said. "1 would like to
see every group merge into SRA
and have legislators, who would
serve the purpose of relaying in-
formation back to the dorms. She
also said she would like for the
Programing Assistant to come to
SRA meetings. Currently PA's
are not required to do so.
Kevin Johnson, president of
College Hill ARC, said the coun-
cils should remain because dorm
residents are able to benefit from
area activities. "But if the
organization was reorganized,
and all the money was controlled
by SRA, the little things would be
lost He noted that the College
Hill Council has been responsible
for obtaining a volleyball court,
upkeep of a basketball court, fur-
nishing bus shelters, picnic
tables, and sidewalks at the bot-
tom of College Hill.
Wanda Battle, vice president
of Tvler dorm, said that "the
iniiiniai
tangible things the council has
done for the area were really
good She also said she felt that
a lot of information is repeated at
House meetings, so the unifica-
tion of one Council may
eliminate this repetition.
Saying that Central Campus
gets nothing from its Area Coun-
cil, the vice president of Slay
dorm said "students are more
apathetic and are not as willing to
do the things College Hill is able
to do Page also added that
money was also being wasted and
therefore dorms are not able to
plan as many activities as they
would like to do.
Elizabeth Tyson. West Area
President, said "You can't beg
people to attend meetings, or par-
ticipate in them
SRA President Debbie Gem-
bicki said SRA is in a dormant
state now and it would make
more sense to combine councils
thereby making the lines of com-
munication more open to dorm
residents. However, there could
be some problems in the abolish-
ment of the councils, and some
areas would lose more than
others, she said.
Information will be conveyed
to the residence halls and a vote
will be taken March 13, the next
SRA meeting. The Residence Life
Committee will then decide on a
course of action, Gembicki said.
Three Area presidents, SRA
president and various faculty
members make up the RLC.
Contributions Total More Than $4 Million
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Private gifts to ECU totaled
$4.2 million during 1983-84, as
compared to $2.7 million for
1982-83, according to James
Lanier, vice chancellor for In-
stitutional Advancement.
Lanier termed the year "a very
fine year" in terms of contribu-
tions. He said the primary in-
creases were in the areas of
medicine and academic pro-
grams. Of the $4.2 million, ap-
proximately $1.6 million went to
medicine, almost $1 million to
athletics and approximately $1.7
million to academic programs.
Lanier said the increase was
mostly due to heightened cor-
porate contributions, but there
Private Gifts Increase
were also big increases in in-
dividual donations. He said there
are three separate groups respon-
sible for obtaining gifts, the
Educational Foundation, the
Medical Foundation and the
ECU Foundation.
All contributions, Lanier said,
must be solicited. "Very rarely
does a gift come in unsolicited
he said. The Alumni Association
solicits contributions by direct
mail, alumni telefunds and per-
sonal solicitations, while the
Pirate Club performs basically
the same services aimed at ob-
taining athletic contribtions. The
Medical Foundation, Lanier said,
relies mostly on individual
solicitation.
Lanier said he foresees
"another excellent year" for the
ECU Foundation, adding that
they saw their "first million-
dollar year" in 1984.
The University Scholars' Pro-
gram "has proven to be a big
asset Lanier said. To date, 11
of 20 scholarships have been
funded. Seven gifts have been
received funding one scholarship
and four gifts have been received
funding two to three scholar-
ships.
"I think 1984 has set a new
standard of excellence for the In-
stitutional Advancement
divison Lanier said. "We have
built upon the strengths that were
here and we are now assembling
the tools and resources necessary
to consistently attract increasing
levels of private support form in-
dividuals and corporations
Court Reduces Restrictions
w w j k . JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Hold Out
Spring Break is finally hear and students soon will be heading for the beach. Is there any chance of con-
vincing everyone to stay in Greenville so they can see what a ghost town really looks like? Oh well, we
thought so. Have a safe and enjoyable break. See y'all in March.
Photo Head Resigns; Jordan Assumes Duties
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
New Editor
Photo Lab Photographer Jon
Jordan was chosen as interim
head of the Photo Lab by the
ECU Media Board Wednesday,
following the resignation of Neil
Johnson.
Johnson said he resigned
because of "other obligations
that had to be met He said he
has a busy schedule and felt "it
would be beneficial to the Buc-
caneer and other mediums if they
get someone who has more time
to devote to the business at
hand
Jordan was selected, according
to Johnson, because "if someone
who didn't know what was cur-
rently being done in the lab had
come in, it could have detrimen-
tal effects on the schedules of
campus publications
The position has been
designated as that of interim head
because selections for new media
heads will be made in April, ac-
cording to Media Board Chair-
man Mike McPartland.
McPartland said Johnson "has
done a tine job, but meeting
deadlines has been a bit too much
with his schedule He added
that he felt there would be a
"smooth transition
"Jon said, he knows the ropes
and I'm sure he'll continue to
keep up the quality of the lab's
work McPartland said.
Jordan, 23, a Chemistry ma-
jor, said he doesn't foresee any
problems in meeting deadlines
for campus publications, "I'm
just trying to deal with what hap-
pens as it happens he said.
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The
Supreme Court ruled 5-4
Wednesday that the Environmen-
tal Protection Agency may ex-
empt individual industrial plants
from national clean water stan-
dards limiting the discharge of
pollutants.
The ruling was a victory for the
Reagan administration and the
chemical industry which had
challenged a lower court's deter-
mination that the government
agency could not grant variances
from national rules for treating
toxic chemicals before they are
dumped into public waterways.
Although few such variances
have been given so far, industry
complained it would be saddled
with very high costs if required to
meet national clean water stan-
dards. But environmental groups
warned that the companies were
simply trying to delay compliance
with standards ordered by the
Clean Water Act.
The statute directs the EPA to
set national standards for in-
dustrial discharge of treated toxic
waste � pollutants that have
been at least partially cleansed
before flowing into lakes and
streams.
In a second opinion Wednes-
day, the Supreme Court, comply-
ing with the wishes of Congress,
unanimously ruled that money
withheld for income taxes and
Social Security is part of a fami-
ly's income for the purpose of
calculating eligibility for welfare
grants.
A lower court had ruled that
states should consider net rather
than gross income when deter-
mining eligibility and benefits. In
reversing that ruling, the
Supreme Court acknowledged
that Congress already had
enacted legislation to settle the
controversy.
In the water pollution case,
Justice Byron White wrote for
the majority that the high court
should not second guess EPA's
interpretation of the Clean Water
Act.
"EPA's construction (of the
statute), fairly understood, is not
inconsistent with the language,
goals or operation of the Act.
Nor does the administration of
EPA's regulation undermine the
will of Congress
Led by Justice Thurgood Mar-
shall, four justices took exception
to the court's ruling, saying the
environmental agency had taken
action "inconsistent with the
clear intent of Congress
NMHMMMMMMtM.MMA�.
-4
?
k
i

it





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28. 1985
The Kinks
The ECU Student Union Major Concerts
Committe is presenting Tfu Kinks, live in con
cert, March 14, 1985. in Minges Coliseum.
Tickets will be $10 in advance, and $12 for
non students and at the door Tickets will go
on sale today at u 00 in the central ticket of
flee of Mendenhall Student Center. Don't
miss it! 11!
AMA Elections
Anyone Interested In running for an AMA
position for next year, turn your name In
folder outside room 227 in Rawl.
Joyner Library
has received a publication which will be of
interest to those sutsdents who are preparing
to take the NTE How to Prepare for the Na-
tional Teacher Examinations may be used in
the Reserve Room of the library
Summer School at BOCC
Undergraduate students interested in atten
ding summer school at Beaufort County
Community College may apply for admis
slon through The Office of Admissions at
Beaufort County Community College
Summer session l begins May and ends Ju
ly 5 while summer session 11 Is scheduled for
July 8 through August 14.
General information on available courses
offered, registration and other information
is available from the Office of Admissions,
Beaufort County Community College, P.O.
Box 1049, Washington, NC 27889
For further information, contact the Office
of Admissions at (919) 944-4194.
ECU Surfing Club
A club for all beach-lovers a team for com
petltlve surfing. There will be a meeting at 8
Thurs . Feb. 28 in the coffeehouse
(Mendenhall basement). Everyone going on
the trip to Florida spring break needs to at
tend this meeting. Any newcomers are also
welcome
Pirate Walk
Student escorts and jogging escorts are
avilable for ECU students. Facuty, han-
dicapped persons and staff Call Pirate Walk
at 757-4414 Sun. through Thurs evenings,
from 4 to 12 p.m. Our operational area in
eludes the ECU main campus and a two
block surrounding area, college hill and the
Minges complex.
Aerobic Fitness
Register for second session aerobic classes
Feb. 24-March 1 from 8:30-4 p.m. Come to
room 204 Memorial Gym or call 752 4387
ECU Frisbee
The ECU "Irates" will be playing at Univer
sity of Florida Gamsville March 2&3 and at
Miami Dade Community College March 9 S.
10. If you are in the area come on out and
jam with de Irev Force. Hot ultimate
There will be practice Mon,Tues. and
Thurs. at 3. Meeting Tues. at 9 Florida peo-
pie must have University excuse if your ab
sent Lets leave Fri. about dusk.
PPHA Meeting
On Thurs Feb. 28 at 5:30 in Mendenhall
room 221, there will be a regularly scheduled
meeting of the Pre Professional Health
Alliance. All members are expected to at
tend and pay dues and for the pins as agreeo
upon. All other persons interested in the
health related fields are welcomed and en
couraged to attend
Delta Sigma Phi
hope you have a great spring break-we know
all the brothers, sister, and pledges are gon
na party it up-why not, after all your'e Delta
Sigma Phi's- have fun. Little sisters and
pledges-just remember we have a meeting 8
p.m. March 18.
Paragon
A thriller, about death and afterlife. Coming
soon. Don't miss it
Prime Time
sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ,
will be meeting in Jenkins Aud Art Bldg
every Thurs. at 8 p.m. Please join us for fun,
fellowship and Bible Study
Newman Center
ECU has employment information for
graduating seniors interested in working in
campus ministr or youth ministry. For
details contact Fr. Terry at the Newman
Center, 953 E 10th St or call 752-4214.
Announcements
Officials
Need extra money? We'll let you call the
shots with softball and team handball. Of
flcials for Intramurals are needed! The soft
ball clinics will begin March 12,4 p.m. In MG
102 while team handball starts March 11 at 4
p.m. In room 102 Memorial Gym. If you have
a question call Willie Ehlirg at 757 4387. No
experience necessary.
Intramurals
Swing with the IRS. Intramural tennis
doubles registration begins March 11 13
Play begins March 18. Come to 204 Memorial
Gym to sign up or call 757 4387.
Pre-Season Softball
and regular season IRS softball action will
begin March 15. Registration will be held In
204 Memorial Gym March 12 13 so get the
teams together new! Swing into spring with
IRS softball. For more information call
757 4387 Officials: the first clinic will be held
March 12 at 4 p.m. in MG 102.
Team Handball
Register for regular season team handball
with intramurals March 12-13 in room 204
Memorila Gym. For more info, call 757-4387.
If you need x tra money and want to of-
ficiate, a clinic will be held March 11 at 4
p.m. in BG 102.
Co-Rec bolleyball
Is spiking in your repetoire? If so, register
for intramural co-rec volleyball March 18-19.
3 guys and 3 gals are needed to play. For
more info, call 757 4387 or come by room 204
Memorial Gym.
Co-Rec Racquetball
Registration for intramural co-rec raquet
ball begins March 18 20 Play will start
March 25. For more information come by
room 204 Memorial Gym or call 757-4387. Sw
ing into spring with the IRS.
PoliticalScience
Student's Society
is sponsoring a lecture entitled "The Nuclear
Race: A Different Perspective" by Cdr.
W.H. Withrow today at 2 p.m. in BC 101.
There will be a meeting of the Political
Science Student's Society directly following
the lecture. Everyone Is invited to attend
NC Student Legislature
The next meeting wiI be held March 11 at 7 in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse Lt. Governor
candidates Gordon Walker(ECU) and Bob
Mazzoni(Catawba) will present their "plans,
promises and political speeches Read your
hillbooks over spring break Elections after
session Have a great break.
ECU Racquetball
Club
will have a next organizational meeting on
Wed March 13, at 5 p.m. in Memorial Gym
rm. 102. Meet new members, find out for our
next events (Eastern Seaboard inter-
collegiate Racquetball Tournament) and
practices on Tue. Th. 9 to 12 p.m. and Sat. 8
to 10 a.m. at Minges court. All members and
anyone interested are welcome.
ECU Frisbee
The Irey Force will be at U.FGainsville
March 28.3 and Miami Dade Community Col-
lege on March 9&10. If you are in the area
during break come on out and watch de I rey
Force jam on hot ultimate. Ireys we leave
Dunn at 2 Pri. irates we leave Dunn at 2 Fri.
FlatbaM fanatics 2 Fri. Be there or walk.
Remember the Natural Light spring
Ultimax V the ultimate jam March 30-31
here, don't get too oblong in Fla.
ECU College Republicans
The CR's will meet tonight at 4 in the
Mendenhall Coffhouse We will discuss the
past spring convention. Congratulations Mr.
Parliamentarian and Grassroots, Mr. Club
Chairman of the Year and Mr. Hero of the
Revoltion. Thanks to all members for mak
ing ECU CR's a strong club, you share in
these awards.
Alpha Phi Big
Brothers
The next meeting will be SunMarch 10 at
9.30 p.m. All big brothers (and men in
terested in being big brothers) are urged to
attend this meeting the beach weekend trip
set for March 29 30 will be planned at this
meeting, if yuu are planning on going-bring
$10 refundable deposit fee.
Grateful Dead Fans
Roadtrips is back on the road. Pick up your
Dead tickets at Apple Records. Price in-
cludes round trip by bus.
DONTREA
STYROHEAD
lei's face it, a daily diet of tasteless Go for the fresh alternative! Get a
burgers in styrofoam boxes can turn fresh, delicious Subway sandwich or
you into a dull person, salad for a change. You '11 love it.
E. Fifth St. CM1MP 758-7979
Delivery Starting 3-10-85 Thru "The Jokes on Us"
Omega Psi Phi
and Delta Sigma Theta will have their
Omega and Delta Ball on March 23. It will be
a tropical evening of enchantment. Tickets
are on sale now.
Also a spring break jam will be presented
at the Unlimited Touch on Thurs March 28.
There will also be a 9-11 happpy hour and all
proceeds will go to the Heart Fund Associa-
tion. Rides will be provided between 9-10:30
at MSC
Biol. Cookout
The ECU Biology Club will have a cookout on
Mon March 11. The cookout wil be at 4
behind the Biology Building In the vicinity of
the gazebo. This will be a social event that
will enable new and old Biology Club
members to meet other members and
generally just have a good, fun time. We will
not have a speaker at this meeting, but, what
a way to begin the second half of the
semester. AM members are urged to keep in
mind that Officer elections are coming up.
Please let one of the officers know if you are
planning on becoming a candidate for an of-
fice. This cookout will be held unless another
hurricane prevents us from holding It.
Circle K
There will be no meetings, until after spring
break. Everyone going to the convention
must have their money in by today. Look In
the paper for the next meeting. Have an
awesome break.
Coming Attractions
There's excitement brewing beside Charles
Blvd and behind Harrington field! Check out
what could be interesting. The fun begins the
14 of March and won't die until the darkness
over takes the 0 of April.
SAB Meeting
There will be a Student Athletic Board
meeitng Mon March 11 at 4 in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Seniors
A 1985 Commencement memorandum will be
mailed during the week of spring recess to
each senior and graduate student who is ex
pected to complete all degree requirements
by the end of spring semester.The memoran-
dum will provide details relative to the Com
mencement program shedule, rehearsal,
caps, gowns, and announcements, diplomas
and guest invitations for inclement weather.
Yeatbook Portraits
will be taken during March 18-29. Walk Ins
are welcome, but avoid the lines and signup
now. It takes only five minutes and five
poses are free. Sign up at the Buccaneer of-
fice (2nd floor publications building across
from Joyner Library).
Spring Break Pictures
the yearbook is looking for candlds of you
and your friends during spring break. Bring
us your snapshots and we'll print the best in
the 1985 Buccaneer. Call or come by the year-
book office (across from Joyner Library)
757 4501
Concert Photos
The Buccaneer Is looking for photos of
musical groups that have played regionally
during the last year, especially in the NC-VA
area. If you've gofem we'll prlnfem In the
1985 Buccaneer and give you the Credit line.
Call or come by the yearbook office (across
from Joyner Library) 757-4501.
Photographs
are you a closet photographer?, have some
party pictures?, or some prints left over
from a photography class? The yearbook is
looking for interesting and unusual photos of
the campus, students, and Greenville. Bring
them in the 1985 Buccaneer and give youth
credit line. For info call 757-4501.
NAACP
We will hold our meetings on the regularly
scheduled dates in March 11th and 25th with
elections scheduled for the 25th. Any persons
interested In running for office should be at
the March Uth meeting and contact Wllma
at 752 920lf Your presence Is ecouraged at
this meeting If you really want to be inform
ed of the issues presently facing ECU
students.
Best Tan Contest
Work on that tan over spring breakl Delta
Zeta Is having a "Best Tan" contest at the
Elboon Tues March 12. There will be prizes
for participants, and the greek frat or sororl
ty with the biggest turn out will win a free
keg I See you there. Aloha I
Buddhist Meditation
and Study Group, there will be a meeting
tonight at 7 In E 201 of the Physics Building
We will be starting the books "Taoism" by
Blofeld and a translation of "Tao Te Ching
Please bring a cushion.
Attention
Dr. Charles J. Dillman, head of the Dept. of
Biomechanics and Computer Services at the
Olympic Complex in Denver, will be presen-
ting a slide show on Fri March 1 at 11
a.m12 in rm. 144 Minges. This is a great op-
portunity to hear a professional speak about
the programs he has developed with Olym
pic athletes. So please attend
Nursing Majors
Freshmen nursing malors are urged to con
suit their faculty advisors, prior to or during
prereglstration for summer and fall 1985,
concerning sophomore course changes and
to pick up memo concerning program
changes.
All other nursing malors are advised to
seek their advisor's assistance when
prereglsterlng for revised courses for fall
1985.
Grateful Dead Fans
Roadtrips Is back on the road Pick up your
Dead tickets at Apple Records Price in
eludes round trip by bus
Yeatbook Portraits
will be taken during March 18 29 Walk ins
art welcome, but avoid the lines and sign up
now It takes only five minutes and five
poses are free Sign up at the Buccaneer of
fice (2nd floor publications building across
from Joyner Library)
Spring Break Pictures
the yearbook is looking for candids of you
and your friends during spring break Bring
us your snapshots and we'll print the best in
the 1985 Buccaneer Call or come by the year
book office (across from Joyner Library;
757 4501
Concert Photos
The Buccaneer is looking for photos o
musical groups that have played regionally
during the last year, especially in the NC VA
area if you've got'em we'll print'em in the
1985 Buccaneer and give you the Credit line
Call or come by the yeartook office (across
from Joyner Library) 757 4501
Photographs
are you a closet photographer?, have some
party pictures?, or some prints left over
from a photography class? The yearbook is
looking for interesting and unusual photos of
the campus, students, and Greenville Bring
them in the 1985 Buccaneer and give youth
credit line For info call 757 4501
NEEDED: Journalists
Many openings for fall &
summer sessions including
Managing Editor. APPLY:
The East Carolinian 8-5
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buv Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
'$ AII Trunsai tions Confidential cX
es 757-0322 iScNcS
Hour viXta - 4:rm Mot-Sat C

L
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
Copyright 1985
Kroger sav on
�Ouantitv Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
I
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
March 2 1985
4
S

0oouhoU
REGULAR OR LIGHT'
Coors
-Beer
6
(Vf& I
DIET COKE OR
coca
Cola
LIMIT 2
PLEASE
12 02
Cans
$259
;S?
OREO
ice Cream
Bars
BIANCO, ROSATO,
"D ORO OR
Riunite
Lambrusco
$89

2-Ltr.
N.R.B.
BUY ONE LB.
OR MORE SANDY MAC
Boiled Ham!
GET ONE 6 CT. PKGJ
Kaiser Rolls
7
8 PC. BKT.
�s?
c�"
��
.m
wishbone
Fried Chicken
B $3?9
7
-V
ra 00'
V
:
2ft
�c. t?
j$
THIN CRUST
SINGLE TOPPING
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
For
50-60 a.
PREVIOUSLY FROZEN MEDIUM
FRESH BAKED
French-
Bread
LVS.
CALIFORNIA
SEEDLESS
Navel
Oranges
Lb.
Headless
Shrimp
LIMIT
� 5 LBS.
PLEASE
CUT FROM A 40-LB. BLOCK
Mild Cheddar
Cheese
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacn of these advertised items
is required to oe readiiv
available for sale in eacn Kroger
Sav on eiceot as sperificaiiy
noted in this ad if we do run
out of an item we win offer you
voor cnoice of a comparable
item when available reflecting
tne same savings or a rameneck
wnicn win entitle vou to pur
cnase tne advertised item at
tne advertised price within so
days Only one vendor coupon
.win be accepted per item
IMPORTED
Sweet
Nectarines
SHOP THE KROGER DELI-BAKERY
FOR A WIDE VARIETY OF
Special Occmlm Cokia
VeSidom Potty Tiwja
Quick Fix Wteofo
Ta-Ge SoMduticli
STOP BY AND SEE OUR
SELECTION!
Lb.
Go Krogering
Effects Of Cuts Widen
Banks May
(CPS) � Banking leaders are
scurrying to head off an obscure
provision of the Reagan ad-
ministration's package of pro-
posed student financial aid cuts
they say threatens to kill the
whole student loan program.
The administration wants to
cut the amount of money
Washington pays banks when
they make student loans.
The loans, of course, carry in-
terest rates lower than the bank
could get if it used the money for
standard commercial loans. To
encourage banks to loan the
money to students instead, the
government pays banks the dif-
ference between regular interest
rates and student loan interest
rates.
The administration wants to
cut payments to banks by $150
million next year. It argues banks
can still make a reasonable profit
on student loans.
Not so, say the bankers.
"These loans are not high pro-
fit loans as it is now says Joe
Belew, government relations
director for the Consumer Banks
Association.
"If this reduction goes
through, it would virtually kill
the entire government-
guaranteed student loan pro-
gram he sail
"The prog
workable o
bankers anyi
Stoner of thel
Association
Although
have conside
ding their turl
ing leaders n
first time thev
Reagan admij
dent loans.
One key hi
ficial agrees ti
program is
this should
says Jean Frc
seants state hi
agencies.
"I asked
what they thj
reimburseme.i
laughed. I
But the bail
may prove pc
At issue
allowance"
the federal g(
up for the difl
low interest r
Student Loai
percent) a
banks woul
ing the mone
tor.
Income Tax
Bv ELAINE PERRY
S��ffWrti�
Having problems with income
tax forms? A variety of services
are being offered to help with the
filing of tax returns.
As in previous years, the ECU
Accounting Society will be help-
ing students with tax returns. Ac-
cording to Gorman Ledbetter, an
ECU business professor, the
students help primarily with the
basic forms. "If it's too com-
plicated, they won't do it he
said.
The services will be offered
every Mondaj
p.m. in U
Center urn. :
The Intern
located at 10II
fering assistaij
basis. Student
help without
addition, mi
number, 800-1
needing assist
The IRS
Joyner Librj
material to hi
as other
federal inco
Audio c
Crackdown
Campus public safety officers
will be conducting a special
operation to combat a growing
problem of unescorted males in
the womens' residence halls until
the end of the spring semester,
according to Lt. Gene McAbee,
crime prevention officer with the
ECU Department of Public Safe-
ty.
"Complaints have been receiv-
ed from residents and parents by
our departrrent concerning the
flagrant violations of university
policy on male visitors in the
womens' residence halls
McAbee said. "We feel that the
problem has become so severe
that the privacy and security of
our coeds are being
jeopardized
According to McAbee, any
male visitor in the living area of a
womens' residence hall must be
escorted by a female. Plain-
clothes female officers working
in teams with male officers will
patrol lobbies of the dormitories
and living areas if necessary.
Males found unescorted in the
dormitories are subject to arrest
and prosecution for trespassing.
"Our main concern is for
males, particularly non-students,
who have been observed wander-
ing the hallways of the female
residence halls with no particular
destina i
students wj
reasons to
must also
Ti
Sum:
For a
and eei
li Prizes
1st �
Tues. March 12,
Admission SI.OX)
$50.00 plus a ca
beer & dinner
China Express
$25.00 plus a larg
za from Susie's Pi
$10.00 plus dinn
Cubbies �
Sponsorec
Cubbies
Apple Rec
New De.i
Book Bom
�ej
4
ii
.cV- v ,
i0Kmimmtmmu �
v i

i





THliLAS'lAkOI 1NIAN I I .f A f �. ��'�
Effects Of Cuts Widen
Grateful Dead Fans
Joaatripj is Oack on the road Pick up your
ead tickets at Apple Records Price in
Ikdes round trip bv bus
Yeatbook Portraits
oe taken during March 18 79 Walk ins
�r- �.oni( tut avoid'te imes and sign up
. � ve minutes and five
ises ae �� ee SiQn up at the Buccaneer of
cations building across
' �Ty I
Spring Break Pictures
reartxX" - � . andids of you
- If ng break Bring
- - ind we print the best in
me by the year
om Joyner Library)
ncert Photos
ooking tor photos of
awe plaveo regionally
� ear espei-al'v in the NC VA
pr.nf'em in the
mj the Credit line
- si-book office (across
Photographs
Jtographer'5 have some
or.nts left over
I he .earbook is
"usual photos ot
Will Bring
3 ve youth
Coins & Pawn
Dickinson Ave
Id & Silver
SH LOANS
s 'Confidential -f
on
�fights Reserved
- � � d,
items ana Prices
Effective Thru Sat
March 2 1985
COKE OR
Coca
Cola
LIMIT 2
PLEASE
ONE LB.
SANDY MAC
led Ham
399
IB 6 CT. PKG
;er Rolls
CT.
)2EN MEDIUM
Hess
imp
99
LIMIT
5 LBS
PLEASE
)CER DELI-BAKERY
E VARIETY OF
�EE OUR

rogering
MMMHHteMMMH�

!
IL New victims East Carolina
(CPS) � Banking leaders are
scurrying to head off an obscure
provision of the Reagan ad-
ministration's package of pro-
posed student financial aid cuts
they say threatens to kill the
whole student loan program.
The administration wants to
cut the amount of money
Washington pays banks when
they make student loans.
The loans, of course, carry in-
terest rates lower than the bank
could get if it used the money for
standard commercial loans. To
encourage banks to loan the
money to students instead, the
government pays banks the dif-
ference between regular interest
rates and student loan interest
rates.
The administration wants to
cut payments to banks by $150
million next year. It argues banks
can still make a reasonable profit
on student loans.
Not so, say the bankers.
"These loans are not high pro-
fit loans as it is now says Joe
Belew, government relations
director for the Consumer Banks
Association.
"If this reduction goes
through, it would virtually kill
the entire government-
guaranteed student loan pro-
gram he says
"The program would not be
workable or attractive for
bankers anymore adds Floyd
Stoner of the American Bankers
Association.
Although bankers as a rule
have considerable succes defen-
ding their turf in Congress, bank-
ing leaders noted that this is the
first time they've had to fight the
Reagan administration over stu-
dent loans.
One key higher education of-
ficial agrees the threat to the loan
program is real. "I'm satisfied
this should be taken seriously
says Jean Frohlicher, who repre-
seants state higher education loan
agencies.
"I asked a group of bankers
what they thought of the lower
reimbursement rate and they
laughed she adds.
But the bankers worry the cut
may prove politically attractive.
At issue is the "special
allowance" banks receive from
the federal government to make
up for the difference between the
low interest rates on Guaranteed
Student Loans (currently eight
percent) and the interest rates
banks would be able to earn loan-
ing the money to the private sec-
tor.
The government computes the
subsidy by adding 3.5 percent to
the interest rate on 90-day
treasury bills, and subtracting the
interest rate the student pays.
The administration wants to
reduce it to 1.5 percent on top of
the interest rate for 90-day
treasury bills while the student is
in college, and 3 percent
therafter.
Bankers say it would wipe out
banks' profits on student loans.
Instead, the bankers want to
give students eligible for college
loans an open line of credit they
could tap to meet college ex-
penses.
Students, the government and
banks would save the time and
expense involved in renewing
loans each year, they argue.
Under the proposal, students
simply would certify each year
their financial situation had not
changed since the previous year.
The bankers also are proposing
that students and their colleges
jointly cash the loan checks.
"That
political
would eliminate the
repercussions of the
anectdotal stories of students us-
ing their loans to buy cars and the
like says Carl Modecki, the
CBA's president.
Income Tax Aid Available
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
Having problems with income
tax forms? A variety of services
are being offered to help with the
filing of tax returns.
As in previous years, the ECU
Accounting Society will be help-
ing students with tax returns. Ac-
cording to Gorman Ledbetter, an
ECU business professor, the
students help primarily with the
basic forms. "If it's too com-
plicated, they won't do it he
said.
The services vwill be offered
every Monday from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center until the end of March.
The Internal Revenue Service,
located at 101 W. First St is of-
fering assistance on a "walk-in"
basis. Students can go and receive
help without an appointment. In
addition, there is a toll-free
number, 800-241-3860, for those
needing assistance.
The IRS has also furnished
Joyner Library with a variety of
material to help students, as well
as other taxpayers, prepare
federal income tax forms.
Audio cassettes containing
line-by-line instructions for the
preparation of federal tax forms
1040EZ, 1040A and Schedule 1
and Form 1040 and Schedules A,
B and W are available.
Publication 1194, a four-
volume set of the IRS' most re-
quested publications and
Publication 1132, which contains
over 90 reproducible tax forms
that can be easily photocopied,
are available in Joyner.
All IRS materials are located in
the basement level of Joyner's
west wing, in the Documents
Department.
Crackdown On Visitation
Campus public safety officers
will be conducting a special
operation to combat a growing
problem of unescorted males in
the womens' residence halls until
the end of the spring semester,
according to Lt. Gene McAbee,
crime prevention officer with the
ECU Department of Public Safe-
ty.
"Complaints have been receiv-
ed from residents and parents by
our department concerning the
flagrant violations of university
policy on male visitors in the
womens' residence halls
McAbee said. "We feel that the
problem has become so severe
that the privacy and security of
our coeds are being
jeopardized
According to McAbee, any
male visitor in the living area of a
womens' residence hall must be
escorted by a female. Plain-
clothes female officers working
in teams with male officers will
patrol lobbies of the dormitories
and living areas if necessary.
Males found unescorted in the
dormitories are subject to arrest
and prosecution for trespassing.
"Our main concern is for
males, particularly non-students,
who have been observed wander-
ing the hallways of the female
residence halls with no particular
destination; however, male
students who have legitimate
reasons to be in the dormitories
must also be escorted McAbee
said. "They will also be subject
to arrest or administrative
disciplinary action for violation
of the policy
Try a New Path
To Learning
This Summer
Summer School at:
UNC Wilmington
the University by the Sea
For a brochure describing our courses
and general information, write:
Office of Special Programs
UNC at Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, N.C. 28403
Or Call: (919) 395-3195
& Delta Zeta
present
Prizes
1st �
Best Tan
Contest
Tues. March 12, 1985 8:30-1:00 A.M.
Admission $1.00 18 yrs. $2.00 80P
$50.00 plus a case of
beer & dinner from
China Express
$25.00 plus a large piz-
za from Susie's Pizzaria
$10.00 plus dinner at
Cubbies
Sponsored By:
Cubbies
Apple Records
New Deli
Book Bom
Plus A keg to the largest
turnout of any Greek
organization and door
prizes for all.
U.B.E.
Bonds
Susie Pizza
China Express
Heart's Delight
� � ���!� E
�n0fe?
�w
� ��I��
Student Union's
Major Concerts
Committee
Presents:
A Night With
Saturday, March 16th
Minges Coliseum
Tickets:
$10 Student in Advance
$12 Public and at the
Tickets may be purchased at the Central Ticket Of-
fice in Mendenhall Student Center.
Tickets will go on sale
Thursday, February 28, at the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Don 't miss out they will be
going fast
mmmmmmm.
f
X
M.
i
��





Stye lEaat Ear0lttrian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM NORTON, General Manager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, n, &�, Tom Luvender, n�,w.4m�,
Scott Cooper, c��-$p�� �� Anthony Martin, bus uamger
Tina Maroschak, s&t Editor John Peterson, o� .���
BILL MITCHELL, CwoJamn Manager BILL DAWSON, Production Manager
Doris Rankins, smmn rick Mccormac, co-spons &&
DANIEL MAURER, Entertainment Editor DECHANILE JOHNSON, Ad Technician
February 28, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Break
Remember These Rules
Wooooow Holy sh No
class for a week. For a week It's
Spring Break. And, as the movie
teasers say, get ready for the raun-
chiest, rowdiest, get-drunk-fall-
do wn-get-back-up-and-go-some-
more week of your life. That's
right, the main reason most of us
come to college for in the first
place has arrived � the chance to
party in Florida � especially Ft.
Lauderdale, the sun and sin capital
of the college world.
For those of you who've never
been, well, just listen to those who
have.
"You bake in the sun and drink
on the beach in the day, have some
frozen drinks in early evening and
then drink and party all night.
You're burnt out by the third
day says a Chapel Hill senior.
And what's it like along the
Lauderdale strip. Well, just listen:
"It is wall-to-wall people and a
great opportunity to meet people
from all different schools said
an anonymous junior from Fayet-
teville.
Then of course there is the
Bahamas, or Disney World (for
the meek and mouse at heart), or
Skiing or, well, home to the folks.
But we just want to tell you the
main things to remember to do
during the next ten days.
Sleep. We know you got enough
missing your eight o'clock classes,
but you did get up for your ten,
right. Well, you deserve that hard-
earned rest. Just remember to
snooze until noon, get up, go to
the bathroom and go back for four
more hours. This should get you
well-rested for the rest of the
semester. Then, maybe, just
maybe, you'll make the eights the
rest of the year.
Eat. If you're at home. Yes,
there you will re-discover the
vegetable. Most are green, and
even though they taste bad, you'll
store up enough of what's good for
you for the rest of the year of piz-
za, hot dogs and spaghettios. Also,
drink plenty of milk. We don't
know why, but just do it.
Don't study. We know you've
done enough of it already. (Hah!)
You'll have plenty of time for that
when you get back. You can cheat
on this one if you have a paper
due, but don't overdo it, okay.
Get sun. For those of you hitting
the beaches, there will be plenty of
this. Remember to do so in
moderation. Of course, if you pass
out on the beach, it's not your
fault and we'll understand why
you have that lobster complexion.
Lastly, do not under any cir-
cumstances come back from Ft.
Lauderdale, Daytona Beach or the
Bahamas and tell those of us who
stayed behind about your wild
time. We don't want to hear it.
Keep it to yourself and refuse to
speak about it even when someone
inquires about the banana eating
contest. It's a rule all us former
Lauderdalians strictly adhere to.
Have fun. See you in a week.
Bravo to the Department of
University Unions Artists Series
Committee for bringing the Rot-
terdam Philharmonic Orchestra to
Wright Auditorium Wednesday
night. The performance was ex-
cellent, judging from the encore
performance James Conlon and
the orchestra had to give.
From a purely non-musical
standpoint, one can only say
thanks for giving students and
faculty the chance to see a major
symphony orchestra. This is its
first U.S. tour since 1977, and its
great Greenville and ECU were put
on its calendar.
Education is closely related to
exposure, the seeing and experienc-
ing of other things. This bit of
culture tonight opened up a new
world to many. Thanks.
mMsirmmTS5mipMsmmiTurWr
FEW6IRLS,PUT50Mg SHARKS IN WWATERWXTWM
ON RRE� PUT KEEP If R6AL� REMSMK?,7H5 ISA POCWPRAMA
The flight Word
Dennis
Kilcoyne
America is in danger. In spite of all
the billions recently spent on defense,
our country today faces a threat of
nuclear attack greater than ever before.
How did this situation develop?
The first answer lies in the arms con-
trol fever which has gripped us for 20
years. Under President Johnson, the
United States unilaterally halted pro-
duction and deployment of intercon-
tinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), a
policy continuing to this day. Since
1960, we have not constructed a single
aircraft capable of delivering nuclear
bombs on the Soviet Union, and our
sea-based nuclear forces have been
upgraded only very slowly. During the
same time, the Soviets have continued a
massive build-up of strategic aircraft,
sea-based nuclear forces and ICBMs.
Over the past 20 years, they have spent
$500 billion on ICBMs alone, while we
have spent almost nothing.
The second point concerns the heart
of American deterrent policy, a doc-
trine known as Mutual Assured
Destruction (appropriately titled
MAD). Military "experts" decided that
the best defense against missile attack is
to have no defense against missiles.
These MADmen reasoned that a pre-
emptive nuclear strike would leave the
aggressor's homeland incinerated by
reprisal. Mutual destruction would be
assured.
To make the doctrine reality, the
MADmen, with the Soviets, hammered
out the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile
(ABM) Treaty, banning virtually all
forms of missile defense, the only ex-
ceptions being the allowance of two
small missile defense fields and early-
warning radars.
'MAD' Mostly Insane
But the MADmen never bothered to
ask themselves if the Soviets also believ-
ed in MAD. Almost before the ink was
dry on the ABM Treaty, the Soviets
began violating it. In 1973, they com-
menced a series of 60 treaty-violating
tests and started construction of a
missile defense radar station near the
central Siberian village of Abalakova.
The Abalakova station is not an early-
warning radar � it is a massive com-
plex built to keep track of hundreds of
incoming missiles, to figure out their
paths and to assign defending missiles
to intercept and destroy them. It's a
treaty buster.
It's bad enough that the Soviets have
engaged in such an alarming build-up.
The danger is multiplied by neglect for
our own forces:
1) If the Soviets chose to strike pre-
emptively at our nuclear forces (and
Soviet military doctrine preaches the
possibilities of winning atomic war), 95
percent of our ICBMs would be
destroyed. Our ICBMs are useless for
retaliation.
2) At present, our nuclear bombers
present little threat to the Soviets. Our
youngest bomber, the B-52 GH, is 25
years old and cannot penetrate Soviet
air defenses, and cruise missiles launch-
ed from B-52s can be easily shot down
by Soviet interceptors.
3) The much-heralded American sea-
launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs)
have one glaring deficiency which
drastically reduces their usefulness:
their accuracy is poor. Consider a
scenario: True to their doctrine, the
Soviets launch attacks on nuclear and
other military targets in the United
States. Our ICBMs and B-52s are large-
ly destroyed, leaving us only with
SLBM retaliatory power. But because
of the poor accuracy of SLBMs, we
could only attack and successfully
destroy urban areas, not the missiles the
Soviets would use in a second strike. If
we attacked their cities, they would do
the same to ours, resulting in some 80 to
170 million Americans killed. So our op-
tions would be suicide or surrender.
The picture is clear. As one promi-
nent nuclear scientist has said, "Our
adversary has created a great force for
the destruction of the military power of
the United States, and we have signed
away the right to defend ourselves
Our nuclear forces are vulnerable to
near-complete destruction while Soviet
missiles are increasingly protected. Our
only "safe" nuclear force, the SLBMs,
are merely first-strike weapons; they are
useless for retaliation, which is what
they are really needed for.
Don't break out your survival kits
yet, though. There is much to be
hopeful for:
1) By the end of the decade, our
SLBMs will possess the accuracy to
destroy military targets (making them
useful for retaliation), thus increasing
their deterrent value.
2) President Reagan's Strategic
Defense Initiative (SDI) presents an op-
portunity for us to drastically curtail
the threat of Soviet ICBMs.
3) Because both superpowers are
making great strides in missile ac-
curacy, the explosive force (megaton-
nage) of warheads is going down. Col-
lectively, our atomic weapons are one-
seventh their size of 25 years ago. In the
near future, "smart" warheads will be
See. RIGHT, page 5
Trends In Higher Education Deny Colleges' Purposes
By DARRYL BROWN
The response of ECU's top two ad-
ministrators recently to the Association
of American Colleges is indicative of the
crisis in American higher education to-
day. The problems with the reactions of
Chancellor Howell and Vice Chancellor
Volpe to the report citing a "decay in the
college course of study and the role of
college faculties in creating and nurtur-
ing that decay" are many; perhaps the
gravest is their denial that a problem ex-
ists at all, and if one does, it certainly
doesn't extend to ECU. Equally alarm-
ing, though, is the attitude that gives rise
to such an opinion. Their very concept
of the university seems to me a primary
source of the trouble in American higher
education.
Howell and Volpe are in dubious but
certainly not undistinguished company.
Their argument rings true of that made
by John Locke 300 years ago; battle
lines of educational viewpoints were
similar in previous centuries. Locke liv-
ed in one of the first ages to argue for a
predominantly utilitarian purpose of the
university rather than an intellectual
one. Since that time there have always
been voices denying the reality that the
latter purpose is propaedeutic to the
former. Volpe and Howell are in that
tradition; in this age, for better or worse
(worse, I think), such opinion now
prevails in the policymaking of higher
education.
Though this chorus has long called for
practical emphasis in curriculums, a pro-
gram to instruct students in the useful
arts rather than the merely enlightening,
an older and even greater school of
thought has argued for a higher duty of
the university. One of the supreme texts
in this tradition is Cardinal Newman's
The Idea of a University; it is a more ar-
ticulate and thorough argument than I
shall ever be able to make against the sell
out of universities as mere technical
schools serving the marketplace, and for
the irreplaceable advantages of a liberal
education. But if one brushes off this
essay as dated, impractical for our
modern age, two contemporary theorists
will do well: Education Secretary
William Bennett in To Reclaim a
Legacy, or the most brilliant living
defender of the university, Philip Rieff;
his book Fellow Teachers should be re-
quired reading for all college faculty and
administrators.
To the accusation that the American
university may be failing in its duty to
educate students, Howell and Volpe
responded with a resounding "No it's
not It is disheartening, to put it mild-
ly, to observe the quality of American
colleges (ECU included), the direction of
their curriculums, and the abilities of
many graduates, and then to hear those
who lead the university deny any need
for improvement.
More astonishing is the analogy
Howell used to describe the college to-
day; it is a radical departure from the
idea of a university that has endured for
centuries. In colleges now, Howell said,
"students are shoppers and professors
are merchants of learning Thus, the
college is a free-enterprise marketplace,
catering its supply to the demands of its
students. Half are still teenagers, most
are too young to buy liquor, yet they
know best how to attain a higher educa-
tion, and the faculty must peddle its
humble wares accordingly. So we have
come full circle: the administration pro-
vides no leadership at all to college
students, lends no guidance, offers no
advice on what one should get from col-
lege, or how to get it. Students know
best; they can see what the job market
calls for, they pay the bills. Give the peo-
ple what they want instead of what they
need.
The upshot of this experiment? It is
the domination of universities by trade
and technical schools. The curriculum
caters to, indeed encourages, majors in
some subject "useful" or "practical
at the high cost of general education.
The College of Arts and Sciences
humbly bows and adjusts accordingly.
Hence, at ECU one can get a minor in
English without studying literature (one
may take, instead, a course in writing
business letters), and the most popular
philosophy course above the introduc-
tory level is the Philosophy of Business
Ethics. Thereby, the purpose of the
university is completely subverted.
English majors chant upon graduation
their greatest achievement: "We've got
jobs, we've got jobs To which
business majors respond triumphantly,
"Working for us, working for us
My purpose is not to suggest that the
university should not be concerned with
the job market; indeed it should. I sug-
gest, rather, that it should not be con-
cerned with only that, and that there are
better ways to prepare students for that
market than specific occupation train-
ing.
Newman faced a similar argument for
practicality in the last century. The
times, many said, with new advances in
science and human knowledge, require
students more specially trained for oc-
cupational, technical, mechanical arts,
with less time spent on such nebulous
ideals as a critical, disciplined, discern-
ing mind. Newman responded brilliant-
ly, arguing that the well-trained, careful-
ly developed intellect is not only best for
the individual and society, but also the
most truly useful. Said he: "General
culture of the mind is the best aid to pro-
fessional and scientific study, and
educated men can do what illiterate can-
not; and the man who has learned to
think and to reason and to compare and
to discriminate and to analyze will not
indeed at once be a lawyer or a man of
business or an engineer, but he will be
placed in that state of intellect in which
he can take up any" such profession.
Such capabilities seem more practical
today than direct vocational training,
when corporations and industries report
that the specific classroom knowledge of
most degrees is outdated in five years,
and more than half of all college
students are in a job unrelated to their
major 10 years after graduation. Ad-
justing to this, training centers and even
full-time schools set up by corporations
are becoming an integral part of
American business life, necessary to
keep employees well prepared in their
profession. This could create a perfect,
unplanned partnership in education.
Colleges can stop letting students shop
around so much and ground them in the
foundations of a liberal education, with
still three or four semesters in a major
both to introduce them to a profession
and to explore a field of study in depth.
Corporate schools (and graduate
schools) can take over the task of
specific job training and on-going pro-
fessional education. Thus the university
can fulfill its original and proper pur-
pose.
Volpe and Howell, in fact, are living
proof against the philosophy they (at
least tacitly) support of training directly
for a profession; they are cases-in-point
that well-trained minds can excell in
fields not spelled out in college text
books. Both are products of academe,
Howell a political scientist, Volpe a
chemist. Yet they are successful ad-
ministrators of a bureaucracy employing
hundreds with a budget of millions.
Their betrayal of liberal education is a
tragic form of apostacy.
Thus their is credence in Newman's
refutation of "the notion that no educa-
tion is useful which does not teach us
some temporal calling, or some
mechanical art, or some physical secret.
I say that a cultivated intellect brings
with it a power and a grace to every
work and occupation, and enables us to
be more useful, and to a greater
number
Universities should not be absolute
democracies, structured on the assump-
tion that freshmen and sophomores
know as well as anyone how to attain the
foundations of their education. The
faculty and administration should be a
voice of authority, providing leadership
� through open dialogue with students,
to be sure, in the best Socratic tradition
� but still a guiding force. It is they who
should be insisting upon the value of
liberal education, instead of catering to
contemporary exigencies that call for
our colleges to become vocational train-
ing centers. Students and faculty are not
shoppers and merchants, but they are
more analagous to a gardener tending
young samplings, plants which have
their own form and direction in which to
grow, but require care, nurture and oc-
cassional pruning.
(Darryl Brown is a sum ma cum laude
graduate of ECU. A former member of
The East Carolinian staff, Mr. Brown
now is pursuing a masters degree in
American studies at the College of
William and Mary.)
Lecture
sii
ti�
h�
:
I
ml
lol
�j
I
Continued From Page 1
"that the best physicians learn to
treat the total patient, including
the emotions. Sometimes the
presence of supportive famiU
members can heal better than a
dose of any medication
"Most people think it is
physical pain that hurts the
most he -aid. "I think it is the
psychological pain that hurts
worse, and it is up to today's doc-
tors to realize tint this is an im-
portant p of their profession
Cash said nc hoped his career as a
family practicitioner would be
able to suit his patients' needs
and realizing what they need to
help them overcome their illness.
The break up of AT&T was the
subject of W.D. Bulloch's "The
Break Up of the Bell System.
What Might America Gain? Or
Lose?" Bulloch is a visiting
faculty member of ECU's
English Department.
He delved mainly into the
history of the Bell System and
AT&T without arriving at an
editorial conclusion until all of
the facts were presented. Bulloch
opened his lecture by stating that
he would not deal with the hard-
ships experienced by telecom-
Right Wo
accurate that they will be non-
nuclear. This fact, coupled with
SDI, will soon make nuclear
weapons obsolete.
� � � �
A recent letter-writer contested
remarks made in a column on the
situation in Nicaragua. .Among
other demonstrations of naiete.
the writer cited a quote by
Nicaraguan Foreign Minister Mi-
quel D'Escoto. Well, I don't care
what nice thing D'Escoto is say-
ing � I watch the mean things he
is doing. Nothing he says can
change the fact that he is a
former fascist who now works
for another totalitarian regime.
And all his weeping and hand-
wringing about the plight of the
poor can't hide the fact that he
lives in a splendid home, com-
plete with a swimming pool, a
gardner and servants. This
hypocrisy was demonstrated by
the liberal Washington Post.
The letter is so devoid of
realism that I challenge the writer
to a debate and am waiting for a
reply.
Another writer, a non-student
-
I
I
RESEARCH
Send $2 for catalog
of over 16,000 topics to
assist your reseaon ef
forts For mfo . can toll-
free 1�r621-5745 (in II
llnois cat 312-922-03001
UTNcrt n�� . - Q- , (,
Thurs. & Fri
Feb. 28th & Mar. 1
THEATRICS
Sat. Mar. 2nd
SEABOARD
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
�I0 GrccBMkr Mvd
TM-JK) UHMS
24 hour To m$ ServK
I Haal RmIA
I
Spring
&
$5
00 o
I
I
I
I
I when you bring in this coupon on
sculptured noils and perm.
I
I
I
I
I
Specializing in
Hair Styling for
Men & Women
214
T
i 4mih
� �- �PM�MMI�I
f
'V
-��esc-
V






THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY28.J98I,
AfJiT.APM
mum
oocmm
nsane
with
ecause
BMs. we
ess fully
iles the
trike. If
-aid do
ome 80 to
So our op-
�-urrender.
. promi-
i, "Our
rce for
power of
have signed
urselves
erable to
hile Soviet
?cted. Our
e SLBMs,
they are
hich is what
u survival kits
;ch to be
decade, our
the accuracy to
dking them
us increasing
Reagan's Strategic
resents an op-
:all curtail
BMs.
powers are
r. missile ac-
rce (megaton-
rig down. Col-
eapons are one-
ears ago. In the
warheads will be
ses
Volpe a
tr� successful ad-
racy employing
millions.
-al education is a
. m Newman's
i that no educa-
not teach us
calling, or some
physical secret.
d intellect brings
a grace to every
, and enables us to
nd to a greater
: not be absolute
ed on the assump-
men and sophomores
nyone how to attain the
their education. The
I I administration should be a
iority, providing leadership
K open dialogue with students,
I he best Socratic tradition
111 a guiding force. It is they who
le insisting upon the value of
ication, instead of catering to
ar exigencies that call for
s to become vocational train-
rs. Students and faculty are not
and merchants, but they are
lagous to a gardener tending
implings, plants which have
torm and direction in which to
t squire care, nurture and oc-
prunine.
Brown is a summacum laude
of ECU. A former member of
Carolinian staff, Mr. Brown
rarsuing a masters degree in
studies at the College of
ind Mary.)
' -�
Ik
Lecturers Discuss Problems
Continued From Page 1
"that the best physicians learn to
treat the total patient, including
the emotions. Sometimes the
presence of supportive family
members can heal better than a
dose of any medication
"Most people think it is
physical pain that hurts the
most he raid. "I think it is the
psychological pain that hurts
worse, and it is up to today's doc-
tors to realize th�t this is an im-
portant p , ot their profession
Cash said lie hopeu his carec as a
family practicitioner would be
able to suit his patients' needs
and realizing what they need to
help them overcome their illness.
The break up of AT&T was the
subject of W.D. Bulloch's "The
Break Up of the Bell System.
What Might America Gain? Or
Lose?" Bulloch is a visiting
faculty member of ECU's
English Department.
He delved mainly into the
history of the Bell System and
AT&T without arriving at an
editorial conclusion until all of
the facts were presented. Bulloch
opened his lecture by stating that
he would not deal with the hard-
ships experienced by telecom-
munication consumers due to the
break up, but rather with the
significantt importance of what
the dissolution of the world's
largest company means.
Bulloch traced the history of
the Bell system from Alexander
Graham Bell's invention of the
telephone to the recent breakup
of the AT&T monopoly, stressing
the company's traditional sense
of mission and its easy coopera-
tion with governmental regula-
tion.
On the subject of the break up
and deregulation of the industry,
Bulloch said that the break up
has "severely reduced the effec-
tiveness of telecommunications
In support of this, he cited the ef-
fect it will have on telephone
rates for rural customers: "the
break up will drive charges closer
to cost he said, "where na
tional averaging once kept rates
more fair He also noted the
loss of significant funds to the
Bell Labs, which under AT&T,
was responsible for many
technical breakthroughs for both
civilian life and military.
Another very important loss,
Bulloch stressed, was the effect
the break up has had on the
business practices of the industry.
"The break up has driven rates to
the fore front and pushed the
spirit of service to the back he
said.
The lack of fully-developed
thinking skills among secondary
school students was the topic of
Richard Miller on Tuesday.
Miller, of the ECU philosophy
department, gave a speech entitl-
ed, "Education and
Democracy
Miller stressed that the
American educational system
does not put enough emphasis on
thinking and reasoning skills in
the middle and secondary
schools. "It is more important
for students to reason than it is to
memorize Miller said.
Educators need to start
teaching children to think and
reason in the sixth or seventh
grade because they are capable of
doing so. Miller said, "trying to
free people to retain facts when
they are capable of thinking is a
waste of time
This neglect of thinking and
reasoning skills is also found in
some of society's most important
institutions. Miller stated that
Right Word
� � �
accurate that they will be non-
nuclear. This fact, coupled with
SDI, will soon make nuclear
weapons obsolete.
� � �
A recent letter-writer contested
remarks made in a column on the
situation in Nicaragua. Among
other demonstrations of naivete,
the writer cited a quote by
Nicaraguan Foreign Minister Mi-
quel D'Escoto. Well, I don't care
what nice thing D'Escoto is say-
ing � I watch the mean things he
is doing. Nothing he says can
change the fact that he is a
former fascist who now works
for another totalitarian regime.
And all his weeping and hand-
wringing about the plight of the
poor can't hide the fact that he
lives in a splendid home, com-
plete with a swimming pool, a
gardner and servants. This
hypocrisy was demonstrated by
the liberal Washington Post.
The letter is so devoid of
realism that I challenge the writer
to a debate and am waiting for a
reply.
Another writer, a non-student
with whom I've been friendly
although we are poles apart
ideologically, credulously
reported that the ECU
Wolverines want to raise student
fees $50 to pay for the survival
kits to be issued in the event of
Soviet attack or invasion. The
suggestion for survival kits is
merely creative and symbolic.
The allegation about raising stu-
dent fees is totally false, a pro-
duct of the faculty rumor mill
which is trying to slander the
Wolverines out of existence. In
the future, concerned students
and faculty should consult Gor-
don Walker, chief Wolverine, to
check the validity of such
rumors.
Readers can consider the
survival-kit ploy as a Wolverine
move similar to the proposal of
the leftist students at Brown and
other universities, who raised
consciousness about the danger
of nuclear war by demanding that
the administration issue poison
pills to those wanting to kill
themselves on day-one of nuclear
war. Wolverines point to the
cowardice of such an act and how
it betrays the ideals of defending
democracy in the face of an at-
tack by totalitarianism.
Eastern North Carolina's
Largest Entertainment Center
RESEARCH
Send $2 for catalog
of over 16,000 topics to
assist your research ef-
forts For info , call toll-
free 180f621-5745 (in II
llnois can 312-922-0300)
tu s r?mr� ' a m
rhurs. & Fri
Feb. 28th & Mar. 1
THEATRICS
Sat. Mar. 2nd
SEABOARD
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 GreeaviHr Mvd
TM-MU 14 Has
24 hour Towing Service
I-Hani Rentals
AMkto
Proudly Presents
BEER NIGHH
Thursday, Feb. 28th
with
The Motown Sound of
Downtown
$2Admissions all Night
Free Beer till 11:30!
Happy Hour after 11:30
plus
Rock 93's Greg Allinson spins your favorite
dance music on band breaks.
Leave the driving to us!
Call The Liberty Ride
at 758-5570
TW's Nitelife, where the music comes alive!
Spring Break Special
V
i

i
i
$5
00 Off
I
I
3 when you bring in this coupon on a set of
i sculptured nails and perm.
I
I
I
I
I
L.
Jackie
Meekel
Becky
Myers
Par
Brannigan Dunn
Specializing in
Hair Styling for
Men & Women
Call 756-8025
214 E. Arlington Blvd.
"Time magazine is written on a
6th grade level" and that is sup-
posed to be "for the informed
citizen Miller cited the recent
presidential election as a good ex-
ample of this concept. He listed
examples such as the emphasis on
which candidate looked older and
who told the best jokes.
Miller stressed that "the lack
of thinking skills is something
that is hampering people across
the board Educators need to
aid in long-term retention, or else
"it's like pouring water into a
leaky bucket he said.
I
� .�� ,��
Call
Pirate Walld
757-6616
Feast like a king
at Pizza Inn's
Noon and Night
Buffets
All You Can Eat!
S&
o
MON TUES & WED NITE
BUFFETS � $3.19
6:00 (ill 8:30 PM
Weekday Noon
Buffet V.
:a5
11:30 till 2:00
$3.09
5&E
wvatSf
�?
Thincrust Pizza
Pan Pizza � Spaghetti
Homcstyie Soup � Salad Bar
Pot pizza out its Pizza Inn
HWY 264 BY-PASS
NEAR HASTINGS FORD 758-6266
Pizza inn.
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar ��,
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, N 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
EMBASSY FILMS ASSOCIATES m . MONUMENT PICTURES -�,�, . ROB REINER,� THE SURE THING
�� JOHN CUSACK � DAPHNE ZUNIGA � VIVECA LINDFORS iU� �� �� NICOLLETTE SHERIDAN
SSffiSS HENRY WINKLER ���& ANDREW SCHEINMAN M: TOM SCOTT � V- STEVEN L BLOOM . JONATHAN ROBERTS
"S ROGER BIRNBAUM
NM&MBBtfiMMHaNB
PG 13
tlnm An Snag CijMmii le Gm Spas
v. ROB REINER
s� mm m Urn � igggj � Y�t cm��i
EE
EMBASSY
tyJdlifilHt.s:Btdusi' time ijocs PC I
TONIGHT!
Thursday, February 28, 1985
8:00 p.m. � One Show Only
Hendrix Theatre. Mendenhall
Limited seats available. Please arrive early for vour seat
- - - � �-�� -�-���� �'w'iiiJiMIJMMIlp!it)JtaBi
f







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Doonesburv
FEBRUARY 28, 1985 Page 6
The Cars On Empty?
(UPI) � The Cars are in the
pink of commercial health, with
their hugely successful Heartbeat
City album having produced five
hit songs and videos, but the
band is strangely unsatisfied.
Instead of concentrating on a
follow-up album or taking a rest
from their national tour, solo
projects are occupying three band
members, including Cars leader
Ric Ocasek and lead guitarist
Elliot Easton.
It is Ocasek's second solo
album and both he and Easton
say they plan for the forseeable
future to alternately make
records with the Cars and by
themselves.
Easton insists his record, due
this month, is "not born of
frustration or any anger and it's
not meant to pose a threat to my
membership in the Cars or any of
that kind of nonsense. All it is is
something to do in the interim
But there are signs nonetheless
that all is not well in the band.
Ocasek speaks of wanting to
make moodier music and, one
day last summer, was sufficiently
disgruntled with his cohorts to
tell a record magazine interviewer
that "95 percent of everything
that happens in this band, I do
"I don't care what anybody
says in an interview situation, I
not only write the songs, I do all
the video stuff, I arrange most of
the stuff and, on top of it, I take
all the praise o r blame for it he
fumed.
He lashed out at Easton in par-
ticular, saying "nobody knows
that everything he plays he's told
to play and he plays exactly what
he's told; and beyond that, if he
&�
didn't, all I'd hear would be blues
licks and scales from the Berklee
College of Music
The affable Easton turns
stonefaced when Ocasek's
remarks are brought up. Calling
it "a dead issue he said,
"We've all made mistakes in life
and I think a sign of friendship is
the ability to let it roll off your
back and say that's OK and
forgive
It's ironic that intraband
squabbling is coming to light
now, considering the rough seas
that led to the megasucess of
Heartbeat City has smoothed
over.
The band's self-titiled debut
LP in 1976 was a critical and com-
mercial success, introducing
listeners to the band's irresistably
commercial yet sleek pop
melodies with Ocasek's odd but
somehow appropriately detached
vocals.
The follow-up, Candy-O, also
sold well, but the critics seemed a
bit cooler. Panorama in 1980 was
hailed for being adventuresome,
but failed to sell well. The Cars
returned to safe ground with the
fourth LP Shake It UP.
They parted ways for the first
time with producer Thomas
Baker on Heartbeat City.
In came fastidious producer
Jeff "Mutt" Lange and the Cars,
who had spent four to six weeks
making every album heretofore,
were in England more than six
months recording soon-to-be-hits
including "You Might Think
"Magic and "Drive
"It sounds contradictory that
you could work on something for
12 hours to capture spontaneity,
5
but there you go Easton said.
"We would keep at it until it
sounded live, or alive
Easton's solo record, which
was recorded in a four-week
period between the Cars album
and tour, proves that he is
capable of more than "blues licks
and scales from the Berklee Col-
lege of Music
Co-written with Jules Shear,
formerly of the critically acclaim-
ed Jules and the Polar bears, the
record is strong '60's flavored
pop, "Shayla" and "Wide
Awake" being the high points.
Easton is planning to tour with
the record. Although he says he
does not feel pressured to sell as
many copies as Cars albums do,
he is hoping it sells well enough
that he will be able to continue
making solo albums.
"Hopefully, each of our in-
dividual projects will enrich what
we have to offer the band. And
when we come back, we'll bring
what we've learned on our own
back to the band and we'll be that
much stronger for it he said,
and then added, smiling, "That's
my excuse and I'm sticking to
it
Shear was introduced to
Easton when he moved to Boston
after the Polar Bears broke up.
Easton produced four songs for
him, including an early version of
"All Through the Night which
Cyndi Lauper later featured on
her album.
As the friendship grew, they
began socializing with another
ex-Polar Bear, Stephen Hague,
and "we'd all sort of help each
MOVB- r
�OES X � . - .
'Jews, �
�-��
IMSiMPl
1 TUX PLAN
Ji
m �- 7i i turn
3L JOA60BI m
QUESTfa 3��
i Dcum - -v.
-gp cts man �
i U � 4
A. � -
HONc'7 W fol
I -
�W?W7
'Heartbeat City' is the Cars' most successful album date, but is i, �2X2
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lao
other out on each other's pro-
jects Easton said.
He said he and Shear started
writin? songs together "for the
sheer pleasure of it" and even-
tually came up with a sheaf of
songs they decided Easton
should record.
After getting the go-ahead
from the record company, Hague
was tapped as producer and two
members of the Chicago-based
band Ministry, Stephen George
and Brad Hallen, sat in for drum-
ming and bass duties.
"I really don't even like to call
it a solo album Easton said.
"Usually when the giutar player
from a well-known band makes a
record, one would come to expect
40 minutes of guitar histrionics
and an excuse to get really self-
indulgent.
"In my case, it was quite the
opposite, really a collection of
songs. It's not an excuse to pack
as many guitar licks as I can onto
a record
t5.a&CF7 �
SOUb 480, T �
� husbhhps &
WERE - -
SBE r
Soprano To Sing March 13
Man-O-Stick
With equal acclaim for her
performance in opera,
recital, and with orchestra,
soprano Marvis Martin has been
hailed by the international press
for the beauty of her voice and
her gift for sensitive communica-
tion. This fine vocalist, termed
the new Leontyne Price, will be
presented by the East Carolina
University Artists Series Commit-
tee on Wednesday, March 13 at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Miss Martin made her debut
with the Metropolitan Opera on
tour in 1982 as Pamina in The
Magic Flute, and returned to the
Met in New York in the 1982-83
season to sing Xenia in
Mussourgsky's Boris Godunov,
the Princess in Ravis's L 'Enfant
et les Sortileges, and the Celestial
Voice in Don Carlos. She has also
sung Liu in Turandot in Bogota,
Colombia and Ismene in
Mozart's Mitridate at the Aixen-
Provence Festival.
Future operatic engagements
include Mimi in La Boheme with
the Seattle Opera in 1985, the
roles in several seldom produced
works: Ilia in Mozart's Idomeneo
with the Netherlands Opera,
Dorinda in Handel'5 Orlando i
Carnegie Hall (with Manly
Home), and Almirena in the
Met's new production of
Haydn's Rinaldo (also with
Marilyn Home.)
Miss Martin has been a fre-
quent guest artist with orchestras
and choral societies. In 1982 she
made her debut with the Chicago
Symphony at the Ravinia Festival
in Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass
and Mozart's Mass in c minor,
both conducted by James Levine.
In 1983 she was guest artist at the
Spoleto USA Festival, perform-
ing in several chamber music con-
certs and also performing in solo
recital. Miss Martin has given
several performances with the
Chamber Music Society of Lin-
coln Center, including the world
premiere of "Nocturne a
Menotti piece commissioned for
Alice Tully's 80th birthday at
Lincoln Center. With the Music
Aeterna she sang Haydn's "The
Creation" at the Metropolitan
Museum, and at Avery Fisher
Huck Finds Adventure In The 80s
UPI � Mark Twain started The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
with a warning to those who
might be tempted to over analyze
his work.
"Persons attempting to find a
motive in this narrative will be
prosecuted he wrote "Persons
attempting to find a moral in it
will be banished; persons attemp-
ting to find a plot in it will be
shot
No telling what he would have
thought about trying to update
the story 100 years later.
Still, it's an interesting thought
� what would a contemproary
equivalent of Twain's hero be
like, what sort of 1980s hell
would he raise, which institutions
would he scoff at0
Some Twain scholars wince at
the thought of updating Huck
Finn, considering it an undertak-
ing akin to asking for a rewrite on
Genesis.
"You can't take Huck Finn
out of his situation said Robert
Hirst of the University of
California at Berkely, who is
heading a project to compile
50-plus volumes of Twain's
works. It wouldn't be the same
thing
"I'm not even sure he needs
updating said writer Justin
Kaplan of Cambridge,
Massachusetts. "If you landed
him on his feet (in the 1980s) he
might not act so differently. He
might be a lot more disgusted
with what he finds, though. But I
think that if you did drop him in-
to today's culture, he might come
out of it unscathed
Bringing Huck into the 1980s
with some semblance of the
values and non-values that Twain
gave him would require transfor-
ming him from a river rat into a
suburban brat. Picture him living
in a blue-collar Southern Califor-
nia suburb with a divorced
unreconstructed flower-child
mother who never had the energy
or familial skills to keep him in
line.
"You'd have to have a ne'er-
do-well who gets into some bad
situations with society said
Professor James Cox of Dart-
mouth, whose Twain writings in-
clude a contribution to a book of
essays being published to mark
the centennial of U.S. publica-
tion of Huck Finn
Like so many 14-year-old kids
in such a setting, he smokes dope
and dabbles with other drugs,
skips school, hangs out at the
mall and shoplifts a six-pack of
beer when he can't pilfer the
money from his mother's purse.
A contemproary Huck also
would be snitching the car keys
and waiting for a
behind-mom's-back opportunity
to go sailing on the highway. He
would have to settle for an in-
terstate as his Mississippi River.
Huck Finn may have been the
original rebel without a cause,
running through life as quickly as
possible with his instincts as his
only guidelines. Even when he
helped Jim escape slavery he did
not act out of sympathy with the
abolitionist movement or even
the personal feeling that he was
doing right.
Today he would have a variety
of left and right-wing issues to
become involved in � nuclear
freeze, anti-abortion, gun con-
trol, anti-communist, pro-
Sandinista, anti-apartheid.
But be assured his involvement
would be accidental, peripheral
and as short-lived as he could
make it.
"He'd like to do the thing
that's easiest and handiest Cox
said. "He has no standards, just
feelings. He takes the path of
least resistance
At the risk of Twain's
posthumous wrath, Cox offered
a profile that applies to American
literature's best bad boy in both
the author's time and the 1980s.
"I think Huck Finn was a
nihilist. He rejects civilization
itself he said. "He says civiliza-
tion isn't evil � just that it's
cramped and he can't stand it
Hall she sang the "Messiah" with
Musica Sacra under the direction
of, J&fhgrd Wetenburg. She
returned to the Metropolitan
Museum with Musica Sacra to
sing Bach cantatas. She sang the
Brahms Requiem with the New
York Choral Society at Carnegie
Hall, later performed this same
work with the National Sym-
phony in Washington, D.C and
appeared with the Washington
Choral Arts Society at their 1982
Christmas concert.
Marvis Martin's extraordinari-
ly praised New York recital debut
was given in 1981 at the 92nd
Street Y as part of the Kathleen
Ferrier Prize awarded her by
Young Concert Artists. She made
her European recital debut in
Nantes, France, and she has also
sung at the 1982 summer Aixen-
Proyence Festival and the Artist
Series of the Ambassador
Cultural Foundation in
Pasadena, California. Future
recitals are scheduled at the Ken-
nedy Center, Alice Tully Hall,
the Morgan Library, the Century
Club, and the Brooklyn Academy
of Music, where she sang a series
of Qershwin. songs. - J 4 k 1
Besides the Kathleen Ferrier
Prizea national award from the
Young Concert Artists Interna-
tional Competition in New
York), Miss Martin's awards in-
clude the 1983 Gold Medal for the
National Opera Institute Com-
petition, and three prizes in the
1980 Concours International de
Chant in Paris: First Prize of the
Paris Competition, Prize for "La
Melodie Francaise and the
Mozart Prize. In 1980 she also
won First Prize in the WGN-
Illinois Opera Guild "Auditions
of the Air which included an
appearance in Chicago at the
Grant Park Concerts summer
festival. In 1981 Miss Martin join-
ed the Met's newly established
Young Artists Development Pro-
gram.
Miss Martin is a native of
Miami, Florida and a graduate of
the University of Miami and the
Manhattan School of Music.
�4r We&C,a
lo'vr cf -ms
'abocst re J
ggg TH& �y
A.
WU(&X�&S'
lev 0K4S?,TS&tA, A
A
i
Walkin' The Plank
CINEMA
Film Provides Plethora Of Suspense
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Inadequate acting and a
dearth of character
development and plot depth
are more than compensated
for by a plethora of suspense
in the new Orion Pictures
release The Mean Season. This
is not a movie for the faint-
hearted, nor for those with a
yen for on-screen soul-
searching, but if you enjoy
riding rollercoasters, it's a
good bet you'll like this movie.
The movie centers around
Malcolm Anderson (Kurt
Russell), a dissatisfied, eight-
year veteran reporter for a
Miami newspaper. Just as
Anderson is about to leave it
all for a small-town
newspaper, he is handed the
story of a lifetime. A girl is
murdered and the killer
chooses Anderson as his con-
tact with the rest of the world,
telling him this is the first of a
series of murders.
As the film progresses,
Anderson is drawn deeper into
the killer's web, becoming a
media figure himself and, for
all practical purposes, an un-
willing partner in the crimes.
The issue of whether Ander-
son should be continuing to
speak to the killer is explored
only briefly, as Anderson's
girlfriend (Mariel Hemingway)
protests his involvement. The
plot is ultimately resolved in a
startling manner, but this issue
remains unresolved.
High Anxiety
THE MEAN SEASON: Produced bv David Foster
and 1 awrence Turman; directed by Phillip Borson
screenplay by Leon Piedmont; based on the novei
In the Heat of the Summer by John Katzenbach
Director of Photography Frank Tidy; music b
Lalo Schifrin; released by Orion Pictures; currentlv
showing at the Buccaneer movie theatre in the
Greenville Square Shopping Center This picture is
rated R
CAST
Malcolm Anderson Kurl Ru$sen
Christine ConnallyMariel Hemingwav
A" DeRichard Jordan
Nolj Richard Mason
With a few small lapses, the
action in The Mean Season is
constant, with very few gaps.
There are several scenes,
however, that are almost ir-
ritating. For some reason, the
writers seemed to feel it
necessary to string the already
involved audience along with
several fake scares. In one,
Russell plays a Psycho scene
while Hemingway is in the
shower; in another, a
"stowaway" appears in the
back of a car. These scenes
were unnecessary and
detracted from the continuity
of the suspense.
The worst scene in the
movie looked like a takeoff on
Raiders of the Lost Ark.
Anderson, in hot pursuit of
the killer, pulls up at a
drawbridge just as it opens.
He stops his car and leaps
across the gap between the sec-
tions of the bridge, just barely
making it. In a movie that
seemed to stick to basics,
without a lot of melodrama,
this was just a bit unrealistic.
The Mean Season didn't
earn its R rating through sex
or violence. There is almost no
nudity and a surprising lack of
blood and gore. In a sense, it
plays on the mind, with things
happening when they're least
expected. It's well worth see-
ing for these surprises,
although it is definitely not a
movie to see twice.
CRfcZto ri;wlXt5T Kiw�,
DO P�5 0 E.�rHPRtLSb Mi
-ntM�. LOVE Wr0 KiOH-T eE.
MIWE. AF�K. X. Mow
You SrWG Vou ou-r" X
"7 r
Uncouth TOOTH
w
�JIJ�j.l
�� �
n
-�r�rr

-JlpSZ �
v






BRl AR 28. 1985 Page 6
5&
�A" ��
�����
;u Photo Lab
I! Ihe�r avt?
d. one vould come to expect
mutes of guitar histrionics
in excuse to get really self-
i m uas quite the
all a collection of
k. It's not an excuse to pack
mv guitar licks as I can onto
ch 13
P .d the Brooklyn Academy
�'�here she sang a series
'��A
des the Kathleen Ferrier
I a national award from the
ng Concert Artists Interna-
Competition in New
Miss Martin's awards in-
: the 1983 Gold Medal for the
tional Opera Institute Com-
lition, and three prizes in the
10 Concours International de
ant in Paris: First Prize of the
is Competition, Prize for "La
fciodie Francaise and the
7art Prize. In 1980 she also
In First Prize in the WGN-
rois Opera Guild "Auditions
� .Air which included an
earance in Chicago at the
lant Park Concerts summer
Jtival In 1981 Miss Martin join-
the Met's newly established
lung Artists Development Pro-
Martin is a native of
ami, Florida and a graduate of
University of Miami and the
lhattan School of Music.
f Suspense
me Hemingway is in the
lower; in another, a
nowaway" appears in the
Ick of a car. These scenes
re unnecessary and
tracted from the continuity
the suspense.
The worst scene in the
)ie looked like a takeoff on
iiders of the Lost Ark.
iderson, in hot pursuit of
killer, pulls up at a
twbridge just as it opens.
stops his car and leaps
ross the gap between the sec-
Jns of the bridge, just barely-
iking it. In a movie that
;med to stick to basics,
thout a lot of melodrama,
Is v. as just a bit unrealistic.
he Mean Season didn't
rn its R rating through sex
violence. There is almost no
dity and a surprising lack of
xxi and gore. In a sense, it
iys on the mind, with things
jppening when they're least
Ipected. It's well worth see-
Ig for these surprises,
)hough it is definitely not a
vie to see twice.
y
v
Doonesbury
okay, mr endicott lets
move on to the domestic
issues do youfavorthe
treasury department's
K TAX SIMPLIFICA -
, VON PLAN? k
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
MRENPICUTT.IMHERE
WITH YOUR WIFE. CAN
HONEY? W JELL US WHAT WVUE
FEELING TODAY?
I PONT KNOW. I DON'T KNOW
WHAT I FEEL. I'VE LOST THE
COURAGE OF MY CONVICTIONS I
HAVE THIS 7ERRJBLE
" URGE TO'PANDER'
I NO LONGER HAVE
ANY DIRECTION1 MY OH MY
SENSE OF PURPOSE GOD
IS GONE11 HAVE
K NO IDEA WHO -
YOU'VE. YOU'VE mi.U&BWT
TURNED HIM SURE. WE'RE STILL
INTO A WAITING FOR LAB
PEMOCRAJI P&ULTS.
MRS. ENDiCQTT, I'M TERRIBLY
- SORRY ABOUT THE TURN IN
'� YOUR HUSBANDS RECOVERY
THERE WAS SIMPLY
; NO'WAYTO FORE-
SEE IT
AS I TOLD YOU WHILE YOU
WERE SIGNING THE CONSENT
FORM. THE SCIENCE Of
POLITICAL TRANS-
PLANTS IS STILL
IN ITS INFANCY
I KNOW YOU DID, DOCTOR I UNDER-
STOOD THE RISKS'I REALIZED THERE
WAS A CHANCE THE OPERATION COULD
LEAVE HIM POLITICALLY
IMmiREP FOR THE
REST OF HIS LIFE1
NOBODY NEW KNOW.
BUT A MA'AM YOUDONTHAVE
-SOB TO REGISTER HIM.
DEMOCRAT'
&3tfMt
Man-O-Stick
urn
Walkin' The Plank
Uncouth TOOTH
JHEEAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY28J9852
ECU
SEMESTER
BREAK PARTY
AT
WEDNESDAY-MArTBX 1985
NO COVER WITH THIS AD OR ECU I.D.
FREE CHAMPANGE AT THE DOOR
Aquitaine
Progression
by
Robert Ludlum
"Great Book to Read when You're Out
Catchin'Those Rays
available at
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center Open 7 days o week 9:30-9:30
WISHING VOU L1VEV AT THE TOWERS? VOU CAN THIS FALL'
CALL TOR VETAJLS ON RENTAL OR PURCHASE. 756-8410
RINCCOLD TOWERS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
student condos at ECU campus
sale and rental units
on-site management
night security personnel
fully furnished and accessorized
carpeted & air conditioned
kitchen appliances furnished
laundry facilities
resident parking stickers
WARD PROPERTY BROKERS
10B COMMERCE STREET
DRAWER 566
GREENVILLE IM C 2783S
919 756-8410
RECORD BAR'S

CODE NAME: Music Intelligence Project
MISSION: Track Down Vital New Music
OBJECTIVE: Expose New Albums Through
Special Prices & Inside Infbrrnation
CONTACT: Any Record Bar Agent
A SENSE OF WONDER
VAN MORRISON
Served two decades creating rock masterpieces
Influenced Seger, Springsteen. & others
New Lp features unigue mix of R&B, Jazz, & Rock
If s no secret: Another classic from a true rock original
6.99 CASSETTE OR LP
poTvaor
ACROSS A CROWDED ROOM
2. RICHARD THOMPSON
� Fcinctedandledlegendafyfcik-rcKAgjoupFAJRPORT
CONVENTION
� Produces passionate songs
� Alkiew essential coltectton of instrumentalty brilliant
and moving music. m
CASSETTE OR LP
VU
V
3. VELVET UNDERGROUND
" 60s band accused of leaving major impact on new
music scene
" Mystery tapes tostfoM 6 years until recent discovery
ROLLING STONE" magazine
MARKETED BY:
PolyGram Records
6.99
CASSETTE OR LP
Record Bar
SALE PRICES GOOD THROUGH MARCH 13TH!
THE PLAZA & CAROLINA EAST MALL

-i a c





THE EAST CAROl IN1AN
Sports
February 28, 198 Page 8
Camels Down ECU At Buzzer
Herb Dixon (21) takes this rebound away from Clarence Grier (33).
He grabbed eight boards in last night's loss to Campbell University.
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sports Editor
John Huffstetler's 18-foot
jumpshot with :12 seconds re-
maining gave Campbell Universi-
ty a 60-58 victory over ECU,
snapping a Camel 19-game road
losing streak.
Senior guard Andrea McGee
did the most damage for Camp-
bell. He hit eight of 10 shots from
the field to lead all scorers with
19 points. Huffstetler finished
with 12 and freshman guard Juan
Austin had 10.
Although the Pirate defense
forced Campbell into 18 tur-
novers, ECU was ice-cold in their
shooting performance. As a
team, ECU shot 43.1 percent
from the floor for the game �
35.5 in the second half.
When center Leon Bass picked
up his second personal foul with
11:02 left in the first half, ECU
coach Charlie Harrison went to
his five-guard lineup.
"I wanted to get some emotion
into our defense Harrison said.
"It just didn't happen tonight
In the last home game of the
season, ECU got off to an early
lead. When William Grady
scored on a layup from Herb Dix-
on, the Pirates went up 4-2 at the
Netters Split Opening Match
The Lady Pirate tennis team
fared well in their opening match,
thrashing UNC-Wilmington 8-1,
however, the men's team was not
so fortunate, as they fell to
Atlantic Christian College 6-3,
In the women's action,
number-cne seed Ann Mander-
field took the first set of her
match 6-3. However, she drop
ped the next set 7-6, and lost the
tie breaker (7-4), to drop the
match to Angie Frazier of the
Seahawks.
Second-seeded Tyraina Myers
had an easy time with her oppo-
nent, as she lost just four games
in her match. She was victorious
6-4, 6-0. After a tough start,
sophomore Susan Brown
outlasted Leanne Barkley to win
her match bv the score of 0-6,
7-5, 6-2.
Freshman Susan Montjoy had
to go three sets before dumping
Allison Sanders 6-1, 4-6. 6-1.
Karla Hove also needed extra
time to knock off her opponent.
After winning the opening set
6-3, she dropped the second set
7-6. This forced a tie breaker, in
which she won 7-5.
In the only other singles match,
Sheila Feeley won decisively 6-3,
6-2.
Manderfield made up for her
singles loss as she teamed with
Myers to win their top-seeded
doubles match easily, 6-1, 6-2.
Brown and Feeley were also vic-
torious in doubles, as they knock-
ed off their opponents 6-3, 6-2.
The freshman team of Montjoy
and Hoye were just as much a
success as they rolled over the
Seahawks' third seed 6-2, 6-2.
Head coach Pat Sherman was
impressed with the girls' perfor-
mance.
"I'm really, really pleased with
the performance of the team
Sherman said. "I'm also pleased
with the progress that the team is
making
The Pirate men ran up against
some tough competition at ACC,
according to Coach Sherman.
"They (ACC) have a strong
team she said. "They're very
experienced. They have mostly
foreigners � two guys from
Sweden, one from New Zealand
and one from India.
"We had some strong
matches Sherman added. "The
play was good overall
The men had a hard time in the
season opener. However, they
managed to win in two single
matches and were victorious in
the top-seeded doubles match.
Davis Bagley, the fifth-seeded
singles player, proved to be a
bright spot for the Pirates. He
surrendered just five games in his
6-2, 6-3 victory. Coach Sherman
was especially pleased with
sophomore's play.
"Davis had a fantastic perfor-
mance Sherman stated. "It was
his best performance ever
The only other singles victory
was from sophomore David
Turner. He defeated ACC's Ran-
jet Shinde 6-1, 6-3.
Captain Galen Treble and se-
cond seeded Greg Willis won the
only doubles match for ECU.
The two won the first set 7-5,
then the ACC players defaulted
the second set.
Despite the loss, Coach Sher-
man feels that the game ex-
perience was good for the men's
team.
"We lost some top people,
which hurt us in our
preparation she said. "This
experience will really help us in
the future
Here is a look at the Spring
season for both of the Pirate
squads.
MEN'S
Feb. 28 UNC-WILMINGTON
18:27 mark. ECU was then
outscored 10-0 over the next three
minutes.
ECU made a comeback of its
own and tied the game 12-12 on a
Keith Sledge 18 footer with 13:10
left in the half. The Camels
retaliated and built a 10-point
lead on two free throws by Austin
with 5:15 left in the opening
period.
The tide turned once again, as
ECU stormed from behind to
take a 30-29 halftime lead. Grady
led the Pirate surge by scoring
seven points in the last three
minutes of the half.
ECU looked as if this momen-
tum would lead to a second-half
blowout. But this was not the
case.
McGee was on fire to open the
second half. He scored the first
11 of Campbell's 15 second-half
points, giving the Camels a 44-34
advantage with 14:36 remaining.
The Pirates came back and cut
the Campbell lead to three
(51-48) on a Curt Vanderhorst in-
side shot with 7:48 remaining in
the game. As the game got into
the final minutes, the intensity
level rose and each Pirate posses-
sion became crucial.
With :55 seconds remaining,
Vanderhorst assisted Sledge on a
short-turnaround jumper. This
shot tied the game at 58-58.
However, Campbell would have
time to set up for a final shot.
As Dixon did to Campbell on
Dec. 13, 1985, Huffstetler did to
ECU on Feb. 27, 1985. His
jumper with :12 seconds left,
lifted Campbell past ECU 60-58.
The Campbell road victory was
their fourth in 64 tries.
"We didn't play particularly
good defense ECU coach
Charlie Harison said. "We had
to stop McGee, tonight we just
couldn't seem to guard him.
"They did a good job of
shadowing Curt all over the
floor Harrison added. "Our
inconsistency for the duration of
the season is our problem. I'm
sorry for the fans that stuck with
us
For the Pirates, Vanderhorst
and Bass led the way with 14
points apiece. Grady and Dixon
added nine each and Sledge chip-
ped in eight.
The Pirates have one more
game before the ECAC South
Tournament in Williamsburg,
Va. ECU will travel to James
Madison University on March 2.
��So Long
With this being the last home
game for the Pirates, Mike Aman
will have to put up his costume
and say so long.
Aman, a senior graduating in
May, has been in 'the Pirate
costume for the past two years.
He explains his past experiences
as being 'great
"I've really enjoyed being the
mascot Aman said. "It really
takes a lot of hard work and
dedication
Aman admits it is a bit difficult
getting motivated for every game,
however the kids always show
their gratitude.
"The kids are always excited
� know matter what the team's
record may be he said. "They
keep me motivated.
"If you don't love ECU, you
shouldn't be in this costume
Aman continued. "You have to
be faithful to the university
Encore
Freshman guard Herb Dixon
was named ECAC South rookie
of-the-week for the second time
this season. The 6-3, Bath, Maine
native scored 30 points and dish-
ed out 24 assists in losses to the
Naval Academy and American
University and a win over UNC-
Wilmington last week. This vic-
tory was the first in the con-
ference for ECU in the '84-85
season.
Carson's Tracksters Impress
Despite Being Outnumbered
March 19CAMPBELL
March 22at Old Dominion
March 23atVCU
March 25HARVARD
"B-TEAM'�
March 27PFEIFFER
March 29at Guilford
April 1at Campbell
April 11ST. ANDREWS
April 12-13at Azalea Tourney
at UNC-Wilmington
April 14 UNC-GREENSBORO
April 16at Pfeiffer
WOMEN'S
March 15CAMPBELL
March 18PEACE
March 22at Old Dominion
March 23PFEIFFER
March 26Ohio University
at Duke Faculty Club
March 27at UNC-Greensboro
March 29HARVARD
�'B-TEAM"
March 30DAVIDSON
April 3at Guilford
April 10 UNC-WILMINGTON
April 15CHARLOTTE
April 19-20ECAC South
Conference Tourney
ECU track coach Bill Carson is
not one to boast about his
athletes before they have proven
themselves.
He chooses to let his team pro-
ve itself quietly before expressing
pre-season optimism. Conse-
quently, Carson approached the
1985 season like most others with
a wait and see attitude. But he
knew there was a lot of potential
in this year's Pirate squad and it
appears that his secret cannot be
kept much longer.
The Pirates generally enter
meets featuring teams bo' larger
in terms of the number c hletes
as well as national re nition.
Therefore, Carson ch ses to
concentrate on the sprint and
relay events in order to maximize
his talent. He has done that very
effectively and this year may be
the best yet for ECU track.
"I feel that we should be a top
ten finisher in the IC4A's Car-
son said. "We have channelled
our program in that direction.
We should run better in the relay.
We have some depth in our
quarter milers and that will free
us up enough to run some in the
open events.
"Our 4 X 100 team never
finished lower than third last year
and I expect our times to im-
prove he continued. "It will
still be difficult for us to score in
bigger meets when we only enter
eight of nineteen events
Freshman Lee MacNeil
qualified for the NCAA's in his
very first meet and has run off a
streak of eight wins without a loss
in the 55-meter dash. The St.
Pauls, NC, set a new ECU in-
door record with his 6.20 clock-
ing in the event. Track and Field
News does not recognize times
registered on over-sized tracks,
however, the time would place
MacNeil in fourth place among
collegians this year.
Craig White is expected to have
another excellent season running
the hurdles for the Pirate
tracksters. White, who also plays
football fdr the Pirates, has
already broken his own school-
record time in the 5 5-meter
hurdles with a clocking of 7.25.
Chris Brooks is also expected
to have a fine season on the
hurdles, having already registered
a time 47.18 in the open
400-meters in an early-season
meet. The time should place him
among the Track and Field News
top ten for the event.
Ken Daughtry shattered the
school record with a clocking of
1:02.82 in the 500 meters.
Daughtry combines with Julian
Anderson, Rueben Pierce and
Phillip Estes on what may be the
strongest mile-relay team in the
school's history. Anderson has
been timed at 1:09.61 over 600
yards, fourth best among col-
legiate runners in 1985. Pierce is
one of ECU's most talented
sprinters ever, while Estes has
had an exceptional workout
season and may play a key role in
the success for the Pirates in 1985.
To say that the Pirates have
gained some attention would be
an understatement. Coach Car-
son has been notified that
Southern Methodist was impress-
ed with ECU's showing in the
Bud Light Invitational and will
sponsor the team's trip to par-
ticipate in the SMU Invitational
held in Dallas.
"I will be pleased if we place in
the big meets as well as we did
last year Carson said. "I expect
us to run faster and use more
athletes than we were able to last
season. Staying healthy is the key
to our season
The Pirates appear to be get-
ting stronger and stronger as the
outdoor season approaches.
Without question, a lot of in-
terested eyes will be focused on
the purple and gold of the ECU
tracksters as they end their in-
door season and begin looking to
their outdoor competition.
Next for the Pirates is the
prestigious IC4A's in Annapoils,
Md on March 2-3.
Lady Bucs Defend Tourney Championship
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The Lady Pirate basketball
team will try to defend their
ECAC South Tournament
Championship this weekend in
Richmond, Va.
ECU won the inagural event
last season, which was held here
in Greenville. They defeated
George Mason in their opening
game 68-41. They trounced Rich-
mond 54-39 in the championship
game to win the tournament.
The Lady Pirates breezed
through the regular season
schedule, losing only on the road
to UNC-Wilmington. This loss
stopped their winning streak at 15
games.
Although ECU experienced a
slight letdown in their last four
games, Pirate head coach Emily
Manwaring expects her team to
be ready to play in the tourna-
ment.
"We were under a lot of
pressure to keep our winning
streak going, and I think that ef-
fected us Manwaring said.
"When it comes tournament
time, I know we'll be ready.
The Lady Pirates are definately
the pre-tourney favorites, and
playing the role of the hunted
does not bother Manwaring at
all.
"We have enough talent, and
if we want it bad enough we
should win it she said. "Every
team in the field is capable of
winning the tournament, but we
should be the team that is ex-
pected to win. We had the best
record in the regular season, and
played the best throughout the
year - - I expect us to win it
Emily Manwaring
The Lady Pirates receive a bye
to the semi-finals of the tourna-
ment, which begins on Friday.
ECU plays the winner of the
game between George Mason and
the team that finishes fifth in the
regular season standings. The
other team in the bracket will pit
the winner of the Richmond-
American game. The game is the
final regular season contest in the
ECAC South, and will determine
who finishes fifth as both teams
are currently tied with 3-8
records.
Although ECU's chances of
winning the ECAC South tourna-
ment are good, the probability of
advancing any farther is unlikely.
Winning the tournament does
not, at present, insure an
automatic bid to the NCAA
Tournament.
"The chances of us receiving
an at-large bid (to the NCAA) is
very slim, since we lost that game
to Wilmington Manwaring
said. Their overall record was on-
ly 14-10, but if we would have
won and then won the tourna-
ment, I think we would have got-
ten some notice with a 19-game
winning streak
Even though the Lady Pirates,
in all likelihood, won't make the
NCAA tournament they do have
a lofty goal within reach. Two
wins in the conference tourna-
ment would give ECU its first
20-win season since the 1980-81
campaign.
"I said we were going to win 20
games going into this season
Manwaring said. "And I want to
keep my prediction integrity in-
tact.
The ECAC South All-
Conference team will be an-
nounced at the Banquet the night
before the tournament. The team
is chosen by position, with a
center, two forwards and two
Anita Anderson (42) and the rest of her teammates will try to repeat
tournament champions in the ECAC South this weekend.
guards making up the squad.
ECU could conceivably end up
with no players on the all-league
team, despite having the best
record in the ECAC South. Since
conference statistics include all
games played, opposing players
roll up impressive numbers
against lesser competition.
"The procedure for how we
select the all-conference team
needs to be changed Manwar-
ing said. "We should select the
top-five players regardless of
position, using only statistics
from actual league games. We
played games outside the league
against Old Dominion, South
Carolina (twice), North Carolina
and North Carolinia State, while
the other team's did not play
anywhere near that kind of
schedule
With only the Tournament
left, Pirate junior guard Sylvia
Bragg only needs 30 points to
become the ninth all-time 1,000
point scorer in ECU history. She
is currently in ninth place behind
Leora "Sam" Jones on the
Pirates career-scoring list.
Senior center Anita Anderson
has also made her mark in the
ECU record books. She blocked
35 shots over the course of the
27-game regular season, the fifth
highest total in Lady Pirate
history. She is the fourth all-time
shot blocker in ECU history.
Hoops
After doing almost eight years
of college basketball for NBC, I
think it's time to speak out about
t the dangers of the TV explosion
that threatens to engulf the sport
today.
Just take a look at your
newspaper or TV Guide, It's
frightening. If you have a dish,
and want to get all the cables, I
guarantee you there's not a
Saturday thet you don't have a
pick of 10 to 15 top-flight college
basketball games.
The problem is that the college
season today is geared for max-
imum TV exposure. That's
because the regular season is not
run out of Shawnee Mission, Ka.
Only the NCAA Tournament is
run by the NCAA.
The result is that the regular
season has become more and
more structured for college TV,
with all 250 Division-I schools
looking to create their own feif-
Sultans Up
dontj
pen-
its o
ball
worsl
backl
W
hapj
the
heavi
won'
filiatl
natu
numl
sponj
that
CoIU
ages
TH
iTlUCI
candl
you'
storel
you
We'rl
a stej
Fi
a go(
had
weeM
that
treat,
garm
I
prob
the
that
there
gam el
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Suff � riler
Spring break could never have
come at a better time. Memorial
Gym will need at least a week to
cool down from all the net action
of IRS basketball.
Upsets seem to be the name of
the game as the men's indepen-
dent finals Thursday night could
crown a new and relatively
unheard of squad. The season's
top ranked and vurtually unques-
tionable pick for the All-Campus
title, The Clique, was knocked
out of their chance at this
season's title by rival Sultans of
Swat.
Granted, the nets are still hot
from all the action, but who took
them lhera-Hy? WeH, the Skoal
Brothers literally saw the fire as
the obviously under rated Heat
defeated Skoal to win a chance at
the divsional finals.
John's Gang, mentioned
momentarily in the race for the
championship, meets Unknowns
II for their shot at the indepen-
dent title. While, the Ha Beens
atter
lookii
final;
Thl
game
ed,
not
breai
char
will
All-i
post-
Th
onlv
The
men-
Sneai
awav
In
Jim
the
off
Pinn
otheri
Ed Jl
knocl
Gleni
Tl
no v
K -
This Wa
In Downtown
Free Co
Ken He
Saturday
Doors Open At 8:0
Concert At 9:00
The No. 12 Choi
JUST RIGHT FOR
STEAKONABUDG
Served With Your Choice Of Pc.
And Onions Or Mushroom GrasA I
WE PUT rr OH THE PLATE

�mmmmm
���
77

I fT





PageS
t Buzzer
iv e
P i
It)
Aman, a senior graduating in
May, has been in 'the Pirate
costume for the past two years.
He explains his past experiences
as being 'great
"I've really enjoyed being the
mascot Aman said. "It really
takes a lot of hard work and
dedication
Aman admits it is a bit difficult
getting motivated for every game,
however the kids always show
their gratitude.
"The kids are always excited
� know matter what the team's
record may be he said. "They
keep me motivated.
"If you don't love ECU, you
uldn't be in this costume
Aman continued. "You have to
be faithful to the university
Encore
t
I
Freshman guard Herb Dixon
was named ECAC South rookie
f-the-week for the second time
season. The 6-3, Bath, Maine
native scored 30 points and dish-
ed out 24 assists in losses to the
Naval Academy and American
University and a win over UNC-
Wiimington last week. This vic-
tory was the first in the con-
ference for ECU in the '84-85
season.
Impress
umbered
school's history. Anderson has
been timed at 1:09.61 over 600
yards, fourth best among col-
legiate runners in 1985. Pierce is
one of ECU's most talented
sprinters ever, while Estes has
had an exceptional workout
season and may play a key role in
the success for the Pirates in 1985.
To say that the Pirates have
gained some attention would be
an understatement. Coach Car-
son has been notified that
Southern Methodist was impress-
ed with ECU's showing in the
Bud Light Invitational and will
sponsor the team's trip to par-
ticipate in the SMU Invitational
held in Dallas.
"I will be pleased if we place in
the big meets as well as we did
last year Carson said. "I expect
us to run faster and use more
athletes than we were able to last
season. Staying healthy is the key
to our season
The Pirates appear to be get-
ting stronger and stronger as the
outdoor season approaches.
Without question, a lot of in-
terested eyes will be focused on
the purple and gold of the ECU
tracksters as they end their in-
door season and begin looking to
their outdoor competition.
Next for the Pirates is the
prestigious IC4A's in Annapoils,
Md on March 2-3.
nship
guards making up the squad.
ECU could conceivably end up
with no players on the all-league
team, despite having the best
record in the ECAC South. Since
conference statistics include all
games played, opposing players
roll up impressive numbers
against lesser competition.
"The procedure for how we
select the all-conference team
needs to be changed Manwar-
ing said. "We should select the
top-five players regardless of
position, using only statistics
from actual league games. We
played games outside the league
against Old Dominion, South
Carolina (twice), North Carolina
and North Carolinia State, while
the other team's did not play
anywhere near that kind of
schedule
With only the Tournament
left, Pirate junior guard Sylvia
Bragg only needs 30 points to
become the ninth all-time 1,000
point scorer in ECU history. She
is currently in ninth place behind
Lcora "Sam" Jones on the
Pirates career-scoring list.
Senior center Anita Anderson
has also made her mark in the
ECU record books. She blocked
35 shots over the course of the
27-game regular season, the fifth
highest total in Lady Pirate
history. She is the fourth all-time
shot blocker in ECU history
Hoops Suffi
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1985
After doing almost eight years
of college basketball for NBC, I
think it's time to speak out about
the dangers of the TV explosion
that threatens to engulf the sport
today.
pen� (LSS dSK,S TV� tCO man networks- cables
h!L r 8? scasSn has lost � independents. ESPN does 90
MSTiA 2 ? ��. season alone. We're get-
ball in 1984, which will only get
worse in 1985, and we must get it
back.
What eventually is going to
happen, will be oversaturation of
the product to the extent that the
heavyweights, NBC and CBS,
ting to the point that we're
creating the complete arm-chair
fan, a remote-control wizard,
who cheers from his living room.
The rationale is simple: Why
put on your whole overcoat and
boots, go out in the winter, fight
ur�n�t k� �ui . i �7 .�v lv"l3� 8� �ui in me winter, iignt
Just take a look at youi
newspaper or TV Guide, It's
frightening. If you have a dish,
and want to get all the cables, I
guarantee you there's not a
Saturday thet you don't have a
pick of 10 to 15 top-flight college
basketball games.
The problem is that the college
season today is geared for max-
imum TV exposure. That's
because the regular season is not
run out of Shawnee Mission, Ka.
Only the NCAA Tournament is
run by the NCAA.
The result is that the regular
season has become more and
more structured for college TV,
with all 250 Division-I schools
looking to create their own feif
filiates in line to broadcast their
national package, and get the
number of viewers needed so a
sponsor will pick up the tag. At
that point, the whole show goes.
College basketball's TV dark
ages will begin.
The problem is, there's too
much of a selection now. It's the
candy store syndrome. Anytime
you're allowed to go into a candy
store to eat anything you want,
you won't come back as often
15 to 20 dollars when you go back
home, just to watch college
basketball live, when there's pro-
bably a better game on the tube?
Chicago is one of the big reasons
why DePaul is where it's at to-
day, and why they've got guys
from San Diego, Los Angeles,
Flint, Mich Queens and Philly.
Guys who didn't know who Ray
Meyer was until they tuned in
Super-Channel Nine.
Don't get me wrong, I don't
think DePaul knew they were set-
ting a trend. They just happened
to be in Chicago, which had
channel nine. But what happen-
ed, it alerted all the other top-
mL� r . z �� " �ncu an me omer top-
What this does is dry up the recruiting coaches to get on TV at
lVl:ir�n-II anH III chnnU nA �. .
Division-II and III schools and
shrinks their paid attendence.
Worse still, it dries up the high
schools. And when you do that,
you're killing grass-roots basket-
ball.
What we have to do is allow
the high schools Tuesday and Fri
u�'rA tnii u V . "�. HiBii suiuuis i ucsaay ana rn-
. HLtalkm� aboutJhe �ale of day nights in each time belt from
a steak, not th� ctooL- tcu ,
a steak, not the steak itself.
Five years ago, if wanted to see
a good intersectional game, you
had to tune into NBC on the
weekend. Period. A game like
that had sizzle because it was a
treat, something special, the only
game in town. Now, there's so
much steak available, it's in
danger of losing its lure. Another
problem in all this � thanks to
the expansion of networks � is
that every night of the week,
there's X amount of quality
games. There's just too much
7-10:00 pm, free of pro or college
basketball, so their budgets can
breathe, so people will go watch
them. And we have to give the
Division-II and III schools their
Wednesdays and Fridays, so they
can get enough warm bodies in
the door to pay the referees.
The reason for the college TV
explosion is not the dollar, like
most people think. What's more
important to the coaches is the
exposure, for recruiting pur-
poses. Super-Channel Nine in
any cost Give it away if you have
to, but get on the tube.
So now almost everybody's got
a network, and there's so many
different games now, that
nobody can get a big audience,
because it's become so diluted. It
used to be, when there was just
two networks, NBC and CBS,
that sponsors could be sure to get
about half the audience, big
numbers, all things being equal.
Now you've got to divide that au-
dience by 20, so the sponsor
won't pay the money, because
their in the minus pool with Mr.
Neilson, and nobody is making
money. The latest example was
just last week, when the Big-10
had to take over its telecasts,
because its licensee was losing
money.
� 6 1UC1C: -�u:1 lo� m"cn poses. Super-Channel Nine in money
Sultans Upset Clique In IRS Basketball
ifi�iitKO,H attempt to out shoot the Bandit. nair �� �a a-�. .
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff W rflor
Spring break could never have
come at a better time. Memorial
Gym will need at least a week to
cool down from all the net action
of IRS basketball.
Upsets seem to be the name of
the game as the men's indepen-
dent finals Thursday night could
crown a new and relatively
unheard of squad. The season's
top ranked and vurtually unques-
tionable pick for the All-Campus
title, The Clique, was knocked
out of their chance at this
season's title by rival Sultans of
Swat.
Granted, the nets are still hot
from all the action, but who took
them literally? Wen, the Skoal
Brothers literally saw the fire as
the obviously under rated Heat
defeated Skoal to win a chance at
the divsional finals.
John's Gang, mentioned
momentarily in the race for the
championship, meets Unknowns
II for their shot at the indepen-
dent title. While, the Has Beens
attempt to out shoot the Bandits,
looking forward to the divisional
finals.
The women's championship
game has already been determin-
ed, but due to deadlines, it will
not be printed until after spring
break. Look for the divisional
champions and how their road
will be paved on the way to the
All-Campus championship in the
post-break issue.
The b-ball courts are not the
only hot items worth mentioning.
The racquetbail doubles tourna-
ment came to a close with
Sneaker Sam's top picks walking
away with the championships.
In the men's-open division,
Jim Hunt and Raymond Song,
the defending champions, held
off Steve Ammons and Brady
Pinner to win the division. The
other men's-division title went to
Ed Jiminez and Ed Smith who
knocked off Carl Bradsher and
Glenn Hamelton.
The women's champs came as
no surprise. Robbie Tweed and
Kim Swinson, the top-seeded
pair, met and defeated Cheryl
Curtis and Kim Adams.
Tennis doubles, team hand-
ball, co-rec volleyball and manv
outdoor activities are on the
March agenda. Check out all the
IRS info in room 204 Memorial
Gym or call, 757-6387.

See What You're Missing
A simple and painless
examination can be your first
step in treating and correcting
many common ailments.
Contact lenses can give you a
whole new outlook, and the new
soft lenses make them easier to
use than ever!
Hours by appointment,
evening hours available. Call us
now
Student discounts on
lenses and supplies, whatever it
3o it.
DR. DENNIS A. O'NEAL
Optical Shop
Telephone
756-6600 or 758 259?
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concert
Ken Helser
Saturday March 2
Doors Open At 8:00
Concert At 9:00
�758-6600 or 758 ?59?
i CAMP TON-A-WANDAH l
Student Opportunities
We are looking for girls interested in be-
ing counselors � activity instructors in a
private girls camp located in Henderson-
ville, N.C. Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WSI), Horseback riding, Ten-
nis, Backpacking, Archery, Canoeing,
Gymnastics, Crafts, also, Basketball, Com-
puters, Soccer, Cheerleading, Drama,
Nature study, Field Hockey. If your school
offers a Summer Internship program we
will be glad to help. Inquiries � Morgan f
Haynes, P.O. Box 400 C, Tryon, NC
28782.
CONSOLIDATED
THfHHfS
ADULTS $100 TIL 5:30 � SSSfffsiJt
�J ���
The No. 12
JUSTRIGHTFOR "
STEAK ONABUDGET
Sirloin
1.99 j
I hufc l
No. 12 $1
Tues. and Thurs
For Lunch
and Dinner
Potato Fixin's
Bar
Your Meaf
t�
Hills Cop"
jjJSJJLA RatedR Red-R 1
f 1-3-5-7-9
"Beverly
ENDS TODAY
2-5-8:15
Killing Field"
ENDS TODAY
7:00-9:00
"Mean Season"
CHUCK NORRIS
AN AMERICAN HERO'S
STORY CONTINUES.
UllSSWG
CANNON
The Beginning
MCMUUi CANNON PRODUCTIONS N l

folTE
Rated X
In Color
FRISAT.
OPEN
11:00 PM
STARTS
11:30
NO
PASSES
THE BITE IS DEEP.
THE LUST IS
FOREVER, . .
Staffing
Annette Haven � Seka
John Leslie
Jamie Gillis
wmmmmmmmmm
Classifieds
WANTED
40 PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self-addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Program
Director, Waterfront Directors, Ac
tivity Director, Head Counselors,
Cabin Counselors, and Activity
Leaders for YMCA co-ed camp.
Camp Kanata, Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, NC 27587. (919) 556 2661.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mountains have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
(WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
basketball), gymnastics,
artscrafts, pioneering, music
photography, drama, dance,
generals. Write: Professor Bob
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 94
Leamington St Lido Beach, NY
11561.
RIDE WANTED: Need a ride to
New Jersey for spring break. May
be able to leave Thurs. evening. Will
pay part of the gas. Call 752-099, ask
for Dan.
MOVING: Need person or group to
rent 2 bdrm townhouse apt really
nice $320mo. Free twin beds before
March 15. JimBob 7 3577 after 6 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Outgoing,
upper classman to share 3 br.
townhouse not far from campus. On
ly $150 month no utilities. Call
756 8428
SANDWICH SHOO
Happy Hour - 2 pm-6 pm
DAILY
60 oz. Draft $1.75
Corner of 4th & Reade
Downtown

u
�r.
V
Vr
101' 5 u Downtown
NEW MBUM
PREVIEW
WZMB'5
PERMANENT
WME 10-12
n, free: KEG
-�SEB1M6. BREAK 1
A great new book from HUMANlnceraction
Subtle winning ways to tell someone they like you!
H
OWTO
ONDAY
lf y�J want a date for Friday.
Nothing attracts people to each other
like certain subtle signals. YOU can
learn whjn they are and how to use
themwith CONFIDENCE to make some-
one feel you're special. Benefit as
you enjoy reading of the first-hand
experiences of others, like yourself,
�trying to attract someone they like
No, you don't have to be beautiful,
Iwealthy, popular or unique in any way
I these tt-sted winning ways do work
Ifor everyone willing to try them.
We know how you feel about first encounters. Maybe you
are afraid to approach someone � scared you will be
rejected, or worse yet. laughed at or put down. Per-
haps you re missing your chance to meet someone that
you find interesting because you don't know the right
way to go about it. Worry no more.
"HOW TO FLIRT ON MONDAY" was written especially
for you to overcome these fears and to give you
new self-assurance. Discover how to make shyness
work for you. Know why "acting out of character-
is always the wrong thing to do. Learn how to use
the verbal handshake" technique plus many more
subtle approach ideas you nave yet to think of
Read how a mere glance, scent or smile can ignite
a relationship and be sure
that you're using them the
right way.(You'll know you
know how!) Chapters also
uncover many sensitive areas
no one ever tells you about
but we tell it like it is
with humor and warmth. If ever
you've wanted someone you like
to "want to" know you then
this book is a must! You won't
put it down til it's finished.
How IO
jGXL Monday
I
"Hi
Box 1091, Shalimar, FL 32579
Please send a copy of HOW TO FLIRT ON MONDAY in a
plain envelope.(great gift item!) My payment of
$9.95 (plus $1.05 postage and handling) is en-
closed. I may return the book anytime within ten
days of delivery for a full refund. C
mm
I
o m, ' �. �.

V
iyiigmglt�jW(iM��� mm - mammmm
��-��.�.��� ttmifmfmmmyi ��
��!��






10
Hi i S i K(H INIAN
I I BKt K 28, 1985
HBO3 WANTED: Person for strip
on tor singing telegrams to
� 'on bouquets. Serious in
( all Trturs. or Fri. at
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
bedroom house, own room,
of space Pets encouraged
5 355 5318
PKRSONAL
MA PHI EPSILON & ALPHA
ma PHI: Little sisters will be
: another Beer Wars Happy
TONIGHT AT BEAU'S So
our Partv Clothes and let us
n the Spring Break Spirit
01 ' y about il.AT
ST YOU GET MAIL
led v I zens
CAROL BLUE: It was a quick buck
- I OVED IT! Obviously you
fcCU the way we do, so
,Ou GET THE HELL
e you not good enough"
to v our mama" You
lave the attitude to be
Mr. EC Daddy
tS Ya beautiful, we love ya!
�.tiii burnin' up for your
ans.
MOLE AND TREECE: Tho
d weekend. Georgetown
an experience girls
and, bar hopping, beer
id bitch sessions with the
Treece, you'd make a mink
mommy We're looking for
� � the next road trip! It i
Maryland but we'll "ti
anyway even on the
ive ya! Sne
ant wait for my pr
L.D
r's almost � e to
ne. The exp
e There will be
an island dream and
"ner bunch a 'ne corner in
Florida scene) So be sure tc
t . ' please be care. & i
it's ea
�;n to smile and
o be clever! PS. The Bahama
� s Sue for a ten

G:
!
PRETTY BOY I've enjoyea
;ether You have
.ay of making me laugh ana
e. One cest thing-
TO ' t?ppy 20tl
e better for the
IS. Hapc OVE YOU!
FOR SALE: Bicycle frame. 57 cm
Road racing frame, Colombus SL,
Cinelli Lugs, Campy Drop Out, lm
ron Paint, Specialized Headset,
English Thread bottom bracket
Built by Nobllette of Ann Arbor, Ml
Perfect condition Call 338 3178.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted
Responsible party to assume small
monthly payments on spinetconsole
piano Can be seen locally Write:
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P O. Box 520,
Beckemeyer iL 62219
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: IBM
Correcting Typewriter Experienc
ed typist will do all types of typing!
Call Debbie at 756 6333
FOR RENT: Private room I block
from campus. $75 per month and '4
utilities Call John at 758 9856 or
752 4039
FOR SAL E: '81 Honda CB650Custon
MT LLE. 5,000 miles, cover, ADJ.
Sack rest & luggage rack $1500 with
helmet. 752 6359 Before 1030 a.m.
Tu 8. Thurs
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Sunday: March i, 1985
Lb
ISO ehoie Round Whale
10-12 lbs. Av. - Sliced FREE!
Sirloin
FOR SALE; Schwinn 10 Speed bike
Very good condition Call 752 1989
FOR SALE: General Electric air
conditioner I year old Good condi
tion $90 Call 752 1989
FURNISHINGS FOR SALE: Lamp,
bookcase chair, desk, drafting
table owner must sell, prices
negotiable in the extreme You could
walk off with the lot for $150, but will
sell pieces individually Call "Ace"
at 758 8552
POINSETTIA BEACH INN On the
Ft. lauderdae snp and ocean
Special spring break rates for
students of ECU Call 1 305 527 1800
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pirkguard, case
and strap included Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert
6 SPACES LEFT: For Sprmg Break
at Daytona, Beaih front ,rs� � ome,
first serve, call Dean at 752 5588 or
H evin at 752 97
MOBILE HOME FOR RENl
Clean, neat, 2 bedroom ' batr
furnished withii 5 minutes If
campus $17S per month Call
746 337 1 rtler 6 p I
TYPING SERVICE Word ;
cessor 105 N Elm Street Resumes,
letters theses, term papers, etc A
curate, dependable service Can
Ben, L aws at 752 1454
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All tpmg needs 758 824
7 58 5488
USDA
CHOICE
USDA Choice Beef Rib Sliced FREE'
10-12 Lbs. Average
USDA Choice Beef Rib
Rib Eye Steak
u 3.98
We reserve the
L right te limit
USDA Choice Beef Round
Sirloin
Tip Roast
quantities.
Lb.
USDA Choice Family Pack
Cube
Steak
Alpha s i c 5.
ard. No other
candidates need apply. Ga Tech has
THE KING OF ALPHA SIGMA
PHI. 3aj-s he hopes eve as a
gree Break
MAD DOG: Cool be
hose guvs from State Hope
were ed from wrestling.
' ana lose those tan
j Broad
CAROLINA SUCKS dislike
Care g Ed Golden Hearts are
ng "Carolina S - mumper
Front oi - eStudent Supd
ore & around campus
THE BROTHERS PLEDGES AND
GOLDEN HEARTS OF SIGMA PHI
EPSILON: � e to wisr
everyone a very safe and prosperous
Spring Break
SIG EP & ALPHA SIG LITTLE
SISTERS: Hope ysiI have a great
Happy Hour We're looking forward
aismg he with ou all once
again! The Sg Eps
START SPREADING THE NEWS:
We'll be there Saturday. We're gon
na oe a part of if in old NEW
YORK! ! WATCH Ol
DELTA ZETA: washes everyone a
WILD but safe Sprmg Break! Get
toasted" and come back and enter
our "Best Tan" contest at Elbo!
Congratulations to Tina, Brenda,
and Nancy on their awards at Pro
vince Day in High Point We love
ou!
NICK, WOODY, JEN, MARK,
JANET, TODD and DAWN: Get
ready to blow it out in Florida! Let's
make it the best Your fellow Party
Animal, Cheryl.
BUBBA: Our Lauderdale chauffer.
Be read for the snow to fall while
the sun snines PG 8. EF
ARE YOU TRYING TO TELL ME:
That nobody is going to DETROIT,
or just MICHIGAN for SPRING
BREAK?' Make it a last minute
thing . we have the bucks and the
place t stay Call KATHY 758 8016.
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
iaundry service Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
ca. 758 3087. DON'T BE
SCARED leave Jack a message
and save $50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4 speed,
l0W mileage. Only one owner. Gets
good gas mileage call after 5 30.
758 4689
v&T
117159
California Navel
Oranges
Greenvillf
Imported Chilean
Plums & Nectarines
V
Lb. .99

WWrW
Plcg. of 6 - 12 Oz. Cans
Meister
(3
.
m
z
tfeWS
n
isp LIBRARY
it
This week's feature
Volumes 6 & 7
Numbers 1-10
$259
BANTAM BOOKS.
PLUS FREE
Volume 19!
A Guide To Fun
& Learning
With purchase of Vol. 2
Greenville
2 Liter Diet Pepsi Pepsi-Free Diet Pepsi-Free
If? v z
8 Oz. - Wise Puffed Crunch
Cheez
Doodles
6 5 Oz. Cal Food - Chicken Turkey
a. a i
m 2"
NW; 96 02 Downy
aV
6800 EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
Fabric
Softener





�'�






MOT
Smooth on new Extra Rich Edge Gel and
you'll never go back to an ordinary shave. Because now
you've got 4C 6 more rich lubricants than the leading
foam, t get everything you might expect in a
. And something you didn't An extra-
.ce in comfort.
.JHNARY CLOSENESS AND COMFORT
For a 19 x 25 fuM color poster of this ad, send $3.00 check or money order payable to Edge Ptv
Madison, Wl. 53714. Allow 4 -6 weeks. Offer valid while supplies last. Void where prohibited.
ayable to Edge Postrr Offer: P.O. Box 8944,





X
MOVIE
COVER
FACES
.
INTERVIEW
DIRECTORS
I 1 I I 'I ll (: I t t"
I 111! I U I L �
- N ll ' '
ll s I II.I II
BEHIND THE SCENES
i I.H iiiIimii -iv
I' I h t � 1 1111 I
IM ' I I I 1 I It' I I I
COMING SOON
ii �





-
Tender Moments with
a Motorcycle Mama
herilyn Sarkasian was a
very shy girl, with large
hm1i eves. B) age twelve,
he had perfected the tonn
of an autograph � Cher �
that she, when she grew up and became
an actress, would graciously give to lans.
By sixteen she left home, still dreaming
of being an actress. At nineteen she was
half of a singing team. Sonny and Cher,
which sold lour million copies of its first
record. In due time she owned .1 :1 room
Beverly Hills mansion with a thousand
gowns in its closets. She still wanted to
he an actress. Instead, she had more
million-selling records, a silly hit of a
television series and a lew seasons pranc-
ing Las Vegas stages in gauze and heads.
"You see Cher savs, "the reason it
took me so long to become an actress was
that people could only see mv comedic
side
Cher is definitely an actress now, with
an Oscar nomination to verify what lans
and critics have felt about her complex,
vet natural performances in Come Back to
the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean
and in Sllkwood. "1 feel freer now than
I've ever been Cher told a report-
er alter her role in Silkwood, in which
she appeared without makeup and with
disheveled hair and baggy, mannish
clothing. Alter the 18-gowns-per-show
glamor, the gilded (string, breastplates
and headdress tawdriness. it was like an
atonement.
Her third serious role is the new Peter
Bogdanovich movie, Mask, which is
scheduled to open in I.He March. Cher
steps ahead with a more active sort of a
4 fHE MOVIE MAGAZINE
character than Silkwood: Doll) Pelliker, as
the motorcycle madonna Rust) Dennis.
At the same tune, she retrenches to a
sensitive-but-tough persona that dales all
the way back to the pop records she-
made as a teenager. Rusi is a woman
who has chosen to be an outsider, to be
tough, because she's a ven vulnerable
girl within. It's a role thai fits Chei like a
glove.
"When Anna (Anna Hamilton Phelan,
Mask's screenwriter) started writing the
ment, an amazingl) positive sense ol
himself and what he could accomplish.
One ol the things Cher did to prepare
l()1 the role was to meet the woman who
hadalread) lived the part
�When 1 met Rustv Cher sass. "I
reall) didn't ask hei about who she
was because I think thai the best way to
find out about someone- is to ask them
how they leel about everything else. She's
just like one big dichotomy - and a real
strange combination. Like, she's taken a
Sam Elliott and Cher
script Cher relates, "she said she had
this really strai ge impulse and she went
down to the Beverly Cineplex (a Los
Angeles theatre) to see Come Back to the
Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean
and then she came home, got an eight by
ten glossy of me, put it up on the- wall
and started writing it with me in mind
The real Rustv Dennis mothered a son
who suffered from a disfiguring disease-
hut had. with his mother's encourage-
lot of drugs and she- hangs out with hik-
ers, hut vet she's very metaphysical
Cher peppers her conversation with
such phrases as "like "cool" and "hip
Talking to her is like talking to an old
friend. At 38, now fulfilling that long-
held wish to he an actress, she- seems to
have put t lot f insecurity behind her.
With her singing partner Sonny Bono.
Cher was pliant, taking near total direc-
tion from her show-biz experienced
man. With her doe eves, straight, long
id Sunset Snip bellbottom fash-
lian aiu
-





ions, she was the perfecl commercial
realization ol a Sixties hippie girl. Uter,
on her own again, she tried Foi film roles
and couldn'l gel taken seriously. 1 hen
came the Vegas act, .1 short-lived shot al
disco queen stardom, .1 bla k leather-
imaged lock hand. "People regarded me
,is a clothes hangei more than an enter-
tainer she opined to a reporter. Yel the
image kepi hei alive and she kepi the
image alive, she was famous foi be-
ing populai - 01 perhaps vice-versa -
hut she w;isn't considered a talent.
Seeing rock singei Linda Ronstadl
break loose ol hei own blue-jeaned
image l essaying a lead role in the Jo-
seph Papp piodiu lion ol nlhei I and
Sullivan's I In Pirates oj Penzance, Chei
found the courage to tn Cherilyn Sar-
kasian's dream on e more, she look a
New York apartmenl and approached
Papp for an audition. He asked, bluntly,
how in the world he was to know wheth-
er site had an talent, considering the
"junk" she had been in previously. Bui
she won an audition and a pivotal role in
Papp's production ol Jimmy Dean. When
Altman made the film he kepi hei in the
role, and when directoi Mike Nichols
saw hei pel foi in.nue he asked hei on
the spot to be in Silkwo d.
Ironically, Ni hols had tinned Cher
down foi a pan almost ten years earlier.
1 his tune he was so eagei to place her in
his film thai he deliberately withheld the
tail that ('hei was to pla a lesbian with
a decidedl) un-put-together look, (her
was afraid t going cold turke) on cos-
metics, bui even mote fearful of acting
alongside Meryl Streep. Hie payoff came
in great reviews and ever more respect-
ful attention from filmmakers.
i got the script ol Mask last December
along with this reall) wonderful letter
from produce! 1 Mart) Starger saving
that the) Starger and director Peter
Bogdanovich wanted me tor the movie
and that the) hoped 1 liked the script as
much as the) did.
"So 1 wenl npstaiis and started to read
i, and when 1 got about halfwa) through
1 was so upset that I went righl to the
ending, and 1 was, like, a mess. Then 1
went hack to the middle, finished it. and
I mean. 1 was hysterical. 1 cried and I
died and 1 cried. From the moment I
lead it. it just seemed er real.
Audiences ma ver) likel) share some
of those copious emotions. Mask is an
affecting tale about personal struggle, all
the more impactful tor being based on
tact. Plent) of the film's impact also 1 ides
on how true to the tough-sensitive
Once a song-and-dance girl, Cher has evolved a complex screen presence.
character Cher is. Within limits. Bog-
danovich gave her rein to improvise
elements of Rustv Dennis.
"I don't really like being directed that
much Cher confesses. "I like having a
certain amount of freedom with which to
work. Peter tells you exactly what to do
and you listen to it and then you do what
"I like having a certain
amount of freedom
you want to do. And 1 figured out how
to work with him - he gives you line
readings and then you go and do it the
way you want to. And if it's as good as or
better than what he expected, he'll let
you do it your own way.
In other words. Cherilyn Sarkasian
found out how to get her wish. Meryl
Streep has publicly lauded Cher as "an
instinctive actress" possessing "rare hon-
esty For the time being. Cher savs. she
will wait for the reaction to Mask before
sketching her next career move, as she
did after Silkirood.
At one point during the making of
Mask, Cher paid Sam Elliott - her on-
screen boyfriend - a compliment about
being rather excellent for an actor who
isn't too famous. "I had never heard of
him Cher savs. laughing. "But he was
fabulous and I said to him. Sam. how
come people haven't had the chance to
see how fabulous you are?' And he said
to me. How come it took you so long?"
Now that Cher is making her mark as
a serious actress, filmmakers are starting
to wonder wh it took them so long to
sense her potential. At least, now that
the actress dream has become a reality,
she has arrived with her autograph al-
readv perfected. �
fHE MOVIl MAGAZINE 5
' Vv
k-





Candy
is Dandy
special tailed I In Last Polka, alongsi
brothci Stan Shmenge and the mam
�� i the lin.il audition, Kogdanovii h
S������ M Muih mp �,
with holes m ill. month and through
.egu.ai guests of then musical otrermg the eves it was a prem interesting
f�� horned k Lutonian immigrants, on auchtum ng started. Stol,
the largei screen, Cand) puts Ins frame
behind home plate .is the catchei on a
small town, semi-pro baseball outfit. He's
Richard Pryor's best friend on the squad
is main aecompliee .is Pryoi the
w;ls faced with .1 rathei grueling on
screen challenge. 'Even day lie recalls,
I had to spend about three and .1 hall to
t�n hours in ilu makeup hair, hi
i zzx;mirr
.111(1 in
Hllrlllpnl.il Ml Sion Ol
ihc UlllClCSs
and the makeup was just like wearuij
Brewsters Millions - has to go on a spend
��� 1 evtMi more sizeabkMoitunt worthwhile He. had to project
everything through Ins eves, the di
cctoi savs. 1 can 1 emphasize Ins
It's ,1 stalwai I sec one! banana 1
�� ol thing thai (land) ahead)
muside I'oni II.inks in Splash. fteyoiu
Brewsters Millions and Liu La ' Polka a
Cand) hasn't announced spe ih new
clans' However, l)isne Studios an-
iunted last spring thai the) had signe
IK il
hievemeni in this film nough
Stolt studied a ting I'oi two ears ai
s( I be ame disillusioned with the
academii approa. h, though he says,
vies he Leaving selI. he first sought roles in a
John Candy cats up another plum role.
L
.ihoiil di phi
ike Saturday Sight Livt before it, 1
insaneh funnv television series with com
s(. I I 11 ained, polished and
aun( hed .111 impressive quota of film
stars, including Rick Moranis (Strange
(ihosthusters, Streets of Fin I Dave
( anch to produce three mo
contract allows him freedom to appea. in
productions foi othei studios and gives
( and) some of the 1 loui enjoyed b
()thei people - including Eddie Murphy.
Richard Pryoi and Michael Keaton
with similai production deals, h's fanl)
he certain, however, thaiand) will stick
edy, �fin still .1 little nervous
drama he admits. �
. vc been studying ai ihe 1 ofi Studio
md privateh I have .1 coach who helped
Mask Stolt sas.
me oul .1 greal deal on
Next in the T2 yeai old's c areei
reienth completed European production
tiied Emerald, costarring 1 'I Harris Ih
Right Stuff, Places in thi Heart) nm Max Von
S (b i.
B
1 homas (Strangt Brew) and Eugene Lev)
(Splash, (ihosthusters). Bui John Cand)
r�a) wind up the mosl visible of this
si Vbred 1 orned) rop � .is mu h foi
the bulk (.1 Ins rotund B'3" physique as
foi the cjuantit) of plum comi roles lies
asked to plav.
veteran 1 1941, Stripes, Ih, Blues
'��'� "��'� and w�1;1, � &iinR �i, m
ERIC STOLTZ'
New Face
In Ilu Wild Lift and Fast Times at Hidgi
mont High, two recent teen-oriented
comedies, Eric Stoltz comes off as yciui
typical fun-loving American youth, chas-
Erit Stoltz: a fact full "I makeup, a st ript full
il ran emotion
latmn, ui�U Mocmi 1 even nave
As a
( l
( ,ni(l .m 1 cue new
foi the- new roles to matei iauz
two-time Emm) winnei foi Ins SCI
writing s k 1
1 I1.11.
i an
likebus .md Sean Penn.
Bui once you've seen Mask, directoi
Petei Bogdanovich's lust film in ncarh
,n� skS' l , s hc four vears. set for a late March openmg
rAltvrs emin& �� it.shighl) unlikel) thai you'll cvei think
the entire movie, Sn.li' handsome face is
nation �f opera greal Luciano Pavarotti
extras hired fo, the esed 20 pounds of all-concealing
,akeup s he plays Rock) Dennis, the
foi ,in St V spool of I lt Godfather
so ,n (in ate, Italian
� I�ke into applause He is also . . �
dl1 �lrli , rraniodiaphyseal dysplasia.
1H-� i'lii �
dnewes.ex� incls a pan. - hen wup and mine
al()n�5ide megasta, Richard with my disease. What really-ge was
( ,n
film
i yoi and .1 1 able I V spe 1
I HI MOVII M . XIM
Vosh 1
he rav emotion of the s 1 ipt.
,R iGORMA






J&
s0"&
,
.r�l� j i "�" �'llitg�T
-�
50 mm at 1 30 sec at f 8 5
wrareensfj
�:�
ft
Life isn't always rosy. But you can capture the
color of any mood with Kodachrome 25 and 64
films the best color slide fUms ever from Kodak.
Films that deliver clean, crisp, saturated colors.
1 ttVii'Afwb 2).t � 1 y 111 � vm 11 m -
sharp detail in both highlight and
shadows. With Kodachrome 25 and
64 films for color slides, your moods
wont lose a shade of their meaning.
(Because time goes b
L





Into the Night
Marks First Lead Rote
ome actors get inside their
roles; JefT Goldblum prefers to
ride on top. Whether he's play-
ing "New Jersey the doctor-
turned adventurer of Buckaroo
Banzai, the seasick NASA aide of TheRight
Stuff or the cynical writer of puff pieces
for People magazine in The Big Chill, a big
part of each character is Goldblum's own
distinctive sell. It's no easy self to define:
vulnerable and manipulative all at once,
manic, charming and gifted with split-
second timing. Combine those criss-
crossing attributes with lanky height and
a nervously charged voice and von under-
stand why Goldblum (pronounced
Goldbloom) could never he one of those
actors who fades into a part, submerging
their off-screen personality. Thus far,
Goldblum has lent his presence to sup-
porting parts and cameos. Now, with the
upcoming John l.andis film called Into
the Night, opening in March, he steps into
a leading role.
"They're calling it a 'dangerous ro-
mance savs Goldblum, flashing a fur-
tive smirk, "so I guess Tin the dangerous
romantic lead.
"I play a man who has come to a dead
end in his life. I cross paths with an at-
tractive young woman. She's in the mid-
dle- of troubles involving high financial
stakes
Mixed into the plot are several
surprise-choice cameos and bit parts:
performers David Bowie and Dan Ayk-
royd, directors Paul Mazursky Moscow on
the Hudson), Lawrence Kasdan (The Big
Chill), Roger Vadiin Barbarella), David
Cronenberg (Scanners), Jonathan Demme
(Melvin and Howard) and Richard
Franklin (Psycho II).
Goldblum, 32, chose an acting career
while in high school, but kept that plan
sec let. Bypassing college, he left his
Pittsburgh home for New York to study
acting, soon winning an apprenticeship
DAVID ALEXANDER





K
DAVID AlFXANDER
,n Sanford Meisner's Neighborhood
Playhouse.
A year later, Goldblum's height won
him a minor role as a guard in a Joseph
Papp Central Park production of Two
Gentlemen of Verona. When the show
moved to Broadway, Goldblum moved
with it.
Weather dictated his next break. In
1973, Goldblum was in the stage comedy
� Grande de Cora Cola. Director Robert
Altman, then at a career peak following
M.A.S.H. and McCabe and Mrs. Miller.
(aught a performance and liked wh.it he
saw in the rangy character actor. "He
had only come in the theatre to escape a
blizzard savs Goldblum. Whatever the
reason, Altman offered him small roles
in California Split and Nashville.
There followed a number of hit parts,
each increasingly larger and juicier. In
Next Stof Greenwich Village he was a
keved-up actor who. awaiting a trvout,
imagines so intensely that he'll he re-
jected that he storms out of the room in
a fine froth. In Between the Lines he was a
rock critic for an underground Boston
newspaper who sold his freebie albums
and gave lectures entitled 'Whither Rock
and Roll" to gullible coeds in order to
squeak by without working. For the 1979
version of Invasion of the Bodysnatchers he
played a mud-bath proprietor. In Annie
Hall he was on screen for a few memora-
ble moments as a California partygoer
who phones his guru because he's forgot-
ten his mantra. A short-lived TV series.
Tenspeed and Brownshoe, in which he co-
starred with Ben Yereen, also added to
Goldblum's reputation.
But his appearance in Lawrence Kas-
dan's bittersweet comedy The Big Chill
boosted Goldblum several notches above
the (tilt status he had been attaining. As
a once-radical journalist now successfully
employed as a gossip-mongering hack,
Goldblum was a standout among a cast
tint seemed to include nearly every tal-
ented actor (William Hurt. Kevin Kline,
Mary Kay Place, Glenn Close, JoBeth
Williams) of the baby-boomer genera-
tion. Goldblum's part represented an
irony and disappointment felt by main
of the generation. As The Bin Chill went
on to become an unqualified box office-
success, Kasdan gave major credit to
Goldblum's "comic genius
Next came another of those decep-
tively small appearances that end up
being a moviegoer's dominant memory.
In The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai he
plaved brain surgeon Sidney Zwibel, who
dons oversized cowboy gear, renames
The Big Chill
boosted Goldblum
above cult status.
With Into the Night co-star Michelle
Pfeiffer, a dangerous romantic lead.
In The Big Chill, an ex-radical, laced
with irony.
himself "New Jersey and joins a comic
book-style crimefighting army.
Goldblum then returned to television
as comedian Ernie Kovacs in the docu-
drama Between the Laughs. Kovacs, who
experimented boldly in his early Fifties
comedy show, is thought bv many to have
been a genius.
"He was much adored savs Gold-
blum, "and there's a group of people
who really worship him. hiking on that
character was a real challenge
Now comes Into the Night, written bv
Ron Koslow, Goldblum's first movie to
(all his own. After supporting the likes of
Donald Sutherland. Sam Shepard and
Peter Weller, it's the tall, intense guy's
turn to be that "dangerous romantic
lead
For this major career step. Goldblum
enjoys powerful help behind the camera.
Into the Sight's director is John I.andis,
who has also directed Trading Places,
Animal House and The Blues Brothers.
"I think he's great savs Goldblum.
"He has the best kind of enthusiasm tot;
work and it's infectious. He's great fun to
work with. "�
rHE MOVIE MAGAZINE 9

J


H
V kA-





Peter Bogdanovich sits in the library
of his sumptuous Bel Air digs. A
45-year-old filmmaker who won in-
stant acclaim in 1971 for The Last Picture
Show, Bogdanovich re-lights his cigar and
reveals why, alter four years of not film-
ing, he (hose a project called Mask.
"It's a ver) touching, true story says
Bogdanovich, "which deals with some
simple things that are very important to
me � outside appearances, courage, love
and death. Particularly outside appear-
ances, because I think that one of the
biggest problems we've got in society is
the way that people judge things from
external evidence.
"It's a theme the diredoi continues,
"that runs through a lot of m work.
Peter
Bogdanovich
Aims for the Heart
Saint ack the liiul.u character in Bog-
danovich's ninth feature film, for exam-
ple, is a pimp, yet he does something
noble- thai even a President wouldn't do.
They All Laughed is all about appearances,
as are Daisy Miln and Paper Moon. So
Mask goes right to the heart of a lot of
things thai interest me
Bogdanovich is also linked to the
theme of appearances by his tragic love
affair with formei Playboy Playmate of
the Year, Dorothy Stratten. In Ian. the
main reason thai the director has not
made a film since They All Laughed (which
co-starred Stratten in 1980), is thai he's
spent the better pail of the last foul
years writing The Killing the Unicorn:
Dorothy Stratten (1960-1980).
"II you re.id the book you'll see thai
Mask has an element that even relates to
Dorothy's story savs Bogdanovich. "She
was fascinated by The Elephant Man � the
play � because she identified with him.
You see, in main ways, beauty is just as
much a barrier to communication as ug-
liness is And so is notoriety, and so is
celebrity, and so is fame and so is money
Asked what he thought of Stai SO, the
Bob Fosse film loosely based on Straitens
life. Bogdanovich raises the pitch of his
voice: "Star SO is badh made and has
nothing whatsoevei to do with what
happened
Bogdanovich is equally candid in as-
sessing his own body of work. "There
arc- two pic lines that I think are poorly
executed � for a variety of reasons �
and those aie At Long Last Lore and
. n kelodeon
He expresses affection foi Ttu Last l'i -
uir Show, What's Up Dot ?, Papei Moon and
Daisy MiUer, but Bogdanovich feels that
Saint ink and They All Laughed are prob-
ably his two besl films. "Saint Jak and
They All Laughed were also more ambi-
tious than the others sas the director,
"as well as being somewhat more- eotnpli-
c aleel and clif fie nil to make
In terms ol difficulty and complica-
tions, Bogdanovich ranks Mask right up
there at the top of his list. "Getting the
makeup light was a real challenge �
especially in color � so we did ten or
twelve tests and ii underwent many
main changes because we wanted the
boy's face lo look jiisi like the leal
character's lace. And you know what?
When the real boy's inolhei came on
the- set and saw hi ic Stoltz she said:
He looks like Roc k, but even more
important, he acts like Rocky' � which
was really quite something m
magine trying to spend $'M) million in
30 days � without acquiring any as-
sets. Think you could do it? Bel you
wouldn't mind living. That's the infalli-
ble premise of Waltei Hill's new comedy,
Brewster's Millions, which stars Richard
Pryoi and John (iandy.
Actually, the word "new" should prob-
ably Ik- put in quotation marks. Brewster's
Millions has been filmed six limes before
under different titles, the first a silent
version which starred Fatty Arbuckle in
1914. Script foi the cm rent version came
from the- writing team responsible for
the Eddie Murphy smash trading Places,
Timothy Han is and Herschel Weingrod.
How does sue h an oft-told tale- keep its
10 I 11F MOV 11- MAGAZINE
Walter
Hill
Aims for Laughter
perennial appeal? Director Waltei Hill,
best known for his gangland films like 48
HRS. and Streets oj Fire, de-sc ribes Brew-
ster's Millions as "an attempt to plug into
that universal fantasy of ge-tting rich
cjiiick. which of course, like most things,
is nevei quite- that simple. It's probably
been around so long savs Hill, "because
there's something really fascinating
about the notion of falling into sudden
wealth due to some long lost relative
Then, too, as Hill notes, "What's kind
of nifty about the whole situation is that
you have to spend a lot of money in
order to gel really i ic h
What's really rich? All previous ver-
sions of the- film found Monty Brewstei
having to squandei SI million in 30 days.
In Hill's remake, Brewstei (Richard
Pryor) has to spend $30 million in the
same period of time in ordei to inherit
$300 million, limes (and inflation tales)
have- changed. Moreover, as Hill tells it,
the- real tough pail ol Monty Brewster's
task is that "spending $30 million in JO
days and not having any assets to show
for it, is ac tualh a very difhe uit task
Brewster's Millions is Walter Hill's eighth
direc lorial effort. What made- him decide
lo embark on his fust lull-fledged com-
edy? "The producers of ibis picture
knew that I was anxious to do comedy as
well as action films. But since- I got
started as an action director, I never
L
- .





Walter Hill
reall) had been offered the chance to
direct a comedy. I hen. because 48 IIRS.
working with Pryor says Hill, "was that
at first I was probably a little too much in
awe of him, because to me Ri hard Pryor
is just an amazing talent.
"What Richard is in this movie is not
so much a comedian, hut th.it rarest of
things� what used to he referred to as a
light leading man There are very few
of those around
In addition to Pryor, who plays a reliel
pitcher for a minor league baseball team
in Hackensac k. New Jersey, Brewster's Mil-
was suh a mix of corned) and action � lions, which opens in May, also features
and since it was successful � I got the
ham e to do Brewster,
"M ideal st.ite" Mill enthuses, "would
be to do an action picture and then a
comedy, and foi ever) other action pic-
tine, a western. But, as Brewstei finds
out, nothing's evei reall) that simple
Brewstei is played b) the inimitable
Richard Pryor. "The problem I had
John (landy, who portrays Brewster's best
buddy.
Brewster's Millions' budget is the largest
Hill has ever worked with. In order to
convey the- needed opulence, production
designer John Vallone built a number of
lavish sets on big sound stages. These
sets included an elaborate French Pro-
vincial design for the hotel suite that
Pivot rents for SI million a month. Later
in the shooting, this set was redesigned
(according to the script's requirements)
to a florid Italian Renaissance night-
mare (complete with working watei foun-
tain), to a vivid post-modern environ-
ment (which included tables resting on
bowling ball legs) and finally to a stark
Bauhaus look.
In view of all the fine talent and pro-
duction values that Brewster's Millions has
going for it, does Hill anticipate a major
hit? "One of the most difficult tilings in
the world savs Hill, "is to figure out
what somebody's going to want to see a
year from now.
"But look, if you add up all the movies
that I've been creatively involved with �
what they tost and what they made � I'm
way ahead. And in this business, that's
more than anyone tan really expect. So all
I can say is that I've been pretty lucky
Long before he dove headlong into
nerds and CIA intrigue, Jeff
Kanew had a successful career with
his own Hollywood business. He created
trailers, those brief but mightily impor-
tant "previews of coming attractions"
shown in theatres before the main fea-
ture. Now he's one of Hollywood's cur-
tent in-demand directors, with a solid hit
in Revenge of tin- Nerds and a potentially
strong follow-up called Gotcha, written by
Dan Gordon and Steven Kronish, slated
lor a mid-Mav release.
Kanew
Horizons
Nerds, Gotcha Director Started Small
At 17 Kanew scored a part-time job in
the trailer department of United Artists.
He had dreams of being a rock 'n' roll
star, but discovered instead a promising
future in his unexpected talent for pro-
moting full-length movies with three-
mi: tute reels.
He soon formed his own outfit, Utopia
Productions, and treated trailers for
such films as The Graduate, Midnight (low-
hoy. Rocky and a number of Woody Allen's
movies.
In the simplest sense, a trailer must
c ompress the maximum of action and mood
into a vet small space. Making trailers
educated Kanew on several of filmmak-
ing's finer points. In short order, the
urge to rock and roll took a back seat to
Kanew's growing desire to direct movies.
In 1971 he directed Black Rodeo, a
highly-praised feature-length documen-
tary about a Harlem rodeo. Six years
later he sold Utopia to finance atural
Enemies, which he also wrote and di-
rected. It was a thoroughlv downbeat
story about a disillusioned man who kills
his own family then turns his gun on
himself. "It was the saddest film ever
made Kanew says.
When that attempt flopped, Kanew
took the job of editing the work of an-
other first-time director, Robert Redford.
The film in question, Ordinary People,
went on to win the Oscar as Best Picture
of 1980.
Since prestige attaches to those linked
with a Hollywood winner, Kanew was
able to climb into the director's chair
once more. This time, creating Revenge of
the Serds, he shifted wiselv to an upbeat
storv. Gotcha, which continues that light-
hearted trend, is a romance involving a
college student and a CIA spy.
"I'm a little surprised to learn I have a
knack for light entertainment Kanew
says, referring to his forgotten heavy-
drama debut. "The light stuff is fun
to do �
"HE MOVIE MAGAZINE II

va. Lv





�mm
1
3$
:�.
������
.
m
,141
m
ifcii
W-
� .
�3s
�si
&jfl!
3v,
S�
ywJ:v�-
nl�
�� ���,
M
� . t � , ���� �' H-
�-�.
& ��
r
'�p
if I1'
n.
A
&K
fcW
&SP
-ijjT"
-i'WMy rife-
:�

�&�:� �'�'
Vfy :Jt
.m
wmm&m:
I didn't
buy my
car stereo
backwards.
$Jte
Js&m
S-ii
Urn
Why should you?
My car stereo dealer told me if you want clean,
clear accurate sound-choose your speakers
first. Because if the speakers can't handle
it, you won't hear it. No matter what kind of
sound your receiver pulls in.
Then he told me: Jensen.�
If you want to hear it the way they played it,
choose Jensen speakers first. Jensen invented
car speakers in the first place. And they're
a leader today. Simply because they know
how to deliver the goods.
Naturally I got a Jensen receiver to go
with my Jensen speakers. Great team,
designed to play best together. Makes sense.
Makes great sound, too. I want to hear
it all. With Jensen, I do.
�:�$�:
��M
JENSEN
When you want it all.
5
MS�
& �' '�
m
flW�T � W





mfJ
Nerds Team Reunites
tt �
Kanew and Edwards Create Comic Spy Thriller
m
It's llii Graduatt with bullets en
iluiscs (Inc( tiii rfI Kanew, teamed
(UK c iik ire with uthon Kdwards,
his si,u in last summer's welcome
sin pi isc lni Him, Rti i ngt "t rhi i rds.
"Ihi Gradunti was .1 t e 111111.4 t il;t� sioi.
whie) 1 this is. Ii was ,1 love sii)i. which
ihis is. And vet 11 n.is vcrv, ver lunuv,
whi h hopelnll this will be
I he new Kanew Kdwards pi 1 �je 1 is
Gotchn, based parth n the recent col-
legiate fad foi make-believe murdei
games. I he film's topsv-turvv )l(ii scuds
hdw.uds from 1 s Angeles to Paris and
I' asi Bei lni .ind then back to Los
ngeles, acquiring along the was .1 mys-
terious lovei named s.islu and an annov-
ingh murder-minded Soviet operative
called VI,id. It's ,1 college-centered vei
s 1 (111 (il 111 s 1 the s11111 I 11 11 g I I I(I
llii(h(ii(k loved to do, placing .111 ordi
11.11 1 I1.11 ,k ici in ,111 extra-ordinan sii
nation. with nndei currents ol humor,
romance and daugei swirling l Kanev
seems to enjo mixing elements. 'erd,
foi example, s.1 s ,1 sexv urn romp
blended unh personal insights,
"Gotcha Kanew s,is, "started out to
be ,1 coined) with suspense. Bui it seems
in have become .1 suspense with coined v.
Aftei weeks in Pal is and Bei lin, the
film's cast .ind (lew .ue 1 (da .11 woi k in
I.iimli.i 1 I,os ngeles. I he shooting
s( h t lu It calls foi .1 s( tut (Miiside 1 he
( tin 1 ,d I ntelligc m e Agem 's lo al
offices. However, thai secretive agenc)
thwai ted e ei attempi to leai n theii
building's Iik.num. Instead, Kanew, Ed-
wards ,ind companv have set up cameras
.ind lights Hillside ,1 Ii,ink tower.
Ironically, 1 he v 1 ung hei o of Gotiha
fat es .1 siinil.ii fi ustrating inability to
track dow n theIA w hen he needs
them, rdwai ds pla s iinathan, .1 I (.1.
sophomore, who is initialb more success-
I id pla mil; 1 he pi etend assassination
game than he is with '411 Is. I le needs to
grow up. .ind fighting foi Ins life while
falling in Ii�ve pro ides the mothation.
"I feel really lucky to do
another movie with
Jeff
Kanew .ills Ins teaming with Kdwards
"a two in.in 1 (pei ici ompany.
I feel 1.ilb lui k to do anothei
ino ie w 11I1 efl I' dwards sa) s. " I he
rappoi 1 between the a toi and the di
rectoi is so importanl and we gel along
so well. Ii in.ikes 11 nun h easiei to om-
iniuiii .lie.
"Jeff's .1 vcr sensitive, caring guy
adds Kdwards. whose (redits also in hide
Fast Funes ,1! Ridgemonl High and Heart
I ih a W'hi I le wants mosl ol .ill to
care about the people in Ins movies. As .1
result, Ins characters have .1 wide range
of feelings and come a ross .is human.
rhat's the ingredient, explains Ed-
wards, thai turned Revengi thi Xerd.
into .1 comed which nonetheless struck
deep emotions.
"The studio wanted anothei Porky's
savs Edwards. "We dunk we gave them
something with a little substance in-
stead
II Edwards seems extremeb loyal, he
owes bis job on ibis lilm to Kanew s per-
sistence. Some high-level doubters
wouldn't believe thai the stai ol a movie
aboul nei ds could plav aonv in ing
loinaniK lead. Kanew did some powerful
pel suading.
"AnthoiiN is a ei creative actoi who
.idds ,1 lot m iti ins 11I humoi in alm �si
even scene savs Kanew " lld lies abso
Iiiieb the charactei in Goti ha. I le's
healthy, wholesome, kind of naive, vel
undei IK alb a sin ing pel si hi
In the closing moments ol Gotcha's
si 11 pi, l mi at lian. s.ish.i and lad re-cross
paths Ii.k k al theampus mil i mathan
has le.lined so well in Ins game-playing
foravs. B now lies been exposed to low.
dangei and deceit; he isn'i a silh sopho-
more an longei Bui it's an open ques-
tion whethei he'll live long enough to
t no his new loiind maturity. Hitchcock
himsell couldn'l bring matters down an
(Ii isei to the wire. �
I III K � II MAC. ll I
L





HOLLYWOOD
IN BERLIN
illegally, in Edwards' rented (ar, n ae
cepting the rock &: roll cassettes Kdwards
took them on his second visit. 1 he) re-
quested sp(( iln nines. Judging from
those requests Foi Del Leppard and
lion Maiden, among others tastes
among 16-year-old boys diffei little be-
tween East and Wesi
ili.it wasovei ed boloi I ul nun als.
Kanew's wall, therefore, was plain e-
uieni giay.
I Ins slighi distoi lion ol reality was noi
the onh 1 lollywood trick used in Bei lin.
According to Kanew, East Bei lin didn'i
look anything like lus expe tations. "I
expected it to he gray, drab and ugly. Bui
Meanwhile, directoi Jefl Kane was " wasn't thai wa) ai all. Vs a mallei ol
building Ins own Berlin Wall several feel
.iwa from the real wall, I bat was done,
obviously, so filming could be done on West.
both sides ol the "wall But K.mew says
there's anothei reason, fhe real wall is
(overed with years of graffiti, and be-
cause he wanted a wall that would SUg-
gest "oppression he couldn't have one
l.u t. the an hite lure in East Bei lin i
uicei and more impressive than in the
kanew admits ih.it this "slight misrep-
resentation" amounts to perpetuating a
stereot) pe, hut he heei full) adds, "this
is a movie where realit) is ol limited
value �
Border tensions are re-created in Berlin
for well-placed cameras.
SJ Students Play
' the Murder Game
B
ecause Gotcha required location
shooting in West Berlin, several
membei s oi the ast and i ew
found themselves with up-close oppor-
tunities to see fast-West relations. Actoi
Anthom Edwards, foi one. used his days
ofj to travel into fast Berlin and stnke
W
bether called "Gotcha' (as in the
new libn ol the same name').
wiote then personal "dossiei and en-
ti usted it to a leader, w ho dii e ted the
game without playing it. Players were
secreth given anothei player's dossier, a
dan gun and three suction-cup darts.
1 he last plavei "alive" was die winner,
hut prizes were also given foi the most
Killer" oi "KAOS" (killing As creative!) sneak) "kills.
Organized Sport), a make-believe nun
del tad swept college campuses m the
earh Eighties. It annoved college ad
B some reports, the game originated
m 1978 at the- I niversit) ol Mi higan. It
migrated during Spring Break to the
ministratoi
s whose securit) forces kepi campuses ol Florida, eventual!) spread-
Rushing to gun-armed assailants oui
inm west to 1(1 A and oiiits m between.
Among the legends ol the sport are a
lnendsh.ps with two teenage resi- of campus shrubbery, but it delighted
. . i Hollvwood screen- Michigan man who dressed as ,i i nited
Parcel deliven man to delivei a "lethal"
dents. Both boys were proud hast Oer- the imaginations oi
m ms Edwards savs, m though the) writers.
Plavers were drawn into the game with dart, and a Florida coed who wangled a
weie happ) to meet a Westerner, the)
showed no interest in evei leaving theii a newspapei oi bulletin
enough plavers had been ollec ted
ci m 11 .
Bui that didn't stop them from riding, sometim
lend ,u. When date' with het unsuspecting victim, lured
inn into hei apartmeill and annihilated
es as mam as 20 oi 30each him at close range. �
COMING SOON
IN OUR NEXT ISSUE
in delighted to abdi ate the role of
Met, h to you telegrammed novelist
(iregoi Mi donald to ai toi he
t ;hase. "Pi etending to he attra live,
i hai ming, witt) and energeti all these
vears has been a tei rible strain on me.
(hew plays tin- wisegu) investigative
, epot Hi 1 donald i eated in his
l-million-copy-selling novel Fletch. Mow
does the mastei ol mug-and-tumble
corned) measure up to the role? Read
out eclusie interview in the next issue
ol I In Moi'U Magazim
Ih, best thing about Robin Williams' s the pan
bathtub in Moscow on tin Hudson was , ailed Touch and (��
Mai ia Wonso. who Hoated gra efull) as
Williams' Italian-born girlfriend. Now little gu) phoned home Ih, Extra
ii i hi kit t (. ii
Terrestrial has become a pel iii.iiient ad-
dition ti inei icari c ultine. With II
soon to be re-released,7hi Moi'ti Magazim
takes a look at the stubb spaceman's last
int; impac t.
Ridle) s on. dim toi ol the lei i living
lien, has tinned his imagination to the
remote past. Legend, Scott's newest film,
is peopled with ogres and princesses,
unicorns and sorcerers. Fom Cruise,
the rugged stai oi Risky Business, heads
the (ast.
Steven Spielberg doesn't own summer.
It just seems thai way, considering the
illions ol nckets sold to lin adventurous
w.u m weathei ofiei ings � like � Raid
she's in the compan) ol Michael Keaton en oj tht Lost Ark, Jaws and so on. Foi
on the case. As an intrepid
reporter in Fletch, he wont even allow
Kareem Abdul-jabbar to steal the ball.
headlines a new coined) the super-secrel Back to tin Future, due
iis coming summer, (laptain Steve pro-
I the three sens since the famous du.es while protege and friend Roberi
Romancinti tin StumZeme kis duee is. �





Presenting High Bias n and
the Ultimate Tape Guarantee.
Memorex presents High Bias II, a tape so
extraordinary, we're going to guarantee it forever.
We'll guarantee life-like sound.
Extraordinarilyflat frequency response at,zerojdB
recording levels, combined with f m�i�
noise levels, means music is captured liva Then
pprmarass � our unique oxide-bondmg process, locks eacn oxiae
2S3 detail-onto the upa So music stays Uva
K the 1st play. Or the 1000th. But forever.
Well guarantee the cassette.
We've engineered every facet of our transport mechanism
to protect the tape Our waved-wafer toPrsp00tll
Silicone-treatedrollers insure precise z�0
safe tape movement. To protect the tape and mecOmmsmweve
surrounded them with a remarkable cassettehousing made
rigid and strong by a mold design unique to Memorex.
Well guarantee them forever.
If you ever become dissatisfied with MemorexmfrBias,IUor
any reason, simply mail the tape back and we 11 replace it free.
�DU LL FOREVER WONDER
IS IT LIVE,
OR IS IT
MEMOREX
-3,
L
v V





J






Title
The East Carolinian, February 28, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 28, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.395
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy