The East Carolinian, February 21, 1985






�ht
(Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.42
Thursday February 21,1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Board Plans To Investigate
College Entry Requirements
V '
tLSCQVC i0H J0RDAN - ECU Photo Lab
Mid-terms are finally upon us and yes folks, there's no escaping. It appears that these two students are
searching deep for the correct answers. Oh, by the way, don't get too bummed out when you get your test
scores back. Simply get a grip and think about the sun. Yeah!
ECU Fall Applications Increase
By DALE SWANSON
SUff Writer
ECU's applications for admis-
sion for the fall of 1985 are up 7
percent over the amount received
at this time last year, according to
a report given at the Board of
Trustees meeting last week.
Officials say that, although it is
difficult to project how great the
increase will be, it is rapidly ap-
proaching the 15 percent increase
in applications seen for the 1984
academic year.
"ECU is becoming more well
known in a very positive way
said Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo Volpe.
Volpe said he is unable to make
any projections about the final
number of applications.
The increase in freshman ap-
plicants at ECU is higher to that
expected at N.C. State and
similar to that expected at UNC-
Chapel Hill.
N.C. State officials report a
large number of applications, up
only slightly from the last two
years, which saw the school's
largest freshman classes in
history. A spokesman from the
admissions office said freshman
applications increased last year,
but added that the number
generally does not fluctuate
significantly.
The Assistant Director of Ad-
missions at UNC-Chapel Hill
said the school expects an in-
crease of between 8 and 10 per-
cent in freshman applications. He
said he feels freshman applica-
tions are increasing, following a
slump last year, because of minor
changes in the application form,
which includes an essay. "Where
the wording of the essay was
somewhat threatening to poten-
tial students, we have made some
changes to make it less threaten-
ing he said.
CHAPEL HILL (UPI) - The
chairman of the University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors called Wednesday for an in-
vestigation of academic rules for
athletes at the system's 16 cam-
puses.
"The time has come for our in-
stitutions and the board of gover-
nors to review our policies in this
area said Baord Chairman
Philip Carson.
Carson's call for an investiga-
tion into athletes' admission stan-
dards and academic progress
comes in the wake of revelations
abut Chris Washburn's admis-
sion to North Carolina State with
a Scholastic Aptitude Test score
far below average.
"For some time members of
the board of governors have
publicly and privately expressed
growing concern about the im-
pact of intercollegiate athletics on
educational programs and on the
academic standing of student
athletes, both at the national level
and in our own university Car-
son said.
Washburn's 470 score on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test was just
70 points above the minimum
possible score. It was disclosed in
a court case in which he pleaded
guilty to three misdemeanor
charges for stealing another
athlete's stereo.
University President Bill Fri-
day told state legislators Tuesday
that he favors a minimum stan-
dard for college athletes of 700
on the SAT. The test has a max-
imum score of 1,600.
Friday said the 16 institutions
now set their own standards and
make exceptions for students
with outstanding talents, par-
ticularly in athletics.
"The board has followed with
great interest the work President
Friday has been doing as part of a
national effort by educational
leaders to bring about major
changes in NCAA regulations
Carson said.
Carson said he will ask the
board at its March 8 meeting :o
appoint a committee to conduct
the investigation.
Carson said the schools would
be asked to assess the impact of
athletic programs on academics
and report the findings to the
committee, which then will deter-
mine if any policy changes are
necessary.
Carson said he would ask the
committee to complete its work
and make recommendations to
the board as soon as possible.
He said the investigation would
be intended to "insure and
demonstrate that our own house
is in order, that sound educa-
tional policies governing the
athletic programs are in place,
and that these policies are being
effectively and conscientiously
administered
Carson called for national
reforms in college athletics.
"The major problems in inter-
collegiate athletics that are the
cause for most of our concerns
are national in scope. Construc-
tive change is needed and must be
had at the national level he
said.
Two N.C. legislators filed bills
in the state House Wednesday
which would require students to
score at least 700 on the SAT
before attending the University
of North Carolina system.
The 700-point cutoff for
freshmen taking the SAT would
go into effect in the 1986-87
school year under the bills spon-
sored by Reps. Howard Chapin,
D-Beaufort, and Thomas
Rhodes, R-New Hanover.
"I know they're lowering stan-
dards for athletes Rhodes said.
"It rankles me that they're doing
that and lowering the equality of
education in this state for the
benefit of athletes
Chapin, a former public high
school coach and teacher, said he
"wasn't a Phi Beta Kappa or
anything like that But he said
he thinks his bill is "a step in the
right direction.
But Tony Strickland, who is in
charge of freshman a imissions
for UNC-Chapel Hi said an
"arbitrary" cutoff score is un-
fair.
"A high school record is a bet-
ter predictor � I'd rp.ther stick to
that he said. "Four years (in
high school) teils us a lot more
than three hours (of test-taking)
on a Saturday morning
Although grade point averages
and SAT scores usually reflect
each other, "some people do well
in class and don't do well on a
test Strickland said.
SGA Elections Dates Set; Variety Of Forums Scheduled
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Filing for the SGA elections
will begin next week and a variety
of events and changes are plann-
ed for this year's elections, which
are scheduled for March 20.
According to SGA Elections
Committee Chairman Howard
Lipman, students wishing to run
for SGA offices should file bet-
ween Feb. 25 and March 1. Ap-
plications may be picked up in
the SGA offices in Mendenhall
Student Center. There is a $10 fil-
ing fee.
The positions of president, vice
president, secretary and treasurer
are open. SGA rules require that
applicants for the positions have
a 2.0 gpa and maintain full-time
student status and good academic
standing with the university.
Forty-eight semester hours of
credit are required for the posi-
tions of president, vice president
and treasurer, while 16 hours of
credit are required for the posi-
tion of secretary. All positions re-
quire two consecutive semesters
of enrollment at ECU.
(CPS) � State grant funding
for college students increased in
47 states this year, a new survey
shows, bringing a "banner year"
for state-supported grant pro-
grams.
Much of the increase,
moreover, reflects student
pressure on state governments to
improve higher ed funding, aid
experts report.
"This year is exceptional in the
fact that all but three states in-
creased their grant awards to
students reports Jerry Davis,
co-director of the National
Association of State Scholarship
and Grant Programs' annual
survey of state student aid fun-
ding.
This year $1.4 billion in state
grant money was awarded to over
1.5 million students, the survey
shows, a 17.4 percent increase
over last year's level.
Most of that money � 84 per-
cent � will fund so-called need-
based grant programs which
award funds on the basis of stu-
dent financial needs.
Overall, the survey says, states
will fund $1.2 billion in need-
based grants, up 15 percent from
last year's $1.03 billion.
Since 1980, Davis says, state
funding of need-based grant pro-
grams has shot up over 42 per-
cent, increasing the number of
grant recipients by 15.4 percent.
Such dramatic increases "cer-
tainly help a lot of students and
provide greatly needed support"
in the midst of declining federal
grant money, says Dallas Martin,
executive director of the National
Association of Student Financial
Aid Administrators.
The increase in state grant
monies is particularly important
because it comes at a time when
federal grant programs are at
their weakest level ever, Martin
says. Only about a third of all
federal aid money goes to grant
programs, while the remainder
finances loan programs.
Martin and other aid experts
worry the increased federal em-
The filing fee, Lipman said,
will act as "a type of insurance"
to ensure that, following the elec-
tion, candidates remove any cam-
paign material they may have
posted on campus.
There will be eight polling
places on campus this year in-
stead of the usual 20. Lipman
said this is to avoid some of the
problems involved with getting
students to work at the booths.
"It's hard to control 20 ballot
boxes he said. The locations
will be Mendenhall, West Cam-
pus, Central Campus, the Stu-
or Many (
phasis on loans over grants is for-
cing many student to incur educa-
tional debts they can't repay.
"The state grant increases in
no way make up for the losses
we've had at the federal level
Martin points out, "but they are
encouraging
Indeed, several years ago many
states cut back or froze all educa-
tion funding to cope with the
recession and dwindling tax
revenues.
But this year's increase in state
grant funding has come about
more from student pressure on
state governments than from an
improved economy, Davis says.
"I really think state govern-
ments this year are responding to
demands from students who need
more money because of the
higher costs of attending state in-
stitutions he says.
"I think it does signify a
recognition on the state level that
education is a high priority, and
that state legislatures have
responded positively to student
dent Supply Store, the Croatan,
the bottom of College Hill, the
Allied Health Building, and
Jones Cafeteria.
The fall elections were cancell-
ed due to the presence of lists of
candidates at the polling places.
Lipman said he feels the eight
locations can "be more easily
supervised to alleviate these pro-
blems
A candidates' meeting will be
held March 11 to inform can-
didates of elections rules and
campaigning procedures. Cam-
paigning can begin immediately
following the meeting.
A major change for candidates
this year is the fact that no door-
to-door campaigning is allowed
in the residence halls. SGA Presi-
dent John Rainey said plans are
being made to schedule several
forums to allow candidates to
reach more students. One forum
cosponsored by The East Caroli-
nian and the SGA will be held
March 19. In addition, forums
are planned for College Hill,
West Campus, and possibly other
areas.
"We want to get the candidates
to go before the student body-
since they can't go
door-to-door Rainey said. Lip-
man added that this should make
the elections more interesting
because the candidates "will have
to work harder
"I would encourage all
students to get involved this year
and seek offices in student
government because it is so im-
portant Rainey said. "It is
definitely a worthwhile ex-
perience
needs agrees NASFAA's Mar-
tin.
"But two years (of state grant
increases) doesn't make a trend
warns Davis.
"Even now he says, "what
we're seeing is not a whole bunch
of money coming in from every
state, but a lot of money coming
from a handful of states. Eighty-
eight percent of this year's grant
funds are coming from 16 states,
while the other 34 states had less
substantial increases
Two states � Hawaii and
Wyoming � held their grant fun-
ding level, the survey shows.
Washington was the only state to
decrease grant money, cutting its
grant budget from $7.5 million to
$7.2 million.
Still, Davis expects the increase
in state grant funding to con-
tinue, "especially if the federal
aid budget is cut some
"I wouldn't be surprised to see
a 12-to-14 percent increase in
state grant funding next year
he predicts.
Dismal Education Reports Released
(CPS) � Last week, the
Association of American Col-
leges released a report criticizing
higher education.
Three weeks earlier, the
Carnegie Foundation did the
same thing.
The National Endowment for
the Humanities published its
study last November, a month
after the National Institute of
Education released one.
In the coming months, two
more national reports on the con-
dition of American higher educa-
tion are due.
It seems, in short, to be an
open rhetorical season an
anything and everything that's
wrong with colleges.
And many observers say the
parade of reports has created a
climate of reform that may
change the way students go to
school, whether the higher educa-
tion community likes it or not.
"Colleges don't respond well
to outside meddling, and I expect
there will be substantial
resistance to changes says
Charles Finn, director of the
Center for Education and
Human Development at Vander-
bilt University.
"But if the higher education
community doesn't take action,
someone from the outside will
"We in higher education have
been smug in our little cottages
says Frank Newman, president of
the Education Commission of the
States.
See EDUCATORS, Page 5
Thins JOW jo"dam ecu � c�b
The books are getting heavier, classes are getting longer and you
can't wait for spring break to arrive. Never fear, ECU has the only
phone on campus that will make those beach reservations for you
including the Persuader's private number. Have fun in the sun
y'all!

.immm
mwmm
� n JjplW
m t imiii � m i, � i � � i i 1 i fc , m , , jMMaMl
mmm
tiiii �.
mm mm. mm mm
f
V
?zfy�
I
m
. ii v





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21.1985
-��
?
Announcements
Summer Camp Jobs
Another location to learn of Summer Camp
Jobs as counselors, lifeguards, and nurses is
the Career Planning and Placement Office.
Come In the Bloxton House and look In the
Summer Jobs Notebook and look on the Sum
mer Camp Board for more information.
Camps from throughout the U.S. have an-
nouncements there: Seafarer, Yellowstone,
Girl Scout Camps, YMCA Camps, Camps in
Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania,
Florida, and more. Apply now.
Buddhist Meditation
There will be a meeting tonight at 7 in room
E205 of the Physics Building. Basic medlta
tion instructions will be given for any new
people attending. Discussion on Taoism will
begin. Please bring a cushion. Refreshments
will be served. Hope to see you there
U ni tar ian-Uni versa list
Fellowship
Think about your life. How did it begin: how
does it continue? Where is it headed? Come
loin us for service, fellowship and lunch on
Sun Feb. 24, 11 a.m at 499 Oak St. This
Sun's topic is Abortion: Is if a Yes or No
question? Everyone Is welcome!
Prime Time
Prime time sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Chirst, will be meeting in Jenkins Aud
Art Blgd. every Thurs. at 8 p.m. Please join
us for fun, fellowship and Bible study.
Pi Kappa Phi
is everyone ready for Founder's Day? Hope
so because it all starts tomorrow Here is a
run down of events: Fri.�9-Holiday Inn
(casual); Sat�9 Alumni Basketball game
at Memorial Gym, 5 Banquet at Holiday
inn; 9 Papa Katz.
Hope to see everyone there! By the way,
welcome back alumni at the Beta Phi
Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi.
Student Residence
Association
will met on Wed Feb. 27, at 4 p.m. in Room
212 Mendenhall Student Center. Please plan
on attending!
HEY YOU
TKE Lit' Sisters want to thank everybody for
coming down to our Valentines Day happy
hour� you made It jammln! Look for
another one real soon. Welcome all new little
sisters and remember brothers and
pledges YOUR THE BEST
NC Student Legislature
There will be a meeting Mon Feb. 25 at 7 in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse We will
discuss: Session, bill assignments, research
teams for ECU 's bills, and other business.
Pleas let the Chairman know If you are In-
terested in being a delegate at session.
ECU College Republicans
There will be a meeting today at 5:30 in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse We will discuss the
Spring elections convention held at Duke this
weekend. Members, it is not to late to get
tickets and reservations. You worked hard In
the elections, we triumphed, let's enjoy it
this weekend.
LSS Society
There will be a meeting on Wed.
�. In room 221 Mendenhall.
Feb. 20 at 7
Law Society
The next meeting of the ECU Law Society
will be held on Wed Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. in rm.
221 of Mendenhall Plans for the Washington,
DC. trip will be discussed. All members
should be there, and anyone interested is In-
vited. For more information, call Mike
Gardner at 758 5672.
Pi Kappa Phi
Founders Day is here. All brothers are
reminded of the schedule of events. Fri.
nlte�mixer at the Holiday Inn. Sat. 9
a.m.�Alumni and Undergrad basketball
game, Memorial Gym. 5 p.m.�banquet and
dinner at Holiday Inn and then the party
starts at 9�The Pi Kapp drunk bus service
will be in full operation that night�It's gon
na be a wild one. Also, brotherhood on Mon.
wil be as follow: Exec and appointed from
4 6 and brotherhood will be at 8 sharp�all
meetings will be in Mendenhall.
Kappa Sigma Lil Sis
would like to invite everyone out to Beau's
Thurs Feb. 21 to 'party down' as they
challenge the Lambda Chi Little sisters to at
keg race Come on out and cheer them on!
Aldha Phi Big
Brother Rush
All big brothers, sisters and all interested
young men are reminded that big brother
rush for Alpha Phi sorority will be today at
the Treehouse restaurant downtown from
4-7. It's only 5. for your favorite draft�so
come out and party and meet the big
brothers and sisters of Alpha Phi.
Groove Phi Groove
will be having a formal smoker Sun Feb. 24,
at 8 p.m. at Mendenhall Student Center.
Also, will be haiving a Precious Gem interest
meeting 8 p.m. Thurs Feb. 21, at
Mendenhall Student Center.
ECU Poetry Forum
will meet Thurs Feb. 21 in room 248
Mendenhall at 8 p.m Those wishing to have
their poems discussed should bring 4 to 8
copies of each poem.
ECU Surf Team
And the Treehouse Restaurant present:
Frostbreaker Happy Hour II, Fri Feb.
22�3-4 featuring: 'The PerformersA new
Hawaiin surf movie; video's of the ECU Sur-
fing Team; special price on pitchers; music
by: U2, Talking Heads, Cars, B 52's Spon
sored by: Marsh's Surf & Sea.
Special Olympics Volunteer
Coaches Meeting
All opersons interested in being a volunteer
special Olympic coach on Fri April 19, there
will be a mandatory volunteeer orientation
meeting. The meeting wil be on Mon Feb.
25, 7:30 p.m. at the Greenville Rec and Parks
Dept, JC Park, on Ceder Lane. If you can not
attend, but are interested in volunteering
your time or have any questions, contact Bill
Twine, 752-4137 ext. 201.
ILO
The International Language Organization
will hold a meeting on Tues Feb. 19 at 3:30
In BC 305 This is a mandatory meeting for
members! All Interested persons are
welcome to attend the ILO meetings. You do
not have to be a F.L. major to become a
member Come join the fun of ILO!
l mmmsaammmmzammmm����M���M�������wwM��,m

V
gfcg CoUHTRV CoOKlMG f
Anniversary Lunch Special
Bring your E.C.U. I.D.
and eat for only $2.50
between 11 a.m. &2p.m.
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
CaU for Take Outs - 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ll:00am-8:00pm
Come to University Class
at Jarvis Memorial
beginning Sunday Feb. 24
at 9:45 a.m.
Room 201
Led by Mark & Lou Ann
Spebbins
All undergraduates &
graduates invited
Doughnuts & Coffee will
be served
� �M
Aerobiciie
Register for IRS (Intramural) aerobic
classes Feb. 24�March l in room 204
Memorial Gym. Drop In classes MonThurs
5:15-4:15; 4:30-7:30. Participate rather then
speculate!
Attention
Thurs Feb. 21 could become the most im
portant day of your life by coming to
Mendenhall from 11 4 p.m. You can learn
more about CADP, responsible drinking, tips
to successful partying and more.
Graduate Students
Wesley Foundation is now accepting applica-
tions for a graduate couple to serve as resi-
dent advisors and program assistants for the
1985-84 school year. Housing is provided at
the Methodist Student Center. For Informa-
tion call 758 2030.
Rooms Available
For students at the Methodist Student
Center. Applications for summer school and
fall may be picked up at 501 East Fifth
Street. Interviews will be held March 11-15.
For further information contact Richard or
Sheila Beeker at 758 2030 after 5 p.m.
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Tonite: In the Attic, TKE presents the 10th
annual Ring-Girl Competition. Doors open at
9 p.m contest begins at 10 p.m. For more In-
formation call TKE House (758 4822) or Scott
at 758 7298.
Frisbee Club
De Irates Ultimate practice Mon, Tues,
Thurs. 3 Sat, Sun 2. Bretheren meeting 9
Tues. at MSC. 'IreeForce' to Wilm on Sun.
leaving Dunn at ll a.m. Be there or at least
be somewhere!
KYF
King Youth Fellowship will be having a Bible
Study Tues Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. In 242
Mendenhall. For more information contact
Jack at 752-1081.
Phi Eta Sigma
There will be a business meeting of Phi Eta
Sigma on Tues Feb. 24 at 5:15 p.m. In 221
Mendenhall.
Library Science 1000:
Second Block Classes
Students registered for Library Science 1000,
Sections 21-34 should begin classes Mon
Feb. 21. Students registered for Sections
35 41 will begin classes Tues Feb. 24.
Biology Club
will have If s next meeting on Mon Feb. 25.
The meeting will be held In the Helm's
Reading room 2 floor Bioloby Bldg . at7 p.m.
Our distinguished quests will include 2 first
year medical students at the ECU School of
Medicine, Jennifer Coats and Bart Edwards.
Also, we will have a fourth year medical stu-
dent, Jules Barefoot.They will be on hand to
answer any questions students who are
thinking about the medical field may have.
All old and new members In attendance will
receive a free scanning electron mtcrogram
calendar. Don't miss It.
Women's Soccer Club
Women's outdoor soccer practice to be held
Thurs Feb. 21 at 4 In anticipation of nice
weathe Meet In front of Flemmlng Dorm
(5th St. side). All women welcome, club
members expected. Questions? call Ginger
at 752-9722.
Teamwork In Health
interested in finding out how each of the
following team members contributes to toatl
health care: Music Theropy, Occupational
Theropy, Phlslcal Theropy, Social Work, and
Therapeutic Recreation? Come out Tues
Feb. 24 to Brewster Building room C-103 at
7:30 p.m. and hear a representative from
each field. Opportunity for questions will be
provided and refreshments will be served!
Sponsored by EUC Student Committee Oc-
cupational Therapy Association.
Gamma Geta Phi
Honor Society will meet Thurs Feb. 21 at 7
p.m. in Jenkins Aud. This will be your last
chance to pay dues and we'll also give out the
tickets. See you there I
Graduate Advisory Council
Just a reminder to all Graduate Advisory
Council members, we will have a meeting
ThursFeb. 14 at 4 p.m. In Brewster B-104.
Please bring you copies of the
Constitution we will be working on revi-
sions.
National Teacher
Examinations
The National teacher Examinations-Core
Battery-will be offered at ECU on Sat
March 30. Application blanks are to be com-
pleted and mailed to the Educational Testing
Service, box 91 l-r, Princeton, NJ 0541 to ar-
rive by Feb. 25 Wt5. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, room 105, Greenville.NC 27834
ACROSS
1 Deface
4 Linger
8 Communists
12 Employ
13 One opposed
14 Butter
substitute:
colloq
15 Require
17 Flap
19 Teutonic deity
20 Ancient
21 Priest's
vestment
22 Skill
23 Carry
25 Hail!
26 Three-toed
sloth
27 Poem
28 Anger
29 Enthusiasm
32 Japanese
drama
33 Land of the free
35 Mills: abbr.
36 Clutch
38 Decay
39 Sign of zodiac
40 Above
41 Writing
implement
42 Separate
43 Inquire
45 Article of
furniture
46 Pale
47 Maiden loved by
Zeus
48 Damp
49 Repudiate
formally
52 Piece of
dinnerware
54 War god
56 Pedal digit
57 Choir voice
58 Final
59 Female sheep
DOWN
1 Mire
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
2 Peer Gynt's
mother
3 Distant
4 Staff
5 In addition
1231r567891011
12r14
151 1718�r
� 20m122
2324� 25� 26
2728� 2913031
32� 33� 35
3637� 38� 39
40454142
4344� 461
AT� 48� 495051
i25455156
575859
10� 1984 United Feature Synclicate
6 Italy: abbr
7 Name
8 Take unlawfully
9 Spanish article
10 Antlered animal
11 Classify
16 Beverage
18 Hebrew month
21 Declared
22 Succor
23 Chinese faction
24 Aroma
25 Exist
26 Macaw
28 Demon
29 Perform
30 Hebrew
measure
31 Disturbance
33 Snake
34 Electrified
particle
37 Diving bird
39 Woolly
41 Part of flower
42 Moccasin
43 Opera by Verdi
44 Dirt
45 Draft: abbr
46 Direction
48 Which person
49 Legal matters
50 At present
51 Golf mound
53 Saint: abbr
55 Sun god
Pirate Walk
Girls there is one way that you can meet guys all
the time. Call 757-6616 and ask for an escort from
Pirate Walk. It's the safe walk in town. P.S. All
operators and escort should plan to attend the
Pirate Walk meeting this coming Mon at 6:30 in
the Mendenhall multi-purpose room; Please at-
tend!


OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
on
CODvrlght 1985
Kroger Savon
�0uantltv Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Sat Feb. 23, 1985
L
fiSft
S3
ser
IS
tf.
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser
(�?c& i
m
x-
frkir
diet coke, caffeine free
COKE, CAFFEINE FREE
DIET COKE OR
Coca
cola
2 Ltr.
?c3�S�"�
N.R.B.
jp
i(,
24 OZ.
Loaves
COST CUTTER
Sandwich
Bread
99

A
ASSORTED VARIETY
Totino's
r
28&,
CRISPCRUST
vV
KROGER
IN WATER
Chunk Light
Tuna

.
Ssfc
JL
THIN CRUST
PEPPERONI, MUSHROOf
SAUSAGE OR CHEESE
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
2 �$550
1 Lb.
Pkg.
SERVE N SAVE
SLICED
Luncheon
Meat
$128
SERVE N SAVE
All Meat
wieners
12 02.
Pkg.
aV1.



V
TENDER
Fresh
Broccoli
,3rf
FRESH BAKED
Italians
tread
CALIFORNIA
Navel
Oranges
Bch.
LVS.
MOZZARELLA, FETA OR
Provolone
Cheese
-v&
�a�
FRESH CUT
Mixed
. �
Lb.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacn of these advertised items
is reauired to oe readiiv
available for sale in each Kroger
sav on except as specifically
noted m this ad if we do run
out of an item we wm offer vou
your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting
the same savings or a raincheck
which will entitle you to our
chase the advertised item at
the advertised price witnm jo
Ciays Only one vendor coupon;
.wiNbe accepted per item
IMPORTED
WHITE OR RED
seedless
crapes
r i
V
z1
Lb.
�J0
ry
7 Go Kroner inn I
Go Krogering
�te�MMh�BlM
� � � , mii�oi
im i mm
-liJEEAST CAROLINIAN FEI
Infamous 'Kissinii
Mono
HEALTH
C0LUM
Infectious mononucleosis is
Primarily a disease of the adoles-
cent and young adult. The peak
incidence of the disease occurs
between 15 and 25 years of age
"Mono" is characterized by a
sore throat, fever, fatigue,
swollen glands" (enlarged
lymph nodes in the neck and
Perhaps elsewhere) and change
�n your blood. In addition, vou
may hae a rash, an enlarged
spleen (a lymphoid organ which
normally lies just under the
lower ribs) and even jaunc
(yellowing of eyes and sk
Other abnormalities may occu
infectious mononucleosis. but
very rare.
( The best guess at present is I
"mono" is caused by a virus ca
ed the Ebstein-Barr virus, wr.
has been found in cases of in!
tious mononucleosis as well as in
some other diseases. The disease
may be contracted by kissing a
carrier. A recent study she .
an individual with active symp-
toms may also pass on the
disease, because a smaii arm
of virus may be present in
Whitfield Suc
As PanhellenU
By ELAINE PERR
SttH v nxtf
Leadership of the ECL
Panhellenic Council changec
recently as Lisa Whitfield
elected president of the organiza-
tion, succeeding Cindy Fair-
banks.
"The issue of declining g
point averages among sorontie
will be looked at said V.
field, a junior Fashion and Mer-
chandising major. "Grade
usually come up in the sprii
Whitfield said, adding thai
they do not "different
sociais will be cut out or the)
become more infrequent" Vt
field, who is a member
.Alpha Phi sorority, said sor
houses will have monitored i
hours for those with low
Whitfieid said her
goals involve plans for G
Week, computerized sore
rush and the possibility of the ex-
ecutive board going to a national
council in Florida.
Panhellenic Advisor Laura
Sweet said she feels Whitfield, as
well as the rest of the newly-
elected Panhellenic Cour.
"will do an excellent job. The
council is new with no one return-
Happy Hou
DA
60 oz. Dn
Corner of -
Down
The No. 12
JUST RIGHT FOR
STEAK ON AB1
Served With Your Choice Of
And Onions Or Mushroom I
Wt PUT fT ON THE PLATE
V 1

i i






-liJEEAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 21.
1985
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
Infamous 'Kissing Disease
Peer Gynt's
mother
Distant
Staff
in addition
� 891011
1 M22
19
� 263031
39
35

Wat"50

5
56
59
6 Italy: abbi.
7 Name
8 Take unlawfully
9 Spanish article
10 Antlered animal
11 Classify
16 Beverage
18 Hebrew month
21 Declared
22 Succor
23 Chinese faction
24 Aroma
25 Exist
26 Macaw
28 Demon
29 Perform
30 Hebrew
measure
31 Disturbance
33 Snake
34 Electrified
particle
37 Diving bird
39 Woolly
41 Part of flower
42 Moccasin
43 Opera by Verdi
44 Dirt
45 Draft: abbr
46 Direction
48 Which person?
49 Legal matters
50 At present
51 Golf mound
53 Saint: abbr.
55 Sun god
In ted feature Syndicate
Walk
pt you can meet guys at
i k 'or an escort from
fe walk in town. P.S. All
lould plan to attend the
coming Mon at 6:30 in
pose room; Please at-
CoDvignt 1985
Kroger Savon
�Quantity Rignts Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Sat Feb 23, 1985
I
COKE, CAFFEINE FREE
)KE, CAFFEINE FREE
DIET COKE OR
Coca
Cola
6.5-
Oz.
Can
KROGER
IN WATER
Chunk Light
Tuna
59c
m N SAVE
�Meat
leners

TENDER
Fresh
Broccoli
99
FRESH CUT
Mixed
io Krogering
, �'�(
-CStT3i -
?
Mononucleosis Symptoms Explained
Infectious mononucleosis
primarily a disease of the adoles-
cent and young adult. The peak
incidence of the disease occurs
between 15 and 25 years of age.
"Mono" is characterized by a
sore throat, fever, fatigue,
"swollen glands" (enlarged
lymph nodes in the neck and
perhaps elsewhere) and changes
in your blood. In addition, you
may have a rash, an enlarged
spleen (a lymphoid organ which
normally lies just under the left
lower ribs) and even jaundice
(yellowing of eyes and skin).
Other abnormalities may occur in
infectious mononucleosis, but are
very rare.
The best guess at present is that
"mono" is caused by a virus call-
ed the Ebstein-Barr virus, which
has been found in cases of infec-
tious mononucleosis as well as in
some other diseases. The disease
may be contracted by kissing a
carrier. A recent study shows that
an individual with active symp-
toms may also pass on the
disease, because a small amount
of virus may be present in the
saliva for some time. It should be
noted that this is not always the
case. It is the intermittent
presence of the virus in the saliva
which has earned infectious
mono its reputed relationship
with kissing.
Your physician or health care
provider will know if you have
mono from the combination of
complaints you have and what
heshe finds on examining you
(only 1 percent of patients with
mononucleosis do not have
enlarged glands which are readily
felt in the neck as sizable bumps,
for example).
Suspicions of mono can be
confirmed by laboratory tests.
However, it may take a week or
two after fever develops before
laboratory tests become positive
therefore, if your test is not
positive at first, and it still ap-
pears from your symptoms and
findings that you may have
mono, your physician may repeat
blood tests.
It is very unpredictable how
long you will be sick. About a
third of the individuals with
mono at most colleges and
universities never have to stay in
bed since symptoms are mild.
Some people apparently have
mono and recover without know-
in� 'hey have had it. They may
even be able to go about their
usual activities, including
athletics, because the only effects
of the disease are some enlarged
lymph nodes, the blood changes
and perhaps minor sore throat
and fatigue.
If you do have fever, or sore
throat or fatigue, good medical
care should get you up and
around within a few days to two
weeks in most cases. If your
spleen is enlarged, you must be
careful not to physically exert
yourself or allow any blow to the
chest or abdomen to avoid a
possible rupture of the spleen.
Only in one or two cases out of
100 will a patient need to be con-
fined to bed for more than two
weeks.
The length of fatigue is
variable. A few people have little
or no fatigue at any time. An
even smaller number of people
will experience fatigue for mon-
ths. Fatigue is not the cause of
the mono but the result of it. The
rate of recovery from mono is
strongly influenced by
psychological well-being. People
who are strongly motivated to
return to their usual activities
recover more rapidly than others.
If any of the symptoms
described here make you suspect
you have mono, don't panic or
make the decision yourself. Seek
a diagnosis-
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buv Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
All Transactions Confidential f
Buy-Sell-Trade
Des 757-0.122 1
Hour: 9:00m � fcOnsm Moo-S� CV
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $2.00.
CHILDREN,
ANYTIME
BUCCANEER MOVIES
Whitfield Succeeds Fairbanks
As Panhellenic President
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
Leadership of the ECU
Panhellenic Council changed
recently as Lisa Whitfield was
elected president of the organiza-
tion, succeeding Cindy Fair-
banks.
"The issue of declining grade
point averages among sororities
will be looked at said Whit-
field, a junior Fashion and Mer-
chandising major. "Grades
usually come up in the spring
Whitfield said, adding that, if
they do not "different sorority
socials will be cut out or they will
become more infrequent Whit-
field, who is a member of the
Alpha Phi sorority, said sorority
houses will have monitored study
hours for those with low gpa's.
Whitfield said her primary
goals involve plans for Greek
Week, computerized sorority
rush and the possibility of the ex-
ecutive board going to a national
council in Florida.
Panhellenic Advisor Laura
Sweet said she feels Whitfield, as
well as the rest of the newly-
elected Panhellenic Council,
"will do an excellent job. The
council is new with no one return-
ing from last year she said, ad-
ding that they were "extremely
enthusiastic Sweet said there
will be training sessions involving
one or two meetings with past ex-
ecutive members and a six-week
leadership session to explain
responsibilities to the new
members.
Sweet thanked Fairbanks for
her work. "She was really com-
mitted to establishing a good rap-
port Sweet said.
Fairbanks said she feels many
positive improvements were
made during her presidency.
"We accomplished the goals we
could and made major steps
toward the others she said.
"We made a good name in the
community and contributed
money to several projects
Fairbanks said the unity of
Greek organizations and their in-
volvement and support were im-
portant to her, adding that she
felt the Inter-Fraternity and
Panhellenic Councils had worked
well together. "I was proud of
everything and learned a lot
about myself Fairbanks said.
"I got a lot of support
E.C.U. Rugby Club
vs.
N.C. State Univ.
Sat Feb. 23rd at 2:00 p.m.
Behind Allied Health Bldg.
North Carolina
Collegiate Championship!
" Rain or Shine
E.C.U.
Rugby Football Club
Greenville, NC
ESTABLISHED 1975
SCREEN I
Beverly Hills Cop � R
9:00 Only
LUNCH SPECIALS
are back
at
.suBiyyigiv51
Sonflwiches & Salads
Buy any 6" Sub,
Large Drink and Chips
and get a 6" Sub
FREE
7 Days a Week
11 AM - 3 PM
i���
Starts Friday
SCREEN I
The Mean Season � R
1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00
SCREEN II
The Killing Field � R
2:00 5:00 8:15
SCREEN III
A Passage to India � PG
. 1:30 4:45 8:00
LATE SHOWS FRI-SAT
Open 11 :QQ � starts 11:30
SCREEN I
Marylyn Chambers Stars in
Insatiable Part II � X
SCREEN li
Special Late Show Fri-Sat
Beverh Hills Cop � R
N BISCUITS
758-2098
OPEN 24 HOURS!
7 Days a Week
"TIME-OUT"
TIME-OUT"
Superb
. � Chicken & Rkriiiis m
3 Wings And a � B�Y "
I
'
Biscuit For
$1.19
EXP. 3-3-85
Chicken Snack
And Get One
I Chicken Snack Free
EXP. 3-3-85
A great new book from jMfljAMlnteraction
Subtle winning ways to tell someone they like
H
OWTO
ON
Monday
if you want a date for Friday.
Nothing attracts people to each other
like certain subtle signals. YOU can
learn what thev are and h.w to use
themwith CONFIDF.SCF. to make some-
one feel you're special. Benefit as
you enjoy reading of the first-hand
experiences of others, like yourself,
:rying to attract someone they like.
o, you don't have to be beautiful,
wealthy, popular or unique in any way
these tested winning ways Jo work
If or everyone wiling to try them.
We know how you feel about first encounters. Maybe you
are afraid to approach someone � scared you will be
rejected, or worse yet, laughed at or put down. Per-
haps you're missing your chance to meet someone that
you find interesting because you don't know the right
way to go about it. Worry no more.
"HOW TO FLIRT ON MONDAY" was written especially
for you to overcome these feats and to give you
new self-assurance. Discover how to make shyness
work for you. Know why "acting out of character"
is always the wrong thing to do. Learn how to use
the "verbal handshake" technique plus many more
subtle approach ideas you nave yet to think of.
Read how a mere glance, scent or smile can ignite
a relationship and be sure
that you're using them the
right way.(You'11 know you
How IO
J&TL Monday
know how!) Chapters also
uncover many sensitive areas
no one ever tells you about
but we tell it like it is
with humor and warmth. If ever
you've wanted someone you like
to "want to" know you then
this book is a must I You won't
put it down til it's finished.
"Hi!
Box 1091, Shalimar, FL 32579
Please send a copy of HOW TO FLIRT ON MONDAY in a
plain envelope.(great gift item!) Mv payment of
$9.95 (plus SI.05 postage and handling) is en-
closed. I may return the book anytime within ten
days of delivery for a full refund. cckwttaM
1ZS2ST - rTTTT-rrm i i i i i i i
��o flaw
I
I
���������" �� � m ��-�-
� no m m i�i �n
- - �-��- �� � �� o � � ���� m i� iMfcXlMXfc � � i
k m � o
w � 4
1 fi





3Uje �a0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, o��Manger
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, n�� &&� Tom Luvender, DtoroAdvertising
Scott Cooper, o-sarfs �-��� Anthony Martin, bus,� Manag�-
Tina Maroschak, svte�dor John Peterson, cu Manager
BlLL MITCHELL, Circulation Manager BILL DAWSON, Production Manager
Doris Rankins, secwMrv � Rick Mccormac, co-spons Editor
DANIEL MAURER, Entertainment Editor DECHANILE JOHNSON, Ad Technician
February 21, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Athletics
Academic Rules Necessary
The University Board of Gover-
nors chairman's call for an in-
vestigation into the academic rules
for athletes at the 16 constituent
schools Wednesday is a signal to
the state's citizens that their
universities will not lessen their
commitment to learning. Chair-
man Philip Carson said the time
has come to put into perspective
the role of big-time college
athletics.
In the meantime, UNC-system
President Bill Friday said he favors
a minimum standard for college
athletes. Friday would like athletes
at UNC-system schools to achieve
�at least a 700 out of a possible 1600
;on the Scholastic Aptitude Test.
?Right now the 16 schools, in-
cluding ECU, set their own stan-
dards and make exceptions for
tvidents with outstanding talents,
particularly athletes.
What Friday, Carson and two
reneral assemblyman who in-
troduced a bill requiring a 700 SAT
score to enter the UNC-system
schools are telling us is it's time to
put priorities in order. A universi-
ty, as any professor or student will
ell you, is an intellectual ex-
perience, a place to expand the
mind and its horizons. It is a place
where people learn of new and old
worlds and expose themselves to
different morals and cultures.
Universities are for thinking; not
for slam-dunking.
Carson said the investigation is
intended to "insure and
demonstrate that our own house is
in order, that sound educational
policies governing the athletic pro-
grams are in place, and that these
policies are being effectively and
conscentiously administered For
the people on the committee to
create such a house, a few changes
will definitely have to be made.
The first change must be in at-
titude.
We all know that college
athletics are big business, prac-
tically separate from the campus
itself. Athletic boosters raise
money. There are special dorms.
The athletes are in effect employed
by the school; they're entertainers,
Making money for the university.
Especially here in ACC country,
the spector of sports can easily
overwhelm any administrator into
letting in an inferior student. But,
North Carolinians need to ask
what they really want: Schools that
are fair and just to all those who
apply, or schools that place an em-
phasis on basketball and football
for profit.
The choice should be clear, and
most people probably share the
same sentiments as Rep. Thomas
Rhodes, R-New Hanover, one of
the sponsors of the 700-SAT bill in
the state house. "It rankles me that
they're doing that (admitting un-
qualified student-athletes) and
lowering the equality of education
in this state for the benefits of
athletes
The East Carolinian hopes that
the UNC-system will adopt some
type of satisfactory cut-off point
for acceptance of athletes to con-
stituent schools. The 700 SAT with
appropriate grades (a 2.3 predicted
gpa from high school grades)
would be adequate. At ECU, we
have learned that our football
team has standards higher than the
NCAA regulations, that is com-
mendable. Also, word has it that
new head coach Art Baker is com-
mitted to the idea of a "student-
athlete We hope this brings more
of our players closer to their
diplomas.
The shame is all this didn't come
about until the Chris Washburn af-
fair. We know President Friday
has been working, along with other
administrators in the system, to
better the standards and protect
the integrity of our schools for a
long time. But, alas, the public
does not fall in line until something
happens, until the boom has
literally fell on our collective
heads. But, as the old saying goes,
"It's better late than never
Rep. Howard Chapin,
D-Beaufort, the other sponsor of
the house bill, is a former public
high school coach and teacher. He
says he "wasn't a Phi Beta Kappa
or anything like that But, he
adds, if they can't make a 700
on the SAT, they can't get in
That's the kind of attitude we
need. No matter how good a
leaper, thrower, catcher or
shooter, if you can't make the
grade, you can't "get in
Did You Know � The second
annual Great Pirate Purple-Gold
Pigskin Pigout Party is scheduled
for Friday and Saturday, April
19-20. Boy, oh, boy, what fun.
They'll be a football game, a pig
cookin' and a mystery all-star
guest (mysterious because he
hasn't been chosen yet).
There will even be a big
fireworks display. Mark it on your
calendars, boys and girls. Should
be lots of fun.
Campus Forum
Bounce Basketball, Fellas
Having been an active member on
both the University Honor Board and
the Academic Integrity Board, I have
become accustomed to dealing with in-
dividuals fairly. This stems from an in-
dividual's performance in determining
his own future. I feel that individual
performance should be the sole
criterion for maintaining one's posi-
tion here at the university. This should
include faculty members, as well as
students and those employed by this
university to include our various
coaching staffs. If in these areas we are
not producing, then the deficiency
should be removed.
One of the most obvious areas that
has not produced in years is the men's
basketball program. This has not only
brought disappointment to the student
body, but to the community as well.
This type of disgrace is not just limited
to our immediate area, but it has
brought humiliation on a national
level. I don't think the university
should be subject to this shame.
Last year we all enjoyed the recogni-
tion our football team brought to
ECU. Our national ranking gave this
university something to talk about and
be proud of. It was an achievement
that no other in the state could claim.
Then, last fall, we were not nationally
ranked. We had lost a good number of
players who made up the nationally
ranked team, so we removed what we
thought the deficiency was: Coach
Emory.
After four years of disappointing
basketball seasons, it seems we are not
removing the deficiency, only retaining
it. I've heard the problem being blam-
ed on lack of student support at these
games, but the enthusiasm will not be
there as long as the basketball team will
not produce. I think that four years is
long enough to determine whether or
not one's basketball program will
work. It is now time to remove the
deficiency and replace it with new ideas
and a new program. We have nothing
to lose and nowhere to go but up.
We learn here only what we are
taught, and those individuals that
make up this university have the
(responsibility of molding student
character, to include fair and ethical
standards of behavior in dealing with
others. The university is not just here
to pump out graduates but to produce
graduates who will contribute to socie-
ty and perhaps bring back honor on
this university. It is the responsibility
of the university for setting a good ex-
ample for us to go by and for correc-
ting its mistakes.
Thomas S. Buonocore
Political Science
Tiffed Tester
During the past three years at ECU I
have encountered teachersinstructors
that will not return, for the student to
keep, tests given during the course.
Still yet, there are some instructors
who will not let students hand copy
questions off the test to keep for later
reference. Some of these same instruc-
tors present, word for word, the same
questions on their midterm and final
examinations.
This appears to be a situation in
which the instructor is too slack or lazy
to rewrite their test materials for the
next semester. However, instructors
expect their students to put many long
hours into preparatory work for a test
that is given semester after semester.
Consequently, there are a few
students who, by some act from above,
obtain a copy of an instructor's old,
yet current tests. No one can place
fault with these students. This for-
tunate student, if heshe is smart, uses
the old test as a study tool.
The point is, why are students
unable to obtain, for permanent keep-
ing, testing materials that they com-
plete and pay for through this universi-
ty. The students pay for their educa-
tion, and it would seem reasonable for
students to be able to keep their
materials used in learning. This would
also help motivate some instructors to
revise and make up new test materials.
Mary E. Greene
Junior, SLAP
Kits Useful
So the Wolverines have an action
proposal � to add $50 more or less to
student fees for "basic survival kits"
� you know, gas masks, food,
blankets Did I read that straight?
Good Republicans proposing to go in-
to students' pockets that way?
On second thought, though, the idea
may have merit. Blankets would be
about as useful in case of nuclear at-
tack as MX's � and they're a whale of
a lot cheaper.
Edith Webber
ECU Peace Committee
,ammmmsmm
Column Covers Kaleidoscope of Kits, Kwips, Kaboodles
Pee Dee is dead! Good riddance. That
silly name for a cartoon mascot, born in
the minds of 10-year-old consultees, kids
whose wisdom was sought by the ad-
ministration, has been officially interred
by the Board of Trustees after loud pro-
tests from ECU students. Our next
The ?inht Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
target ought to be the logo itself, the so-
called "Pirate Fierce of mien, dark of
look, chest puffed out like a fighting
rooster, he struts menacingly toward us
� BUT THIS PIRATE IS DISARM-
ED! His beard is trimmed like a liberal
professor's. Some peacenik type has
taken away his weapon. Who ever heard
of an unarmed pirate? Traditionally, we
visualize him with a brace of flintlock
pistols stuck in his belt, and in his fists
he clutches a sharp-edged dirk and
claymore. That's a real pirate! Let's br-
ing him back here to embody a fighting,
winning spirit.
� �����
Another thing off the top of my mind.
Someone ought to do something about
the scheduling of events on campus.
Last Thursday night, about a hundred
people were present at a lecture given by
a former member of the Carter ad-
ministration. Presumably, what she had
to say was useful, but economic lectures
do not grab any of us. Attendance was
obligatory for some of us students. On
the same evening, professor Brett Wat-
son led a choral group � made up of
the Concert Choir and the Greenville
Chamber Choir � in the performance
of several motets of Palestrina and with
the piece de resistance being the classic
Faure Requiem. Friends tell me that the
performance in Wright Auditorium was
splendidly done, the voices well balanc-
ed and blended. Too bad some of us had
to miss it, especially since conductor
Watson had obviously worked hard to
give ECU a first-rate performance.
Witnesses say, alas, that the audience
was small (despite the $1 admission
price). Some of us at the lecture would
surely have been in Wright but for the
conflict of schedules.
If you are a culture fan, and you miss-
ed the Vienna Boys Choir, the loss was
yours. Fortunately, on that night the au-
dience was large and full of spirited
responses. Score one for the campus and
community in that evening of entertain-
ment and aesthetic pleasure.

There was some debate about my re-
cent column on abortion. Not surpris-
ingly, some of the rebuttal was er-
roneous.
One fellow cried out that "surrender-
ing to the moral decrees" of government
threatens "the individual's right to make
conscious, moral decisions I ask him:
does this mean I should have the right to
make the conscious, moral decision to
kill you? Does it mean that I, with the
protection of the law, should be allowed
to blow you in half with an M-60
machine gun? Of course not.
As a matter of fact, one of the higher
functions of our government is to im-
pose the people's morality on all of
society. Consequently, murderers,
rapists, drug pushers and other of-
fenders have no individual right to make
conscious, moral decisions to commit
crimes. Abortionists will soon be back in
this category.
Another protestor told this newspaper
that in my column I was guilty of
"dramatic generalization that is, I was
unspecific. To him I say; the column is
just that � a column. It is not a term
paper or treatise, and its most important
function is not only to inform but to
entertain. The column, I believe, fulfills
those functions.
The same fellow made an astonishing
statement. He said that abortion should
remain a legal option until "viability"
(whatever that's supposed to mean) of
the fetus is proven. In other words, he
said that until we are certain that the un-
born is a human life, we should continue
the killing. But what if we prove that it is
human life? Well, then we are awash in
the blood of guilt and murder. Or do we
just say to the millions of dead babies,
"Oops, sorry 'bout your deaths
No, I say that until we are absolutely
certain that the unborn is not human, we
should choose life. Only then can we be
certain that mass murder is being avoid-
ed.
(Editor's note � In Mr. Kilcoyne's
column last week, the closing quote had
a clause inadvertently deleted. It should
have read, "We must hold elections so
that the people can vote for Sandinismo,
to show that the people favor the Soviet-
Cuban advance, that the Nicaraguan
people favor totalitarianism, that the
Nicaraguan people favor Marxism-
Leninism. " The East Carolinian regrets
the error.)
- � -
Educato
Continued From Page 1
"But now the spotlight of
reform is beginning to turn to
higher education
Seemingly everyone is trying to
get in the spotlight, too.
"Colleges are not delivering on
their promises newly-named
education secretary William Ben-
nett said at his swearing-in last
week, adding colleges are "ripp-
ing students off" by not deliver-
ing good educations.
In most university curricula
"almost anything goes the
AAC pronounced a day earlier.
"For the most part, these
reports are right on the mark
Vanderbilt's Finn says. "If
anything, they are a bit mild
But
broad
Nielsoi
tion o(
-n
tion
some
there,
hard I
"MJ
student
ieges
muni
The
studer
"I
team
hard
tion.
a rott
El
Florida Fra
(CPS) � University of Florida
officals have suspended a frater- can't
nity and are likely to probe all the book
fraternity "little sister" programs B .
on campus after one house monit
started selling a raunchy hand- practij
book to students. "doz�
The handbook names certain pubh
female students, and recom-
mends how many beers it takes to ot
persuade them to engage in sex- Stevei
ual intercourse
Put out by the Beta Theta Pi
house and offered for $2 a copy,
the book also outlines the sexual
escapades of members.
The fratern.ty says the book
was intended as a joke, but a
universitv administrators aren't
amused.
"Whether it was meant as a
joke or as a National Lampoon,
we don't find it funny sa
assistant student affairs Dean
Thomas Dougan. "it is extremely
inappropriate
The book also call some
students "sand niggers and poin-
ty heads and makes anti-
semitic references to others.
In a prepared statement , the
fraternity presiden: 5aid the
handbook is not an official
publication of and is not condon-
ed by the fraternity.
The handbook is "in poor
taste says Thomas Beyer of the
national Beta Theta Pi organiza
tion.
Players'
Charges
Dismissed
Two ECU football players
were dismissed of aggravated
assault charges in Pitt County
District Court on Thursday, Feb.
14, 1985.
John Curtis Willamson of
116-B Belk Dorm and Ronald
Gilliard of 204-D Belk Dorm
were onginallv charged with
assaulting an ECU student in
Scott Dorm on Feb. 2, 1985.
Other reports the Department
of Public Safety included several
larcenies occurring this past week
on Campus. Feb. 13, 3:07 p.m.
� an official at the Biolog
Department Office reported the
theft of a set of triple beam
balance scales from a room in the
Science Complex.
Feb. 15, 2:55 p.m. � a
manager at the Mendenhall
Snack Bar reported the larceny of
food products from the snack
bar .ooler. At 3:00 the same day.
an employee of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center reported that one of
the kites on display had been
stolen from the second floor of
Mendenhall. The kites are the
property of Kitty Hawk Kites of
Kitty Hawk, N.C.
Feb. 20 1:34 a.m. � A White
Dorm resident reporting seeing a
white mile exposing himself
south of White Dorm.
Super
Specials!
7 Days
a Week
BLUE
MOON CAFE
Call for more
information
752-1294
V
i
!






THEEASTCAROHNHAN
IAT GOES
FEBRUARY 21, 1985
6?
Wily
Fellas
;urrent tests. No one can place
with these students. This for-
ident, if he she is smart, uses
id te a a study tool.
point is, why are students
obtain, for permanent keep-
ing materials that they com-
and pay for through this universi-
-tudents pay for their educa-
: it would seem reasonable for
. to be able to keep their
ed in learning. This would
motivate some instructors to
e and make up new test materials.
Mary E. Greene
Junior, SLAP
Kits Useful
the Wolverines have an action
toposal � to add S50 more or less to
;dent fees for "basic survival kits"
you know, gas masks, food,
lankets Did I read that straight?
od Republicans proposing to go in-
students' pockets that way?
second thought, though, the idea
lay have merit. Blankets would be
out as useful in case of nuclear at-
Ick a- MX's � and they're a whale of
t cheaper.
Edith Webber
ECU Peace Committee
�Stowa
'0
oIHWEA
boodles
that until we are certain that the un-
pi is a human life, we should continue
killing. But what if we prove that it is
lan life? Well, then we are awash in
blood of guilt and murder. Or do we
say to the millions of dead babies,
fops, sorry 'bout your deaths
4o, I say that until we are absolutely
tain that the unborn is not human, we
uld choose life. Only then can we be
tain that mass murder is being avoid-
WEditor's note � In Mr. Kilcoyne's
Yumn last week, the closing quote had
lause inadvertently deleted. It should
e read, "We must hold elections so
t the people can vote for Sandinismo,
how that the people favor the Soviet-
ban advance, that the Nicaraguan
Vple favor totalitarianism, that the
taraguan people favor Marxism-
�unism. " The East Carolinian regrets
error.)
Educators Dissatisfied With Recent Reports
Continued From Page 1
"But now the spotlight of
reform is beginning to turn to
higher education
Seemingly everyone is trying to
get in the spotlight, too.
"Colleges are not delivering on
their promises newly-named
education secretary William Ben-
nett said at his swearing-in last
week, adding colleges are "ripp-
ing students off" by not deliver-
ing good educations.
In most university curricula
"almost anything goes the
A AC pronounced a day earlier.
"For the most part, these
reports are right on the mark
Vanderbilt's Finn says. "If
anything, they are a bit mild
But if the critics are using too
broad a brush, says Robert
Nielson of the American Federa-
tion of Teachers.
"This is not a focused reac-
tion Nielson says. "There are
some world class institutions out
there, and you don't have to shop
hard to find a good education
"Moreover, 36 percent of
students go to community col-
leges and nobody's bashing com-
munity colleges
The "bashing" can depress
students and teachers.
"It's like being on a basketball
team Nielson says. "You work
hard, you face tough competi-
tion, and then the paper says it's
a rotten team
Elementary and secondary
education weathered a flurry of
reports in 1983 and 1984, but it's
hard to say just what changes
they've caused, says Robert Mc-
Clure of the National Education
Association, the largest teacher's
union.
"The action seems to be more:
more standards, more time, more
teachers.
Some reports only stirred up
counter reports.
The widespread calls for more
emphasis on core subjects, for ex-
ample, prompted the National
Commission Secondary Voca-
tional Education to issue its own
report last year.
It found students need a mix of
vocational and academic train-
ing.
But for several reasons,
educators expect the college
reports may actually lead to
change. They point out that:
�Substantial changes were
enacted quickly after similar
reports during the late 1950s,
when math and science curricula
were overhauled in the wake of
the successes of the Soviet space
program.
�Higher education reforms do
not always have to be approved
by state legislatures, where
elementary and secondary school
reforms sometimes bog down.
�Competition among colleges
for students could force cam-
puses to act quickly. "Parents
and students can ask tough ques-
tions and they can vote with their
feet Bradford College Presi-
dent Arthur Levine says.
But nothing will change unless
the reports also show how to raise
more money, says Ernest Ben-
jamin of the American Associa-
tion of University Professors.
Bradford's Levine disagrees.
Innovative programs, not more
resources, are the key, he says.
"What will stop the flow of
these reports is that the money
for them will dry up, and more
schools will start following their
recommendations he says.
"It's the best thing you can do
to rejuvinate interest in a school
if you don't have a Doug Flutie
Uhe most prominent collegiate
football player this past
season) Levine says.
Florida Frat Selling 'Raunchy' Books
(CPS) � University of Florida
officals have suspended a frater-
nity and are likely to probe all the
fraternity "little sister" programs
on campus after one house
started selling a raunchy hand-
book to students.
The handbook names certain
female students, and recom-
mends how many beers it takes to
persuade them to engage in sex-
ual intercourse.
Put out by the Beta Theta Pi
house and offered for $2 a copy,
the book also outlines the sexual
escapades of members.
The fraternity says the book
was intended as a joke, but a
university administrators aren't
amused.
"Whether it was meant as a
joke or as a National Lampoon,
we don't find it funny says
assistant student affairs Dean
Thomas Dougan. "it is extremely
inappropriate
The book also call some
students "sand niggers and poin-
ty heads and makes anti-
semitic references to others.
In a prepared statement , the
fraternity president said the
handbook is not an official
publication of and is not condon-
ed by the fraternity.
The handbook is "in poor
taste says Thomas Beyer of the
national Beta Theta Pi organiza-
tion.
Players'
Charges
Dismissed
Two ECU football players
were dismissed of aggravated
assault charges in Pitt County
District Court on Thursday, Feb.
14, 1985.
John Curtis Willamson of
116-B Belk Dorm and Ronald
Gilliard of 204-D Belk Dorm
were originally charged with
assaulting an ECU student in
Scott Dorm on Feb. 2, 1985.
Other reports the Department
of Public Safety included several
larcenies occurring this past week
on Campus. Feb. 13, 3:07 p.m.
� an official at the Biology
Department Office reported the
theft of a set of triple beam
balance scales from a room in the
Science Complex.
Feb. 15, 2:55 p.m. � a
manager at the Mendenhall
Snack Bar reported the larceny of
food products from the snack
bar .ooler. At 3:00 the same day,
an employee of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center reported that one of
the kites on display had been
stolen from the second floor of
Mendenhall. The kites are the
property of Kitty Hawk Kites of
Kitty Hawk, N.C.
Feb. 20 1:34 a.m. � A White
Dorm resident reporting seeing a
white male exposing himself
south of White Dorm.
Super
Speci
7 Days
a Week
BLUE
MOON CAFE
Call for more
information
752-1294
National fraternity officials
can't recall seeing similar hand-
books at other schools.
But the head of a group
monitoring fraternity hazing
practices says she has been told of
"dozens and dozens" of similar
publications.
"I'm hearing more and more
of this type of thing says Eileen
Stevens of Sayville, N.Y who
founded the Committee to Halt
Useless College Killings after her
son was killed in a fraternity in-
itiation ritual.
But, Stevens says, this is the
first time one has been sold
publicly.
"In most cases, these things
never see the light of day because
the girls are embarrassed, the
members don't talk about it
publicly and there is a secretive
shroud covering what goes on at
CAMP TON-A-WANDAH
Student Opportunities
We are looking for girls interested in be-
ing counselors � activity instructors in a
private girls camp located in Henderson-
ville, N.C. Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WSI), Horseback riding, Ten-
nis, Backpacking, Archery, Canoeing,
Gymnastics, Crafts, also, Basketball, Com-
puters, Soccer, Cheerleading, Drama,
Nature study, Field Hockey. If your school
offers a Summer Internship program we
will be glad to help. Inquiries � Morgan
Haynes, P.O. Box 400 C, Tryon, NC,
28782.
PET
VILLAGE
We Cany A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
M�iicr Card and Visa are accepted and financing
is available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 2834
PHONE 756-9222
Put your degree
to work
where it can do
a world of good.
The toughest ot
you'll ever love
Your first job after graduation should offer you
more than just a paycheck. We can offer you
an experience that lasts a lifetime.
Working together with people in a different
culture is something you'll never forget. It's a
learning experience everyone can benefit from.
In Science or Engineering, Education, Agricul-
ture, or Health, Peace Corps projects in de-
veloping countries around the world are
bringing help where it's needed.
If you're graduating this year, look into a uni-
que opportunity to put your degree to work
where it can do a world of good. Look into
Peace Corps.
RECRUITERS WILL BE ON
CAMPUS FEBRUARY 19 AND
20 IN THE CAREER PLACE-
MENT OFFICE, RLOXTON
HOUSE. SIGN UP TODAY!
individual chapters she says.
In this case, Florida suspended
Beta Theta Pi for the remainder
of 1985, and its "little sister"
program for an indefinite period.
The university also may review
all such programs at the school.
"Little sister" programs try to
involve female students in ac-
tivities of a fraternity. Most often
the females are not sorority
members.
REWARD
$200 CASH reward for informa-
tion leading to the arrest and con-
viction of the person or persons
who removed the purple and gold
banners from the lot of Joe Culliper
Chrysler Plymouth Dodge. All in-
formation will be held in the
strictest confidence. Anyone having
any information contact Garry
Singleton or James Phillips
756-0186.
WISHING V0U L1VEV AT THE TOWERS? V0U CAN THIS FALL'
CALL E0R VETAJLS ON RENTAL OR PURCHASE. 756-S410
RINGCOLD TOWERS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
student condos at ECU campus
sale and rental units
on-site management
night security personnel
fully furmshed and accessorized
carpeted & air conditioned
kitchen appliances furnished
laundry facilities
resident parking stickers
WARD PROPERTY BROKERS
'OS COMMERCE STREET
DRAWER 56S
"��"EEN. Lit' N C 27835
919 756-8410
ITS FOR YOU!
Movie: "Purple Rain"
7 and 9 p.m. MSC
Late Movie: "La Cage Aux Folles"
11 p.m. MSC
Student Star Search
MSC
Artists Series: Rotterdam
Philharmonic Orchestra
8 p.m. Wright
Sneak Preview: "The Sure Thing"
8 p.m. MSC
Illumina Competition Entries
Sponsored
by
February 21,22,23
February 22, 23
February 25
February 27
February 28
March 12,13
The Student Union
�TR
�u�r
�e
'Q�
o�
���c
DEADUNE:
FESRUART 27. Spa
DETAILS: MENOENHAll STUDENT CENTER ROOM 234 7S7H t 7,0
0jf0j0jto0flll0lt,f'1
� " �� f � vmm-�0t�ri
i.�ntmmmtF






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Doonesbury
FEBRUARY 21, 1985 Page 6
Poitier Directs
Dancers In
'Fastforward'
we agreed at the outset that this was not to
be a film about break dancing, but a broad
amalgam of the beauty of dance7
Columbia Pictures presents
the new motion picture Fast
Forward, a story of eight small-
town teenagers from Sandusky,
Ohio, who have big-time dreams
and leave home to go to New
York to compete in a national
talent contest. The high-spirited
group call themselves "the
Adventurous Eight" and include
a host of screen newcomers.
This dance musical introduces
a group of new faces in an exposi-
tion of how these daring
youngsters set goals, face adversi-
ty and work together to survive
all odds in making their dream
come true.
Director Sidney Poitier sees
Fast Forward as "a picture as
much about self-sufficiency as it
is about dance. It is a movie
about young people who have
taken hold of their lives and
taken responsibility. They go out
using the pleasure principle of
dancing but they use it to mold
their destination, to captain their
own ship
Poitier cast the film with ut-
most care, scouring the country
for four months in search of
young, formally trained ballet
dancers. From thousands of
talented applicants, Poitier chose
eight. "I looked at almost 3,000
dancers and after I found a hand-
ful, I had to select eight who
could not only dance exquisitely
but act as well
Of the Fast Forward cast of
newcomers, two consider
themselves mainly singers,
several have appeared previously
in stage plays and others in sup-
per club revues, dance concerts
and summer stock. None was
ever in a theatrical motion picture
before now. Suddenly with Fast
Forward, these eight performers
were brought to Hollywood to
make their film debuts and, vir-
tually, start at the top.
Six days a week for nearly
three months they arose at 5:30
a.m. for grueling hours of pre-
production rehearsal with
choreographer Rick Atwell, who
Director Sidney Poitier and Columbia Pictures have assembled eight young newcomers for the dance film Tastforward
developed the film's seven major
dance sequences.
"Sidney conceived the story
for the movie and knew exactly
what he wanted says Atwell,
"so we agreed at the outset that
this was not to be a film about
break dancing, but a broad
amalgam of the beauty of dance.
I worked to create a potpourri of
dance, including my own style of
movement, some ballet, some
jazz and other world-recognized
techniques as well as smatterings
of the hot contemporary street
dance
Director Poitier and Producer
John Veitch assembled a strong
cast of veteran actors to support
the newcomers. Renowned
classical actress Irene Worth ap-
pears in a very uncharacteristic
role as a promoter's feisty widow
who aids the Adventurous Eight,
donning black leather and a punk
hairdo. From Broadway and star-
ring film roles comes Constance
Towers, who appears as the
beleaguered mother of a spoiled
society brat (Karen Kopins).
Fast Forward also utilized the
proverbial cast of thousands.
Aside from the eight principals
making their film debut, there are
24 key supporting actors, six
featured break dancers and a
dozen members of two rock
bands. Literally thousands of ex-
tras were used to fill out a garden
party scene, disco clubs and the
Shootout talent contest audience.
Producer Veitch says about
Fast Forward, "I don't think of
it primarily as a dance picture, I
think of it as a class entertain-
ment story about young kids who
are dancers who take a chance to
prusue their dreams
Conductor Leads Philharmonic To ECU
James Conlon
By ROBIN WHALEY
Staff Writer
Supreme. Commanding. Ma-
jestic. Inspiring.
These are just a sampling of
the adjectives used to describe
conductor James Conlon's direc-
tion of the Rotterdam Philhar-
monic Orchestra, which will per-
form at Wright Auditorium on
Feb. 27. But what of the man
himself?
At 34 years old, James Conlon
is in his second season as music
director of the Rotterdam
Philharmonic Orchestra. In addi-
tion, he is Music Director of the
Cincinnatti May Festival, the
oldest and most prestigious
choral festival in the U.S. Over
the past ten years, he has con-
ducted orchestras and opera com-
panies all over the world.
His education at Juilliard
seems to have prepared Conlon
Air Force Band Takes Off Feb. 23
The fourth Saturday night in
February is the scheduled
dale of the arrival in Greenville
of the United State Air Force
Tactical Air Command (TAC)
Band from Langley Air Force
Base, Virginia.
At 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23,
the full complement of the TAC
Band will present a concert for
the public in Wright Auditorium
on the campus.
This year's Air Force concert is
again co-sponsored by the Air
Force Reserve Officer's Training
Corps (AFROTC) at East
Carolina University and The Dai-
ly Reflector.
Tb?re 's no admission to be
charged for attending the con-
cert; however, those planning to
attend will be required to secure
tickets in advance.
Several points of ticket
distribution have been arranged.
They can be picked up at the
AFROTC office on campus, at
The Daily Reflector, at Sheppard
Memorial Library, and at the
Record Bars at both The Plaza
and Carolina East Mall.
The tour program scheduled
for the Feb. 23 performance at
Wright represents a wide range of
styles and time periods.
Among compositions slated
for the program are ones by
Leonard Bernstein, Hector
Summer Theatre
Auditions
More than 100 actors, singers,
dancers and technicians are
being sought for the 20th season
of Broadway musicals produced
by the East Carolina Summer
Theatre. Auditions have been
scheduled for Saturaday, Feb.
23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. in room 206 of the
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
Slated for production this sum-
mer are: A Funny Thing Happen-
ed on the Way to the Forum (July
1-6); Baby (July 8-13); The Rob-
ber Bridegroom (July 15-20); and
Peter Pan (July 24-27 & 29-31).
Performers will be hired by the
show or for the entire season,
with rehearsals set to begin June
16 in Greenville. People audition-
ing should bring music and
prepare a song which shows their
voice to it's best advantage. No a
capella singing will be permitted;
an accompanist will be provided.
Auditioners may be given steps
and routines by the
choreographer after completing
the singing audition.
Technicians should bring a
resume with letters of reference
for an interview. There are also a
number of apprentice postions
available.
Boys and girls (who can play
boys), ages 8-16 and a 12-16 years
old girl (for the role of Wendy)
are needed for Peter Pan.
Children should also prepare a
song.
All performers in the Summer
Theatre are paid except for ap-
prentices. Salaries are commen-
surate with size of role and per-
forming experience, talent and
training. The minimun salary is
sufficient to cover temporary liv-
ing cost in Greenville for non-
Equity performers and complies
with Equity salary scales for per-
formers who belong to the union.
For further information, call
757-6390.
Berlioz, Charles Griffe, Johannes
Brahms and Igor Stravinsky on
the first part of the program.
Following an intermission, music
to be performed will include
pieces by Henry Fillmore,
Johann Straus, Glenn Miller,
Floyd E. Werle, Edwin
Goldman, and Samuel Ward's
"America the Beautiful
Sgt Donald W. Hedrick is to be
the flute soloist for Griffe's
"Poem for Flute
The Tactical Air Command
Band is conducted by Captain
Lowell E. Graham, a native of
Greeley, Colorado. A clarinet
major, he is a graduate of the
University of Northern Colorado
with a master's degree in clarinet
performance. In 1971 he became
director of instrumental music at
Colby Community College in
Colby, Kansas, and in 1974 audi-
tioned for the U.S. Air Force
Band Commander Program and
was immediately accepted.
Deputy commander and assis-
tant conductor is 2nd Lt. Mark
R. Peterson, a native of Joliet,
111. who was commissioned in
1983. Prior to entering the Air
Force, he served as director of
bands at a high school in Illinois.
He holds undergraduate and
graduate degrees from the Nor-
thwestern University School of
Music, Evanston, Illinois and is a
woodwind major.
Airman First Class Terry Vos-
bein of Decatur, Ga. is the ar-
ranger for the band. Before join-
ing the Air Force in 1983, he
played bass guitar and arranged
for the Terry Vosbein Trio and
other groups in Georgia, Florida
and Arizona, including work for
cabaret theatres in Atlanta. He
attended North Texas State
University, the University of
Miami and Austin Peay State
University.
quite capably for his career. He
debuted as guest conductor with
the New York Philharmonic in
1974. Since, he has directed such
companies as the Chicago Sym-
phony, the Philadelphia Or-
chestra, the Los Angeles Philhar-
monic and the National Sym-
phony. In Europe he has ap-
peared with the Berlin Philhar-
monic, the London Philhar-
monic, the London Symphony,
the BBC Symphony, L'Orchestre
de Paris and L'Orchestra di San-
ta Cecilia. In addition, Mr. Con-
lon has served with the
Metropolitan Opera, the London
Royal Opera and the Paris
Opera.
Why the diversity and exten-
sive travel for a man of such pro-
mise? Conlon told interviewer
Barbara Zuch, "When I started
out conducting, I was 22. I was
too young to have an orchestra of
my own. I didn't want to have
any non-musical responsibilities
for at least 10 years
"You can develop much more
flexibility when you're young.
Guest conducting forces you to
develop under different cir-
cumstances
Although Mr. Conlon has set-
tled into a "permanent home"
with the Rotterdam Philhar-
monic, he remains active. He will
travel to 14 cities with the or-
chestra this season. In addition,
he will open the Maggio M'isicale
in Florence with a new produc-
tion of Don Carlo, and will lead
Tosca at the Paris Opera with
Hildegard Behrens, Luciano
Pavarotti and Gabriel Bacquit.
He also has engagements with the
London Philharmonic and L'Or-
chestre de Paris as well as an ap-
pearance with the Chicago
Ravinia Festival.
This exhausting performance
schedule has not prevented Mr.
Conlon and the Rotterdam
Philharmonic from recording,
however. With Erato Records,
they have recently released Liszt's
Faust Symphony and Janacek's
Idyll and Lachian Dances. Two
more albums, featuring Liszt's
Dante Symphony and the com-
pleted Poulenc concerti, are
scheduled for release this year.
James Conlon has emerged as
something of a wonderboy in the
musical world, but he seems con-
cerned only with the quality of
his work. Unhurried in the midst
of a remarkably hectic schedule,
Conlon pondered the future with
writer Manuela Hoelterhoff. "I
have yet to do the Ring Cycle
he mused, "there's plenty of
time
The Dance Theatre will be presented on Feb. 21-23 in McGinnis Theatre at 8:15 p.m.
Dance Theatre Showcases Variety Of Styles
By ROBIN WHALEY
Staff Writer
Congratulations to the
East Carolina Dance
Theatre for their yearly coup.
An evening of dance opened
last night in McGinnis
Theatre, featuring five selec-
tions danced by more than 50
dancers from the ECU Depart-
ment of Theatre Arts. The
selections ranged from ballet
to modern and tap dance.
The opening number, a
ballet choreographed by Mavis
Ray, is a delight. "The Family
of Karl Larsson" celebrates
Suzannes' birthday party. The
scrim used at opening and
closing curtains provided the
still-life effect of the Karl
Larsson paintings that in-
spired it. This piece is ex-
uberant and lively, capturing
all the joy of the occassion.
Dancer Jami Wilkerson was
breathtakingly wonderful as
Suzanne. She conveyed a par-
ticularly subtle nuance of
movement that set her apart.
Brian Frette as Olof was also
outstanding. The 1910 period
set designed by Robert Alpers
was a gorgeous backdrop for
an equally gorgeous dance.
The highlites of the evening
followed, with collaborative
efforts featuring the dancers'
talents as well as those of stu-
dent visual artist Patrick
Keogh and student composer
David Garza.
"Haunted Shadows" was
my favorite piece.
Choreographed by Patricia
Pertalion against a projected
backdrop of Patrick Keogh's
artwork, the dance was a study
in fear. The first sequence was
like the e.e. cummings "Hallo-
ween" poem brought to life.
But the music of Tangerine
Dream in the following se-
quences brought to life a
riveting display of silhouettes
in torment.
An Evening of Dance was a
triumph. In fact, my only real
criticism goes to the audience
members who arrived late and
talked during the perfor-
mance. The East Carolina
Dance Theatre certainly earn-
ed our respect and applause.
The Dance Theatre con-
tinues its performances
through Saturday, Jan. 23.
Tickets are still available for
the 8:15 shows.
tiSPONS&IL TV M&i $OH� UB6ISLA
WS HAVB JB '�'$ " 01 I i
oiHe&oFusARi ma I - �
OuP-
m
: h
f-
5JOW4S '�' � . HAvt
ANYSREt � �

-�'f'Oa
fee
J

�e
5UCOSSFUID "� ,�
- Jv
1 n ���. �. 0
V7EReS7EP . 1
10UR.R&. �
r
FEk ,
��.�
�� MATARl � �
T


- � �
Man-O-Niick
Walkin' The Plank
One Night While TOOTH Was Downtc

� H
�y �� ' i� �i
�m����
���-
�y-
- m, mnm.
�� WiHW
l'
V







II ARV 21
1W
Page 6
pt dance film Fastfonvard
featured break dancers and a
dozen members of two rock
bands. Literally thousands of ex-
tras were used to fill out a garden
I part bcene. disco clubs and the
Shootout talent contest audience.
Producer Veitch says about
Fast Forward, "I don't think of
i it primarily as a dance picture, I
think of it as a class entertain-
ment storv about young kids who
I are dancers who take a chance to
x prusue their dreams
ic To ECU
This exhausting performance
schedule has not prevented Mr.
Conlon and the Rotterdam
Philharmonic from recording,
however. With Erato Records,
they have recently released Liszt's
Faust Symphony and Janacek's
Idyll and Lachian Dances. Two
more albums, featuring Liszt's
Dante Symphony and the com-
pleted Poulenc concerti, are
scheduled for release this year.
5
n,
tale
R1C-
iad
Hth
no
it.
he
N-0
James Conlon has emerged as
something of a wonderboy in the
musical world, but he seems con-
cerned only with the quality of
his work. Unhurried in the midst
of a remarkably hectic schedule,
Conlon pondered the future with
writer Manuela Hoelterhoff. "I
have yet to do the Ring Cycle
he mused, "there's plenty of
time
iinnis Theatre at 8:15 p.m.
ariety Of Styles
backdrop of Patrick Keogh's
artwork, the dance was a study
in fear. The first sequence was
like the e.e. cummings "Hallo-
ween" poem brought to life.
But the music of Tangerine
Dream in the following se-
quences brought to life a
riveting display of silhouettes
in torment.
An Evening of Dance was a
triumph. In fact, my only real
criticism goes to the audience
members who arrived late and
talked during the perfor-
mance. The East Carolina
Dance Theatre certainly earn-
ed our respect and applause.
The Dance Theatre con-
tinues its performances
through Saturday, Jan. 23.
Tickets are still available for
the 8:15 shows.
Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
XXI WOW. OVERSIGHT 15 AN AtVESOME
PESPONSI0IUT) MEN SOME- LE6ISLA-
WS HAVE JO VISIT TOXIC wsiEsm,
OTHEfiS OF US ARE CALIEV TO RISK
OUR LIVES IN SMCE.
ITS ESPECIALLY T0U6H WHEN IT
MEANS 0E1N6PAPT OF HISTORY AS
THE FIRST SEHA TOR IN SPACE tU BE
06U6EVT0ST1R THE HEART50FMEN
m Mm I RETURN
I'VE BEEN TRYING MJHATPO
WTHINK0FSOMETHIN6 YOU HAVE
TO SAY THAT WOULP SUM 50 FAR,
UP THE MEAHIN6 OF MY SIR?
TRIP
f:rrfrri�vj
"ONE 6IANTL5AP
TDWARPSAPPROV
ING THE 1986
NASA BUDGET
PERFECT
P0N7
CHANGE
AWORP,
SIR
AND THOSE ARE THE. QALLBY
STOWAGE BINS VO YOU HAVE
AN) SPECIAL DIETARY EEPS
SENATOR?
i' 4"vA-i. i -�XL�I j j
2 It,
NO. I PON'T WANT TO
BEViEATEPANY DIF-
FERENTLY THAN TUB REST
OF THE MEN. IS THAT IT
BBQtapi
B Ma
FOR TDPAY?
rm
�&.
GOOD WHAT
c?o JIMe l5 UFT
SIR. Qff? HAc, IT
BEEN SET
YET?
YES. SIR.
7-02.

THAT'S A
LITTLE EARLY.
COULD WE MAKE
IT 9 30 OR I07
�:�� if tr � . .��� -�. . �,
ANPWE UNPERSTANP YOUVE
SUCCESSFULLY TRANSPLANTED
THE HEART OF A LIBERAL INTO
A CONSERVATIVE. NATURALLY
UEATTHEDNC ARE VERY
NTERESTEDN
YOUR RESULTS. F
UHHUH WELL, TO BE HONEST,
MR KIRK,WE PONT REALLY
KNOW WHAT WE'VE GOT YET.
OUR BOY HAD SOME COMPLICA-
TIONS, AND WE'VE ONLY JUST
WELL, DOES
EVEN BETTER.
PROGRESSIVE? IHlmmm-
HOW MANY
FIN6EFS?
YOU
TELLME.
�e EWKan, i mooing to ask
� 4 ZEM QUESTIONS TO SEE F
� VSSl ,EAR HAS AFFECTS
� � ATTITUDES, OKAY?
� WAT ARE YOUR
. :a - JU ON
T ARMSCONTROL
&
ttr
'9 f.F
SAME AS THEY VE ALWAYS BEEN'
ARMS CONTROL IS INSANITY1 THE
SOVIETS ARE MURDERING SWINE
AND ANYONE WHO NEGOTIATES
WITH THEM SHOULD
' HAVE HIS HEAP
EXAMINED" V
Man-()-Stick
Watkin' The Plank
v
c
W7
&
BE
rAUAH say- "MAW WHO Wats
FORTUNE. Rft. CHEAP 61ASS -4
SrtOUlON'T CALL MAN WITH
6VK1 CAMLL CKIY.
r9-Y
trtfte&j.
!PW
One Night While TOOTH Was Downtown
JIM HAS SUCCEEDS IN
TRANOUILIZING THF. BEAST
NOW, JIM WILL TIL MIM UP
AND WE WILL TRANSPORT
MIM TO A NEW AND SAFE
�NViR0N1�NT
BM COYTWUNG TO DO THlS
Wt WILL RID THE. AREA 0FIT5
DIRE OVERPOPULATION PROB-
LEM. JUST ANOTHER WAM OF
rlAWTAINMG MUTUAL OF OtMMS
WMAKMGMTI
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21. 1985
The Best Prices In Town
Open 8 a.m. to Midnigjht, 7 Days A Week
Located Next to the East 10th St Pizza Hut
2510 E. 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 7525222
If you have to do your own laundry, do it in style at the Wash Pub
Malpass Muffler and Parts
With this coupon your choice
of Valvoline or Castrol oil (up
to 5 quarts) and Fram oil filter.
$11.99 �
(Offer expires March 1,1985)
2616 East 10th Street Greenville NC 27834 758-7676
BEfiU'S
NIGHT CLUB
presents
&

vt-L

With Daddy Cool!
Plus each Friday night,
the Girl of the Month Contest
Doors open at 8:00 with happy hour from 8:00-9:30.
with 2 for 1 highballs. 50� draft & $2.00 pitchers!
You can t afford to miss Eastern North Carolina s 1 end-of-the-week-part
at your favorite Hot Hits nightspot, that s Beau s of course!
Added Attraction: Daddy Cool will be giving away T-shirts. Records. Movie
Passes, etc. all night long every Friday night!
So c'mon out to where the Party People Part
& get energized at the one the onh Beau s of course
Located in the Carolina East Centre Phone 756-6401
Beau s is a private club for members and their guests age 19 & over
All ABC Permits Memberships available at the door
Guests are welcome.
Coming Soon: BUBBA, The Beau's Party Machine.
Can you party with him? We will see
LARGE SELECTION
SELECTION � QUALITY � PRICE NOBODY CAN MATCH US!
GREENVILLE GOLDSBORO
Greenville Square (K-Mart Plaza) Eastgate Shopping Center
2806 Cashwell Dr.
703 E. Greenville Blvd.
HOURS: MON-SAT10-9
PMMM��iHtmMp9MtMh0

r
- '
-�k�M
yr
V
I







'
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Bucs Begin Soon
Sports
FEBRUARY 21, 1985 Page 8
By TONY BROWN
Staff Writer
The perennially potent ECU
baseball team enters the '85
season Sunday with high expecta-
tions of improving on last year's
success.
That success included captur-
ing the ECAC-South tourna-
ment, a No. 20 ranking by Col-
legiate Baseball and two wins in
the NCAA-championship tour-
nament.
Only eventual champion
Miami's rally for two runs after a
seventh inning tie, stood between
the Pirate baseballers and a
driver's seat to the final four last
year. With this background, new
head coach Gary Overton is
nucleus Overton said. "But
we're not as strong up the middle
as we were. I still feel defense will
be our strong point, though.
"East Carolina has traditional-
ly won with pitching and defense
and I feel this trend will continue
this year the coach added.
"Winfred Johnson and Jim
Peterson are our top two pit-
chers, with 18 wins between them
last year
Overton feels Mike
Christopher will move into the
third pitching spot, partially as a
result of pitching in Virginia's
Valley League last summer.
"We're looking for another
starter or long reliever to emerge
also Overton stated. "We have
Winfred Johnson
1985 Baseball
"cautiously optimistic" about
the chances for a repeat perfor-
mance.
"Everybody thought we'd be
in good shape this year said
Overton. "It looked like we
would have almost all the starters
returning, but a couple of unex-
pected losses may have a serious
impact
The loss of ace pitcher Bob
Davidson, who signed with the
New York Yankees, was com-
pounded last Saturday when
ECU's veteran second baseman
Steve Sides was lost for the '85
season with a broken wrist.
"We still have a good
Greg Hardison
Co-Captains
several pitchers who can fill this
role
Some of those include David
Mabe, Danny Culpepper and
Chubby Butler. Butler has been
the primary relief man for the
Pirates, with an excellent record
as a rally "stopper
The target of those hurlers will
be catcher Jim Riley. "Riley is
excellent defensively and directs
the pitchers well Overton said.
"But with 48 games to play, we
don't have the depth there we
need.
With the loss of second
baseman Sides, the infield is
more of a question mark. Pit-
Freshman forward Monique Pompili (14) hits a layup, as teammate
Victoria Watras looks on.
Gridder Breaks Record
ECU football coach Art Baker
announced that one of his players
has broken a weight-lifting
record set in 1983 by All-America
guard Terry Long, now of the
Pittsburgh Steelers.
Daniel Cole, a walk-on
linebacker from Whiteville,
N.C set a strength mark by lif-
ting 825 pounds from a squatting
position, according to Baker.
Cole, a 5-9, 195-pound
sophomore, is also an outstan-
ding student academically with a
3.9 grade point average. His
studies include biology and
chemistry, accoriding to Caroline
Ayers of the chemistry depart-
ment.
chers Johnson and Christopher
will anchor first base when not
pitching, while Mark Cockrell
and Mike Sullivan have been vy-
ing for third base.
Co-captain Greg Hardison, a
defensive gem, will probably con-
tinue to start the doubleplays at
shortstop. But with Sides hurt
just last week, second base and
shortstop are unsettled. Utility
man Robert Langston is currently
slated as a backup for the infield,
but with Sides out he could gain a
starting slot.
Chris Bradberry will patrol
center field and should continue
to shine on both defense and of-
fense. Greenville native and co-
captain Mark Shank will solidify
the left-field position with his
glove and .301 batting average.
Junior-college transfers Monty
Carter and Dean Ehehalt are the
top contenders to fill the right
field slot. This is one of Coach
Overton's primary concerns.
Offensively, the Pirates are
simply awesome. Multi-talented
Winfred Johnson will be looking
to top his ECU records of 18
home runs and 46 runs-batted-in.
He amassed these totals while hit-
ting for a .321 average and hurl-
ing 10 wins last season.
Bradberry is expected to join
Johnson as the Pirate's main
long-ball threat. He continuously
hit for extra bases last season in
compiling an astounding .354
average, which led the team.
Greg Hardison had his share of
RBI's last year, adding 33 in
averaging .319. According to
Coach Overton, he's the best
over-all player currently on the
squad. His excellent power was
demonstrated by the 5 homeruns,
4 triples and 12 doubles that he
pounded out in 1984.
"We have a chance to score
some runs based mainly on
Bradberry, Johnson and Har-
dison Overton feels. "Johnson
was the conference player-of-the-
year last season, so we certainly
feel he will play as well or better
MMtoto�mtiMiltoM��M m
Winfred Johnson, ECAC South player of the year last season, returns to lead the Pirare baseball team this
year. The Pirates hope to make another trip to the NCAA Tournament this season.
this year
"We had planned to run a lot
offensively the coach said.
"But with Sides hurt, we won't
have quite as much speed on the
base paths. I still feel there's a lot
of speed on the team, though
ECU should be able to take full
advantage of this speed and
overall stamina since the Pirates
face a similar schedule as last
year. With the early schedule dot-
ted with many northern teams
escaping the cold winter breezes
(theoretically, at least) with a trip
down south, endurance should
favor ECU.
The baseball Pirates will enjoy
the home comforts of Harrington
Field for a great majority of their
games, unlike other major ECU
sports. The Pirates host all but 17
of 48 regular season games, and
10 of the 17 come in double
headers.
"Our main emphasis, of
course, is on conference games
Coach Overton stated. "That's
what will get us into the NCAA
tournament. The ECAC-South is
so balanced this year, a team with
as many as three losses may win
the regular season
Chief contenders for the league
title are ECU, William & Mary,
James Madison and UNC-
Wilmington, according to Over-
ton. "We had to beat William &
Mary on the last day of the
regular season last year to make it
to the tournament, then had to
win four straight, including two
in-a-row against Madison to win
the tournament. We expect the
same battle this year he said.
Only the ECAC-South regular
season champ is guaranteed a slot
in the "ECAC-South" tourna-
ment now and only the tourna-
ment champ is certain of an
NCAA-postseason bid. The
second-place regular season
finisher will probably get a nod
for the "ECAC-South" event,
but other non-league Eastern
teams will be in competition for
the three openings in the four-
team field.
"The main emphasis is on win-
ning the regular season title and
insuring ourselves a place in the
ECAC-South tournament said
Overton. "ACC teams are always
emphasized by the public, but we
could win all five games against
the ACC and not go to
postseason play.
"We do have a good rivalry
with the ACC, though he add-
ed. "Other than conference wins.
the win against Carolina was one
of the highlights last year. 1 also
feel the new assistant coaches will
contribute a great deal this year
towards our continued success
Former ECU star and 1980
graduate Billy Best returns to
familiar haunts, following a five-
year stint in the Kansas City
Royals farm organization.
Best is filling the assistant
coach spot vacated when Overton
moved upstairs as head coach.
His expertise is expected to have
quite an impact on the Pirate for-
tunes, according to Overton.
Greene County native James
Fulghum, who steps from the
starring role he enjoyed for the
Pirate nine the past few seasons,
becomes the graduate assistant
for ECU. His primary task has
been working with the pitchers
and catchers.
While Coach Overton is
naturally reluctant to speculate
on his team's outlook, it appears
to be another in a series of
outstanding seasons for Pirate
baseball.
ECU opens the 1985 season
Sunday at 2 p.m. against Atlantic
Christian at Harrington Field,
which is located east of Minges
Coliseum off Charles Blvd.
L , ' - � " �� -�� "��vuun.n.Mtt niuj. uuscuin uii vnaries Diva.
a ay Bucs Battle Seahawks
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The Lady Pirate basketball
team has only two obstacles in its
path, as they try to go through
the regular season unbeaten in
the ECAC South.
UNC-Wilmington, who ECU
defeated 88-75 earlier this year at
Minges Coliseum, will host ECU
tonight in Trask Coliseum in
Wilmington.
The Lady Seahawks, who are
currently 6-5 in league action and
12-10 overall, are led by senior
center Gwen Austin.
Austin leads the league in both
scoring and rebounding, and for
ECU to be successful they must
control her.
"We have to keep her (Austin)
off the boards ECU coach
Emily Manwaring said.
Austin is not the only Seahawk
who presents a problem for ECU.
Freshman forward Elizabeth Bell
leads the league in field-goal
percentage, hitting almost
58-percent of her shots.
"They lead the league in team
field-goal percent, and have four
of the top eight individual leaders
in field goal percentage Man-
waring said. "We need to run the
ball up the court and play good
defense to win
This will be the last road game
of the regular season, and Man-
waring is well aware of how dif-
ficult it is to win on the oppo-
nent's home court.
Everybody seems to � to the
occasionn when their at nome
she said. "I know we're
undefeated in the conference at
home
On Sunday, the Lady Pirates
will try to remain unbeaten at
home, as they host Richmond in
their final home game of the
season.
The game will also be the last
home appearence in a Lady
Pirate uniform for seniors Anita
Anderson and Annette Phillips.
In their earlier meeting this
year, ECU downed the Lady
Spiders 77-61, behind Lorainne
Foster's 29-point effort.
Richmond, who is currently
ECAC South. She averages 18
points and nine rebounds per
contest.
Anderson and Phillips, both
junior-college transfers, will
receive their senior plaques
before the start of the contest.
Both players have been key in-
gredients to the Lady Pirates'
16-game winning streak.
Annette (Phillips) and Anita
(Anderson) are two different type
players Manwaring said. "But
both have played a big part in our
transition style of game.
Anderson, who came to ECU
last year from Chowan junior
college, averages 13.2 points and
7.2 rebounds per contest.
Annette Phillips
3-7 in league play and 7-16
overall, is led by Karen Eisner.
Eisner is the second leading
scorer and rebounder in the
Anita Anderson
"Anita (Anderson) is more of
an offensive player Manwaring
said. "She is our leading scorer
and second leading rebounder,
and she has really come through
for us this year
Phillips, who came to ECU
from Louisburg junior college,
averages 4.4 points and 4.3 re-
bounds per game.
Manwaring feels that statistics
don't truly reflect Phillips' con-
tribution to the team.
"Annette's stats don't really
show what she has meant to the
team she said. "She plays good
defense and is not afraid to get in
there and mix it up. She always
guards the other team's toughest
offensive player when we play
x-nan-to-man (defense) Man-
waring continued.
With wins in both games, ECU
would increase its winning streak
to 18 games, and improve their
overall record to 19-8.
Manwaring knows exactly
what her team must do in order
to win the next to games.
"If we keep the intensity up we
can do it (go undefeated in the
league) she said. "We have
enough pride and desire, and we
really want these next two
Sunday will be the last chance
to see the Lady Pirate basketball
team in action, with seniors Anita
Anderson and Annette Phillips,
in Minges Coliseum this year.
Game time is at 3:00 p.m and
it would be nice for as many peo-
ple as possible to come out and
support the Lady Pirates, and
their two seniors in their final
home appearence.
Softball Team Looks To Good Season
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sports Editor
Afer an impressive 25-15
record last year, the Pirate soft-
ball team is looking foward to
another banner season in 1985.
Last year's team competed in
the fast-pitch competition for the
first time in the schools' history.
Head coach Sue Manahan was
pleased with squad's perfor-
mance.
"I was very proud of last
year's team, Manahan said. "The
team realizes last year was an ex-
periment, and with hard work
they have a lot to build upon
The Pirates have a good
outlook for '85, with the entire
pitching staff returning from last
year. Stacey Boyette, ECU's first
academic All-America, heads the
list of veteran pitchers. Last year,
she was 12-3 with an ERA of 1.6.
Pam Young and Robin Graves
also return to the pitching rota-
tion, which should prove to be a
strength for ECU.
The infield is solid, but the out-
field may have some question
marks, according to Manahan.
The ECU women lost three out-
fielders to graduation in '84.
However, Eva Hughs, Wendy
Ozmont and Phyllis Willis return
and are steady performers return-
ing to the Pirate outfield.
ECU will return the entire star-
ting infield of a year ago. Dawn
Langley will play first base, when
regular starting pitcher Robin
Graves takes the mound. Carla
Alphin will be returning to the
second-base position. Lisa
Zmuda, last year's co-MVP, will
be at shortstop for the Pirates. At
third base, the Bucs will have to
choose between the starting ser-
vices of either Sandy Kee or
Tamara Franks. Behind the plate
will be Susan Martin.
Coach Manahan feels that the
Pirates must practice hard and
play as a team to be successful.
"Our team has never been one
to score a lot of runs she said.
"We will work harder offensively
in our preseason drills. I don't
have any superstars, I have good
athletes with good attitudes. We
are very team oriented
The 1985 Pirate roster should
be a real challenge to the Lady
Bucs. They are scheduled to play
in the Florida State Tournament
and the Penn State Invitational.
Both tournaments will be featur-
ing top-notch competition. The
1985 schedule will be posted at a
later date.
With the depth and experience
on this year's Pirate softball
team, ECU should once again
prove to be a success in 1985.
�� m m r nl �
Ellis Ui
Clemson, S.C. (UPI) � First-
year Clemson coach Cliff Ellis
says he likes a challenge and
that's good, because the school
certainly has given him one.
Ellis inherited a basketball
team that finished last in the
Atlantic Coast Conference the
past two seasons. His job was
made harder because he arrived
too late last spring to do much
recruiting.
Now allegations of illegal
prescription drug use have pro-
mpted a criminal investigation at
Clemson, throwing the school's
athletic department in turmoil.
Two track coaches have resign-
Kresse
CHARLESTON, S.C. (UPI) -
John Kresse and his former men-
tor, Lou Carnesecca, are on a roll
that has taken both to the pin-
nacle of college basketball.
Kresse's college of Chariesto
Cougars are top-ranked in the
NAIA and Carnesecca
John's Redmen are No. 1 in
NCAA.
"There's a lot of satisfaction
that says Kresse, who coached
under Carnesecca for 14 yea:
St. John's and with trie New
York Nets of the NBA "It's ex-
citing to look at the ratings and
see mv team and St. John's at the
top
Intramurals
ByJEANNETTEROTH
SufrWrtttr
The intramural department has
all the mat action as this years
wrestling tournament registration
gets underway.
Taking last years team title
were the Low Riders with the
men from Kappa Sigma placing
second. Gather your crew
together, pin last year's cham-
pion, and become the 1985 team
title holder. Come out and see all
the mat action Feb. 25, 26 & 28 in
Minges Coliseum.
Get your body into swimming
suit shape with IRS aerobic
classes. Registration for the se-
cond session begins Feb.
24-March 1
in room
104
Memorial Gym. Besides meeting
with your scheduled class, drop-
in MonThurs. from 6:15-7:15
and 6:30-7:30 and aerobicize with
a new instructor. Don't forget the
weekend .50 cent special. The
IRS wants you to be the 'bell of
the beach
Co-rec bowling is on a roll as
the No.l ranked Powerhouse re-
main undefeated with a recent
pin total of 1,247. Campus
Crusade should sneek into the ac-
tion, and at least capture the title
for the most teams entered,as
they go into the competition with
five teams. How about those
folks from your FM
alternative-91.3 WZMB. who
rolled over the High Rollers
717-591.
The hoops are sizzling this
week as teams fire up for the up-
coming playoffs. Several ke
games will be played in deciding
this years divisional champions.
In the women's division. Alpha
Phi remain undefeated with a re-
cent 17-13 win over the Tn
Sgs,leading the squads of the
sorority league. Guess who
jumped into the polls this week'1
Umstead Jockettes are 3-0 after
an upset victory over the highly
ranked White Rim Robbers. The
Thrillers keep their top spot, but
should experience some tough
games before they go unbeaten
into the championship.
In the men's residence hall
division, Garrett Five-O and
Brick Masons boast 3-0 records.
While the independent division
houses at least eight squads with
unblemished records. It should
be quite a battle for the indepen-
dent championship.
Two teams lead the fraternity
division as Phi Kappa Tau and
Alpha Sigma Phi should fight it
out for the divisional champion-
ship.
Head on out to Jobbies Gym
today and watch the men's and
women's weight lifting cham-
pionship. The women will begin
lifting at 3:30 while the men start
an hour later. Good luck to all
the IRS bench pressers.
Start getting your softball team
together for the annual Miller-
IRS pre-season softball tourna-
ment to be held after spring
break.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th I0a.m12noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
V
gSC-r- I
I
t

i





Ellis Unconcerned A bout A dverse Publicity
N 1 1
I Ills

crimii
resse
' 3
ll tit
li
It

- : �
H B

Of Charleston

p

I
Gam
ds
lependent divis
ist eight squad
-bed records. It should
� r rht indepen-
� m icad the fratern
Phi Kappa 7'au and
hi should fight it
� nal champion-
out to Jobhies Gym
and watch the men's and
en's weight lifting cham-
hip I he women will begin
tg at 3 50 while the men start
li later Good luck to all
IRS bench pressers
irt getting your softball team
her for the annual Miller
� eason softball tourna
mem to be held after spring
kk
SPORTS MEDICINI
SERVICES
M Th 10 a.m. 12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 pm
'
1�1 m�
� iw1 . yI 8 j t� � J
(llj





10
IgIgQLJN!AJ!LEBRUARY 21, 1985
1
Classifieds
WANTED
60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Need
roommate to share expenses in nice
3 bedroom apt. at Eastbrook. Rent
$100 and V3 utilities. Call 758-0364 bet-
ween 4-7 p.m Please keep trying.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Program
Director, Waterfront Directors, Ac
tivity Director, Head Counselors,
Cabin Counselors, and Activity
Leaders for YMCA co-ed camp.
Camp Kanata, Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, NC 27587. (919) 556 2661
FEMALE GRAD STUDENT: Seeks
serious student or professional
roommate. Two bearoom
townhouse, $147.50 rent & v2 utilities
Call 758 9941. Keep trying.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mountains have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
(WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
basketball), gymnastics,
artscrafts, pioneering, music,
photography, drama, dance,
generals. Write: Professor Bob
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 84
Leamington St Lido Beach, NY
11561.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
nice 2 bedroom apt. on Riverbluff
Rd. Carpeted, dishwasher,
washerdryer, patio $125 rent, v2
deposit. Call 758-6207 after 5.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM-
MATE WANTED: Immediately to
share 3 bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates. Rent $117 per month
plus '3 utilities. Call 757-3306. Please
Keep trying.
PART TIME CUSTOMER PERSON
NEEDED: For Monday and Satur-
day. Must be vivacious, personable,
and able to deal effectively with the
public. Must love movies. Call Sun-
shine Video at 756-4392.
RIDE WANTED: Need a ride to
New Jersey for spring break. May
be able to ieave Thurs. evening. Will
pay part of the gas. Call 752-0998, ask
for Dan.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT: Per
sonal aide for disabled student. Wed-
Fri. 12-2:00. Block from campus.
Contact Rick Creech 752-2594.
SENIORS AND
UNDERCLASSMEN: You still have
one more chance to be includedin the
1985 BUCCANEER. The
photographers return March 18-27.
You can walk in, but avoid the lines
and sign up now! Call or come by the
yearbook office 757 6501 It's all free!
STUDENT RESIDENCE
ASSOCIATION PARTY: THE
MAGIC OF THE ORIENT:
February 23, 1985 at the
Holidome, Holiday Inn. The
party begins at 9 p.m. and the
cost is $4 single or M a couple.
Get tickets through local resi-
dent hall, must be bought in
advance. Lots of your favorite
beverage, food will be served
and music will be provided.
PERSONAL
SWEET PETE: How did you really
hurt your back? Those exercises and
games must have been tough
HEY: The girls at Friendly are
friendly! Thanx for the cut Pattie'
-Pizza Man.
RUSH: The Big Brothers of Alpha
Phi Sorority will be having their spr-
ing rush this Thursday, Feb. 21st at
The Treehouse from 4 to 7. It's only a
nickel for your favorite draft beer,
so come on out and meet everyone.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT IN THE
COLD: Greeks who haven't arrang-
ed for a group photograph call or
come by Buccaneer office Tues. or
Thurs. 2 5 p.m. 757-6501.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AITOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 GrecniUr Btvd
TS4-JMJ U Hits
'4 hour Towing Service
I -Hiul Rental
SPRING
BREAK
PARTY
Ft. Lauderdale
From $149 on the Strip
7 nights 8 days
t'800)368-2006 TOLL FREE
DAVID LEE: You proved me right!
I should have listened to myself and
kept turning you down. I gave you
the benefit of the doubt and you
weren't even worth my time.
Evidently Caroline was right about
you. KB.
ADPi's: We are heading towards an
out in the sun, As sisters together we
have so much fun! Eleven more
days and we'll be out of reach, If you
want to find us look at the Bahama
Beach. Forty ADPi's sailing out to
sea. On the Carnival Cruiseline we
will be! Can't Wait JC & SW PATA.
LAMDA CHI ALPHA: Lamda Chi
Alpha will be having Little Sister
rush on the 26th & 27th of Feb. at 9
p.m. The house is located at 500
Elizabeth St. For more info, call
7526159.
SIG EPS & ALPHA SIGS: The little
sisters of Sigma Phi Epsilon and
Alpha Sigma Phi will be having
another "Beer Wars Happy Hour"
on Thursday, Feb. 28th at Beau's.
Come on out and party with the
women of Sig Ep & Alpha Sig
CONGRATULATIONS PHILLIP
WELCH: The newest brother in Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity- we're glad
you're with us and proud that you
stuck with it!
PI KAPP HAPPY HOUR: The
Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity
will be having a Happy Hour at TW's
Nightlife tonight- Enjoy live band
entertainment and happy hour
prices. Anyone who wants to have a
good time "be there Call the
"Liberty Ride 758-5570 for a ride
there and home.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY KAREN: We
love you! Love, The Beta Delta
pledge class of Alpha Omicrom Pi.
ALPHA SIGS: You know we know
how to party. See ya Thursday! The
AOPi's
HAPPY HOUR: The brothers of
Sigma Phi Epsilon will be having a
Happy Hour tonight at Olde Towne
Inn. Everyone come on out and par-
ty with the Sig Eps!
SIG-EPS: Thanks for all the support
you've given us! You're the best!
Looking forward to seeing you
tonight at Olde Towne Inn! The
Sigmas
CAROLINA SUCKS: If you dislike
Carolina: Sig Ep Golden Hearts are
selling "Carolina Sucks" bumper
stickers in front of the Student Supp-
ly Store & around campus.
CONGRATULATIONS DANA
SCHACHT AND LUCY PAKE: For
receiving the All Greek Woman
Award and Outstanding Alum
Award. Congratulations to everyone
el so receiving awards, we're proud
of you! -AOPi's
SIG-EPS: Be ready to throw down at
the Sweetheart Formal Saturday
night
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR
NEW SIGMA SISTERS: Catherine
Dixon, Kelli Tarr, Chris James, Kim
Tolton, Elizabeth Bilosoly, Dawn
Brooks, Camille Britt, Christie
Dunn, Lee Ann Harris, Isabelle
Cosgrove, Deborah Watkins, Lisa
Jefferson, Amy Jackson, Chris
Dolan, Lauren McDough, Laura
Uthus, Carter Chaffin, Heather
Wallace, Gretchen Morgan, Harriet
Lanier, Sarah Boiling, and Stacy
Grigg! We love you!
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call. 758 3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save $.50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4-speed,
low mileage. Only one owner. Gets
good gas mileage- call after 5 30
758 4689.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 756 4664,evenings or
752-6106 days.
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752-0998, ask
for Robert.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted
Responsible party to assume small
monthly payments on spinetconsole
piano. Can be seen locally. Write-
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O. Box 520,
Beckemeyer, il 62219.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
DataWorks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes, and more. Ail work
is computer-checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in
eluding paper. (Call for specific
rates.) Call Mark at 757-3440 after
5:30 p.m.
POINSETTIA BEACH INN: On the
Ft. Lauderdale strip and ocean
Special spring break rates for
students of ECU. Call 1 305-527 1800
FOR RENT: Large I bedroom loft,
cathedral ceiling, dishwasher, $240
per month, 758-4614.
FOR SALE: Hitachi stereo cassette
speakers, as new. $150. Tan vinyl
recliner, $40. Barbell set, $20
74i-2329, evenings.
FOR SALE: Bicycle frame. 57 cm.
Road racing frame, Colombus SL,
Cinelli Lugs, Campy Drop Out, m
ron Paint, Specialized Headset
English Thread bottom bracket
Built by Nobllette of Ann Arbor, Ml'
Perfect condition. Call 338-3178
TYPING SERVICE: Word pro
cessor. 105 N. Elm Street. Resumes,
letters, theses, term papers, etc Ac
curate, dependable service Call
Betty Laws at 752 1454.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs, 758-8241 or
758 5488.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: IBM
Correcting Typewriter. Experienc
ed typist will do all types of typing"
Call Debbie at 756-6333
Puzzle Answer
MAilA1 IT1"EDs
USjJIaNT 11LE0
DEMAN TaIbHeR
OI jDA bWairT
TOTEHAVjEiBA1
ODE� mreWairDoIr"
ilOJaTmeR1 cJaBM1
L.HIASIP p �R0TBLiE0
1PEnHpiairT
ASKj�BED W AN
1ol 7WE ;T �� EiCJANT
LS HBA REOE
ALtjcJJaSIIWE
Plaza
cinema V2m3
PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
HELD
OVER,
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concert
The Keith Shiely Band
Saturday Feb. 23
Doors Open At 8:00
Concert At 9:00
They were five total strangers, with nothing in common,
meeting for the first time.
A brain, a beauty, a jock, a rebel and a recluse
Before the day was over, they broke the rules. Bared their souls
And touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
THE
BJRJEK FAST CLUB

A brain,
a beauty,
a jock,
a rebel and
a recluse.
THEY ONLY MET
ONCE. BUT IT CHANGED
THEIR LIVES FOREVER
A UNIVERSAL P'C1
J3E
A
Weekdays at3:00 - 7:10 - 900
Sat. & Sun. at 3:30 - 5:20 - 7:10 - 9:00
STEP
OUT OF
.LINE
East Carolina
Dance Theatre
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the dorm doldrums
behind�there is an alternative. Your own place at Tar River Estates
Select a one-bedroom garden apartment or two-or three-bedroom townhouse
Enjoy fully equipped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the river
Conveniently located near East Carolina University. Come by todav nr call
TaflQverJ
752-4225
140 Villnw St.
Office Hours
M-F 9:00-5:30
Sat & Sun 1:00-5:00
East Carolina Playhouse
McGmnis Theatre
February 20-23 � 8:15 pn
ECU S :� � S3
3ei ��� H Put "
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students - Rent an apt. by May 1 st &
keep your apt. RENT FREE. For details call or
come by Tar River Info Center 1400 Willow
St. No. 1.
Eastern North Carolina's
Largest Entertainment Center
Il Proudly Presents
FREE BEER NIGHT
Thursday, Feb. 21st
with
Co-Sponsored by Society of Physics Students
This is the start of your dreom dote'
(Let us help you finish your dream )
Introducing;
A- � -
si;�:V
nm sfvm
Let us help you find your dream date.
Membership. Only ECU students can participate.
Cost: first 500students-$5.00,501 to 1000 students- $7.00 , 1001 up - $9 00
Applications will be available by mailing a self-addressed
IXIhTXiI PomPUt6r Datl"9 P � ����
(weekday m�ifw �re information call 752-9667
days) between 6:30 pm and 11:30 pm or all day Satur-
Formation of C64 Computer Club. Call 752-9667.
The Spontanes
Featuring Harley Hogg & the
Rockers
$2 Admission all Night
Free Beer till 11:30!
Happy Hour after 11:30!
Rock 93's Greg Allinson spins your favorite
dance music on band breaks
Leave the driving to us!
Call The Liberty Ride
at 758-5570
TW's Nitelife, where the musk comes alive!
Privot. Club - All ABC Perm.M


V i







Title
The East Carolinian, February 21, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 21, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2794
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy