The East Carolinian, February 12, 1985






(Blft i�nt Carflliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.39
Tuesday February 12. 1985
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Debate
Legislators Approve Yearbook Ad
JON JOftDAN - tCU PWte Lab
These are a
"go for the
Pirate Profit
few of the volunteers whu helped to raise more than $25,000 in contributions during this years
gold" alumni telefund. For details, see the story on this page.
By HAROLD JOYNER
AaWWNmUHw
After much discussion, the
SGA Legislature Monday night
passed a bill that includes a $300
allocation for a four-page layout
for itself in the 1984 issue of the
Buccaneer, the ECU yearbook.
Debate centered on an amend-
ment to cut the $300 from the
total appropriation of $1,210.
Controversy arose when two
legislators disagreed with how the
money should be spent.
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne told
The East Carolinian he thought
the funding was "a complete
waste of money He also did not
understand why the executive
council "fought like hell to get
this money
As the debate continued,
parlimentary procedures were put
to maximum use as Speaker of
the Legislature Kirk Shelley step-
ped down from the chair to fight
for the bill. Shelley defended the
use of the money saying, "This
ad is a good investment. I think it
will increase SGA awareness to
ECU students and faculty
Day Legislator Richard Wynne
opposed the use of the money
and said he thinks it is an
"unethical way to spend
student's money
"I think instead of just having
the executive officers
photographed SGA President
John Rainey said in defense of
the appropriation. "The SGA
could benefit greatly by showing
students what SGA is all about
However, Kilcoyne said the
"SGA gets all the exposure it
needs; probably more than it
deserves. I don't think members
of the Legislature joined because
they saw us in the yearbook
Mike McPartland. SGA vice
president, said "We're here for
the students and I think placing a
four-page ad in the Buccaneer
would let the students know
about such things as SGA
refrigerator rentals, Review
Board and Honor Board "
Gary Patterson, editor of the
1985 Buccaneer, said the SGA
had to pay for the picture in the
yearbook because of a new
policy. "Every organization on
campus was sent a form letting
them know they could choose one
of four options in having their
group photograph in the Buc-
caneer; one of them being choos-
ing to have one-third of a page
reserved for them at no cost.
"The SGA had the same op-
tion as everyone else and the
chose to take advantage of the
See YEARBOOK. Page 6
Student Union Sponsors Logo Contest To Increase Interest
By ELAINE PERRY
SUfTWrltrr
In an effort to promote the
ECU Student Union during
February, a logo contest and a
Student Star search will be held
to offer students the opportunity
to become involved in Student
Union activities.
The Student Union will award
a $200 prize to the student design-
ing the new logo. The logo
"should depict the Student
Union in a creative way said
John Greer. chairman of the
Public Relations and Publicity
Committee.
"The entry should be 8 inches
by 10 inches, camera-ready, and
should contain a phrase, design
or combination of both said
Greer, a senior majoring in Com-
munity Arts Management.
Greer said interested students
should talk to a Student Union
member in order to obtain an
understanding of the purpose of
the union prior to beginning
work on the logo entry. He added
that students should be aware
that Mendenhall Student Center
is t separate organization and
does not need to oe reflected In
the logo.
Judging will be done by the
Public Relations and Publicity
Committee. First, second and
third choices will be made and
sent to the Program Board. A
winner will then be selected based
on the committee recommenda-
tion and the other entries receiv-
ed. The Student Union Board of
Directors will make the final deci-
sion, Greer said.
The Student Union is under no
obligation to pick a winning entry
if it is felt that no entry is
suitable, Greer said. The deadline
for �Inm Is Wednesday, Feb. 27
at 5 p.m. Entries can be submit-
ted at either the Information
Desk or Room 234 of
Mendenhall.
The Minority Arts Committee
will sponsor the Fifth Annual
Student Star Search this month.
"The show will be as close as
possible to the format of the ac-
tual show Star Search said Tre-
maine Waddell, chairman of the
committee.
The show is open to singers,
dancers, comedy acts, actors and
models enrolled at ECU. "In the
the show have been good.
Each year it has gotten better and
better said Waddell, a senior
majoring in Music Education and
Voice Pedagogy.
A monetary first, second and
third prize will be awarded to the
overall winners, she said. Ap-
plications must be in by Friday,
Feb. 15 at 6 p.m. A meeting for
interested persons will held on
Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. in the Coffee
House of Mendenhall.
A written description of the
talent must be prepared and acts
are limited to no less than three
minutes with a maximum of
seven minutes. The Talent Show
will be held on Monda. Feb. 25
at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Plan are currently being made
for the Student Union spring
banquet including the presenta-
tion of two scholarships to com-
mittee chairmen with a 3.C gpa.
The scholarships were provided
to "promote students to keep
good grades and to recruit tor
students" in the Student Union
said Student Union President
Regina Hardee. "It is also an in-
centive to do a good job :n the
Student Union Hardee said
Right-Wing Organization Petitions For Nuclear Survival Kit
By JENNIFER JF.NDR4SIAK
N�wi r.dlior
If the ECU Wolverines, a
newly-formed campus right-wug
organization, have their way,
every student at ECU will be
issued a nuclear survival kit upon
enrollment.
According to Gordon Walker,
president of the Wolverines, the
group is currently working on a
petition drive in order to obtain
the approximately 1,400
signatures necessary to hold a
referendum. If the signatures of
10 percent of the student body
are collected, the SGA will con-
sider the issue of the kits.
Walker said the group would
like to see the issue on the ballot
for the SGA elections in March,
provided enough signatures are
collected. "We want to make a
statement that life is better than
death in any situation Walker
said.
The Wolverines, Walker said,
"are against nuclear war, but we
are not quitters and will not just
take a pill and crawl in a corner
to die The idea of a nuclear
survival kit was formulated in
response to a recent vote by
Brown University students to
stockpile cyanide pills for use in
the event of a nuclear attack.
Walker said the kit would con-
tain items such as a copy of the
Constitution, food, blankets and
a gas mask � "the items needed
for basic survival
The proposal is more of a
"symbolic measure" than
anything else, according to
Walker. He said he hopes the kits
would not need to be used. "W'e
don't want a nuclear war, but un-
til there is bilateral disarmament,
it's a threat we live under every
day
One hundred petitions began
circulating on campus Friday. In
addition, Walker said tables will
be set up in front of the Student
Supply Store this week or next
week in order to recruit members
and signatures. The deadline for
obtaining the signatures is March
8. "We'll give it our best
Walker said.
"We'd like for students to
walk away from ECU thinking
that 'under any circumstances we
want to live he said.
SGA President John Rainey
said that, although he has "not
seriously dwelled upon the idea
he would rather see the issue
come before the legislature than
appear on a ballot. The issue has
not yet been brought before the
SGA.
'I'd like to keep the elections
ballots as clear as possible,
without any referendums
Rainey said. He added that the
idea "should originate in the
students' elected
representatives
Charles Sune, president of the
ECU Young Democrats, said he
feels the idea is consistent with
many of the group's objectives,
but "stockpiling nuclear survival
kits is not a worthwhile
objective
More Than S25,000 Raised
Telefund Meets County Goal
By JENNY MEADOR
Start Writer
"Go for the gold" was the
theme of this year's Regional
Telefund at ECU. The campaign,
sponsored by the ECU Alumni
Association, lasted four days and
raised over $25,000 in the Pitt
County area to be used for
scholarhips, faculty enrichment
and research programs and the
enhancement of academic pro-
grams.
Cynthia Kittrell, special gifts
coordinator at the
TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center, said the goal of the tele-
fund is "to improve ECU and
ultimately benefit the students.
Private dollars for the university
provide for our margin of ex-
cellence
The telefund is not only impor-
tant because of the money raised
for ECU, but because it gives
alumni a chance to participate in
the advancement of the universi-
ty. "The alumni have real benefit
and impact on the university
Kittrell said.
"I got $250 on one call and
that was exciting because I know
I'm doing something good for the
school. I was nervous about call-
ing at first, but it's fun and I real-
ly feel good about it said Alicia
Balint Corey, a 1984 graduate.
Eddie Stallings, a 1981
graduate, said the purple and
gold decorations and the cowbells
ringing when a call came in in-
spired him. "This is marvelous
he said. "I'm ecstatic. This is the
my
most fun I've had with
clothes on in a long time
There are over 6,000 ECU
graduates in the Pitt County
area, 60 of whom volunteered to
call the rest of the alumni. The
joint efforts of the volunteers and
the alumni helped to reach the
$25,000 goal and also increased
the base of alumni givers, Kittrell
said. She added that students can
take pride in knowing the majori-
ty of ECU alumni will take in-
terest in and support today's
students.
Helms Receives Aid In CBS Battle
RALEIGH (UPI) � A conser-
vative North Carolina newspaper
editor said Monday he asked CBS
for a list of stockholders to help
Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C, in his
campaign to take over the net-
work.
Hoover Adams, editor and
publisher of The Daily Record in
Dunn and a CBS stock owner,
declined to say how the list would
be used, but he hinted the names
may become ammunition in a
proxy battle for control of the
network.
"Well, in any proxy fight you
need to know the names of the
stockholders, don't you?" said
Adams, a longtime friend of
Helms. "I'd say that's a good
conclusion
Helms and a group of his sup-
porters named Fairness in Media
called last month for conser-
vatives to buy CBS stock to end
the network's "liberal bias
FIM told the Securities and Ex-
change Commission Friday it has
started "discussions with third
persons" in its quest for control
of the network.
The SEC filing said the FIM is
"considering, but has not finally
decided, to conduct a proxy cam-
paign to elect either one or two
directors" when the CBS board
of directors meets this spring.
The document also disclosed
Adams' request, but the editor
said Monday his role in the FIM
campaign is simply that of a sup-
porter.
"I'm just a friend of Helms,
and I like to help my friends
said Adams. "CBS has really
been getting away with murder.
All we want is fairness
"Somebody had to do it he
said of his request for the names.
Jim Cain, an FIM spokesman,
said Monday Adams volunteered
for the task because his CBS
stock is listed in his name rather
than that of a brokerage firm.
New York state law specifies that
only such "record holders" may
request lists of other
stockholders.
Cain said securities law pro-
hibits him from commenting on
the group's plans beyond what
has been filed with the SEC, but
that FIM may be filing more in-
formation soon.
Helms sent letters to one
million conservatives in January,
saying that if they bought 20
shares of CBS stock apiece.
Fairness in Media could "end
CBS's bias forever" and
"become Dan Rather's boss
Initial filings with the SEC last
month said the group did not
plan a proxy fight, but might
decide on one later.
CBS Chairman Thomas
Wyman referred FIM represen-
tatives to lower company officials
last week when they asked to
meet with him about the net-
work's new coverage. His rebuff
sparked a renewed drive by
Helms suporters to take over the
network.
The new FIM filings prompted
a flurry of trading in CBS stock
late last week. The stock opened
up at $81 per share Friday, up
from $78 38 at closing Thurs-
day. Prices slid to $79 12 by late
Monday afternoon.
"People everywhere are ex-
cited Adams said. "Even in
Dunn they're enthusiastic
Please Mr. Postman
JO JOKDAM -
ECU nmi Lab
In case you were wondering, this is the gny who brings all those
checks from mom and dad. We thought we should show you one of
the most important individuals on campus.
'
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HO t AST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12, 1985
Announcements
Education
Women's Indoor Soccer
Tournament
ro Oe neia March 15 17 tor all oroanned In
Jeoenoeot teams Contact Gmoer vann at
'S3 '22 or vaniu Mcocton at 757 6064 it vou
Bra itpreited 15 entry tee
Political Science Student's
Society
"old a meeting at J o m wed Feo 13 in
BC 105 Anyone 'ega'die�a of malor is m
'to to a"end At are planning a lot of ex
' -g even tor tne future so come ana be a
. a low'
Deputy US Marshall Exam
. a or dates tor tte Deputy US Mar
sra'i Eam are from Peb � 23 information
s ata-iade at the Career Planning and
f sceme-Se'y .e Bio�'or House Come by
� ��� now '0 ot' started n a career in
�- . div ht si me US Department of
Crawford
. von w M feature Crawford
s�fn c speaker Sun Feb 17 at
n Menaria Theatre He vnu be
� Sensational Sex Also there
Hern ec show admission s
rone � �. 'ed Don f miss th.s
ECU FnsbeeClub
irates there wn be a mandatory
phi - rm 247 Mendenha'i
nol it' you out of this
� nq Piorida tr,p win be
s ot Ultimate Bobhy
�ere
River Study
�� Pamhco Tar R ver
� ee' a ' p n- Thurs Feo
?-ewsfer A te'd proiect on
River Wll be organiied
ILO
nfernat ona. angage Organiiation
c � � ' -s' meeting of the spring
� .��. �eb '2 at 3 30 In BC 305
. 1 arc -j�c to attend You do not
-e a Corelflr anguage maior to
c an wC member We welcome an m
Come on the fun of ILO1
� �"�� Dei s
Pirate Walk
1 : e� ' �o. dc no have f.me to rtn during
-�. rneri e nave the answer tor you
. � corn The ;oggers �� run mo"
rnurj from A tot p.m Can P ra'e Wa'�
Interviewing Workshops
"i-ffPjwinO Placemen' Service
tfte Bo�on House is oHermg 'ties one
r wmi to a a rou in developing beHer
�� ��v. ng sk Irs for use In your ;oo search
� � a a scussion of how to interview ori
��� aous win be snared These ses
1 .v ce ic -n rre Career Planning
- .� p m on Peb 7 ,11 and 19 Sen-ors
� - � . �r,rCKragec c attend one of
he ses s
Resume Workshops
� o a-i- -g ana piaceme" Service
-�� - HoutM s oer.ng one hour ses
m prepare your aw- resume
��s ge ,00s without some
vi-i epo�es 'eciuest a
! you' eduation and e�
v -5 � fioip vy.i' be ne'd In the
�nn ncj -�r- 31 he Bio�ton House
ec 5 '3 and 20
Wrestling
�-� Rc wresting competition
�� . as a'e needed so come by
�nefirsi nlc Feb. I9atep.ni. In �G 105 To
s :ome Cy room 204 Memorial Gym or
� 757 W
Intramurals
Weight lilting registration lor the IRS
Weight Lilting Tournament to be held at Job
bies Gym will begin Feb II 13 Don't miss
out on me action
Limited Supply
The LSS iPRC) Society is selling carnations
and balloons at affordable prices in the lobby
ol the Student Supply Store The Society will
be selling today, tomorrow and Thurs bet
ween 9 a m and 4 p m They will also deliver
to any residence In the Greenville area on
Thurs Feb 14
West Area Residence
Council
Wes' Area presents Campus Wide.
Residence Hall Students Only' Dating Game
on Feb 19 At Jenkins Auditorum 7 10 p m
Application available and returnable to any
area coordinator s office Deadline Feb 15
a' 4 0 m
Buddhist Meditation
We'll nave a meeting Thurs Feb 14 at 7 in
room E 201 crl the Physics Building Bring a
cushion lor meditation practice
Pi Kappa Phi
interested ;n a good time? II so , iotn the P'
kaoos at their happy hour on Wed . Feb 13
at 9 p m at the Elbo Room AH art invited to
come out an experience the Pi Kappa leei
Weight Lifting Meet
The IRS in coorporat.on with Jobb'es gym is
sponsoring the annual weight lilting mee
Registrat on begins Feb 11 13 The meet wM
oe held Feb It Come by room 204 Memor al
Gym to sign up
Phi Eta Sigma
W ii be having a dinner meeting on Tues .
Feb U at the Western steer on 5th St The
time is 5 30 p m Our speaker will be trom
cooperative education This will be a pay lor
your own meal
AMA
Consumer Products Marketing � Learn
about the marketing ol consumer products
when the American Marketing Assoc hosts
Steve Johnson from Texise mc a consumer
products firm Come to the Multi purpose
i-oom in Menoennatl on Tues Feb 19th a' 4
See you 'fvere!
AMA Meeting
Come to the American Marketing Assoca
tion meeting on Tyes , Feb 13 in Raw' 130 at 3
p m We avt lots to do end need your help1
CADP
Heip promote responsible orinkng' Become
a part ol CADP There win be a meeting
Thurs . Feb 14 at 4 p.m in Emvm Han. "n
210 An interested persons p'ease a�end
Early Childhood
Education Club
is meeting today at 5 p m We will meet
room i?9 Speight Please come! I
Lipsinc Contest
PhBeta Sigma Fat -s sponsoring a l ipsmc
Contest a 14C grand pnje will be given
away Anyone interested In being a contes
lent must register with w T Roge'S
(753HM) by Feb 15 A SI reg tee per person
per act is required
KYF
will be hevmg a Bible Study Tues . Feb 13 a1
7pm in 248 Mendenhali More information
call Jack at 753 10�1
Society For
Advancement
Of Management
Don't lorget meeting Wed . Feb 13 3 Rawl
104 Membership lorms available at
meeting Deadline lor membership Feb 71
Come ioln usl
Survey-Cultural Center
This week In the Student Supply Store end
throughout the various dorms, represen
tatlves Irom NAACP will be circulating a
survey regarding the Ledonia S Wright
Cultural Center Your input Is ol Malor Im
portance so II you have not completed a
survey by Thurs , call Wllma at 753 9301
Your cooperation will delinltely be ap
predated
Financial Management
Positions avilable lor graduate MPA ol MBA
students lor summer, 1985. and one addl
t'onal semester with Federal Highway Ad
m nistratlon in Washington. D C Requires
some accounting knowledge and pays bet
ween S14.300 and S17.800 on an annual basis
Contact Cooperative Educations oftice, 313
Rawl Building
INDT
inducfriai Technology students interested In
Northern Telecom lor the summer should
contact Co op office in 313 Rawl to update ap
plication materials as soon as possible
Enviromental Health
Positions available tor environmental health
student lor the summer 1985. with a maior
utility in Charlotte Contact Cooperative
Education. 313 Rawl Building
Phi Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity
Bud Light, and rock 93 invite you to ioin us on
the courts lor the volleyball marathon lor
Easter seals on March 2cV3 at Vmges Col
iseum! Pre registration deadline lor in
'e'ested participants is Thurs Feb 31 ECU
students who participate will play their
games early sat morning so Spring plans
won't be interrupted For more in tormatlon
call the toll tree volleyball hotline at
1 800 662 9712 or write Jean Gaddy. Easter
Seal Society 3948 Browning Place, Raleigh
NC 27609
Florida
Win a trip to Fioroa lor spring break Two
persons stay 4 days and three nights in
Orlando Round trip air Kinston to Orlando,
�'ansportation between airport and hotel On
sale at the student's supply store Feb
7.8.11 15 Winner will be announced Feb 21
Sponsored by the ECU school ol Music s
Men's Glee Club
Omega Psi Phi Frat
presents a valentine s Day jam Thurs . Feb
14 at the Unlimited Touch Young ladies who
wear red and white ge' m lor 50 cents with
iO There will also be a 9 11 happy hour
Transportation will be provided by Van at
Mendenhali Student Center All proceeds go
to our National Achievement Week Pro-
gram
B4AIXOONS
botr&i J-e6W
Gcmdalr's
� 756-7235 I
Feast like a king
at Pizza Inn's
Noon and Night
Buffets
All You Can Eat!
M(IS, TL'ES & WED NITF
BUFFETS - $3 19
6 00 till 8:30 PM
Weekday Noon
Buffet w
11 30 till 2 00
$3.09
Thincrust Pizza fJ
Pan Pizza � Spaghetti
Homestyle Soup � Salad Bar
For pizza out its Pizza Inn
HWY 264 BY-PASS
NEAR HASTINGS FORD 758-6266
-Pizza inn,
Kappa Sigma Little
Sister Rush
Feb 11413 Parties begin at 9 o m Come on
girls end party with me best! Everyone Is In
vlted
Racquatball Club
ECU Racquettoall Club will hold an organize
tlonal meeting on Wed Feb 13 5 P m ln
Memorial Gym R I03B Imporant meeting
All members end anyone interested ere
welcome
Attention Sophomores
Learn how to earn S26O0 during your tlrval
two yeers ol college through the Army ROTC
Two Yeer Program Army ROTC ���'c
Cemp starts you toward our exciting Army
career Attend a Basic Camp Information
Session Tues 13 Feb IW5 from 4 toe p.m In
the Coffee House at Mendenhali Student
Center
Scholarships
The Department of Mllltery Slence (Army
ROTC) Is now accepting applications for 3
and 3 yeer merit scholershlps These scholar
ships pay full tuition and fees plus en
allowance for books and supplies each
semester For more Information contact
Captain Lllivek or Master Sergeant Boyies
at 334 Erwln Hall or call 757 ��7 or 474
Quakers arc Frltnds
Quakers lind that amidst the pressure and
noise ol modern life there is in silent worship
a healing and creative power First day
meeting Sun Richard and Mary miller's
home, 101 C Cedar Lane (can 75 7i�)
Ambassadors
We will have our next general meeting on
Wed , Feb 13 at 5 p m In the Mendenhali
Multipurpose room A big welcome to all our
new Inductees You re a great group and
we're very proud you're a part of our
organization
ECU Gospel Choir
Hungry? The ECU Gospel Choir will bespon
soring an 'All You Eat Spaghetti Buffet'
Thurs Feb 3a! The dinner will be held
from 51 pm in MSC'S Multi Purpose room
ECU students, faculty, and Greenvlle
residents art welcome Tickets art two
dollars Proceeds will be used for ECU
Gospel Choir's Spring Tour For more Infor
mation. please call Keith Horton at 'it 93
Hope to see you there Bon Appetite
Pre-Prof osslonsl
Health Alliance
win heve a meeting Thurs . Feb 14 at 5 X
p m The meeting will be held in room 331 In
Mendenheli Student Center Mrs Evelyn
McCarthy will be ttve special Quest speaker
One of rttr main topics will center on the
MED program held et UNC CH during the
summer All members end Interested guests
are encouraged to attend Refreshments will
be served
ECU Archery Club
will be holdlrvg a rrvewrine Thun . fe� 14 � 4
if- room I0J Itrvemorlai gym Events let- the
sor ng semester will be discussed We
welcome all students, fecuity and staff
Delta Sigma Phi Little
Sister Rush
Feb U et the New Dell We'll perry 9pm
until There will be e perty at the Delte Sg
house on Frl . Feb 15 We're Interested in
any girl who can offer something to our
fraternity Come perty with the best end
meet the sisters ol Delte Sigma Phil
Pre-Med
Attention oftlcers. member, and pledges.
There will bee meeting Tues . Feb 12 at 7 30
In Flanagan 307 The speaker win be Or
Tingeisted. Chairman of Pediatrics at ECU
School of Medicine All are Invited Refresh
men! will be served At 7 In conference room
there will en Executive meeting At 7 15 In
107 Fianegan there will be a pledge meeting
Presbyterian Fellowship
Come loin us for singing, munchies and
fellowship tonight at 7 30 p m at the
Methodist Student Center. 501 E 5th St
TKE Lil Sis Happy Hour
It's happy hour tlmel TKE lil' sisters art
having this one al Olde Towne Inn Thurs .
Feb 14. from 7 10 p.m Look tor flyers
around compus Bring a Valentine for
special admission price)
Alpha Phi Omega
Anyone interested In loinlng a Naitonal Co
ed Service Frat please can one or all or the
following numbers 75e 91S�. 75s U31.
757 eOO APO accepts an who want to serve
the campus community end nation
Sierra Club
Meilnde Welton. prolect coordinator lor the
NC Wildlife Comm in the araa ot non game
and endangered species, win be the featured
speaker at the Fee 11 meeting ot the Sierra
club Ms Welton will discuss the
commision's bald eagle and sea turtle pro
lects as well as other wiidiile restroation and
protection protects in NC
The Sierra Club meets at I p m at the
First Presbyterlen Church at lath and Elm
viators welcome
Intramural Sport Clubs
The Karate Sport Club is currently heving
classes for anyone yellow belt ano above
The schedule is Advanced classes Mon a'
7 30 p m Jim McAleneen, Thurs at 7 X
p m Chuck Johnson, wed et 7 30 p m Ann
Venplth II you ere interested n becoming
involved drop by any session in the dence
room ol Memorial Gym
Graduate Advisory Council
Just a reminder to an Graduate Advisorr
Council members We wll havt a meeting
Thurs , Feb U i' I p m In Brewster B 104
Plese bring your copies o the Constitution
We will be working on rev.s ors
ECU Gospel Choir
The ECU Gospel Choir win ceiebrete irs 2nd
anniversary on Sun . Feb 34. et 3 p m . m
Hendrix Theater Admission is free Choirs
� rom eataea uryn.i,�� �n� raeaaeejae win b
singing at this celebration Come ex and
heer some good gospel music1 Your suppor
win be greatly appreoeted
Program Coordinator
Position aveilebte for summer with state
government supervisting summer youth pro
grem ideei for personnel maior Must be
Robeson County resident end heve a car
Contact cooperative Educetion 313 Re�
Building
Beach Jobs
Retail positions evenebie r Nags Heed lor
the summer Conlect Co op Office 313 Rew
Bunding
Health Care
Veriety of positions eviieble m Hospital Se'
ting in Pennsylvania Good pay ano oppor
tunlty for professional experience contac
Coop Office 313 Rewi Building
Computer Science
Position available for summe' tetS with ma
ior companys m Fayeffeviiie Students
should ravt Fortaran Basic, experience us
Ing LOTUS 1.3.3 desireabie Contac
Cooperative Educetion 313 Rewi Building
Life Planning Workshop
This workshop s ntenoed to prov o
essistance to students unsure of the direc'io-
they wish their i.ves to teke The focus w
be lifestyles tor the future Many people M
not thmk of themselves es heving influence
on their futures, but rather ust let the
future happen Perticipents m Ms planning
win engege m e process of sen examinat.or
of present oehevors. aoe setting end dec
sior making The Lite Planning Worishoc
will meet 11.30.37.25 from 3 4 30 pin- Jt
Wright Annex
Although advance registration is no -e
quired we wou'd apprec ate advae
notification of nteres to risure ha we �.
adeouate mater ais on hand Piease cona I
the Consei.ng Center n JO? Wr gh A-�.
!757 441 lor further ntorme or :r - fl �
know you pia" �o a"enc
Coping With Stress
A free m n, cass offeree E e EC-
Counseling Center tor SuOeni �, a-
idenfily sources of s'ress f-a.r pes � .e
changes manege you' 'esponse to s-ess.
situations leem to reiex mprove se ' :on
f oence Mon Triurs Fee HI' ' 2 - Xi
Wrigh A"nex No edvance 'eg s"a or s
required Can or stop by ItM -oc-se
Center lor further nlorma on 3C A' pert
Annex 757 �6�'
MlJMMMfi
�jAL�( OF , ri�
For Your Special Valentine! X
Caspari Valentine Cards V
y German Valentine Candles AmmI Special Gift V
y 117 E Fifth Street
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Arrives Feb. 14
5C
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Mon. - Sat.
10.30 - 530
Greenville Flower Shop
1027 Evans St.
758-2774 MC & Visa ft
WE'LL PAY YOU TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER.
It vou have at least
two years ot college lett.
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And it vou quality, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to1,000 a vear.
But the big pavort
happens on graduation dav
That s when you receive
an officer s commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention vour
bank account).
Enroll in Army ROTC
For more information,
come to the Basic
Camp Information
Session Tuesday, Feb.
12, from 4 to 6 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhali Student
Center or stop by
Room 324, Erwin Hall.
aARMYROTC
BEALLYOUCANBE.
(CPS) � In us second term,
the Reagan administration will
cut most student aid and fold the
remainder into a "block grant"
program, overhaul the L S
Department of Education and in
i-rease federal control over college
course content if the conservative
Heritage Foundation has its way
The first-term Reagan ad-
ministration adopted mar.
Heritage Foundation ideas �
abolishing the Education Depart-
ment, extending tax breaks to
segregationist schools, limiting
laws tha' bar colleges from
discrimination against womer
remtroducing praver in schooi,
and cutting student aid pro-
grams, among others � a
own.
Manv observers are looking l
the foundation's new repor
hints of w hat
administration's new
policies will be.
In its Dec. 6 repor. 'M
for Leadership: Contir.
Conservative Revolution
foundation calls for a "reformed
Department of Ed- �
resembling a "three-room schooi
house tighter control
dent financial aid purse sti
and a presidential commission to
monitor academic standards
Whether such suggestions
become law pro-
blematic
"They don't have the votes
get the suggt. ins through Con-
gress, contends Rcben Hocr
' � egie F :�: r
me Advancemet reaching.
"It's no going U ippc
one sees a r
proposals "
"The higher
munity as a whe
out too mar
recommendat
par: of polic;
Bill M.Narr,a
Association o
leges an
"It's clear l
� g admin
recommend
s e r.
Saunder
budge:
pres. j

ed a
idea-
8
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U-a Phi LittleProgram Coordinator
shpj�i'or at) i�Oi for wmmi �'���
jv�"rnen �up�rvi�tins�ummer yourrl pro
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LOTUS 1.2.3 ae'aC!e Contact
Is nappy HourDpa ,� . � f .i. . a- on )'Raw B 'omg
W �� Br9
?ga
Lite Planning Workshop
. tvorkirtop � mtnata to provide
tsi stance to 5'uoanti unjure o� tn� direction
� � r v, - vn to rah Tne �ocu will
� �v e or tne tgre wi"v people do
. . �n-5e ,� ai -av -ig "fiuence
FfK Future but ra�ner u�t 'at tne
�.� e acoe" PerrK pa" n te planning
� r-satf - a process o ��it rumination
a � ows aoa saving and dec
neking The Life Planning Aorisnoc
nmm 1.20.72.23 '� Bffl )l It Oi" 308

eg is' j" s no -e
w� aapp'e. ae adva"ce
� � s � 'a e have � � �� contact Alright Anne
� -�-�� on ck o let us
CopingWVitti Stress
- � ft- �e ECU
VM H M can
v - m - t - ame posH ve
� � � HP M - sa�stii
1 , .�e ai 0'0�e sail con
Mw � - .tft -s l 2e.m �s
. 'A-f. sadvance e s,a on s SfOC 6 r?a counseling � a- c T A' g
757 66
ri'Jt'1 jl. m r.

� i� ���' fir .J ; -
0 , am
Greenville Flower Shop
102? Evans St.
'S8-2774 MC & Visa
jd
GET INTO
MER.
OTCE

tertl F ' .
u � ��� im this I
&1 00C a year
big pa M ft
ppei � �� lu ;fion day
� � reo
" � r s o rmmisaon
5 get � ur KhJv in
ipt-1 riot to mention your
count i
Enroll in Arniv ROTC
For more information,
come to the Basic
Camp Information
Session Tuesday, Feb.
12, from 4 to 6 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhall Student
Center or stop by
Room 324, Erwin Hall.
ARMY ROTC.
BEALLYOUCANBE,
Education Overhauls Plannet 1
(CPS) � In its second term,
the Reagan administration will
cut most student aid and fold the
remainder into a "block grant"
program, overhaul the U.S.
Department of Education and in-
crease federal control over college
course content if the conservative
Heritage Foundation has its way.
The first-term Reagan ad-
ministration adopted many
Heritage Foundation ideas �
abolishing the education Depart-
ment, extending tax breaks to
segregationist schools, limiting
laws that bar colleges from
discrimination against women,
reintroducing prayer in school.
and cutting student aid pro-
grams, among others � as its
own.
Many observers are looking to
the foundation's new report for
hints of what the
administration's new college
policies will be.
In its Dec. 6 report, "Mandate
for Leadership: Continuing the
Conservative Revolution the
foundation calls for a "reformed
Department of Education"
resembling a "three-room school
house tighter control of stu-
dent financial aid purse strings
and a presidential commission to
monitor academic standards.
Whether such suggestions will
become law, however, is pro
blematic.
"They don't have the votes
get the suggestions through Con-
gress, contends Robert Hochstein
of the Carnegie I
me Advancemen I feai
"it's not Roing to happen No
one sees a prayer for the Heritage
proposals
"The higher education com-
munity as a whole would not hold
out too many hopes that the
recommendations will become
part of policy and law agrees
Bill McNamara of the National
Association of Independent Col-
leges and Universities.
"It's clear that Congress is not
taking administration education
recommendations very
seriously says Charles
Saunders of the American Coun-
cil on Education. "Since the 1982
budget cuts. Congress ignores
presidential cuts
But the foundation doesn't see
that as a problem.
"We think we've recommend-
ed actions that can be taken
without a great deal of congres-
sional action said Eileen Gard-
ner, author of the foundation's
new education section, explains.
"It's difficult making radical
changes that Congress has to
okay
Her revamped "three-room"
Education Department would
house a "check writing machine"
to issue funds, an education
statistics bureau, and a "bully
pulpit" from which to promote
ideas and recommendations.
The Justice Department would
enforce education regulations.
In 1980, the foundation
wanted to junk the Education
Department altogether, Gardner
runes but congressional opposi-
tion saed it.
"The education establishment
is a powerful lobby group she
adds. "Opposition to abolishing
the department keeps it going
Even though the Heritage
Foundation has retreated from its
1980 stand, the White House
itself still likes the idea of
dismantling the department.
Presidential advisor Edwin
Meese is "mulling that idea
again a high level government
source reported last week.
A Meese aide confirmed the
administration may propose
abolition again.
But the administration also is
seeking a new secretary of educa-
tion to succeed Terrel Bell, who
resigned recently.
Such rumors lead some to
believe the foundation's in-
fluence may be fading.
While the foundation has been
"a favorite think tank and source
of great enlightenment to the
Reagan administration
NAICU's McNamara senses the
administration is "looking a little
more critically at the foundation,
which pleases us
"We feel Congress will look
even more critically than the ad-
ministration he adds.
"We hope the proposals will be
quite successful the founda-
tion's Gardner counters. The
1980 proposals produced a "mix-
ed record, too modest for our
taste she admits.
"One or two categorical pro-
grams were folded into block
grants Gardner adds. "But,
then again, the department re-
mained powerful and we still
have funding of some objec-
tionable programs
"There's an enormous public
recognition of the federal
deficit Carnegie's Hochstein
adds. "Cuts have to come out of
the whole range of support pro-
grams
Student financial aid cuts are
possible, he says, but the extent
of the cuts depends on public opi-
nion and the Congress.
"Education shouldn't be the
key target for (diminishing) the
federal deficit Hochstein says.
"There's a likelihood of some
cuts, but not as massive as those
proposed by the Heritage Foun-
dation
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uttj? iEaat (Earolfman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, utmmiMm-
Greg Rideout, Mmting ���
Jennifer Jendrasiak. ��uw Tom Luvender, oiwkw ���������
Scott Cooper. � �.�.1��� Anthony Martin, eui.neumm
Tina Maroschak. s.�j�- John Peterson, cmm�.���
Bll L MlTCHEl I . i InilllliniT Wwrr BlLL DAWSON, Product,� Mmnattr
Doris Rankins. v.w. Rick Mccormac, co-sts�a�or
Daniei Maurer, MrwrnniMw DeChanile Johnson, Adr,mt
Februarv 12. 198?
Opinion
Page 4
Press
Guv's Seal Signals Debate
Gov. James G. Martin has
declared today First Amendment
Day in North'Carolina. With the
stroke of his pen and the stamp of
his seal, the governor brings to the
forefront a vital issue facing
citizens of this state and nation. It
is a time in this nation when too
few people are aware of the impor-
tance of free press and free speech.
Because of this, some efforts have
been made to curb our right to
speak and to write on any topic
without the threat of persecution.
Through this proclamation, Gov.
Martin has decried that citizens
must seek to understand how and
why we have the First Amend-
ment.
The First Amendment, ratified
Dec. 15. 1791, states: "Congress
shall make no law respecting an
establishment of religion, or pro-
hibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of
speech, or of the press; or the right
of the people peaceably to assem-
ble, and to petition the Govern-
ment for a redress of grievances
Here, within these 45 words, our
Founding Fathers gave citizens a
way to stay informed and enable
them to make conscientous deci-
sions about the affairs of state.
These words make democracy
work.
Gov. Martin's proclamation
thanks the press for keeping North
Carolinians informed. Over the
years, the development of objec-
tive newspapers has helped the
state's people see both sides of the
many issues which affect our na-
tion. They have contributed
criticism and arguments from
every side of the varied political
spectrum to enhance public
debate. Free press and free speech
have also helped North Caroli-
nians understand the complex
issues facing our nation. But now,
more than ever, we need to affirm
our belief in the principle of an
unobstructed free press.
The framers purposefully left
the First Amendment ambiguous.
Through countless court cases over
our 200-year history, we have
come to define our present day
meaning of the press. We now
know what is meant by "press"
and by "speech We have learned
that the government cannot
obstruct criticism of it except in ex-
treme circumstances. Government
has a heavy burden to prove when
it tries to gag the mouths of
criticism.
But, today's Supreme Court,
AN OPERATOR HERE
AT pM6 MAGAZINE,
�V0UHAVENTSU6P
1
Liberal Ar
reflecting the mood of the people,
is trying to rein in the press. Of
course, it is not trying to make us a
controlled society, but any tighten-
ing of the strings of restraint is an
affront to the First Amendment.
The new Court has said that
reporters minds can be probed.
They have restricted the definition
of "public official And new,
conservative members that can be
added during Reagan's second
term will only seek to gag us fur-
ther. Already, the Court is looking
for cases to rule on against the
press.
Then there is the problem of the
people. Somehow, a lot of people
feel the press is against them. They
don't get the logical extension that
the press is them. They don't seem
to understand that the more issues
and arguments in the arena of
debate, the more chance that the
truth has to prevail. Recent op-
position to the press being in
Grenada during our military inva-
sion of the island nation
underscores this point. People
need to understand that in a free,
democratic society, they are the
rulers of their own fate. They need
to know what is going on to suc-
cessfully govern themselves.
How can the press, the makers
of public opinion, stem the tide of
opposition to its constitutional
base. Well, by continuing to bring
fair and accurate reporting to the
people. By continuing to label opi-
nion as opinion. It's a shame that
probably the most effective way to
let people know that they realy
cherish their press' freedom is to
take it away. Quickly, they will
scream for its return. Just glance at
the Soviet Union.
Probably the only way to stem
the official opposition of the press
is to elect a leader that doesn't
manipulate it. The Reagan ad-
ministration has sought to official-
ly gag its employees from speaking
with the press and talking about
the innerworkings of government.
But, how else are we to govern
ourselves0. Maybe the justices that
Reagan will eventually appoint to
the Supreme Court will realize
that, as Hugo Black said, no law
means no law.
So, Gov. Martin, the press and
the people appreciate the gesture.
We are glad you recognize the im-
portance of the Fourth Estate. We
hope you will help us educate the
people of our state and nation
about the importance of it.
.�OUR CEGAl
STAFF Wa
BESTANPAG
B9,�

Democratize Economy
Last week I looked at the problem of
de-industrialization and some of its
consequences. Its principal conse-
quences are unemployment and the
economic dismemberment of com-
munities. The ultimate outcome of this
trend toward corporate flight and
disinvestment from the economy's pro-
ductive sector will be the weakening of
the whole American economv In such
circumstances, 1 maintain, the tendency
of many large corporations to maximize
short-term profits at the expense of
workers and communities is in direct
conflict with the public interest.
From The Left
Jay Stone
I added that we cannot rely upon an
industrial strategy which promotes the
growth of high technologv industries,
such as microelectronics, because hi-
tech employs fewer people and general-
ly pays less than the industries that are
declining. Largely as a result of this, hi-
tech firms run into the problem of pro-
ducing too many goods for a market
place in which people don't make
enough wages to afford their products.
Also, hi-tech strategy does not deal with
de-industrialization. Hi-tech is clearly
no panacea.
The world economv is undergoing
very basic and thorough changes. The
accords which helped facilitate the un-
precedented prosperity throughout
western industrialized nations following
World War II broke down in the early
1970s. Now recession seems to be a
spector which constants looms over the
world's industrial democracies. As a
result, unless fundamental structural
changes are made, Americans are
threatened with the prospect of a
declining standard of living. In addi-
tion, the steady erosion of the
American middle class that statistics
show occuring over the past few years
means that America will become a more
polarized society unless policies are
adopted that will reverse this trend.
The proposals advanced by the
Democratic left for dealing with these
problems may be broadly grouped
together under the rubric of "economic
democracy The principle of economic
democracy simply means that those af-
fected by economic decisions have a
right to a say in the decision-making
process. Specifically, the essential
elements of this strategy are: l)the shift
of control over investment decision
making from corporate domination to
broader participation by the public and
2)the reconstruction of economic
decision-making through democratic,
worker- and workerconsumer-
controlled production.
American society is characterized by
extreme concentration of private
ownership and control of capital. For
example, a: the end of 1974, there were
more than 14,000 commercial banks in
the United States with total deposits of
$754.7 billion; yet, just four banks �
Bank of America, First National City
Bank, Chase Manhattan and Manufac-
turer's Hanover Trust � held 20 per-
cent of these deposits. Moreover, con-
gressional hearings conducted in 1968
by Wright Patman demonstrated that a
small number of the largest commercial
banks controlled huge blocks of cor-
porate stock through their trust depart-
ments. The earnings of the trust funds
belong to the beneficiaries or
stockholders (including many billions
of dollars in pension funds), but power
over the investment of the funds resides
with the bank trustees.
In 1XS. these same four hanks plus
28 other giants had a total of 514 in-
terlocking directorates (this means that
many of the same people sit on the
boards of directors of several corpora-
tions) with the 220 largest corporations.
This represents but one aspect of an en-
tire complex of inter-relationships
whereby the top wealth holders in the
United States maintain their control
over the country's economic life.
As long as financial control of capital
remains so tightly concentrated and in-
terwoven, competition for funds will be
heavily weighted in favor of the needs
and priorities of the large corporations.
De-industrialization is only one exam-
ple among many of the disastrous con-
sequences of following this kind of in-
vestment policy.
Part of the solution to this dilemma is
for the public to assert greater control
over assets and sources of funds that
workers collectively and public citizens
generally already "own" or to which
they hold claims. Among these are:
federal, state and local government
funds now controlled by private finan-
cial institutions and employee retire-
ment funds now managed by private
financial institutions.
One irony of the emergence of the in-
stitutional investor is that a con-
siderable portion of the half-trillion
dollars in worker's pension funds are
now invested in the equity of American
industry. (As of 1976, the total book
value of all assets held by pension t .
was $443.4 billion.) Assertion of ov,
ship and rights of control over tl
funds by the worker-beneficiaries .
turn capital investment in new p
directions. Though federal law currer
ly militates against this, a progre
administration could and si
for new legislation to turn thi � -
around.
This movement could form
nings of a more equitable distr - :
of wealth, a genuine full-employ
economy and greater democrat
workplace and in the community
one thing we can be certain; If wor.
were given control over their own per
sion funds the would refuse
bankroll companies which choose l
abandon their communities to rekx
in foreign countries or low-w
regions of the United States
Workers, presumably, would be
more likely to balance the quest for pro-
fits with the desire for decent
humane working conditions and
security The would be less like
sacrifice the environmental integrity of
the communmts s�.Vcyc Hcv . �
friends and their families must iie and
work for higher profits as well. T
same points hold true for enhancing the
degree of public control over assets like
federal trust funds, unemployment
surance and Sociai Security, as well as
state and local government bank ac-
counts.
If this restructuring of control o-
investment decisions were to take pia.e
new priorities would emerge A number
of unmet public needs might be met
These could include better and more
universal health care, low-income h
ing and neighborhood revitalizatior
rebuilding of cities and econ
rebirth of rural areas and small famiU
farms, pollution control, transporta-
tion upgrading, environmental
enhancement, energv retrofitting and
many other projects that the gov err. -
ment lacks the reenue to fund now.
The democratization of the American
economy would likely give rise to new
economic institutions and an entirelv
new set of economic priorities than
those that now guide the economic deci-
sions of large corporations. Would
workers invest in South Africa to ex-
ploit cheap black labor11 Would the
public urge the overthrow of Third
World governments to maintain high
profits? Perhaps nothing conclusive car.
be said, yet the answers seem to suggest
themselves A democratic econom
perpetuates democratic values.
Washburn Case Points Out University Double Standards
By GREG RIDEOUT
What is happening to Chris Washburn
is sad. What our nation's universities are
doing to themselves is even sadder. The
blue-chip recruit and N.C. State
freshman obviously had a lot going for
him. Every college basketball coach in
the nation wanted Washburn to come to
his school. He was a celebrity in the
ninth rade � all because he's tall and
can play a mean game of basketball. Un-
fortunately, he didn't have much luck or
maturity. And he isn't on the bright
side, either.
Washburn is suffering a little more
than he deserves to. After his arrest for
stealing a stereo from a dorm room, and
after his pleading guilty to misdemeanor
charges of breaking and entering, he was
probably looking forward to paying his
dues and putting it all behind him. He
knew what he did was wrong and that
his punishment was just. During the
court proceedings his lawyers entered his
academic history, college board scores
and an intelligence test score into the of-
ficial records. They became, at that mo-
ment, public record. And now Chris
Washburn is a necessary but unfor-
tunate example of the twisted alliance
between college and sport.
Our learning institutions now have
spawned entertainment branches. These
entertainment branches, or athletic
departments, are distinct from the rest
of the college except that students are us-
ed as performers. At most schools, there
is no such thing as a studentathlete
anymore. The term is used by TV sports
commentators and college coaches to
gloss over and legitimize the players run-
ning around on the courts and fields.
Never has this been more clearly seen
than in the Washburn case. His
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores
are low. He received a 470 � combined,
just 70 points above the minimum. The
average score for an entering freshman
at N.C. State is 1030. Washburn got a
200 on the verbal portion; he did not
score one point on his own. On the
math, he fared a little better, getting a
270. His grades at the first two high
schools he attended were mostly C's, D's
and F's, and not until his third school,
Laurinburg Institute, was he able to pull
up his average to NCAA standards. His
IQ is below average � 86. All of this
does not add up to someone who should
be admitted to college.
Why, then, was Chris Washburn �
and surely many others like him �
matriculated? Well, there is the money a
winning sports program generates to a
school; there's the pressure from alumni
for a winning team, and there's the
"PR" for the school that has a winning
team. College sports is big business. And
although Washburn's scores are pro-
bably lower than even most athletes, he
was, after all, a franchise � a pressure
even a chancellor of a university bows
under. Washburn meant more to N.C.
Sute than any Rhodes or Fulbright
scholar.
Some say that special admittance re-
quirements for athletes are justified
because they expose people who other-
wise wouldn't go to college to "new and
different" experiences. At college, these
people would attain new values and be
assimilated into the college mainstream.
Nothing could be farther from the truth.
At most schools, like here at ECU, foot-
ball players mix almost exclusively with
other members of the team. They go
through school as a unit. This is not to
say that they won't get an education, but
certainly the argument for admitting
academically deficient athletes is proved
false by this fact.
Strict admittance requirements is a
way to prevent the star
athleteacademicallly unqualified per-
son from entering school. New NCAA
proposals, already under fire, want a
minimum 700 score on the SAT. This,
plus a 2.5 high school average, would
eliminate those athletes who surely could
not do college work. But, it would also
keep most athletes eligible. These are not
terribly high standards.
But, we must not be obscured by the
reality of the situation. Money blurs
most people who perceive clearly, and,
as Bruce Poulton showed in the
Washburn case, even chancellors can
forget the mission of a university. If we
don't adopt some kind of middle-
ground standards, then there is only one
other alternative: give athletics back to
the students, and make a pro league that
encompasses the present college teams
Team members could go to school if
they want at the sponsonng institution
� if they met admittance requirements.
This solution, of course, would be a
shock to the system, but one that is
desperately needed to bring universities
back on the academic track. America is
a sports-loving country. But, we have
gone a little too far. Sports and
academics were never ordained to go
together. With the unwitting help of
Chris W'ashburn, the debate on the pro-
per role of athletics in a university set-
ting has started. In the end, the colleges
and the Washburns of the world are us-
ed by the fans. WTiat a sad comment on
our educational system.
(CPS) V�hen Iowa S
University senior Jeannette
fielder recentlv walked into a job
interview with some conservative
bankers, she figured she d,
have a change She w I
an English major
"I said 'Do vou realize that I
haven't had anv tinance
And thev said 'No p
We'll train you Fielder re
"They all said thev
had been a liberal arts stud-
" I hev felt their per
wav so narrow 1 wa-
Fidder, who will go on I �
for the bank after gradua'
spring, was, in ta inte
bv about 10 corporations
Though her .ase n
tvpical, vollege pla
foals d. - r countT
that the number of firm; � .
to hire
substantialK ov�
"Even major �orp
now giving an
ruere look at
graduates repon
quist, w: Northw
University's career placement
center and :
nual repor trad . ffers
nationwide
Lindqu iing
interest in lit
i uld n
some adrmmj
the j
I
hum a
ing-
.
.
part of a
about 1980.
Liberal an
have marketabi
skills, both written
analytica.
more trainable he
Sma
more this vear
receptive to lib
than to gra
specialized degrees.
mand higher salaries
"If hard I i
graduate to convince a ma
poration that he
valuable sk
the College Placerr
sav -
"But will
operation,
time to se:
If the trend in favoi
Valentin
Studen
J.
1L
:5
D

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'� �'��



i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FfcBRLARY 12, 1985
iTOER FOR LIBEL
flN6RlB$ Oft
WHAT
.SO
OUR l$Al
STAFF wa
BS 57ANPVG
W.H.
T
conomy
.
pension funds
n of owner -
.cr these
aries could
new policy
aw current-
. a progressive
Id push
iation
form che bcgin-
. tribution
full-employment
. ater democracy at the
the community. Of
. f .ar workers
n pen-
is :hey would refuse to
companies which choose to
T;e communities to relocate
intnes or low-wage
: the United Statc-
presumably, would be
alance ?he quest for pro-
�- r foi decent and
nduions and job
���ould be less likely to
the environmental integrity of
if communities where they, itioir
families must live and
fits as well. These
hold true for enhancing the
ibtic control over assets like
isl funds, unemployment in-
o S a well as
g ' bank ac-
truci . Jl control over
le ere to take place,
.merge. A number
might be met.
. include better and more
- i health cat - .ncome hous-
. - I retaliation,
rig of and economic
�mail family
pollution control, rransporta-
ng, environmental
tnent, energ tting and
other ne govern-
i -enue to fund now.
! the American
jive rise to new
: an entirely
mic priorities than
ie the economic deci-
�rporations. Would
- '� in South Africa to ex-
a li iabor� Would the
the overthrow of Third
fl � ; governments to maintain high
Perhaps nothing conclusive can
ers seem to suggest
A democratic economy
perpetuates democratic values
uble Standards
ana De
lege mainstream.
fi n thett
�oot-
I ith
cam. They go
is noi to
in education, but
admitting
;guirements is a
It the star
I unqualified per-
ol. New NCAA
Ider fire, want a
the SAT This.
l average, would
who surely could
lut, it would also
ie. These are not
obscured by the
n Money blurs
ve clearly, and,
hwowed in the
Washburn case, even chancellors can
forget the mission of a university. If we
don't adopt some kind of middle-
ground standards, then there is only one
other alternative: give athletics back to
the students, and make a pro league that
encompasses the present college teams.
Team members could go to school if
they want at the sponsoring institution
� if they met admittance requirements.
This solution, of course, would be a
shock to the system, but one that is
desperately needed to bring universities
back on the academic track. America is
a sports-loving country. But, we have
gone a little too far. Sports and
academics were never ordained to go
together. With the unwitting help of
Chris Washburn, the debate on the pro-
per role of athletics in a university set-
ting has started. In the end, the colleges
and the Washburns of the world are us-
ed by the fans. What a sad comment on
our educational system.
Liberal Arts Majors Have N arketable Skills
(CPS) � When Iowa State
University senior Jeannette
Fielder recently walked into a job
interview with some conservative
bankers, she figured she didn't
have a chance. She was, after all,
an English major
"I said "Do you realize that I
haven't had any finance classes?'
And they said 'No problem
We'll train you Fielder recalls.
"They all said they wished they
had been a liberal arts student.
"They felt their perspective
was so narrow. I was tickled
Fielder, who will go on to work
for the bank after graduation this
spring, was, in fact, interviewed
by about 10 corporations.
Though her case may not be
typical, college placement of-
ficials across the country report
that the number of firms looking
to hire liberal arts gratis i. up
substantially over last year
"Even major corporations are
now giving an increasingly
sincere look at liberal arts
graduates reports Victor I md-
quist, who directs Northwestern
University's career placement
center and is the author of an an-
nual report tracking job offers
nationwide.
Lindquist says the increasing
interest in liberal arts graduates is
part of a trend that began in
about 1980.
Liberal arts grads "tend to
have marketable communication
skills, both written and oral,
analytical tools, and tend to be
more trainable he explains
Small businesses are also hiring
more this vear. and are more
receptive to liberal arts grads
than to grads with technical or
specialized degrees, who mav de
mand higher salaries
"It's hard for a liberal arts
graduate to convince a major cor
poration that he or she has
valuable skills Judith kavser of
the College Placement Council
says.
"But with a mom and pop
operation, it's easier to get the
time to sell yourself
If the trend in favor of libera
arts grads is reaching new highs,
it could mean the end of what
some administrators have dubbed
the "taxi-driver syndrome the
spectre of bright, overqualified
humanities graduates who drive
taxis while waiting for 'mean-
ingful' jobs that never
materialize.
But others says the increase in
job offers for liberal arts
graduates is not larger than for
graduates in other disciplines.
"I'd like to believe that
employers have come around to
the advantages of liberal arts
graduates says Gary McGrath,
the career development director
for liberal arts majors at the
University of Minnesota. "But
that's not the case
McGrath says an improved
economy is the reason more
employers are interested in liberal
arts grads.
"When the economy improves,
employers are willing to look at a
more diverse group of
applicants he says.
The College Placement Coun-
cil's annual survey of major cor-
porations indicates business ex-
ecutives plan to hire eight percent
more grads this year than last.
Other surveys, however, sug-
gest that liberal arts majors will
not benefit from that increase.
In fact, both Lindquist' survey
and a similar study by Michigan
State University placement direc-
tor Jack Shingleton, show the
number of job offers to liberal
arts grads will decline slightly this
year.
The surveys, however, focus
on large firms' recruitment plans
and may not reflect interest by
small firms in liberal arts majors.
Stanford liberal arts grads
began doing better in the job
market in 1980 despite surveys
showing a general pall in student
job prospects at the time.
One hundred sixteen firms in-
terviewed liberal arts majors that
year, compared to only 11 four
years earlier.
Similar increases were reported
at other schools.
The proliferation of practical
courses in liberal arts curricula,
and an increasing realization that
the technical skills required in
business can be taught on the job
helped liberal arts grads, career
placement officials say.
However, many liberal arts
majors are still said to suffer in
the job market because of a fixa
tion on one subject.
"The liberal arts graduate
should have experience with
almost anv activity
Put your degree
to work
where it can do
a world of good.
b after graduation should offer you
jusl a pay he Wei an otter you
c- expenei e thai lasts a lifetime
Working togethei .tth people in a different
re is something you I! never forget it s .t
learning expert m � everyone an benefit from
!� Si enceor Engineering Education, Agricul-
i Health Peace i orps projects in de-
itries around the world are
bringing help where it s needed
u re graduating this yeai lookintoauni
p � �. ty ti put yi �� degree ti vtk
when it can do a world of good, look into
irps
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1






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12, 1985
Yearbook Charges Debated
Continued From Page 1
option that would allow them to
pay for four pages in the year-
book he said.
"This new policy was in-
stigated by the Bucanecr this year
to ensure that all groups get in the
yearbook. In the past, editors of
the yearbook have shown
favoritism to certain groups and
we want to eliminate that Pat-
terson said.
McPartland said he felt the
photo spread would get the SGA
away from an executive image
and direct it towards student in-
volvement. He also agreed with
Kilcoyne and said while it was
true the Legislators spent more
time than usual in debating such
a small amount of money, "I was
pleased with the debate and I
think it should always be like
that. 1 have seen other bills that
involved much more money and
were passed by consent. I hope
the legislature realizes the impor-
tance of debating issues because
it will strengthen the student
government a lot
"The SGA is not a spectator
sport Patterson said in
response to why various athletic
events are given more coverage in
the Buccaneer. "If the football
team had wanted a group picture
in the yearbook, they would have
gone through the same pro-
cedures as the SGA has done
"We've already had 80-90
groups respond to the forms we
sent out, almost half of what was
photographed last year in the
yearbook he said. We aimed
this new policy primarily at large
organizations such as the Greeks,
Ambassadors, and SGA He
said the six major ECU-media
groups would not have to pay for
their exposure in the Buccaneer
because they will be treated as
separate sections. "Other campus
yearbooks have been letting
organizations who want the ex-
posure pay for it and it has work-
ed well he said.
Rainey also added that he felt
taking out a four-page ad in the
Buccaneer would help support
the yearbook and help keep costs
down.
1983 Buccaneer Chosen
For A11A mericanA ward
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NmMM
The 1983 Buccaneer, ECU'S
yearbook, recently won a Four-
Star Ail-American award from
the American Collegiate Press
Association, according to 1983
Buccaneer editor Lisa Coleman.
Coleman said the award means
the Buccaneer is "one of the top
books in the nation The deci-
sion is made based on concept,
display, copy, photography, art
and graphics, she said.
The award was received last
week and received 4,110 points
out of a possible 4,500, Coleman
said. She added that almost all
past Buccaneers have won this
award.
"This award shows we spent a
lot of time and we're finally get-
ting the recognition we deserve
she said.
1985 Buccaneer Editor Gary
Patterson said the 1984 yearbook
should be delivered at the beginn-
ing of March and the 1985 book
has met all deadlines so far.
Capture
Your
Valentine
LOVE LINE
$1 Will Say It All On
Valentine's Day
($1.50 for non-students)
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Publications Building
across From Joyner Library
So telephone calls will be accepted
Deadline for ads is 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12
A

LIU'S ORIENTAL IMPORTS
Sale on all addabeads
rugs, screens, furniture
752-1750
Rivergate Shopping Center
FEBRUARY 14
Send
A
Love
Line
Fourth Annual
Lecture � Seminar Series
Distinguished Guest Lecturer: Dr. Juanita M. Kreps
Topic: The General State of the Economy
Tuesday, February 12
7:30-9 a.m Lecture No.l (Auditorium, Jenkins Fine Arts Center) Topic: The Economy in 1985: Domestic
Wednesday, February 13
7-8:15 a.m Breakfast seminar sponsored by the Pitt-Greenville Chamber of Commerce (Ramada Inn) Topic Economic Policies
and Problems of the Reagan Administration
9:15-11:15 a.m Seminar No.l (Room 244, Mendenhall Student Center) Topic: ECU faculty and students will discuss with Dr
Kreps points she made during Lecture No.l.
12-1:30 p.m Luncheon Seminar sponsored by the North Carolina Council on Economic Education (Room 221. Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center) Topic: The Value of Economic Literacy in Today's Society
2:15-4:15 p.m Seminar No.2 (Room 244 Mendenhall Student Center) Topic: ECU faculty and students will discuss with Dr Kreps
the general topic of Lecture No.2: The Economy in 1985: International
Thursday, February 14
10-11 a.m Press Conference (Room 244, Mendenhall Student Center)
11-12 a.m Rap Session with Students (Lobby. Mendenhall Student Center)
12-1 p.m Lunch (Dr. Kreps and seminar participants in Multi-Purpose Room, Mendenhall Student Center)
2-4 p.m Coffee sponsored by the Committee on the Status of Women and the University Women's Network (White Residence
Hall)
7:30-9 p.m : Lecture No.2 (Auditorium, Jenkins Fine Arts Center) Topic: The Economy in 1985: International
LIFEGUARDS
The City of Greenville Recreation and
Parks would like to interview qualified
applicants for swimming instructors and
lifeguards. Full-time and part-time sum
mer work. Please contact Charles
Williams at Greenville Recreation &fj
Parks Department at 752-4137, ext. 205.
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)���
According To Businesses
Basic
(CPS) � Big business wishes
htgher education would get back
to basics and leave specialization
to the corporate classroom, a
Carnegie Foundation for the Ad-
vancement of Teaching study
says.
While most admit they're
generally happy with their
employees' education, corpora-
tions spend up to $100 billion a
year to educate workers, partly
because colleges spend too little
time teaching communication
and problem solving skills, the
study notes.
"Higher education is abandon-
ing us own mission and
purpose claims Carnegie Foun-
dation communications director
Bob Hochstein.
"It's attempting to imitate and
rival corporate education when
liberal learning is the core of
what higher education should be
about he adds
Corporate education has ex-
isted for decades to update
employee technical skils, but
company programs are "big and
getting bigger" with the spread of
high technology, Hochstein says
Big business now educates
millions of workers a year in
courses ranging from remedial
reading to nuclear physics, says
study author Nell Eunch.
As a result, corporate schools
must broaden their curricula to
include math, reading and com-
munication, basic skills that
should be taught in college, she
adds.
"Corporate education has
become a matter of teaching
basic skills as well as narrow
specialization Eurich explains
"These studies shouldn't have to
be duplicated in corporate
ckassrooms. Especially not for
college graduates
"There docs
need for this kj
agrees Sylv
spokeswoman fl
Council on Edul
"Many (cor
look comparab
fered in a tradit
ting with lots
basics she sav
Corporations
and Potomal
American
Westinghouse
and AT&T offe-
cationai opporl
traditional coll
says, and mar. .
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12. 1985
nnual
inar Series
a M Kreps
of the Economy
� ipk Economic Solicits
: -wd-nts U discuss �uh Or
ct Ml (Room 221. Mendcnhall Slu
i dents� ii� us �ith PH kreps
Network White Residence


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Just in Monday
Shipment of Overcoats
ED. HERRINGBONE,
,v SOLIDS.
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WESTERN
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up the phone and give us
mk Delivery Begins March 1st.
- � �. r�

?
According To Businesses
Basic Education Best
(CPS) � Big business wishes
higher education would get back
to basics and leave specialization
to the corporate classroom, a
Carnegie Foundation for the Ad-
vancement of Teaching study
says.
While most admit they're
generally happy with their
employees' education, corpora-
tions spend up to $100 billion a
year to educate workers, partly
because colleges spend too little
time teaching communication
and problem solving skills, the
study notes.
"Higher education is abandon-
ing its own mission and
purpose claims Carnegie Foun-
dation communications director
Bob Hochstein.
"It's attempting to imitate and
rival corporate education when
liberal learning is the core of
what higher education should be
about he adds.
Corporate education has ex-
isted for decades to update
employee technical skils, but
company programs are "big and
getting bigger" with the spread of
high technology, Hochstein says.
Big business now educates
millions of workers a year in
courses ranging from remedial
reading to nuclear physics, says
study author Nell Eurich.
As a result, corporate schools
must broaden their curricula to
include math, reading and com-
munication, basic skills that
should be taught in college, she
adds.
"Corporate education has
become a matter of teaching
basic skills as well as narrow
specialization Eurich explains.
"These studies shouldn't have to
be duplicated in corporate
classrooms. Especially not for
college graduates
"There does appear to be a
need for this kind of training
agrees Sylvia Galloway,
spokeswoman for the American
Council on Education.
"Many (corporate) programs
look comparable to what's of-
fered in a traditional college set-
ting with lots of training in the
basics she says.
Corporations like Chesapeake
and Potomac Telephone,
American Sterilizer,
Westinghouse, General Motors
and AT&T offer employees ;du -
cational opportunities rivalling
traaitional colleges, Galloway
says, and many offer accredited
courses and degree programs.
"We don't necessarily aim at
covering higher education defi-
ciencies claims Terry
Capatosto of McDonald's media
relations department. "But we do
offer 18 hours of accredited
courses toward an associate
degree in food service
"We're generally happy with
what we're seeing coming out of
colleges she adds. "But we
need to take university training
one step further
"We're broadening our cur-
riculum beyond technology
agrees Steve Finn of McDonald's
chief rival, Burger King.
"We offer general courses
knowing they have many applica-
tions he explains. "Thousands
go through our program each
year. We have a major interest in
higher education
Other corporations have
similar interests, Carnegie's
Hochstein notes, and highei
education should take its cue
from them.
"Higher education needs to
evaluate the flexibility of its pro-
grams and its goal orientation
and teach people to live respon-
sibly in a complex world
Hochstein says. "Corporations
are doing lots that is of interest in
education and education leaders
should recognize corporations as
a new partner
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ATTENTION
If you are a sophomore or junior and
have a 3.3 or better GPA, you are invited to
attend the smoker of PHI SIGMA PI Na-
tional Honor Fraternity. It will be held
Tuesday, February 12, at 7 PM in 244
�: Mendenhall. Dress is informal (coat and tie
3 for men, skirt-proper attire for ladies). -
Come and find out how to become a part of J
our great brotherhood! �

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f






IMt I-AM l KO! INIAN
Style
1 BKI AtO 12 l�rt Pa�
EWntingjCenter
Spanning The Curriculums
B JENNY MEADOR
Mart UrIUf
Writing is a chore. Just to get a
grammatically correct, pensive,
and flowing sentence down on
paper often takes some people
ten minutes or more. People who
don't write well also try to avoid
writing situations and are ap
prehensive about taking ourses
where writing is required or
choosing careers where writing is
a must.
But, there is help. The ECU
Writing Center, now in it's se-
cond year, is the largest writing
.enter on the East Coast Dr
Patrick Biarro, director and
rounder of the Writing Center.
said, "The first year we were in
operation we learned a lot about
he types of things we needed to
change or improve, but it was a
good sear We offered our ser-
ices to over 000 students, and
we saw roughlv 13,000 freshmen
in 1100 and 1200 English classes
The Writing Center's attitude
is that writing needs to be done in
each class and in each area of
.icademia because in the business
world, literacy is required for all
.bs and skills; therefore, the new
cept "writing across the cur-
riculums" has evolved. "A steer
ing committee is being set up to
support writing across the cur-
riculum to all schools and agen
cies of the Universitysaid Biz-
arro, who was surprised that
over 100 faculty members showed
interest in the committee
With 43 teaching assistants and
Biarro. the Writing Center of-
fers a variety of English-related
services. Student programs are
the students develop an interest in
what and how the write said
graduate student, Katheryn Darl
ing.
The workshops given h the
Writing ('enter focus on four
main topics: l. Finding a suitable
topic, 2. Note taking, 3 Sum-
marizing, paraphrasing and
avoiding plagerism, and 4 Revis-
ing a term paper. I ast year 1,319
'We need to get writers feeling good about themselves.
broken down into three different
categories and four unique
workshops are available.
The first catagory, small group
instruction, basically offers aid to
freshmen in English 1100. In the
second catagory, the referral pro
gram, teachers refer students
with special writing problems
(such as connecting commas and
correct diction) to the center for
help. Walk-ins are seen on a
tutorial basis.
"The duties of a T.A.
(teaching assistant) are to tutor
students and help them with
editing skills. We teach them how
to become good proofreaders
The neat thing about working at
the Writing Center is watching
students attended these
workshops and this yeai Bizarro
expects at least 1 ,000 per
workshop. The biggest workshop
turnout is about avoiding
plagerism. "We will probably
have 1,600 to 1,700 students all
together Bizzaro said 1 he
workshops, led bv teaching
assistants, are held every
week on the hour. Regulai hours
are: Monday - Thursday, 9
to 5 p.m , Monday, p m and 9
p.m Friday, 9 a m to 3 p m
"People have really been sup-
portive and 1 have excellent
T.A.s. This ix new and challeng-
ing because we ai .Ming
edge of what net ' lone
We need to de il rea istica ith
the problems that new students,
and even graduates, have when it
comes to writing. We need to get
writers feeling good about
themselves. I hope students feel
welcomed and that we are
positive toward their potential
said Bizarro.
Does the writing center really
help0 "Definitely" was the con-
sensus of many teaching
assistants. "I think it has helped
students not only reinforce what
they have learned in class, but
a! s o has improved many-
students' grades. Students who
originally wrote 'D' papers have
gone to a 'B' or 'A said
Teaching Assistant Joy Rouse.
Mike loyner, another teaching
assistant, also noted, "Students
improve in content as well as sub-
ject matter. There's obviously
more to writing than watching
one's grammar
A future project for the
Writing Center is a "Grammer
Hotline Bizarro is also seeking
grants and writing scholarships to
help purchase computers, pro-
vide national seminars, and begin
writing research Bizarro hopes
that the Writing Center will soon
begin to benefit the whole com-
JONJOIOtK
"Walk right in, and sit right down
� C'J �H3i f
Kites, kites and more kites If
you've walked in Mendenhal!
Student Center and not noticed
something a little different, you
must have had your evex closed
The Student Union Visual Arts
Committee's newest Mendenhal
Gallery attraction, "Colorful
Kite Tales will undoubtedly
throw you for a loop
The committee rented the col-
orful kite collection, 50 in all,
from Kitty Hawk Kites in Kitty
Hawk, N.C. They also purchased
4 displav panels from the
Smithsonian Institute Traveling
E xhibition Service which give in-
formation and the history about
� anous kites. Those on view
Mendenhall are the Box,
' dragon, Flat, Bowed, Parafoil,
C anopv, Parawings, Delta, Wind
�socks, and Rogallo
"Colorful Kite Tales" will be
n display until Feb 24
Atlanta Victims React
JON JORDAN
(l PI) - Sitting in her living
room. Venus Tavlor sipped on a
Peps shed a few tears and wat-
ched her daughter murdered all
over again
Taylor, whose daughter Angel
1 anicr, 12. was one ol the 2H vie
tims ot "The Atlanta Child
Murders who watched the CBS
television movie Sunday night
with no misgivings.
"1 wanted to see it said
Taylor, who viewed the movie
with hei sister, daughter-in-law,
two grandchildren and a friend
"It was OK That's what happen-
ed .
"1 was bothered a little bit.
especially the part about Angel
said Taylor, who wiped her eyes
during the scene depicting her
daughter's murder. "But I'm
glad 1 saw ;�
Civic leaders, claiming the
movie ix filled with inaccuracies
and casts doubt on the guilt of
convicted killer Wayne Williams,
were not so receptive to the
telecast ot the "docudrama" bas-
ed on the three year killing spree
that left 28 young blacks
murdered and the city scarred.
"It was a bad enough tragedy
as it wax. and it's really bad to
make it a worse tragedy and
that's what the movie does said
Joe Drolet, a prosecutor in the
trial of Williams, 26, who was
Paul Taylor To Make Solo Debut
Pianist Paul Taylor, a faculty member of the ECU School of Music, will present his first solo recital
Wednesday, Feb. 13 at 8:15 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall The concert is tree and open to the
public.
For his program, Taylor has selected two major compositions � Franz Schubert's "Sonata in H flat Ma-
jor" in four movements, and Sergei Rachmaninov's "Sonata in B-fiat minor" in three movements
Taylor, a former faculty member at Incarnate Word College in San Antonio, Texas and Samford I niver-
sity in Birmingham, Alabama, came to ECU in the fall of 1984. He is serving a one-year appointment as lec-
turer of group piano performance and piano accompanying.
He is currently working on a DMA. degree at the University of Wisconsin. Taylor earned an NUM.
degree from the University of Illinois and a B.M. degree from the University of Texas.
Active as an author and adjudicator of the Music Teachers National Association and the American
Federation of Music Clubs, Taylor has also worked as rehearsal pianist for numerous dance organizations
including the Joffrey 11 Ballet and the Paul Taylor Dance Company.
Paul Tavlor
Traveling To Ceylon
Sri Lanka-Resplendent Ceylon will take you to Buddhist festivals.
The island of Ceylon (Sri
Lanka) will be the subject of the
next Travel Adventure film, SW
l.anka � Resplendent C eylon, to
be presented on Thursday, I-eb.
14 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Ceylon, which is off the coast
of India, is a storehouse of exotic
spices and rare gems and has a
culture that dates back over 2500
years. It is a small country, com-
parable to the state of West
Virginia.
Ceylon's people are a varied
group. The majority are
Sinhalese, but many Tamils,
Moors, Burghers and Veddahs
also reside there.
Among these races, education
is very important. The people of
Sri Lanka know that education is
the only means to "get ahead"
and realize that it can bring more
to their children than they had
themselves. Despite this,
however, one third of Ceylon's
population is illiterate.
The major city in Ceylon is
Columbo, a busy harbor town
which houses government
buildings, a race course and the
beach of Mount Lavinia.
Ceylon is still, as it has been
since early times, a symbol of
beauty and exotic romance. Ac-
cording to Muslim legend, Adam
and Eve, after being expelled
from the Garden of Eden, lived
out their lives in Ceylon, next to
the Garden of Eden � the most
beautiful place on earth.
Ralph Gerstle's Sri l.anka �
Resplendent Ceylon is being
sponsored by the Student Union
Travel Committee.
convicted in two I the murders
and implicated in I thers.
Jim Minter, editor of The
Allan Journal and the Atlanta
Constitution, called the movie
"the usual indictment of the rural
South set among the glittering
skvscrapers of Atlanta
"It is more of the same -
justice in Georgia. No just.
the South Minter said.
A CBS executive in New York
said the network received about
50 xalU during the broadcast t
complain about the way the film
depicted the events in Atlanta
"Most of them are negative
said George Schweitzer, C BS vice
president of communications
"They call and say 'I just want to
tell vou that I don't like wha' �
: '
But Schweitzer defended the
handling of the film. "We relive
that drama based on fact is a
legitimate literature that goes
back to Shakespeare and back
even to the Greeks'
CBS, after a meeting with
Atlanta civic leaders last week,
agreed to begin the dramatization
with an advisory, "The following
presentation is not a documen-
tary, but a drama based on cer-
tain facts surrounding the murder
and disappearance o children in
Atlanta between 199 and 1981.
Some of the events and
chara
said p
The set
will I
.

ed by A
ed Marcl 4, 198 I
was �
tree.
Taylor beheves police c e
quick to close the book 9n vY�
murders after s
: ed
"1 didn't like the � jry
ind h;r: guilty
murders)
said he killed th thei
too Tayl i was
guilty of the hy -
he '
Taylor ca ne movie
basically accurate b said I -
overdramatized in spots "If
anything, the movie gave the
police more credit than 1 would
have given them she said. "The
movie made it appear the p
were concerned from the beginn-
ing. But at the beginning, the
poiice were nonchalant and in-
competent They weren : con
cerned. 'Wei victims' parents)
got treated like dogs at the begin-
ning. I have forgiven, yes, but 1
will never forget
Finding A Special Mate
feeling a little blue because
everyone has a special Valentine
except you? Well, Megan Newell.
Bill Shepard and the Delta Sigma
Phi's may have just the cure
For Thursday, Feb 14, the
group has organized an "Annual
Roxv According to Newell, the
highlight of the evening will be a
mock "Dating Game similar in
format to the former television
show, "The Dating Game
The event will begin at 9 p.m.
at the New Deli. Those wishing to
participate in the game can sign
up at the door.
Contestants will be randomly
selected and several rounds of
questions will follow. The two
winning couples will receive a
catered dinner at the spot of their
choice (complements of Simply
i legant, a local catering service).
The Amateurs will provide
music tor the evening, and
Newel! said that thus far prizes
have been donated bv Pantana
Bob's. Book Barn, Wrong Uj
Corrigans, Olde Towne Inn.
Chico's. Flamingo Records.
Quick Silver Records, Back
Stage, Fabracial Too, and the
Treehouse.
There will be a Si 50 cover
charge for the evening.
Trivia, Trivia, Trivia
i
i
1. Who is "The Father of Geometry0"
I 2. What is the largest city in the world?
I
I 3. How many candidates have become President of the U.S. with a
popular vote of less than 50 percent of the total cast0
j 4. What is North Carolina's motto?
I
I 5. In Bonnie and Clyde, who portrayed Warren Beatty's older
I brother?
I
6. What is the Boy Scouts' motto?
I 8. What woman won the gold medal for figure skating in the 1976
I Winter Olympics?
I
9. Who won the James E. Sullivan Memorial Award in 1982�
I 10. What's the zodiacal symbol for Gemini?
S� Answen Oa P�f� �.
Classifieds
WANTED
PKRSO
FEMALE ROOMMATf WANTED
Nons" . � t'
towiriCHjs Lexlngl - Square ?.
TO ATMet'C Clut $!75 f-
depos ' r�aH itiiitiet -
Gurganus a' 757 M'y
after S X) p n
FEMALE BOOMWt't WANTED
Nonsrr,oe'p Par a . I - : at'
. rni J143 -
?ord Arms Aprs a ��
X ?97
FEMALE ROOMMATE A-
for 3 Dec - � ' -
� age
dryer " "a� i
p js -� Hes Ca 4 -
ROOMMATE WANTED
share expeny
3 Deoroon- aoT - - k R�
1100 and
rfvee 4 & 7 p rr
POSITION NEEDED Af
se n Pr imar. i,
- I
Atri e
CLAIRE
shar�
ea � �
LISA S
-
, -
NEEDED

SOfOr " �
j nt
-
WANTED
-�-
la P bi
CERTIFIED SPf ED
TEACHER

Home
N
SEN .
6C PER HUNDRED Pi
;ess


i
APARTMENT FOR REN"
�a ns - i-
seoos 1 Ca
MALE ROOMMATE SEFDE-�
spiit expt
Ca 758-
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Rent$115 a-
Great
rsa tm

Valentine Day C
Central Book
.
20 ECU Di
For Students and Facul
on all prescript!
eveglasses
315 Parkview Common
Aero From Doctor ParkI
pucians
WE
PAY
CASH
FOR
On Rinp Dtunoad Rl�f�
GaMASttrerJewcrtv
Stfrer Cote
'VS
WI �UY & SIU
T.V'�, Hcreo'i, ftaxm, video,
Wcydes, wstefces. btaocatan,
AJM-FM, cmmCU. beaten, food
�T��I, typewriter etc.
0tnlt SAtfS CO
EVANS, "� the
DowntowB GftCB
�aaa

i





lHfc EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12, 19�5
ictims React
:
nalized for
es the advisory
part.
he moie
night.
a hose murder
tered officially un-
v anta police, disap-
4 9i Her body
'���. tied to a
eves police err too
quick to c.ise the hook ota hc
ns as con-
two,
was the jury
gu l (of two
the police
other kids,
"It" he was
vshy wasn't
ca:iec: the movie
il said it was
-pots. "If
c ga-e the
nan I would
she said "The
rpear the police
ed from the beginn-
the beginning, the
.halant and in-
The weren't con-
:tims' parents)
treate Ice gs at the begin-
v � trgiven, yes, but I
' 'get
Inding A Special Mate
follow. The two
will receive a
the spot of their
-1 Sirnplv
-1a g service).
irs "a ill provide
evening, and
New .that thus far prizes
en donated bv Pantana
� Barn. Wrong Way
-ins, oide Towne Inn,
Flamingo Records,
Records, Back
iciat Too, and the
ehouse.
�Mil be a SI 50 cover
the evening.
rivia, Trivia, Trivia
.
ometry?"
ive become President of the U.S. with a
cn percent of the total cast?
i'ma's motto
Bonnie and Clyde, who portrayed Warren Beatty's older
I'
nits' motto?
tat woman won the gold medal for figure skating in the 1976
p
3 won the James E Sullivan Memorial Award in 1982?
I What's the zodiacal symbol for Gemini? , . -� -
V Answers On Ptge 9
Classifieds
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Nonsmoker Unfurnished
-ownhouse Lexington Square next
to Athletic club S175 per month plus
deposit, half utilities Call Janice
Gurganus at 757 6450 or 355 4974
after 5 30pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Nonsmoker Partially furnished apt,
. rent ($143) and Vt utilities. Strat
Kwd Arms Apts call Wendy at
Jit 1797
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
� 3 bedroom townhouse at Windy
R oge Condominiums Washer,
�,er microwave, fireplace $145
,lus '3 utilities Call 79491
ROOMMATE WANTED: Need
tommate to share expenses In nice
tsedroom apt at Eastbrook Rent
s K and ' 3 utilities Call 758 034 bet
Aeen 4 &, 7 p m Please keep trying
POSITION NEEDED: Aerobic Ex
se Instructor Primarily
� me hours Apply at Greenville
etic Club
NEEDED: A middle aged single
. 'o be a live In house mother for
ty on campus starting May 1
. ne 1 Contact Stephanie for in
�nation at 756 8422 after 6
.vanTED: Experienced swimmer
g .e lessons to two children ages
- 6 Call Pam at 758 3411
CERTIFIED SPECIAL ED
TEACHER: Position available im
ecately to teach multi
a capped students in a private
n profit school Must have NC A
'eaching certificate Send resume
� ranscnpt to Carbell Children's
4ome mc Box 544 Jacksonville,
n C 28540 Equal Opportunity
� -Diover
- PER HUNDRED PAID: For pro
ess ng mail at home! information.
nd self addressed, stamped
-veiope Assocates Box 95.
- iselle New Jersey 07203
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
ins Quarters Apt 21 $230 plus
deposit Call Donna at 758 5901
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses b Xk from campus
Can 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Sent $115 a month utilities included
Great locat.c- 8, great roommates
Call 758 6224
PERSONAL
CLAIRE: Our beginning is beautiful
(Austin)! Here Is to the love we'll
share from now on You are more
than beautlfull The "28"
LISA S Don't worry about the long
drive to New Bern every morning,
I'm sure you can handle It And
you're gonna be great at student
teaching because I have faith In you
I'm so proud to be your little sis
Love, Your Alpha Omicron Pi
Pledge
F.P There was no inverse log of,
the eighth root of, 130.72803 to the
nearest whole But heavy breathing
8. alliteration (sunny Sunday sen
suous sex) made him vaunt of her
prowess
B F (Oitch) and B.C. (or is if P.B):
Well Gitch, too bad the ball never got
back in your court. Better luck next
time! Also, how was the sleep on the
couch at the social?!
B.C. Better watch out for that flour,
for it just might rise on you Who
knows, maybe B N will visit you
soon! Signed R F "The B S'er"
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES
OF SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Would
like to thank the Delta Zetas, Tri
Sigs and Alpha Sigs for a very sue
cessful turnout Thurs. night Hope
we can do it again sometime!
TOTHE PARTY DONKEYS: Well
it was weird, but WE HAD A GOOD
TIME didn't we?! Always
remember to watch out for those tall
people! Fer sure.
SENIORS AND GRAD STUDENTS:
The photographers are here. Get
your senior portrait now at the year
book office Call or come by now
757 6501 (across from Joyner
Library) The photographers are
leaving on Friday so come by soon
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call 758 3087 DON'T BE
SCARED leave Jack a message
and save50 when you have your
laundry cleaned
FOR SALE: Loft which meets dorm
regulations Good condition $70 or
best offer Call 756 1546 between 7 9
p.m
Valentine Day Cards
Central Book & Sews
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week
9:30 to 9:30
20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
pucians
Open 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4 speed,
low mileage Only one owner Gets
good gas mileage call after 5 30,
758 4489
CAMPUS POSTERS: Are now
available in a limited quantity at
The Buccaneer Office (across form
Joyner LibraryJust S3 to brighten
your winter walls We accept
checks, cash and livestock.
ATTENTION: GRADUATES A
SENIORS: Special discount rates
and financing Encyclopedia Britan
nica. For free presentation call
7584155
STUDENTS: Will do your taxes for
reasonable price Reduced rates for
students $5 for state, $5 for federal
Call Doris at 757 4557 or 355 2510
after 6
FOR RENT: Mobile homes for rent
2 br furn 16, unfurn 140, 2 br turn
135, unfurn 120 No pets, no children
Call 758 0745 or 754 9491
FOR RENT: Beach Apts Cater to
HOUSE PARTIES AND WORKING
STUDENTS Ideal location 8. rates
Ocean Drive section of North Myrtle
Beach SHORE FUN COMPANY
Call (803) 442 7930 or 249 6903 (after 5
p m.)
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates, please call
754 8934 after 5 30
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 754 4444,evenings or
752 6106 days
GET THE MONEY YOUR
DESERVE: From your income tax
refund Income Tax Service Low
rates, call 758 7356
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang Two pickups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert
FOR SALE: Aquarium Large 70
gallon tank $45 758 8283
FOR SALE: 10 to 15 if old Pioneer
integrated amplifier 7070w, $45
Hand made floor speakers $49 pair
AR l turntable $25 Call 752 0481.
FOR SALE: Panasonic stereo equip
merit $400 or best offer Call Pete
754 1183
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: IBM
Correcting typewriter Experienced
typist will do all types of typing! Call
Debbie at 754 4333
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs, 758 8241 or
758 5488
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
DataWorks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes and more All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (Call for specific
ratesCall Mark at 757 3440 after
5 30 p m
SLEEP EASY: Waterbed, very good
condition Heater, sheets,
everything included Call 758 5901
anytime
COLD BEER: Big 5 cu ft
refrigerator "To keep all your
favorite beverages ice cold $49 95
Call Jay B. 758 9532
Kssssssssssssssssssfssssss,
�win
Kappa Sigma
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LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND: Car keys with white key
chain near 5th St. and Forest Hill
Drive. Call Pam 758 3411
LOST: Tan & white large sized dog,
blue collar, 758 8283 Answers to the
name Tosha
Tues. & Wed. Feb. 12th & 13th
Party Begins At 9:00.
Come and Party With The Best
���"SSjf
WXVWXWXVWfV
SSEZSiaB
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Copyright 1985
Kroger Sav-on
Ouantirv etgnts Reserved
HOne 50IC TO Dai�rS
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Fee 16 1985
yy



BEER
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Miller
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DIET COKE, CAFFEINE
FREE COKE OR
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12 OZ.
Cans

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Potato
Chips
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ASSORTED VARIETY
Totinos
Pizza
CRISP CRUST
Party Pfcza
Gal.
Jug
CHILLED KROGER
Orange
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$29
ITALIAN
Submarine
Sandwich
FANCY EASTERN
RED ROME OR
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Apples
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SEA MAID 9 OZ. PKG
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FRESH BAKED
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BOJA (5 OZ. PKG.)
35-
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DELI-BAKED
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BUY ONE
GET ONE
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Shrimp cocktail s?
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FRESH CUT
DELI-BAKED
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Long stem
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ADVERTISED ITEM POUC
Eacn of tnese advertised 'terns
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your cnoice of a comparaoie
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Aerobic Celebration For
The Heart Association
The Aerobic Workshop will be holding an "Aerobic For Heart"
event for the American Heart Association.

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Sunday February 17th at the Minges Coliseum. The event is from
12:30 to 2:30 � you must be there at 12:00 to turn in your donation
sheet and register for prizes.
Call or com by the Aerobic Workshop from 2:00 to 1:00
p.m. to pick up donation sheets (Ibis is on a donation basis
� people can sponsor you for as much or as little asthey
can afford. If you have trouble finding sponsors you can
always sponsor yourself for a few dollars.
At intermission Lots of Prizes & refreshments to be given away by
local merchantsin addition to the prizes the American Heart
Association gives for donation goals reached by individuals.
'Everyone Welcome' come workout with your ECU Pirate Foot-
ball Team, they'll be there All other individuals, clubs & organiza-
tions invited to participate.
pP
As Always the Aerobic Workshop will help provide "En-
thusiasm, Motivation, Excitement, & Fun"
YOU won't want to miss it!
The Aerobic Workshop
Downtown G'ville
417 Evans St.
757-1600
Aerobics!
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12:00 to turn in your donation
from 2:00 to 1:00
i i$ on a donation basis
ivch or � little asthey
reshments to be given away by
prizes the American Heart
reached by individuals.
it with your ECU Pirate Foot-
individuals, clubs & organiza-
op will help provide "En-
fc Fun"
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miss it!
Aerobics!
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I HI t ASI 4 AKOl INIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 12. I98
Page 11
American Defeats Bucs 79-62
Roy. Smith (41) tips in a errant anderhorst jumper iii the Pirate defeat
iasi night lo American I niverMtv in Mingesoliseum.
Rookies Of The Week
nn M .
j Herb Dixon won ro
of the eek h women's
a men's basketball in
hma ' �
time
�� . . puiled
!own 1" rebounds and Mocked
� I
tit ute
Mi
nd handed out 11
i
W ilmington a n &
Marv. His
. unst
& Mar were
, exclipsing b;s previous high
16 set earlier in the week
ns� UNC-Wilmington.
Pirates' last fiv games
Dixon has scored 72 points and
averag - Since becom-
ing $ three games ago.
Dixon has scored 53 points for a
17 6 average
With the selecti r. oi I): �
everj : i man recruited by
I harlie Harrison has recieved
rookie of the week honors.
B SCOTT COOPER
Steve Nesmith's 20 points and
a balanced American University
scoring attack handed ECU its
ninth ECAC South conference
defeat, 79-62.
With sophomore guard Frank
Ross out of action for the past
eight games, the Eagles have
looked to Nesmith to pick up the
slack. The senior forward has
now led the Eagles in scoring over
the past six games. This is
Nesmith's best output since scor-
ing in double figures in the first
seven games of last season.
Jim Lutz and Mike Sampson
scored 13 points each for
American University. Charles
West added 12 and fresman Eric
White chipped in 10. In addition,
I utz grabbed 10 rebounds and
White hauled in nine. Sampson
dished out five assists.
The Pirates were hurt, once
again, by their inability to get
consistent rebounding. To add to
the problem, sophomore forward
Derrick Battle will likely be miss-
ed for the remainder of the
season. Battle is scheduled to
have surgery on his shoulder
following the season. ECU
C oach Harrison has indicated
he doesn't expect Battle to
turn � action
hi lai ris
te Pirau s was du
theii poor defensive play.
Our defense played
atrocious Harrison said. "I
don't understand how we can
hold teams like William & Mary
and Wilmington to such low
shooting performances, and then
play so poorly
In the first half, the Pirates
played well on the offensive end
William Grady's driving layup
gave ECU an early lead.
American answered hack. The
team's began trading baskets un-
til the Pirates took a five-point
advantage (15-10) on a pair of
1 eon Bass tree throws with 14:0
left in the opening period.
The Pirates then hit a cold spell
as American University
out scored ECU 16-5 over the next
six minutes. This gave the Eagles
a 26-20 advantage at the 8:12
mark in the opening period.
During the remaining eight
minutes of the period, the team's
traded baskets as ECU was able
to come within four points on
several occasions. However, the
Pirates trailed 41-35 at intermis-
sion.
With the Pirates struggling
through their 1985 campaign,
American University head coach
Ed Tapscott feels that ECU has
run into some bad luck.
"If there's a team that has had
more bad breaks than us, it has to
be ECU Tapscott said. "Coach
Harrison is as fine a coach as any
school could want. They seem to
be going through the same per-
formance problems as we have
In the second half, the Eagles
opened their lead to 10 points in
the first minutes of the half. Curt
Vanderhorst and Herb Dixon
retaliated by cutting the AU lead
to six (45-39), with 17:56 remain-
ing to play. This was as close as
the Pirates could get.
The Eagles opened their lead
12 on a White jumper with 13:01
remaining. The Pirates came
back to cut the lead in half,
59-53, on a Vanderhorst 20
footer with 10:24 left.
In the last 10 minutes, AU
outscored ECU 20-9 to cruise to a
79-62 victory.
"I'm very embarrassed
Charlie Harrison said. "It was a
terrible, terrible performance.
We didn't play with any level of
intensity
The Eagle win snaps a year-
long road losing streak that ex-
tended from Jan. 7, 1984 � when
AU defeated Drexel in
Philadelphia, 48-47.
The Pirates will be at home for
their next two games. They will
face non-confernce foe Winthrop
College on Wednesday night, and
then Richmond on Saturdav Feb.
16.
Saturday Feb. 9, 1985
Keith Cieplicki scored 24
points to lead William & Mary
over ECU 80-71, giving the
Pirates their eighth conference
loss of the season.
Three other Indians scored in
double figures for the evening.
Kevin Richardson added 15 and
Herb Harris chipped in 11.
Center Matt Brooks scored 10
points and grabbed a game-high
12 rebounds
For the Pirates, William Grady
led the way with 24 points
Freshman guard Herb Dixon saw
39 minutes of action and scored
23 points. Curt Vanderhorst add-
ed 10 points before fouling out
with 9:56 remaining in the game.
As a team, William & Mary
was able to out rebound the
Pirates 42-29. ECU Head coach
Charlie Harrison feels this a ma-
jor problem for his squad.
"We're getting beaten on the
backboards Harrison said
See SEAHAWKS, Page 13
Pirate Golfers Start Season
B RICK McCORMAC
( o-porls f dlior
The ECU golf team will try to
continue its fine performance of
the fall season in the second-
annual Hilton Head Island Lear-
. i iter Intercollegiate Golf
H
The three-day tournament runs
I eh. 14-17, and is the first tour-
nament for the Pirate Golfers of
the spring season.
"Tt's the first tournament so
you don't really know what to ex-
pect ECU golf coach Bob
Helmick said. "We've been hav-
ing some bad weather and
haven't had a lot of time on the
course to practice Hopefully we
will be able to get some time on
the course before the tourna-
ment
The three-day event will be
highightcd by a workshop with
noted sports psycholigist Dr.
Jack 1 lewcllen of the Hilton
Head Island Learning Center.
The tournament will be hosted
by defending champion Clemson
and will have a tough 24-team
field.
All the ACC teams with the ex-
ception of Maryland will be par-
ticipating. Also in the tourna-
ment will be: Furman, Virginia
Commenwealth, Old Dominion,
Marshall, Guilford, Limestone,
Georgia Southern, Tennesee,
Kentucky, Richmond, Tennesee-
Chattanooga, UNC-Charlotte,
Rollins, Temple and Southern
Methodist University
"This an excellent field, and an
oportunity to get the golfers out
early in the year and see how they
may or may not do Helmick
said. "I think we will be rather
competitive in this field
For the tournament, Helmick
plans to take Chris Caja. who
was the medalist in the Wolf pack
Invitational this fall, and Mike
1985 Spring Golf Schedule
Bradley who had the lowest
stroke average during the fall
season.
Also going will be Mark Ar-
cilesi and Paul Steelman, both
sophomores
Helmick was unsure as to who
the final member would be, but
said it would probably be either
sophomore Dennis Hart or junior
Will Dubose.
"Chris (Cjazai and Mike
(Bradley) have both been playing
really well he said "Paul
Steelman has been playing well
too.
"We played good in the fall
he continued. "And I'm looking
for a continuation into the spr-
i n g .
This spring the Pirate go I
will be competing in sever, tour-
naments, highlighted by the
ECAC South tournament I
played at Brook alley Country
Club, the ECU home course
Feb. 14-17
March 8-10
March 14-16
March 29-31
April 4-6
April 12-14
April 19-2!
Hilton Head Learning Center
The Palmetto
University of South Carolina Invitational
Iron Duke Invitational
Furman University Invitational
University of North Carolina Invitational
ECAC South Tournament
HiltonHead.SC.
Santee, SC.
Columbia. SC.
Durham, NC.
Greenville, SC.
Chapel Hill, NC
Greenville, NC.
Lady Pirates Lengthen Winning Streak To 13
B RICK McCORMAC
i : Pn tes
ge Ma 68-66 in
�time last n ght in Fairfax,
� une marked b scoring
by both teams
EC 1 . who now has wot 15
es in n w this season, is a
8-0 and in first place in
ECA So ith.
"We didn't play very well
h Emily Man waring
1 "We were lucky to come
away with a win
GMl led 10-4 with 15:00 left
in the - period. ECU then
proceeded to run off eight con-
secutive points to take a 12-10
lead.
The Ladv Pirate run was
started by two baskets by Moni-
que Pompili. Anita Anderson's
jump shot, followed by a
Lorainne Foster score comprised
the ECU surge.
With 6:07 left in the first half,
Alma Bethea hit a five footer to
give the Lady Pirates their biggest
lead of the half at 27-20.
The lead was short lived
however, as it was GMU's turn to
go on a scoring spree, outscoring
EC U 13-3. During the run the
Lady Patriots scored the last six
baskets of the half to take a 33-30
lead to the lockerrom.
In the second half ECU once
agaan led by as many as seven
(40-33) with 8:05 remaining.
GMU trimmed the Pirate lead
to two points (54-52) with 1:30 re-
maining in regulation.
After a layup by the Lady
Patriots, Linda Jones hit to put
George Mason up 56-54.
With 21 seconds remaining in
regulation Squirewell missed two
foul shots and George Mason
claimed the rebound.
Jones was fouled with 18
seconds remaining. The foul was
ruled intentional and she was
awarded two shots. She missed
both however, and ECU got the
rebound.
Anderson shot and missed with
ir ticks remaining on the clock,
he rebound in as
the buzzei sounded to send the
game into overtime, tied at 56-56.
The teams traded baskets in the
earl) moments of overtime, until
Jones hit a 20-foot jumpshot to
give Mason a one-point (66-65)
lead.
With 52 seconds remaining
ik'thea converted on one of two
foul shots tor the Lady Pirates to
I it the score at 66-66,
GMU went down and missed
and Pompili got the rebound.
After a errant ECU shot
Squirewell got the rebound and
put it in to give ECU a 68-66 lead
with eight seconds left on the
clock.
The L ady Pats turned the ball
over without getting a shot off
and ECU escaped with a hard-
earned (68-66) victory.
The Lady Pirates were led in
scoring by Anderson who had 19
points and 12 rebounds in the
contest.
Pompili was the only other
ECU player in double figures
finishing with 13 points. She also
pulled down nine rebounds in the
ECU victory.
Jones of George Mason was
the high scorer in the contest
finishing with 28 points.
Valerie Douglas also played
well for the Lady Patriots
finishing with 14 points, and a
game-high 15 rebounds.
For the game ECU hit 28 of 73
shots from the field for 38 per-
cent. The Lady Pirate defense
held George Mason to 34 percent
shooting from the field om a 25
of 63 shooting performance.
This is the fifth consecutive
games that ECU limited its oppo-
nent to a shooting percentage in
the thirties.
Once again the Lady Pirates
won the battle of the boards
(54-42), and that was the dif-
ference in the game according to
Manwaring.
"We out rebounded them
31-23 in the second half and
thaPs what pulled us through
she said. "They shut our transi-
tion game down. We got 14
breaks in the game and converted
on eight of them. We were just
able to get more second shots
Although ECU defeated
George Mason quite handily
earlier this season in Minges, it
was a different type game in The
Arena (GMU's home court).
"Playing on the road is much
harder Manwaring said. "We
just have to get used to it and
continue to improve, because I
don't fel we've reached our peak
yet
ECU improves to 15-8 overall,
and hasn't lost in league play in
the past 11 games (over two
seasons).
George Mason falls to 10-9 and
3-4 in ECAC South action.
Saturday Feb. 9, 1985
The ECU Lady Pirate basket-
ball team defeated American
University 77-62, to give ECU its
12th consecutive victory.
The Lady Pirates, who have
not iost in ECAC South league
play in their past 10 games, used
their transition game to run the
Lady Eagles out of the gym.
"Our running game is what did
it for us. We scored on 14 out of
15 fastbreaks ECU coach Emi-
ly Manwaring said. "They tried
to press us and we just ran right
through it
The Lady Pirates were able to
achieve success on their transition
game, even though American
didn't allow the full-court
baseball pass to Lorainne Foster.
"They stopped the long pass
Manwaring said. "We had to get
everybody down on transition
and beat them down court five on
four
ECU never trailed in the con-
dent My number one rule is never test and led 39-28 at hamime in
the second half, the Lady Pirates
led by 20 with 15-minutes remain-
ing in the contest. The Lady
Eagles were able to get within 10
points before ECU pulled away
for its final 15-point margin of
victory.
was a little disappointed
our defense Manwaring
m mini - EC! r�o U
Anita Anderson (42) shoots a jumper in a Lady Pirate Victory earlier
this season. The Lady Pirates have now won 13 consecutive games.
47 don V want us to get too overconfi-
dent My number one rule
underestimate the opponent
�Emily Manwaring
with
said. "This team shouldn't have
scored 62 points against us. We
just didn't put enough pressure
on their shooters "
Manwaring was also disap-
pointed that her team let the
Lady Eagles back in the game
after leading by 20.
"They cut the lead back to 10
after we had led by 20 she said.
"If we'd won by 20, I would have
wanted to win by 30
Foster led the Lady Pirate at-
tack scoring 20 points, while
freshman Monique Pompili
scored 16 coming off the bench.
Anita Anderson contibuted 15 to
the Pirate win.
Sylvia Bragg scored nine
points, but also had nine assists
and 10 rebounds.
ECU continues to out rebound
conference foes, this time by a
53-37 margin. Pompili led the
way, hauling in 12, while Ander-
son had 11.
For the game, ECU hit 30 of 69
shots from the field for a respec-
table 44 percent. However,
American was able to only con-
nect on 23 of 68 attempts for 34
percent.
Dana Diller led American's
scoring with 18 points. Beth
Shearer and Kathy Hughes, add-
ed 15 and 12 respectively.
With the loss, American falls
to 2-5 in the ECAC South and 9-9
overall.
"I think the team has to
realize, the second time around
the league we're the team to
beat Manwaring said. "We
have to continue to improve
because the other teams are.
"I don't want us to get too
overconfident she continued.
"My number one rule is never
underestimate the opponent
The next game for the Lady
Pirates will be Saturday after-
noon against conference foe
William & Mary in Minges Col-
iseum.
t
I
A






12 rHEhASTCAROl 1NIAN FEBRUARY 12. 1985
Flutie Only Big USFL Signing This Season � . ,
When the New Jersey Generals signed � Douglas Richard the wealthiest clubs can buy Young and 18 other prime pro- after some of our tournament Fame and the fifth spot on the w WW www Vw mw
When the New Jersey Generals
signed Doug Flutie to a five-year
contract estimated at 5.5 million
to 7.5 million, it was heralded as
another chapter of free-spending
history in the United States Foot-
ball League.
It was anything but For the
USFL, small is becoming big
again.
As the league approaches its
third season, it's last in the spring
before taking on the National
Football league in the fall of
1986. Most of the leagues' 14
teams have reverted to the
league's original concept � live
cheaply with a nucleus of low-
priced journeymen, using one or
two high-paid stars to sell tickets.
"The market has pretty much
dried up says Leigh Steinberg,
the agent who negotiated quarter-
back Steve Youngs 40-million
dollar contract with the I os
Angeles Express last year. "What
we're seeing is a retrenchment, a
return to the original concept of
the USFL
For a league that lost an
estimated 70-million dollars last
season and more than 100 million
in its first two years, retrench-
ment is a matter of survival
Last year at this time, the
USFL had expanded from 12
teams to 18 and was grabbing
big-name players by the bushel.
By the time the NFL held its draft
last May 1, about a third of the
top 100-college prospects had
been signed by the USFL. Also,
standout NFL players like Joe
Cribbs, Doug Williams, Brian
Sipe and Gar Barbaro had
jumped to the new league.
So far this season, only one of
college football's top 100 has
signed Douglas Richard
Flutie, quarterback, Boston Col-
lege, and the third consecutive
Heisman Trophy winner to take
the USFL's money and run.
Moreover, other than Cris Col-
linsworth of the Cincinnati
Bengals, who signed a futures
contract two years ago with the
Tampa Bay Bandits, no other
established NFL players have
jumped this year. Washington of-
fensive lineman Mark May
visited New Jersey's camp for
two days last week, then re-
signed with the Redskins a day
later.
The retrenchment policy is
likely to continue � only New
Jersey, Memphis and Jackson-
ville have shown the inclination
this year to spend the money for
blue-chip players. But even their
budgets are limited and more big-
money acquisitions would be
countered to new Commissioner
Harry Usher's policy of imposing
financial parity from the top in a
league, where the top payrolls are
three times the size of the bot-
tom.
"If you're going to have a
league that's not going to go right
out of sight, you have to say,
'I et's curtail some of this incen-
tive to buy the biggest and the
best all the time says Usher,
who succeeded Chet Simmons as
the USFL's commissioner two
weeks ago.
"There's a continual pull and
tug between the finances of the
individual clubs, and the com-
petitive aspect of the league
itself I'sher says. "The league
is only as strong as its weakest
member. It can't allow an
economic policy to develop where
the wealthiest clubs can buy
everyone out
Most USFL teams say they are
willing to stick with what they
have, according to the new com-
misioner.
"If we go down to a 40-man
roster, it will be very difficult for
them (draft choices) to make the
team says John Ralston, presi-
dent of the Portland (Boston
through New Orleans) Breakers,
which hasn't even contacted most
of its draft choices. "We'd rather
let them go into the NFL, let the
NFL train them, and when the
NFL cuts them, we'll get them
back next spring
Usher will have task in equaliz-
ing team payrolls; not only are
the teams unbalanced financially,
so are the resources of the
owners, according to Usher. For
New Jersey's Donald Trump,
builder of New York skyscrapers,
a few million here or there is
nothing; for other owners, whose
fortunes are counted in the
millions or tens of millions, a
large loss is � well, a large loss.
The USFL begins its 1985
season with the top payroll
teams, New Jersey and Los
Angeles. They spend more then
7-million dollars on salaries,
three times as much as the San
Antonio Gunslingers, who have a
2-million payroll.
Los Angeles is a prime example
of what overspending can do.
Last year, despite signing
Writers Needed
Apply In Person
THE
.COUNT
BASIE
ORCHESTRA
LIVEI
Tuesday. F�bru�ry 12. 1985
8 00pm
Wright Auditorium
ECU Campus Gr�envill�
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Budget
Budget Lives Up To Its
Name At Spring Break
Let Budget take you on
its 5 or 8 Day Beach
Getaway Special
Call 756-8432
203 WEST
GREENVILLE
BLVD.
In the lobby of the
Sheraton
Budget rents to qualified drivers 19 years or older.
Call 756-8320
Use your SEARS Charge Card
Young and 18 other prime pro-
spects, the Express drew only
10,(XX) a game in the spacious
(Los Angeles) Coliseum. They
finished the year an estimated
18-million dollars in debt, with
owner J. William Oldenburg in
deep legal and financial straits.
This year, the league is running
the Express and the team is quiet-
ly divesting itself of some of
those 1984 rookies. The most re-
cent is running back Kevin Mack,
who signed with the NFL's
Cleveland Browns.
The individual salary structure
is also skewed in the USFL.
defenders weren't when
Alabama-Birmingham put on a
decisive scoring run. Also, he
remembers where his players
were supposed to be when they
broke curfew before the
Louisville game.
He understands better Mar
quette's Rick Majerus telling him
the first year would be the worst.
North Carolina's venerated Dean
Smith telling him no one would
be sympathetic about a tough
schedule once the season got
started. The former coach and
TV commentator Al McGuire
saying referees almost never defer
to a rookie coach's protests.
Joey still looks considerably
younger than his 35 years, but
time and pressure are splitting the
differences in a hurry.
"I feel losing in my stomach
more than I used to and I thought
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TAKEOUT
ORDERS
after some of our tournament
losses that would never happen
he said, referring to early round
losses in the NCAA tournament
in recent years. "My family is
just about my only release from
basketball. When I get wound
up, the first thing I do is hug my
little one (4-year-old son Brian)
and he ends up helping me more
now than I help him.
"But my wife says I'm not
happy even when we win, and
that if I don't learn to enjoy it, 1
won't be around for very long
Joey's lather hung around
DePaul long enough (42 seasons)
to compile 724 wins, good for a
plaque in the basketball Hall of
Fame and the fifth spot on the
all-time Division 1 coaches vic-
tory list.
With his son's help, Ray built
the small Catholic universit
under the "El" tracks into a na
tional power.
That legacy was supposed to be
handed over intact when the
school's seventh head coach
anointed No. 8
"It's lucky we were father and
son. I'd hate to think what the
pressure would be like on
somebody else Joey Meyer
said. "He was so successful for
so long that there would always
be some second-guessing
PERSONAL DENTIST
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wn QANDALF'S
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ask about our party box
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Assorted Candies
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�aaaaa
tegan I
Do-
5 10 rem�
match b�
- .
80-7
kw
George I
thro .J
58-56
P
-
Continued From Page n
"The rebounding edge is
riduculous
The Pirate started out slow as
they trailed 10-2 at the 15 2"
mark in the opening period A
Dixon three-point play and
baskets by Roy Smith and
Vanderhorst shortened the In
dian lead to 14-9 with 13 0 re-
maining in the first half
William & Mary -her.
outscored ECU 16-8 over the next
seven minutes, taking a �
lead with 6.15 left in the Hs I
The Pirates then traded ba
and mildly outscored the Indian
13-12 in the last six minutes of the
opening period Grady
Pirate charge by scoring e .
while Dixon added some free
throws for ECL
Coach Harrison thought
the Pirates played very c
second half
"We were lethargic in the I
half Harrison said "We came
out ready to play in he second
Herb played well and had bell
from Scotty (Hardy i and I
(Bass). It was the
got us beat
The second half saw the Pirate-
get off to a great start by scoring
the first eight points, chopping
the Indian lead to five p
(43-38).
With 12:43 remaining U 7
Grady's reverse iayup tsec
game, 47-47 The End
retaliated as reserve Terr. Tra.e:
connected on a pair 1 I ei
up their lead to 51-49
ECU was able to cut the Ir
lead to two points on two
sions. However, when the Pirate-
got into early foul trouble
New Volley
B JEANETTEROTH

In case you don't live on 'the
Hill' and have never expend
the thrills and chills of be
volleyball, then the IRS in
you to enjoy one of the most
popular recreational actr-
around.
Complete with sand, the In-
tramural Department rece
built two beach voleyba.
They arc located on Tyler Beach.
When the warm summer wind
blows into town, blow on c
the beach, and check out an IRS
volleyball and enjoy the endless
summer on us.
Co-rec bowling begins this
week at the Mendenhail Bow
Center And Sneaker Sam had
issued the earliest predictions.
Last year's champs, the Wesley
Wombats are not entered in this
year's competition, so watch for
The Powerhouse to take the
championship. Bowling Stones
and the Strike Four round out the
top-notch competition.
.Annually. Jeffries Beer and
Wine and the IRS sponser the in-
famous Budweiser arm-wrestling
tournament. This year's a.
promises to be exciting with some
pretty handy work being done b)
the competitors.
In the women'v division, I
"the arm" Greene will attempt to
defend her title in the 1?6 pound
and over weight class
Sneaker Sam has picked his top
shots for the men's weight
classes. In 150 pound and under,
Gary Bishop and John Savage are
the favorites. In the 151 7f
class, Robbie Price and Richard
Cook are looking for a high
finish. In the 176-199 class
tis Serduk and Reggie McDonald
loom to be the tor finishers Arc
in the 200 and over category,
se:
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is Season
Fame and the fifth spot on the
all time Division 1 coaches ic-
With his son's help, Ra built
the small Catholic university
Lindet the "El" tracks into a na
al powei
i cgacy was supposed to be
ded over intact when the
seventh head coach
v 8
� e were taiher and
to think uhat the
re like on
Meyer
successful for
always
i-g ss
SON AL DENTIST
you need a mring,
ofessional den 1st?
ing done by the doctor
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iveraity Profession Center
E, 10th St. Greenville, NC
75S-4927
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n Survivors Orleans (Women)
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pply of brand
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HY?
Ordinary
inesGift
GANDALF'S
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turf
"Pillowtalk" Pillowcases
Superman Underwear
Horny Toads
Valentine Mugs
Assorted Candies
Carolina East Mall
756-7235
Lv,rw,
Seahawks Down Bucs
Continued From Page 11
The rebounding edge is
nduculous
The Pirates started out slow as
they trailed 10-2 at the 15:27
mark in the opening period. A
Dixon three-point play and
baskets by Roy Smith and
Vanderhorst shortened the In-
dian lead to 14-9 with 13:08 re-
maining in the first half.
William & Mary then
outscored ECU 16-8 over the next
even minutes, taking a 30-17
lead with 6:15 left in the fist half.
The Pirates then traded baskets
and mildly outscored the Indians
13-12 in the last six minutes of the
opening period. Grady led the
Pirate charge by scoring eight,
while Dixon added some free
throws for ECU.
Coach Harrison thought that
the Pirates played very well in the
second half.
"We were lethargic in the first
half Harrison said. "We came
out ready to play in the second.
Herb played well and had help
from Scotty (Hardy) and Leon
lBas) It was the little things that
got us beat
The second half saw the Pirates
get off to a great start by scoring
the first eight points, chopping
the Indian lead to five points
143-38).
With 12:43 remaining to play,
Grady's reverse layup tied the
game, 47-47. The Indians
retaliated as reserve Tony Traver
connected on a pair of jumpers to
up their lead to 51-49.
ECU was able to cut the Indian
lead to two points on two occas-
sions. However, when the Pirates
got into early foul trouble, they
began to lose momentum.
Down by 10 points (70-60) with
5:10 remaining, ECU could only
match baskets with William &
Mary while falling to the tribe,
80-71.
Thursday Feb. 7, 1985
George Durham's 15 points,
including two game-winning free
throws, gave UNC-Wilmington a
58-56 victory over ECU, giving
the Pirates their 13th loss the
1985 season.
For the Seahawks, center Brian
Rowsom scored 15 points and
grabbed a game-high 12 re-
bounds. Bobby Jo Springer add-
ed 10 for Wilmington.
The game was close
throughout, as neither team lead
by more than seven points. The
lead also changed hands five
times during the course of the
game.
Coach Harrison believes that
the Pirates are playing better,
despite the loss.
"Our guys are playing with
more confidence Harrison
said. We're playing much better.
We just need to improve on our
inside game
Layups by Dixon and Grady
gave the Pirates a 4-0 advantage
early in the game. Sandy Ander-
son countered on a Seahawk.
layup with 18:20 remaining in the
first period.
After a Rowsom dunk and
Mark Gary jumper, Vanderhorst
and Keith Sledge retaliated for
ECU. Sledge's jumper gave the
Pirates their biggest lead, 14-7,
with 12:20 left in the first half.
UNC-Wilmington wa able to
cut the lead to two (14-12).
However, Roy Smith's three-
point play with 9:43 remaining
gave the Pirates a 17-12 advan-
tage.
Dur.ng the last 9:43 of the first
period, the Seahawks managed to
outscore ECU 16-5. This gave
UNC-Wilmington a 28-22
halftime advantage.
The second half was very close,
despite the Seahawks taking an
early six-point lead.
Grady scored on a driving
layup to open the second period.
From that point, the team's trad-
ed baskets.
With 15:00 remaining to play,
Durham fouled Grady. In result,
Grady's free throws tied the game
38-38. Vanderhorst's layup put
the Pirates up for the first time in
the second half.
The team's managed to trade
baskets until the 7:14 mark.
Then, Dixon's driving layup gave
ECU a 50-47 advantage. After a
Seahawk timeout, Vanderhorst
sank a jumper to cushion the
Pirate lead, 52-47.
Clutch shooting by Dixon and
Vanderhorst kept the Pirates
atop down the stretch. However,
George Durham stole the show
by scoring on a three-point play
with :52 seconds to play. This
tied the score at 56-56.
To encore his performance,
Durham canned two free throws
with :10 seconds left to lift UNC-
W'ilmington to a 58-56 victory.
The Pirates were lead in scor-
ing by Dixon. He was eight for 10
from the field for 16 points.
Vanderhorst added 14 and Grady
had 10.
New Volleyball Courts Built
B JFANETTEROTH
surrwriur
In case you don't live on 'the
Hill' and have never experienced
the thrills and chills of beach
volleyball, then the IRS invites
you to enjoy one of the most
popular recreational activities
around.
Complete with sand, the In-
tramural Department recently
built two beach voleyball courts.
They arc iotated on Tyler Beach.
When the warm summer wind
blows into town, blow on out to
the beach, and check out an IRS
volleyball and enjoy the endless
summer on us.
Co-rec bowling begins this
week at the Mendenhall Bowling
Center. And Sneaker Sam had
issued the earliest predictions.
Last year's champs, the Wesley
Wombats are not entered in this
c?.r's competition, so watch for
The Powerhouse to take the
championship. Bowling Stones
and the Strike Four round out the
top-notch competition.
.Annually, Jeffries Beer and
Wine and the IRS sponser the in-
famous Budweiser arm-wrestling
tournament. This year's action
promises to be exciting with some
pretty handy work being done by
the competitors.
In the women's division, Lori
"the arm" Greene will attempt to
defend her title in the 136 pound
and over weight class.
Sneaker Sam has picked his top
shots for the men's weight
classes. In 150 pound and under,
Gary Bishop and John Savage are
the favorites. In the 151-175
class, Robbie Price and Richard
Cook are looking for a high
finish. In the 176-199 class, Cur-
tis Serduk and Reggie McDonald
loom to be the top finishers. And
in the 200 and over category,
Chris Kelly is the heads-on
favorite.
Watch the strong arms of ECU
compete in the all-campus finals
later this month.
In recent basketball action,
The Enforcers broke the IRS
record for the most points scored
in any women's contest The
broke the previous record of 85,
set in 1981, with a new high of 90
points.
The men's league continues to
be dominated by The Clique,
who average an amazing 70
points a game while holding their
opponents to a mere 28.
Next in line is the Unknowns
II, a surprise squad who plan to
shock the Clique into a
independent-division showdown.
As the action continues, listen
to the latest scores and highlights
on the The Tennis Shoe
Talkshow. The show airs at 2:30
and 5:30 every Tuesday and
Thursday on your campus radio
� WZMB, 91.3 fm. Enjoy the
five-minute action update with
your host Stephanie Luke.
� � � � �
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
Luncheons
Receptions
Coffee Breaks
east Carolina dining services
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Feb. 15 at 6:00 PM
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Tickets: $5.00 Adults $4.00 Children
Call 752-0578
Sponsored by: International Student Association
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IMF f ASI AROI INIAN

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14 IHl EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12, ls8
Vanderbilt Officals Concerned
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI) -
Vanderbilt University has pro-
duced 29 Rhodes scholars and no
Heisman Trophy winners. It ap-
pears to be the last place one
would expect to find a drug scan-
dal in the athletic department.
I ong a football doormat in the
vnitheastern Conference, the
Commodores reached respec-
abilitv in the last three seasons
onl to see a controversy over
the use of steroids by some
athletes, casting a cloud over
those accomplishments.
"It was a shock to see
something like steroids in the
headlines said Paul Har-
rawood, dean of the Vanderbilt
School o I ngmeering and the
faculty chairman oi the universi
ty's Intercollegiate Athletics
Committee. "Of course, m in-
itial reaction was a quick defen-
sive posture, but then you have to
realize there is something there
"Concern would best describe
my reaction Vanderbilt athletic
director Roy kr er said.
"These days it's pretty hard to be
shocked about anything that
. mes down the street
The steroid issue burst upon
the normally quiet campus
through an investigation by the
rennessec Bureau o' Investiga-
tion The T.B.I, inquiry centered
around the source of the anti-
n flam mat or v drug
phenvlbutaone found in the
body of Augustinius Jaspers, a
track star at Clemson University
who died last Oct. 19 o heart
failure.
M Wood Wilson, a Nashville
area pharmacist, told Sports Il-
lustrated that he and Vanderbilt
strength coach E.J. "Doc" Kreis
provided phenvlbutaone and
steroids to Sam Colson, strength
coach at Clemson who has since
resigned. Kreis, a former Clem-
son football player, has taken a
leave of absence and has declined
comment on the investigation.
Wilson also said he sold
steroids to as many as 50 Vander-
bilt football players from late
1982 to September 1984.
Arzo Carson, T.B.I, director,
said the investigation may deal
with the illegal dispensing of
more than 100,000 doses of
prescription drugs from Wilson's
pharmacy, which closed in
September 1984.
Although Wilson said his drug
deliveries to Vanderbilt players
were "no secret George Macln
tyre, the football coach, said he
was unaware of them.
"1 don't know if I was naive of
the problem or not said Macln-
tyre, lampooned recently in the
school newspaper. The Hustler.
He was portrayed in a cartoon
standing among a group of one-
eyed, two-headed "steroid
mutants
Kramer said he did not feel the
steroid investigation was a sign
that, at Vanderbilt, the student-
athlete has become the athlete-
student.
"That might be the case at
some schools, but you look at the
academic requirements for our
athletes and the programs they
are required to take Kramer
said, "There is no doubt that the
student is first and the athlete is
second
A full athletic scholarship to
Vanderbilt is worth approximate-
ly 12.(XX) dollars a year, and it is
not dispensed casually bv the
privately endowed university.
The average Vanderbilt student
possesses a Scholastic Aptitude
Test score of 1.112. One-third of
the 1984-85 freshman class rank-
ed in the top-10 percent of their
graduating class in high school.
Also, 50 percent of the school's
5,000 undergraduates who obtain
their bachelor's degree, will pur-
sue some form of graduate work.
About 40 percent of Vanderbilt
athletes go on to some form of
higher study, according to
Kramer.
While the school has enjoyed a
good reputation academically, its
football teams generally have not
been widely respected. The pro-
gram has unproved under Macln-
tyre, however, with the 1982 team
finishing 8-3 with a Hall of Fame
Bowl berth and last season's club
ranked briefly in The Associated
Press Top 20.
Maclntyre feels that pressure
to perform could be a con-
tributing factor to the use of
steroids by some athletes, not just
a Vanderbilt but across the na-
tion. Others agree.
"The great sadness is that there
are people in the past who have
bought athletes with money,
steroids and drink said Bill
Wade, a Vanderbilt booster who
quarterbacked at Vandy from
1948-52 and went on to spend 14
years in the National Football
I eague with the Los Angeles
Rams and Chicago Bears.
"College athletics is out of
hand in this country and it's not
due so much to the coaches as it is
to the people who put undue
pressure on athletics Har-
rawood said. "The coaches are in
bind because of the pressure to
win.
"These kids want to get bigger,
stronger and quicker, and when
we, as coaches, see them doing it,
we congratulate them Macln-
tyre said. "1 mean, what are you
supposed to say, 'Aw, now,
you're getting too big. You'd bet-
ter slow down That's
ludicrous
Wade said that he "never saw
any drugs while at Vanderbilt
but several former Vanderbilt
football players said they were
aware of the use of steroids.
"It wasn't for public display
said Joe Staley, a Commodore
defensive end and linebacker dur-
ing 1979-82. "A guy wouldn't br-
ing steroids into the weight room
and yell, 'Here's the steroids
But you could get them
Since the investigation became
public, Kramer has announced
the start of random steroid
testing for all Vanderbilt athletes.
Failure to pass the test could
result in the loss of both athletic
eligibility and financial aid for
the athlete, according to Kramer.
Chancellor Joe B. Wyatt said
the university had taken a "bold
step" in initiating the steroid
testing program.
"The measure of a person or
an institution is how they deal
with bad news he said. "In this
particular case, 1 think Vander-
bilt was decisive in beginning to
act once the problem was
raised
Kramer's action generally has
gained approval from the
school's academic community
and the public, but it may still be
too early to determine if steroids
have tarnished Vanderbilt's im-
age
& Sigma Sigma Sigma
Present
DRAFT NIGHT
Tues.Feb. 12, 1985
Admission $1.50
8:30-1 00 AM
18rs SI.00
10- DRAFT ALL NITE
& Sigma Nu
Present
VALENTINE'S PARTY
Wed. Feb. 13, 1985 8:30-1 00 AM
Admission $1.50 18 vrs $1.00
10- DRAFT ALL XITE
Plus Drawing for Special Dinners For To at Greenx tile's Finer
Restaurants & Other Door Prizes
Sponsored By:
King & Queen � Darryl's � Sneet t aroline's
PET
VILLAGE
Valentine's Special
Baby Dwarf Rabbits $6.00
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing
is available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 756-9222
4,3,4,4.4,4.4.4.4, ���� 4.4 4.4.4.4.4 ��&
Buccaneer
THE YEARBOOK OF EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
v
1
�4C�r
4 i
-1. J
Portraits 1965
SCHEDULE
All Dates. 9 -12am 1-5pm
emors
Until Friday
Underclassmen -
(Also late seniors & makeups)
vacuity
March
18-27
� All above dates
(No appointment necessary)
5 poses �No Charge!
2nd
Questions? 757-6501
floor � publications building

r
� �' f
f





Title
The East Carolinian, February 12, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 12, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.391
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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