The East Carolinian, February 19, 1985






�h� iEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.41
Tuesday February 19,1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Dole To Speak At May 4 Ceremony
ECU News Bureau
�nd Staff Reports
U.S. Secretary of Transporta-
tion Elizabeth Dole will be the
speaker at ECU's 76th com-
mencement on May 4, Chancellor
John Howell announced Friday.
The university will award
Secretary Dole the honorary doc-
tor of letters degree "in recogni-
tion of her outstanding leader-
ship and achievement Howell
told the Board of Trustees.
Dole will become the third reci-
piert of the honorary degree,
joining former ECU Chancellor
Leo Jenkins and former Sen.
Robert Morgan, both of whom
received degrees in 1983.
"She is among North
Carolina's and our nation's most
distinguished leaders and public
servants Howell said. "Her
many contributions to our na-
tion, including her service as U.S.
Secretary of Transportation, br-
ing great pride and appreciation
to all North Carolinians
The decision to award Dole an
honorary degree was made by
ECU's Honorary Degree Com-
mittee, which is headed by
Joseph Boyette, dean of the
graduate school. Boyette said the
committee strictly examines all
recommendations for honorary
degrees and then makes a recom-
mendation to Howell.
Boyette said faculty, students
and any other interested persons
may suggest individuals for
receipt of an honorary degree.
Between 15 and 20 nominations
are received by the committee
each year, he said.
"We felt that she (Dole) was a
very good candidate he said.
"She was a North Carolina per-
son who had done a lot in the way
of public service
Howell said Dole was invited
to give the address following her
selection as an honorary degree
recipient. He said he asked Sen.
John East, R-N.C, to persuade
her to accept. East will introduce
Dole at the commencement
ceremonies.
Dole, a native of Salisbury, is
the wife of Sen. Robert Dole,
R-Kansas. Prior to accepting the
cabinet post in the Reagan ad-
ministration in 1983, she served
as Assistant to the President for
Public Liaison, directing Presi-
dent Reagan's outreach program
to secure the views of business,
labor and agriculture.
She is a former Federal Trade
Commissioner, a former Deputy
Special Assistant to the President
and a former staff assistant to the
Assistant Secretary of Health,
Education and Welfare.
She was graduated with
distinction in political science
from Duke University where she
was president of the student body
and elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
She did postgraduate study at
Oxford and completed her MA
degree in education at Harvard.
She was one of only 15 women in
an entering class of 550 students
at Harvard Law School and
received her law degree there.
Following service in HEW in
Dole
Dole served as exscutr. c director
of the President's Committee on
Consumer Interests. When the
Office of Consumer Affairs was
created in 1971, she was named
deputy director. In 1973, she
became a member of the Federal
Trade Commission.
Area Hardee's Robbed
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
The Jenkins Fine Arts Building was the site of a bomb threat during Juanita Kreps' lecture Thursday night.
See story, page 5.
By GREG RIDEOUT
And
HAROLD JOYNER
The Hardee's restaurant at 910
Cotanche St. was robbed Mon-
day evening by two armed black
males, according to Greenville
police. The two escaped with an
undetermined amount of money.
The robbery occurred at ap-
proximately 10:10 p.m accor-
ding to Det. Sgt. Daniel Heinz of
the Greenville Police Depart-
ment. He said the two men walk-
ed in the side door facing Ninth
Street. They approached one of
two cashiers at the counter, and
one of the men pointed a gun at
her and said "give me all your
money according to Heinz.
All the cash drawers in the
restaurant were emptied and no
money was taken from the safe,
he said.
Four employees were in
Hardee's at the time of the rob-
bery � three females and one
male. There were no customers in
the restaurant at the time.
The two armed men handed a
brown paper bag to the cashier
and jumped over the counter.
After getting the money, they ex-
ited out the back door of the
restaurant, probably on foot, ac-
cording to Heinz. The men were
in the restaurant between three
and four minutes, Heinz said.
Heinz said the two men were
black with a medium build and
around six feet tall. He said they
were both in their 20s. One man
was wearing a blue bandana
around his face. Heinz said the
two guns carried by the men were
probably .38 caliber revolvers.
This was the first armed rob-
bery of a Greenville fast food
restaurant this year, according to
Heinz.
Police on the scene found foot-
prints believed to be left by the
two men, along with a broken
pair of sunglasses found in the
parking lot.
No one was injured during the
robbery.
Heinz said anyone seeing
anything suspicious in the area
around 10 p.m. should contact
him at the Greenville Police
Department at 752-3342.
Hardee's restaurant resumed
business between 2 a.m. and 3
a.m according to the night
supervisor.
Fee Increases Await Approval By Board of Governors
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK their meeting Fridav. h HitrnccpH hv th� RnarH �,a�����
Newi Editor
If approval is given by the
UNC Board of Governors, ECU
students will see a $18 per year in-
crease in fees on their tuition bills
next year. The decision to send
the fee increase proposal to the
Board for approval was made by
the ECU Board of Trustees at
their meeting Friday
The fee increase will comprise
an $8 per semester increase in fees
for athletics and a $1 per semester
increase in fees for Mendenhall
Student Center. The increases
will become final only after
receiving Board of Governors ap-
proval. Vice Chancellor for Stu-
dent Life Elmer Meyer said he is
not certain when the subject will
be discussed by the Board.
Chancellor John Howell spoke
briefly to the trustees on the sub-
ject of the ECU budget for the
next two years. "If there are tax
cuts, there will be budget cuts and
university budgets are more
susceptible to cutting than some
of the others he said.
The budget currently before
the state legislature is for the
More Convictions Seen
period covering July 1985 to June
1987. This budget was devised by
the UNC Board of Governors.
"We're always worried about
budget cuts Howell said. He
added that Gov. James Martin
campaigned on a platform of cut-
ting taxes and has "come into of-
fice maintaining that position
Howell said he feels the
trustees should support the
budget proposal and be aware of
the possibility that there may be
cuts.
The trustees also passed a
resolution honoring Katie
Morgan, who served on the
board until forced to resign when
her husband Robert accepted the
position of director of the State
Bureau of Investigation.
"Chancellor Howell and the
trustees, along with the entire
university, will always be in-
debted to Katie for her dedication
and love for East Carolina said
Board of Trustees Chairman C.
Ralph Kinsey. The resolution
cited Morgan's "superb leader-
ship, skill and understanding
The next Board of Trustees
meeting will be May 3.
Chronic Offenders A Problem
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newi Editor
(This is the final segment of a
three-part series concerning
North Carolina's 1983passage of
the Safe Roads Act. Part I con-
cerned the change in individual
drinking habits following passage
of the act, Part II with methods
used for detection of the intox-
icated driver. This segment deals
with the conviction of drunk
drivers.)
Under the provisions of the
Safe Roads Act, different
evidence is admissible in court in
a drunk-driving case and stricter
sentencing is advocated. In addi-
tion, plea bargaining is excluded
and an individual's drivers'
license is revoked immediatelv
upon determination of a blood
alcohol concentration of 0.10, or
refusal to take a breathalyzer
test.
Under North Carolina law,
there are five levels of punish-
ment for DWI. These levels are
determined by the absence or
presence of aggravating or
mitigating factors.
There are two categories of ag-
gravating factors. Grossly ag-
gravating factors are: Two or
more convictions for an impaired
driving offense within seven
years; A prior conviction for an
impaired driving offense within
seven years; Driving while license
is revoked under an impaired
driving revocation; Serious injury
to another caused by defendant's
impaired driving. Aggravating
factors include gross impairment
of faculties, especially reckless
driving, driving leading to an ac-
cident causing over $500 damage
and personal injury and passing a
stopped school bus.
Mitigating factors include
slight impairment, safe and
lawful driving except for impair-
ment, safe driving record and
voluntary submission for assess-
ment and treatment before the
trial.
The levels of punishment range
from Level I, which mandates a
mandatory minimum of 14 days
and up to 2 years in jail and a fine
of up to $2,000, to Level 5, which
mandates punishment of up to 24
hours in jail or 24 hours of com-
munity service, a 30-day loss of
driving privileges or any com-
bination of the three. A fine of
up to $100 may also be imposed.
According 'o Thomas D.
Haigwood, Put County District
Attorney, the major change in
the law has been the fact that
while, prior to the passage of the
Safe Roads Act, impairment of
physical and mental faculties had
to be proven to convict an in-
dividual of DWI, the only
evidence necessary today is a
blood alcohol content of 0.10.
"Now even if there is not
enough evidence to prove beyond
a reasonable doubt that the men-
tal and physical faculties were ap-
preciably impaired, you simply
have to prove that the blood
alcohol content is 0.10 he said.
Haigwood said this makes it
"easier to obtain convictions
He added that another important
change is that breathalyzer test
results are admissible in district
court without the breathalyzer
operator being present by af-
fidavit. "This makes it easier to
move cases through district
court he said.
Although the technicalities in
breathalyzer testing may result in
dismissal of a case, Haigwood
said he feels steps are being taken
to overcome these technicalities.
"As in any criminal case, you see
cases where judges dismiss
charges against defendants as a
result of technicalities and the
breathalyzer test is a technical
area of the law he said.
"We do lose some cases
because the police officer or
breathalyzer officer fail to fill out
some form correctly or didn't
observe some technicality
Haigwood said, adding that he
hoped the newly-enacted law re-
quiring two breathalyzer tests to
be administered in succession will
be a step toward overcoming dif-
ficulties.
The Pitt County Court system
currently tries approximately 140
DWI cases each month. "I don't
see a decrease in the number of
cases and I have the feeling that
in recent months there has been
some increase Haigwood said.
Haigwood said the one-time
offender is generally not much of
a problem, but the chronic of-
fender is. "This burden on the
system is of real concern to the
public he said. "You can only
fine someone so much or keep
them in jail so many days and
then they'll be back out
While the sentences imposed in
DWI cases have received much
Continued On Page 5
Dance For The Heart
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Photo Lao
A wide variety of energetic volunteers, including members of the ECU football team, participated in two
hours of aerobics Sunday to raise money for the American Heart Association.
SGA Denies Funds ion The inside
By HAROLD JOYNER
Aultunt News Editor
The NAACP was denied SGA
funds Monday night when the
Legislature became aware that
the organization's constitution
was in direct violation of an Ap-
propriations Committee rule.
Wilma Case, president of the
ECU chapter of the NAACP,
asked the legislators to fund
travel for members to attend a
conference in Washington, D.C.
She said the money they were
asking for would cover the
allowable 19 cents per mile and
the use of a university vehicle.
However, Legislator Richard
Wynne told the SGA that in
reviewing the NAACP's constitu-
tion, his committee found that
the ECU chapter's constitution
was similiar to that of the na-
tional chapter and was "clearly
partisan Wynne pointed out
SGA appropriation guideline
number nine, which states, "No
partisan, political or social action
organization shall be funded
Also opposing the bill was
See STUDENTS, Page 5
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style6
Classifieds7
Sportsg
�SGA President John Rainev
announced today that filing
for the March 20 SGA election
will take place Feb. 25 to
March 1. Applications may be
picked up at the SGA office.
Rainey also reminds student
organizations that their
budgets should be submitted
by March 1.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 19, 1985
Thirty Second Spot
For Concert Band
Join me united States Air Force Tactical Air
Command Band for a very special evening of
musical entertainment. Sat Feb. 23 at the
Wright Auditorium. This outstanding
musical group, on tour from Langley Air
Force Base, Virginia, will present an ex-
citing program featuring selections from the
light classics and broadway hits, to stirring
patriotic specials, current vocal hits and
even the big band era. The program, spon-
sored by Air Force ROTC and Daily Ref lee
tor, is poen to the public and will begin at 8
p.m. For free tickets, contact Air Force
ROTC at 757 654a or 4597 or come to the se
cond floor of Wright Annex.
Crossover
Cross over into a new sound, contemporary
Christian music is gaining in popularity as
awareness increases. wzv.B is keeping up
with the trends. Crossover will introduce you
to 'music with a message each Sun. morn-
ing from 6-12. For those who have ears to
hear, listen to crossover. On your campus
album station, WZMB 91.3 FM.
African Music
Fri� Feb 22 at 6 p.m WZMB, 91.3 FM will
present two hours of contemporary African
Music. Most of this music has never been
aired in America before. Ageman Oua, a stu-
dent from Ghana, will narrate the show.
Delta Sigma Phi
Lii Sister Rush
has been changed to New Deli. We'll begin
partying at 9 on Thurs. Admission is $2 and
again on Fri. at the house on tenth st. There
will also be a 'dating game' on Thurs. night's
rush. We're all psyched to meet any new
girls who want to part of our Delta Sigma Phi
Fraternity
ECU Archery Club
will be holding a meeting Feb. 21 at 4 p.m. in
Mem. 105b. The meeting is open to all
students, faculity, and staff. Important
topics concerning shoots and projects will be
discussed. So if you enjoy the the outdoors
please come by and give us a listen. For
more information just call Greg at 752-6265.
Rugby Club
ecu vs. NCSU Sat Feb. 23, 2 p.m. North
Carolina Collegiate Championship Be there.
Rain or shine.
ECU Surfing Club
There will be a meeting Tues Feb. 19 at 8 In
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse. Yearbook pic
tures will be taken at the start of the meeting
so be on time!
Music Courses
The school of Music encourages students to
consider enrolling in the following music
courses designed for non-music majors dur-
ing the fall term. MUSC 1108�Non-Music
Major Group Voice; MUSC 1208,1218� Non-
Music Major Group Piano I and II; MUSC
2208�Music Appreciation; MUSC 2218�Or
chestral Music; MUSC 2238�Contemporary
Music; MUSC 2258�History of Jazz Music;
MUSC 3018�Introduction to Basic Music
Skills; MUSC 3028�Music Education in
Elementary Grades; MUSC 3038� Music
Education in Intermediate Grades; MUSC
3048Muslc for Exceptional Children.
Performance organizations are open to all
students, but an audition is required prior to
registration in any performance group
unless the student has the consent of the in-
structor.
No other school of music course offerings
may be taken without permission of the in-
structor and authorization from the Dean's
office.
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
In the Bloxton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you In developing better
Interviewing skills for use in your job search.
A film and discussion of how to interview on
and off campus will be shared. These ses
sions will be held in the Career Planning
Room at 3 p.m. on Feb. 7, 11, and 19. Seniors
are especially encouraged to attend one of
these sessions!
Deputy U.S.
Marshall Exam
Application dates for the Deputy U.S. Mar
shall Exam are from Feb. 4 22. information
Is available at the Career Planning and
Placement Service, Bloxton House. Come by
and learn how to get started in a career in
this division of the U.S. Department of
Justice.
Women's Indoor
Soccer Tournament
to be held March 15-17 for all organized in-
dependent teams. Contact Ginger Vann at
752-9722 or Vanessa Higdon at 757 6064 if you
are Interested. S5 entry fee.
Computer Science
Position available for summer 1985 with ma-
jor companys in Fayetteville. Students
should have Fortran, Basic, experience us-
ing Lotus 1,2,3 desireable. Contact
Cooperative Education 313 Rawl Building.
Health Care
Variety of positions available in Hospital
Setting in Pennsylvania. Good pay and op-
portunity for professional experience. Con-
tact Co-op Office, 313 Rawl Building.
SPRING
BREAK
PARTY
Ft. Lauderdale
From $149 on the Strip
7 nights 8 days
'800)368-2006 TOLL FREE
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
410 GracaxiaV Wvd
itaoau - u Has
?4 hour Towing Service
L Haul Rentals
iTllllHf
Announcements
Program Coordinator
Position available for summer with state
government supervising summer youth pro-
gram. Ideal for personnel major. Must be
Robeson County resident and have a car.
Contact Cooperative Education 313 Rawl
Buildinp
ECU Gospel Choir
will celebrate it's 2nd anniversary on Sun
Feb. 24 at 3 p.m. In Hendrix Theater. Admis-
sion is free. Choirs from other universities
and colleges will be singing at this celebra-
tion. Come out and hear some good gospel
music! Your suppport will be greatly ap-
preciated.
Hungry?
The ECU Gospel Choir will be sponsoring an
"All You Eat Spaghetti Buffet" Thurs Feb.
21. The dinner will be held from 5-8 p.m. in
MUC'sMuIti-Purpose Room. ECU students,
fraculty, and Greenville residents are
welcome. Thickets are two dollars. Proceeds
will be used for ECU Gospel Choir's Spring
Tour. For more information, please call
Keith Horton at 758 9296. Hope to see you
there. Bon Appetite.
AMA
AMA presents "Consumer Products
Marketing Learn about the marketing of
consumer products when the American
Marketing Assoc. hosts Steve Johnson from
Texlse, Inc a consumer products firm.
Come to the Multi purose room in
Mendenahll on Thues Feb. 19 at 4. See you
there!
West Area
Residence Council
West area presents "Campus Wide,
Residence Hall Students Only" dating game
on Feb. 19. At Jenkins Audltorum 710 p.m.
Application availble and returnable to any
area coordinator's office. Deadline: Feb. 15
at 4 p.m.
Wrestling
Register for the IRS Wrestling competition
Feb. 18-20. Officials are needed so come by
the first clinic Feb 19 at 6 p.m in MG 102. To
register come by room 204 Memorial Gym or
call 757-6387
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House is offering one hour ses-
sions to help you prepare your own resume.
Few graduates get jobs without some
prepartion. Many employers request a
resume showing your education and ex-
perience.
Sessions to help will be held in the Career
Planning Room of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m. on Feb. 5, 13, and 20.
PhiU
party for all members, Tues Feb. 19th at 5
in the Van Landingham Room.
ECU Playhouse
Save the price of a ticket�Usher for dance
theatre Feb. 20-23 and see the show free. Sign
up and information sheets are on the bulletin
board in Messick Theatre Arts Center.
Phi Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity
Bud Light, and Rock 93 invite you to join us
on the courts for the Volleyball Marathon for
Easter Seals on March 2 and 3 at Minges Col
iseum! Pre registration deadline for in-
terested participants is Thurs Feb. 21. ECU
Students who participate will play their
games early Sat. morning so Spring plans
won't be interrupted. For more information
call the toll free Volleyball Hotline at
1 800 722 0652 or write Jean Gaddy, Easter
Seal Society, 3948 Browning Place, Raleigh
NC 27609.
Visual Arts Forum
announces Ifs 1985 spring film series. All
films will be shown in Jenkins Auditorium
and begin at a p.m. 'Allegro Nontroppo' and
'Image' will be shown Fri Feb. 15. 'Bet-
ween Time and Timbukto' on Fri, March 1.
'The Challenge-Tribute to Modern Art" on
tues March 12. 'Rude Boy' on Fri, March
29. The last film of the series is 'Jane Is Jane
Forever' to be shown Fri April 12. The VAF
film series Is open to the general public and
all students are encouraged to attend.
CSCI Jobs
Army Systems Command wants to know now
how many wish to apply for their jobs for
summer and or fall semesters. The Co-op of-
fice must mail off your applications by Feb.
25! I To apply for this ob see Carol Collns or
Sue Benson In Rawl 313 now If not sooner!
CSCIJobs
Northern Telecom needs someone to start
NOW in a CSCI co-op job. Needs GPA-2.98n
grade In COBOL. (Also Northern Is taking
applications for summer now.) To apply for
this job see Carol Collins or Sue Bneson in
Rawl 3132 now If not sooner!
Quakers Are Friends
Quakers find that amidst the pressure and
noise of modern life there is In silent worship
a healing and creative power. First day
meeting: Sun Richard and Mary Miller's
home, 1801 C Cedar Lane (Call 758 6789).
Scholarships
The Department of Military Science (Army
ROTC) is now accepting applications for 2
and 3 year merit scholarships. These
scholarships pay full tuition and fees plus an
allowance for books and supplies each
semester. For more information contact
Captain Lllivak or Master Sergeant Boyles
at 324 Erwin hall or call 757-6967 or 6974.
Enviromental Health
Positions available for environmental health
student for the summer with a major utility
in Charlotte. Contact Cooperative Educa-
tion, 313 Rawl Building.
INDT
Inductrial Technology students Interested in
Northern Telecom for the summer should
contact Co-op office in 313 Rawl to update ap-
plication materials as soon as possible.
Financial Managment
Positions available for graduate MPA or
MBA students for summer, 1985, and one ad-
ditional semester with Federal High Way
Administration In Washington, DC. Requires
some accounting knowledge and pays bet-
ween $14,300 and (17,800 on an annual bases.
Contact Cooperative Education's office, 313
Rawl Building.
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House is offering one hour ses-
sions to help you prepare your own resume.
Few graduates get jobs without some
prepartion. Many employers request a
resume showing your education and ex-
perience. Sessions to help will be held In the
Career Planning Room of the Bloxton House
at 3 p.m. on Feb. 5, 13, and 20.
Summer School At
UNC Wilmington
Undergraduate and graduate students in-
terested in attending summer shcool at
UNC-W may register for classes through The
Office of Special Programs at UNCW.
Sumer Session I begins May 28 and ends
June 28 while Summer Session II Is schedul-
ed from July 8 through Aug. 9.
Vlsting students from other institutions
may enroll In summer courses at UNCW on-
ly with written permission from the
Registrar or Dean of the institution in which
they are currently enrolled.
A general information brochure describ-
ing courses offered, registration and other
information Is available from the Office of
Special Programs, UNCW, 401 S. College
Raod, Wilmington, NC 28403. For further In
formation, contact the OSP at (919) 395-3195.
ILO
The international Language Organization
will hold a meeting on Tues Feb. 19 at 3:30
In BC 305. This is a mandatory meeting for
members! All interested persons are
welcome to attend the ILO meetings. You do
not have to be a F.L. major to become a
member. Come join the fun of ILOI
LSS Society
There will be a meeting on Wed
p.m. In room 221 Mendenhall.
Feb. 20 at 7
ECU Frisbee
The ECU Frisbee Club is open to all In-
terested students and staff. We play at the
bottom of college hill Tues Thurs. and Sun.
afternoons. Anyone is welcome to come
throw or hack. The warm weather is coming
and so are the'I rates' Watch for the Natural
Light Spring Ultimax V March 30431 at
ECU. Yo Stein.
Frisbee Club
De irates Ultimate practice Mon, Tues,
Thurs. 3 Sat, Sun 2. Bretheren meeting 9
Tues. at MSC. 'ireeForce' to Wilm on Sun.
leaving Dunn at 11 a.m. Be there or at least
be somewhere I
Pirate Walk
Girls there is one way that you can meet
guys all the time. Call 757-4614 and ask for an
escort from Pirate Walk. It's the safe walk In
town. P.S. All operators and escort should
plan to attend the Pirate Walk meeting this
coming Mon at 4:30 in the Mendenhall
multi-purpose room; Please attend!
Aerobicize
Register for IRS (Intramural) aerobic
classes Feb. 24�March 1 in room 204
Memorial Gym. Drop In classes MonThurs.
5:15-4:15; 4:30 7:30. Participate rather then
speculate!
Society For Advancement
Of Management
Presents Dr. H. Horowitz, Program
manager. Management Developement
Center, IBM, speaking on Corporate
Business. Tues Feb. 19, 3:30, Rawl 104. All
welcome.
Attention
Thurs Feb. 21 could become the most im-
portant day of your life by coming to
Mendenhall from 11-4 p.m. You can learn
more about CADP, responsible drinking, tips
to successful partying and more.
Progressive Student
Network
Tired of hearing about how the New Right
has taken over our campuses? Come find out
what progressive students are doing at
schools all across the nation. Come to the
organizational meeting of the Progressive
Student Network. Tonight 8 p.m.
Mendenhall, room 247. For more informa-
tion contact Lisa at 752 5724.
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Do You
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NAME
ADDRESS
Rooms Available
For students at the Methodist Student
Center. Applications for summer school and
fall may be picked up at 501 East Fifth
Street, interviews will be held March 11 15.
For further information contact Richard or
Sheila Beeker at 758 2030 after 5 p.m.
Fat Tuesday
Pancake Supper
You are invited to a pancake supper tonight
at 5:30 p.m. at the Methodist Student Center,
501 East Fifth Street (across from Garrett
Dorm). Free pancakes and all the trlmings.
Sponsored jointly by the campus ministries.
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Tonlte: In the Attic, TKE presents the 10th
annual Ring-Girl Competition. Doors open at
9 p.m contest begins at 10 p.m. For more in-
formation call TKE House (758 6822) or Scott
at 758 7298.
KYF
King Youth Fellowship will be having a Bible
Study Tues Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. In 242
Mendenhall. For more information contact
Jack at 752 1081.
Phi Eta Sigma
There will be a business meeting of Phi Eta
Sigma on Tues Feb. 26 at 5:15 p.m in 221
Mendenhall.
Phi Beta Lambda
There will be a general meeting on Wed,
Feb. 20 at 3 in Rawl 342. Josh Rogers, owner
of PTA Pizza and Advice, will speak on pro
blems of small business. All interested per
sons are welcome.
Library Science 1000:
Second Block Classes
Students registered for Library Science 1000,
Sections 21-34 should begin classes Mon
Feb. 21. Students registered for Sections
35-41 will begin classes Tues Feb. 26.
Alpha Phi Big Brothers
Big brothers happy hour will be tonight at
the Elbo starting at 9:30. Also, big brother
rush will be at Treehouse Thurs Feb. 21
from 4-7� Everyone is urged to attend.
Biology Club
will have it's next meeting on Mon Feb. 25.
The meeting will be held in the Helm's
Reading room 2 floor Bloloby Bldg at 7 p.m.
Our distinguished quests will include 2 first
year medical students at the ECU School of
Medicine, Jennifer Coats and Bart Edwards.
Also, we will have a fourth year medical stu
dent, Jules Barefoot.They will be on hand to
answer any questions students who are
thinking about the medical field may have.
All old and new members in attendance will
receive a free scanning electron microgram
calendar. Don't miss It.
Phi Upsilon Omicron
Phi U welcome back party! All members
welcomel Feb. 19�5 Van Landingham
Room.
Teamwork In Health
Interested in finding out how each of the
following team members contributes to toatl
health care: Music Theropy, Occupational
Theropy, Phislcal Theropy. Social Work, and
Therapeutic Recreation? Come out Tues
Feb. 26 to Brewster Building room C 103 at
7:30 p.m. and hear a representative from
each field. Opportunity for questions will be
provided and refreshments will be served!
Sponsored by EUC Student Committee Oc
cupational Therapy Association.
Gamma Geta Phi
Honor Society will meet Thurs Feb 21 at 7
p.m. In Jenkins Aud. This wilt be your last
chance to pay dues and we'll also give out the
tickets. See you there!
Circle K
Want to be a video? Circle k is making one of
their own For a Blast come Wed. at 5 In
Mendenhall Rm 221 You could be a star. Be
there Free food
ECU Forensic Society
A meeting will be held Tues Feb. 19, in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 248.
Anyone still interested in participating In
debate, public speaking, oral interpretation,
and dramatic interpretation come join us.
We would love to see your smiling face.
Review Board�SGA
Applications are now being accepted for the
University Review Board. There are 2 open
ings for the remainder of the semester. To
file, go by the SGA office and fill out an ap
plication and sign up for an interview. Ap
plications will only be taken on Tues , Feb
19.
Beach Jobs
Retail positions available in Nags Head for
the summer. Contact Co op Office 313 Rawl
Building.
Graduate Students
Wesley Foundation is now accepting applica
tions for a graduate couple to serve as rev
dent advisors and program assistants for the
1985 86 school year. Housing is provided at
the Methodist Student Center For informa-
tion call 758-2030
�U
Women's Soccer Club
Women's outdoor soccer practice to be held
Thurs Feb. 21 at 4 in anticipation of nice
weather. Meet in front of Flemming Dorm
(5th St. side). All women welcome, club
members expected. Questions? call Ginger
at 752 9722.
CITY
STATE
ZIP
PHONE
SOC SECURITY
J.
SIGNATURE
Cheers!
To help you
celebrate that
special event, we'll
provide you with a
complimentary bottle
of champagne with
each tuxedo rental.
No, gimmicks, no
hidden extra charges.
It's just Scott's way to
say "Thank You
Best of all. when you
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that you look your
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Unempl
By HAROLD JOYNER
A�i�Mi ttam Marm
The United States will always
have a deficit, said former U.S.
Secretary of Commerce Juanita
Kreps last week. However,
depending on whether the coun-
try is experiencing structural or
cyclical unemployment, the solu-
tion to the ever-growing deficit
may be solved once this par-
ticular type is recognized.
ex j
un
ed
blul
woj
mei
chj
der
sucl
mil
to
Sex Diffen
From Ano
By BILL MITCHELL
Sttff Writer
How sex differs for men and
women was a topic of discussion
in a lecture entitled "Sensational
Sex" given by Crawford Loritts
Sunday in Hendrix Theatre.
Loritts said sex is a physical
release for men, while through
sex women are looking for some
type of commitment.
The lecture was sponsored by a
number of campus organizations,
including the Minority Arts
Council, the NAACP, Campus
Crusade for Christ, and and
several campus fraternities. It
was presented as pan of ECU's
celebration of Black History
month.
Loritts stressed that American
society is very confused about the
interaction of love and sex. He
said he dislikes the fact that so
many people believe love and sex
are the same thing, pointing out
how "wrong" it is to use the term
"making love" so casually. Sex is
just one of the many ways to ex-
press love, he said. He presented
three key factors in a sexual rela-
tionship, a concept developed by
Murry Kaplin, a noted
psychologist.
The first of these factors is that
sexual interaction is the end result
of a gradually developing in-
terpersonal relationship. The se-
cond is the fact that sex alone is
not the thing that holds a rela-
tiol
tha
tiol
the
ual
DU
tint
anc
sex
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 19, 1985
Teamwork In Health
resteo 'H ttrxjinfl out how each ot the
i (ig!�m members contributes to toatl
t to care Music Theropy Occupational
- pi" steal Trteroov Social Work and
ipti ' c Recreation7 Come out Tues ,
26 'e B'ews'er 8uidng room C 103 at
g r tnd lea' a representative from
� tity lor questions will be
It ind retreshments w.n be served!
gnsorcd by EUC Student Committee Oc
-aonai riwrapy Assoca'ion
Gamma Geta Phi
� rhurs Feb 21 at 7
l A ' I " Oe vour last
- ID jive out the
Circle K
-aArtg one Ot
Aed at 5 m
� oe a star Be
:u Forensic Society
es Feb w in
Soom 248
I r pating in
� Tterpretatlon,
jen� iOin us
?ace
;w Board�SGA
km being a cepled �or the
- There s-e 2 open
- it se�es'er To
� j � ot � �- ap
an in 'erviev. Ap
jes ceb
Beach Jobs
Jble - Nags Head for
3H :e 313 Rawl
ale Students
M J ocr ng applica
f'vf as resi
. � - ass s'ants tor the
Mousmg s provided at
.enter cor informs
Cheers!
S-iV- &S�u. -ill
To help you
celebrate that
� ial event, we'll
rovide you with a
phmentary bottle
ampagne with
each tuxedo rental.
No. gimmicks, no
hidden extra charges.
It's just Scott's way to
say "Thank You
Best of all. when, you
choose from our vast,
competitive priced
selection of styles,
you'll feel confident
that you look your
best. Now that's some-
thing to cheer about!
Washington Square
Mall
13 laenti'ication to participate in mis otter
$
Unemployment Trends Discussed By Kreps
By HAROLD JOYNER Curremlv th iinitH Qt�c i .ih �, �� �
Aubtut N�
i Editor
The United States will always
have a deficit, said former U S
Secretary of Commerce Juanita
Kreps last week. However,
depending on whether the coun-
try is experiencing structural or
cyclical unemployment, the solu-
tion to the ever-growing deficit
may be solved once this par-
ticular type is recognized.
Currently, the United States is
experiencing structural
unemployment, meaning advanc-
ed technology has pushed the
blue collar worker out of the
work force. In cyclical unemploy-
ment, these workers have some
chance of getting their job back,
depending on outside factors,
such as the foreign trade market.
"Though the current ad-
ministration has laid out a plan
to end the deficit Kreps
said at a press conference, "the
plan is already behind schedule
She said the reason was due to
Reagan's endorsement of lower
cuts to the defense budget.
Concerning how economics
relate to ecology, Kreps said it is
the responsibility of the con-
sumer to find ways to replace lost
resources. "It is very expensive to
maintain the quality of our
resources, but the nation has
become much more aware of the
Sex Differences Discussed
From Another Viewpoint
By BILL MITCHELL
Staff Wilier
How sex differs for men and
women was a topic of discussion
in a lecture entitled "Sensational
Sex" given by Crawford Loritts
Sunday in Hendrix Theatre.
Loritts said sex is a physical
release for men, while through
sex women are looking for some
type of commitment.
The lecture was sponsored by a
number of campus organizations,
including the Minority Arts
Council, the NAACP, Campus
Crusade for Christ, and and
several campus fraternities. It
was presented as part of ECU's
celebration of Black History
month.
Loritts stressed that American
society is very confused about the
interaction of love and sex. He
said he dislikes the fact that so
many people believe love and sex
are the same thing, pointing out
how "wrong" it is to use the term
"making love" so casually. Sex is
just one of the many ways to ex-
press love, he said. He presented
three key factors in a sexual rela-
tionship, a concept developed by
Murry Kaplin, a noted
psychologist.
The first of these factors is that
sexual interaction is the end result
of a gradually developing in-
terpersonal relationship. The se-
cond is the fact that sex alone is
not the thing that holds a rela-
tionship together and the third
that the "whys" of a sexual rela-
tionship are more important then
the "what" or the "how
"We are constantly bombard-
ed by sexual messages Loritts
said. "Americans are trained to
associate sexual productivity with
certain products This mainly
concerns advertising and the
music and television industry.
"Man's strongest drive is his sex-
ual appetite, and we are being
manipulated by it Loritts con-
tinued. "Society itself is telling
and persuading us into equating
sex with love
Loritts also brought up the fact
that the Bible has some very in-
teresting things to say about sex.
The Bible has three main prin-
ciples concerning sex, he said. He
listed them as follows: The first is
that sex is good and a part of
God's creation. It stresses that
sexual desire is not wrong, but a
preoccupation with that desire is
wrong. Sex is a magnificent gift
from God, but a responsible gift.
The second principle is that the
best condition for sex is mar-
riage.Both the nature of sex and
marriage are commitment. Sex is
for three very important things;
children, enjoyment, and
oneness. This unity raises two
people to a higher level of
awareness. "Sex is a statement of
commitment to one person for
the rest of your life Loritts
said. The third principal is that
sex involves a concept of being
open both physically and emo-
tionally.
Loritts brought up the concept
of body (ownership. He said
three guidelines of this concept
are; mutual responsibility to your
partner, sex not used as leverage
to get something and mutual
authority over the other person's
body. Sex is a giving situation, he
said, and you should be concern-
ed with the other person's body,
not your own. The third guideline
is mutual consent.
Loritts went on to stress that
both love and sex come from
deep within the heart and soul.
Let The
Classifieds
Work For
You
Greenville
� Flower Shop
758-2774
Corner Ean &. 1 IT
RESEARCH
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I of over 16,000 topics to
I assist your research ef-
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llnois call 312-922-0300)
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dilemma of soil conservation
than ever before The consumer
will end up paying for the quality
of vital resources, she said, "but
if he doesn't pay, then ecology
cannot be ensured.
The difference between
"economic man" and "social
man" and how President Reagan
placed between the two was sug-
gested by Kreps. As far as equity
goes, two considerations must be
met, she said. First of all, better
equal employment has enabled
the U.S. to guarantee better
equality in the work force.
Workers are getting equal pay for
equal work and because there is
no discrimination, people are not
held back.
The other difference, which
she says cannot possibly work, is
the cutback' of various aid to the
disabled, elderly and even
students going to college. She
said she thought the needs of
these people called for more at-
tention than the Reagan ad-
mistration has given to them.
"It's not a bad investment to give
student loans for education she
said. "I would hate to see us lose
the progress we've made so far. I
know it's not easy for students to
go through school Kreps said
she thought it would be bad
economic policy to make it dif-
ficult for a student to get his
education
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V






�te iEaat �arnitnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM NORTON, General Manager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
JENNIFER JENDRAS1AK, Hen. Eo, TOM LUVENDER, D.reaor of Adding
Scott Cooper, co td,IOr Anthony Martin. BuMf� Manager
Tina Maroschak, so tduor John Peterson, (�, Manager
Bill Mitchell, ocwo, m bill Dawson, pwUcr�m Mm�cr
Doris Rankins, &��, r!Ck Mccormac, co-sPor� &
Daniel Maurer, Emmmmmm Edaor DeChanile Johnson, Ad Technician
February 19, 198?
Opinion
Page 4
Drinking
New Age Proposal Unfair
The resolution passed by the
University of North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments recently that opposed rais-
ing the drinking age to 21 in North
Carolina was a much-needed cry
by students to protect their rights.
With the speed of a steamroller
down a mountain highway, the
General Assembly will soon com-
pletely crush the rights of students
to drink. The reasons are noble,
but the solution they are using for
the drunk driving problem is a
quick fix.
Two years ago, the drinking age
was raised to 19. That move made
a statement. It said that 18-year-
olds were politically powerless,
and it declared that it was all right
to be called a man at 18 to fight
and die for one's country, but not
to have a beer in the local bar. The
new bill, introduced by Rep. Dan
Lillie, D-Lenoir, is going one step
further, and unfortunately,
nobody will be able to do anything
about it.
The federal government has
mandated that highway funds be
cut if states don't raise their drink-
ing ages to 21. This, of course, is
coercion. There's no way a state
can survive without highway
monies. We accept that this is part
of the game, and we can only sit
back and watch in amazement as
our federal government gives in to
the pressure of drunk driving
groups. Instead of looking at ways
to curb the entire problem, they
are onlv fixing part of it.
The UNCASG resolution, at
least, expresses our consternation
and exasperation. College students
and 18-21-year-olds are the whipp-
ing boy of the safe highway move-
ment. We are the easiest to blame
because we are politically expen-
dable. Congressmen in
Washington know we don't vote.
Of course, we understand the
reasons why of the groups who are
pushing the raising of the age.
They are just pushing unfairly.
They should be asking other
segments of the population to take
their fair share of the burden. The
groups say we drink irresponsibly.
Sure, some of us do, but many 25
35 45- and 50-year-olds do, too.
These people (MADD, etc.)
have pressured our federal
representatives and are now lean-
ing on our state house members.
Maybe they need to realize that
stronger laws that pack more
punch would be more preferable.
These kinds of measures would
strike at all age groups who drink
and drive. Not only would this be
better, it would be fair.
It would probably take a
political miracle, but our General
Assembly should stand up and
fight for the rights of its citizens. It
should make a statement saying
that North Carolinians who are
18-21 years old are not going to be
unfairly punished for a crime they
didn't commit.
Well, we realize it won't happen,
after all, everyone needs highway
funds. But, maybe we shouldn't
give up hope. The UNCASG
hasn't. Those of you who feel
strongly should write your con-
gressman or senator and your state
house member. We will.
W USTl W&NPOUS SYSTfcto ASSQUneLY IWPfcMOUS TO ATTACK
IT HAS COMPOteKfS NAUUFACJURfc& M AVI 435 COUsfe&SlOUN. WSTWCTSP
Campus Forum
Column Conflicts With 'Witness'
Did you know � There have
been no national elections in Cuba
since 1958. Fidel Castro heads the
Council of Ministers, the chief
governing body. Cuba, an island
nation of the West Indies group,
has only one political party. That
party is the Cuban Communist
Party.
The party has a 100-member
Central Committee, a Politbureau
of eight and a Secretariat of six.
Tourist travel is banned to Cuba
from the United States.
Two interesting things happened to
me last Thursday. The first was
reading Dennis Kilcoyne's column on
Nicaragua and the second was receiv-
ing a letter from Mike Hamer, who is
living in Nicaragua as part of the
Witness for Peace project. WFP is an
organization that is concerned about
the undeclared war in Nicaragua and
the senseless murders that are taking
place there. I'd like to share some of
Mike's thoughts as he writes about
what he is witnessing living in the coun-
try that Kilcoyne writes so freely and
uninformly about.
Let us look for a minute at all those
Somozas working for the Sandinistas
now. The uprising in 1979 which over-
threw the Somoza regime came from
the peasants, and those who were
leading the revolution were the natural
choice to take over leadership until
elections could be held. According to
our government, the bulk of the con-
tras fighting is part of the old Somoza
soldiers who want to reinstate a dic-
tatorship openly supported by our
government.
Now Dennis, are you saying that our
government is lying to us? Maybe the
old Somoza soldiers are now trying to
rebuild their country which can only
mean that the United States is the
group trying to overthrow the new
government? This is an interesting
thought. As far as big fish goes, Mizuel
D'Escoto is a member of the
Maryknoll priesthood, educated in the
United States, who left this country to
work with the peasants in Nicaragua.
Mike spoke with Mizuel D'Escoto
last week. He wrote part of their con-
versation to me, "We must renounce
whatever prevents us from relating to
each other as brothers and sisters; and
we must create a new society so that we
have a new family. We set out to stand
side by side of those who are suffering
repression; and we suffer the same
persecution as Jesus suffered Does
this sound like the words of the old
Somoza guard?
Dennis, not even you can believe
that the war going on now is supported
by the peasants of Nicaragua. Why
would people who are being killed and
tortured by the contras suddenly
change sides and join in killing other
peasants? Mike tells me that since 1979
more than 7,000 peasants have died at
the hands of these contra forces. This
doesn't make sense. I believe the group
you are referring to are the Miskito In-
dians which are a very small percent of
the Nicaraguan population. They have
joined the contras because of promises
of single ownership of land, etc.
Finally, I would like to share some
of Mike's observations since arriving in
Nicaragua. "The shortages of goods is
very real and the sanction imposed on
the country by our country is drastical-
ly hurting the economy, there is very
little meat for the people. The worse of
it though is the violence. I am observ-
ing that even though some people are
referring to this as a civil war there is
no excuse for the United States to fund
the contras, who are beyond a doubt
killing innocent people.
"I have heard President Reagan say-
ing that the United States has to pro-
tect itself from Nicaragua. This is such
a joke; the country is having trouble
keeping any bus-lines open, and I think
that they have six WWII-type anti-
aircraft guns to protect Managua from
air attack. This is a country where
health care has improved almost 100
percent and literacy is now 80 percent.
I know that the present government
has problems, but it is hard for them to
try and build their country when they
are consistently being harrassed, both
physically and economically by the
United States
I would suggest that before you write
another article on Nicaragua you check
out your facts, if not with people who
have actually been there, than at least
with some reliable source instead of
trying to allign post-WWII rebuilding
with the beginning of a new govern-
ment that is trying to do the best for its
people.
By the way Dennis, can you name
any old Nazis that are working for the
East Germans now?
Lysa Hieber
Greenville
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted.
Worker-Owned Business Good Option In Dem Economy
Conservatives argue that workplace
decision-making should be under the ex-
clusive control of capital owners and
their appointed managers. In their view,
profit maximization requires capital
owners and managers to make the
"most efficient" decisions or else lose
out to the competition. The most effi-
cient firms, in turn, will produce the
most goods, realize the highest profits,
charge the lowest prices, pay the highest
wages and employ the greatest amount
of labor.
From The Left
Jay Stone
In the conservative view, then, pro-
perty is a right and the organization of
production under current institutional
arrangements is the most efficient we
can devise. Despite its drawbacks, it
should not be abandoned for a new form
of organization that would not be as ef-
ficient.
Yet, we must ask whether the notion
of private property has any relevance in
an economy which an estimated $250
billion in direct government subsidies
has gone into the private energy industry
since the end of World War I; half has
gone into the oil indus'ry alone. The
much younger nuclear power industry,
by the mid '70s, accounted for about
eight percent of that historical total and
is now thoroughly dependent on conti-
nuing federal subsidies for its economic
survival.
Corporate bailouts are also a way in
which the public finances the profits of
business. In fiscal year 1982, the federal
government gave the oil and gas industry
tax credits for exploration and develop-
ment that, if calculated as direct govern-
ment spending, amounted to almost $3.3
billion. Tax credits for business invest-
ment in general amounted to more than
$19 billion. There is also the matter of
contracting by government, primarily in
the defense industry, that is done in
ways that bear no resemblance to free
enterprise since little genuinely com-
petitive bidding for military contracts
takes place. This, of course, leads to cor-
porate boondoggling (read theft).
Last, but not least, there is the subtle
type of government aid for private
business that is virtually impossible to
calculate in dollars � absorbing the ex-
ternal costs of production. In simple
language this means that if an industry
pollutes, government pays much of the
cost of compensating the victims and of
cleaning up the mess. Or, when employ-
ment falls because factories are
relocating overseas, taxpayers foot the
bill for public assistance benefits.
These examples are not presented to
suggest that private property should be
abolished and all industry nationalized
or that any other such far-fetched and
ill-conceived scheme should be under-
taken. Rather, the examples are
presented so that it will be clear to the
reader that in the current American
economy the distinction between public
and private is hazy in many cases ano, in
any event, the notion of private property
should not prevent us from rationally
examining the flaws in current economic
structures and considering alternatives.
A view of the current organization of
production that is less sanguine than the
conservative view is discussed by three
graduates from the Harvard School of
Economics: Samuel Bowles, David Gor-
don and Thomas Weisskopf in their
book Beyond the Wasteland. They say
the organization of production in most
American firms is geared not to max-
imize output but to extract more labor
from workers at the lowest possible
wages. This requires the development of
technology that lowers the cost of labor
and increases labor productivity.
Also, with the introduction of new
technology, work is broken down into
simple repetitive tasks so that semi-
skilled workers can be substituted for
skilled workers, lowering wages. In this
view, the hierarchical structure of pro-
duction, the technology used and the
division of labor are chosen by
employers for their efficiency in max-
imizing productivitywage difference,
not for production or even productivity
itself.
Furthermore, this view insists that the
present system is efficient only in the
sense that it maximizes profit. Maximiz-
ing profit, however, often has not
resulted in the production of more goods
or in more jobs for workers. Sometimes,
in fact, corporate policies which max-
imize profits have been anathema to the
public interest and the well-being of
American society.
Also of importance is the fact that
worker dis-satisfaction is endemic in the
present system of production. Gordon,
Bowles and Weisskopf mount a lot of
evidence to suggest that it is this dis-
satisfaction and labor-management
strife that is particularly responsible for
the decline in the growth rate of
American productivity during the last
several years. (The United States has a
lower growth rate in gross domestic pro-
duct per worker than Japan, West Ger-
many and Sweden, among others.)
Yet, to say that measures of produc-
tivity should be the determining factor in
decisions regarding how we structure the
economy would be to miss the point.
(Many government regulations that pro-
tect the health and safety of workers and
the public lower the rate of growth in
productivity, though not as much as
conservatives claim.) It is merely instruc-
tive to note the fact that countries that
have invested most in the care and train-
ing of workers and that give workers
high participatory roles in workplace
decision-making (such as West Ger-
many, Japan or Sweden) have also
chalked up the best records of economic
performance in recent years.
In their book Economic Democracy,
Derrick Shearer and Martin Carnoy ad-
vocate the promotion of worker-owned
and controlled cooperatives as one alter-
native to current economic institutional
arrangements. The authors discuss five
case studies of worker-owned com-
panies. One involves 18 worker-owned
plywood firms in the Pacific Northwest
that produce about 12 percent of all
American plywood and range in size
from 80 to 450 worker-owners. Each
firm grosses between $3 million and $15
million annually. Some have been
operating for 30 years.
Other case studies focus on cooperatives
in Spain, England and France.
Shearer and Carnoy conclude that
worker-owned and operated firms tend
to enhance the health and safety of the
worker-owners and generally to con-
tribute part of their profits to in-
vestments in human capital. For exam-
ple, the plywood factories retrain
workers who are made obsolete by new
machinery and provide free lunches, full
medical and dental care and company
paid life insurance.
In addition, though worker-owned
firms did not make wages completely
uniform, they did at least equalize them
significantly compared with non worker-
owned firms. The authors also argue
that worker-owned firms enjoy higher
levels of productivity and that, though
under a producer-cooperative system of
economic growth with employment in-
creasing more slowly, the increase would
be more stable (with fewer and less in-
tense recessions) than under the present
system.
To foster development of producer -
coops, Shearer and Carnoy propose the
development of public financing for
cooperatives through public banks that
can use union pension funds for job
creation and preservation, and through
direct government loans to hard-pressed
industries reorganizing under worker-
controlled production. An additional
strategy might be to require by law com-
panies to give workers six months notice
of an intention to shutdown a plant, as
the governments of West Germany,
Sweden and The Netherlands do. The
workers should then be given first op-
tion to buy the plant at a fair price to be
negotiated with the courts as arbiter.
Producer coops, however, are only
one example of an alternative institu-
tional arrangement that could be
fostered to enhance democracy in the
American economy. Other examples will
be discussed in later columns.
Student L
ByDALESWANSON
Si�ff �rti�
The North Carolina Student
Legislature held its February In- I
terim Council meeting this past
weekend at UNC-Charlotte and,
according to ECUNCSl Presi-
dent James Calduell. it was a
very productive meeting
Student Legislt
Denies Money
Continued From Page 1
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne. He
said other partisan group
as the College Repubii
"didn't bother showing up to
the SGA for money, knowing
they would be rejected he said.
"I'm sure this conference
to their cause Kilcoyne said,
"but they are supporting
something that not all students
do support. I'm glad the S
stuck to the rules and voted th
funding down
After the vote. Case had :
comment on the decision
said, "I will have to look furth
into what they were tali
about
In other SGA action, $9'
Threat Interru,
A bomb threat Thursda e
ing forced a full-house at Jen!
Auditorium outside for
minutes before Dr. Juanita K
could deliver her speech on the
economy. According to Cam
Public Safety, an anonym
caller phoned at nZ p.i
said, "There's a bomb in
Auditorium
Public Safety dispat
officers to the auditorium,
crowd was told by Dean I
Ryan of the College oi V
D Wl Effects D
publicity, Haigwood saic I
it is a matter of more,
stricter, sentences. "I think
DWI cases the judges are rr
more aware of the public' .
cern for the drinking driver and
as a result of that, the seme
are somew hat more e ere
said. ��I'm not sure thai
sentences imposed are ionger.
just that there are more short
tivt sentences
si
&2
lW'U S.
Ulr' SCREF
LOT.4TI-D n
CdFA Carolina
dining ser
The No. 12 Cho
JUST RIGHT FOR
STEAKONABUDG
Served With Your Choice Of P
And Onions Or Mushroom Gravi
WE PUT n ON THE PLATE
t
�Sfkf- MtMf�
,
�WL
t
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 19, 1985
IN
X-YFB1
&&S&I0NAL DISTRICTS!
' Witness'
Managua from
country where
T-proved almost 100
is now 80 percent.
nt government
urd for them to
country when they
ig harrassed, both
illy by the
efore you write
aragua you check
" with people who
n there, than at least
ce instead of
WWII rebuilding
t a new govern-
do the best for its
� Dennis, can you name
that are working for the
Lsa Hieber
Greenville
Forum Rules
h elcomes letters
i ien Mail or
office in the Publica-
from the en-
� r 1 :hrar.
'leation, all let-
v name, major and
s, phone number
author(s). Letters
typewritten pages,
paced or neatly printed. All
bject to editing for brevi-
i libel, and no personal
ill be permitted.
conomy
I s in human capital. For exam-
ine plywood factories retrain
vho are made obsolete by new
unerv and provide free lunches, full
ical and dental care and company
life insurar.
addition, though worker-owned
Is did not make u-ages completely
I they did at least equalize them
j intly compared with non worker-
led firms The authors also argue
worker-owned firms enjoy higher
Is of productivity and that, though
er a producer-cooperative system of
omic growth with employment in-
:ng more slowly, the increase would
ore stable (with fewer and less in-
recessions) than under the present
fcm.
foster development of producer-
is. Shearer and Carnoy propose the
iopment of public financing for
peratives through public banks that
.se union pension funds for job
tion and preservation, and through
bt government loans to hard-pressed
jstries reorganizing under worker-
Irolled production. An additional
egy might be to require by law com-
es to give workers six months notice
intention to shutdown a plant, as
governments of West Germany,
Ben and The Netherlands do. The
ers should then be given first op-
buy the plant at a fair price to be
Itiated with the courts as arbiter.
oducer coops, however, are only
example of an alternative institu-
U arrangement that could be
red to enhance democracy in the
ncan economy. Other examples will
Iscussed in later columns.
Student Legislators Experience A 'Productive' Weekend
By DALE SWANSON
Staff Writer
"We usually get through half
of the number of resolutions that
The Mrth r . we Passed is weekend
Legislature L F? r"w StUdem Ca,dwdl Said' He added that on"
terfm Conn f FebrUary ,n" ly tWO of the ei�ht resolutions
!C� Co"nci lmeetmg this past debated elicited strong debate
weekend at UNC-Charlotte and, The first controversial issue to
according to ECUNCSL Presi- be debated during the meeting
aent James Caldwell, it was a was prayer in public schools The
very productive meeting. resolution, which was defeated
Student Legislature
Denies Money To Group
L eator "n hr��P�e ' u appropriated to the newly formed
Legislator Dennis K.lcoyne. He ECU Forensic Society Under the
as the College Republicans
"didn't bother showing up to ask
the SGA for money, knowing
they would be rejected he said.
"I'm sure this conference is vital
to their cause Kilcoyne said,
"but they are supporting
something that not all students
do support. I'm glad the SGA
stuck to the rules and voted this
funding down
After the vote. Case had no
comment on the decision and
said, "I will have to look further
into what they were talking
about
In other SGA action, $961 was
Janice Schreiber and Rick
Rhodes, both of the Department
of Theater Arts, the society hopes
to bring recognition to ECU by
attending various tournaments.
The original request by the
group was $2,784. The SGA pass-
ed the lowered amount for travel
expenses and entry fees to two
events, instead of the original
four the Forensic Society had re-
quested funding for.
Rhodes said after the meeting
he was pleased with the amount
the SGA passed. "It's great
because we see this as seed
monev
Threat Interrupts Lecture
A bomb threat Thursday even-
ing forced a full-house at Jenkins
Auditorium outside for 20
minutes before Dr. Juanita Kreps
could deliver her speech on the
economy. According to Campus
Public Safety, an anonymous
caller phoned at 7:27 p.m. and
said, "There's a bomb in Jenkins
Auditorium
Public Safety dispatched five
officers to the auditorium. The
crowd was told by Dean Eugene
Ryan of the College of Arts and
Sciences at about 7:35 p.m. that
there was a bomb threat and to
move out of the building, accor-
ding to members of the audience.
Assistant Director of Public
Safety Francis Eddings said the
five officers did a visual inspec-
tion of the auditorium. The
search turned up negative and the
people were allowed to return to
their seats.
According to Eddings, this is
the first bomb threat at ECU in
"about two or three years
D WI Effects Discussed
publicity, Haigwood said he feels
it is a matter of more, not
stricter, sentences. "I think in
DWI cases the judges are much
more aware of the public's con-
cern for the drinking driver and
as a result of that, the sentences
are somewhat more severe he
said. "I'm not sure that the
sentences imposed are longer,
just that there are more short, ac-
tive, sentences
As far as publicity and more
punishments being effective in
reducing the incidence of drunk
driving, Haigwood says he hopes
to "see a decrease because of the
public's awareness that there is
obvious concern over the number
of fatalities and the penalties
However, he added the impact
will be on the occasional social
drinker � "the chronic drinker
will continue to drink and drive
by a 65-36 roll call vote, was in-
troduced by NCSL members
from N.C. State and would have
put the NCSL on record as op-
posing school prayer but suppor-
ting the use of public school
facilities by student religious
organizations. Caldwell said the
resolution was defeated largely
because of inconsistencies in
language.
A resolution calling for a man-
datory life sentence without
parole, introduced by students
from UNC-Greensboro, resulted
in much controversy, according
to Caldwell. Those opposed to
the resolution argued that such a
sentence would give the prisoner
no incentive to live or cooperate
in the prison environment. Those
favoring the resolution cited the
number of repeat criminals on
the streets. The resolution passed
by a 54-22 roll call vote.
The sale of Conrail, the
government's freight train opera-
tion, was also discussed, with the
NCSL passing a resolution favor-
ing a public sale of the railway.
Conrail is currently valued at $7
billion dollars and would be sold
to public stockholders under the
terms of the resolution.
The fact that North Carolina is
unique in having a governor with
no veto power was addressed in
another resolution calling for the
granting of such a power. ECU
delegate Kirk Shelley was the on-
ly dissenter on the resolution,
arguing that such a power
would impose too many reguia
tions on the scientific communi-
ty.
Two bills concerning nuclear
power and waste in the state were
passed by voice votes. A resolu-
tion calling for greater coordina-
tion between North Carolina
community colleges and private
industry was passed by consent.
The NCSL is a group of
politically interested students. It
meets regularly to discuss and
pass resolutions concerning cur-
rent political issues. Copies of
these resolutions are forwarded
to government officials and manv
actually become law.
��� it 0 D�'o. i�, m.M.uil pt� � �(� �4p Slo .
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1 HI 1 M i KOI IM VN
Morita Anticip
ByJAY&El LIOl hKAH7
Illl��tln�ll Photo Ne�i
M Miyagi in Thf Karate a
ducei Jerry Weintraub w
Now, M ;i cadem ward non
Best 5 i the firsi g
was km
Hit Sequel
to a pareni
tmn Ml ol us
ippening
Morita
� the
i
� �
'



I
tijMmwmMmm'
4: -
.
. the
E
ill the
5
tal Hall
1 I HKl XKN W, IW
Page
Pat Morita
defining m w � he explain'
"Happy Days he starred in the
md Tina The half-h om was one oi the
n with only five episo
om "Blansky's Beautie
lied in less than n.
ith a role in Midway,
at World War naval battle, the n ease
Slapstick (Of Another hind), starring Jerry 1 ewis and Savannah
landing The Karate Kid
Mori t a '
equel to The Karate Kid
Dance Theatre Combines
Faculty And Student Talent
idem,
will be
he hastarolina
Theatre Wednesday
20 23
inni? rheal
than 50 dan.
Department
o mce Theatre

� stude
: the Schoi M and
Art. ccordun or-
Weeks, the
ed creativity between the dif-
media "has pro-
iall) tunning
es She went on to say that
with � tnd of interaction one
pire the other and
i unique h td
sun; nee.
� lows a col-
lab i v e e f 1
� Ltricia Pertalion
and ;h, is a good ex-
ile of the team approach in-
ded in this annual dance event.
An MIA candidate in the School
Art, Kcough specialize!
igraphy and
"Haunted Shadows"
, orates his work using pro-
tions on tte an en-
mment foi the dancers and a
�d of fear and confrontation.
Said Keough, " rhis has been a
. special experience for me
. for the first time, my
k is an integral part of a live
stage performance It no longer
stands by itself, but will be pan
of the actionthe dance
Patricia Weeks has created a
modem dance piece using
original music composed by
David Garza, a senior composi-
tion major in the School of
Music. The piece is built around
the interchange o roles between
six dancers and three musicians,
all ol whon
and the sound ' i
Cara emphasi; ythm w
the use of the vibes and �
othei h instrument that
doul
Tradition
represent in a
choreograp!
film
ECU Ins;
and paintings
nst Carl Larsson, Ra
dancers in a piece that shows a
charming episode in the life
the larsson family: a birthday
party for the eldest daughter. Her
choreographic tale in tap
dance will also be featured in a
piece she calls "pure fanta
Using the music oi Billy Joel and
The Temptations, nine ECU
dance majors will "camp it up in
a rag-bag of fun
Rounding out the evening vs
be a parody of a typical MTV
vid Oper
Choreographed by Jeron
Jenkins, visiting instructor in ja.
dance, this is a thematic pie
featuring 2? dancers who per-
form numerous stock characters
most commonly associated with
the big city street life: the bag
lady, punk rockers, motorcycle
gangs, mafia members and street
walkers. Said Jenkins, "Our
costume designer has had a ball
with this because it calls for such
colorful dress; oversized hats.
feathers, sequins and lots o
glitz The music is from the
popular contemporary team,
Ashford and Simpson.
Reserved seat tickets are on
sale at the McGinnis Theatre Box
Office from 10 a.m. until 4 p m
Reservations can be made bv call-
ing 757-6390.
Wanted: Actors, Singers And Dancers
Auditions Set For Outdo I
the Lost Colony'
The I ost (olony
.vsil hold aud
n Feb 23 a I on
al H " Sit�
! in The 1 ost Col-
ling More than 125 ac-
;ingers and techni
e employed each summer,
and all positions are sal i
tnd singers will audi-
: m dai II audi-
. p.m rhose interested
. in technical work mav applv
at e oi after-
on.
nonees should be
perform a memoriz-
ed speech from a play of their
ice This selection should be
approximately two minutes long.
Singers are also asked to pre-
sent one two-minute
tion in English, designed I
the voice at its best. All sing
auditions must be accompan
by piano. - pianist will be pro
vided tor those who do not h
their own accompan;
In addition to the acting
tion, dancers will be included in a
dance movement class by i
W alkei . The I st olon
choreographei I he will
given several combinations to ex-
ecute following an ample warm
up period. Training in ballet.
jazz, modem or folk dancing
would be especial! helpful No
prepared material is necessary tor
dance auditions.
A limited number ot actor and
technician positions that draw
i ford important

kno
betwe mic and pro
fessional tl rop profi
, ol the
vill si
ductions
� h
directed entirelj b The I ostol-
oilwing the Feb. 2 audi
in Ma outs will be
the Southeastern 1 heatre
auditions in Iampa.
Florida on Match 7-9 and at the
Ihitdooi Drama audi-
i hapel Hill, N on
1 he 45th season of The Lost
( olony will run from June 14 to
Angus' 23. Rehearsals foi prin-
actors will begin Ma 23;
full company rehearsals will
begin on Max 2
I oi more infoi mation call
4 7 3 2 12 7.
Trivia, Trivia, Trivia
1 W ho won an Oscar for her role as the eccentric passenger in Air-
port
2. Who composed the music for Chariots of Firel
3 Who was the World Series MVP in 1975�
4 What was the longest running western in television history ?
5. What character did Tom Selleck portray in "The Rock ford
Files?"
6. How many counties are there in North Carolina?
7. Who portrayed Alex's girlfriend in The Rig ChilP
8. Who wrote the theme song for "Bosom Buddies
9. Who directed the 1954 version of Romeo and Juliet"1
10. Which female tennis player won the singles title four times in a
row ?
See Answer On Page 7.
Classifieds
WAVIH)
NEEDED
soroi '
i
60 PER HUN
PAR '
MAI ;
SUN'
FE-V
HAt
I
PER'
nDA BE
SIGMA PHI El
Use
Class
TL
JL
DAYTOK
Beach!
Go with the
been a great
past :
full accon
beachfront
c h e ii e 111 (.
because space
For those
alreach signed up
balance are
week! Call D
752-5588 or K
752-9732.
��- i

.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 19, 1985 7
1985 Page 6
'at Morita
g m work he explained.
Days he starred in the short lived
e half-hour sitcom was one of the first
on with only five episodes shown.
Blansky's Beauties" opposite Nancy
pa in less than a season,
s with a role in Midway, the drama
War 11 naval battle, the never release
starring Jerry Lewis and Savannah
iarate Kid.
to produce, direct and make more
leuel to The Karate Kid.
re Combines
Student Talent
all of whom share the movement
and the sound at various times.
Garza emphasizes rhythm with
the use of the vibes and various
other percussion instruments that
double as scenery pieces.
Traditional ballet will be
represented in a work
choreographed by Broadway and
film veteran Mavis Ray, who is
also a member of the dance facul-
ty at ECU. Inspired by the draw-
ings and paintings of Swedish ar-
tist Carl Larsson, Ray has cast 18
dancers in a piece that shows a
charming episode in the life of
the Larsson family: a birthday
party for the eldest daughter. Her
choreographic talents in tap
dance will also be featured in a
piece she calls "pure fantasy
Using the music of Billy Joel and
The Temptations, nine ECU
dance majors will "camp it up in
a rag-bag of fun
jf
lion
ex-
in-
:nt.
lool
in
md
rs"
ro-
jen-
jd a
Ion.
fcn a
me
Jmy
llive
)ger
jart
Rounding out the evening will
be a parody of a typical MTV
video: "Street Opera
Choreographed by Jerome
Jenkins, visiting instructor in jazz
dance, this is a thematic piece
featuring 23 dancers who per-
form numerous stock characters
most commonly associated with
the big city street life: the bag
lady, punk rockers, motorcycle
gangs, mafia members and street
walkers. Said Jenkins, "Our
costume designer has had a ball
with this because it calls for such
colorful dress: oversized hats,
feathers, sequins and lots of
glitz The music is from the
popular contemporary team,
Ash ford and Simpson.
Reserved seat tickets are on
sale at the McGinnis Theatre Box
Office from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Reservations can be made by call-
ing 757-6390.
rivia, Trivia
pr role as the eccentric passenger in Air-
c for Chariots of Firel
es MVP in 1975?
ming western in television history?
Selleck portray in "The Rockford
here in North Carolina?
rl friend in The Big Chill?
lg for "Bosom Buddies?"
;rsion of Romeo and Juliet?
yer won the singles title four times in a
inswcrs Ob Page 7.

Classifieds
WANTED
NEEDED: A middle-aged single
lady to be a live-in house mother for
sorority on campus starting May 1
or June 1. Contact Stephanie for in-
formation at 756-8622 after 6.
60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
PART-TIME PERSON: Needed to
answer phone 8:30 am- 12:30 Mon-
Fri. Light typing required. Call
7586200.
MALE ROOMMATE: Wanted for 3
bedroom house, own room plenty of
space, pets encouraged. No deposit.
355 5318.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Program
Director, Waterfront Directors, Ac-
tivity Director, Head Counselors,
Cabin Counselors, and Activity
Leaders for YMCA co-ed camp.
Camp Kanata, Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, NC 27587. (919) 556-2661.
FEMALE GRAD STUDENT: Seeks
serious student or professional
roommate. Two bedroom
townhouse, $147.50 rent & Vi utilities.
Call 758-9941. Keep trying.
WANTED: A fast delivery business
that will deliver favorite foods
quickly and cheaply. This is no joke.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS:
Men and women. Two overnight
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mountains have openings for many
counselors in tennis, waterfront
(WSI, sailing, skiing, small crafts),
all team sports (baseball and
basketball), gymnastics,
artscrafts, pioneering, music,
photography, drama, dance,
generals. Write: Professor Bob
Gersten, Brant Lake Camp, 84
Leamington St Lido Beach, NY
11561.
PERSONAL
PANDA BEARS' REVENGE: We
won! Last Sunday, we showed that
we don't quit and most importantly
that we have spirit. Keep it up! It's
great to be a part of Alpha Omicron
Pi.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Midweek
BASH Pantana Bobs. Half-price
memberships and $2 pitchers. Tee-
shirt raffles! 9-1 Wednesday.
RUSH: The Big Brothers of Alpha
Phi Sorority will be having their spr-
ing rush this Thursday, Feb. 21st at
The Treehousefrom 4 to 7. It's only a
nickel for your favorite draft beer,
so come on out and meet everyone.
PARTY: The Big Brothers of Alpha
Phi Sorority will be having a happy
hour tonight at The Elbo Room- it's
10t draft night, so come cout loose
and have a jammin time with the big
brothers and sisters of Alpha Phi.
STEPHEN: Thank you for always
being there and loving me these past
4 years. You've really showed me
what love is. You are the sunshine
that always keeps a rainbow near!
I'll love you forever! -Angie
BECKY: Have you heard of the
latest jokes? "The Joke's on Us"
delivers food and jokes to your
doorstep.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT IN THE
COLD: Greeks who haven't arrang-
ed for a group photograph call or
come by Buccaneer office Tues. or
Thurs. 2-5 p.m. 757-6501.
KIM AND VAL: Boy this year has
sure been busy. I miss you. Love,
Kris
CONGRATULATIONS DELTA
ZETA: On winning the Most
Outstanding Sorority Award for the
second year in a row! Lef s keep up
the good work!
SWEET PETE OF THE YELLOW
HOUSE: Hope you have a great
Valentine's Day. Try not to party too
much! -J.E.
HEY-HEY "WALLY You're In
credible! Happy 21st! What kind of
mischief can we get into now?!
"Leave it to Beaver" P.S. Happy
Val. Day
HAPPY VAL. "NINY" AND JOHN:
It's a rare and special thing to find a
friend who will remain a friend
forever. Thanks- Your R.A.
CAROLINA SUCKS: If you dislike
Carolina: Sig Ep Golden Hearts are
selling "Carolina Sucks" bumper
stickers in front of the Student Supp-
ly Store & around campus.
HEY BIG CHEESE We like Guda
and Portwine. What do you prefer?
Remember BYOC! -J.E.
CDK AND SUGARBRITCHES:
Hope you both have a fantastic
Valentine's Day. You're terrific. -E
JILL: Those flannel pajamas make
you look so sexy. You need to wear
them over to the yellow house
sometime and party with us.
Use The
Classifieds
They
Work!
AS$
presents
DAYTONA
Beach
Go with the trip that has
been a great success for the
past 3 yrs. We guarantee
full accomodations at a
beachfront hotel with kit-
chenettes. Call now
because space is limited.
For those who have
already signed up, account
balances are due this
week! Call Dean at
752-5588 or Kevin at
752-9732.
RIDE NEEDED TO DETROIT: For
spring break. Please call Kathy at
758-8016.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT IN THE
COLD: Greeks who haven't arrang-
ed for a group photograph call or
come by the Buccaneer office Tues.
or Thurs. 2-5 p.m. 757-6501.
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick-up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call. 758-3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save $.50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla-
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4-speed,
low mileage. Only one owner. Gets
good gas mileage- call after 5:30,
758-4689.
ATTENTION: GRADUATES &
SENIORS: Special discount rates
and financing. Encyclopedia Britan-
nica. For free presentation call
758-4155.
STUDENTS: Will do your taxes for
reasonable price. Reduced rates for
students. $5 for state, $5 for federal.
Call Doris 355-2510 after 6.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec-
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 756-4664,evenings or
752-6106 days.
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752-0998, ask
for Robert.
FOR SALE: 29 gallon aquarium
with full hood, wood stand,
undergravel filter, air pump, exter-
nal power filter (150 GPH), ther-
mometer, heater. All for $100. Call
752-9740.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted:
Responsible party to assume small
monthly payments on spinetconsole
piano. Can be seen locally. Write:
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O. Box 520,
Beckemeyer, IL 62219.
FREE LADIES CAR CARE
CENTER: At Goodyear Tire
Centers located at 729 Dickinson
AVe. and West End Shopping
Center. 752-4417 and 756-9371. Please
call for reservation. Limited enroll-
ment. Wed Feb. 20, 1985 from 7 to
9:15 p.m.
East Carolina
Dance Theatre
East Carolina Playhouse
McGinnis Theatre
February 20-23 - 8:15 pm
ECU Students: $3.00
General Public: $4.00
Call 757-6390
SOFT CONTACTS
DTULYWtAR $40.00pair
EXTKNDL.I)
WEAR $60.00paiH
TINTED $70.00Pa'f
(blue. aqua.
green, brown)
STUDENT ID REQUIRED
'IhefAovt' prices do noi include lees lor professional serua'v
Prolessionl lees depend on lens lpe and your previous soft
Jens experience
Call for more information � 756-9404.
OnOMEINC
�YECAR6C�NT�R
Drs Hollis '� Subal
ton Annex 22H Greenville Blvd.
!?mmwwmvw
Budget
Budget Lives Up To Its
Name At Spring Break
Let Budget take you on
its 5 or 8 Day Beach
Getaway Special
Call 756-8432
203 WEST
GREENVILLE
BLVD.
In the lobby of the
Sheraton
Budget rents to qualified drivers 19 years or older.
Call 756-8320
Use your SEARS Charge Card
$
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
DataWorks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes, and more. All work
Is computer-checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, In-
cluding paper. (Call for specific
rates.) Call Mark at 757-3440 after
5:30 p.m.
POINSETTIA BEACH INN: On the
Ft. Lauderdale strip and ocean.
Special spring break rates for
students of ECU. Call 1-305-527-1800
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND: A great service for
students and non-students.
Deliveries from Burger King,
Western Sizzler and Villa Roma.
Call "The Jokes on Us" 757 1973.
LOST: Brown leather wallet in Arl-
ington Blvd. BB & T parking lot.
Pleas call Dale: 758-1151.
LOST: Tabby cat with gold eyes. Ap-
proximately I yr. old and weighs 5
lbs. Answers to the name DOOSE
Call 752-0551 June Gunter or
758-4265 - Alpha Phi House. Reward
offered.
OFFER
GOOD
THRU
SUN
FEB. 24
Av
Corner of 4th & Reade
Downtown
S � N O i
Free Delivery
Ham & Cheese No. 1
OR Turkey & Cheese No. 10
Ham, Salami & Cheese No. 3
$2.69
Coupon valid on deliveries
& at Substation
11 AM-11 PM
752-2183
SVQghtclub
presents
Wednesday
The Brand New Ladies' Zoo
Featuring the
Ladies: Free Admission and Free Draft & Wine from 8:00-10:00.
Men admitted at 10:00. SO' Draft. S2.00 Pitchers & 2 for I Highballs.
Come on out and parry with the ECU Golden Girls
at your favorite nightspot. Beau's . . of course
Phone 756-6401 Located in the Carolina East Centre
Beau s is i private club for members and their guests 1� & over
All ABC Permits Memberships available at the door
Friday: The last 2 (iris will be picked for Ms Beau of Februart
Finals will be Thursda. Feb. 2th. Be There:
I Can you jam with Bubba? Find out soon: OL11"IL'lLlLlLlLli'ILl!
a'VmMWy,
Put your degree
to work
where it can do
a world of good.
Your first job after graduation should offer you
more than just a paycheck. We can offer you
an experience that lasts a lifetime.
Working togethei with people in a different
culture is something you'll never forget It's a
learning experience everyone can benefit from.
In Science or Engineering, Education, Agricul-
ture, or Health, Peace Corps projects in de-
veloping countries around the world are
bringing help where it's needed.
If you're graduating this year, look into a uni-
que opportunity to put your degree to work
where it can do a world of good. Look into
Peace Corps.
RECRUITERS WILL SE ON
CAMPUS FEBRUARY 19 AND
20 IN THE CAREER PLACE-
MENT OFFICE, RLOXTON
HOUSE. SIGN UP TODAY!
X "l0ni0immmi0m.m �00umni'n�' � ��-�-�
� - -
. mbh, -4�- -W-n� �� ������ ��� ��'





rHEEASTCAROl 1N1AN
Sports
FEBRUARY 19, 1985
Page 8
Lady Bucs Clinch Conference
l H Humbert - ECV Photo Lab
nnette Phillips (34) scores on the inside as Lisa Squirewell (31) and
Monique Pompili (14) watch, in their victory last night
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The Lady Pirate basketball
team, behind 21 second-half
points from Sylvia Bragg,
defeated James Madison 61-57
last night in Minges Coliseum.
The win over the second-place
Dukes assures ECU of the regular
season championship in the
EC AC South. They will also get a
bye in the conference tourna-
ment.
The contest was nip and tuck in
the opening period with nine lead
changes in the first half.
A Julie Franken jumper from
six feet, with 2:48 remaining in
the half, gave the Dukes their big-
gest lead of the contest at 23-18.
Two Anita Anderson foul
shots with 2:14 left, followed by a
Monigue Pompili follow shot,
put the Lady Pirates within one
at 23-22.
After a JMU basket, two free
throws by Lisa Squirewell and a
layup by Anderson sent ECU to
the lockerroom with a 26-25 ad-
vantage.
In the early moments of the se-
cond half, the Dukes opened up a
four-point lead (32-28) with 17:02
left to play.
A Bragg jumper followed by a
Lorainne Foster bank shot, tied
the score at 32-32.
James Madison coach Sheila
Moorman, sensing a shift in the
momentum, called time out to try
to settle her team down.
Two Bragg jumpers, with a
30-second shot clock violation by
the Dukes in between, put the
Pirates up to stay (36-32).
"The thirty second call was the
turning point in the game ECU
coach Emily Manwaring said. "It
really changed the momentum
From there on, it was all ECU
as the Lady Pirates built up as
much as a nine-point margin on
two occasions, before settling for
their final four-point margin of
victory.
Bragg, who led the Lady
Pirates in scoring with 25 points,
scored 21 of the last 29 points for
ECU, to help put the game away.
"I told Sylvia (Bragg) to go
ahead and shoot, don't worry
about dishing the ball off Man-
waring explained. "The defense
was so spread out, trying to deny
the pass � that the shots were
there
Also in double figures for ECU
was Lisa Squirewell with 13, and
Foster who finished with 11.
The Lady Pirates forced the
Dukes into 16 turnovers, while
limiting them to only 37-percent
shooting. Manwaring felt that the
defense was the major factor in
the ECU win.
"Our number one goal was to
play good defense, and I think
our defense did it for us
tonight she said. "I think we
did a good job of at least getting
a hand in their face nearly every
time they shot
The ECU defense limited JMU
center Alisa Harris to only five
points in the game, on one for
seven shooting from the field.
"Annette Phillips, Alma
Bethea and Anita Anderson all
did a good job defensively
Manwaring said. "Anita (Ander-
son) played with a broken finger,
and Alma (Bethea) played despite
being in the infirmiry yesterday
The win was the 15th in a row
for ECU, and leaves them with a
17-8 overall record and a perfect
10-0 in the EC AC South.
Saturday Feb. 16, 1985
The Lady Pirate Basketball
team defeated William & Mary
on Saturday 74-57, using their
fastbreak to pull away from the
out-classed Indians.
ECU scored on 19 out of 25 at-
tempts on the fastbreak, but also
had 26 turnovers in the contest.
Despite the 17-point margin,
ECU coach Emily Manwaring
was not too happy with her
team's performance.
'I don't think we played as
well as we should have against a
team of this caliber she said. "I
never felt they were in the game,
but we should have beat them by
double what we did
The Lady Pirates led 40-31 at
the half, behind Sylvia Bragg's 12
first-half points.
With ECU up 42-31 early in the
second half, the Indians had their
last run, cutting the margin to
four points at 42-38.
Lorainne Foster then con-
verted a layup off the Lady Pirate
fastbreak with 17:28 to be
played, starting an ECU run.
A Victoria Watras layup off a
pass from Foster, followed by a
Anita Anderson layup, had the
Lady Pirate lead back to 12
(50-38).
A basket by Debbie Wade with
9:04 to be played in the contest,
made the score 56-48. But the In-
dians could get no closer, as ECU
outscored the Indians 18 to nine
to pull away for their 14th con-
secutive win.
Once again ECU displayed a
balanced scoring attack, with
three players in double figures
and two more finished with nine
points.
Bragg and Foster, each scored
12 points to lead the Lady Bucs.
See LADY, Page 10
Pirates Lose To Midshipmen And Spiders
By SCOTT COOPER
opori'� rditnr
Vernon Butler and David
Robinson combined for 27 points
to pace the Naval Academy to a
76-66 conference victory over
ECU.
With the win. Navy picked up
us 20th victory of the season.
Navy, now 20-4 overall, has
won at least 20 games in back-to-
back seasons. This is the second
time in the history o' the Naval
Academy, that the Midshipmen
have reached this illustrious goal.
Navy jumped out to an earl
12-2 lead behind the strong inside
play o Robinson. The Pirates'
first basket came on a Willam
Grady dunk at the (14:58) mark.
However, the drought didn't last
long as ECU started hitting their
jumpers and began beating Navy
down the court.
A Curt Yanderhorst steal and
slam dunk cut the Midshipmen
lead to 21-16 at the :30 mark of
the first half. From this point.
Navy rallied to outscore ECU
13-4 over the last seven minutes
c f the half. Navy was up 34-30 at
the intermission.
Despite the Pirates' cold
shooting, Grady scored ECU's
first eight points of the second
half. This wasn't quite enough as
the Midshipmen took control,
56-32 on Butler's three-point
play.
The never-quitting Pirates
slowly trimmed the Navy lead �
playing good defense and hitting
key shots. When Dixon assisted
Grady for a layup off the break,
ECU cut the Midshipmen lead to
64-54 with under four minutes
left to play.
The Pirates got within seven
points (67-60) on a Grady steal
and layup. Though clutch free
throw shooting by the Mid-
shipmen (the ECAC South's se-
cond best free throw shooting-
percentage team) enabled Navy
to cruise to a 76-66 victory.
Vanderhorst led all scorers
with 26 points. Grady tied his
career-high with 24. Keith Sledge
and Roy Smith added six points
apiece.
Saturday Feb. 16, 1985
Despite a late comeback and a
career-high 30 points from Curt
Vanderhorst, the Pirates fell to
ECAC South rival Richmond
University, 63-60.
Junior John Newman led the
way for the Spiders with 23
points. The all-ECAC South
selection also grabbed eight re-
bounds. Freshman center Peter
Woolfolk and Kelvin Johnson
had 14 points apiece. John Davis
grabbed a game-high nine re-
bounds, but was held to just two
points on the evening.
Although the Pirates fell
behind by 11 points early in the
second half, ECU battled back to
cut the lead to two points on
three separate occasions.
Coach Charlie Harrison felt
that the Pirate comeback was
mainly due to good defense.
"Our defense did the job for
us Harrison said. "It enabled
us to get back (in the game), our
missed shots cost us the chance to
win.
"This was a good college
game Harrison continued.
"Our kids gave one heck of an ef-
fort
The Pirates jumped out early
to take a 4-0 lead on a Leon Bass
10 foot?r with 18:51 remaining in
the first half. The Spiders
retaliated behind the sharp
shooting of Newman, outscoring
left. ECU then went scoreless
over the next three minutes. This
drought enabled Richmond to
jump to a 27-18 advantage.
However, ECU battled back and
cut the lead to 34-30 at intermis-
sion.
The second half started slow
for the Pirates. ECU got their
ECU 14-4 over the next four
minutes.
William Grady, Vanderhorst,
Herb Dixon and Keith Sledge
each nailed jumpers to bring the
Pirates to within two, 16-14 mid-
way through the first half.
The teams traded baskets over
the next three minutes. A
Vanderhorst jumper "it the
Spider lead to 21-18 with 7:48
first basket at the 16:19 mark,
when Bass turned an offensive re-
bound into a score. The Pirates
then got on track as a Sledge
16-foot jumper cut the UR lead
to 45-40 with 13:13 remaining to
play.
The Spiders went on to open an
eight-point lead (54-46) with 5:04
left to play. The Pirate defense
suddenly tightened. Vanderhorst
then scored eight points as ECU
outscored Richmond 10-4, cut-
ting the UR lead to two (58-56)
with 2:22 remaining.
After Johnson hit a jumper,
Dixon assisted Vanderhorst for a
20 footer. This cut the UR lead to
60-58 with :44 seconds left.
However, two clutch free throws
by Greg Beckwith gave the
Spiders a four-point cushion, as
Richmond defeated ECU 63-60.
The Pirates did play better in-
side, as they grabbed 31 rebounds
� eight on the offensive end.
Coach Harrison felt that the im-
provement was definitely ap-
parent.
"We played better and didn't
get killed on the boards he
said. "When they get that many
rebounds, they've had a produc-
tive night. I wish they could have
done it all year
Aside from Vanderhorst's 30
points, Grady added 10. Roy-
Smith, Bass and Sledge each
chipped in six for the Pirates.
Though Dixon scored just two
points, he dished out 12 assists �
just one off the school's record.
ECU travels to Washington,
D.C. to battle American Univer-
sity on Thursday Feb. 21. They
will play their final home-
conference game on Saturday
Feb. 23 at 7:30 pm.
Pirate Football Looks Good
With Baker 9s First Recruits
Golfers Look To Palmetto
By RICK McCORMAC
( (i-Sporis Kdiiitr
The ECU golf team finished a
disappointing 21st out of 24
teams in the Hilton Head Learn-
ing Center Golf Tournament,
over the weekend.
UNC finished first in the three-
day tournament, followed by
Georgia Tech and host Clemson.
Walt Chapman of Tennesee
took the individual title, while
Jerry Hass of fourth-place Wake
Forest was second.
The leading finishers for the
Pirates were Mike Bradley and
Paul Steelman. both
sophomores.
Although the finish was the
worst for a Pirate golf team in
two years, ECU coach Bob
Helmick was not too upset with
his team's play.
"I'm not too disappointed, we
just played bad Helmick said.
"We only had a couple of days to
practice due to the weather, and
as the old saying goes 'we stunk
the place up
The tournament was the first
of the spring season and Helmick
feels the poor performance can
be of some help to ECU in future
tournaments.
"It will help motivate us to
prepare for the upcoming tour-
naments he said. "It was pro-
bably the worst we've played in
two years and it will probably be
the worst we play this year.
"We lost to some teams that
we've beaten year in and year
out, and we will continue to beat
them he continued. "We are
capable of playing much better
golf and we will play better
The next tournament for the
Pirate golfers will be The Palmet-
to Intercollegiate Golf Tourna-
ment, which runs March 8-10 at
Santee, S.C.
The Palmetto will be ECU's
first match against District III
North competition. Included in
the field will be: UNC, Duke,
Wake Forest, NC State, Clem-
son, South Carolina, Furman,
Maryland, Kentucky and The
Citadel.
How the Pirate golfers fare in
district III competition will deter-
mine whether or not they go to
the NCAA tournament later in
the spring.
New ECU football coach Art
Baker has signed 17 players.
Along with the previous signees,
The Pirates announced its 1985
football signings.
ECU had 21 scholarships
available under NCAA rules, and
planned on signing no more than
18 players early during the of-
ficial signing period. The other
three (available scholarships) are
to be saved for players who make
late decisions, whom Baker feels
worthy of signing.
Below is a list of those who
signed:
Reggie Mckinney, 5-10,
185-pound running back from
Southern Wayne High School in
Mount Olive, NC.
Cedric Ray, 6-3, 215-pound
tight end-linebacker from E.E.
Smith High School in Fayet-
teville, NC.
Steve Englehart, 6-1,
220-pound linebacker from St.
Vincent-St. Mary's in Akron,
Ohio.
Willie Lewis, 5-9, 175-pound
running back from Valdosta
High School in Valdosta, Ga.
Joe Holmes, 6-4, 220-pound
tight end-linebacker from
Manteo High School in Manteo,
NC.
Travis Hunter,5-10,
175-quarterback from West
Orange High School in Winter
Garden, Fla.
Carl Carney, 6-2, 225-pound
defensive lineman from Brooklyn
Casey High School in Columbia,
SC.
Steve Salva, 6-3, 230-pound
lineman from Dunwoody High
School in Dunwoody, Ga.
David Carr, 6-5, 220-pound
tight end from Franklin High
School in Reisterstown, Md.
Terrel Britt, 6-0, 220-pound
linebacker from Bethel High
School in Hampton, Va.
Ricky Torrain, 5-9, 170-pound
defensive back from Orange
High School in Rougemont, NC.
Tim Wolter, 6-2, 190-pound
defensive back-punter from East
Wake High School in Wendell,
NC.
Lynn Porcher, 6-2, 180-pound
defensive back- quarterback
from Hillcrest High School in
Dalzell, SC.
Stuart Southall, 6-1,
248-pound offensive lineman
from Baldwin County High
School in Miledgeville, Ga.
Brad Walsh, 6-1, 185-pound
quarterback from Summerville
High School in Summersville,
SC.
Compton McCurry, 6-1,
210-pound linebacker from Sum-
mersvile High School in Sum-
mersville, SC.
Burke Holtzclaw, 5-10,
165-pound quarterback from
Valdosta High School in
Valdosta, Ga.
Swimmers Victorious: Look To NCAA's
By TONY BROWN
Muff Writer
The ECU swim teams
displayed their readiness for the
NCAA postseason meets by roll-
ing over American University and
George Washington last
weekend.
The men finished their season
Friday against American with a
64-48 win, then unexpectedly
gained a forfeit over GW. The
women were even more im-
pressive as they beat American
66-46 and GW 84-56.
With Caycee Poust leading the
way, the women tied the longest
winning streak of four straight �
since the women's swimming pro-
gram was begun in 1977.
Poust took first place in the
200-individual medley and 100
backstroke against American on
Friday, then came back Saturday
to take the 200 butterfly and 200
backstroke against GW. She then
swam on the first place
400-medley relay team in that
meet.
Poust also qualified for the
NCAA postseason meet with her
2:14.4 time in the 200 backstroke.
The women's 200-freestyle relay
team added a new freshmen
record with a 1:42.1 time versus
GW.
Keith Kaut paced the men's
winning effort versus American
as he won the 50 and 100
freestyles. He then swam on the
first place 200 freestyle relay
team.
ECU's Kevin Hidalgo set a new
American University pool record
with a 1:58.3 time in the 200 but-
terfly in taking that event.
Kaut, Hidalgo, Bruce"
Brockschmidt and Chris Pitelli
added to the honors for the men
with a new ECU varsity record of
1:25.8 in the 200-freestyle relay.
"We simply continued the pace
we've maintained lately said
Coach Rick Kobe. "I couldn't be
more pleased. Caycee Poust and
Scotia Miller were absolutely
outstanding.
"I'm so proud of both the
men's and women's teams he
added. "They did a heck-of-a-
job
The men's win brought their
final record to 9-5, with only the
NCAA postseason event left. The
pair of wins by the women raised
their season dual-meet mark to
7-5, thus assuring a winning
season with only one regular
season meet left.
The two teams will each have a
two-year overall win streak. The
women will go for a new record
for consecutive-meet victories in
their final match this season. The
men now sport an impressive 15-3
season mark over the past 18
years.
The Lady Pirate tankers will
finish their regular season tomor-
row at William & Mary.
ECU Winners vs. American
Men
1000 freestyle: Chema Lar-
ranaga, 10:16.8.
200 freestyle: Bruce
Brockschmidt, 1:47.0.
50 freestyle: Keith Kaut, 21.8.
One-meter diving (required):
Paul Durkin, 170.
200 butterfly: Kevin Hidalgo,
1:58.3.
100 freestyle: Kaut, 47.9.
500 freestyle: Andv Cook,
4:51.4.
One-meter diving (optional):
Scott Eagle, 289.8.
200-freestyle relay: (Kaut,
Hidalgo, Brockschmidt, Chris
Pitelli).
Women
200 freestyle: Nancy James,
2:01.7.
200-individual medley: Caycee
Poust, 2:17.7.
100 freestyle: Chris Holman,
55.65.
100 backstroke: Poust, 1:02.1.
500 freestyle: Scotia Miller,
5:23.3.
One-meter divingtional):
Lori Miller, 199.
100 breaststroke: Jessica
Feinberg, 1:12.5.
200-freestyle relay: (Holman,
James, Jennifer Pierson,
S.Miller), 1:42.37.
ECU winners vs. George H ash
� omen
400-medley relay: (Poust,
Feinberg, Ellen McPherson
James), 4:08.5.
1000 freestyle: S.Miller,
10.43.1.
100 backstroke: Holman,
1:03.1.
200 butterfly: Poust, 2:12.9.
100 freestyle: Holman, 54.8.
200 backstroke: Poust, 2:14.4.
100 butterfly: Annette Burton
1:02.1.
200-individual medley Poust
2:16.5.
S,freestyle relay; (Holman,
S-MiUer, Pierson, James),
Bridgep
BRIDGEPORT, CONN (UPI)
� Not since P.T. Barnum took
Tom Thumb on tour has a show
from this city gained as much at-
tention as the one fans are calling
"Basket-Bol
All but one of the University of
Bridgeport's first 21 games was
sold out. People come not so
much to root for their teams as to
see Manute Bol, a native of
southern Sudan's Dinka tribe and
the talest basketball player in the
United States � if not the world.
"When I first came here they
look at me funny Bol said of
his classmates and fans. "But
now they don't care
Bruce Webster's job is much
like Barnum's was. His life has
changed for the better and worse
since Bol came on the scene.
Webster is Bridgeport's basket-
ball coach. He also is surrogate
father, friend and publicist.
"The difficult part for mc
handling his daily schedules so we
both can live Webster said.
"Constantly getting him to the
dentist, getting him to the foot
Mets'
New York (UPI) � The New
York Mets were the sort of team
to which the word "hapie
often was applied when new
ownership took over in March
1980.
"At the time I joined the club,
the farm system was not produc
ing major-league quality pia
as it did in the mid and late 60
said Frank Cashen, who took
over as the team's general
manager in 1980. "We knew
from the start our number-one
priority was to rebuild the farm
system
And rebuild they did.
On the eve of spring train
'85, the Mets shape up as a
powerful contender. They have a
bright young pitching staff led b
Dwight Gooden and Ron Darl-
ing, and a powerful batting order
featuring Gary Carter, Keith
Hernandez, Darryl Strawberry
and George Foster.
"If you look at it, three
through six (in the batting order).
we have the potential for 350 to
450 runs batted in firsi-
baseman Hernandez said.
"There's that potential
Credit the Mets' farm svstem.
U
i
hi
33
�A
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A simple end painless
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step in treating and correcting
many common ailments.
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whole new outlook, and the ne
soft lenses make rhem easier ft
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rakes to do it
HO
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home And there snotti
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Siving W. Greenville
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Hours:
11AM-1AM Sun-Thurs
11AM-2AMFn & Sat
Limtfea oefcver, areas D"vfs ra" j-vjefl
nw� t

f






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Page 8
erence
1 don't think we played as
It as we should have against a
am of this caliber she said. "I
?er felt they were in the game,
we should have beat them by
able uhat we did
'he idd Pirates led 40-31 at
e half, behind Sylvia Bragg's 12
-half points.
nth Ed up 42-31 early in tne
nd half, the Indians had their
run. cutting the margin to
- at 42-38.
nne Foster then con-
layup off the Lady Pirate
ik with 17:28 to be
starting an ECU run.
Victoria Watras layup off a
m Foster, followed by a
nderson layup, had the
Pirate lead back to 12
isket by Debbie Wade with
played in the contest,
.ore 56-48. But the In-
: get no closer, as ECU
he Indians 18 to nine
mil av i) for their 14th con-
ECL displayed a
ing attack, with
in double figures
inished with nine
oster, each scored
ad the Lady Bucs.
I D . Page 10
lers
'hey grabbed 31 rebounds
n the offensive end.
hat the im-
� ement wa definitely ap-
Irent.
We played better and didn't
.ed on the boards he
Ic "When they get that many
jounds, they've had a produc-
night. I wish they could have
lr year
from Yanderhorst's 30
Grady added 10. Roy
Bass and Sledge each
j in six for the Pirates.
lough Di.xon scored just two
he dished out 12 assists �
p OT1p off the school's record.
ivels to Washington,
to battle American Univer-
on Thursday Feb. 21. They
play their final home-
ace game on Saturday
2? at :30 pm.
s Good
emits
Torrain, 5-9, 170-pound
e back from Orange
� school in Rougemont, NC
im Wolter, 6-2, 190-pound
Fensive back-punter from East
ike High School in Wendell,
Ann Porcher, 6-2, 180-pound
Ifensive back- quarterback
m Hillcrest High School in
lzell, SC
tuart Southall, 6-1,
-pound offensive lineman
m Baldwin County High
lool in Miledgeville, Ga.
Irad Walsh, 6-1, 185-pound
irterback from Summerville
'h School in Summersville,
ompton McCurry, 6-1,
-pound linebacker from Sum-
Irsvile High School in Sum-
(rsville, SC.
Jrke Holtzclaw, 5-10,
-pound quarterback from
ildosta High Schoo' in
ldosta, Ga.
A's
vlillen, 1.12.37.
:C I winners vs. Gnorge Hush
tt omen
100-medley relay: (Poust,
inberg, Ellen McPherson'
ies), 4:08.5.
1000 freestyle: S.Miller
143.1.
JOO backstroke: Holman
13.1.
feOO butterfly: Poust, 2:12.9.
JOO freestyle: Holman, 54.8.
100 backstroke: Poust, 2:14.4.
00 butterfly: Annette Burton
.1.
lOO-individual medley: Poust
5.
p-0-freestyle relay:
Wler, Pierson,
1.
(Holman,
James),
1.
I
Bridgeport's ' 'Basket-
FEBRUARY 19, 1985
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. (UPI)
� Not since P.T. Barnum took
Tom Thumb on tour has a show
from this city gained as much at-
tention as the one fans are calling
"Basket-Bol
All but one of the University of
Bridgeport's first 21 games was
sold out. People come not so
much to root for their teams as to
see Manute Bol, a native of
southern Sudan's Dinka tribe and
the talest basketball player in the
United States � if not the world.
"When I first came here they
look at me funny Bol said of
his classmates and fans. "But
now they don't care
Bruce Webster's job is much
like Barnum's was. His life has
changed for the better and worse
since Bol came on the scene.
Webster is Bridgeport's basket-
ball coach. He also is surrogate
father, friend and publicist.
"The difficult part for me is
handling his daily schedules so we
both can live Webster said.
"Constantly getting him to the
dentist, getting him to the foot
doctor, getting him to the or-
thopedic doctor, making sure
that he eats well, making sure he
goes to the weight program, mak-
ing sure he gets his visa cleared
"People ask me how big is he,
I say, 7-foot-6, with sneakers 7-7,
the length of his leg is 48 inches,
his arm is 44 inches, his waist is
32 inches, he's missing 15 teeth,
he was born Oct. 16, 1963.
"I've got three kids of my own
and I couldn't tell you any of
those things about them
Webster added.
Of course none of Webster's
children is able to do the things
Bol does on a basketball court.
"I couldn't believe he blocked
my shot from the foul line is
the way Central Connecticut
State University guard Tony Lit-
tle summed up the feelings of
many of Bol's opponents this
season. In the game agianst
Central, Bol scored 28 points,
grabbed 15 rebounds and blocked
eight shots.
It was a typical performance.
With Bol averaging 23 points,
Draws
14 rebounds and eight blocked
shots per game, Bridgeport is
19-4 and atop the Division-II
New England Collegiate Con-
ference at 9-1.
"I like to play every day said
Bol, who began playing basket-
ball just five years ago. "I can
play two times a day. I'm not
thinking about the pros right now
� I just want to concentrate on
what I'm doing in college
Opposing teams cannot figure
out how to guard him or how to
shoot over him. Webster said one
opposing coach told his team not
to shoot within 15 feet of the
basket. He said one of the
coaches at New Hampshire stood
in the lane and swatted back his
players' shots with a broom to
prepare them for a game with
Bridgeport.
"C.W. Post practiced with
what they call a Bol stick. They
measured a player who was 6-5
and gave him a stick with a big
hand on it to make up the dif-
ference to 7-6 Webster said.
"Well, Manute blocked 12 Post
Mets' Farm System
Jonr V"krL- i TD1 HTi�. KT J �
shots and I think five New
Hampshire shots
Still, Bol believes other players
are able to take advantage of him
because of his dominating size.
"Sometimes referees don't call
the fouls and I get mad he said.
"But that makes me play better.
Like when I play against
somebody and he pushes me and
they don't call a foul. I don't
have to hit him, I play harder
Because of his height and
limited background in the United
States, Bol requires special atten-
tion off the court too.
"When he first got here, we
took two single beds and tied
them end to end, and we thought
we had a cure-all Webster said.
"But then a couple of weeks later
he came in and said he had a bad
back.
"So then the school housing
department bought an extra-long
queen size bed. It's 84 inches long
and he's 90 inches long, so if he
sleeps on it diagonally he's all
right
Bol came to the United States
from the Sudan National Team.
Before that, he lived with his
family, part of the traditionally
tall Dinka tribe.
Webster described the Dinkas
as a nomadic group of people
who raise cattle and travel to
wherever they can find water.
Only the larger cities in the Sudan
have electricity. The Dinkas,
Webster said, have no electricity
and live, for the most part, in
mud huts.
Former Farleigh Dickinson
coach Don Feeley noticed Bol
while he was touring Sudan. He
brought him and another player,
Bol's roomate and friend, Deng
Nihal, to the United States to
play.
"To some degree we're pro-
bably using or getting the benefits
of using Manute Webster con-
ceded. "But, at the same time we
are making a very legitimate ef-
fort to give him a solid education
and to Americanize him and
make him independent in this
country
Bol attends a special English
class for three hours every day
and hasn't missed a class while at
the university. But, he isn't so
good about his weight training
program or ' '3 special diet.
Bol's biggest problem is that
can't seem to eat enough to gain
the weight he needs to mix it up
inside with the bigger centers of
college basketball.
"I don't like a lot of the food
here Bol said in broken Engish.
"The food is the same (as in
Sudan), only they cook it dif-
ferent
Bol weighs about 195 pounds.
"He only likes steak, ham-
burgers, spaghetti and chicken
Webster said. "We tried giving
him this special diet with dif-
ferent sorts of vegetables to
balance it out, giving him 5,000
calories a day. He wont eat ithe
eats small amounts of food, three
or four times a day and he should
probably be eating five or six
times a day
New York (UPI) � The New
York Mets were the sort of team
to which the word "hapless"
often was applied when new
ownership took over in March
1980.
"At the time I joined the club,
the farm system was not produc-
ing major-league quality players
as it did in the mid and late 60's
said Frank Cashen, who took
over as the team's general
manager in 1980. "We knew
from the start our number-one
priority was to rebuild the farm
system
And rebuild they did.
On the eve of spring training
'85, the Mets shape up as a
powerful contender. They have a
bright young pitching staff led by
Dwight Gooden and Ron Darl-
ing, and a powerful batting order
featuring Gary Carter, Keith
Hernandez, Darryl Strawberry
and George Foster.
"If you look at it, three
through six (in the batting order),
we have the potential for 350 to
450 runs batted in first-
baseman Hernandez said.
"There's that potential
Credit the Mets' farm system,
a deep reservoir of talent.
It began last season, when the
rapid development of the pit-
ching staff helped the team to 90
victories, the most since the
"Miracle Mets" of 1969.
The jewel of the staff is
Gooden, who at the age of 19, led
the majors with a rookie record
of 276 strikeouts. The relief
tandem of Jesse Orosco and
Doug Sisk, all products of the
Mets' minor-league system.
Trades brought starters Darl-
ing from Texas and Sid Fer-
nandez from the Los Angeles
organizations. Both polished
their skills at the Mets' Class
AAA affiliate in Tidewater
before being summoned to New
York.
The addition of prospects such
as Calvin Schiraldi, who was 17-4
last year in the minors. Randy
Myers, the 1984 Carolina League
Pitcher of the Year and Roger
McDowell have rekindled
memories of the pitching-ritch
'69 Mets.
So deep is the talent that the
widely respected minor-league
newspaper, Baseball America,
voted the Mets the organization
See What You're Missing
A simple end painless
examination can be your first
step in treating and correcting
many common ailments.
Contact lenses can give you a
whole new outlook, and the new
soft lenses make them easier to
use than ever!
Hours by appointment.
Evening hours available. Call us
now.
10 Student Discount on
!enses & supplies whatever it
takes to do it.
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Optical Shop
Telephone
758 6600 or ?58 2592
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There's no place like
home. And there's noth-
ing like a fresh, hot pizza
from Domino's Pizza
delivered there in 30
minutes or less. Just call
no problem1
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A Campus:
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11AM-2AMFri. & Sat.
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Limited delivery areas. Drivers carry under $20 "1985 Dominos Pizza Inc
�.�,
of the year in 1984. It was the se-
cond straight year that the Mets
were named, as its 400-297 record
among six minor league teams.
Three of the teams won league
championships.
Aggressive scouting and expert
instruction work at every minor-
league level are dominant traits
of the Mets' farm system.
"Over the past five years, clubs
have gone a little college happy in
the amateur draft said Joe
Mcllivaine, the Mets' director of
player personnel. "My feeling is
that we've got great confidence in
our own instructors and can do a league clubs drooling � and the
better job than any college in- Mets trading to fill particular
structor at the developmental needs.
stK . "The trades we have made for
Joe (Mclhvaine) stresses that Carter (from Montreal) and Her-
we've got to scrounge, root out nandez (from St. Louis) have en-
any possible prospects said tirely involved players that the
Harry Minor, the club's special Mets have scouted and then sign-
assignment scout who is based in ed Cashen said. "If you know
Long Beach, Calif. "He's not
afraid to call you at five o'clock
in the morning and ask you to
jump on a plane that day to see
someone play
The result has been a surplus of
talent that has left other major-
there's capable replacements r
the system, it gives you a certain
amount of flexibility if you want
to make a deal
As New York battled unsuc-
cessfully to catch the Chicago
Cubs last season in the National
X
League East, the Mets were able
to bolster their roster by acquir-
ing veterans Bruce Berenyi from
Cincinati and Ray Knight from
Houston for several minor-league
prospects.
Now, with the addition of
power-hitting third baseman
Howard Johnson from the
Detroit Tigers, Cashen expects
the Mets to "contend for the East
title down to the wire
It's a far cry from 1980, when
Cashen inherited a team that was
coming off three-consecutive
last-place finishes in the NL East.

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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 19,1985
NCAA Documents
CHAMPAIGN, ill. (UPI) -
Newly released NCAA
documents, part of a broad in-
vestigation that resulted in sanc-
tions against the University of Il-
linois, contain unsubstantiated
charges against the school that
range from academic ir-
regularities to improper
recruiting inducements, some by
head coach Mike White.
White has denied the charges,
which were among 86 withdrawn
by the NCAA from the original
list of 171 allegations against the
Illinois football program. Still,
the unsubstantiated charges were
released by the university under
court order.
One recruit, whom the
documents say quit the team in
anger, said White suggested he
could arrange for a car and
clothing for the athlete in Cham-
paign. Another said White gave
him 100 dollars in cash.
And, the mother of a recruit
said White promised round-trip
plan tickets to Illinois' home
games so she could see her son
play.
In no case were there any ex-
planation of why the allegations
were dropped, but the documents
show conflicting testimony.
After a two-year investigation,
the NCAA ruled last summer that
Illinois was guilty of 85 infrac-
Depaul's Meyer
tions � most involving recruiting
� and it placed the football pro-
gram on probation for two years.
The university refused requests
to make public the documents
from the case, so Mini Media
Co which publishes the Daily II-
lini campus newspaper, filed suit
under the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act.
Circuit Judge Jack DeLaMar
ordered the papers released, and
the university produced edited
versions that did not contain
athletes names or the unsubstan-
tiated charges. DeLaMar than
ordered a complete disclosure
and the university complied.
The documents also contain an
unsubstantiated allegation by a
recruit that an assistant coach
took 17 biology exams for him
while he was enrolled at a junior
college.
The coach denied it and an of-
ficial of the college said the
charge was ridiculous because
"the kid failed the course � if
anyone cheated, surely he would
have passed
The same athlete charged that
an assistant coach arranged for
someone else to complete a test so
he could earn credits in a weight-
training proficiency course. The
coach also denied that.
According to the university's
investigation, conducted by
former federal judge Philip W.
Tone of Chicago, there was con-
flicting testimony in both cases
involving the junior-college tests.
The allegations against the
football program � some
substantiated and some not � in-
cluded providing transportation,
food, lodging, meals and per-
sonal items to athletes.
Though the NCAA did not
find that the individual allega-
tions against White were true, it
chastised him for not ensuring
that his assistant coaches also
abided by the rules.
The two-year probation cost Il-
linois an opportunity to play in a
bowl game last season and will
keep the Mini off television next
season. In addition, White's
salary was frozen for one year.
He was also barred from off-
campus recruiting for one year,
and he gave up 10 of his 30
scholarships this year.
After a term as an assistant
coach with the San Francisco
49ers, White took over a losing
Illinois football team in 1980. In
one year, he turned the program
around, and in 1984 he took Il-
linois to its first Rose Bowl in 20
years.
CHICAGO (UPI) � Joey Meyer
expected the pressure, but he was
looking forward to some fun as
well. Halfway into his first
season, as successor to his own
father as basketball coach of
DePaul, he is turning out to be
half right.
"If I had to pick at them so
far, that would be it � it just
hasn't been fun yet Meyer said.
"There's never been a time in the
lockerroom or practice when I've
been able to say to the kids, OK,
let's go and leave it at that.
"There's always someting tak-
ing the edge off, something to
struggle over, whether it's trying
to get the kids to play exactly the
way I set the floor, or getting
them to show up for pre-game
meals at nine o'clock instead of
one, two, or five minutes after
Joey Meyer inherited a team
loaded with blue-chip players.
Many of the players were
recruited by Meyer while he serv-
ed 10 years as an assistant to his
father, Ray Meyer, who retired
last year after 42 years as the Blue
Demons' head coach.
The Blue Demons opened the
season in a familiar position �
near the top of the rankings.
They escaped their first outing
with a shaky one-point decision
over unheralded Northern Il-
linois. Five straight victories hid
the problems, but DePaul was
unmasked at top-ranked
Georgetown and upset four days
later at Western Michigan.
Since then, the Blue Demons
have stumbled six more times on
the road � against Alabama-
Birmingham, Dayton, Louisville,
Loyola (of Chicago) and top-
ranked St. John's.
The Blue Demons have lost
five of their last six games, and
fallen out of the national rank-
ings.
The education of Joey Meyer
has been anything but fun.
"I just haven't been able to
solve the whole puzzle, to get five
guys playing well and playing
together on a given night he
said. "That's been the biggest
surprise. By this time of the year,
Tracksters Set Marks;
Prepare For IC4A's
By BILL MITCHELL
Stiff Writer
"A great performance by the
team said ECU coach Bill Car-
son about the Pirate Track
team's participation in the Bud
Light Invitational Track meet in
Fairfax, Va on Sunday.
Lee Vernon McNeil broke a
George Mason Field House
record when he finished first ir
the 55-meter dash. He had a time
of 6.15 seconds. This record tim
ranks him in the collegiate top
five in the 55-meter dash. Erskir
Evans finished in third place wi
a time of 6.28.
Craig White finished second
the 55-meter high hurdles with
time of 7.25. This broke an ECl
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3p.m5:30p.m.
SatSun. 1p.m5 p.m.
school record.
Chris brooks did a fine job in
the long jump, finishing in se-
cond place. This makes Brooks
one of the top contenders going
into the IC4A Indoor Champion-
ships in two weeks.
Phil Estes ran well in the
quarter mile and ended up with a
sixth place finish. Ken Daugherty
set a school record in the
600-yard run, but with the top-
notch competition, he ended up
in seventh place. Julian Anderson
also ran well in the race.
"We are really looking good
for the IC4A's Carson said.
"We have potential to do fairly
well
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9a.m5:30p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
ROUTECHANGE t
The SGA Transit will revert back to
its old operating schedule of the
Gold Route after 6 p.m. starting
Monday Feb. 18th.
REWARD
$200 CASH reward for informa-
tion leading to the arrest and con-
viction of the person or persons
who removed the purple and gold
banners from the lot of Joe Culliper
Chrysler Plymouth Dodge. All in-
formation will be held in the
strictest confidence. Anyone having
any information contact Garry
Singleton or James Phillips
756-0186.
I
I expected to be able to do that
He's trying. Still as trim as he
was during his playing days at
DePaul, and looking just as
studious behind tortoise-shell
glasses, Joey sits in the back of
the lockerroom after games, try-
ing to unscramble statistics and
young men's motivations.
He looks into their eyes for in-
tensity during practice and into
their souls in private meetings.
He remembers when he was more
"pal Joey" than "Coach Joe
He was a safe harbor back then,
an assistant the kids could talk to
when they were the center of one
of Ray Meyer's fabled storms.
He remembers how the clock
showed 0:00 when Dayton put in
the winning basket, where his
defenders weren't when
Alabama-Birmingham put on a
decisive scoring run. Also, he
remembers where his players
were supposed to be when they
broke curfew before the
Louisville game.
He understands better Mar-
quette's Rick Maierus telling him
First Year Difficult
the first year would be the worst.
North Carolina's venerated Dean
Smith telling him no one would
be sympathetic about a tough
schedule once the season got
started. The former coach and
TV commentator Al McGuire
saying referees almost never defer
to a rookie coach's protests.
Joey still looks considerably
younger than his 35 years, but
time and pressure are splitting the
differences in a hurry.
"I feel losing in my stomach
more than I used to and I thought
after some of our tournament
losses that would never happen
he said, referring to early round
losses in the NCAA tournament
in recent years.
"My family is just about my
only release from basketball.
When I get wound up, the first
thing I do is hug my little one
(4-year-old son Brian) and he
ends up helping me more now
than I help him.
"But my wife says I'm not
happy even when we win, and
that if I don't learn to enjoy it, I
won't be around for very long
A(p Big Brothers
present
rJ DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, Feb. 19, 1985
Admission $1.50
8:3u-l :00 AM
18yrs. $1.00
1(K DRAFT ALL NITE
0KT
present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 1985 8:30-1:00 AM
Admission $1.50 18 yrs. $1.00
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
X
315 Parkview Commons
Acron From Doctor Park
Open 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446
pucians
3
SGA ELECTIONS
The Following Positions
are Available:
President, Vice President,
Secretary, Treasurer
Filing Dates
Feb. 25 - March 1st
SGA OFFICE 8-5
Joey's father hung around
DePaul long enough (42 seasons)
to compile 724 wins, good for a
plaque in the basketball Hall of
Fame and the fifth spot on the
all-time Division I coaches vic-
tory list.
With his son's help, Ray built
the small Catholic university
under the "El" tracks into a na-
tional power.
That legacy was supposed to be
handed over intact when the
school's seventh head coach ap-
pointed No. 8.
"It's lucky we were father and
son. I'd hate to think what the
pressure would be like on
somebody else Joey Meyer
said. "He was so successful for
so long that there would always
be some second-guessing
Lady Pirates Win Again
Continued from Page Eight
Anderson was next with 11
points, and a game-high nine re-
bounds. Alma Bethea and Lisa
Squirewell each contributed nine
points to the Pirate attack.
Debbie Wade and Bridget
Kealey led the way for the In-
dians, each finishing with 16
points. Karen Jordan was the on-
ly other William & Mary player in
double figures with 15 points.
For the game, ECU out re-
bounded William & Mary 58 to
44, while holding the Indians to a
miserable 27-percent shooting
from the field.
ECU, who has never lost a con-
ference game at home in nine
outings, is now 9-0 in the ECAC
South and 16-8 overall.
ECU has not lost in over a year
to an ECAC South oponent and a
little complacency may have set
in.
"The past three games we
haven't dominated the way we
should. We've been playing just
good enough to win Man war-
ing said. "We need to start play-
ing with more intensity on
defense and we need to get more
pressure on them when they
shoot
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a taring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
60S E. 10ta St. GreeoYille, NC
BIRTHDA Y SPECIAL
at Greenville's Oldest Restaurant
Carolina Grill
Celebrating our 85th anniversary
Come by on your birthday and eat
breakfast FREEH
Breakfast anytime. From the Student
Center take 9th St. West � just a quarter
mile.
CORNER of 9th & DICKINSON
MONSAT. 6 am-3 pm Phone 752-1188
FREE Comic Captions
For a limited time, receive 15
comic captions free with every
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So take advantage of this offer
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 19, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 19, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.393
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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