The East Carolinian, Febraury 26, 1985






�he
darolmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.43
Tuesday February 26, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
State SA T Scores
Elizabeth City State University
Fayetteville State University
Winston-Salem State University
North Carolina Central University
North Carolina A&T
Pembroke State University
Western Carolina University
East Carolina University
UNC�Wilmington
Applachian State University
I NC-Charlotte
UNC-Greensboro
UNC-Asheville
N.C. School of the Arts
N.C. State University
UNC-Chapel Hill
590
598
611
636
678
792
824
850
861
892
908
910
929
1000
1028
1055
Minimum SAT Scores Debated
By DALE SWANSON
SUf f Wrltw
UNC system officials across
the state have been expressing
deep concern over two bills in-
troduced to the N.C. General
Assembly last week which would
set a minimum Scholastic Ap-
titude Test score of 700 for all
new freshmen in the UNC
system. The bills, intended to
crack down on academic side-
stepping in athletics, were in-
troduced by Rep. Howard B.
Chapin, D-Beaufort and Rep.
Frank Rhodes, R-Forsyth.
Many college officials have
emphasized the discriminatory
issues that would arise from such
an action, as well as the
disproportionate weight it would
place on tests such as the SAT.
Charles Halland, chairman of
the board of trustees at the
predominantly-black N.C. Cen-
tral University in Durham said
"traditionally, the SAT scores of
a lot of our black students have
not been as high as we would like
them to be but they are closing
the gap Several other represen-
tatives of predominantly-black
universities said the legislation
would keep many students from
entering predominantly-white
universities. A 1981 consent
decree issued by the federal court
system calls for a 10.6 percent
minority enrollment in the UNC
system by 1986. Currently, the
system has an 8.6 percent minori-
ty enrollment, with ECU's figure
standing at 11 percent.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
said the question is
socioeconomic rather than racial.
"Here in the eastern part of the
state the average high school SAT
score was 750 he said. "Most
of the high school students here
are white and from low-income
households and typically do not
do as well on the SAT as higher-
income students
"SATs are biased against
members of the lower socio-
economic classes said Angelo
Volpe, vice chancellor for
Academic Affairs.
Raymond Dawson, vice presi-
dent for academic affairs for the
UNC system, was quoted in the
Raleigh News and Observer as
feeling such legislation would be
an "unwise" use of SAT scores.
"I think it would be advisable
that the (UNC) board of gover-
nors be left with the respon-
sibilities of admissions
decisions Dawson said.
"The SA T is only part of
the admissions equation. "
Both Howell and Volpe em-
phasized that SAT scores are only
a part of the admissions re-
quirements. "We generally weigh
a student's high school record far
heavier than their SAT score
Howell said. "The SAT is on'lv
part of the admissions
equation Volpe added.
According to both men, con-
siderations for admission are bas-
ed on a student's apparent abilitv
to survive in the university. "We
admit many students with good
high school grades but low SAT
scores who prove to be very suc-
cessful at ECU and leave with
high employment potential
Howell said. "If we were to in-
corporate a minimum SAT score,
many regional students would be
screened out of a good
education
Howell added that "any
minimum SAT score, even one
lower than 700, would suggest to
the public that the SAT is far
more important than it is
Concerning the question of
academic requirements for
students recruited on the basis of
athletic ability, Volpe said such
factors are serious considerations
in the admissions process. "We
always need to consider a stu
dent's special talents, though
these are not necessarily always in
the area of athletics
Spring Concert Scheduled;
Kinks Perform March 16
The car's all packed and you're read
some of us. Other folks on campus are
of a popular mode of campus transport
'Uff'c FJfJ f J�N JORDAN - ecu pho�� �-�b
Nunny paradise, where we'll all motion for the ocean. Well
racticing for that major wave at the beach through the use
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
After many semesters of ef-
fort, the ECU Major Attractions
Committee has succeeded in
booking a spring concert. The
Kinks will perform in Minges
Coliseum March 16.
"I'm really excited that we can
have such a big show said Ma-
jor Attractions Committee Chair-
man Mike McPartland. He said
the committee has been attemp-
ting to book the Kinks since last
semester. They had originally
been booked for January, but
cancelled the show.
Tickets for the performance
will be $10 for students, $12 for
non-students and at the door.
They will be sold at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
Educators Win Award For Research
ECU News Bureau
Two ECU educators who con-
ducted research on teacher cer-
tification and the effectiveness of
math teachers have won the 1985
Distinguished Research Award
from the Association of Teacher
Educators.
Charles Coble, dean of the
ECU School of Education, and
Parmalee Hawk, a clinical pro-
fessor of education, were named
recipients of the award at the
ATE national conference last
week in Las Vegas. The award
was given for their Spencer
Foundation-funded research on
the validity of math teacher cer-
tification standards.
The ECU study, believed to be
the first of its kind, found that
math teachers, certified in their
field, scored "significantly
higher" on instructional presen-
tation in the classroom than did
math teachers who were certified
in other fields.
In its conclusion, the pilot
study found that "in-field cer-
tified math teachers know more
math, they show evidence of us-
ing more effective teaching prac-
tices and their students achieve a
higher grade level than out-of-
field teachers of mathematics
This research, say Coble and
Hawk, has a national impact in
the area of education because
teacher certification guidelines
have been largely the result of
"arm-chair thinking Before the
research, states which certified
out-of-field teachers in science
and math had done so "without a
data base to suggest how effective
non-certified teachers may be in
the classroom they said.
They emphasized that theirs
was a pilot study limited to 36
teachers and 826 students in nine
rural school systems in eastern
North Carolina. All participating
teachers were certified, with one-
half being certified in math and
the other 18 holding certification
in some other area.
Lotteries May Help Fund Schools
(CPS) � Colleges in a number
of states soon may start reaping
the benefits of organized gambl-
ing if educators are convinced
campuses will come out winners.
At least two states - California
and Iowa - are expected to launch
lotteries soon, joining the 17
states and the District of Colum-
bia already in the lottery
business.
Until this year, only New
Jersey earmarked a portion of its
lottery profits for higher educa-
tion, and the amount - $102,000
for the current fiscal year - is not
large enough to have a substan-
tial impact.
That is about to change.
The budget presented to the
California legislature by Gov.
George Deukmejian Jan. 30 calls
for spending $56.7 million in lot-
tery funds for higher education
next fiscal year.
And officials from three Iowa
campuses recently asked
lawmakers for nearly all the
money - some $40 million -
generated by the state lottery ex-
pected to begin this year.
Some lawmakers, moreover,
see the gambling money as a neat
way to fund new campus pro-
grans.
Deumejian, for one, recom-
mended using lottery money to
set up new programs that higher
education officials wanted fund-
ed with traditional revenue
sources.
But if the legislators don't
agree to use the money for the
programs, the programs won't
begin at all, educators fear.
Proposition 37, approved by
58 percent of those voting in
California last November, re-
quires that lottery funds supple-
ment state funds, not replace
them, they point out.
"The governor said either you
take these programs with lottery
funds or you don't get them
says Suzanne Ness of the govern-
ment affairs division of the
state's higher education commis-
sion.
"That's caused a large amount
of disgruntlement
Deukmejian's proposals con-
firm the fears of proposition op-
ponents, including Ralph Flynn,
director of the California
Teachers Association, which
represents professors in the
California State University
system.
"Regardless of how the
revenue is generated, the tempta-
tion on the part of the governor
and the legislature is too great not
to treat lottery funds just like
general revenue Flynn says.
The result, Flynn predicts, is
that lawmakers will use lottery
funds to offset money higher
education would otherwise have
received from other state revenue
sources.
Fred Klass, a legislative lob-
byist for the state's community
colleges, adds: "It's a short-term
hoopla, but in the long run it
won't make much difference
"One way or the other,
legislators will find a way of put-
ting the lottery money in the same
big pot with all other funds
"This is going to create an illu-
sion of a higher level of support
for education Flynn says. "It
will divert attention from our
needs
And William Pickens, chief
fiscal analyst for the higher
education commission, warns
that using lottery funds to sup-
port continuing expenses such as
salaries can backfire.
"Lottery revenues are subject
to wide swings, particularly after
the initial interest subsides
Pickens notes.
"And if they don't come in one
year, the legislature is not likely
to replace them with state funds
unless they happen to have a
significant amount of money
available
Iowa college officials say they
share these concerns, but are not
dissuaded.
"We are very concerned about
the legislature respecting our
'regular' askings and giving them
the greater attention UI Direc-
tor of State Relations Frank
Stork says.
"But legislators have made a
commitment to funding only
non-recurring items with lottery
funds, and we are hopeful they
will uphold that commitment
dent Center and sales are schedul-
ed to begin Friday morning. The
price is "not unreasonable
McPartland said. He added that
"any major attraction, whether
or not it was in a place with a
larger seating capacity, would
charge more
McPartland said the concert is
not being presented for the pur-
pose of earning a profit, the
ticket receipts will cover the costs
and any money remaining will go
into the Major Attractions Com-
mittee budget to cover future
concerts.
The last major concert at ECU
was the Charlie DanielsMarshall
Tucker Band concert in October,
1983. That concert lost money
and, as a result, has put the Ma-
jor Attractions Committee in a
difficult position, McPartland
said. "We don't have a lot of
money, we're dealing with bor-
rowed funds he said. "I feel
this concert will get us back on
track and put us in a position to
look at other acts
Tickets for the concert are in
the process of being printed, but
McPartland said he is unsure of
the exact number to be
distributed. He said that due to
the late confirmation of the con-
cert, it will be difficult to get the
tickets before Friday. Students
with valid IDs and activity cards
will be permitted to purchase two
S10 tickets. They also have the
option of obtaining another stu-
uent's ID card and purchasing
four ticket s.
The Kinks were the first choice
of the committee, McPartland
said
JON JUKUAN � eiu rnv.v �
Hanging Out
ECU residence hall residents enjoy the warm temperatures and
probably thought spring break had arrived one week eariv.
On The Inside
Announcements2 .The deadline for candidates
�5? 4 � file for the SGA elections is
?.y,e6 Friday, March 1.
Classifieds7
Sports8

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1985
Announcements
SGA Cla
Pirate Walk
Girls there Is one way that you can meet
guys all the time. Call 757 6614 and ask for an
escort from Pirate Walk. It's the safe walk in
town. PS. All operators and escort should
plan to attend the Pirate Walk meeting this
coming Mon at 6:30 in the Mendenhall
multi-purpose room; Please attend!
Aerobicize
Register for IRS (intramural) aerobic
classes Feb. 24�March 1 in room 204
Memorial Gym. Drop in classes Mon. Thurs.
5:15-6:15; 6:30 7:30. Participate rather then
speculate!
Teamwork In Health
interested in finding out how each of the
following team members contributes to toatl
health care: Music Theropy, Occupational
Theropy, Phisical Theropy, Social Work, and
Therapeutic Recreation? Come out Tues
Feb. 26 to Brewster Building room C 103 at
7:30 p.m. and hear a representative from
each field Opportunity for questions will be
provided and refreshments will be served!
Sponsored by EUC Student Committee Oc
cupafional Therapy Association.
ECU Frisbee
The ECU Frisbee Club Is open to all in
terested students and staff We play at the
bottom of college hill Tues Thurs. and Sun.
afternoons. Anyone is welcome to come
throw or hack. The warm weather Is coming
and so are the'irates Watch for the Natural
Light Spring Ultlmax V March 30 a. 31 at
ECU
Frisbee Club
De trates Ultimate practice Mon, Tues,
Thurs. 3 Sat, Sun 2. Bretheren meeting 9
Tues. at MSC. 'IreeForce' to Wilm on Sun.
leaving Dunn at 11 a.m. Be there or at least
be somewhere!
Rooms Available
For students at the Methodist Student
Center. Applications for summer school and
fall may be picked up at 501 East Fifth
Street Interviews will be held March 11 15.
For further information contact Richard or
Sheila Beeker at 758 2030 after 5 p.m.
Phi Eta Sigma
There will be a business meeting of Phi Eta
Sigma on Tues Feb 26 at 5:15 p.m. in 221
Mendenhall
New Policy
Because of limited space and time to devote to
announcements the following guidelines are
heretofore to be followed by groups or depart-
ments submitting announcements:
�All announcements submitted will be printed if
space allows.
�When space limitations exist (as they often do),
the most recent announcements of the following
list (which is in descending order of importance)
will be printed. There will be no deviation from
these rules.
�Campus organization meetings.
�Academic announcements (guest lecturers,
etc.).
� Intramural and club sport announcements.
�Co-op employment announcements.
�Church and religious announcements directly
pertaining to students.
�All-campus parties not devoted to profit.
�Club or fraternity or sorority parties that are
devoted to charities.
�Other announcements not covered under the
above rules but that are group-related.
THERE will be absolutely no congratulation
messages printed in this section. Also, The East
Carolinian reserves the right to edit an-
nouncements for non-essential material gram-
mar punctuation spelling obscenity or libel.
This policy is effective Jan. 15 1985.
SANDWICH SHOP
GOOD
THRU
SAT.
MAR. 2nd
Large Ham. Bologna
& Cheese No. 15
$1.99 11AM-11PM
752-2183
Corn of 4th ond Rood. Od Ut Store Only
Downtown
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert C argil!
University Professional Center
60S E. 10th St. Greenville. NC
758-4927
19.50
Value
360� swivel. 60-watt
rated with spaghetti
cord. White, brown, red.
blue or black.
Summer School at BOCC
Undergraduate students Interested In atten-
ding summer school at Beaufort County
Community College may apply tor admis-
sion through The Office of Admissions at
Beaufort County Community College.
Summer session I begins May and ends Ju
ly 5 while summer session 11 Is scheduled for
July S through August 14.
General Information on available courses
offered, registration and other Information
Is available from the Office of Admissions,
Beaufort County Community College, P.O.
Box 1069, Washington, NC 27889
For further information, contact the Office
of Admissions at (919) 946-6194.
ECU Surfing Club
A club for all beach lovers, a team for com
petitive surfing. There will be a meeting at 8
Thurs Feb. 28 in the coffeehouse
(Mendenhall basement) Everyone going on
the trip to Florida spring, break needs to at
tend this meeting Any newcomers are also
welcome.
KYF
King Youth Fellowship will be having a Bible
Study Tues Feb. 26 at 7 p m. in 242
Mendenhall. For more information contact
Jack at 752 1081
Pre-Med
Attention officers, members, and pledges.
There will be a meeting In Flanagan 307. The
speakers will be 1st Year medical students
from ECU School of Medicine. All are invited
and refreshments will be served. At 7 In
Flanagan 307. There will be an Important
meeting concerning the symposium. All of-
ficers, member, and pledges are expected to
attend.
Epsicopal Worship
A student Episcopal Service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated on Tues.
evening, Feb. 26 In the chapel of St. Paul's
Episcopal Church, 406 4th st. (one block from
Garrett Dorm). The service will be at 5:30
p.m. with the Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev.
Bill Hadden, celebrating.
Attention
Thurs Feb 21 could become the most Im-
portant day of your life by coming to
Mendenhall from 11-4 p.m. You can learn
more about C ADP, responsible drinking, tips
to successful partying and more.
ACROSS
1 High mountain
4 Runs easily
9 Remuneration
12 Weight ot India
13 Angry
14 High card
15 Made a
common
interest ol
17 Warns
19 Evergreen trees
21 Parcel of land
22 Pronoun
24 Tattered cloth
26 Promontory
29 Souvenir
31 Sailor: colloq
33 Pair
34 Babylonian
deity
35 Small child
37 Spanish title
39 Deciliter: abbr
40 Total
42 Small lump
44 Caravansary
46 Former Russian
ruler
48 Proposition
50 Sell
51 Regret
53 Famed
55 Pricks painfully
58 Cylindrical
61 Possess
62 Yawned
64 Dawn goddess
65 Marsh
66 European
67 Cleaning device
DOWN
1 Snake
2 Sign of zodiac
3 Drive onward
4 Hold on
property
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
5 Command
6 Parent: colloq.
7 Sched. abbr.
8 Trade for
money
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9 Separated
10 Perform
11 Affirmative
16 Boundary
18 Vast age
20 Sink in middle
22 Handle
23 Chiefs
25 Deity
27 Country of
Africa
28 Compact
30 Farm animal
32 Genus of cattle
36 Flap
38 At no time
41 Challenging
43 Noise
45 Buy back
47 Hurry
49 Lavishes
fondness
on
52 Urges on
54 Spreads for
drying
55 Cry
56 Couple
57 Carpenter's
tool
59 Also
60 Extrasensory
perception:
abbr.
63 Greek letter
Public Lecture
The Medieval and Renaissance Studies Com-
mittee and Phi Alpha Theta, the History
Honors Society, will sponsor a public lecture
on the topic "Henry II of France and the
Demise of Medieval Warfare" by Professor
F. Baumgartner, VPi, on Thurs Feb. 28, at
� p.m in Brewster B 202
Women's Indoor Soccer
Practice's: Feb. 26 at 9:30 In Memorial Gym
(north side) and Feb. 21 at 9 (Mem. Gym
N). Club members expected, all other
women welcome.
Scholarships Available
Air Force ROTC Is looking for students seek
Ing education, opportunities, and ex-
perience. Air Force ROTC offers scholar
ships for tuition, books, and S100 per month
The Air Force Officers Qualifying Test
(AFOQT) Is offered on 18 March (Mon) from
1.30 to 6:30. This is necessary in order to be
considered for scholarships for the fall
semester of 1985. All Interested students are
urged to visit Maor Patton at Air Force
ROTC on the second floor of Wright Annex or
call 757-6598 for further information
Pirate Walk
Sutdent escorts and logging escorts are
avilable for ECU students, Facuty. nan
dlcapped persons and staff. Call Pirate Walk
at 757-6616 Sun. through Thurs. evenings,
from 6 to 12 p.m. Our operational area in
eludes the ECU main campus and a two
block surrounding area, college hill and the
Minges comples.
Aerobic Fitness
Register for second session aerobic classes
Feb. 24 March l from 8:30-4 p.m. Come to
room 204 Memorial Gym or call 752 6387
ECU Frisbee
The ECU "Hates" will be playing at Univer
sity of Florida Galnsville March 28.3 and at
Miami Dade Community College March
98.10 If you are in the area come on out and
iam with de Irey-Force. Hot ultimate.
There will be practice Mon,Tues. and
Thurs. at 3. Meeting Tues. at 9. Florida peo-
ple must have University excuse if your ab-
sent. Lets leave Fri. about dusk.
PPHA Meeting
On Thurs , Feb 28 at 5 30 In Mendenhall
room 221, there will be a regularly scheduled
meeting of the Pre Professional Health
Alliance. All members are expected to at
tend and pay dues and for the pins as agreed
upon. All other persons Interested in the
health related fields er. welcomed and en
c our aged to attend
Pi Kappa Phi
Everyone Is reminded to come out and sup
port "B" team basketball tonight in their
playoff game at 7 p.m at Minges Also.
remember our happy hour at the Elbo Room
this Wed. Founder's Day was great, and the
Alumni turnout was terrific�1985 86 looks
even better
Omega Psi Phi
and Delta Sigma Theta will have their
Omega and Delta Ball on March 23 It will be
a tropical evening of enchantment Tickets
are on sale now
Also a spring break jam will be presented
at the Unlimited Touch on Thurs . March 28
There will also be a 9 11 happpy hour and an
proceeds will go to the Heart Fund Assooa
tion Rides will be provided between 9 10 30
at MSC
AMA Elections
Anyone interested in running tor an AMA
position for next year, turn your name 'n
folder outside room 227 in Rawl
Joyner Library
has received a publication which will be ot
interest to those sutsdents who are preparing
to take the NTE How to Prepare for the Na
tional Teacher Examinations may be used ir
the Reserve Room of the library
Amabassadors
We will have a genera! meeting on Feb 27 at
5pm in the Mendenhall Multipurpose room
We nave lots of activities to discuss before
spring break and we'll have a report from
the members that attended the regional con
vention It will be an exciting meeting
I
CAMP TON-A-WANDAH
Student Opportunities
We are looking for girls interested in be-
ing counselors � activity instructors in a
private girls camp located in Henderson-
ville, N.C. Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WSI), Horseback riding, Ten-
nis, Backpacking, Archery, Canoeing,
Gymnastics, Crafts, also, Basketball, Com-
puters, Soccer, Cheerleading, Drama, f
Nature study, Field Hockey. If your school
offers a Summer Internship program we j
will be glad to help. Inquiries � Morgan I
j Jiund un sjjmsu-
Haynes, P.O. Box 400 C, Tryon, NC,
28782.
feb 2b
7'30 pm.
Brewster 005
(Jccupa-honal Therapy
Physio Therapy
Social Work-
Music Therapy
Therapeutic Recreation
clinicians, Faculty
Do you khow ki)af fnese people do?
. Do you know hoN each team member conxvi bules
-fo -fhe feom 7
. rome "Tuesday find out-
� Chcmce for queshonb A0
� Refreshments
Colorful Adjustable
Clip Lights
12.99
galleria
The Raza in Greenville Shop Nightly Til 9
The No. 12
JUSTRIGHTFOR
STEAK ON A BUDGET
� � � -�
Sirloin

No. 12 $1.99
Tues. and Thurs I
For Lunch
and Dinner
F�ee
Potato Fixin's
Bar
Your Meal'
For the second week in a row,
the SGA denied funding to the
ECU chapter of the NAACP
Quorum was called Monday
night and the meeting ended,
following lengthy debate from
both sides.
Last week president of ECU �
NAACP Wilma Case asked the
legislators to fund travel for
memberi
V ahintl
request
SGA deej
affair, vj
guideline's
Alter
the bill
debate ci
question.
Beware Of
HEALTH
C0LUM
It's almost Spring Break and
many students' thoughts are on
getting the perfect tan. Before
heading off to Florida, keep in
mind some tips about sun ex-
posure.
After a long cold winter, limit
Memorial
Established
By Professor
ECL Nc�v B
In memory of their son, an
ECU history professor and his
wife have established a fund to
help handicapped children
through a special remedial educa-
tion program.
With such a program at ECU.
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gowen saw
their oldest son Bobby, achieve a
dramatic breakthrough in his
lifelong struggle against severe
physical handicaps.
To the amazement of his fami-
ly and doctors, Bobby Gowen
learned to read and write, to play
the piano and give recitals, to
make friends and enjoy social ex-
periences and travel. And he
became an ardent and en-
thusiastic sports fan.
Bobby Gowen died last Nov.
28, succumbing to the heart and
lung defects and other frailities
that had made him a near invalid
since birth.
"All of his life he was severely
limited by his body his father
said. When he died at the age of
19, Bobby weighed only 52
pounds.
In establishing the Bobby
Gowen Memorial Scholarship
Endowment Fund, his parents
said that entering REAP
(Remedial Education Activity
Program) in the School of Educa-
tion was a turning point in Bob-
by's life.
"That was the big
breakthrough Dr. Gowen said.
"It opened up worlds for Bobb.
It enabled him to make the very
best of what he did
Bobby entered the REAP pro-
gram at the age of five. After one
and a half years of the program,
learning number concepts, color
concepts, shape concepts,
language arts and speech therapy.
he was enrolled in the public
schools.
Judy McCall. acting director
of REAP, said Bobby "made
consistent progress" in the pro-
gram.
Gowen and his wife, the
former Nobuko Tsutaoka of
Tokyo. Japan, said their son
"was a very special person
"He was severely limited, but
he turned it � the adversity � all
around by his own character
Gowen said. "How proud we
were of Bobby's ac-
complishments.
"He had courage, tolerance.
incredible patience and. aboe
all, love. His spirit was tremen-
dous, even though everything was
stacked against him his father
said.
"What we understand now is
that it was not what we were do-
ing for Bobby, but very clearly it
was v hat he was doing for us
Gowen said. "He made our lives
so much richer
The Gowens said the purpose
of the endow ment fund, to which
friends also contributed, is to
provide financial aid for pupils
enrolled in the program. "It is to
enable them (REAP) to take
children similar to Bobby and
open to them all of the oppor-
tunities that Bobby got through
the program Gowen said.
REAP serves children ages 2-8.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1983
PPH A Meeting
On Thury, Feb ?8 at 5 30 In Mendenhall
room Ml. there will be a regularly scheduled
-neetlno of the Pre Professional Health
Alliance All members are expected to at-
tend and pay dues and tor the pins as agreed
jpon Ail other persons Interested In the
rtealth related fields are welcomed and en
-ouraged to attend
Pi Kappa Phi
Everyone Is reminded to come out and sup-
oor B team basketball tonight In their
oiayotf game at I p m at Minges. Also,
remember our happy hour at the Elbo Room
�his Wed Founder's Day was great, and the
Mumni turnout was terrific�1985 86 looks
en better
Omega Psi Phi
lelta Sigma Theta will have their
�ega ana Delta Ball on March 23 It will be
i tropical evening of enchantment Tickets
i'e on sale now
� H a spring break iam will be presented
the jrmmited Touch on Thurs March 28
nere n also be a 9 11 happpy hour and all
���oceeds win go to the Heart Fund Associa
� m provided between 9 1030
AMA Elections
res'ea in running for an AMA
ie�� year, turn your name in
i 227 in Raw I
Joyner Library
s received a publication which will be of
'eresf to tnose sutsdents who are preparing
'pNTE How to Prepare for the Na
' eider Examinations may be used In
terve Room of the library.
Amabassadors
rave a genera1 meeting on Feb 27 at
I ne Mendenhall Multipurpose room.
e j's o activities to discuss before
sreax ana we'll have a report from
-oers that attended the regional con-
it win be an exciting meeting.
WANDAH
portunities
girls interested in be-
uvity instructors in a
rated in Henderson-
� needed especially in
orseback riding, Ten-
Archery, Canoeing,
Iso, Basketball, Com-
eerleading, Drama,
lockey. If your school
ternship program we
Inquiries � Morgan
400 C, Tryon, NC,
TACTS
AILY Wt VR UO.OOpai,
EXTENDI I)
WEAN $60.00pair
IIV! II) $70.00Pai�
(blue aqua,
green, brown)
DENT ID REQUIRED
lees tor professional �eria's
type nd inir previous oii
ation � 756-9404.
?On�R?A
(ircenvslle b.vd
letf
Idwiches
tdwiches
cream
lent
�rvice
the hill
iing services
Clamp
For the second week in a row,
the SGA denied funding to the
ECU chapter of the NAACP.
Quorum was called Monday
night and the meeting ended,
following lengthy debate from
both sides.
Last week president of ECU �
NAACP Wilma Case asked the
legislators to fund travel for
members to attend a
Washington, D.C meeting. The
request was denied because the
SGA deemed the trip a partisan
affair, violating appropriations
guidelines.
After a motion to reconsider
the bill was passed, this week's
debate centered on the same
question. "We really don't know
if we're funding something that's
political or not said Richard
Wynne, an SGA legislator. He
said the SGA should reconsider
its definition of partisan activity.
Wynne pointed out that the
center of the debate was the trip
itself and the constitution as was
indicated in the Feb. 19 issue of
the East Carolinian.
Beware Of Those Ultraviolet Rays
An advisor to ECU �
NAACP, Charla Davis, told the
legislators the conference was an
"invitation" by the national
chapter. "It is purely educa-
tional Davis said, "and
definitely no partisanship is in-
volved. The ECU chapter will
probably be the only school that
is represented and will show that
this school has some vested in-
terest in the NAACP
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne
asked if an itinerary could be
shown to the legislators. Case
said an informal one had been
drawn up and included the
visiting of North Carolina Sens.
John P. East and Jesse Helms,
along with First District Con-
gressman Walter B. Jones. Kil-
coyne was not satisfied with the
itinerary.
Vice Chancellor for Student
Life Elmer Meyer said that letting
these students attend the meeting
would be beneficial. He advised
the SGA to carefully consider this
appropriation of funds.
Before debate could continue
any further, a member of the
legislature called for a count of
legislators and determined the
number present did not constitute
quorum so the bill automatically
died.
HEALTH
COLUh
It's almost Spring Break and
many students' thoughts are on
getting the perfect tan. Before
heading off to Florida, keep in
mind some tips about sun ex-
posure.
After a long cold winter, limit
Memorial
Established
By Professor
ECU News Bureau
In memory of their son, an
ECU history professor and his
wife have established a fund to
help handicapped children
through a special remedial educa-
tion program.
With such a program at ECU,
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gowen saw
their oldest son Bobby, achieve a
dramatic breakthrough in his
lifelong struggle against severe
physical handicaps.
To the amazement of r' ami-
ly and doctors, Bobby Gowen
learned to read and write, to play
the piano and give recitals, to
make friends and enjoy social ex-
periences and travel. And he
became an ardent and en-
thusiastic sports fan.
Bobby Gowen died last Nov.
28, succumbing to the heart and
lung defects and other frailities
that had made him a near invalid
since birth.
"All of his life he was severely
limited by his body his father
said. When he died at the age of
19, Bobby weighed only 52
pounds.
In establishing the Bobby
Gowen Memorial Scholarship
Endowment Fund, his parents
said that entering REAP
(Remedial Education Activity
Program) in the School of Educa-
tion was a turning point in Bob-
by's life.
"That was the big
breakthrough Dr. Gowen said.
"It opened up worlds for Bobby.
It enabled him to make the very
best of what he did
Bobby entered the REAP pro-
gram at the age of five. After one
and a half years of the program,
learning number concepts, color
concepts, shape concepts,
language arts and speech therapy,
he was enrolled in the public
schools.
Judy McCall, acting director
of REAP, said Bobby "made
consistent progress" in the pro-
gram.
Gowen and his wife, the
former Nobuko Tsutaoka of
Tokyo, Japan, said their son
"was a very special person
"He was severely limited, but
he turned it � the adversity � all
around by his own character
Gowen said. "How proud we
were of Bobby's ac-
complishments.
"He had courage, tolerance,
incredible patience and, above
all, love. His spirit was tremen-
dous, even though everything was
stacked against him his father
said.
"What we understand now is
that it was not what we were do-
ing for Bobby, but very clearly it
was what he was doing for us
Gowen said. "He made our lives
so much richer
The Gowens said the purpose
of the endowment fund, to which
friends also contributed, is to
provide financial aid for pupils
enrolled in the program. "It is to
enable them (REAP) to take
children similar to Bobby and
open to them all of the oppor-
tunities that Bobby got through
the program Gowen said.
REAP serves children ages 2-8.
your first exposure to the sun to
15 minutes. Sunning can then be
gradually increased. Try to avoid
mid-day tanning from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. when the sun is the most
intense. The burning component
of sunlight, ultraviolet light, is
not filtered by clouds, so it is
possible to get tanned and also
burned on a cloudy day.
There are now sunscreens that
can screen out harmful UV light.
The PABA (Para-Aminobenzoic
acid) compounds range from 1
power to 21 power; the 21 power
will totally block the UV light
with one power letting in the
most UV light. The powers are
also referred to as the Sun Pro-
tection Factor which represents a
multiple of the time it takes to get
a minimal sunburn on your skin.
You should remember that often
sunburn does not show up until
hours after you've gotten out of
sun. Everyone has different skin.
Fair complexions and red heads
have a skin type that is easily
burned and should use a SPF of
8-15. Dark haired and darker
skinned people burn rarely and
can use a SPF of 2.
Medications can cause reac-
tions when exposed to the sun.
Women on oral contraceptive
pills have increased sensitivity to
sun and get splotchy tans due to
estrogen effects. Tetracycline, an
antibiotic, can cause sun sen-
sitivity so a type of allergic reac-
tion can occur in sun exposed
areas. Other drugs that can cause
sun sensitivity are valium,
benadryl and compazine. If you
have any questions about medica-
tion you are taking, ask a phar-
macist or other health care pro-
vider.
The worst thing about sun ex-
posure is that damage to the skin
builds up. Physicians are now
seeing the effects of sun exposure
for 10-20 consecutive years. Skin
becomes leathery and tough after
many years of sunning. UV
radiation can cause recurrence of
both oral and genital herpes,
which can be prevented by using
lip sunscreen and avoiding pro-
longed exposure. Also, UV ex-
posure can cause solar keratosis
which is a noncancerous growth
on skin but has a low chance of
becoming malignant.
Enjoy your time in the sun but
please remember to use modera-
tion.
The Student Health Center has
a brochure on sunning that pro-
vides more detailed information
about medication sensitivity and
sun protection factors.
y Vr Ww
Puzzle Answer
ALP1LOPEsPAY
SER'RATEACE
PO0LED� ALERTS
T Hp Ei MN C O WE RA GLO NT ES S
R E AE A DL D1 T R UG A DO D D OB O sN ED Ru D A0 L 1
T SA REB1 NTV EE DN TD E
ST1NGSTERE
OWN1GAPED1EOS
BOGSW1SSIMOP
Biscuits
OPEN 24 HOURS
� 758-2098 �
Located at the corner
of Charles and 11 th St.
at the old "Creamery"
location.
Chicken
Biscuits
HANGOVER SPECIAL"
FREE Chicken
Biscuit
Tfe
Buy one get one Free.
Chicken Biscuit.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
FREE Chicken
Dinner (mixed)
Buy any Chicken Snack
or Box and Recieve a
"Mixed Snack" Free!
iehtcjib
T
presents
Thursday
M
FNPpzM
Pre-Spring BrTak Festival of Fun
featuring the Hot Fun in the Sun Boogie Man
Daddy Cool
playing all your Spring Break Hits
Event 1 - AZ& & IE Ul Sisters, Beer War 3
Event 2 - The Girl of the Month Finals
Event 3 � Happy Hour from 8-9:30!
Event 4 - Beau's T-Shirts Only $5.00!
Event 5 � Your Chance to win $$ to take on Spring Break!
So put on your Party Clothes & let us get you in the Spring Break SPIRIT
at Eastern North Carolina's biggest pre-Spring Break Party Nightspot,
That's Beau's of course!
Located in the Carolina East Centre Phone 756-6401
Beau's is a private club for members and their guests
All ABC Permits. Memberships available at the door
Guests are welcome.
Don't Forget: Back from Break Bikini Contest Wednesday. March 13. Be There!
l.9 � � Xfc�W4yXM�jy
mmmeim0m
'mmmmmmmmammammmmmwmm
mmm
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VN
V
QUje iEaat (Sarnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM NORTON, General Manager
Greg Rideout, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, mm mm Tom Luvender, mm
Scott Cooper, co-spon Edor Anthony Martin, mm Manager
Tina Maroschak, we Edi,or John Peterson, cmm ����
BILL MITCHELL. arculalion Manager BILL DAWSON. Production Manager
Doris Rankins. sm Rick Mccormac. co-spon Editor
DANIEL MAURER, Entertainment Editor DECHANILE JOHNSON, Ad Technician
February 26, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
U.S.S.R.
Get A New Leader, Guys
We know the Union of Soviet
Socialist Republics is listening.
Heck, they read The East Caroli-
nian every business day to monitor
the subversive goings on at ECU.
Well, we've got a message for its
leaders: Get a new leader and stop
playing medical games with the
world and your people.
First of all, your present leader
is not only dumb and ignorant, he
can't even stand up without two
Vladymirs at his side. He is in no
condition to be heading the second
strongest country on the face of
the earth. Nor are his medical
ducks in a row to be leader of the
un-free world.
The man is going to die soon;
that's what the headlines say.
Soviet Union, go ahead and retire
him. Let him spend some time with
his grandchildren before the great
Lenin in the sky comes and plucks
his red star. At least our old man,
Ronald Reagan, is fit. He could
chop wood with any 30-year-old
Hollywood stuntman. He is alert
and intelligent(&) enough to run
our side of the world. Heck, but
ol' Konstantin, well, he might as
well get his affairs in order.
So, for our and the world's safe-
ty, get another guy. Are there any
young, bright wippersnappers
creeping around the Kremlin. You
know, a young Gregori with a
Western smile and a winning at-
titude. Someone that at least can
go to the John by himself and
make his speech appearances on
time.
We, The East Carolinian, know
you are listening. After heretofore
describing the aforementioned
situation, we propose the follow-
ing suggestions:
�Get someone 50 years old to be
in charge. That way he'll have time
to learn the job.
�Put someone less-hardlined in
the job. Maybe if you start show-
ing a little softening, we can get
some constructive dialogue going
on this nuclear arms stuff.
�Find someone who knows that
towing the Marxist line is not good
for the country's economy. Ten-
year plans don't put bread on the
table. Maybe if you realize we have
to work together, then, heck, we
both won't have to worry about
any button pushing.
�Last, get someone who knows
that we aren't really that naive, but
that we are willing to help save the
world. We know you guys can be
sons of bitches, but we also realize
the consequences of blowing both
our stacks.
So, Chernenko, roll over and
give someone else a chance. Ron-
nie's looking for history, and we
don't want you to give him the
wrong kind.
Did You Know � What is the
history of football? Ancient savage
tribes played football of a
primitive kind. There was a ball-
kicking game played by Athenians,
Spartans and Corinthians 2500
years ago, which the Greeks called
Episkuros. The Romans had a
similar game that they brought to
the British Isles when they went
conquering.
But, undoubtedly, the game of
U.S. football traces directly to
English rugby. Informal football
was played on college lawns well
over a century ago. The first for-
mal intercollegiate game was
played between Princeton and
Rutgers at New Brunswick, N.J
on Nov. 6, 1869, with Rutgers win-
ning six goals to four.
��JBBJBIi
Get Graduatl
Hey, SGA Candidates
Heed The E.Cs Advice
By GREG RIDEOUT
Monday marked the beginning of the
SGA Executive Election season. Can-
didates began filing yesterday and will
continue to do so through Friday, en-
ding the first leg of their journey for the
top spots in student government. After
a candidates' meeting on the Monday
after Spring Break, the real politicking
will begin.
From right after the meeting until
March 20, the day of the election, the
posters, handshakers, speech makers
and letter-to-the-editor writers will be
out in full force. Yes, all the men-who-
would-be-president, or for that matter,
vice president, secretary or treasurer,
will be pumping hands and kissing
babies (maybe just "babes" in this
case) trying to rack up the votes for the
"Third Wednesday in March
Luckily, our microcosm of the
democratic process is short and to the
point. We campus political scene wat-
chers may have known who was going
to run, but at least they really haven't
started yet. Heck, George Bush is
already running for 1988, and his
sidekick, Ronnie, ran for 12 years
before he struck gold. Whew, we don't
have to experience this, however, since
most folks stay at ECU only five years
anyways.
So, with the opening gun fired, what
kind of advice can the old E.C. give all
those candidates and people thinking
about running. Well, after many years
of experience in SGA elections, in-
cluding some intimate political
knowledge of some and a bit of tamper-
ing with others (not this staff, but
rumor has it, other staffs), we kind of
know the deal.
First of all, candidates, be honest. No
fudging, faking, fasttalking or lying.
Abraham Lincoln wasn't a good presi-
dent just because he could whistle
"Dixie No, he was truthful. If you're
over in Clement or up in Scott, don't
exaggerate and say you were president
of the home-ec majors club when you
were really only the vee-pee (sound
familiar). Nope, honesty is the best
policy.
Second, don't mention book rental.
Students are tired of book rental. If we
hear one more speech with the phrase,
and the time has come at this great
university for a consolidated, in-
tegrated, non-partisan book rental
system to be instituted we'll hang the
candidate that uttered it from the top of
the Joyner flagpole. Face it, it's a cool
thing to say, and most students hear the
sound of more money going towards
the suds when a prez-potential says it,
but it just won't work. First of all,
studious students keep their books, and
the other 85 percent like the idea of get-
ting money at the end of the year that
Mom and Dad don't know about. Hell,
that's 40 bucks for a new pair of bag-
gies for the beach.
Third, don't connect yourself to
other campus politicos. You never
know what's lurking in someone else's
past. Several years ago, a clean-cut,
would-be prez linked himself to the
sargeant-at-arms of the Students for a
Radiated World, thinking the votes
would pile up. Little did he know that
the unnamed sargeant-at-arms had been
busted four times by the campus police
for blocking the entrance to Krispy
Kreme. So, stay distanced but cordial.
Remember, that engineering club
mascot might just be a flaming en-
vironmentalist.
Fourth, beer and food get votes every
Government Involvement In Economy Is Good For U.S.
For the past several weeks, I've been
discussing the flaws endemic in an
economy based solely on the profit
motive. Contrary to the conventional
conservative "wisdom we have seen
that those people whose overriding goal
is profit do not necessarily act in a way
benefiting society. Thus far, we have
looked only at how the process of de-
industrialization leads to higher levels of
unemployment, a decline in the number
of jobs paying decent wages and the
overall weakening of the American
economy.
In future columns, we will see how
corporate interests often distort U.S.
foreign policy and development policy in
the Third World, thus embroiling
From The Left
Jay Stone
America in needless and unjust military
conflicts, exacerbating poverty and
world hunger and substantiaUy ag-
gravating environmental problems. We
will see also that the Reagan administra-
tion's assault on social programs and
labor legislation is, in fact, a new form
of class war.
The majority of Americans are asked
to make sacrifices so that corporations
and the wealthy may enjoy a greater
level of prosperity while offering virtual-
ly nothing in return. (The logic of trickle
down has been substantially defrocked.)
Meanwhile, America is being moved
backwards by a president who roman-
ticizes the by-gone days of class
polarization and mean-spirited social
strife. The sour underbelly of
Reaganomics reveals itself as the new
social Darwinism.
It is against such a scenario that I have
juxtaposed the call for economic
democracy. In my last two columns, I
have proposed that there should be
greater involvement by workers and the
public in investment decision-making
and greater involvement by workers in
the day-to-day decisions of the
workplace.
Yet, even if these structural reforms
were initiated by a serious progressive
government and fully supported by the
nation's major labor unions, consumer
groups, civil rights organizations,
women's organizations and others, the
country's largest corporations � the
Fortune 500 � would still hold the na-
tion's economy captive. A capital strike
� or refusal to invest � by the large
corporations or even more large-scale
capital flight overseas by multinational
firms would plunge the economy into a
recession and threaten the reform
government with a national crisis.
A strategy aimed at greater
democratic participation in economic af-
fairs and a more equitable distribution
of wealth must, therefore, deal with the
dominant role of the large corporation
in American society. In their book
Economic Democracy, Derrick Shearer
and Martin Carnoy propose a com-
prehensive strategy for acheiving this
end.
Public ownership of key firms is pro-
bably the single most maligned proposal
the democratic left has advanced. Con-
servatives have attacked public owner-
ship of business on the grounds that
such a policy leads to state
totalitarianism and public enterprises
are inherently wasteful and inefficient.
Shearer and Carnoy, however, examine
several experiments with public owner-
ship in countries such as West Germany
and Great Britain, and they conclude
that public enterprises in most
democratic western economies are run
efficiently and are well-managed.
Moreover, they point out that cor-
porations established and owned by the
public to accomplish specialized
economic development have appeared
throughout American history. Public,
non-profit corporations have built
bridges, dug canals, created ports, run
airports, managed turnpikes and per-
formed dozens of other tasks. Current
American examples of public ownership
include the Communications Satellite
Corporation, the Corporation for
Public Broadcasting, the Federal Na-
tional Mortgage Association, the
Federal Home Loan Bank and the Ten-
nessee Valley Authority.
Shearer and Carnoy advocate the
creation of a government holding com-
pany, remotely similar to the
Reconstruction Finance Corporation of
the New Deal era. Unlike the RFC,
however, the new company would be us-
ed to reform and gradually democratize
the American economy. The company
would purchase the requisite number of
shares (between 10 and 20 percent should
be sufficient in most cases) in at least
one major firm in each major industry
dominated by a few companies. These
would include the automobile, drug,
chemical and computer industries, as
well as others.
Empowered by its share interests, the
government holding company would
place public members on the boards of
directors of these corporations �
members who represent consumers and
labor. For businesses that are dependent
upon government subsidies, tariffs, tax
breaks and public agencies that pay for
corporate damage to the environment,
the government should negotiate for
shares of stock in return for the ongoing
financial support.
The point of such a strategy would be
that competitive public enterprises
would, in many cases, affect the
behavior of the remaining private firms
by engaging in pro-consumer commer-
cial practices and, through competitive
pressure, induce these companies to
follow their lead in producing a safer,
high-mileage car or a readable insurance
policy.
The public companies would also pro-
vide vital information to the government
on the actual costs and processes involv-
ed in the industries, and thus serve as a
standard for social responsibility in
areas such as product safety, worker
health and safety, labor relations and
environmental standards. Thus, if the
government deemed it necessary to pro-
secute a corporation because of laxity in
any of the areas mentioned above it
would have a model for comparison
with the performance of private firms.
Yet a government holding company
could only purchase shares in 25-30
firms at the most, consequently, most of
the Fortune 500 would be left intact. For
this reason, Shearer and Carnoy propose
the reform of existing anti-trust legisla-
tion. They maintain that under current
laws, definitions of illegal, non-
competitive behavior are so vague and
the burdens of proof so demanding that
cases are tied up in court for years at
great public expense and with few
results.
In addition, divestment, the desired
result of anti-trust suits, should be ex-
time. If you're going to hold a rally,
suds are essential on this campus. Pri
spective voters may not remember how
you stand on visitation policy, but
they'll know if the budweiser was free-
flowing and the McNuggets were
good supply. Nothing gets to a college
student quicker. Anything for free
questions asked. Two former SGA
treasurers were said to have won strictK
because of their baking ability (hash
brownies in the early '70s, we believe).
So, remember, the keg will lead to
kinghood.
Fifth, don't you dare tell anyone.
"It'll look good on my resume You'll
sink faster than the Titanic. Of course,
we all know it's true, but no one wants
to actually hear it. One candidate
several years ago went so far as to
describe where on his vitae he'd place
"SGA President Needless to say. he
never got the chance. Please, say you
want to better humanity, save mankind
or even, "I just want to sit in the nice
chair in the Mendenhall office �
anything but, "Uncle Harvey will sura-
ly give me a job now
Of course, this is not a complete set
of the rules. No one has really compiled
all the faux pas. But, we know thing
will go just smashing; an interesting go
around again, with seemingly worth
candidates (although unannounced).
But, remember, students will be wat-
ching. You tell them you want the job
to advance their cause. So, at least do a
good job convincing them of that.
Maybe, you'll get a lucrative deal after
the year in office is over. We've heard
Paul Naso got six figures for his in-
timate memoirs, and rumor has it that
John Rainey is going to do Jell-O com-
mercials with Bill Cosby. Not bad, eh.
tended so that a divested division of a
conglomerate might be converted into a
worker-owned or worker-community
owned enterprise.
The authors also believe that govern-
ment regulations that protect the en-
vironment, the health and safety of
workers and the rights of consumers
should be strengthened, though they say
the role of government in regulating
business can be reduced in these areas
through worker-controled initiatives
over time. They point out that most
government regulatory agencies are
dominated at present by the very
businesses that they are supposed to
regulate. This is particularly true under
the Reagan administration. A reform
government should change this.
A final avenue of control over cor-
porate decision-making is government
planning where the government,
representing the public interest, would
excercise influence over management
decisions in the interest of promoting
stable, regional economic development
and maintaining high levels of employ- -
ment.
In many western European countries,
the government and the company, and .
frequently labor unions, negotiate
agreements regarding plant location and
plant closures. Democratic planning
would ultimately produce an overall
public framework within which market '
exchanges between enterprises and bet- �
ween labor, consumers and enterprises
would take place. In a democratic j
economy, planning would not replace
market relationships. It would supple- �
ment them.
Next week I will talk about the e
Reagan deficits and what they mean for I
the economy.
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Wrter
As graduation approaches,
parents and relatives may have
difficulty acquiring space at area
motels due to limited space.
Gradu;
schedule;
Mane
the Econi
minimur
motel am
will be ofi
Phi Kappa Phi Symj
What's Right With America,
February 26-27, !
ursing Building Auditoriui
Tuesday, February
8:45 a.m. � Dr. John Howeil, ChanJ
Remarks.
9 a.m. � Dr. Martin Schuarz.
Chauvinism: The Educator's Mission
10 a.m. � Dr. Richard Miller. Edu
11 a.m. � Dr. David Glascoff. Exch
and the Right to Choose: A Mark
1 p.m. � Dr. Jeanne Sea fella.
American Sews Media: Some Ethical am
of the Right to Privacy v. the Public's ?j
2 p.m. � Susan Tacker. Westm
Media and Traditional Freedom
3 p.m. � Mr. WD. Bulloch, The Br
System. What Might America G
Wednesday. Februaf
9 a.m. � Dr. Evelyn McNc
10 a.m. � Dr. Karl Rodabaugh. Th
Architects of Modern America
11 a.m. � Robbie Edwards. H
Clean?
1 p.m. � Ted Cash. .4 Broken Hea
American Medicine
2 p.m. � Dr. Rita Saldanha and D:
for Handicapped Infants: An Amerk
20 ECU Dil
For Students and
on all prescripl
eyeglasses
315 Parkview Corn
Actom From Doctor!
pticians
Eastern No
Largest Enter
Pri

LADIES L�
Wednesday, 1
' 804 420 J��c
Fabw
Doors open 8:00 for Lad
Free wine & draft 'til 10:00
Doors open to MEN at 1
Detroit Motown sound of I
Leave the driving
all The Liberty
at 758-5571
Attention Students! Eery YYEC
T Niteiite brings you afterrn
loors open 5:00 pm with Free .
. prices on all beverages 'til 8:i
lie beach music!
Private Club - all ABC
A.
T
mmmm
Tl
v
fl
A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1985
R�LANC,
ClfcREP
fR CBS,
U'hi
V-A
dvice
hold a rally,
campus. Pro-
emember how
Klicy, but
as free-
gget- were in
a college
r free, no
mer SGA
v e won strictly
ability (hash
we believe).
will lead to
tell anyone,
e You'll
M course,
no one wants
candidate
far as to
ae he'd place
-ay, he
, say you
e mankind
the nice
lice �
will sure-
omplete set
compiled
things
nteresting go
worthy
lounced).
be wat-
uit the job
H least do a
m of that.
. deal after
er. We've heard
ures for his in-
r has it that
iell-O com-
Not bad, eh.
U.S.
I
Is a
I
I
ted division of a
be converted into a
rker-community
3 believe that govern-
protect the en-
:he health and safety of
e rights of consumers
ened, though they say
rnment in regulating
be reduced in these areas
)rker-controled initiatives
rhe point out that most
regulatory agencies are
at present by the very
they are supposed to
s particularly true under
gan administration. A reform
ent should change this.
al avenue of control over cor-
decision-making is government
g where the government,
ing the public interest, would
influence over management
; in the interest of promoting
egional economic development
ntaining high levels of employ-
� estern European countries,
:rnment and the company, and :
Itiy labor unions, negotiate
Ints regarding plant location and
losures. Democratic planning
kimately produce an overall
ramework within which market
:s between enterprises and bet- :
)or, consumers and enterprises ;
take place. In a democratic ;
planning would not replace ;
lationships. It would supple- ;
tm. -
1
� eek I will talk about the :
-ficits and what they mean for :?
omv. :
-
Get Graduation Reservations (Infirmity Among Elderly Discussed
.
By ELAINE PERRY
surr Writer
As graduation approaches,
parents and relatives may have
difficulty acquiring space at area
motels due to limited space.
Graduation ceremonies are
scheduled for May 4.
Marie Compton, manager of
the Econo Lodge, said there is no
minimum stay requirement at the
motel and the "usual special rates
will be offered to those with three
Phi Kappa Phi Symposium
What's Right With America, What's Wrong
February 26-27, 1985
Nursing Building Auditorium, Room 101
Tuesday, February 26
8:45 a.m. � Dr. John Howell, Chancellor, Opening
Remarks.
9 a.m. � Dr. Martin Schwarz, Patriotism Versus
Chauvinism: The Educator's Mission
10 a.m. � Dr. Richard Miller, Education and Democracy
11 a.m. � Dr. David Glascoff, Exchange, Expectations,
and the Right to Choose: A Marketer's View
1 p.m. � Dr. Jeanne Scafella, What's RightWrong with
American News Media: Some Ethical and Legal Considerations
of the Right to Privacy v. the Public's Right to Know
2 p.m. � Susan Tacker, Westmoreland v. CBS: Modern
Media and Traditional Freedom of the Press.
3 p.m. � Mr. W.D. Bulloch, The Break-Up of the Bell
System. What Might America Gain? or Lose?
Wednesday, February 27
9 a.m. � Dr. Evelyn McNeill, Spaces and Faces in America
10 a.m. � Dr. Karl Rodabaugh, The New Middle Class:
Architects of Modern America
11 a.m. � Robbie Edwards, Water � How Do We Keep It
Clean ?
1 p.m. � Ted Cash, A Broken Heart: Caring and Curing in
American Medicine
2 p.m. � Dr. Rita Saldanha and Dr. John Moskop, Caring
for Handicapped Infants: An American Dilemma
20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
t
pucians
Open 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446
Eastern North Carolina's
Largest Entertainment Center
Presents
LADIES LOCKOUT
Wednesday, Feb. 27th
Featuring
Virginia's Hottest Male
Revue
Fabulous Tails
For
Females
A
Doors open 8:00 for Ladies only with
Free wine & draft 'til 10:00!
Doors open to MEN at 10:00 for the live
Detroit Motown sound of DOWNTOWN.
Leave the driving to us!
all The Liberty Ride
at 758-5570
Attention Students! Every WEDNESDAY in March
TW's Nitelife brings you afternoon happy hours!
Doors open 5:00 pm with Free Admission 'til 6:00,
; : prices on all beverages 'til 8:00, and the best in'
live beach music!
Private Club - all ABC Permits
or more to a room She said a
deposit is not required, but ad-
vance payment will guarantee a
room.
The Sheraton is requiring a
deposit of the first night's pay-
ment. The deposit must be made
seven days after the reservation is
made. According to Brenda
Mann, the front desk clerk,
"there will be no special rates.
We only have a few rooms left
The Ramada Inn will be accep-
ting only guaranteed reserva-
tions. Virgil Evans, front desk
manager, defined a guaranteed
reservation as one confirmed
with a credit card and advance
deposit.
With 75 of 155 rooms filled,
Holiday Inn's Guest Service
Manager Becky Covington said
"the bookings for graduation
weekend are about the same as
last year at this time The Holi-
day Inn is also requiring a
guaranteed reservation.
Greenville's Best Value Motor
Lodge is requiring a deposit and
rates will have a $10 to $15 in-
crease, said Pam Patel, the
manager's wife. She said reserva-
tions will not be accepted until
one month prior to the event.
Check
Out The
Library
By HAROLD JOYNER
AsiltUBl Ntwi Editor
Many elderly people are not
only faced with the dilemma of
social prejudice, but the rapid
decline of their health. However,
a clinical psychologist from
UNC-Chapel Hill said in a lecture
at ECU Monday that it is only 20
percent of the elderly people who
experience a decline in their
health and even more recently,
the onset of Alzheimer's Disease,
a progressive illness that causes
mental deterioration, memory
impairment and personality
changes.
Dr. Rosalie Ackerman, guest
speaker of ECU's Department of
Psychology, said in her lecture
"Brain-Behavior Relationships in
the Aging: Are the Elderly Sick,
Dumb and Eccentric?" that over
80 percent of the people over the
age of 65 are healthy and manage
by themselves.
Ackerman also said she feels
doctors are sometimes too quick
in making a diagnosis
Alzheimer's disease. "Many fac-
tors have to be taken into accouni
before an accurate diagnosis is
made she said. "If one's family
has a history of Alzheimer's
Disease, then at middle age, that
person has about a 17 percent
more chance of being afflicted
with it. For people over the age of
65, the percentage rises to 50 per-
cent
She said studies she has been
involved with at John Umstead
Hospital in Chapel Hill involve a
lot of people who are misdiagnos-
ed. Instead of Alzheimer's
disease, some may have
pseudodementia, which is a form
of depression, not a loss in the
memory process. Only thorough
testing, she said, can the actual
symptoms of dementia and
pseudomentia show up.

X
& Kappa Sigma
Present
ALL CAMPUS AMATEUR
MALE STRIPPERS CONTEST
Tues. Feb. 26,1985
8:00-1:00 AM
Admission $1.00 18 yrs. $2.00
8G-Cans ALL NITE
LADIES LOCKOUT TILL 10:00
PRIZES
1st $100oo CASH PLUS Sponsored By:
A l YR. FREE For Heads Only
na 50oo PASS TO Aerobic Workshop
3rd 25oo THEELBO 5-�up
Entries can sign up at the Student Sup S ai8" &
ply Store Mon & Tues or call Kf House Fall & Spring K Pledges
752-5543. Deadline 8:30 P.M. Tu� g Plcdgw
7 A"7
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
Copyright 1985
Kroger Savon
-Ouantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
I
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
March 2. 1985
i
REGULAR OR LIGHT'
Coors
Beer
f
faf l
DIET COKE OR
coca
Cola
LIMIT 2
PLEASE
12 02.
Cans
OREO
ice Cream
Bars
BIANCO, ROSATO,
D'ORO OR i-
Riunite
Lambrusco
t-pmez?"
&&

2-Ltr.
N.R.B.
BUY ONE LB.
OR MORE SANDY MAC
Boiled Ham
u,3"
GET ONE 6 CT. PKC
Kaiser Rolls
?
Btl.
r:
8 PC. BKT.
Wishbone-
Fried Chicken
� $399
Bkt mm?
?
14 j
S
r
aC

L
�St2
�2?'
THIN CRUST
SINGLE TOPPING
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
For
50-60 CT.
PREVIOUSLY FROZEN MEDIUM
Headless
Shrimp
FRESH BAKED
French-Ki
Bread
LVS.
CUT FROM A 40-LB. BLOCK
Mild Cheddar
CALIFORNIA
SEEDLESS
Navel
Oranges
Lb.
LIMIT
5 LBS.
PLEASE

Cheese
ADVERTISEO ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items
is required to oe readily
avanaoie for sale in each Kroger
Sav on except as specifically
noted in this ad if we do run
out of an item we will offer you
your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting
the same savings or a ramcheck
which win entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item at
the advertised price within JO
days Only one vendor coupon ,
.will oe accepted per item
IMPORTED
Sweet
Nectarines
SHOP THE KROGER DELI-BAKERY
FOR A WIDE VARIETY OF
is Special Occoduut Caked
is VeUmm Potty Tima
Quiet Fix Weofo
V T&-G& SoMfhuicked
STOP BY AND SEE OUR
SELECTION!
Lb.
Go Krogering

r
1 - .���p. .��T . l n Jl rtirT my
���� �
i �

ih





'
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
FEBRUARY 26, 1985
Page 6
From Singer To Actor
Gladys Knight
By JAY & ELLIOTT KRAVETZ
ImenutJoMl Photo Newi
Singer Gladys Knight will co-
star with Flip Wilson in a pilot
for CBS to be called "Charlie
and Company This will be
Gladys' second series, but her
first in a role in which she doesn't
play herself.
"We're going to be taping
television in the near future
Knight told us during a recent in-
terview. "We have very high
hopes for that. We're going to
leap over here and try this out a
little bit
Knight's first series was a four-
week summer variety series in Ju-
ly, 1975, which she co-hosted
with her singing group, the Pips.
She also starred in the film Pipe
Dreams, a sprawling romantic
adventure set against the con-
struction of the Alaskan pipeline.
"I would love to make another
movie she said. "As a matter
of fact, I've been doing quite a
bit of TV things lately for the ex-
perience. I feel I don't want to go
into acting because I had a suc-
cessful career in music and I want
to jump on and say, 'I'm Gladys
Knight, I think I deserve a part
"I don't want that because I
have too much respect for those
people who do this full time
Knight continued. "They spent
their life working at this. It's a
mockery to just jump over there
and say, 'Well, I can act
"I don't feel someone can
come in and say, 'Well I can do
what you do' when I've spent all
my life doing it she said. Ex-
perience means something � and
training. So I want to get some
things under my feetget my feet
wet and really do it.
"I feel I can really do it she
added. "I just haven't had a
chance to yet
With some groups calling
themselves veterans after 27 mon-
ths, Gladys, her brother Bubba
and cousins Ed and William have
been singing and surviving
together for over 30 years. Add
to this the fact that those years
have witnessed some of the best,
most soulful and innovative
music in the history of the
medium.
"We're about music, not
necessarily R & B music, though
that's the way our music is typed
or cast she said. "We are enter-
tainers. We feel more so than be-
ing recording artists, even though
we've had extensive recording
success.
Hailing from Atlanta,
Georgia, the group really had its
beginnings the day Gladys was
born. The foursome first sang
together at one of Bubba's birth-
day parties and from there
graduated to church teas and
various family functions. Gladys,
who remembers singing her first
notes at age four, became a
professional at the tender age of
seven, after winning the $2,000
grand prize on Ted Mack's
Original Amateur Hour.
"I'm a family person she ex-
plained. "I'm a mother � a
single parent. I have three
children. Among us, between The
Pips and myself, we have 23
children. We are just a family
orientated group. I also have a
brother who plays with our band
and has for years
It was William's mother, Mrs.
Margaret Guest, along with
Gladys' mother, Elizabeth
Knight and another cousin James
"Pip" Wood, who decided that
the group's talent warranted a
professional career.
"Our parents are very impor-
tant in Gladys Knight and The
Pips she explained. "They
were very encouraging and really,
I guess, it was them who got this
thing started in the first place, so
we owe that to them
Using Wood's nickname,
"Pip" as their moniker, Gladys
Knight and the Pips were born.
"When we got started it was
not hard to get into
showbusiness Knight recalled.
"We took our changes and we
paid our dues, as the old timers
say. I'm thankful for that
because I feel it helped us to ap-
preciate when things did get bet-
ter.
"It helped us to be ready and
prepared for making that step
toward longevity she added.
The group's first single was
released on the Brunswick label
shortly after the group began
touring in 1958. The song was
called "Whistle My Love" and
was followed in 1961 by a hit of
substantial proportions for the
fledging vocalists.
"I think I have to give credit to
a lot of people we've had sur-
rounding us she said. "They
loved us, first of all, therefore the
advice they gave us was from a
totally caring point of view.
"So many times in our
business when you get represen-
tatives, managers, booking
agents, who could care less
Knight explained, "all they want
is in case you get popular �
they're there for that 10, 15, or 20
percent or whatever she con-
tinued. "But we had loving peo-
ple around us
"As I said, our parents were
very important, even though they
were not showbusiness people
she recalled. "They cared enough
to get into it and see what's hap-
pening. You shouldn't go there
just from instincts; from founda-
tion
"They knew what was wrong
for us she continued. "Dope,
you do not touch. We got that
early on. All the people around
us instilled in us being performers
first.
Gladys Knight
COH Changes Name To Reflect Diversity
By TONY BROWN
Sun Writer
The Carolina Opry House is no
more � long live TW's Nitelife!
Yes, Greenville, the COH has
changed its name, but only to
reflect the variety in entertain-
ment offered by the five-year-old
nightclub. Country music will
still have a place there, though.
"We had no choice said
Buzz Ledford, the entertainment
coordinator. "It just got to the
point where there wasn't enough
support for strictly country
music. Lots of people would ask
for it, but wouldn't come when
we had it.
"We've been headed toward
this decision for about a year
he stated. "When we opened in
1979, there was a great country
music surge because of John
Travolta's Urban Cowboy and
we had a strong demand every
night.
"At one time we had two
mechanical bulls that were in use
constantly Ledford added,
"but fads change and we have to
change along with them to sur-
vive
Even though the COH featured
much more than just country
music over the past year or so,
the name kept many potential
patrons at bay. Those different
sounds have included '50s and
'60s rock'n'roll, beach music and
top 40. Stars like Jerry Lee
Lewis, Johnny Rivers and Ricky
Nelson have also appeared
recently, but the "country" im-
age continued due to the name,
according to Ledford.
"We finally came to the deci-
sion to change the name to reflect
this variety he said. "We're
planning a tremendous range of
events to attract a wide audience.
Basically, we're just expanding
on the diversity we've already
had
The current "regular" line-up
will remain largely intact, Led-
ford said, but contract re-
quirements and booking ar-
rangements will sometimes alter
it.
Wednesday nights will feature
live Top 40 rock, with groups
such as Virginia's hot January
Rose playing in conjunction with
Fabulous Tails For Females, a
male dance troupe. This com-
bination has been a goor drawing
card recently, attracting many
ladies. The ECU Rugby Team
has served as waiters for this
event at times also.
Thursdays will feature live
"oldies" rock'n'roll, with Rock
93's Greg Allinson playing solid
gold during the breaks. Excellent
showbands such as The Marvells
and Spontanes have attracted
large numbers of ECU students
lately.
Allinson's oldies have become
a fixture with Thursday's free
beer. Tunes such as "The Curley
Shuffle "The Twist The
Isley Brothers' "Shout and
even Frank Sinatra's "New
York, New York" have caused
some of the most riotous and
carefree dancing scenes im-
aginable.
Friday nights will offer a mix-
ture of entertainment such as
beach music, country and top 40
rock. Acts such as The Chairmen
of the Board, as well as the
phenomenal country rock Super
Grit, will appear. Super Grit's
most recent claim to fame was
writing and recording the official
theme song for North Carolina's
400th anniversary celebration.
Saturdays will basically be
reserved for country, with Super
Grit and other top country stars.
Ledford is currently in negotia-
tions with a number of acts, in-
cluding Tammy Wynette.
While the COH has seldom
been open on Sundays, the new
TW's plans to bring in big-name
comedians and other alternative
forms of entertainment. He has
been talking with funnyman Jay
Lenno, who has appeared on the
David Letterman Show.
Ledford is pursuing other
alternatives such as "big bands
jazz and even card-playing tour-
naments. "We want to offer
anything the public will
support he said. "We feel we
have the most variety of any club
around.
As a part of the changing style,
the atmosphere of the nightclub
has been altered. A slickly
painted dance floor replaces the
plain wooden one of the past. An
entrance canopy and window
awnings have been added to
stylize the appearance.
The previous rustic look has
been changed to a contempory
mode, with accompanying
upgrading of TW's staff in tux-
edos and bow ties. Faded jeans
and tee shirts will no longer be
allowed.
Tennis shoes have also been
banned, with the exception of
Thursday night. ECU student
Theresa Rinaldi said it's nice to
see the guys "dressed up for a
change while sophomore
Jackie Brown said she likes the
new carpeting and different kinds
of music.
A major feature solely offered
by TW's is a free ride service.
Patrons within Greenville (or
very near) can call the club and a
van will pick them up and take
them home. "We do this as a
public service said Ledford.
"We want everybody who needs
a ride to have one. We're also en-
couraging everyone to be as safe
as possible
Only Three More Days
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Mill�in
March 1 marks the day
everyone has been waiting for �
Spring Break, a time when
thousands of college students
migrate to the beach, the
Bahamas or the mountains for a
week filled with nothing but fun.
What makes these places so ap-
pealing? The atmosphere!
Tina Sponhaltz of the Green-
ville Travel Center said that most
people seem to be going to Ft.
Lauderdale. "A lot of people are
driving to Florida this year she
said. She added that although
they have arranged two group
trips to the Bahamas and several
individual trips to Naussau,
money has forced most students
to stick to Florida.
Julie Long said of her trip to Ft.
Lauderdale last year, "I was im-
pressed. It's not at all like I
thought She added, "We saw
people from all over the place �
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Virginia, everywhere
Another student, Jay Johnson,
went to Ft. Lauderdale to "get
away from school, relax and meet
new people "It's a place where
college students can let go �
anything goes Johnson said.
Some found the atmosphere
quite different than they expected.
"Fort Lauderdale was unlike any
environment I had ever experienc-
ed because you couldn't even walk
down the sidewalk without runn-
ing into someone. But I enjoyed it
just the same said Randy Mews.
Susan Tollefsen and Michele
Pridgen chose a different sort of
atmosphere � the Bahamas. "We
wanted to go somewhere dif-
ferent Tollefsen said.
"Somewhere not too crowded
that offers a lot of
entertainment Pridgen added,
"We got to go snorkeling, scuba
diving and parasailing. The
Bahamas is a nice place to go
because it's fun as well as relax-
mg.
And for 46 students, the
Bahamas will be the place to be.
The ECU Student Union Travel
Committee is sponsoring a cruise
to Nassau for $449 per person for
a quad room and $499 per person
for a twin room. The fee includes
everything except spending money
and food during the bus ride.
At the opposite extreme, some
50 ECU students will be traveling
to Snowshoe, West Virginia for a
week of skiing. Jo Saunders,
coordinator for the trip, said that
Love And Sex Depicted In
Reiner 's Newest Comedy
.
-fc
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
It's almost time to chunk the books and head for some real sun!
some students will receive a one-
hour credit in P.E. "We have
been doing ski-related exercises to
get our bodies in good shape
she said. The trip, which will be
March 3-8, costs anywhere from
$194 to $295.75, depending on the
ski package purchased. This
money includes lodging, lift
tickets, lessons and equipment for
the entire week.
Saunders added that there will
be plenty of entertainment as well.
Besides races with other schools,
there will be square dances, a wine
and cheese party, an Olympic size
swimming pool, hot tubs, and
various entertainment spots.
"Every year we go the kids
sayThis is the greatest way to
spend a vacation Saunders
said. "We're ready to go she
concluded. Aren't we all
By LISA McDONALD
Staff Writer
The difference between sex
with love and sex without love is
the theme of the romantic com-
edy The Sure Thing, a sneak
preview to be presented Thurs-
day, Feb. 28 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre.
The film, directed by Rob
Reiner of "All In The Family is
the story of two college freshmen
who seem worlds apart, but
discover that opposites can and
do attract.
The boy, played by John
Cusack, is Walter "Gib" Gibson,
an 18-year-old Ivy League
freshman preoccupied with junk
food and sex. The girl, played by
Daphne Zuniga, is Alison Brad-
bury, the studious, well organiz-
ed all American type, who thinks
she has her future firmly planted.
When the couple meet in a
freshman writing class, they do
not admit their feelings for one
another. He is uncomfortable
with his feelings towards her, and
her nonchalent attitude makes
him unsure how to win her ap-
proval.
Unable to deal with his doubts
about Alison, Gib accepts an in-
vitation to spend Christmas in
California with his best friend,
Lance (Anthony Edwards).
Lance, who is attending college in
California, has lined up a date
for Gib with what he promises
will be a "sure thing" (Nicollette
Sheridan).
Gib quickly accepts the invita-
tion and wastes no time in lining
up a ride to the West Coast. But
he then discovers that he will be
sharing his journey with Alison,
who is going out West to spend
Christmas with her boyfriend,
Jason (Boyd Gaines). It is on the
trip that we see their relationship
go from animosity to friendship,
and from friendship to love.
When Rob Reiner was
presented with the script, he was
immediately taken with it. "I lov-
ed the sweetness of it, the roman-
tic aspect The film is about two
people who think they want one
thing, but discover that they ac-
tually want something else. What
they discover is that they want
each other.
Classifieds
WANTED
60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Program
Director, Waterfront Directors, Ac
tivity Director, Head Counselors,
Cabin Counselors, and Activity
Leaders for YMCA coed camp
Camp Kanata, Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, NC 27587. (919) 556 2661
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mountains have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
(WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
basketball), gymnastics,
artscrafts, pioneering, music,
photography, drama, dance,
generals. Write: Professor Boo
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 84
Leamington St Lido Beach, nv
11561.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE WANTED: Immediately to
share 3 bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates. Rent $117 per month
plus V3 utilities. Call 757 3306 Please
keep trying.
PART-TIME CUSTOMER PERSON
NEEDED: For Monday and Satur
day. Must be vivacious, personable,
and able to deal effectively with the
public. Must love movies. Call Sun
shine Video at 756 4392
RIDE WANTED: Need a ride to
New Jersey for spring break. May
be able to leave Thurs. evening Will
pay part of the gas. Call 752-0998, ask
for Dan.
6 SPACES LEFT: For Spring Brea
at Daytona, Beach front, first come,
first serve, call Dean a 752-5588 or
Kevin at 752-9732.
RIDE NEEDED: To Ft Lauder
dale, Fla. Will help pay for gas. May
leave any time after 11:30 a.m
Thurs. the 28th. Call Dianne 758 6055.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
roommate wanted to share
2-bedroom townhouse api. $147.50
rentmo. & Vi utilities. Partly fur
nished. 758-9941. I am in class a lot so
keep trying.
ATTENTION GRADUATES &
SENIORS: Special discount rates
and financing. Encyclopedia Britan-
nica. For free presentation call
758-4155.
MOVING: Need person or group to
rent 2 bdrm townhouse apt really
nice- $320mo. Free twin beds before
March 15. JimBob 7 3577 after 6 p.m.
NEWMAN CENTER: ECU has
employment information for
graduating seniors interested in
working in campus ministry or
youth ministry. For details contact
Fr. Terry at the Newman Center, 953
E. 10th St or call 752 4216.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mts. have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
(WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
basketball), gymnastics,
artscrafts, pioneering, music,
photography, drama, dance,
generals. Write: Professor Bob
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 84
Leamington St Lido Beach, NY,
11561.
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON & ALPHA
SIGMA PHI: Little sisters will be
having another "Beer Wars Happy
Hour" this Thursday night. .8
p.mat Beau's. Come on out and
party with the women of Sigma Phi
Epsilon and Alpha Sigma Phi
SPRING BREAK, WHEW Never
thought it would get here. What a
party. We're northern bound- Gotta
love it! Just think, guys will buy us
drinks, and if they take our number
they WILL call Southern
Gentlemen- BA HA- WHERE???
Kim, Vallooking forward to biting
the Big Apple. Remember, don't
mind the maggots. Stiner, Boner.
are there bars in Hooterville?
There's probably a still- In Pete &
Georgia's backyard PC. Call
LUKE. You guysThanks! V.C.
TO I
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Spec al
stuoenl
The Aerobic
Will Be Remodeling Ov
(We Will Be Closed March 4
We Will Re-Open Mor
THE LARGE!
AEROBIC ROOM IN Gl
New Wall to Wall Carpet, Mirr
System ! AII Mem bersh ips W 'ill
Amount of Classes. New Lower
Immediately. Lots of Parking SI
Conveniently Located
Downtown Greenville
417 Evans Street
757-1608
We
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I Ml FASTAROI INIAN
sity
i a contempory
ompanying
staff in tux-
Faded jeans
longer be
also been
the exception of
ECU student
sa h aid it's nice to
dressed up for a
lie sophomore
said she likes the
�nd different kinds
eature solely offered
ree ride service.
thin Greenville (or
near) can call the club and a
1 pick them up and take
"We do this as a
vice said Led ford,
v. ant everybody who needs
o have one. We're also en-
� .ng everyone to be ss safe
depicted In
Comedy
d deal with his doubts
Gib accepts an in-
tation to spend Christmas in
lifornia with his best friend,
ince (Anthony Edwards).
who is attending college in
Uifornia, has lined up a date
Ir Gib with what he promises
111 be a "sure thing" (Nicollette
lendan).
�Gib quickly accepts the invita-
Tn and wastes no time in lining
a ride to the West Coast. But
then discovers that he will be
iring his journey with AJison,
p is going out West to spend
iristmas with her boyfriend,
son (Boyd Gaines). It is on the
that we see their relationship
from animosity to friendship,
" from friendship to love.
hen Rob Reiner was
ssented with the script, he was
lediately taken with it. "I lov-
jthe sweetness of it, the roman-
aspect The film is about two
r�le who think they want one
r.g, but discover that they ac-
Jly want something else. What
t discover is that they want
fch other.
M-BRl ARV 26. 1985
Classifieds
wanted
60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro
cessing mail at home! Information
send self addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Program
Director, Waterfront Directors Ac-
tivity Director, Head Counselors,
Cabin Counselors, and Activity
Leaders for YMCA coed camp
Camp Kanata, Rt. 3, Box 192 Wake
Forest, NC 27587. (919) 556 2661
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mountains have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
(WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
basketball), gymnastics,
arts crafts, pioneering, music,
photography, drama, dance'
generals. Write: Professor Bob
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 84
L-eamington St Lido Beach, NY
11561.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE WANTED: Immediately to
share 3 bedroom apartment at Tar
R er Estates. Rent $117 per month
plus � 3 utilities. Call 757-3306. Please
keep trying.
PART TIME CUSTOM R PERSON
NEEDED: For Monday and Satur-
day. Must be vivacious, personable,
and able to deal effectively with the
public Must love movies. Call Sun-
ne Video at 756-4392.
RIDE WANTED: Need a ride to
New Jersey for spring break. May
be able to leave Thurs. evening. Will
pay part of the gas. Call 752-0998, ask
for Dan.
6 SPACES LEFT: For Spring Break
at Daytona, Beach front, first come,
first serve, call Dean at 752 5588 or
Kevin at 752 9732.
RIDE NEEDED: To Ft Lauder
dale, Fia. Will help pay for gas. May
leave any time after 11; 30 a.m ,
Thurs. the 28th. Call Dianne 758 6055.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
roommate wanted to share
2-bedroom townhouse apt. $147.50
rentmo. & 'a utilities. Partly fur
nished. 758-9941. I am in class a lot so
keep trying.
ATTENTION GRADUATES &
SENIORS: Special discount rates
and financing. Encyclopedia Britan
nica. For free presentation call
758 4155.
MOVING: Need person or group to
rent 2 bdrm townhouse apt really
:�. Free twin beds before
5 JimBob 7 3577 after 6 p.m.
NEWMAN CENTER: ECU has
employment information for
graduating seniors interested in
working in campus ministry or
youth ministry. For details contact
Fr. Terry at the Newman Center, 953
E. 10th St or call 752-4216.
LAMDA CHI ALPHA: Little sister"
rush scheduled for this week has
been cancelled.
TO MY BROKEN HEARTS: Why
don't you sell something that will
make real bucks, fast. Even little
sisters should show more tact when
referring to "their mama Carol
Blue
TO THE YOUNG LADY: I wish I
had introduced myself to last Friday
at the Student Health Center.
would like to get to know you. I was
wearing a green shirt and gray
jacket, I was the guy with the
toothache. Please call me collect at
946 7878, ask for Mike. You were
wearing a blue sweater.
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA
PHI: Would like to invite everyone
out to the Elbo Room this Wednes-
day night for a pre-spring break hap
py hour- let's all get wild before tne
road trips.
KAPPA SIGMA BROTHERS: "It is
in our hearts" -Alpha Psi Pledge
Class.
PI KAPPA PHI: Fraternity wishes
to express its sincere thanks to our
alumni who came out to Founders
Day last weekent- Your continued
support and dedication to the Beta
Phi Chapter is an inspiration the
chapter is, and will always be,
thankful for.
CARMEN E Thanks for going this
weekend. I had a great time, hope
you did too. - Bill S.
PEBBLE: Did you ever find your
d-te?
REG: You'd better not get brand
new on me, or I'll read your history!
Love ya babe! Vicki.
A KAPPA SIGMA CASHEW: The
most wanted nut in a Planters jar.
Congratulations Poo. -Ebbi.
GRATEFUL DEAD FANS: Road
Trips is back on the road. Pick up
your Dead tickets at Apple Records.
Price includes round trip by bus.
"J KENT: Lar9e I bedroom loft,
cathedral ceiling, dishwasher, $240
per month, 758-4614.
FOR SALE: Hitachi stereo cassette,
speakers, as new. $150. Tan vinyl
recllner, $40. Barbell set, $20
746-2329, evenings.
FOR SALE: Bicycle frame. 57 cm.
Road racing frame, Colombus SL,
Cinelli Lugs, Campy Drop Out, Im
ron Paint, Specialized Headset,
English Thread bottom bracket.
Built by Nobllette of Ann Arbor, Ml.
Perfect condition. Call 338-3178
TYPING SERVICE: Word pro
cessor. 105 N. Elm Street. Resumes,
letters, theses, term papers, etc. Ac
curate, dependable service. Call
Betty Laws at 752 1454.
"WESSIOIiAL TYPING SER
Y'c A" TVPing needs, 758-8241 or
758-5488.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: IBM
Correcting Typewriter. Experienc
ed typist will do all types of typing'
Call Debbie at 756-6333.
FOR SALE: Electric typewriter
Royal 550, $90. Call Linda Morton at
757-5919 after 6
FOR RENT: Private room I block
from campus. $75 per month and 4
utilities. Call John at 758 9856 or
752 4039.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house
With.ng walking distance to cam
752S57785 deP�S,t & ' ?ar 'e3Se Ca"
ROOMS FOR RENT: Kitchen & den
walking distance to campus $160
per month plus deposit and I vr
lease. 758 5793 or 752 5778
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: A gold rope chain bracelet
very sentimental gift. Please 1
any time after 5 if found Reward 0
fered Phone 752 9935 Thank ,ou
much
KINKS CONCERTGet your ticket'
for the the hottest show in town Tt
Kinks will make their only Norr
Carolina appearance on Saturda,
March i6 Tickets are $10 fc
students and S12 for the gener
public and at the door if there ar
any left' Be there! I
(8�7; vTT v .TT777
G2KNvfuEENCVE �RU ST' MRCH 2 AT P 'N
nTHFSR�QF�E?R SALE N0T AVAILABLE TO
OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
i
(703 GREENVILLE BUD GREENVILLE NX 1
PLUS DOUBLE COUPONS
h
REGULAR BEAN
EightCCIock
Coffee
ALL VARIETIES
GJI
EIGHT
0 CLOCK
COff��
lb.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mts. have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
oasketball), gymnastics,
artscrafts, pioneering, music,
photography, drama, dance,
generals. Write: Professor Bob
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 84
-eamington St Lido Beach, NY,
11561
CAROLINA SUCKS: If you dislike
Carolina: Sig Ep Golden Hearts are
selling "Carolina Sucks" bumper
stickers in front of the Student Supp
ly Store & around campus.
CONGRATULATIONS DANA
SCHACHT AND LUCY PAKE: For
receiving the All Greek Woman
Award and Outstanding Alum
Award. Congratulations to everyone
elso receiving awards, we're proud
of you! AOPi's
SIG-EPS: Be ready to throw down at
the Sweetheart Formal Saturday
night
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR
NEW SIGMA SISTERS: Catherine
Dixon, Kelli Tarr, Chris James, Kim
Tolton, Elizabeth Bilosoly, Dawn
Brooks, Camille Britt, Christie
Dunn, Lee Ann Harris, Isabelle
Cosgrove, Deborah Watkins, Lisa
Jefferson, Amy Jackson, Chris
Dolan, Lauren McDough, Laura
Uthus, Carter Chaffin, Heather
Wallace, Gretchen Morgan, Harriet
Lanier, Sarah Boiling, and Stacy
Grigg! We love you!
DONALD DUCK CHILLED
100 PURE
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL 10
OR MORE PURCHASE
P&Q BRAND
oc
bag
Orange Juice I Paper Towels
k
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL 10 00
OR MORE PURCHASE
DIET COKE-SPRITE-TAB
Coca Cola
12 gal.
ctn.
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL 10.00
OR MORE PURCHASE
CS�)
big roll
TOWllS
kv&t
m
LIMIT THREE WITH ADDITIONAL 10
OR MORE PURCHASE
2ltr.
bti.
00
BUY ONE-Get One FREE!
SALE
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON & ALPHA
SIGMA PHI: Little sisters will be
having another "Beer Wars Happy
Hour" this Thursday night8
p.m at Beau's. Come on out and
carry with the women of Sigma Phi
Epsilon and Alpha Sigma Phi
SPRING BREAK, WHEW Never
thought it would get here. What a
ty. We're northern bound- Gotta
love it! Just think, guys will buy us
brinks, and if they take our number-
ney WILL call Southern
Gentlemen- BA HA- WHERE???
Kim, Vallooking forward to biting
'he Big Apple. Remember, don't
mind the maggots. Stiner, Boner,
are there bars in Hooterville?
There's probably a still In Pete &
Georgia's backyard P.C. Call
LUKE. You guysThanks! V.C.
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Your own persona
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call. 758-3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save $.50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: I979 Toyota Corolla
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4-speed,
low mileage. Only one owner. Gets
good gas mileage- call after 5:30,
758 4689.
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752-0998, ask
for Robert.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted:
Responsible party to assume sma
monthly payments on spinetconsole
piano. Can be seen locally. Write:
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O. Box 520,
Beckemeyer, IL 62219.
POINSETTIA BEACH INN: On the
Ft. Lauderdale strip and ocean.
Special spring break rates for
students of ECU. Call 1-305-527-1800
MAOLA
('2 GAL.)
The Aerobic Workshop
Will Be Remodeling Over Spring Break!
(We Wilt Be Closed March 4 thru March 9)
We Will Re-Open March 11 With
THE LARGEST
AEROBIC ROOM IN GREENVILLE
New Wall to Wall Carpet, Mirrors, & Great Sound
System! All Memberships Will Be Unlimited
Amount of Classes. New Lower Prices Effective
Immediately. Lots of Parking Space.
FRENCH'S
BROWN (.75 OZ.) � SPAGHETTI (1.5 OZ.)
CHILI-0 (1.75 OZ.) � SLOPPY JOE (.5 OZ.)
Sauce & Gravy Mixes
BUTTER-ME-NOT (10 CT � 9 , OZ
Ann Page Biscuits
FRANKLIN
(24 OZ.)
, ANN PAGE (12 CT. � 10 OZ.
Butter Split Bread Frozen Waffles
T
FLAV-O-RICH
(8 0Z.)
Ice gi Sour
Cream y Cream
FLAV-O-RICH
(6CT.)
Scooter
Crunch

I
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rm KBBCBSBBt
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FLORAL SHOPPE
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po�
2�9
Conveniently Located
Downtown Greenville
417 Evans Street
757-1608
???�?????�???????�?�?�
$25 Monthly
We V Aerobics!
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41



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w





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 26, 1985 Page 8
Losing Streak Snapped
ECU Pounds Hawks
i.H !� �U: -Kl Phnti. I ah
Curt Vanderhorst (11) drives past Brian Rowsom (25) in the Pirate win.
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sporti Editor
William Grady's 26 points pac-
ed ECU to a 78-61 thrashing of
UNC-W on Saturday night, snap-
ping a 16-game conference losing
streak.
Grady connected on 11 of 16
field goals and was four of five
from the line. He also grabbed six
rebounds and blocked two shots.
Curt Vanderhorst continued
his hot shooting by scoring 19
points. Herb Dixon added nine
and dished out a game-high 11
assists. Leon Bass and Keith
Sledge chipped in eight points
apiece.
The Pirates played good
defense throughout the game.
ECU forced the Seahawks into 14
turnovers on the evening.
However, early foul trouble ap-
peared as Roy Smith picked up
his fifth personal foul with 8:23
remaining in the game. A little
over a minute later (7:13), Bass
was disqualified with his fifth
foul. This left head coach Charlie
with some height problems.
Harrison responded with his
short, but quick lineup of five
guards � Scott Hardy, Sledge,
Vanderhorst, Dixon and Grady.
The group responded with
tenacious hustle and outstanding

defense as they outscored UNC-
W 24-12 over the last seven
minutes of the contest. Harrison
praised the 'little guys' for their
effort.
"It was fun to watch 'em win
one Harrison said. "The little
guys really go after those re-
bounds. They didn't shy from the
pressure and they played with in-
tensity.
"We made a run at American
(University) with the small line
up Harrison continued.
"We've got a lot of good post-up
people. Both Herb and Keith play
above the rim
Grady scored the first nine
points for ECU as the Pirates led
9-5 with 16:03 left in the opening
half. Bass hit a turnaround
jumper to up the Pirate lead to
11-5 with 14:54 remaining.
Seahawk center Brian Rowsom
retaliated with his turnaround to
pull UNC-W to within four, 11-7.
After another Grady layup, the
Seahawks scored the next eight
points to take a 17-13 lead with
8:57 to play in the half. Then,
baskets by Vanderhorst and
Grady tied the game at 17-17.
The team's traded baskets
throughout the remainder of the
half. Dixon's pair of free throws
before the buzzer, knotted the
Lady Pirates Take Conference Title
game at 27-27 at intermission.
To start the second half, Smith
sank an 18-foot jumper to give
ECU a quick lead (29-27) that
they would never relinquish.
Bass' eight footer gave the
Pirates a 31-27 advantage with
18:13 left in the game.
After a George Durham
jumper, Sledge assisted Grady on
back-to-back possessions. The
Pirates took a 38-31 lead (with
15:14 remaining) on Grady's
three-point effort.
The Seahawks battled back to
cut the ECU lead to three points
(44-41) on a pair of free throws
by Terry Shiver.
Sledge then came alive on the
offensive boards. With 12:28 he
scored off an errant ECU shot.
He repeated his follow technique
with 11:44 remaining, giving
ECU a 46-41 lead. Dixon upped
the ECU lead to 48-41 with a
10-foot jumper.
With 8:48 left, Vanderhorst
drove to the basket and scored
while being fouled. His three-
point play gave the Pirates a nine-
point lead, 53-44. The team's
matched baskets for the next five-
and-a-half minutes.
After losing both Smith and
Bass to fouls, ECU tried to use
the shot clock to their advantage.
This proved to be successful as
Dixon, Grady and Vanderhorst
scored on jumpshots.
With 2:15 remaining,
Vanderhorst's tip-in off a missed
free throw gave the Pirates a
64-53 advantage.
ECU went on to lead by as
many as 19 points. The cowd
was especially vocal with :27
seconds left when Dixon's steal
turned into a reverse dunk. The
Pirates final two points came on
a pair of free throws by Peter
Dam, giving ECU an easy 78-61
victory.
"The final score doesn't
always indicate the outcome of a
ballgame Harrison said. "It
(the score) wasn't indicative of
the way the game went.
"We wanted to utilize the shot
clock Harrison added. "We
wanted to get the ball to Herb
and let him penetrate. Things just
went well for us tonight
Despite the lack of height dur-
ing the later stages of the game.
ECU grabbed 36 rebounds to that
of 37 for the Seahawks.
For UNC-W, Rowsom had 19
points and a game-high 16 re-
bounds. Durham added 16 and
Bobby Joe Springer scored 14.
Nee EAGLES, page 10
ByRICKMcCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The Lady Pirate basketball
team got back on the winning
track, with a 84-67 trouncing of
Richmond on Sunday afternoon
in Minges Coliseum.
The win gave ECU the regular-
season championship in the
ECAC South. The Lady Pirates
finished with a 11-1 mark in the
first year of regular-season com-
petition in the two-year-old
league.
Richmond led by as many as
nine on two occasions in the first-
half, before ECU cut the margin
to one (31-30) at the half.
The second half was all ECU.
The Lady Pirates blistered the
nets hitting 20 of 26 field-goal at-
tempts for a 76.9 percentage.
ECU outscored the Lady
Spiders 19 to four, in the opening
six minutes of the second half.
With the Lady Pirates ahead
by seven (42-35) with 14:34 re-
maining, Lisa Squirewell con-
verted a three-point play to put
ECU up by 10. A Sylvia Bragg
layup, followed by a Annette
Phillips layup had the Lady
Pirates comfortably in front
49-35.
With the score 50-39 in ECU's
favor, senior center Anita Ander-
son took over. Anderson, who
made her final appearance in
Minges Coliseum, scored the next
12 ECU points to put the Bucs up
62-52.
Richmond was able to get no
visiting Lady Spiders 18 to 11 in
the last five minutes. They went
on to win by their final margin of
17 points.
"The key to the game was our
man-to-man defense in the se-
cond half ECU coach Emily
Manwaring said. "We forced
them into a few turnovers and
were able to get up by nine
(points) right away
ECU was led in scoring by
junior point guard Sylvia Bragg.
She had 24 points on a 10 of 15
shooting performance from the
field.
Lisa Squirewell was next for
ECU with 20 points, hitting seven
of 10 attempts from the field.
Anderson finished the game with
16 points, with 14 coming in the
final half. Foster was the final
Lady Pirate in double figures,
finishing with 11 points.
Manwaring attributed much of
her team's shooting success to the
type of defense Richmond
played. "They stayed in that
zone and we came out in the se-
cond half and started hitting our
shots she said. "That enabled
us to get the ball inside. I thought
Annette Phillips made some nice
passes inside, for some easy
shots
Richmond was led by Diana
Cannon who finished with 19
points and 11 rebounds. The
Lady Pirates limited Karen
Eisner to 12 points, seven below
her average. Jackie Israel and
Dawn Pappas also had 12 points
closer as ECU outscored the in the losing effort.
"We did a good job on Eisner,
but Cannon really came through
for them she said. "She (Can-
non) didn't start the first time we
played against them. We did
about as good a job defending
her as they did defending Anita
(Anderson) in the second half
Richmond outrebounded the
Lady Pirates 39-38, but also com-
mitted one more turnover
(22-21). In the second half,
however, ECU committed only
three turnovers to Richmond's
11.
"I think we needed a win to get
our confidence up Manwaring
said. "In the first half we didn't
play aggressively, our press gave
up more turnovers than we forc-
ed. In the second half we cut
down on our turnovers, and were
able to hit our shots
With the win ECU improves to
18-9 overall, and 11 -1 in the
ECAC South.
Feb. 21, 1985
UNC-Wilmington ended the
Lady Pirates' winning streak at
15, with a 79-70 victory last
Thursday night in Trask Col-
iseum in Wilmington.
In the opening half, the lead
changed hands several times with
ECU leading by as many as seven
points.
The Lady Seahawks ended the
first half with a flurry to go to the
lockerroom with a 43-34 advan-
tage.
In the second half, UNC-W
went up by as many as 11 points,
but ECU was able to pull within
three with 5:30 left to play.
With 5:10 remaining in the
contest, ECU forward Lisa
Squirewell picked up her fifth
foul and had to leave the contest.
ECU trailed by only one, 70-69
with 2:40 left to be played. From
that point, the Lady Seahawks
scored the next five points to go
up 75-69 with 1:40 left in the
game.
ECU was only able to score
one more point, and Wilmington
clinched the victory at the foul
line.
Senior Center Gwen Austin,
who is the leading sco and re-
bounder in the ECAC ,th, led
Wilmington with 22 nts and
13 rebounds. Sissy Morse had 21
points, while Sonya Pickard add-
ed 15 to the Seahawk effort.
Anita Anderson led the Lady
Pirate attack with 18 points,
while Lorainne Foster added 16.
Lisa Squirewell led ECU in re-
bounding with 11, and scored 14
points before fouling out.
The Lady Pirates were outre-
bounded 46-42, and committed
five more turnovers than the
Seahawks.
"We didn't get any offensive
rebounds ECU coach Emily
Manwaring said. "We weren't
able to get any second or third
shots
Manwaring felt her team did
not play as well as they are
capable of. "We seemed to be in-
timidated she said. "They got
up bv nine, and we were forced to
See UNC-W, page 10
I B Ml viHrRF rI PfcaM I ab
Alma Bethea (30) blocks a shot in the Lady Pirate win oer Richmond.
The victory assured ECU of the first ever regular season title in the
ECAC South.
Ruggers Lose Tough Match To Wolfpack
� iM jci. � flk emm m-votm?&��& � n mwi � �1� b �.
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sporti Editor
The ECU rugby team fell short
in their quest for the North
Carolina Collegiate Division
Championship by losing to N.C.
State 15-12 on Saturday after-
noon.
A good crowd of about 500
was on hand to watch the Pirates
battle the Wolfpack. The game
was especially rough due to the
ECU � N.C. State rivalry. ECU
captain David Schumacher
believes the rivalry has always
been.
"It's a grudge match
Schumacher said. "Everytime we
play it's a dirty match and it's
always hard hitting
The Pirates led throughout the
contest, dominating most of the
play. A late Wolfpack rally
enabled N.C. State to take the
game and the N.C. Collegiate
Division Championship.
Jim Whitaker scored the first
"try" (an equivalent to a
touchdown in football, though
only worth four points) for ECU.
Mike Brown added the two-point
conversion to give the Pirates an
early 6-0 lead.
When Mike Brown's penalty
kick split the uprights, ECU led
This maul took place Saturday afternoon when the Pirate Rugby team battled N.C. State.
9-0. However, N.C. State manag-
ed to get a penalty kick and cut
the Pirate lead to 9-3.
ECU added to their lead when
Ted Williams' drop-kick was
perfect from about 20-yards out.
This gave the Pirates a 12-3 ad-
vantage.
The Wolfack came back to
score the remaining 12 points of
the contest. State scored their
final 'try' at the end of the game,
to make the final score 15-12.
Rugby is a rough sport with
much contact involved.
However, the Pirates played
unusually rough on Saturday �
according to rugby president and
player Bill Zimmerman.
"It was a pretty intense
game Zimmerman said. "We
played the most physical game
we've played (all season). The
� team played very well overall
N.C. State, known for their
powerful "scrum" (when the
players huddle together to put the
I ball back in play, after a minor
t infraction), was bei ; pushed
v back by ECU throughout the
match.
"We dominated three-fourth's
of the game Zimmerman con-
tinued. "Their (N.C. State)
scrum was a lot bigger than ours,
but we won most of the scrums
Despite the loss to No. 1 rank-
ed N.C. State, ECU played a fine
game, according to Pirate fans on
hand.
"This is one of the most ex-
citing sports I've ever seen said
ECU student Jim Smith. "It's
really wild to see these fellas
stinging each other like that �
and with no pads
After a rugby match it is
customary for the home team to
party with the visiting squad.
Although it was a bitterly con-
tested match, the two team's par-
tied together by watching the
game films and singing rugby
songs.
The Wolfpack will go on to
play UNC-G next. If successful,
they will go to the East Regionals
in Memphis, Tn. This would in-
clude top competition from the
east coast, including the Ivy-
League schools.
Next for the Pirates will be a
home match against the Dan
River Rugby Club from
Yanceyville, N.C, on Saturdav
March 16 at 2:00 p.m. Be sure to
come out and support the
Pirates.
Johnso
By TONY BROWN
Suff Writer
A pair of Winfred Johnson
two-run homers and superb
defensive play powered the ECU
baseball team to at 5-0 season
opening win over Atlantic Chris-
tian College Sunday at Harr
Fington Field.
Johnson quickly served notice
of his readiness to defend his
team-leading '84 homerun and
?RBI stats as he slammed a two-
run shot over the centerfield
fence on his first swing of the
I season. He then followed that
I blast with a near-duplicate effort
I in his next at bat, thus driving in
four of ECU's five runs for the
day.
With sparkling defensive play
behind ECU starting pitcer Mike
Christopher and reliever Jim
Peterson, the Pirates were as hot
as the summer-like temperature.
Christopher threw only 61 pit-
ches in six innings while notching
five strikeouts and allowing nc
runs. He gave up only two sink,
and a pair of walks, forcing ACC
batters to ground out time after
time
Swimm
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The ECU women's s� am
defeated William & Mary "�
last Wednesda in Adair Gym-
nasium in Williamsburg. Va.
The win was the Lad Pii
swimmer's fifth in a row.
longest winning streu-
historv of women's swimming
ECU.
The 400-yard medle reiav
team of Caycee Poust, Je
Feinberg, Ellen McPherson
Chris Holman set a new vai
record with a winning time
4:07.69. Poust led off with a
1:01.5 in the 100-v.
backstroke, which qualified her
for the NCAA competition.
The team of Lori Livingston,
Joelle Ennis, Nancy Ludwig and
Jennie Halstead finished thin
the event.
In the 1000-yard freestyle.
Gorenflo captured second place.
with a time of 11:32.52, while
teammate Tracy Hope finis
third.
The Ladv Pirate swimmer
Greenville
Flower Shop
758-2774
Corner Evan3 &. UTii St.
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U 26, 1985
Page 8
I
I
awks
This proved to be successful as
Dixon, Grady and Vanderhorst
-cored on jumpshots.
With 2:15 remaining,
Vanderhorst's tip-in off a missed
free throw gave the Pirates a
64-53 advantage.
ECU went on to lead by as
many as 19 points. The crowd
was especially vocal with :27
seconds left when Dixon's steal
turned into a reverse dunk. The
Pirates final two points came on
a pair of free throws by Peter
Dam. giving ECU an easy 78-61
tory.
'The final score doesn't
lys indicate the outcome of a
game Harrison said. "It
(the score) wasn't indicative of
the way the game went.
"We wanted to utilize the shot
clock Harrison added. "We
wanted to get the ball to Herb
and let him penetrate. Things just
well for us tonight
Despite the lack of height dur-
ing the later stages of the game,
ECU grabbed 36 rebounds to that
37 for the Seahawks.
For UNC-W, Rowsom had 19
points and a game-high 16 re-
bounds. Durham added 16 and
Bobby Joe Springer scored 14.
Nee EAGLES, page 10
' H Hi MBKR1 M I Ph.m, I ah
Ihe Ladj Pirate win over Richmond.
I ?ver regular season title in the
'fpack
but we won most of the scrums
Despite the loss to No. 1 rank-
ed N.C. State, ECU played a fine
game, according to Pirate fans on
hand.
"This is one of the most ex-
citing sports I've ever seen said
ECU student Jim Smith. "It's
really wild to see these fellas
stinging each other like that �
and with no pads
After a rugby match it is
customary for the home team to
party with the visiting squad.
Although it was a bitterly con-
tested match, the two team's par-
,tied together by watching the
game films and singing rugby
I songs.
The Wolfpack will g0 on to
play UNC-G next. If successful �
they will go to the East Regionals
in Memphis, Tn. This would in- j
I elude top competition from the j
least coast, including the Ivy- �
League schools.

Next for the Pirates will be a -
Ihome match against the Dan I
iRiver Rugby Club from
lYanceyville, N.C, on Saturday
March 16 at 2:00 p.m. Be sure to I
:ome out and support the I
Crates. '
1
Homers
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 26, 1985 9
By TONY BROWN
SUM Writer
A pair of Winfred Johnson
two-run homers and superb
defensive play powered the ECU
baseball team to at 5-0 season
opening win over Atlantic Chris-
tian College Sunday at Harr-
ington Field.
Johnson quickly served notice
of his readiness to defend his
team-leading 84 homerun and
RBI stats as he slammed a two-
run shot over the centerfield
fence on his first swing of the
season. He then followed that
blast with a near-duplicate effort
in his next at bat, thus driving in
four of ECU's five runs for the
day.
With sparkling defensive play
behind ECU starting pitcer Mike
Christopher and reliever Jim
Peterson, the Pirates were as hot
as the summer-like temperature.
Christopher threw only 61 pit-
ches in six innings while notching
five strikeouts and allowing no
runs. He gave up only two singles
and a pair of walks, forcing ACC
batters to ground out time after
time.
Peterson came on in relief in
the seventh. He shut out ACC for
the final three innings, allowing
no runs, no hits and no walks. He
picked up three strikeouts and
continued the trend of forcing
mostly groundouts. The error-
free defensive play of the Pirates
aided greatly in fashioning the
two-hitter by the ECU pitching
duo.
The tone of the game was set
early as Christopher collected
two of his five strikeouts in the
top of the first inning and forced
ACC's Rick Olivere to ground
out. This midseason form had the
large crowd of 1,200 eagerly an-
ticipating ECU's half of the
frame.
The crowd was not disap-
pointed. Mark Shank, the
Pirates' first batter, walked, then
was out at second on a fielder's
choice by Greg Hardison. A pop-
out to second dampened ECU's
hopes, but after Hardison stole
second, the first of Johnson's
homers gave the Pirates a sudden
2-0 lead.
ACC fared no better in the se-
cond inning. Mark Connerly
Swimmers
grounded out to second to open
the frame. Bruce Ellis struk out,
then Kenny Moore grounded out
to Christopher to end the inning.
ECU added a run in the second
to pad the lead. With one out,
Jay McGraw doubled to the
centerfield fence, then was
knocked in by a Jim Riley single
over second when the ACC cat-
cher failed to hold the throw to
the plate. Riley took second on a
wild pick-off attempt by the cat-
cher, but was tagged out at third
on a grounder by Robert
Langston. A fly-out then cut the
scoring effort short.
Christopher continued to
befuddle the ACC batsmen in the
third. He added two more
strikeouts and a grounder to third
base to continue his perfct game.
Both teams could have left
after the bottom of the third inn-
ing as the scoring closed out with
a pair of Pirate runs. Following a
Chris Bradberry double,
Johnson's second homer easily
cleared the right centerfield fence
to make it 5-0 for ECU.
ACC's only serious threat
came in the top of the fourth.
Olivere singled over second to
end the perfect game for
Christopher, then moved to se-
cond on a walk to Bruce Ellis.
Ken Moore struck out, followed
by ECU s only doubleplay of the
day, which ended the threat.
The Pirates failed to take ad-
vantage of a pair of baserunners
in the bottom of the fourth. With
one out, Riley slapped a sharp
single to left. Langston picked up
one of ECU s 12 hits with a curv-
ing single to rightfield, putting
men on first and second, but two
infield outs kept them from ad-
vancing.
ACC went down in order for
the fourth time in the top of the
fifth.
Bradberry opened the Pirate
half of the fifth with a single
through the infield. Johnson
moved him to second with his
third straight hit of the day. Mon
Carter's ground out put runners
on second and third, but a
grounder and a pop fly got ACC
out of another jam.
ACC got a baserunner with a
lead-off single in the sixth. A
fielder's choice eliminated the
lead runner when Pirate short-
stop Hardison made a superb
play to get the out at second on a
hard-to-handle grounder.
Christopher then continued his
excellent fielding off the mound,
getting the next out with a throw
to first on an infield grounder.
This moved the ACC baserunner
to second. Ellis drew his second
walk of the game, but a long
drive to the rightfield fence by
Ken Moore was snared by
McGraw to end the frame.
ECU's only 1-2-3 inning
followed with three consecutive
grounders. ACC returned the
favor with a similar result in the
top of the seventh.
The Pirates greeted the second
ACC pitcher with a lead-off walk
by Hardison, followed by a liner
in front of the left fielder by
Bradberry, putting men at first
and second. Johnson then finally
made his initial out of the season
by hitting into a doubleplay at
third. With Bradberry at second,
Carter drew a walk, but a
grounder by Sullivan ended the
inning.
Again ACC went down 1-2-3 in
the eigth. The familiar pattern of
two strikeouts and a grounder
repeated itself.
ECU put men on without scor-
ing in the bottom of the eighth as
McGraw walked, then a push-
bunt put him at second with one
out. Shank walked, but a nice
grab of a Hardison drive to
centerfield left multiple runners
stranded again.
ACC again went down in order
in the top of the ninth to end the
game. On the final out, first
baseman Johnson made a fine
defensive play to top the day for
ECU.
"I'm most proud of our
defense said Coach Gary Over-
ton. "We had a chance to put it
away several times, but left run-
ners in scoring position.
"This is the first time I can
remember in the years I've been
associated with ECU that a
player (Johnson) hit homeruns in
his first two season at bats
Overton said. "We scheduled this
game to give us some experience
prior to our league opener with
William & Mary and we're
satisfied with it as a first effort
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The ECU women's swim team
defeated William & Mary 78-62
last Wednesday in Adair Gym-
nasium in Williamsburg, Va.
The win was the Lady Pirate
swimmer's fifth in a row, the
longest winning streak in the
history of women's swimming at
ECU.
The 400-yard medley relay
team of Caycee Poust, Jessica
Feinberg, Ellen McPherson and
Chris Holman set a new varsity
record with a winning time of
4:07.69. Poust led off with a
1:01.5 in the 100-yard
backstroke, which qualified her
for the NCAA competition.
The team of Lori Livingston,
Joelle Ennis, Nancy Ludwig and
Jennie Halstead finished third in
the event.
In the 1000-yard freestyle, Jill
Gorenflo captured second place,
with a time of 11:32.52, while
teammate Tracy Hope finished
third.
The Lady Pirate swimmers
Greenville
Flower Shop
758-2774
Corner Ean &. liTii St,
captured the first two places in
the 200-yard freestyle. Scotia
Miller finished first with a time of
1:59.95. Jenni Pierson finished
second in the event with a time of
2:00.34.
In the 100-yard backstroke,
Livingston and Holman finished
first and second. Livingston's
winning time was 1:03.05.
Feinberg captured first place in
the 100-yard breastroke with a
time of 1:11.64. Ennis finished
second in the event for the Lady
Pirate tankers.
Poust finished second for ECU
in the 200-yard butterfly, while
teammates Annette Burton and
Ludwig finished third and fourth
respectively.
Nancy James won the 100-yard
freestyle with a time of 25.8
seconds.
Lori Miller captured first and
second place in the one and three-
meter diving competitions.
In the 100-yard freestyle,
Holman finished second while
teammates James and Pierson
were third and fourth respectivel-
ly.
Poust and Miller finished se-
cond and third in the 200-yard
backstroke.
The Lady Pirate swimmers
took three of the top four places
in the 200-yard breaststroke.
Halstead finished second with a
time of 2:38.65. Ennis and
Feinberg took third and fourth
for ECU.
Miller captured her second
first-place finish in the meet in
the 500-yard freestyle. Tracy
Hope finished third in the event.
Poust rounded out the in-
dividual winners for the Lady
Pirates. She was victorious in the
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200-yard individual medley with
a time of 2:16.93.
The 200-yard freestyle relay
team of Miller, Pierson,
Gorenflo and Ennis, finished se-
cond.
"The girls swam a tremendous
meet ECU coach Rick Kobe
said. "This victory gives them
five in a row, a new school
record
The Lady tankers end their
dual meet season with a record of
8-5. ECU qualified seven girls for
the nationals this year, which will
be held in Orlando, Fla March
13-16.
Sophomore Caycee Poust
qualified in the 100 and 200-yard
backstroke. Joining Poust in the
200 backstroke will be teammates
Wins
Lori Livington
Holman.
and Chris
The 200 and 400-yard freestyle
teams of Scotia Miller, Nancy
James, Jenni Pierson and Chris
Holman also qualified.
Lori Miller was the final
qualifier. She qualified in both
the one and three-meter diving
competitions.
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 26, 1985
IRS Arm Wrestling;
Cycling Club Successful
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
The 1985 ECU-Budweiser arm
wrestling tournament concluded
with the crowning of one familiar
champion and five new cham-
pionship faces.
Lori "the Arm" Greene cap-
tured her second consecutive
136-and over weight division
championship by defeating
"Jammin" Judy Burgess.
In more women's action, Kim
Bates slammed Pam Horsen in
the 135-and under division to win
her first arm-wrestling trophy.
The finals were held in Minges
Coliseum during the halftime of
the ECU-William and Mary
women's basketball game.
The men's finals were held on
Feb. 18 during halftime of the
lady Pirate-James Madison con-
test. In the 150-and under weight
class, Garry Bishop captured top
honors after a run-in with Garcy
"Shark" Ward.
In the 151-175 weight class,
Robbie "The Block" Rice hand-
ed Glenn "The Mauler" Overton
a defeat. In the next division,
Mark "Croatan" Williams
crushed veteran, Curtis
"Mongoose" Sendek, taking the
179-199 division as a prelude to
the heavyweight championship.
In perhaps the best match of
the night, "Big" Don Payne
upset the defending champion,
Chris "Hoss" Kelly in a match
which lasted one minute and fifty
seconds to take the 200-over
class.
In recent sport club action, the
ECU Bike team traveled to
Greensboro in a most successful
race against top-notch competi-
tion.
Beginning at a modest pace
(approximately 18-20 mph), the
seven ECU cyclists easily kept up
with the rest of the pack. This in-
cluded state champion Eric
Fromm.
The final break-away sprint
came without warning and lasted
about five miles at a 35 mph
pace. Mike Adrion, an ECU team
member, and Eric Fromm lead
the chase and broke away from
the remainder of the pack. In the
end, Adrion out-horsepowered
the champ to take the victory.
Other members of the team
rode strong but encountered bike
problems along the way. John
Savage, Mark Bailey, Woody
Tatum, Mike Hainsworth and
Bill Mcluskie all looked strong in
the competition.
The team is planning more
road trips in the upcoming mon-
ths. They feel that they can
become a major force in the state
competition. Meet and join up
with the ECU bike club every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day at 4:00 in front of Memorial
Gym. All riders are welcome.
Remember to register for
aerobic fitness classes now
through March 1. Work your
body through intramurals. Come
by room 204 Memorial Gym.
Down ECU
Continued iVom page eight
Feb. 21, 1985
A balanced scoring attack
from American University
defeated ECU 88-79 in an EC AC
South contest Thursday evening.
Steve Nesmith paced the Eagles
with 22 points and seven re-
bounds. Jim Lutz and Chuck
West added 19 points apiece.
Lutz also grabbed a game-high
nine rebounds. Eric White was
the fourth Eagle in double figures
with 18 points.
Despite red-hot shooting from
the Pirates, the American Univer-
sity inside game was too much.
The Pirates shot 59 percent from
the floor, for the evening. The
Eagles weren't far behind at 56.3
percent.
The Pirates stayed with the
Eagles as ECU lead early in the
contest. Grady's jumper with
15:21 remaining in the first half
gave ECU 10-7 lead. However,
American outscorcd ECU 13-6
over the next six minutes.
The team's then swapped
baskets until Sledge nailed a
i5-foot jumper to cut the Eagle
lead to 21-20 with 9:11 left in the
first half.
American managed to up their
lead to nine points (37-28) with
3:14 left in the half on Longmire
Harrison's only two points of the
game. ECU managed to trim the
margin to seven (40-33) at the
half.
American opened the second
half on a Lutz three-point play.
But with 16:54 remaining to play,
Vanderhorst's steal and layup
brought the Pirates to within
three, 45-42.
The Pirates couldn't stay close
for long as the Eagles outscored
ECU 16-6 over the next five
minutes. Although the Pirates
were making their shots, AU was
answering at their offensive end
as well.
Layups by Dixon and
Vanderhorst cut the American
lead to 78-73 with 3:03 remain-
ing. The Pirate effort was cut
short as AU connected on six of
eight free throws in the last
minutes of play.
Vanderhorst was 14 of 24 from
the field, for 28 points. Grady
was just as hot as he hit on 10 of
15 field-goal attempts for 21.
Sledge added nine points and
Bass finished with eight.
Saturday's victory was the last
conference home game of the
season, but the Pirates will be in
Minges for the last time on
Wednesday Feb. 27 at 7:30 pm.
They will do battle against Camp-
bell University, whom the
Pirates' defeated 58-56 on Dec.
13, 1984.
UNO- W Tops Bucs
Continued from page eight
come from behind.
"I thought we had good inten-
sity against James Madison, but
we havent had it in the other
three games Manwaring said in
reference to her team's previous
three games and the Wilmington
contest. "I don't know if we
peaked to early or not she said.
"But, it does remind us that it is
no fun to lose
While the loss did not hurt
ECU's chances to win the regular
season conference title, or their
top seeding in the EC AC South
Tournament, Manwaring felt the
loss did hurt her team's NCAA
chances.
"I think we probably lost any
slim chance that we had for an at-
large bid with the loss � after we
had gotten off to such a poor
start
Since the ECAC South
women's league is only in its first
year of regular season competi-
tion, its champion receives no
automatic bid to the NCAA. It is
hoped that the league will receive
a automatic bid in the immediate
future.
UNC-W cliched third place in
the league with the win, and is
currently 14-10 overall.
ECU is now 17-9 overall, and
10-1 in the league.
The Lady Pirates will begin
play in the ECAC South Tourna-
ment on Saturday, March 2 at
2:00.
They will face the winner of the
Friday gine between the fourth
and fifth place teams.
The fourth place team will be
George Mason, but who the fifth
seed will be hasn't been determin-
ed yet.
The Aerobic Workshop & The American
Heart Association would like to thank the
following individuals & organizations that
helped make our fund raising event at Minges
Coliseum a huge success �
Apple Records H.L Hodges Sporting Goods
At Barre, Ltd. Jobbie's Gym
Blue Moon Cofe Morgaux's Restaurant
Bill Cain Marsh Surf ft Sea
Chico's Mexican Restaurant Matita's
Coffman's Men's Wear New Deli
Curry Copy Center Pepsi-Cola
Darryl's Restaurant Ramada Inn
East Carolinian Newspaper Rocket Music
Gourmet International Foods Sheraton
Heads Only Snooty Fox
Bob Helmirfc Tree House
� And of course � all the wonderful people that raised the money &
participated in the aerobics � it was a blast!
NEED EXTRA MONEY
for
SPRING BREAK?
WE BUY I AND 1PAYI IMMEDIATE
CASH FOR:
STEREOS
TELEVISIONS
PORTABLE RADIOCASSETTES
57,
mMMiL
VIDEO CASSETTES
im
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITERS
MICROWAVE OVENS
SILVER COINS
1964 & Before .50, .25, .10
1935 & Before Silver $1.00
F�V , Va
I
GOLD CLASSRINGS vx
DIAMONDS & ALL GOLD
RINGS & JEWELRY
35mm CAMERAS
NICE SMALL APPLIANCES
VACUUM CLEANERS
And Now
Clothing � Must Be Quality, Clean
l
Coin and Ring Man
Corner Evans and 4th St.
HiikMMpliia,
4
m�mmmmiimmemiimmmwwOwp1�' �
- � � .
VnWMBjSSl
f
V
-es:
i fr
I
i





Title
The East Carolinian, Febraury 26, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 26, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.394
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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