The East Carolinian, February 14, 1985






(Earnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925


P
Thursday February 14, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Guest Economist Discusses
Growing Domestic Deficit
By BRETT MORRIS
Surf Writer
The general state of the U.S.
economy was the topic of discus-
sion at the first lecture in the
Fourth Annual ECU Lec-
tureSeminar Series. Guest
speaker Juanita Kreps, Secretary
of Commerce under former
President Carter and vice presi-
dent emeritus of Duke Universi-
ty, focused her speech on the
"state of tomorrow's economy
Luring her lecture, Kreps ad-
dressed the issues contributing to
the mounting federal deficit,
which currently stands at approx-
imately $200 billion. She at-
tributed the deficit to factors
such as the deregulation of some
industries, overseas trade deficits
and high unemployment in
"smokestack America
Kreps went on to say that in-
creasing technology and high
labor costs experienced by U.S.
industrie; in recent years are
limiting this country's com-
petitiveness in the world market.
She said lower labor costs in
developing nations and the high
value of the dollar abroad con-
tribute greatly to the U.S. foreign
trade deficit.
Kreps expressed great concern
over this contrast to the present
economic recovery. She said the
1981-82 recession was the worst
since the 1930s. The tightening of
the money supply by the Federal
Reserve Board raised interest
rates considerably, but was an ef-
fective anti-inflationary measure,
she said.
During her speech, Kreps plac-
ed much emphasis on the long-
term effects of the current
economic situation. She said "a
growing proportion of the U. S.
financial debt is being financed
by foreign purchasers of U.S.
securities This means interest
payments will flow out of the
country. She stressed that the dif-
ference between the current
deficit and previous deficits is its
enormous size and the fact that it
is being Financed by foreign in-
vestors through U.S. exports.
The Reagan administration has
pledged to reduce the $200 billion
deficit which now amounts to 5
percent of gross national product
to 2.6 percent of GNP by 1988
and "presumably after that to
disappear with the sunset
Kreps said. She added that
Reagan's decision to make
smaller reductions in defense
spending meant that the budget
schedule was immediately off by
more than $40 billion for 1987.
Kreps said American corpora-
tions are moving outside the
country due to the high cost of
productivity, contributing to "a
period of rising structural
unemployment and fewer job
openings for skilled blue-collar
workers
This translates into the fact
that U.S. manufacturers will
have to be more competitive in
the world market or they will lose
out to lower cost producers.
Concerning the outlook for
college students, Kreps took an
optimistic viewpoint. "Things
have never been better for the
Circulation 12,000
Cars, Beach Weekends
Likely Budget Victims
Kreps
well-educated, upwardly-mobile
youth She went on to say that
"the demand for their (college
students') skills and their educa-
tional components seem
endless
Kreps added that one misfor-
tune resulting from this
technological advance will be "an
acceleration of the inter-
generational gap in incomes and
opportunities This means that
previous blue-collar workers will
be hard-pressed to find a job due
to their lack of technological
qualiFications. In reality this will
create a profound change in the
nation's industrial commercial
complex
Kreps will conclude her three-
day visit to ECU with a lecture on
the international economy
tonight at 7:30 in Jenkins
Auditorium.
Student Leaders Oppose Age Limit
By DALE SWANSON
Staff Wriief
A resolution opposing a pro-
posal to raise the North Carolina
drinking age to 21 was passed by
the University c North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments recently.
According to SGA President
John Rainey. the act was passed
by the group � composed of the
16 UNC system SGA presidents
� in order to "call for hearings
on the proposed raising of the
drinking age to 21 Rainey said
the act is aimed at defeating a bill
introduced to the state House of
Representatives by Dan Lillie,
D-Lenoir County.
The bill was written in response
to a federal bill which would
mandate cuts in federal highway
funding for states not raising
their drinking age to 21. As of
yet, there has not been a similar
bill introduced in the N.C.
Senate.
The UNCASG resolution to
hold hearings on the bill cites a
variety of reasons for not raising
the drinking age. Rainey em-
phasized that raising the age
would unfairly limit individual
rights and have negative effects
on drinking habits. "We feel the
law would cause more problems
than it would solve Rainey
said.
The group's resolution cites
cases where an increased drinking
age was not effective in curbing
drunk driving. According to the
resolution, Maine, Montana and
Florida increased the drinking
age and also had an increase in
alcohol-related deaths among
their youth. In Minnesota,
studies show, traffic deaths
showed a four-fold increase
following the raising of the drink-
ing age.
Rainey said that possibly the
most effective argument given is
that, according to statistics from
1980-83, four of the states with
the best reduction in traffic
fatalities permitted drinking by
18 and 19-year-olds.
Rainey also noted that the law
would be discriminatory because
it would remove the right of some
people to consume alcoholic
beverages. Statistics used in the
resolution state that only 6.7-8.7
percent of accidents involving
drivers ages 18 to 21 are alcohol-
related, while 10.6 percent of ac-
cidents involving drivers 21 to 27
T. Boone Pickens spoke on the roles of shareholders
managers while appearing in Greenville Tuesday.
Students Need Not Worry
and corporate
By GREG RIDEOUT
MaaaflBf Editor
Oil Company chief and high-
stakes wheeler-dealer T. Boone
Pickens Jr. rode into Greenville
Tuesday, telling a standing-
room-only crowd at the Green-
ville Country Club that corporate
America is circling the wagons
around stockholders.
Pickens, 56, president and
chairman of the board of Mesa
Petroleum Co flew in to speak
to an ECU leadership develop-
ment class. The class, part of the
BB&T Center For Leadership
Development, met after Pickens'
speech to area businessmen.
Pickens said management is
scared. Corporate America is not
paying attention to its
stockholders, he says, and its
chiefs are getting fat while they
lounge around at the top. They
are particularly concerned about
two of the things that have made
Pickens a business legend:
and 8.9 percent of accidents with
drivers 45 to 54 are alcohol-
related.
"We feel that strengthening
current laws against drunk driv-
ing would be much more fair
Rainey said.
Rainey added that despite the
threat of a cut in federal highway
funding, N.C. Gov. James G.
Martin has gone on record as be-
ing against raising the drinking
age on the grounds that the
federal bill is unconstitutional
with regard to state's rights.
Rainey mentioned that,
although it is not a significant
amount, the revenue from
alcoholic beverage taxes that
would be saved by not raising the
age could be a factor in offsetting
See ASSOCIATION, Page 3
? Manager
mergers and acquisitions.
"The concern being expressed
in all these cases is that mergers
and acquisition activity is bad
he said. "Believe me, it's not
coming from the stockholders
Pickens, who has tried to take
over several companies � in-
cluding a highly publicized bid to
grab Gulf Oil, said stockholders
"love" takeovers. In fact, he ex-
plained, on the average they gain
30 percent on investments in
takeovers.
Pickens has always been
bullish on stockholders. His
whole business philosophy is
centered around them. Every
chance he gets, Pickens stresses
that chief executive officers at
large corporations, especially the
big oil companies, use their posi-
tion not to make money, but to
protect "their kingdom
"America's executives aren't
looking at takeovers as a means
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newt Editor
The only student loss as a
result of President Reagan's pro-
posed financial aid funding cuts
may be "a divestiture of certain
sorts: stereo divestiture,
automobile divestiture, three-
weeks-at-the-beach divestiture
according to William Bennett,
the new education secretary. Ben-
nett held a press conference Mon-
day.
"It's discouraging for people
in responsible positions to make
statements like that. The situa-
tion for most ECU students is
that they don't have a lot of extra
money to spend on frivolous
things said ECU Chancellor
John Howell. "The students here
are not generally so well off that
they can spend money on riotous
living
Reagan's 1986-87 budget pro-
poses denial of guaranteed stu-
dent loans to all students from
families with adjusted gross in-
comes of more than $32,500;
elimination of grants, work-study
jobs and other aid for those with
incomes of more than $25,000;
and limitation of student finan-
cial aid to $4,000 per year.
"In some ways this seems cold-
hearted, in others it seems
reasonable said Duncan Helm-
mrich, a spokesman for Bennett.
"Because of budget constraints,
the federal budget cannot con-
tinue to finance so that everyone
can go to the school of their first
choice � that's not a reasonable
request
Bennett said Monday that the
government should aim aid at
students "who might not other-
wise get to college at all" instead
of giving some students funding
to choose expensive private in-
stitutions.
"We can't afford to provide
everyone with a choice of
college Helmrich said. He add-
ed that he feels Congress "will
take a long, hard look at the
budget" and that "based on
history there will be many com-
promises
Helmrich also said there have
been both pro and con reactions
to the proposals and "quite a bit
of controversy He allowed
that, if the budget were to go
through Congress as proposed,
some students might be cut out
and some schools iorced to close,
but "we can't project into the
future
One result Helmrich does
foresee is a different set of pro-
cedures for determining aid
eligibility. "Schools may be finer
tuning machinery to focus on
those who need it most he said.
ECU Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo Volpe
said the effect of the cuts would
be "the elimination of people
who would have the opportunity
to go to school under the current
system.
"People from lower
socioeconomic groups will be
limited in their choice of universi-
ty he added.
"I think if the availability of
money is cut, whether in a grant
or loan, it might very well
discourage students who might
profit from education Howell
said. He added that the N.C.
General Assembly has stressed
the fact that education in their
First priority and "a college
education is worth something to
both people and the state.
A spokesman for Rep. Walter
B. Jones, D-N.C, said Jones has
an excellent voting record on
educational issues and recognizes
the need to make money available
to middle-income families. He
added that Jones will continue to
work to insure that individuals
who want and need to obtain a
college education will receive
one. There may be a financial
limitation, he said, but the
amount proferred by the ad-
ministration is "not fair
"The people administering the
education institutions of the
United States are going to work
very hard to keep some of these
proposals from going into
effect Howell said.
of enhancing shareholder value
he said. "They only look at
takeovers as a threat to their
salaries and their perks. And the
reason they perceive it this way is
that they generally own very little
stock in the companies that they
manage
Pickens is at present close to
shooting it out with such a com-
pany. Phillips Petroleum, of
which a Mesa-headed group owns
a 5.7 percent interest, has Pickens
tied up in a complicated business
deal. In the process, the stock of
the company is climbing towards
its assessed value. Management
has resorted to using the "the
poison pill" to prevent a takeover
bid by Carl khan.
The poison pill is a new is-
suance of stock when an acquiror
accumulates a certain percentage
of shares. This makes it harder
for an acquiror to to buy enough
shares to grasp control of the
By HAROLDJOYNER
Assistant News Editor
"A bachelor's degree at East
Carolina is definitely worth
something said ECU
Chancellor John Howell in
response to claims from the
Association of American Col-
leges saying the degree has lost its
value.
In a report made at their
meeting last week in Washington,
D.C the AAC expressed con-
cern with "the crisis in American
education as it is revealed in the
decay of the college course of
study and in the role of college
faculties in creating and nurtur-
ing that decay However, both
Angelo Volpe, ECU vice
ECU's Bachelors Program Sound
chancellor of Academic Affairs
and Howell agree that ECU
offers students a solid education
through general education re-
quirements as well as preparing
them for life.
"At ECU, our faculty is in
charge of selecting curriculum to
meet students' needs Howell
said. The AAC charges that
"students are shoppers and pro-
fessors are merchants of
learning Howell said he feels
ECU's faculty members are
"deFinitely commited to their
careers and have more personal
contact with students than at
most other institutions of higher
learning
ECU currently requires 44
semester hours of general educa-
tion requirements for all
students. "Considering that the
Association wants colleges to
upgrade their requirements, I
would have to say that ECU is
already up there Volpe said.
"The only thing we don't stress
as much, and we probably
should, is foreign language study.
"I feel that any amount of time
spent in college is worth your
time Volpe continued. "There
is no way to take away what so-
meone has learned. Therefore,
any student who graduates from
ECU is, in my opinion, qualified
for an entry level job position. It
is when they want to further their
education in relation to their
employment, that graduate
school becomes necessary to
them
Director of Career Planning
and Placement Furney James
said an employer usually looks at
the overall record of the student
and not just his academic degree.
"Employers are looking in-
dividually at the prospective job
candidate to see what courses
they've taken, if they're bright
and well-adjusted
"I was dismayed when the
report came out Howell said,
"because I feel the committee is
bringing attention to things that I
don't feel are warranted He
also said while some colleges are
offering cafeteria�type courses,
ECU is definitely above par in its
requirements.
company. To prevent bloated
management from doing this,
Pickens says, shareholders "must
stand up and claim their rights
now
Pickens' Fights have not only
left management's sins exposed,
but have left him a wealthy man.
His challenge of Gulf doubled his
company's war chest to $2.1
billion. His personal worth is
estimated at about $50 million.
Not bad for a man who started
out, ironically, with Phillips
Petroleum, quit in 1955, launch-
ed Petroleum Exploration in 1956
and by 1964 had made a killing.
Pickens believes there is only
one way to keep the free-
enterprise system going. "Our
priorities are clear, our decisions
simple � we do what is best for
stockholders
Luckily for the man from
Amarillo, what's best for them is
best for him, too.
Kreps Responds
ECU News Bureau
Juanita M. Kreps, a vice
president-emeritus of Duke
University and former U.S.
Secretary of Commerce, says
college students need their
stereos, cars and trips to the
beach.
"Don't do it. Don't give
them up Kreps told ECU
students attending a campus
lecture last night. "You need
them she said.
Kreps was replying to U.S.
Secretary of Education
William Bennett who said
students who lose government-
guaranteed loans to finance
their education may be re-
quired to give up their stereos,
automobiles and trips to the
beach.
On The Inside
�Did your favorite person
Announcements2 OU V�VILineI Tod?,y
Editorials 4 fa Valentine's Day after ail.
Entertainment Chec� g l0 W
Sports X everybody's reading, to see
aassifieds io wnetBW vou should reward
your sweetheart for doing the
proper thing or yell at them
for forgetting you.
?
�ii- i i m aw
' ' ' ii Haw
"� �����
��fc� m � �i �
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 1985
Announcements
�w-
Pre Professions!
Health Alliance
will have a meeting Thurs. Feb. U at 530
p.m. The meeting will be held in room 221 in
Mendenhall Student Center. Mrs Evelyn
McCarthy will be the special quest speaker.
One of her main topics will center on the
MED program held at UNC CH during the
summer All members and interested quests
are encouraged to attend. Refreshments will
be served
TKE Lil Sis Happy Hour
It's happy hour time! TKE lil' sisters are
having this one at Olde Towne Inn Thurs
Feb 14, from 7 10 p.m. Look for flyers
around compus Bring a Valentine for
special admission price!
Graduate Advisory Council
Just a reminder to all Graduate Advisory
Council members We will have a meeting
Thurs Feb. 14 at 4 p.m. in Brewster B 104.
Plese bring your copies of the Constitution.
We will be working on revisions.
Life Planning Workshop
This workshop is intended to provide
assistance to students unsure of the direction
they wish their lives to take The focus will
be lifestyles for the future Many people do
not think of themselves as having influence
on their futures, but rather, just let the
future happen Participants in life planning
will engage in a process of self examination
of present behaviors, goal setting and deci
sion making. The Life Planning Worlshop
will meet 18,20,22,25, from 3-4:30 pirn. 308
Wright Annex
Although advance registration is not re
quired, we would appreciate advance
notification of interest to insure that we have
adequate materials on hand Please contact
the Conseling Center in 307 Wright Annex
(757 6641) for further information or to let us
know you plan to attend
Coping With Stress
A free mini class of'ered bv the ECU
Counseling Center for Students You can
Identify sources of stress, make DOvfive
changes, manage your response to stressful
situations, learn to relax improve self con
tidence Mon Thurs Feb 18 21. l 2 p m 305
Wright Annex. No advance registration is
required. Call or stop by the counseling
Center for further information ;307 Wright
Annex. 757 6661)
River Study
The ECU Chapter of the Pamlico� Tar River
Foundation will meet at 7 p.m. Thurs Feb.
14 in room C 204 Brewster. A field project on
the lower Tar River will be organized.
Visitors welcome.
Buddhist Meditation
We'll have a meeting Thurs Feb 14 at 7 in
room E201 of the Physics Building. Bring a
cushion for meditation practice.
Pirate Walk
Ladies, If you do not have time to run during
the day then we have the answer for you:
Jogging escorts. The joggers will run Mon.
thru Thurs. from 6 to 8 p.m. Call pirate walk
757-6616.
Frisbee Club
The 'Irafes' begin practicing Mon Tues
Thurs at 3 and Sat. and Sun. at 2 bottom of
the hill. Meeting every Tues. night 9 MSC.
Stein was there!
SAB Meeting
The Student Athletic Board will meet Mon
Feb. 18 in room 221 of Mendenhall Student
Center at 4.
Summer Camp Jobs
Another location to learn of summer camp
jobs as counselors, lifeguards, and nurses is
the Career Planning and Placement Office.
Come in the Bloxton House and look in the
Summer Jobs Notebook and look on the Sum
mer Camp Board for more information.
Camps from throughout the US have an
nouncements there: Seafarer, Yellowstone,
Girl Scout Camps, YMCA. Camps in Maine,
Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Florida, and
more. Apply now.
Valentine Gift
i ooay is last day you'll be able to purchase a
carnation and or balloon for your loved one.
You can order there gifts for delivery
(Greenville area only) or buy them on the
spot at the Student Supply lobby. The
LSS(PRC) Society is sponsoring this sale.
Black History Month
Black History Month will feature Crawford
Loritts a dynamic speaker. Sun Feb. 17 at
7:30 p.m. in Hendrlx Theatre. He will be
speaking on 'Sensational Sex Also there
will be a fraternity step show. Admission is
free and everyone is Invited. Don't miss this
event.
Prime Time
Pirme Time sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ will be meeting in the Old Joyner
Library, RM 221 at 8 p.m. We will be return
ing to Jenkin Aud. next week and for the rest
of the semester. Please join us for fun,
fellowship and Bible Study.
CADP
Help promote responsible drinkingl Become
a part of CADP. There will be a meeting
Thurs Feb. 14 at 4 p.m. in Erwin Hall, rm
210. All interested persons please attend.
Lipsinc Contest
Phi Beta Sigma Frat. is sponsoring a Lipsinc
Contest. A $40 grand prize will be given
away. Anyone interested in being a contes-
tant must register with W.T. Rogers
(752-3686) by Feb. 15. A $1 reg. fee per person
per act is required.
Survey-Cultural Center
This week in the Student Supply Store and
throughout the various dorms, represen-
tatives from NAACP will be circulating a
survey regarding the Ledonia S. Wright
Cultural Center. Your input is of Major im-
portance so if you have not completed a
survey by Thurs call Wilma at 752-9201.
Your cooperation will definitely be ap-
preciated.
Spaghetti Dinner
Delta Zeta Sorority is having an all you-can-
eat spaghetti dinner at the Methodist Student
Center from 5:30 to 7:30 on Mon Feb. 18th.
Get a ticket for $2.50 from any sister or at the
door and come hungry!
Circle K
ECU Circle K Club invites you to come out
and loin us this coming and every Sun. night
at 7 p.m. In Mendenhall room 221 for fun and
socializing. Hope to see you there! The video
will be discussed.
Florida
Win a trip to Florida for spring break. Two
persons stay 4 days and three nights in
Orlando. Round trip air Kinston to Orlando,
transportation between airport and hotel. On
sale at the student's supply store Feb.
7,8,11-15. Winner will be announced Feb. 21.
Sponsored by the ECU school of Music's
Men's Glee Club
Omega Psi Phi Frat
presents a Valentine's Day Jam Thurs Feb.
14 at the Unlimited Touch. Young ladies who
wear red and white get in for 50 cents with
ID. There will also be a 9 11 happy hour.
Transportation will be provided by Van at
Mendenhall Student Center All proceeds go
to our National Achievement Week Pro-
gram.
ECU Surfing Club
There will be a meeting Tues Feb. 19 at 8 in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse. Yearbook pic
tures will be taken at the start of the meeting
so be on time!
BMBB�����
Budget
Budget Lives Up To Its
Name At Spring Break
Let Budget take you on
its 5 or 8 Day Beach
Getaway Special
Call 756-8432
203 WEST
GREENVILLE
BLVD.
In the lobby of the
Sheraton
Budget rents to qualified drivers 19 years � older.
Call 756-8320
Use your SEARS Charge Card

y

tzt
I
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Copyright 1985
Kroger Savon
Ouantltv Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat.
Feb. 16, 1985

S
DIET COKE, CAFFEINE
FREE COKE OR
BEER
x
2i '2
�i �t
Miller
Lite
k��&& v
12 OZ
Cans
$519
2 Ltr.
N.R.B.

REGULAR, AUCRATIN OR
HEARTY SEASONINGS - O GRADYS
Potato
Chips
$129
rcrtijoaan
�M
ASSORTED VARIETY
Totino's
Pizza
fCRI
CRISP CRUST!
Party Ptaa
�W
Gal.
Jug
CHILLED KROGER
Orange
Juice
$239
ITALIAN
Ea.
Submarine
Sandwich
$149
FANCY EASTERN
RED ROME OR
Red Delicious
Apples
�4fti

.c
J
7
FRESH BAKED
Italian
Bread
-V
Lvs.
DELI-BAKED
Heart-Shaped
Cake
, $2"
BOJA (5 OZ. PKG.I
stuffed crab
BUY ONE
GET ONE
&FREB
DELI-BAKED
Dozen Roses
SEA MAID 9 OZ. PKC.
Shrimp Cocktail
BUY ONE
GET ONE
FREE!
�3s
�CELEBRATE-
SPRING BREAK '85
Ft. Lauderdale -
16
on the beach
FT. LAUDERDALES PREMIERE
CONCERT AND DANCE CLUB
10 am to 6 pm POOLSIDE PARTIES
UVE O.J. EMCEEINQ POOLSIDE CONTEST � WATER VOLLEYBALL
TOURNAMENT � FREE BEER CHUG RELAYS � FREE T-SHIRT RELAVS
THE SEU.YFLOR CONTEST � AND CLIMAX THE DAY WITH THE
WETTEST, WET T-SHIRT COWTEST FEATURED IN PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
CASH FRIZES � FREE T-SHIRTS � AND OTHER GIVEAWAYS
7pmto8pm COLLEGE HAPPY HOUR
East Carolina University � Wed. March 6, 1985
I T O'CLOCK ANO � O-OJSC
COMPETE IN THE I
WITH MM COUJKM ID.
I ��B AMD DRAFT BEER - 7M
R CHUGOJNO CONTEST FOR TROPHKS,
EVENINGS
SUMMERS on the beach presents
FT. LAUOEROALE-8 FINEST ROCK 'N ROLL BAND NIGHTLY PLUS OUR
INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED O. J SPINNING THE BEST DANCE
MUSK AND ALL DAY. ALL NIGHT MUSIC VIDEO.
CUP AMD 3AE �CL"P ��0 IMfe
MONDAY:
East Carolina University
NIGHTLY EVENH -
Wed March 6 1985
"Best Bum on th
!llllHH���Hl�IU �m
SATURDAY:
Coma and Party m 3 AMI
Look tor National Concert Acts
VMao Music Night
�ana m aw aMt otmb �mm
! BAR OWN OR DRAFT
GOO� mem 7- PM MK5HTLY
mtmmmmtwmtmam-ama mmmmm Kuomnm acm. jmu � m o-m-i
(LocaM orm-titm Mock Norn of Lai Oka BM. on A1A)
LSPRING BREAK '85 J
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of tnese advertised items
is reauired to be readily
available for sale in each Kroger
Sav on except as speoficaiiv
noted m mis ad if we do run
out'of an item we will offer you
your cnoice of a comparable
item when available reflecting
tne same savings or a rameneck
whicn win entitle you to pur
cnase tne advertised item at
the advertised price within 50
days Only one vendor coupon
win oe accepted per item
DOZ.
FRESH CUT
long Stem
Roses
$2488
Go Krogering
SHOE SALE!
Lotto Jacki Sorensen Deluxe
Reg. $39.95 SALE $25.00
Converse Premier Velcro (Men)
Reg. $39.95 SALE $20.00
Nike Transit (Women)
Reg. $39.95 SALE $20.00
Nike Lady Rio
Reg. $22.95 SALE $12.00
Nike Bree (Women)
Reg. $24.95 SALE $12.00
New Balance 770 (Men & Women)
Reg. $72.95 SALE $40.00
New Balance 660 (Men & Women)
Reg. $53.95 SALE $35.00
Herman Survivors Orleans (Women)
Reg. $23.95 SALE $8.00
Also � A limited supply of brand
name tennis racquets at extremely low
prices Don't Miss Out
ga H.L.
HODGES
210 E. FIFTH ST
7S1-41M
Little Ef
5F�? Students who drink
and drive are stimulation-seekers
who are not likely to be deterred
by laws raising the minimum
legal drinking age, recent
research by a University of
Wisconsin team suggests.
Instead of trying to curb
students' adventuresome habits,
counselors should help students
find new ways to satisfy their
need for thrills, the researchers
say.
Their conclusions are based on
a study comparing student drink-
ing and driving habits with per-
sonality tvpes, says UW
psychologist Frank Farley, who
along with graduate student
Sharon McNeely conducted the
Association Lobb
Drinking Age Pn
study
They
likely
drive t
takers
novelri
experir
"TM
rules
kind
age dn
just cr
to reiei
Alt h
more
researJ
hkel;
characl
'Thl
the
Continued From Page 1
the loss. The resolution also notes
that several other states have
refused to raise their drinking
ages, despite the threatened
federal aid reduction.
The hearings that the resolu-
tion calls for are an attempt to in-
crease debate across the state on
the issue of the drinking age.
Rainey, along with N.C. State
University President Shannon
Carson, is involved in planning
the hearings. "We will probably
organize them regionally, rather
than having one on each of the 16
campuses Rainey said.
State government officials will
be asked to participate in the
hearings where people from both
sides of the issue will be en-
couraged to speak. "We would
Court Date
Postponed
For Students
Two ECU students charged
with assault inflicting serious
bodily injury in connection with
the beating of the programming
assistant at Belk Dorm on Feb. 1
had their court date postponed
Wednesday.
Joe Grinage, 19, and Robert
Cedric Green, 21, will now ap-
pear in court March 11 to face
charges of assaulting Michael
Pitts in a Belk dorm stairwell.
The two students have already-
appeared before the Honor
Board. Results of these hearings
are not made public.
Grinage, a member of the
Pirate football team and on
scholarship, is not working out
with the team, according to Head
Football Coach Art Baker. Baker
said no action will taken on
Grinage's status with the team
until all legal proceedings are
over.
If convicted, Grinage and
Green could receive up to two
years in prison and a $50 fine.
SPRING
BREAK
PARTY
Ft. Lauderdale
From SI49 on the Strip
7 nights 8 days
hope tj
w o u 1
hearinj
that hi
pond
resolut
(800)368-2006 TOLL FREE
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 GrecsnlW Mvd
TStOttJ J4 H R
24 hour Toag Service
I -H�nl Restate
to
Coupon
2 Item 12
Pizza
$3.00
with this Ad
Blue Moon Cafe
752-1294
Thru 2 17 85
?
ajmmmmmmmmmm
m
m
f l
N
a






THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 14. 1985 3
Budget
es Up To Its
spring Break
t f take you on
Day Beach
ecial
'56-8432
WEST
NVILLE
bby of the
9 years - - older.
Charge Card
�M.w��fi.
TE-
3REAK '85
uderdale �

n the beach
. ES PREMIERE
ND DASCE CLUB
OOLSIDE PARTIES
HOC CONTEST � WATER VOLLEYHAU.
CHUG RELAYS � FREE T-SHIRT RELAYS
AMD CUatAX THE DAY WTTH THE
r FEATURED IN PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
-SIRTS � AND OTHER GIVEAWAYS
LLEGE HAPPY HOUR
Wed March 6, 1985
hmtt �rmt mio ttmmuom k� taovt
MU � OOOCK �HD � O'CLOCK
OWCOUfM D
I AND DRAFT BEER - 75c
i CONTEST FOR TROPHtES PWZES
�NINGS
the beach presents
DK N ROU. BAND NIGHTLY PLUS OUR
�ED D J SPINNING the BEST DANCE
NIGHT MUSIC VIDEO
March 6 1985
fLY EVENTS
SATURDAY
Com and Party tH 3 AMI
THURSDAY
Loo tef National Concert Acts
SUNDAY:
VWao Muatc Niom
" mom raw Man mm i -j-
ommoHOHArr
?- Pl NKJHTLY
k� North a l Omu 8w or 1AJ
IBREAK '85jJ
SALE!
ensen Deluxe
SALE $25.00
fer Velcro (Men)
SALE $20.00
'omen)
SALE $20.00
SALE $12.00
len)
SALE $12.00
0 (Men & Women)
SALE $40.00
(Men & Women)
SALE $35.00
rs Orleans (Women)
SALE $8.00
ed supply of brand
:s at extremely low
riss Out
H.L.
HODGES
210 E. FIFTH ST
752-415
Little Effect In Strict Laws
:��
.JfP Students who drink
andI drive are stimulation-seekers
who are not likely to be deterred
by laws raising the minimum
legal dnnking age, recent
search by a University of
Wisconsin team suggests
Instead of trying to curb
students adventuresome habits,
counselors should help students
find new ways to satisfy their
need for thrills, the researchers
say.
Their conclusions are based on
a study comparing student drink-
ing and driving habits with per-
sonality types, savs UW
psychologist Frank Far'lev, who
along with graduate student
Sharon McNeely conducted the
study.
They found that students most
likely to drink excessively and
drive tend to be extroverted risk-
takers who prefer change and
novelty, and who are attracted to
experimental lifestyles.
"These oeople tend to reject
rules and regulations of any
kind Farley says. "Minimum-
age drinking and driving laws are
Farley says. "We need to get
these people to transfer their in-
terests from one to the other.
"If counselors are aware of the
characteristics of extreme
stimulation-seekers, they can
help channel their energy into the
creative potential
To date, Farley and McNeely
have surveyed only a small sam-
ple of students. They
- CoUHTRV C0OKIN6
just creating more rules for them acknowledge their results may
to reject
Although these students are
more prone to delinquency, the
researchers say, they are just as
likely to exhibit positive
characteristics, such as creativity.
"These two forces arise from
the same group of people
Court Date
Postponed
For Students
Two ECU students charged
with assault inflicting serious
bodily injury in connection with
the beating of the programming
assistant at Belk Dorm on Feb. i
had their court date postponed
Wednesday.
Joe Grinage, 19, and Robert
Cedric Green, 21, will now ap-
pear in court March 11 to face
charges of assaulting Michael
Pitts in a Belk dorm stairwell.
The two students have already
appeared before the Honor
Board. Results of these hearings
are not made public.
Grinage, a member of the
Pirate football team and on
scholarship, is not working out
with the team, according to Head
Football Coach Art Baker. Baker
said no action will taken on
Grinage's status with the team
until all legal proceedings are
over.
If convicted, Grinage and
Green could receive up to two
years in prison and a $50 fine.
SPRING
BREAK
PARTY
Ft. Lauderdale
From $149 on the Strip
7 nights 8 days
(800)368-2006 TOLL FREE
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
TSft-MU - 24 HRS
24 hour Towing Service
I -Hani Rentals
Irillitur . ,
Coupon
2 Item 12"
Pizza
$3.00
with this Ad
Blue Moon Cafe
752-1294
Thru 2 17 85
Association Lobbies Against
Drinking Age Proposal
Continued From Page 1 hope that the General Assembly
, . would respond to these
me loss. The resolution also notes hearings Rainey said, adding
tnat several other states have that he hoped they would res-
retused to raise their drinking pond in favor of the UNCASG
ages, despite the threatened resolution,
federal aid reduction.
The hearings that the resolu-
tion calls for are an attempt to in-
crease debate across the state on
the issue of the drinking age.
Rainey, along with N.C. State
University President Shannon
Carson, is involved in planning
the hearings. "We will probably
organize them regionally, rather
than having one on each of the 16
campuses Rainey said.
State government officials will
be asked to participate in the
hearings where people from both
sides of the issue will be en-
couraged to speak. "We would
not reflect all students.
But their thesis that the need
for stimulation is the key to
understanding and controlling
drunk driving � the largest killer
of those 16 to 24 � is supported
by accident statistics.
Farley says those in their late
teens and early 20s have the
greatest need for stimulation.
The plot of traffic accidents
follows the same pattern.
Further, since alcohol is a
depressant, young drinkers are
likely to seek even riskier means
of getting the stimulation they
crave.
The theory, Farley says, ex-
plains why many accidents caus-
ed by drunk drivers involve night
driving, the presence of
passengers and speeding.
"Nighttime driving provides
little external stimulation, mak-
ing passengers more likely to
divert the driver's attention
Farley explains. "All of those
factors maximize the likelihood
of a mistake
Safety regulations such as seat
belt laws and speed limits simply
prompt the stimulation-seekers to
take even bigger risks, Farley
says.
Farley says he does not know
whether the characteristics of
thrill-seekers are genetic or ac-
quired.
&
Daily Specials $2.25 �Beverage
Recieve 10 free plates
ih Semester Meal Plan
vlonthly Meal Plan
20 plates for $50
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs - 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ll:00am-8:00pm
8
1
eat
9VQghtclub
presents
Friday
T
END
JAM
Featuring The Highly Unpredictable
Daddy Cool
Spinning the Hottest Dance Tunes Down East
Happy Hour from 8:00 9:30
with 50c draft, J2.00 pitchers & 2 for 1 Highballs.
Hourly Drink Specials all night long:
Door Prizes given away every hour!
Don't miss out on Greenville's 1 End of the Week Party
at vour Hot Hits Nigh'spot, Beau's . . of course!
Phone 756-6401 Located in the Carolina East Centre
Btau's H a private club for members and their guests
All ABC Permits Memberships available at the door
Guests are welcome.
A great new book from HUMANInteract ion
Subtle winning ways to tell someone they like youl
H
OWTO
ONDAY
if you want a date for Friday.
Nothing attracts people to each other
like certain subtle signals. YOU can
learn what they are and how to use
themwith CONFIDENCE to make some-
one feel you're special. Benefit as
you enjoy reading of the first-hand
experiences of others, like yourself,
trying to attract someone they like.
to, you don't have to be beautiful,
�wealthy, popular or unique in any way
these tested winning ways do work
If or everyone willing to try them.
We know how you feel about first encounters. Maybe you
are afraid to approach someone � scared you will be
rejected, or worse yet, laughed at or put down. Per-
haps you're missing your chance to meet someone that
you find interesting because you don't know the right
way to go about it. Worry no more.
"HOW TO FLIRT ON MONDAY" was written especially
for you to overcome these fears and to give you
new self-assurance. Discover how to make shyness
work for you. Know why "acting out of character"
is always the wrong thing to do. Learn how to use
the "verbal handshake" technique plus many more
subtle approach ideas you nave yet to think of.
Read how a mere glance, scent or smile can ignite -
a relationship and be sure
that you're using them the
right way.(You'll know you
know how!) Chapters also
uncover many sensitive areas
no one ever tells you about
but we tell it like it is
with humor and warmth. If ever
you've wanted someone you like
to "want to" know you then
this book is a must I You won't
put it down til it's finished.
How IO
M
ON
Monday
I
Shalimar, FL 32579
Please send a copy of HOW TO FLIRT ON MONDAY
plain envelope.(great gift item!) My payment of
$9.95 (plus $1.05 postage and handling) is en-
closed. I may return the book anytime within ten
days of delivery for a full refund. iCnecendoaao
Please criiKQe IO
I MasierCad
Visa
rrm i i i i i i i i i i i i
Signature
Name
E�p data
I
I
The Escorts of Pirate Walk
Call 757-6616
CHICKEN VBISCUITS
758-2098
OPEN 24 HOURS!
7 Days a Week
ii
TIME - OUT"
n
'TIME - OUT"
TIME - OUT
a
SUPERB
CHICKEN & BISCUITS
Come by and visit us for our
WEEKEND GRAND OPENING
SPECIALS!
Thursday-Sunday
Use these coupons to get anything on our menu
We soon will be FWFF Located at
delivering. Call us now MJL,ML, the comer rf Char,es
for more information. THBE COUpONS & , lth St. At the old
55-ZUV8 Creamery location.

-
'i i 1 aBaOaaa�a�a�afcaa�ia i � a� � mm.
m ��� laauaji
A






Sty �aut (HutalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM NORTON, General Manager
Greg Rideout, MmmrnBti
Jennifer Jendrasiak, mm Ed,IOr Tom Luvender, d��
Scott Cooper. c Edllor Anthony Martin, �w Manager
TINA MAROSCHAK. SO Bam, JOHN PETERSON, Ctarift Manager
Bill Mitchell. a ���, bill Dawson. ftaM. Aflnflg�
Doris Rankins. s�, RlCK Mccormac, o5p0m �dor
Daniel Maurer, &���� �� DeChanile Johnson, �
February 14, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Lecture
Series Stimulating, Good Idea
There have been many good and
interesting academic events on
campus this year. There was the
election forum which presented
stimulating discussion on the im-
plications and outcome of Deci-
sion '84. There were scholars who
spoke at the request of individual
departments. All these are impor-
tant. Students need them to grow
and mature intellectually.
This week we are given the
special opportunity to participate
in discussion with the fourth an-
nual distinguished guest lecturer,
Dr. Juanita M. Kreps. The Annual
Lecture-Seminar Series is
something ECU should have ex-
treme pride in. Over its four years,
we have had Dean Rusk, former
secretary of state; Ralph Nader,
consumer advocate and Frank
Mankiewicz, a distinguished
political analyst. Each a leader and
a mover in our nation and the
world.
Dr. Kreps, who is on campus to
speak about the national and inter-
national economy, is the former
secretary of commerce under
President Carter. She is vice presi-
dent emeritus at Duke University
and a widely published and inter-
nationally known economist. To
have someone of her caliber on our
campus is an honor and a
privilege. And students should
take advantage of the opportunity
to listen to her and discuss the
world situation with her.
Dr. Kreps played to a full house
on Tuesday. Many students, un-
doubtedly, were required to go for
class. But some went on their own,
and both types came away with an
experience that enhanced their
views of the world. In a time where
the budget deficit is a major factor
in all facets of life, her insightful
comment on what is happening in
the nation is useful to hear and
understand.
We hope students will continue
to support and request such events
on campus. Each of us should con-
tinue to explore new subjects and
inquire about new worlds; after
all, the quest for learning is what a
university is all about. ECU
students and The East Carolinian
sincerely thank the Office of the
Vice Chancellor for Academic Af-
fairs for this opportunity.
ONE OF THESE 15 A KIND, LCMN&, P6M0CRAT1C,
FMFIHTO FROVt NICARAGUA. �7HE
&$3MLtBijirWmKmb
TERRORIST FROM EISAIVAPOR
CMW1BLLM
REAGAN
CAN.
Let's Party, Taxpayers
CoHege P'ess Service
m mm to swit w vou u m uns nwck to protect ufw"
TRB
The New Repabilc
The weekend of Jan. 19-21 saw the
biggest display ever of what might be
called the official American Lucullan
style. The elements are: an in gathering
of corporate jets, limousine traffic
jams, the running up of huge bills in
fancy hotels and restaurants, and lavish
parties at unusual locals (a museum, a
specially erected tent, a department
store), all to mark some ostensibly na-
tional occasion.
What made that weekend in January
so special was that the rites were occurr-
ing simultaneously on both coasts.
Roone Arledge of ABC reportedly
chartered a jet for $259,000 to fly
various corporate executives and
friends to the Super Bowl near San
Francisco, where 4,000 people arrived
at the game by limousine. Twenty-two
firms staged parties in tents adjacent to
the Stanford stadium, with "parrot
tulips (whatever they are) flown in from
France" at one end "42 different
foodstuffs" at another, according to
news reports.
Ford's party is said to have cost $1
million, but Nissan's cost $2.5 million.
Three thousand people came to the of-
ficial NFL reception at San Francisco's
Moscone Convention Center, which
was "transformed into a model
stadium, complete with real grass
turf One guest said, "This is the par-
ty to end all parties in any field in the
country, with the possible exception of
the inauguration
Which, as it happens, was being
celebrated at that very moment in
Washington.
Serious corporate revelers flew over-
night to hit the highlights in both cities.
"Parties! Parties! Parties! observed
The Washington Post, which devoted
hundreds of column inches to describ-
ing affairs by Pepsico, Gannett, Time,
Roy Cohn's law firm and a consortium
of agribusinesses, among others.
Ridgewell's, Washington's leading
caterer, had its biggest day ever Jan. 21.
It served 15,000 people at 26 major
functions. Almost all were corporate
affairs.
"The whole corporate move
toward entertaining clients and guests
has really gained hold in the Reagan ad-
ministration said the Ridgewell man.
"Corporate entertaining is focusing on
what can be accomplished by having a
good time
You might wonder whether
America's top executives don't have
anything better to do with their time
than to spend half of it jetting around
the country throwing and attending
parties.
One explanation might be that
they're not paying for any of it. The
stockholders pay in the first instance.
And since it's all tax-deductible as a
"business expense the taxpayers end
up footing half the bill.
If I take you out to the Super Bowl
and deduct it, I'm out about the same
amount as if I went alone. If you then
take me to the Masters golf tourna-
ment, we're even. Three thousand peo-
ple and 42 different foodstuffs in a tent
is an expanded version of this basic
transaction.
Most of the conspicuous high living
in America is paid for with tax-free
dollars. Any top-flight restauranteer or
hotelier will tell you that. And the more
high living you can afford, the more op-
portunity you have to deduct it. Rich
people can arrange for huge chunks of
their lives to be tax-deductible: travel,
theater, restaurants, even cars and
yachts.
The present rules about deducting
travel and entertainment expenses are
unenforceably vague. In theory, their
must be a "business discussion" in con-
nection with every expense. In practice,
almost anything goes. The effect of
allowing generous deductions for
fun'n'games is that American business
spends more on fun'n'games, and less
on business as you and I understand the
term.
By contrast, the rules about deduc-
ting work clothing are ruthless: no
deduction if the clothes have any non-
work value. But then, the people who
must wear uniforms to work don't have
much clout.
The Treasury Department's tax-
reform proposal would forbid the
deduction of all "business" entertain-
ment except for meals, which would on-
ly be deductible in "a clear business set-
ting not a tent, and would be limited
to $10 for breakfast, $15 for lunch and
$25 for dinner.
This standard is hardly puritanical.
Only one restaurant meal out of 40
costs more than $17, but naturally
that's the one that gets deducted. The
Treasury's reasonable view is that a
meal costing more than $25 is a per-
sonal indulgence, not a business
necessity and ought to be paid for after
taxes, just like a meal costing $3. There
would be a similar limit on deducting
luxury travel.
Deductible luxury living is the
most visible abuse of the present tax
code, and also the most visibly unfair.
The crackdown on deductible luxury is
one example of the Treasury plan's
superiority to the rival Kemp-Kasten
(Republican) and Bradley-Gephardt
(Democratic) proposals in Congress.
These other plans concentrate on ex-
changing the major tax breaks for
reductions in marginal rates. The
Treasury plan does that, but it also
cleans out the Augean stable.
Because it goes after dozens of tax
abuses, the Treasury plan is especially
vulnerable to chipping away by lob-
byists. We got a foretaste of the battle
ahead last month, when pressure from
Congress forced the Internal Revenue
Service to weaken new rules cracking
down on the deduction of automobiles.
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole told
an applauding group of businessmen he
would hold up James Baker's confirma-
tion as Treasury secretary until the rules
were changed.
Dole's the one who's been going
around saying we can't attend to tax
reform until we've done something
about the deficit. This is exactly wrong.
The truth is that we can't generate the
new revenues we need until we have a
tax system that people respect.
Although everyone would like a tax cut,
a recent poll about the Treasury reform
proposal shows that four out of five
Americans wouldn't object to what
they now pay in taxes if they thought
that others were paying their fair share.
(ej, I9�i. I nutd Features Syndicate. Inc.
Nicaraguan Situation Explains Need For U.S. Money
One of the most emotional topics of
debate in the upcoming congressional
appropriations war will be the proposal
to renew funding of the freedom fighters
in Nicaragua. In his State of the Union
message, President Reagan put that pro-
posal on the front burner. He is in a
fightin' mood, and he intends to get
every penny he has asked for.
The flight Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
His opposition is ready, though. They
knew this moment was coming, and they
have been practicing their slogans. One
of their most damaging charges, born of
the mouth of Sen. Christopher Dodd,
D-Conn is that the freedom fighters
are "remnants of the old Somoza
regime referring to the dictator depos-
ed in 1979. The implication is that the
rebels intend to reimpose the old
Somoza-style tyranny. Such an outcome
is, of course, something nobody wants
his tax dollars going to.
But what about the charge? How
much meat is in it? The answer is � very
little. The rebel ranks have swelled to
nearly 15,000, almost all of them
peasants with no military experience.
The peasants despise the Somoza
memory for they were oppressed by the
formei dictator. So how could the rebels
possibly operate in, and draw recruits
from, the peasant countryside if they
were indeed Somocistas? If their motive
was to reimpose the old regime, then
they would not have such a large base of
support in the population. And as the
failed attempts at Marxist revolution in
Bolivia and Thailand demonstrate, a
revolution without a base is doomed
from the start.
The CIA knows this. And as everyone
knows, the CIA armed and trained the
guerillas at the outset. Why would the
CIA permanently doom its own efforts
in Nicaragua by recruiting ex-
Somocistas to direct the guerilla war? It
would make sense for the CIA � for
coldly logical reasons if not from a sense
of morality � to root out the hard-core
Somocistas. Certainly, that has been
done.
So where are all those Somocistas if
they are not in the rebel movement? The
answer is they are working for the com-
munist Sandinista regime. That surprises
you for sure, and indeed, I didn't know
this until very recently. But it makes a
world of sense, and I'll tell you why.
A common assumption is that the
fascists and communists have nothing in
common; one group is on the extreme
right, the other on the extreme left. But
they are very similar. Both believe in
socialist economic theories; both strive
for total power; both practice terror as a
means of subduing the will of the peo-
ple; and both are committed to the im-
position of tyranny and the destruction
of democracy.
That such a brotherhood of ideals ex-
ists between fascists and communists has
been clearly demonstrated in the past. In
the chaos that was Germany in the '20s
and early '30s, the Communist street
thugs and the Nazi Brownshirts clashed
often, yet they agreed that democracy
was the chief evil. So they ganged up on
the democratic Weimar Republic and
destroyed it.
After WWII, the Soviets faced a
dilemma in their new central European
empire. Where to find the necessary
number of totalitarian thugs and killers
to run the Marxist regimes? "But of
course Soviet dictator Josef Stalin
must have said. "There are plenty of
Nazis running around. They have good
totalitarian instincts and obviously
won't hesitate to spill blood to preserve
power Consequently, the recruitment
of Nazis reached a point where a
substantial majority of the Politburo
(ruling body) of the East German Com-
munist Party was made up of former
fascists.
And now we see Nicaraguan
totalitarianism nourished by the brutal
skills of former neo-fascists of the
Somoza era. These brutes include Luis
Carrion, a member of the ruling junta;
Carlos Zarruck, Sandinista minister of
transportation; Samuel Santos, mayor
of the capital city of Managua; etc. I
could go on naming names, but I'll stop
with the big fish: Mizuel D'Escoto, the
Sandinista foreign minister. Anastassio
Somoza I, founder of the Somoza
dynasty, was his godfather. And when
Somoza was assassinated, D'Escoto sent
a tear-jerking condolence to Mrs.
Somoza telling her that he was praying
for "the dear general And one more
juicy note: Sandinista dictator Daniel
Ortega is a known bank robber. Did you
know that if he set foot in democratic
Costa Rica, he would be arrested on
outstanding charges for bank robbery?
Geez, wnat a vulture.
So let's get the debate rolling on aid to
the Nicaraguan freedom fighters. But
let's keep in mind the things I've pointed
out: l)The war in Nicaragua is a popular
peasant-stocked uprising to recapture
the revolution hijacked from them by
the Sandinistas. It is so popular that the
guerilla ranks have increased seven-fold
in two years. 2)The bulk of the op-
pressive "remnants of the old Somoza
regime" are located in the government,
where they are directing efforts to nur-
ture and strengthen totalitarianism, no
matter what suffering they cause.
One item must be put to rest before I
finish. Some may question the populari-
ty of the freedom fighters. They may be
naive enough to point out the recent
"election" in which the Sandinistas won
some 60 percent of the vote. If you think
that was a fair and free election, then
you must also believe the moon consists
of blue cheese. Opposition leaders did
not participate, for the election rules
were totally unfair, and opponents of
the regime were harrassed, intimidated
and sometimes attacked by government-
incited mobs. And the population was
under intense psychological pressure not
only to vote, but to vote for the San-
dinistas. If they did not, their ration
cards might be taken away.
And before you fall for leftist slogans
concerning Nicaragua, let the following
quote burn itself into your brain. It was
uttered by Bayardo Arce, who directed
the destruction of the free press in
Nicaragua and now coordinates the
government-run media. "The (San-
dinista) Front cannot go into elections
under a pink flag if it wants a red con-
stitution he announced. "We must
hold elections so that people can vote for
Sandinismo, to show that the people
favor the Soviet-Cuban advance, that
the Nicaraguan people favor Marxism-
Leninism
Heaven help Nicaragua if we don't
remember and understand those words.
Alumni
(CPS) � Contrary to some
campus sports boosters' claim
that heavy investment in athletics
helps the entire college, winning
athletic teams do not help univer-
sities bring in more monev from
alumni or businesses, a 'resear-
cher has concluded after combin-
ing 12 studies of the issue
University of Nevada at Las
Vegas professor Jame Frev says
all the studies indicate successful
athletic teams never increase �
and often reduce � contributions
to an institution.
Frey's conclusions, summariz-
ed in an article in the January
Larceny R
the
prol
becj
Frei
By HAROLDJOYNER
VultUit Sew, tjtitor
Larcenies continued to
dominate campus crimes this past
week, although there were also
incidents of harassing phone calls
and vandalism.
ECU campus police arrested
Frank George Horning Jr. of 440
Jones dorm Saturday, Feb. 9 at
11:30 p.m. for driving while im-
paired on College Hill Extension.
That same night, a Greene dorm
resident reported at 6:20 p.m. to
campus police that she had been
assaulted with a aeadly weapon
b
soul
Dor
10.
tor
of
I
pus
mer
F
r
brej
i m
-
Happy Hour
DAIL
60 oz. Draft!
Corner of 4rn i
Down To w,
THE
Thu
Thursday
Couples Valentine's Pai
and complimentary win(
Friday
Big Chill Party � Feati
Rock 93's Greg Allison.
Saturday
Sock Hop � Get your
off your shoes, and "t
the 50's and 60's.
A
wf
TW's Nitelife
T
m �� m i �
WK
L m m�
MM
mm
mm
mm
m
4
i
I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 1985
CAN.
vers
� hich would on-
business set-
he limited
unch and
puritanical.
meal out of 40
but naturally
deducted. The
that a
B25 is a per-
a business
. paid for after
sting $3. There
on deducting
;ing is the
. sent tax
unfair.
luxury is
plan's
K.emp-Kasten
Gephardt
in Congress.
irate on ex-
-aks for
rates. The
It also
of tax
especially
�. by lob-
the battle
re from
Revenue
cracking
'f automobiles.
Dole told
esmen he
-onfirma-
ntil the rules
een going
nd to tax
e something
wrong.
I generate the
Ae have a
pie respect.
1 like a tax cut,
:he Treasury reform
out of five
to what
. thought
eir fair share.
f Im
ney
point out the recent
the Sandinistas won
the vote. If you think
fair and free election, then
believe the moon consists
Opposition leaders did
he election rules
and opponents of
Jime were harrassed, intimidated
r mes attacked by government-
And the population was
e psychological pressure not
vote, but to vote for the San-
If they did not, their ration
ight be taken away.
before you fall for leftist slogans
ng Nicaragua, let the following
purn itself into your brain. It was
by Bayardo Arce, who directed
struction of the free press in
ua and now coordinates the
lent-run media. "The (San-
-ront cannot go into elections
mnk flag if u wants a red con-
he announced. "We must
:tions so that people can vote for
smo, to show that the people
Soviet-Cuban advance, that
taguan people favor Marxism-
help Nicaragua if we don't
er and understand those words.
Alumni Response To Winning Teams
(CPS) � Contrarv t , �
anTrT.f Z Contrary
SSk Sp�rts boosters' claim
hebsinVeStmentinath
athTen , em,re C�Ue8e' win"ing
s'ues bnnamS d� n0t he,P uni
s ties bring ,� more monev from
alumni or businesses, a reseat
mrnaStTCludedaf,ercombin-
mg 12 studies of the issue
University of Nevada at Las
Vegas professor James Frev says
a I he studies indjcate successfu
athletic teams never increase -
and otten reduce - contributions
to an institution.
Prey's conclusions, summariz-
ed in an article in the January
issue of Currents, published by
the Council for the Advancement
and Support of Education, pro-
vide new ammunition for critics
of intercollegiate athletic pro-
grams that do not pay for
themselves.
Frey, an associate sociology
professor, acknowledges some
winning teams help athletic
departments raise money, but not
other parts of the school.
"Most observers tacitly accept
the belief that big time athletic
programs are partly justified
because they boost fundraising
Frey notes. "It's time we realized
that just isn't so
The studies also show that "an
institution that concentrates the
bulk of its effort on raising
money for athletics will probably
not raise as much as it could for
other programs he writes.
"By the same token, strategies
that use athletics as a vehicle to
raise monies for academic pur-
poses are also unlikely to be suc-
cesful he adds.
Most college administrators
contacted by CPS seem to agree.
University of Pennsylvania of-
ficials say their fund drive was no
more succesful in the two years
, wlts. ii i ume we realized more succesful in tl
Larceny Reports Increase
B HAROLD JOVNER
AuIsUbi f �, Kdhor
Larcenies continued to
dominate campus crimes this past
week, although there were also
incidents of harassing phone calls
and vandalism.
ECU campus police arrested
Frank George Horning Jr. of 440
Jones dorm Saturday, Feb. 9 at
11:30 p.m. for driving while im-
paired on College Hill Extension.
That same night, a Greene dorm
resident reported at 6:20 p.m. to
campus police that she had been
assaulted with a deadly weapon
by an unknown person in the
southwest stairwell of Green
Dorm. At 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb.
10, James Hickmon, News Direc-
tor of YVZMB, reported that a set
of stereo headphones had been
stolen out of his desk at the cam-
pus radio station.
Other reports to the depart-
ment of campus safety include:
Feb. 6, 1:35 a.m. � A Flem-
ing dorm resident reported
receiving harassing telephone
calls. 4:15 p.m. � Mark Gibson
of 415-C Scott dorm reported a
breaking and entering of his vehi-
cle and larceny while parked on
Ficklen Drive.
Feb. 7, 2:10p.m. � Tull Wor-
thington of Greenville reported
that his vehicle had been broken
into while parked on the lot south
of 10th St. on Feb. 5.
Feb. 9, 10:55 p.m. � Van-
dalism was reported to a car
while parked north of Student
Health Center.
before its football team won or
shared two consecutive Ivy
League championships than in
the two after.
"I'd rather have the team win-
ning because that's one less ex-
cuse for not giving Steve Der-
by, the director of alumni giving,
says. "But in terms of what pro-
mpts people to give, it just
doesn't seem to make that much
difference
Contributions to the school's
athletic department fund drive,
however, have jumped substan-
tially.
Notre Dame officials agree.
Notre Dame's flagging football
fortunes � its team has won only
five more games than it has lost
over the past four seasons �
haven't affected donations at all,
Development Director Torn
Bloom says.
And asking Notre Dame foot-
ball fans who are not alumni for
money has never worked out
well, spokesman Richard Con-
klin adds.
"Football may be the only
thing they know about this place,
but they treat us like a profes-
sional team Conklin says.
"You cheer for the Yankees, but
you don't send them a check
Conklin says the percentage of
Notre Dame alumni making
donations to their alma mater
fluctuate, between 45 and 55 per-
cent ea.n year, but he says the
changes cannot be correlated to
the success of the school's
athletic teams.
Even Boston College DeveJop-
ment Director Dennis Macro,
whose school has reversed a long
tradition of gridiron mediocrity
in recent years and gained na-
tional exposure, does not expect
donations to increase substantial-
ly.
"In the long run it's going to
help us because it's one more
thing to make someone proud of
this institution Macro says.
"But the effect is ever so subtle.
Someone might write us a check
this time and not even know whv "
NIGHT TRANSIT
Friday and Saturday Nights
10:00 p.m. 2:00 a.m.
SCHEDULE HOURLY
Home FederalOn the H
Colle3eHil16afterhour
CannonCourt 12 after h
Eastbrook14 after hou.
River Bluff19afterh
K,n9sRow26 after h
Village Greene30 after he .
�Departure for last round will be at 15 minutes ifi
the hour.
SAMDA1CH SHOP
Happy Hour - 2 pm-6 pm
DAILY
60 02. Draft $1.75
PIT
VILLAGE
oonna Erwuns
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Cornpr of 4th & Reade
Downtown
Master Card and Visa arc accepted and financing
is available. �
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 834
PHONE 756-9222
REWARD
$200 CASH reward for informa-
tion leading to the arrest and con-
viction of the person or persons
who removed the purple and gold
banners from the lot of Joe Culliper
Chrysler Plymouth Dodge. All in-
formation will be held in the
strictest confidence. Anyone having
any information contact Garry
Singleton or James Phillips
756-0186.
Eastern North Carolina's
Largest Entertainment Center
Presents
The fun of the 50's & 60's with
THE MARVELLS
Thurs-Sat, Feb. 14-16
'�������,(�����,�.�� -www��,�����r�
l.iamvw
ITS FOR YOU!
Thursday
Couples Valentine's Party � Reduced admission for couples
and complimentary wine plus free gift to 1st 150 ladies
Friday
Big Chill Party � Featuring music from the "Big Chill" with
Rock 93's Greg Allison.
Saturday
Sock Hop � Get your complimentary socks at the door, kick
off your shoes, and "twist the night away" to the tunes from
the 50's and 60's.
1 Leave the driving to us!
Call The Liberty Ride
at 758-5570
ip TW's Nitelife, where the music comes alive!
Privot. club - All ABC permit.
Kite Show: Colorful Kite Tales � MSC
Travel Adventure: "Sri Lanka Resplen-
dent Ceylon" � 8 p.m. MSC
Movie: "All of Me" � 7 and 9 p.m.
Lecture: Crawford Loritts
I.Ds made � 2:30 MSC
Movie: "Purple Rain" � 7 and 9 n m
MSC
Late Movie: "La Cage Aux Folles" � 11
p.m. MSC
Student Star Search � 8 p.m.
Artists Series: Rotterdam Philharmonic
Orchestra � 8 p.m. Wright
Sneak Preview: "The Sure Thing" � 8
p.m. MSC
Sponsored
by
The Student Union
plus:
February 10-23
February 14
February 15, 16
February 17
February 20
February 21,22,23
February 22, 23
February25
February 27
February 28
OETA.LS MENOENH.lt STUDENT CENTER R00� " .
azamsazzm
ajMMMMM
'
I
m� ������1 fcwrfci �
I





THK EASTAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Doonesbury
FEBRUARY 14, 1985 Page 6
Vision
Quest
Soars
"There are periods
in our lives, I think,
when we're almost
invincible, and then
other periods when
we're as vulnerable
as bird's eggs. I
wrote VISION
QUEST about one of
those invincible
times
By DANIEL MAURER
Eatcrtalaacai Editor
Every so often there comes a
film, focusing on the
adolescent audience, that suc-
ceeds in transcending the
"teenage sexploitation"
stereotype. Director Harold
Becker's Vision Quest is just such
a film.
Working from a screenplay by
Darryl Poniscan, Becker gives us
a rare and honest look at the
dreams, doubts, expectations and
frustrations, that are so much a
part of growing up.
Based on the novel by Terry
Davis, the story surrounds
Louden Swain (Matthew
Modine), an eighteen-year-old
from Spokane, Washington.
Louden, a 199 pound wrestler for
Thompson high school, has a
dream he is determined to see
through. Louden wants to make
his mark this season by wrestling
Shute (Frank Jasper), the states
toughest wrestler. Shute,
however, is a 168 pound
behemoth whose 5' 11" frame is
crowded with a sea of muscule.
Louden, staunchly determined,
concentrates all his efforts on los-
ing the neccessary 23 pounds.
That is, until he falls in love with
a beautiful drifter named Carla
(Linda Fiorentino). Carla, while
making her way from her home
in Trenton, New Jersey to an art
career in California, is stranded
in Spokane when she gets shafted
by a used car dealer.
Modine gives a spirited perfor-
mance as the determined, yet
sometimes naive, Louden Swain.
He relives for us, with almost un-
comfortable realism, those
awkward moments that accom-
pany first love. Modine's inspir-
ing performance makes it easy to
sympathize with the character.
During the film's climactic
wrestling match, we walk the rag-
ged edge with Louden as he grap-
ples with the hulking Shute. We
feel every fall he takes, and wince
at every drop of blood he spills.
Invincibility
VISION QUEST: Produced by Jon Peters and Peter
Guber; directed by Harold Becker; screenplay by Darryl
Ponicsan; based on a novel by Terry Davis; Director of
Photography Owen Roizman; music score composed
and performed by Tangerine Dream; Executive Pro-
ducers Stan Weston and Adam Fields; released by
Warner Bros. This picture is rated R
CAST
Louden SwainMatthew Modine
CarlaLinda Fiorentino
KuchMichael Schoeffling
Mr. SwainRonny Cox
ShuteFrank Jasper
Coach ConnersCharles Hallahan
Mr. TannerHarold Sylvester
ElmoJ.C. Quinn
Newspaper EditorDaphne Zuniga
Kuch's FatherJames Gammon
Louden's grandfatherRobert Blossom
SchmoozlerRaphael Sbarge
BulldozerForest Whitaker
OttoGary Kasper
Modine's leading lady, the sexy
Linda Fiorentino, matches his ex-
cellence step by step in her por-
trayal of Carla, the hardened
street nymph. She provides the
character with depth when she
lets Carla's tough exterior
momentarily slip, exposing her
more vulnerable side.
Michael Shoeffling's portrayal
of Kuch, Louden's best friend
and teammate, gives the story
some focus. Kuch, who claims to
' i , -
�'
JJM
� ���
!������
A
By JAMES &EID
Suff Writer
"Kites make the world seem
smaller and the sky seem bigger.
� Valerie Guvig
The Student Visual Arts
Committee is presenting an
exhibit, "Colorful Kite Tales" at
Mendenhall that does more than
entice an individual's imagina-
tion. It educates. Besides display-
ing 50 colorful and extravagant
kites, the committee is exhibiting
14 display panels that inform
spectators of kiting history.
Although the origin of this fly-
ing apparatus is impossible to
pinpoint, the impact that kites
have made on man can be observ-
ed throughout history. In 206
B.C General Han Hsin and his
small army used a kite to help
them defeat their enemies who
were occupying a fortified
palace.
From a nearby hill, he guided a
kite over the fortress and then,
carefully measured the distance
of the string. With this informa-
tion, he instructed some of his ar-
my to dig a tunnel which would
reach within the confines of the
palace. This act of ingenuity
helped him to surprise and defeat
the enemy. This event also mark-
ed one of the longest reigns in
Chinese history � the Han
Dynasty.
An event in which a kite was
instrumental in shaping our
history was the famous experi-
ment of Benjamin Franklin.
Another important event,
which involved a kite, happened
� Author Terry Davis
be part Indian, attempts to ex-
plain Louden's dream in terms of
what the "spirits"call a Vision
Quest � an affirmation of
manhood.
Kuch, garbbed in Mohawk
hair, feather-earing and moc-
casins, could have easily been one
of the film's most intriguing
characters. We're shown Just
enough of Kuch to peak our
curiosity, but never enough to
satisfy it. Shoeffling did some
wonderful work with the
character, but one gets the feeling
that the cream of his perfor-
mance was left on the cutting-
room floor.
Underscoring these fine perfor-
mances is an exciting music score
by Tangerine Dream. In Vision
Quest they prove once again thier
skill as film score composers. Ac-
companying Tangerine Dream on
the sound track are such popular
artists as Journey, Don Henley,
Ronnie James Dio, John Waite
and Madonna. The film's sound
track is so appropriately intert-
wined with the action, that it suc-
ceeds in enhancinge the overall
picture.
Vision Quest doesn't over-
whelm an audience with the sex,
violence, or rank humor typical
of its genre. Instead, it wins our
hearts with an engaging tale,
sympathetic characters, and a
feeling of familiarity that you
just can't shake. Vision Quest is
like looking into a mirror and
watching ourselves grow up.
Pictured here are Matthew Modine and Linda Fiorentino as Louden Swain, an naive eighteen-year-old,
and Carla, a hard-nosed drifter. This unlikely pair find themselves sharing some interesting times together
in Warner Bros, most recent film release, "Vision Quest
The Western Wind Sings Up A Storm
JON JORDAN- ECl tnloL�b
In Addition to the displays, the Visual Arts Committee !s planning a
kite flying contest for the spring.
Colorful Kite Tales
By Lisa McDonald
Suff Writer
The Western Wind, an inter-
nationally acclaimed vocal
sextet, showed Monday night
how beautiful and exciting a cap-
pella vocal music can be. The
group, which consisted of two
women and four men, also prov-
ed, by performing pieces ranging
from 16th century madrigals to
1930's jazz, that a cappella sing-
ing can be a versatile type of
music.
The group began it's program
with English and Italian
madrigals. One of the most
rewarding aspects of listening to
a cappella music was the har-
mony that could be heard bet-
ween the voices. This was evident
from the very first selection,
"Sing We and Chant It All of
the madrigals were well done,
and the translations that were
provided were a great help in
understanding the lyrics.
The second part of the pro-
gram, German Part Songs, was
also heightened through transla-
tions. In the two humorous
songs, the audience could ap-
preciate the humor because its
source was understood. The
group's singing was poslished to
perfection. They seemed as if
they really understood the
language, and were not just sing-
ing foriegn words from a page.
After intermission, the pro-
gram consisted of American
works, it began with William Bill-
ing's "Three Songs of
Soloman The second of these
songs, "I Change You, O Ye
Daughters of Jerusalem gave
the singers a chance to sing in-
dividually, and it was interesting
to hear how the voiced sounded
alone. The countertenor, William
Zukof, was the most remarkable.
He hit some beautiful high notes
while showing little effort at all.
It was truely amazing.
The group went on to sing
American spirituals and sacred
songs. The tempo of these songs
ranged from rousing and fast to
slow and moving.
Three Duke Ellington com-
positions highlighted the last por-
tion of the concert. The sextet
showed they really enjoyed per-
forming these swing pieces, and
this made the songs more en-
joyable to hear and to watch. The
third selection, 'It Don't Mean a
Thing was especially enjoyable.
The first half of the concert
was serious, showing the fullest
potential of the performers. The
second half was for fun. There
was the right amount of each,
and The Western Wind handled
both with the same amount of
skill.The concert, presented by
The Chamber Festival Commit-
tee of The Department of Univer-
sity Unions and The School of
Music, had something for
everyone, and was enjoyable for
all.
in Niagara Falls. In 1846 railroad
officials wanted to build a
suspension bridge across the
Niagara River in upstate New
York. The bridge had to be able
to support a train and other types
of travel at the same time. It also
had to be built at the narrowest
part of the river. But the river's
strong current caused many pro-
blems.
After several fruitless at-
tempts, the officials decided to
hold a kite flying contest in hopes
that one would reach the other
side of the gorge. On the second
day, a young boy snagged his kite
to a tree on the other side which
enabled workmen to hook a cable
to the string and pull it across the
river.
Closer to Greenville, Dr.
Rogallo, a kite enthusiast from
Nagshead, recently made his
mark in history. He designed the
Ragallo Kite. The kite's design is
being used by NASA's space
shuttles to help slow it down
upon re-entry. A smaller rendi-
tion of that kite can be viewed at
Mendenhall.
Other kites on display are the
Dragon, Box, Bowed, Flat,
Parafoil, Canopy, Parawings,
Delta Wind Socks and Indian
Fighter kites.
The Visual Arts Committee is
also planning a kite flying contest
in the spring, and the Illumina
competition on March 17. This
competition will be open to all
students and is the biggest art
competition of the year.
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
St. If Kdi'or
Be Mine
There are some celebrations
that we just never outgrow,
and Valentine's Day is one of
them.
Think back
to your
childhood
days, when
you cut and
pasted and
made that big
"Valentine
folder How
perfect it
looked, lined
up beside all
the others
under the DiackDoar
Remember how many times
you glanced at it, anticipating
the big day when you could
finally see it overflowing with
cards?
That same expectation still
exists in each of us. Sure it's
changed a little � after all, we
don't care "who gets the most
cards" anymore. But the an-
ticipation is still there. I
haven't met a woman yet who
would pass up a giant-size box
of chocolate candies or a
dozen red roses.
Valentine's Day Began as a
lovers' festival (Lupercalia) in
Rome. During the ceremony,
all the girls' names were placed
in a box. The boys then took
turns drawing a name out,
becoming "paired off" with
the girl until the next Luper-
calia. In an attempt to give the
pagan celebration a Christian
meaning, Pope Gelasius
changed Lupercalia (Feb. 15)
to St. Valentine's Day
(Feb. 14).
St. Valen-
tine, a young
Roman who
was martyred
for refusing
to give up
Christianity,
was said to
have the
power to
patch up
lovers' quar-
rels. Accor-
ding to legend, he died A.D.
270 on Feb. 14, the day
devoted to love lotteries.
Valentine left a farewell note
to a young girl who had
befriended him in prison and
signed it "from your Valen-
tine
This Farewell note evolved
into love notes, and people as
far back as the Dark Ages sent
romantic messages burning
with love. From lace-trimmed
cards filled with sentiment to
contemporary cards filled with
humor, the message is still the
same � Be mine.
Photo by JON JORDAN
Bill Taylor. Musical Director of "The I)aid Frost Show
Jazz Pianist To Visit ECU
The ECU Student Union
Minority Arts Committee
and the School of Music will pre-
sent Jazz Pianist Billy Taylor in
concert on Monday, February 18
at 8:00 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre,
Mendenhall Student Center. The
concert, which is made possible
in part by the McDonald's Cor-
poration, is being held in obser-
vance of Black History Month.
Once musical director of the
popular "David Frost Show
Taylor has written more than 300
songs, a dozen books on jazz and
iazz piano, and made over 30
recordings. Taylor is best known
for his composition "Suite for
Jazz Piano and Orchestra by
the Utah Symphony; and "I
Wish I Knew How It Would Feel
To Be Free which became one
of the theme songs of the civil
rights movement.
"McDonald's is proud to once
again bring the talents of Billy
Taylor to selected communities
across the United states with Jhe
goal of increasing the public's
understanding of the importance
of Black music to America's
culture said Richard G. Star-
man n, vice president of the
Mclonald's Corporation.
There is no admission charge
for h: concert, however, setinp
is -mit � 800 an wE V m -
con. first-sere. .
THIS IS R0LAKD HtOlli too
IMAdOARPA c 3- �
e SBNATORJAKtbAf
IN6 MISSION
mfp�
a.
�.
i
I

.�
VWfPZOPU :�, � �
K : � ' �

� - v �
. ��� asm � � -� 1 . . - - -
O w -

: . - - -
��� fi cum
3C.V . �
Man-0-Sti k
fSVowrtAsJ UV�fL�D THE
fCE GRIP, AAgvi. ?�,
CUS-t AVVN , H A H A J A, , �


fe
AWA7 tV7" rw5i
33?
4
�-�
w
WalkiP The Plank
fv ca5� you ffAvfAtr ac
A Brush With TOOTH
frnLL IN 3LHRCH OF 4
-1ASC0T TOR THE CRtw
TOOTH AND HIS TRUSTED
SlOCKtCK SCCPt" COMB
THE LOCAL B4ffS FOR
PROSPECTS
JUS
a or-sott
Of -t0SE
KT TIC BAR'
�K
4
mmqfm. m � .�
manmtmmmmfmm
��
���; "& �- jfc-
f T
i
i-






HKl AKN '4. �-
Page 6
I Swain, an naie eighteen-year-old,
taring some interesting times together
4 Storm
showed they really enjoyed per-
forming these swing pieces, and
this made the songs more en-
joyable to hear and to watch. The
third selection, 'It Don't Mean a
Thing was especially enjoyable.
i
The first half of the concert
is, showing the fullest
potential of the performers. The
ond half was for fun. There
the right amount of each,
and The Western Wind handled
both with the same amount of
skill.The concert, presented by
The Chamber Festival Commit-
tee of The Department of Univer-
nons and The School of
had something for
ne, and was enjoyable for
&
A
eitor of "The I)aid Frost Show
t To Visit ECU
lion the Utah Symphony; and "I
littee Wish I Knew How It Would Feel
I pre- To Be Free which became one
r in of the theme songs of the civil
18 rights movement.
ttre, "McDonald's is proud to once
I The again bring the talents of Billy
sible Taylor to selected communities
lor- across the United states with the
ser- goal of increasing the public's
th. understanding of the importance
the of Black music to America's
w culture said Richard G. Star-
300 mann. vice president of the
land Mclonald's Corporation.
30 There is no admission charge
)wn for hr concert, however, seating
for is ' � : � � . 800 an vil' He Vr -
by c n. rirst-serve. .
Doonesbury
THIS IS ROLAND HEDLLY ANP
I'M ABOARD A KC-135 WITH
p . SENATOR JAKE EARN AS HE
PREPARES fOR HIS UPCOM-
ING missiononmespace
SHUTTLE.
6ARN. NO STRANGER TO
wejmtfssNess has Bern
TRAINING VIGOROUSLY EVER
SINCENASA CHOSB THE 52-
mrOP SPACE COMMITTEE
CHAIRMAN V BE THE FIRST
NON ASTRONAUT IN SPAC�
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
I AFTERM0NTHS0FTRYN6TDFNP
SOMETHING FOR HIM TO P0 NASA
HAS FINALLY P6SIGNATEPGARN A
space sickness speaAusr. his main
Vim WILL BE. TO THROW UP ON REQUEST
4
I5HB
QUAUFItP?
WELL WE'RE
HERETO
HEAPS
UP'
SENATOR 6ARN, AS YOU KNOW.
m 1 PEOPLt FEEL YOUR TRJP '
6 M MOSTEXWWlIWi JUNKET
�� THE HISTORY OF CONGRESS y
Sag
i N�
:i
V i I
-4 �
m-
wouldn't n be bet-
jertdletapoet
y. ,0RES5AYISTGO
3 FIRST. SOMEONE
' WHO CAN DESCRIBE
1 'S. THE Sma EXPERI-
ENCE TO THE PUBLIC
� WITHELO-
& j QUENCE
H -�
q
s
� PONT WORRY, I'LL BE
, ELOQUENT. I'LL BE
U 3 &TTING MY STAFF
n TO WRITE A MAJOR
" SPEECH ABOUT
WHAT THE TRJP
MS LIKE-
BUT. THEY'RE OH, HELL,
L N0T60IM6. THEY CAN
HOW WILL WORK FROM
i 1HBYKN0W? PHOTOS.
Si M � & OH
CERNEP7HA1 M6H7
GETINmtvAYOf ����
ASTRONAUTS LOHOU
4F7ER QU fit PCXN6
SEROUS WORRP
'X� v! -� �!��-
V
J
f I RJUY INTENPTD
PLUMYOWNWEIGHT
JHATSWHYIM'BEING
� TRAMP TO PERFORM
1 EVEN'THE MOST'BASIC
.1 A HOUSEKEEPING
WJr O) TASKS
"Njr
'BARFIN'JAKE"
GARN. A MAN
ANP HIS MISSION BOY,
THIS IS
TRICKY.
yj 60ffiU&
HI, THERE, MEN
MIND IF I CHOW
J0WNWTTH YOU?
. - NOT AT
� ,4L,SENATOR
Zft HAVE A SEAT
1
K
u
�JUST PUTIN A
W HOURS ON
THE'VOMTCOMET" VE'
THINK I FINALLY 600P,
GOT THE HANG OF SIR.
rHE FOOT RESTRAINS
a
, M
M
Vt
7
mwa
SEEMS LIKE THE
GAINING JUST
60E50NF0REVER
POESNT IT? HOW
LONG HAVEH0U BEEN
MATN6 TOGO UP
' SON?
i
YEARS i, -
� r
THE HELL YES, SIR. (�
YOU SAY! YOU THA1W0UL9
SHOUIPHAVE HAVE BEEN r-
JUSTRUNFOR ONE WAY
SENATE1 T0P0IT.
Man-O-Stirk
'Saow,
CKUS-H MAfiio-er,z(
Walkin The Plank
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 14, 1985 7
SSSSSSSSSSS
Riverside Oyster Bar
752-0090
yster Bar opens
5:00P.M Daily
Steamed Oysters. $8 K(
,1 ��� �. � y"3Peck O.JU
(Large & Salty)
Half Peck ft. O
Oysters on the half shelloo.J3.50
� B
Steamed
Shrimp
In The Shell. One Wound
Baked Potato & Salad
s6"
DINNER
CREATE YOUR OWN
SEAFOOD PLATTER
Select 4 Items Of Your Cho.ce
Soft Shell I
222
� Shrimp
� Flounder
� Trout
� Crab Cakes
� Deviled Crabs
� Clams
� Steamed Shrimp
� Steamed
Crab Legs
� Shnmp Creole
� Oysters
� Scallops
� Catfish
� Barbeque
� Fried Chicken
w2 Vegs.
Only
5.99
Soft Shell t
Crabs
2 Large Crabs
Choice Of 2 Vegetables
$599
� Deviled Crab
� Barbeque
� Catfish
ALL YOU CAN EAT EXTRAVAGANZA
(Available Any Time)
� Fried Oysters
� Trout
� Flounder
� Shrimp Creole
�& Now Bay Scallops
Your Choice Of As Many As 5 Items
�With Alaskan Crab Legs
8.99
� Fried Chicken
� Fried Shrimp
�Crab Cakes
� Clam Strips
i uur inoice (
$I99
6
Mon Tues. & Wed.
(Any Time)
Fried
Popcorn Shrimp
& Trout
All you Can Eat
$599
Super
LUNCH
:SS3S353SggS�SN
Thursday Only " '
Hickory Smoked
Texas Style
r Barbeque Beef
bj 2 Vegetables O 99
ssasss sssss ssssss
Served
11:00-2.00 P.M.
N CASE YOU HAvetT H�fK(.X,
-5U?,YU HAVE ANOTKCR.
-H'AcK of PAPERS To -5.6-M
fc
LooK,T isi��0 A. pRl4K.
WHAT Wout.fi Vou UKfcSiR?)
T05T G-&C Hg A HOT
rv
nrnpw

AND THEN TrtE CoN6-R�.�s-
"SIONAU REPORTS to REA
BE0R.E l:oo.
1 WAN MY MOMMY
Mm

fnw
Ui
t0N)H�U
VV9.
(r
V
Meats and Seafood
Scallops
Shrimp
Trout
Oysters
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Flounder
Fried Chicken
BBQ Chicken
Country Style Steak
Veal Cutlets
Hamburger Steak
Barbeque Dinner
Catfish
Vegetable Plate:
Choice of four vegetables
CHOICE OF
1 Meat
& 2 Veg.
ONLY
Steamed Seafood Feast
Alaskan Crab Legs
Steamed Shrimp
Sauteed Crab Meat
Baked Potato & Salad
$�795
Specials
55SSSSSSSSSSS2S55S�S�SSh
5 0z.
Rib Eye
$3�j
ssssssssssssy
3.25
includes tax
& beverage
Vegetables
Beets
Slaw
Boiled Potatoes
Potato Salad
French Fries
Yams
Black-eyed Peas
Collards
Rice
Mashed Potatoes
String Beans
Apple Sauce
Brunswick Stew
Cabbage
HAK�. -THAT A
A Brush With TOOTH
@TTLL IN 5EIRCH OF A
AWSC0T TOR TH� CRtW,
TOOTH AMD HIS TRUSTED
SIDCKICK,SCOPE COMB
THE LOCAL BARS FOR
PROSPECTS
WHHDONT
WU ASK 50M�
OF THOSE
AT THE. BAR?
I SEE THE
PERFECT,
MASCOT
ALREADY
Steamed
Shrimp
(6 Oz.)
With 2 Vegetables
$Q50
HEW BUB, I
IF I ASK YOU A
BIG QUESTION-
3
Alaskan
Crab Legs
With 2 Vegetables
$Q25
3
Steamed
Seafood Feast
Includes Crab Legs (6 Oz j
Sauteed Crab Meat 2 Oz.)
& Steamed Shrimp
S150
SEAFOOD DELIGHT: Choose from: Cho.ce of three seafoods Shnmp
Oysters. Clam Strips. Trout. Flounder. Crabcakes. Deviled Crabs &. Bav Seal
lops $3.99
��5S�
nmui1 �.rni n if
6

' � s ��. �� - �
s-�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 14, 1985
Page 8
pk$tes Snap L osing Streak
co-soortsEditor creak, seconds remaining (:01 iPmnd? Ac th� tMm'� traded ba
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sports Editor
Curt Vanderhorst's 27 points
paced the Pirates over Winthrop
University, snapping an 11-game
losing streak.
Aside from hitting on 11 of 16
shots from the field and going
five of six from the line,
Vanderhorst collected seven
steals and dished out five assists.
With a 55.4 shooting percen-
tage on the evening, ECU saw a
balanced scoring attack. William
Grady was second for the Bucs
with 15 points. Herb Dixon con-
tinues to produce offensively, ad-
ding 13 points and a game-high
10 assists. Leon Bass and Keith
Sledge both chipped in eight
points.
The Pirate defense also
deserves credit for the victory.
ECU held Winthrop to a 37.5
field-goal percentage in the first
half, 47.3 for the game. ECU
combined for 12 steals and six
blocked shots, causing the Eagles
to turn the ball over 19 times. The
success of the defense helped the
Pirates on the offensive end as
well, according to ECU coach
Charlie Harison.
"Our defense played well,
especially in the first half Har-
rison said. "It got us some scor-
ing � we were able to run our
creak.
The Pirates started slow as
Winthrop jumped out to an early
six-point lead (8-2) on an Allen
Washington layup. However,
after an ECU timeout, the Pirates
cut the lead to 8-5 on a
Vanderhorst 15-foot jumper with
15:28 left in the first half.
The team's traded baskets over
the next five minutes. Moreover,
the Pirate intensity level was
more apparent. The ECU players
seemed to have the motivation
that was with them in the early
stages of the season.
When Vanderhorst scored on a
layup with 11:15 remaining in the
opening period, ECU tied the
game for 16-16.
Washington answered for the
Eagles, putting Winthrop up
18-16 with 10:20 left until the
half. Grady knotted the game at
18-18 on a 16 footer. Then both
team's swapped baskets to tie the
score for the final time.
Vanderhorst netted a corner
jumpshot to give ECU a 22-20
lead with 7:51 left in the first
half. Once in the lead, ECU
managed to hold on and outscore
the Eagles 11-3 over the remain-
ing minutes of the opening half.
Freshman Dixon scored four
points over the ECU run, in-
cluding an eight footer with :10
seconds remaining (:03 Seconds
left on the 45-second shot clock).
This gave the Pirates a 33-23
halftime advantage.
Coach Harrison was pleased to
get a win, but admits it didn't
come easy.
"I'm happy with the win,
though it wasn't a pretty one
Harrison said. "Winthrop is a
pretty darn good team. Our
perimeter people bailed us out
again. "
In the second half, ECU shot
61.5 percent from the floor while
Winthrop hit 54.8. Furthermore,
11 second-half turnovers hurt any
comeback that Winthrop had in
mind.
Bass' eight-foot turnaround
jumper gave ECU a quick
12-point lead, 35-23. But the
Eagles retaliated, scoring the next
six points. Fred McKinnon's 12
footer with 16:53 to play, clipped
the Pirate lead to 35-29.
The relentless ECU trapping
defense enabled the Pirates to
outscore Winthrop 19-10 over the
next seven minutes of action.
Steals by Vanderhorst and Scott
Hardy turned into easy transition
baskets for the Pirates. When
Hardy assisted Dixon on a layup
with 9:31 left, ECU opened its
biggest lead of the game, 15
points (54-39).
As the team's traded baskets
over the next four minutes, Win-
throp was able to come within as
few as eight points on three
separate occasions.
Vanderhorst and Dixon com-
bined to hit eight of 11 free
throws in the last 2:58 of the con-
test. This iced the game for the
Pirates, who went on to win easi-
ly 74-66.
For the Eagles, Mckinnon lead
with 18 points. Washington add-
ed 17 and Jon Bowman had 10.
Brian Pope and Peter
Scantleberry each added eight
points.
Coach Harrison was jubilate
but believes the Pirates must still
work hard. Also, he sees a tough
battle in Richmond this weekend.
"We have to keep working
he said. "We have to do the
things that we're capable of do-
ing.
"We played Richmond tough
at their home last time Har-
rison continued. "They hurt us
inside � Woolfolk (Peter) and
Davis (John). We've got to keep
them off the boards
With the victory ECU is now
6-15 on the year.
The Pirates will be at home on
Saturday night Feb. 16 to host
the ECAC South's second place
Richmond Spiders.
4 . , . �. . . John Jordan � ECU Photo Lab
Curt Vanderhorst (11) dunks for two of his game-high 27 points in the
Pirate win over Winthrop last night in Minges Coliseum.
Anderson Successful
For Pirate Tracksters
. �v� �� iviiiuuuiiu spiuers.
Lady Pirates Dominate League Stats
By RICK McCORMAC The Ladv Pirate, akn h�w � �. .� ��� . � . �
The Lady Pirates also have a
balanced scoring attack, with
The Lady Pirate basketball four players averaging double
team, currently in first place in figures against ECAC South op-
the ECAC South, has totally ponents.
By BILL MITCHELL
Staff W riter
Julian Anderson, a freshman
on the ECU Track team, is hav-
ing great success on the track this
spring.
Anderson has not placed less
than third in any race thus far,
and has had two first place
finishes.
Reached before the track team
workout yesterday, Anderson
gave some reasons why he was
doing so well at the start of his
first season.
"I'm really devoting a lot of
time to practice Anderson said.
"I strive to be consistent in every
workout, I start at a certain pace
and stav at that pace until I
finish
An example of how much ef-
fort Julian puts into his running
showed up in the 400-meter run
in Florida Invitational on Jan.
26. During the backstretch(of the
race), someone stepped on the
back of his leg, knocking his shoe
off. Anderson managed to main-
tain his lead and finish first.
The team practices every week-
day, but Anderson says he has
gotten use to it.
"Practicing everyday is hard.
It gives you the willpower you
need when it comes to the meet
Anderson said. "Practice makes
you confident and gives you a
good feeling inside.
"I really like ECU Anderson
states. "The guys really pump up
your confidence. This is a great
bunch of fellas they build you
up no matter what you do
Anderson agrees with Coach
Carson about being a student-
athlete.
"I like the academic part of
East Carolina Anderson com-
mented. "And I hope to do really
well this semester
The track team has to travel
every weekend, and usually quite
a distance. Due to the lack of
funds, their travel is restricted to
the use of vans. Anderson says
that the travel can be rough at
times.
"Traveling was hard at first,
but I've gotten use to it Ander-
son said. "But going as far as
Florida, it's hard to keep stret-
ching all the way.
Julian played two sports while
at high school in Louisa, Va.
Aside from running track,
Anderson played for the basket-
ball team.
When asked about his winning
ways � and if he can continue
them throught the season, Ander-
son feels that he will do allright.
"I will do my best, and
whatever happens, happens
Anderson said. "I think
everything will fall in place
dominated opposing conference
teams in nearly every statistical
category this season.
ECU, who is undefeated in
eight conference games this
season, has not lost to an ECAC
South opponent in their last 11
encounters with league members.
In games against conference
teams this season, ECU has
averaged 78 points per contest,
while allowing opponents only
62.
The two areas that best ac-
count for The Lady Pirates' suc-
cess this season are, the field-goal
shooting percentages and the re-
bounding averages.
ECU has made 48 percent of its
field goal tries (255 of 528), while
limiting opponents to 36 percent
(187 of 521).
"The shooting percentage for
us has improved since early in the
year, and that has been a key to
our winning ECU coach Emily
Manwaring said. "The better
percentage is an indication of bet-
ter shot selection on our part
Rebounding, an area that was
supposed to be a pioblem for the
Lady Pirates this year, has been
another area of Lady Pirate
dominance.
In eight games, ECU has out
rebounded conference foes by 70
boards (378-308), giving ECU an
average of almost eight more re-
bounds per contest
Lorainne Foster, a junior
guard from Spartanburg, SC,
has averaged 18.1 ppg, while hit-
ting 58 percent of her field-goal
attempts.
Anita Anderson is the second
leading scorer for ECU in con-
ference games, averaging 12.2
ppg. Anderson is tied with
freshman forward Monique
Pompili for the rebounding lead,
each are pulling down 7.5 re-
bounds per-league game.
Forward Lisa Squirewell, who
has the highest field-goal percen-
tage on the team at 60 percent, is
in double figures at 12.0 ppg.
Squirewell is also the third-
leading rebounder aver-�ng 7.1
boards per contest.
Point guard Sylvia Bragg is the
fourth Lady Pirate in double
digit scoring, averaging 10.7
Doints per contest.
The Lady Pirates are definitely
in the driver's seat to finish first
in the regular-season standings.
Five of their eight league vic-
tories have come on the road,
with a trip to UNC-Wilmington
being the only road game left on
the schedule.
The remaining three games will
be played in the friendly confines
of Minges Coliseum, where ECU
has never lost a ECAC South
game (13-0 in two seasons).
William & Mary, James
Madison and Richmond all will
come to Greenville to battle the
league leading Lady Pirates.
"The best thing about our
schedule is that three of the last
four conference games are at
home Manwaring said. "It's a
lot easier to play at home than it
is to play on the road
Saturday's game against
William & Mary will pit the Lady
Pirates against the last place team
in the league. The Indians are 0-8
in the ECAC South, and 2-19
overall.
The game was originally
scheduled to start at 5:30, with
the the men's game against Rich-
immd'Timnetn'artry foliowin'g.
The game will now start two
hours earlier at 3:30.
On Monday night at 7:30 the
Lady Pirates will play second
place James Madison in Minges.
The Dukes will enter the contest
in second place in the league stan-
dings with a 7-1 conference
record and a 17-5 record overall.
"It would be easy to look past
William & Mary and think about
James Madison Manwaring
said.
"It's going to be a tough game.
I'm glad that it's on our home
floor she said. "Last time we
were able to pull together as a
team and send the game into
overtime. We don't want to get
behind, we know what they are
capable 6F doing she con-
tinued. "Hopefully, we won't
wait very long to start playing
well this time
Miller Consistent Swimmer
Football Recruits
The ECU football office has
released a partial list of 1985
football signings. Eight players
from five states signed with the
Pirates on Wednesday, the first
day recruits could sign.
Below is a list of those who
signed:
Reggie Mckinney, 5-10, 185
pound running back from
Southern Wayne high school in
Mount Olive, NC.
Cedric Ray, 6-3, 215 pound
tight end-linebacker from E.E.
Smith high school in Fayetteville,
NC.
Steve Englehart, 6-1, 220
pound linebacker from St.
Vincent-St. Mary's in Akron,
Ohio.
Willie Lewis, 5-9, 175 pound
running back from Valdosta high
school in Valdosta, Ga.
Joe Holmes, 6-4, 220 pound
tight end-linebacker from
Manteo high school in Manteo,
NC.
Travis Hunter,5-10, 175
quarterback from West Orange
high school in, Winter Garden
Fl.
Carl Carney, 6-2, 225 pound
defensive lineman from Brooklyn
Casey high school in Columbia
SC.
A final listing of '85 ECU foot-
ball signings will appear in a later
issue.
By TONY BROWN
SMI Writer
"Team leadership through ex-
ample � that's what helps
make Scotia Miller such a
valuable asset for the ECU swim
team, says Coach Rick Kobe.
"Scotia is without a doubt the
hardest working swimmer on the
women's team Kobe said. "She
always does her best and never
misses a practice or has a bad
meet
The top 12 in each event at the
NCAA is then named All-
America.
Although those relay teams
had little success, Miller has
another shot at it this year, hav-
ing already qualified in the same
three events. The strong-armed
sophomore is only two seconds
away from qualifying in the
200-individual freestyle also.
By winning more than 15 in-
dividual and relay races so far
"Scotia Miller is without a
doubt the hardest working
swimmer on the women's
team
�Rick Kobe
That consistency has enabled
Miller to amass an impressive list
of wins since coming to ECU last
season. She participated in two
freshman record-breaking relays
last year and qualified for the
NCAA Division II meet as a
member of the 200, 400 and 800
freestyle-relay teams.
Note: Swimmers qualify for
the NCAA meet by attaining
predetermined times in each
event during the regular season.
this season, the Silver Springs,
Md. native has proven herself a
top competitor. With three wins
for the Pirates in several meets,
including Old Dominion, Duke
and UNC-Wilmington, Miller
has scored a great number of
ECU's points.
"We've come to rely on her
Coach Kobe said. "With the
tough schedule we face we can't
afford to let down and she sets an
example which reflects that
Miller's attitude towards com-
petition underscores her team
spirit. "We work individually to
meet a team goal she said.
"The only way we can be suc-
cessful is through cooperation as
a unit
Coach Kobe thinks the modest
freestyler has a good chance to
add to her list of ac-
complishments by qualifying in
the 200-individual relay for the
Division II meet in March.
"Miller has several more
chances to hit the time she
needs he said. "We've rested a
week and the women shaved
(their legs) for the meet with
George Washington University,
so I'm sure she can qualify with a
good effort
Will shaving legs really help?
"It's largely psychological
the coach said. "Since they don't
normally shave their legs during
the season, it's quite a change to
shave, so it gets them in the pro-
per frame of mind
The Lady Pirate swimmers
have one major goal which will
require such mental preparation
� surpassing the current
women's record of winning four
meets in-a-row. "We've got two
now and I feel we can win our last
two if we do our best Miller
said.
Miller, who has been swimm-
WL mm' ttaa.
Scotia MiUer (second from left) has been a consistent performer for the Lady Pirate swimmers this year
ing competitively since Ihe was
seven, also keeps her mind on
academics and currently sports a
3.0 average. She came to ECU
because she was impressed with
Coach Kobe, the program and
the lower costs.
"Coach Kobe takes very ac-
tive role in our train .g said
Miller. "I swam a different event
before I came to ECU, but he saw
how I kept up with the long-
distance swimmers in practice, so
he changed me to distance events.
"He's very tough on us the
modest freestyler said, "but it's
just to make us swim as fast as we
can. He takes a lot of abuse from
us. Last summer I was asked to
coach back home, but I said 'No
way
Party
By JEANNETTE ROTH
SUIT Writer
You've heard of getting on
band wagon, well, at the II
swim meet, The Party Waft
was getting on with some serioi
record breaking.
Taking the men's overal
championship in high style. 77
Party Wagon won eleven of ti
thirteen swimming events. Tin
set five new intramural records
The team of ex-ECl swimmer
included Chip Green. Mat.
McDonald, Bobby Michurd, En
Stevens, Perry Newman. Marj
Zelenz, Joey Jacobs and Nel
Presson. They flew through th
water, making a splash in ever
event except the 100-van
freestyle and 100-yard inner-tul
relay.
S1
ou
L
Tired of waiting

Select a one-Dear:
Enjoy fully ec- ppedkrl
spacious
.Onvpnicnt!
Tar
ESTATr
Going Home
But Need A Pll
Tar River Estates h
ECU students - Rel
keep your apt. REN"
come by Tar River
St. No. 1.
Z�
ATTEN
O-M vou MONEsrj
UK.E TO H
- 1 mucr-r
"DO SOU :
POLT 0C NOU12.
U HOURI
'�. r
1
oc
fatf
uzi
: m?
Pal
Happ H.u'
ith 2 lor 1 Highhj I
plus Dnnk Special
�� � - - x: - - - - - I
- Oinm h j- -
Beau I is located tn thrar.ti
AH a�X Nn a -1
Frida The 4th & Sth girt foi
Re there .
Any clur- BVMMtl tront oc cryafl
MCUU � C�r�Tr
A
zZ2ZT-
mm
tm
n
k
i
! t






f
Page 8
treak
As the team's traded baskets
Her the next tour minutes, Win-
firop wa able to come within as
e as eight points on three
-eparate occasions.
anderhorst and Dixon corn-
ed to hit eight of 11 free
irows in the last 2:58 of the con-
st. This iced the game for the
irates, who went on to win easi-
For the Eagles, Mekinnon lead
ith 18 points. Washington add-
J 17 and Jon Bowman had 10.
nan Pope and Peter
antleberry each added eight
tch Harrison was jubilate
t beliees the Pirates must still
uk hard. lso, he sees a tough
I i ittle in Richmond this weekend.
"We ha.e to keep working
d. "We have to do the
that we're capable of do-
"We played Richmond tough
their home last time Har-
�on continued. "They hurt us
side � Woolfolk (Peter) and
ivis (John). We've got to keep
em off the boards
With the victory ECU is now
15 on the year.
The Pirates will be at home on
turday night Feb. 16 to host
: ECAC South's second place
:hmond Spiders.
e Stats
lady Pirates will play second
Mace James Madison in Minges.
Te Dukes will enter the contest
second place in the league stan-
flngs with a 7-1 conference
:ord and a 17-5 record overall.
It would be easy to look past
!liam & Mary and think about
imes Madison Manwaring

'It's going to be a tough game,
i glad that it's on our home
icor she said. "Last time we
ere able to pull together as a
Jam and send the game into
ertime. We den't want to get
srnnd, we know what they are
- sable' of doing she con-
med. "Hopefully, we won't
lait very long to start playing
fell this time
ecruits
hio.
iWillie Lewis, 5-9, 175 pound
ming back from Valdosta high
100I in Valdosta, Ga.
Joe Holmes, 6-4, 220 pound
knt end-linebacker from
anteo high school in Manteo,
ravis Hunter,5-10, 175
larterback from West Orange
$h school in, Winter Garden,
Carl Carney, 6-2, 225 pound
fensive lineman from Brooklyn
sey high school in Columbia,
final listing of '85 ECU foot-
signings will appear in a later
Bucs
AhiUl
ly Pirate swimmers this year.
He's very tough on us the
lest freestyler said, "but it's
to make us swim as fast as we
I He takes a lot of abuse from
(Last summer I was asked to
h back home, but I said �No
Party Wagon Wins Swim Meet
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14. 1985
ByJEANNETTEROTH
SlafT Writer VB"
You've heard of getting on the
band wagon, well, at the IRS
swim meet, The Party Wagon
was getting on with some serious
record breaking.
Taking the men's overall
championship in high style, The
Party Wagon won eleven of the
thirteen swimming events. They
set five new intramural records.
The team of ex-ECU swimmers
included Chip Green, Matt
McDonald, Bobby Michurd, Eric
Stevens, Perry Newman, Mark
Zelenz, Joey Jacobs and Neil uwa,
Presson. They flew through the with the title by winning three of
water, making a splash in every the relay events and two in-
event except the 100-yard dividual races,
freestyle and 100-yard inner-tube Nan George swam in-
dependently into four first places
Matt McDonald set records in and two intramural records.
! � 50"yard beaststroke and the George set record times in the 100
100-yard individual medley. freestyle and 50-yard butterfly.
Perry Newman was also vie- The ex-ECU women's swimmer
tonous m the butterfly events. proved she still has what it takes.
Scott s Killer Whales, Kappa Close behind the top com-
Sigma A, Sig Ep A, Phi Kappa petitors were the Goldenhearts.
Tau A, Lambda Chi Alpha and They won the 100-yard inner-
the Jarvis Strokers all put in fine
performances. David Feast of
Lambda Chi placed first in the
100-yard freestyle event while
Jack Mitchell and Kappa Sigma
A won the 100-yard inner-tube
relay.
In the women's competition,
Jarvis Wonderfish swam away
STEP
OUT OF
-LINE
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the dorm doldrums
behind�there is an alternative. Your own place at Tar River Estates
belect a one-bedroom garden apartment or two-or three-bedroom townhouse
tnioy fully equipped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the river
Conveniently located near East Carolina University. Come by todav "r call.
752-4225
W .VillowSt.
Office Hours
M-F 9:00-5:30
Sat & Sun 1:00-5:00
Managed by U.S. Shelter Corporation
TarlQverJ
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students - Rent an apt. by May 1 st &
keep your apt. RENT FREE. For details call or
come by Tar River Info Center 1400 Willow
St. No. 1.
752-4225
ATTENTION
Cam you honestly ansltrthese q5
HOlo to SPELL �
NDU LIKE TO tfAVH"
9
J
muckf
CAn nou consume t
"PEice A2B ?
tx sou phu it nect S54a , tc coorej&ure
Pact of vojfet&this?
I OR AncorTRb 6RAB nvi vaitrmn?
i 6"en6 rt -io ot-Dtf -f&une xr)n
February 04 cm f0O?.
(-1 M 15510k
fRf
noun
1 wrm a
8 2 - wiwour


-ulAr A
LIViL O.lfX
TntHETi tc sr Vabcy) ujrm
C mnn out & party with the ASA s at the best Valentine s Party
in Greenville at the One i Only Beau s of course'
Beau s is located in the Carolina East Centre. Phone 756-6401
Bau s is a private club for mrmbtrs and their gunls ae 19 4 abovr
All ABC P-imm Memberships available al the door
- Guesfs art uwicom
Friday: The 4th & 5th girl, for Girl of the Month will be picked.
Be there, it may be you!
Any club fraternity, soronty or organiiation wishing to hold a happy hour
social or private party contact us'
i�) a as
tube relay and took the prize in
the 50-yard backstroke with Pat-
ty McGinley at the helm. The Phi
Kappa Tau LiV Sis and Army
ROTC swam competitively for
their namesakes.
The racquetball doubles tour-
nament has begun with some
strong performances by top
men's and women's swingers.
Last years champs, Raymond
Song and Jim Hunt lead the
men's league with an undefeated
2-0 record.
consolidated
Theatres
The pair of leading lady rac-
quetballers also boast a 2-0
record. Robbie Tweed and Kim
Swinson will try for the 1985
championship.
The Budweiser arm-wrestling
competition is heading for an ex-
citing conclusion. IRS top pick in
the 150 pound and under divi-
sion, Garry Bishop has strong
armed his way into the semi-
finals. Scott Dover upset John
Savage to make the cut. Dover,
Bill Kern and Garey Wood will
join Bishop.
Robbie Rice leads in the
151-175 class. IRS pick Reggie
McDonald, has high hopes for
this year's championship in the
176-199 weight class. Good Luck
to all the IRS finalists.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buv Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
J All Transactions Confidential ,
75-0322 &
Hour: 9:00m. . irm Mom-Si $
�E2
ttMIMffiiJi)
BUCCANEER MOVIES
SCREEN I
Beverly Hills Cop � R
9:00 Only
Starts Friday
SCREEN I
The Mean Season � R
1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00
SCREEN II
The Killing Field � R
2j00 5:00 8:15
SCREEN III
A Passage to India � PG
1:30 4:45 8:00
SCREEN I
Marylyn Chambers Stars in
Insatiable Part II � X
LATE SHOWS FRI-SAT
Open 11:00 �start? 11:30
SCKEEN II
Special I ate Show Fri-Sat
Beverh Hills Cop - R
ATTIC
SAT-to concert -PKM with Nightwatch
SUN � Rolling Stones Video (rotc)
CAMP TON-A-WANDAH
Student Opportunities
We are looking for girls interested in be-
ing counselors � activity instructors in a
private girls camp located in Henderson-
ville, N.C. Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WSI), Horseback riding, Ten-
nis, Backpacking, Archery, Canoeing,
Gymnastics, Crafts, also, Basketball, Com-
puters, Soccer, Cheerleading, Drama,
Nature study, Field Hockey. If your school
offers a Summer Internship program we
will be glad to help. Inquiries � Morgan
Haynes, P.O. Box 400 C, Tryon, NC,
28782.
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concert
The Gary Stallings Band
Saturday Feb. 16
Doors Open At 8:00
Concert At 9:00
��mfM(mem�Mt.f,ffWfw �MM,MrV7m,
ROUTE CHANGE t
The SGA Transit will revert back to
its old operating schedule of the
Gold Route after 6 p.m. starting
Monday Feb. 18th.
��� :��
The No. 12
JUSTRIGHTFOR "J
STEAKONABUDGCT "
Sirloin
No. 12 $1.99 I
Tues. andThurs.
For Lunch
and Dinner
�tt
Potato Fixin's
Bar
With Your Meal
THIS
VALENTINES
DAY
KISS
Buy any footlong & get a
2nd Footlong 99 All day
Thursday, February 14th.
!
"Loupies umy
208 E.
Fifth St
Sandwiches & Salads
758-7979
East Carolina
Dance Theatre
East Carolina Playhouse
McGinnis Theatre
February20-23 - 8 IS pm
ECU Students: $3 00
General Public $4 00
Call 7S7-6390
rl
I






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 14. 1985
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Need
roommate to share expenses in nice
3 bedroom apt. at Eastbrook. Rent-
$100 and Vb utilities. Call 758-0364 bet-
ween 4 i 7 p.m. Please keep trying.
POSITION NEEDED: Aerobic Ex
cercise Instructor. Primarily
daytime hours. Apply at Greenville
Athletic Club.
NEEDED: A middle-aged single
lady to be a live-in house mother for
sorority on campus starting May 1
or June 1. Contact Stephanie for in-
formation at 756-8622 after 6.
60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro-
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self-addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
PART-TIME PERSON: Needed to
answer phone 8:30 am- 12:30 Mon-
Fri. Light typing required. Call
758 6200.
MALE ROOMMATE: Wanted for 3
bedroom house, own room plenty of
space, pets encouraged. No deposit.
355-5318.
SUMMER POSITIONS: Program
Director, Waterfront Directors, Ac-
tivity Director, Head Counselors,
Cabin Counselors, and Activity
Leaders for YMCA co-ed camp.
Camp Kanata, Rt. 3, Box 192, Wake
Forest, NC 27587. (919) 556-2661.
WAITRESSES WANTED: For part
time work Wednesday through
Saturday. Good pay plus tips. Apply
at TW's Nightlife or call 758-5570.
POSITION NEEDED: Aerobic Ex
cercise Instructor. Primarily
daytime hours. Apply at Greenville
Athletic Club.
PERSONAL
F.P Oh that inverse of nine-sixty
With YOUR talent will surely fix me.
A scarlet letter upon my chest
Will let you know you've done your
best.
But, wait a second, what's that on
yours?
Another Mil! Well, drop my
drawers I
For a Valentine Celebration finale
Let's climax it with fornication.
Shall we?
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
Would like to thank the Alpha Phi's
and the ZBT's for a wonderful time
last week.
THE SIGMA NU'S: Welcome Vince
back to Greenville and wish a happy
birthday to Andy, Tim and Heart.
Let's throw down Saturday night at
Sweet Daddy Ruffin's place.
HOY
MICHAEL: HAPPY VALENTINE'S
DAY! Thanks for always being
mereI love ya! -Shannon
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY: To
the batbusters from the girls at the
batcave. Thanks- We love you
KEVIN JARMAN: A love story. You
and me. Together. Always. The End.
Happy Valentine's Day. I love you
I do, I do, I dol Still your little Giz-
mo! -Lisa
JAMIE J. "A NICE GUY Thank
you for all your caring and support.
You mean a hell of a lot to me. Hap-
py Valentine's with a lot of love.
-Kat. P.S. Can you play "F- like a
beast?"
ALL-GOOD: Happy Valentine's
Day. I love you. 820079
S.M You chafe me badly, but I still
love ya T.P.
DEAR "FRUSTRATED If you
want to catch this lady- run faster or
consult Ma Belli "Hi" from Dear
Abby. (I just wanted to be original)
MICHELLE: I hope you have a fan-
tastic Valentine's Day. It's nice get-
ting to know you.
-Michael
KA BROTHERS AND PLEDGES:
Happy Valentine's Day! Be
prepared for a wild "all night party"
tonight! Love, your Littly Sisters
PHI KAPPA TAU BROTHERS AND
PLEDGES: Happy Valentine's
Day! Be prepared for BEER,
BOOZE and a BUZZ Friday nite,
and a day of recovery Saturday
Love you lots, your HI' sisters.
DAWN: These words are but a frag-
ment of the feelings captured but not
held, felt but not touched I love
Dawn. - Love Todd.
HOY A: Thanks for this past year,
you've really made it worthwhile.
Sorry I don't tell you how I feel
enough, but remember that I think
you're special.
ROBIN B To the best 'HI sis' who
deserves a big kiss, and unlike Chip,
I won't miss. Have a happy Valen-
tine's day. Your big bro- DEG.
ALPHA PHI'S AND SIGMA NU'S:
The party was great! Thank you
both for the good time: The ZBT's
KIM AND VAL: Boy this year has
sure been busy. I miss you. Love,
Kris
CONGRATULATIONS DELTA
ZETA: On winning the Most
Outstanding Sorority Award for the
second year in a row! Let's keep up
the good work!
SWEET PETE OF THE YELLOW
HOUSE: Hope you have a great
Valentine's Day. Try not to party too
much! -J.E.
HEY-HEY "WALLY You're In
credible! Happy 21st! What kind of
mischief can we get into now?!
"Leave it to Beaver" P.S. Happy
Val. Day
HAPPY VAL. "NINY" AND JOHN:
It's a rare and special thing to find a
friend who will remain a friend
forever. Thanks- Your R.A.
CAROLINA SUCKS: If you dislike
Carolina: Sig Ep Golden Hearts are
selling "Carolina Sucks" bumper
stickers in front of the Student Supp-
ly Store & around campus.
HEY BIG CHEESE We like Guda
and Portwine. What do you prefer?
Remember BYOC! -J.E.
CDK AND SUGARBRITCHES:
Hope you both have a fantastic
Valentine's Day. You're terrific. -E
JILL: Those flannel pajamas make
you look so sexy. You need to wear
them over to the yellow house
sometime and party with us.
RIDE NEEDED TO DETROIT: For
spring break. Please call Kathy at
758-8016.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT IN THE
COLD: Greeks who haven't arrang-
ed for a group photograph call or
come by the Buccaneer office Tues.
or Thurs. 2-5 p.m. 757-6501.
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick-up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call. 758-3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save $.50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: Loft which meets dorm
regulations. Good condition. $70 or
best offer. Call 756 1546 between 7-9
D.m.
jWWMWWH
�S'SSSSSSSSSSSSSfSSSsS
Tonight!
9:00 til 11:00
t
PANT AN A BOB'S

VALENTINE'S
DAY
SPECIALs,
$1.00 Hiball Special
$2.00 Pitchers
.50 Can Beer Special
.50 Wine Coolers
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla-
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4-speed,
low mileage. Only one owner. Gets
good gas mileage- call after 5:30,
758-4689.
CAMPUS POSTERS: Are now
available in a limited quantity at
The Buccaneer Office (across form
Joyner Library.) Just $3 to brighten
your winter walls. We accept
checks, cash and livestock.
ATTENTION: GRADUATES &
SENIORS: Special discount rates
and financing. Encyclopedia Britan-
nica. For free presentation call
758-4155.
STUDENTS: Will do your taxes for
reasonable price. Reduced rates for
students. $5 for state, $5 for federal.
Call Doris 355-2510 after 6.
FOR RENT: Mobile homes for rent-
2 br turn. 16, unfurn- 140, 2 br furn
135, unfurn-120. No pets, no children.
Call 758-0745 or 756-9491.
FOR RENT: Beach Apts Cater to
HOUSE PARTIES AND WORKING
STUDENTS. Ideal location 8. rates.
Ocean Drive section of North Myrtle
Beach. SHORE FUN COMPANY.
Call (803) 462-7930 or 249-6903 (after 5
p.m.)
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates, please call
756-8934 after 5:30.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 756-4664,evenings or
752-6106 days.
GET THE MONEY YOUR
DESERVE: From your income tax
refund. Income Tax Service. Low
rates, call 758-7356.
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang. Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included. Call 752-0998, ask
for Robert.
FOR SALE: 1978 FIAT XI9- $2000 OR
BEST OFFER. CAN BE SEEN AT
JIMMY'S PHILLIPS 66 ON COR-
NER OF 14th AND BY-PASS.
752-2995, 757-6095 or 752-9183.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: IBM
Correcting typewriter. Experienced
typist will do all types of typing! Call
Debbie at 756-6333.
LOVE LINES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs; 758-8241 or
758-5488.
SLEEP EASY: Waterbed, very good
condition. Heater, sheets,
everything included. Call 758-5901
anytime.
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND: Car keys with white key
chain near 5th St. and Forest Hill
Drive. Call Pam 758-3411.
LOST: ECU wallet, contains out-of-
state license and other important
I D's. If found please contact Stacy at
752-9148, Reward,
DAVID: Old TP misses her Califor-
nia TPer. I'd give up a month of
DOOL for a chance to rub those
beautiful feet. All my love a
Happy Valentine's Day. Donna.
TO THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES
OF ALPHA PHI SORORITY: Have
a very happy Valentine's Day, we
love you all and look forward to our
times together Always, the Big
Brothers of Alpha Phi.
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES
OF PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY;
Wish all of our tittle sisters and I
sister pledges a very happy Valen
tine's Day- let's ali get wild at our
Valentine's social tonight at the
house. We love you all.
CHRIS ROMAN: I know you so well,
I've grown so accustomed to the
sound of your voice, the touch of
your handBut every, time you're
near me, every time you hold me, I
discover the wonder of you all over
again. Happy Valentines Day- I love
you. Always, Bob Schultz.
MONICA COX & KAREN
HOWARD: To my Pi Kapp little
sister and my Alpha Phi little sister,
I wish you all a very happy Valen-
tine's day. With lots of love Bob
Schultz.
MICHELOB Not only weekends
were made for you! Keep pour in' it
on! Cheers to a happy anni, many
more to come Your faithful
abuser, BABYDOLL!
BILLY: I want you to know that you
make me very happy and I love you
more every day. Happy Valentine's
day! I love you always, Cathy.
BETA IOTA'S: Happy Valentine's
Day! We love you! The Sisters of
Alpha Xi Delta.
MR. McB Will you be my Valen-
tine? La, la, la, la, la! Love, The Girl
Next Door.
B.A I know Florida's gonna be
great l can't wait! Just wanted to
say l "still care (S.O.S.) and "I'm
Still Lovin' You now and always,
Baby. All my love, Nita Bug!
WANNA: I am so glad you're back
this semester and that you're my HI
sis. Happy Valentine's Day! J.R.
TERRY: Happy Valentine's Day
Sweetheart! I can't wait until we're
together forever 17 May '86! I love
you with arrows! T.A.
LAUREN: I'm falling more in love
with you every day and it's becomm
ing more difficult not to be with you.
Happy v day, I love you. Chris.
MY DEAR ICEBERG: Happy
Valentine's day. You are so special
and your Anais-Anais smells so ex
quisite on you, that every encounter
l have with you is an adventure. I
love you. Titanic.
D.C. & j.g We want you again,
nuns! Can you say Valentine's
night? Love, A & J
WATSON: Happy Valentine's day
Love Holmes.
SUGARFOOT: You are the light and
love of my life. Love, Bioomegal.
FLIPPER AND PHIL: The original
Sig Ep Xi. Let's be friends again.
Have a happy Love, Phil
PETER: Do you give private
lessons on Valentine's night? It
would be ine. A future diver guess
who??
NURSE ANNE, ADEL, JOHN,
SUSIE, WALT, (THE GANG): Can
you say party on Valentine's night?
Let's do it to it huns! Love, JoJo
your roomie!
DEAREST BIG "D Thank you for
the 6 beautiful months. The times
we've spent together have been so
special. Have a wonderful Valen-
tine's You're a dear, May Ray
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY: To
the 2 best roommates a girl could
ask for, all the Alpha Sig brothers
and little sisters, and ail other
friends. Love, Karen (Karon)
LEANN: Happy Groundhog's day,
Happy Birthday and Happy Valen
tine's day. Myrtle Beach days, have
some fun in�. I love you dearly
Bob.
LAURA B I'm glad you cou'd be
here. Happy Valentine's Day and I
LOVE YOU! Love, Doug B.
SUZI: I love you bunches & bunches.
Never forget me, because you own
my whole heart, and always will. 243
forever! i love you. Robbie.
DEAREST CAROLYN: i love you
this day. Let's kill a few million
brain cells and pahty with the smil
guppies and girrafes. Love
always, Andy.
KIMBERLY: Happy Valentine's
Day. I still love you. J.R.L.
KAREN: Happy Valentine's Day.
Just wanted to say I love you and
thank you for the times we have
spent together. Love Chuck.
ANN MARIE: Your rose and B-day
present are in K-WEST. Let's
get'em in 2 wks. Roger
J.N.W Happy Valentine's Day! I
love you! L.A.H.
POOPY: Remember last Valen
tines? Wouldn't see that on Divorce
Court. Love ya, Cakes.
DEAR MR. DeKALB COUNTY:
How-bout some, Valentine? You can
B.Y.M.O.M.T.S. any day, any time.
ve you, C.A.F.
ViCKI: Love you love puppette.
DOLLY: You are a patient woman
months is long enough. I hope
swims by for you soon. Bruce.
GROG'S: Happy Valentine's Day
Karen! I luv ya, your roomy, Iggy.
S.R.B "You are" "truly"
something special We're on a
role- "can't slow down so "let the
isle play "I can't fight this
'eeling anymore" 1-4-3 Happy
entine's day. J.V.L.
B.D.W What can I say? Your
friendship is priceless. Thanks for
thing bro! J.L.
J.C. WILLIAMS: Letting you l.now
that I still care. How about you?
Happy Valentine's day! Much love,
Ms. B.
DEAN: Just a reminder to let you
know that I still need, want, and love
you. Don't ever forget thatokay.
Luv, Traci.
DAVEY DAVE: Are we both fall
ing? I've been "thankin If we are,
let's catch each other. Looking for-
ward to our road trip. Happy Valen-
tine's Day. Love "Double D"
ROBB: If you'd like me to be your
Porsche, You know I would- Because
pink polyester Never smelled this
good. -Whitney.
RICHARD: Happy Valentine's Day.
I love you, Samantha.
L.B.M To my ultimate Valentine- I
love you even though I have to share
you with Bentley. L.B.W.
GENE-GENE: Sku-de-do. .We luv
U! Happy V-day! A.G 8. AS. (The
"A" Team)
FOO: Happy Valentine's Day to the
best Big Brother in the WORLD! I
love ya! Adele
TO MY NEW LIL' SIS MELISSA:
Happy valentine's Day! I hope
you're ready for a jammin'
semester. Your Big Bro.
KEVIN LEE: My one & only Valen-
tine, besides Op Dog! All my love-
Dsquared.
RONNIE LANGLEY: I love you.
From a secret admirer.
S?ssssSi
I DO LOVE YOU WENTIERS: Hap
py Valentine's Day. Love, Richard.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON BROTHERS
AND PLEDGES: To the best frater
nity on campusHAPPY VALEN-
TINE'S DAY! Love, The Sig Ep
Golden Hearts
CAGNEY: Cheer up and thanks for
the support- Lacey.
8th FLOOR CLEMENT: Happy
Valentine's day- Love, Stacy.
ROMO (W.I.G.): Happy Valentine's
Day! Just remember I can't be tied
down and I only want the real thing!
Your Main Squeeze Suz.
DOC: You gave "all of it" to me, I
hope ! have given "all of it" back.
Happy V.D. I love you Angel
CHUCK: It's been a year and you're
still putting up with me- show's real
courage or maybe it's because you
know how much l love you. Happy
first anniversary. There will be no
more depressing Valentine's days
from now on. Love, Anne
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY: The
Brothers, Pledgee, and Golden
Hearts of Sigma Phi Epsilon would
like to wish everyone a Happy
Valentine's Day!
TO THE CURRENT MANAGER OF
THE LOVE PALACE AT 26B: Have
a Happy Valentine's Day! A.L.M.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY: To
the Brothers, Pledges, and Little
Sisters of Alpha Sigma Phil A.L.M.
R.G.C. (SNU-MAN): No
promises. No expectationsNo
obligationsJust be my friend. Hap
py Valentine's Day! The RA's
Roomie.
COACH: Surprise! I don't know
what I would have done these past
two years without you. I love you!
PUDGE
JOHNNY & VAL: To my
familyHappy Valentine's day! I
love ya- ya beautiful! Melanie.
J.R The past seven years, and
three months of my life have been
the very best. I look forward to
growing old with you. HAPPY
VALENTINE'S DAY! Yours
forever, D.R.
GEORGIA: Happy V-day, start get
ting psyched up for The Dead next
month- Vic.
CRAIG: It's been a short two years,
but in this time l have come to love
and need you. I know we will have
many more years and memories
together. The most I can hope for, is
that our future will hold memories
as special as the ones we rae
already shared. Remember May-
mont? I love you! -Lyn
KAPPA SIGS: To the best guys on
campus you will always be our
Valentines! We love youi The Kap
pa Sig Little Sisters.
S.N.M Happy Valentines Da
sweetheart! I still care for you more
than you can imagi ie I miss you
very much. H.R.M
D.R Happy Valentine's Day
Gorgeous! Tomorrow win make two
wonderful weeks of happiness. I
hope that it lasts forever! I LOVE
YOU - T.P.
P.G.G Happy Valentine's Day
Sweetheart! hope you'll always be
mine. I love you- R.A.B.
SIGMA NU BROTHERS AND
NOVICES: Happy Valentine's day
from your little sisters and little
sister pledges. We love you!
L.A.S Happy Valentine's Day! To
the one I love with all my heart. Lots
of love, GH-SS 6
BEAR: What is better than ha
piness? Happy Valentine's Day.
Lots of love, J.R.
AMY LOU: You're my Valentine
with a Heart of Gold. I luv ya and
don't you ever forget it! -N. Young
QUERIDO ERIC: Muchas gracias
por todas las Sonn'sas que me has
dado! Espero en que paso el fin de
semana formal Contigo. Feliz Dia de
San Valentin! Con Mucho Amor,
MARIA
LYN: Thanks for a wonderful year-
and-a-half together and our second
Valentine's day. I love you! -Craig
BILL S Happy Valentine's Day,
valentine. You're a very special
valentine. Looking forward to seeing
you this weekend. I love you. P.W.
EDDIE: Thank you for being mine,
you're one in a million. Happy
Valentine's Day. I love you very
much. -Debi
HAPPY V-DAY HONEY LOVERl:
Thanks for the last two years.
They've been the best! Looking for-
ward to the next 60! Can't wait till
I'm the "Mrs Love You Always-
Bunky
CAROLINE: You smile. I forget
where l am. And it takes me longer
each time to remember again. Love
you, Bobby.
DANNY: Happy Valentine's day
and Happy 22nd Birthday. You're
my one and only. We'll always be
together. I love you! Melanie.
DEBI: l hope our love keeps gro
ing and never stops. The manicott;
was great, l hope your eggs were
OK Stay tuned for another road
trip. I love you more than anything.
Kevin Lee
ROBIN: Thank you for giving me
the chance to fall in love with you
more and more each day. I Love Youf
Bear& Happy Valentine's Day Boc
THE BROTHERS OF LAMDA CHI?
ALPHA: Happy Valentine's day
We love you! Rose, KimC, ana
ly C.
DAVID PLUM: Happy Valen
Day! I love you! Can't wai'
another Tuesday night! Free's
Lover Always!
TIM RUSSELL: Happy Valentine s
Day! You are the best Big Brother!
Love your ill sis Rose Marie.
VIRGIN ISLAND NATIVE: Happy
Valentine's Day! Sorry I'm not
David H David B. Todd, tr
Brody's, Gary E or even Rob L
But I still care! Hang in there only 15
days and we're on our way to
Florida! Love- Bahama Mama.
JOE, ERNEST & FLETCH
you all, but especially Fletch. Let s
have a GOOD time tonight, put leave
Ernest and the calculator
somewhere else Happy Valen-
Day. Bozo's Mom.
DEAR CARLA: Time goes by
quickly. It's hard to believe so many
Valentine's Days are in the past
Love has brought us another one and
wil! bring us many more Thanks, I
Love You- Greg
DEAR GIN: The warmth, love
security you've given me has made
me feel extremely iucky to have so
meone so special. With
love.Oilways Oris
TONY: Piease don't smoke because
I love you and need your frienc
here with me always. hfar
CAROLINE MAE: Happy
tine's Day to a forever friend from
an eternal buddy. Have a great one
-Mike
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY 1 I
the oniy bannerman on campus or
off campus, couldn't afford flowers,
so how's this? Love Charles
DANNY: Happy Valentine's Day:
You're one hell of a big brother. I
love ya. Your til sis, Angie
PAUL. Happy j
the best REAL orother any si!
could ever have Lov� fa, Ka tta.
TO SUE IN E 2: Thanks fc
vite to the party last Saturday
Sorry that we didn't get to sta
3.00, but l really nad a good I
Sure have waited long enough! Hap-
py Valentine's Day and next -
bring a change of clothes
ADELE & MARINA: Hope you are
ready to throw-down heavily
your Big-Bro this Friday night. Hap
py V.D You are the jamminest'
Love ya, Foo.
TO MY SWEETHEART JOHN:
Thank you for making me the hap-
piest girl in the world. You are my
iove, my nfe, my everything. Happy
Valentine's Day. with all my iove.
Forever yours, ;Susanne
DANEILLE: Happy Valentine's
Day. You're a very special person
and I'm starf'in' to Dig Ya! Love.
John.
SOMETHING ELSE: Happy Valen !
tine's Day. I love you. - A.R. Now
JOHN, GREG, BJORN, KANUT
KEVIN, and TOM: The smow a
fall, but the Schnapps sure did flow
and with the Norwegians in fr
the ride wasn't slow! Saturday was
excellent, the skiing was great, thatj
the weekend had to end, is just whatf
we hate! With Gary behind bar, wel
danced until dawn, we probably?
wouldn't have stopped but all the
quor was gone! We had too muc
from beginning to end, you guys!
were just awesome, let's do it again ;
-The other six
TO ALL THE LAMBA CHI ALPHA
BROTHERS AND A.Ms: Have cs
Happy Valentines Day! Love. Yourj
Little Sisters.
PUDDAGE: Happy 4th Valentines
Day! They get better every year
love you very much! Love, Tugar
NO-HOLE, TREECE, KB, JENNJ
JOE BELL & DAD'S GIRL: Happy:
Valentines Day! YA'LL ARE TheS
BEST Sneile
GREG: Plain and simple, I love you
with all my heart. You're so veryi
special to me. Shannon
Mary D.
Mint M.
Kim P.
In all of ECU there are no greater girls than
my little sisters. Moggish you will always be
the most special girl in the world to me Mim
you make the finest lasagna on earth Kim '
welcome to the family!
Love,
BUI
� � i � � m
� � mm mtmmmmmmmmmm
?
i � ��
H
of





Title
The East Carolinian, February 14, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 14, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.392
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy