The East Carolinian, February 7, 1985






Qftiz i�uBt (Karalmtan
Vol.59No.38
Thursday February 7, 1985
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 7925
t.reenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Budget Conference
Lessens Confusion
WTraii
Come Out, Come Out
Everyone's doing their
little feller has obviously
Student suppl store. V
alentinc shopping early this year and this
found the best bargain around in the
e"re all curious to know what is so
interesting in that bag. but of course that would spoil the surprise.
Whatever it is, we're sure it'll put a smile on someone's face. Vill
you be mine, could ou be mine, won't you be m Valentine?
ByDALESWANSON
In an effort to make the SGA
more accessible to student
organizations, ECU'S first an-
nual conference on SGA ap-
propriations was held last night.
Student organizations requesting
funding from the SGA were ask-
ed to send representatives.
"This (the conference) was one
of my campaign promises said
SGA President John Rainey. "I
hope it has eliminated some of
the confusion" concerning ap-
propriations, he said. Rainey
referred to the manner in which
student groups have requested
funds in the past as
"runaround "
Representatives from 44 stu-
dent organizations were present
at the 30-minute meeting where
Rainey and several SGA ex-
ecutive officers explained the ap-
propriations process.
Appropriations Chairman Lisa
Roberts spoke on the procedure
of drawing up a requisition bill
and sending it to the Appropria-
tions Committee and then on to
the Legislature. Although groups
represented at the meeting will
have top priority for SGA fun-
ding, other groups may submit
requisitions between Feb. 15 and
March I. Submitted bills will be
reviewed by the Appropriations
Committee and the student
organization must explain the
proposal. All of the bills that pass
through committee go on to the
Legislature for a vote.
Kirk Shelley, Junior class
president, expressed the need for
organizations to be realistic in
their requests, citing past inflated
requisitions of up to $100,000
"That's more than the SGA gets
all together he emphasized.
Rainey added later that an
outline or paragraph summariz-
ing past uses of fnds and Future
see CONFERENCE, Page 3
Registrar Says Procedure Will Eliminate Schedule Problems
B HAROLD JO NEK
E I Registrar Gil Moore ex-
plained new registration pro
cedures to Student Residence
Association member at
Monday's meeting. Moore's ap-
pearance was requested b SRA
and concerned the dropping of
the schedules of many students
living in residence halls this spr-
ing.
Dan Walsh, president ol Cen-
tral Campus, said residence halls
open Monday, Jan. 1 and
classes began one week later.
WdUh said mans students return-
ed from the holidays Jan. 7 only
to find their schedules had been
dropped because they had not
picked them up bv Jan. 2. He ap-
pealed to the registrar's office
through SRA to find out if there
was any was this situation could
be avoided.
Moore responded to the plea
with an explanation of registra-
tion procedures. "First of all
he said, "1 am on your side 1
believe the lack of communica-
tion Aa the main factor in so
many students losing their
-chedules when returning to
school
Moore went on to say that
after students preregis'ered. they
were given sheets infoiming them
of important dates such as when
a schedule must be secured. "I
suspect a lot of students tossed
the sheet aside and did not think
it anything important to hang on
to he said. The dates were also
printed on the billing statement
the student received. However, it
is doubtful that students will i Ti
into this problem again, he sa
because of a new on-line registr i-
tion procedure that will go in ef-
fect this March 25.
"With this new procedure, a
student will know what his
schedule is the day he signs up for
pre-registration Moore said
The procedure will last three
weeks, he said. "Of course there
are going to be a few problems
with a new system, as there is
with anything being done for the
first time. However, this program
was designed with the student in
mmd to allow for flexibility
Students will not be guaranteed
the popular 10 a.m. � 2 p.m.
time slots for schedules, but the
new registration will make it
easier tor a student to know his
schedule sooner. "Hopefully one
da all lines will end as a result of
this registration he said.
"Believe me, I've had mv share
of standing in long lines and 1
had always hoped to be able to
eliminate them. I think we have a
better chance of doing that
now
Moore said is always willing to
accept suggestions from students
concerning program improve-
ment. "The idea for on-line
registration came around 1971.
By 1979 we were able to put it all
on paper and present it to the
chancellor. It has taken a long
time to get where we are at now,
but I believe it'll be worth it
Other SRA business included
setting the dates for upcoming
elections. Feb. 13 through March
1 will be filing dates for can-
didates. The campaign will run
from March 21 through March
2 the day of the election.
Forty-seven members of SRA
went to Lenoir-Rhyne College for
a state leadership conference of
residence halls. There, a bid
made b the ECU-SRA to host
next year's conference here was
approved by the conference, said
Debbie Gembicki. SRA presi-
dent. "We are looking for ideas
from faculty and students as to
how we can make our conference
a success she said. ECU had
the largest delegation at the con-
ference.
Book Thefts Cause Concern
B HAROLD JOYNER
S�� Ntw, Mm.r
There has been a recent in-
crease in the number of book
thefts at ECU, but this can be
prevented if students make an ef-
fort to protect themselves against
textbook thefts, according to Stu-
dent Attorney General Scott
Sutker.
Since last semester, Sutker
said, the Honor Board has
reviewed five cases involving sell-
ing stolen textbooks. In one in-
stance, students were approached
by an unidentified male who asks
the students to sell his books for
him. The students sell the stolen
books and are apprehended for
book theft
"Students should realize that
they are responsible for all books
they sell, whether they belong to
someone they know or not
Sutker said. If caught, a student
faces being charged with book
theft by the Honor Board, he
said. "Charges can range up to
40 hours of community work,
probation and restitution if a stu-
dent is found guilty
The procedure for recovering a
stolen book is relatively simple,
said Student Supply Store Assis-
tant Manager Roger Bullock. "If
a student suspects his books have
been stolen, he should im-
mediately come to the bookstore
to fill out a lost book form. That
will enable us to check books and
find out who sold them last
Bullock said that a name writ-
ten in a book is not enough iden-
tification. "The book thief can
easily scratch out the name, mak-
ing it impossible for store person-
nel to verify the stolen book he
said.
"There are many ways a stu-
dent can identify his textbooks
he said, "without making it ob-
vious to the thief Two ex-
amples Bullock include circling
particular page numbers in his
textbook. "A student must be
consistent in all of his books he
said. Another way would be to
underline simple words in the
book the first time they appear in
a particular chapter and the last
time they appear. "A student has
a better chance of having his
stolen book recovered if he is able
to leave as many clues possible
for us to look for
The Student Supply Store has
80 coin-return lockers available
to students who elect to keep
their books locked up while shop-
ping at the book store, Bullock
said. "It is probably the safest
place for a student to keep his
books while he is shopping
Sutker said book theft is seen
as a serious offense by the Honor
Board because not only is it steal-
ing, but it inhibits a student from
studying.
ECU PMM L�6
Mention!
les folks, it's that time of the year to buy your loved one a rose for that special da coming up Feb.
14. Little does this unsuspecting patron know is that only those with perfect posture are allowed to
purchase the flower of love.
Teacher Exchange Program Provides Variety Outside Class
El St� Bureau
Moses Sheppard is like most
ollege professors, only his
.iassroom is different.
The classroom, in fact, is not
in a college and neither are the
students, but professor Sheppard
is there anyway in a unique ECU
program that allows college pro-
fessors to exchange places with
'heir high school counterparts.
In its second year, the teacher
exchange program began as a
resolution adopted by the N.C.
Legislature in 1983. It was one of
several experimental programs
porposed by Rep. Howard
Chapin (D-Beaufort) to improve
the quality of teaching in the
public schools.
Under the plan, adopted by the
ECU Teacher Education Coun-
cil, faculty members specializing
in teacher education are en-
couraged to go into the public
schools on a voluntary basis for a
two-week period while their
public school colleagues are
assigned to classrooms on cam-
pus. The professors, in turn, get a
first-hand look at the public
school environment while the
high school instructors bring
their experiences to the attention
of college students ho are plann-
ing careers in public education.
Descriptions of experiences
gathered so far have ranged from
"a wonderful opportunity" to
"terrifying
"Walking back into that
classroom was terrifying said
Sue Bowden, a science education
professor at ECU who returned
last year to a high school
classroom in Duplin County
where she had taught several
years before.
"It was as if I had never left
she said. "Nothing had
changed
In the first of the true ex-
changes between high school and
college instructors, Moses Shep-
pard, a professor of science
education at ECU, began a two
week stint last week teaching
biology to students at North Pitt
High School. Ann Burden, the
biology and advanced biology in-
structor at North Pitt, took com-
mand of Sheppard's science
education methods classes at
ECU.
Both teachers are delighted
with the experience.
"I've become more ap-
preciative of the importance of
motivation says Burden who
describes her experiences in the
college classroom as "a wonder-
ful opportunity
"These (college) students are
self-motivated. They are eager
and anxious to learn everything
they can about the practicalities
of classroom teaching she said.
"Having been a high school
teacher for the past 10 years in
the public school system, I hope I
have some experience I can offer
to them Burden said.
Meanwhile at the high school,
Sheppard is delighted with the ex-
perience of teaching in high
school after being away from it
for almost 24 years.
"Because both Mrs. Burden
and I work with student teachers,
it is giving us the opportunity to
see what each other's assignments
are like and it's giving our
students another perspective as
well Sheppard said. "I think
the experience adds a little more
credibility to our classes
One thing Sheppard has notic-
ed is that very little has changed
in the 24 years he has been away
form the high school "There are
still some students who are anx-
ious to learn and there are others
who are not he said.
Charles Coble, dean of the
ECU School of Education and
director of teacher education at
ECU, says the program is
developing very nicely.
"A number of faculty have
committed themselves to ex-
changes similar to the one Dr.
Sheppard is undertaking Coble
said.
He noted that last year there
were a half dozen faculty on tem-
porary teachingassignments in the
schools. He said the Shep-
pard Burden exchange is the first
of the true, one-on-one
faculty, teacher exchanges.
Coble says he views the pro-
gram as being a mutual benefit to
college professors and high
school teachers. "We see it as a
method for improving teacher
education in general but I think
the primary help will be received
back on our campus he said.
"What we are doing is renew-
ing our know ledge of the realities
of the public school classroom
he said. "This is an attempt to br-
ing us up to date
The exchange program is
directed by a committee headed
by Dr. Robert Barnes. Under the
guidelines developed by the com-
mittee about 10 percent of the
150 teacher education faculty
members would be involved in
the teacher exchanges each year.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment7
Classifieds8
Sports10
�Style Editor Tina Maroschak
reviews the new play The
Diviners which opened last
night in McGinnis Theatre.
See Entertainment, page 7.
i
A
�� � " �
�-��-����
tll��l
.� � !� ll.�Ll�
f 1

"I
'l





�he Eaat (Eartflmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.S9No.38
Thursday February 7, 1985
(.reenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12.000


m
Budget Conference
Lessens Confusion
OS! JORDAN ECU Photo lh
Y very one's
little feller
Student m
Come Out, Come Out
doina their Valentine shopping earls this sear and this interesting in that bag. but f course that would spoil the surprise
has obviously found the best bargain around in the
ppl More. We're all curious t know what is so
Whatever it is. we're sure it'll put a smile on someone's face. Will
sou be mine, could yon be mine, won't you be m Valentine?
ByDALESWANSON
In an effort to make the SGA
more accessible to student
organizations, ECU's first an-
nual conference on SGA ap-
propriations was held last night.
Student organizations requesting
funding from the SGA were ask-
ed to send representatives.
"This (the conference) was one
of my campaign promises said
SGA President John Rainey. "I
hope it has eliminated some of
the confusion" concerning ap-
propriations, he said. Rainey
referred to the manner in which
student groups have requested
funds in the past as
"runaround
Representatives from 44 stu-
dent organizations were present
at the 30-minute meeting where
Rainey and several SGA ex-
ecutive officers explained the ap-
propriations process.
Appropriations Chairman Lisa
Roberts spoke on the procedure
of drawing up a requisition bill
and sending it to the Appropria-
tions Committee and then on to
the Legislature. Although groups
represented at the meeting will
have top priority for SGA fun-
ding, other groups may submit
requisitions between Feb. 15 and
March 1. Submitted bills will be
reviewed by the Appropriations
Committee and the student
organization must explain the
proposal. All of the bills that pass
through committee go on to the
Legislature for a vote.
Kirk Shelley, Junior class
president, expressed the need for
organizations to be realistic in
their requests, citing past inflated
requisitions of up to $100,000
"That's more than the SGA gets
all together he emphasized.
Rainey added later that an
outline or paragraph summariz-
ing past uses of fnds and future
See CONFERENCE, Page 3
Registrar Says Procedure Will Eliminate Schedule Problems
By HAROLD JOYNER
EC U Registrar Gil Moore ex-
plained new registration pro-
cedures to Student Residence
Association member at
Monday's meeting. Moore's ap
pearance was requested b SF
and concerned the dropping of
the schedules of mam students
living in residence halls this spr-
8
Dan W�.ish, president of Cen-
tra! Campus, said residence halls
opened on Monday, 'an. 1 and
. in one week later
Walsl I many students return-
ed from the holidays Jan " only
to find their schedules had been
dropped because they had not
picked them up b Jan. 2. He ap-
pealed to the registrar's office
through SRA to find out if there
was any, way this situation could
be avoided.
Moore responded to the plea
with an explanation o registra-
tion procedures. "First of all
he said. "I am on your side. I
believe the lack of communica-
tion Ads the main factor in su
many students losing their
schedules when returning to
ol
Moore went on to say that
after students preregistered. they
were given sheets informing them
of important dates such as when
a schedule must be secured. "I
suspect a lot of students tossed
the sheet aside and did not think
it anything important to hang on
to he said. The dates were also
printed on the billing statement
the student received. However, ii
is doubtful that students will - n
into this problem again, he said,
because of a new on-line registr i-
lion procedure thai will go in ef-
fect this March 25.
"With this new procedure, a
student will know what his
schedule is the day he signs up for
Book Thefts Cause Concern
pre-registration Moore said
The procedure will last three
weeks, he said. "Of course there
are going to be a few problems
with a new system, as there is
with anything being done for the
first time. However, this program
was designed with the student in
mind to allow for flexibility
Sudents will not be guaranteed
the popular 10 a.m. � 2 p.m.
time slots for schedules, but the
new registration will make it
easier tor a studeni to know his
schedule sooner "Hopefully one
das al! lines will end as a result of
this registration he said.
"Believe me, I've had my share
of standing in long lines and I
had always hoped to be able to
eliminate them. I think we have a
better chance of doing that
now
Moore said is always willing to
accept suggestions from students
concerning program improve-
ment. "The idea for on-line
registration came around 1971.
By 19"?9 we were able to put it all
on paper and present it to the
chancellor. It has taken a long
time to get where we are at now,
but I believe it'll be worth it
Other SRA business included
setting the dates for upcoming
elections. Feb. 13 through March
1 will be Filing dates for can-
didates. The campaign will run
from March 21 through March
27, the day of the election.
Forty-seven members of SRA
went to Lenoir-Rhyne College for
a state leadership conference of
residence halls. There, a bid
made by the ECU-SRA to host
next year's conference here was
approved by the conference, said
Debbie Gembicki, SRA presi-
dent. "We are looking for ideas
from faculty and students as to
how we can make our conference
a success she said. ECU had
the largest delegation at the con-
ference.
I
Bv HAROLD JOINER
There has been a recent in-
crease in the number of bool
thefts at ECU, but this can be
prevented if students make an ef-
fort to protect themselves agains;
textbook thefts, according to Stu-
dent Attorney General Scott
Sutk -
Since last semester, Sutker
said, the Honor Board has
reviewed five cases involving sell-
ing stolen textbooks. In one in-
stance, students were approached
by an unidentified male who asks
the students to sell his books for
him. The students sell the stolen
books and are apprehended for
book theft
"Students should realize that
:he are responsible for all books
they sell, whether they belong to
someone they know or not
Sutker said. If caught, a student
taces being charged with book
theft bv the Honor Board, he
said. "Charges can range up to
40 hours of community work,
probation and restitution if a stu-
dent is found guilts
The procedure for recovering a
stolen book is relatively simple,
said Student Supply Store Assis-
tant Manager Roger Bullock. "If
a student suspects his books have
been stolen, he should im-
mediately come to the bookstore
to fill out a lost book form. That
will enable us to check books and
find out who sold them last
Bullock said that a name writ-
ten in a book is not enough iden-
tification. "The book thief can
easily scratch out the name, mak-
ing it impossible for store person-
nel to verify the stolen book he
said.
"There are many ways a stu-
dent can identify his textbooks
he said, "without making it ob-
vious to the thief Two ex-
amples Bullock include circling
particular page numbers in his
textbook. "A student must be
consistent in all of his books he
said. Another way would be to
underline simple words in the
book the first time they appear in
a particular chapter and the last
time they appear. "A student has
a better chance of having his
stolen book recovered if he, is able
to leave as many clues possible
for us to look for
The Student Supply Store has
80 coin-return lockers available
to students who elect to keep
their books locked up while shop-
ping at the book store, Bullock
said. "It is probably the safest
place for a student to keep his
books while he is shopping
Sutker said book theft is seen
as a serious offense by the Honor
Board because not only is it steal-
ing, but it inhibits a student from
studying.
JON JOOOAN
ECU PIW� Lb
es folks
14. Little
purchase
Attention!
, it's that time of the year to buy your loved one a rose for that special da coming up Feb.
does this unsuspecting patron know is that only those with perfect posture are allowed to
the flower of love.
Teacher Exchange Program Provides Variety Outside Class
H I Sf�i Bureau
Moses Sheppard is like most
dlege professors, only his
classroom is different.
The classroom, in fact, is not
in a college and neither are the
students, but professor Sheppard
is there anyway in a unique ECU
program that allows college pro-
fessors to exchange places with
'heir high school counterparts.
In its second year, the teacher
exchange program began as a
resolution adopted by the N.C.
Legislature in 1983. It was one of
several experimental programs
porposed by Rep. Howard
Chapin (D-Beau fort) to improve
the quality of teaching in the
public schools.
Under the plan, adopted by the
ECU Teacher Education Coun-
cil, faculty members specializing
in teacher education are en-
couraged to go into the public
schools on a voluntary basis for a
two-week period while their
public school colleagues are
assigned to classrooms on cam-
pus. The professors, in turn, get a
first-hand look at the public
school environment while the
high school instructors bring
their experiences to the attention
of college students ho are plann-
ing careers in public education.
Descriptions of experiences
gathered so far have ranged from
"a wonderful opportunity" to
"terrifying
"Walking back into that
classroom was terrifying said
Sue Bowden, a science education
professor at ECU who returned
last year to a high school
classroom in Duplin County
where she had taught several
years before.
"It was as if I had never left
she said. "Nothing had
changed
In the first of the true ex-
changes between high school and
college instructors, Moses Shep-
pard, a professor of science
education at ECU, began a two
week stint last week teaching
biology to students at North Pitt
High School. Ann Burden, the
biology and advanced biology in-
structor at North Pitt, took com-
mand of Sheppard's science
education methods classes at
ECU.
Both teachers are delighted
with the experience.
"I've become more ap-
preciative of the importance of
motivation says Burden who
describes her experiences in the
college classroom as "a wonder-
ful opportunity
"These (college) students are
self-motivated. They are eager
and anxious to learn everything
they can about the practicalities
of classroom teaching she said.
"Having been a high school
teacher for the past 10 years in
the public school system, I hope I
have some experience I can offer
to them Burden said.
Meanwhile at the high school,
Sheppard is delighted with the ex-
perience of teaching in high
school after being away from it
for almost 24 years.
"Because both Mrs. Burden
and I work with student teachers,
it is giving us the opportunity to
see what each other's assignments
are like and it's giving our
students another perspective as
well Sheppard said. "1 think
the experience adds a little more
credibility to our classes
One thing Sheppard has notic-
ed is that very little has changed
in the 24 years he has been away
form the high school. "There are
still some students who are anx-
ious to learn and there are others
who are not he said.
Charles Coble, dean of the
ECU School of Education and
director of teacher education at
ECU, says the program is
developing very nicely.
"A number of faculty have
committed themselves to ex-
changes similar to the one Dr.
Sheppard is undertaking Coble
said.
He noted that last year there
were a half dozen faculty on tem-
porary teachingassignments in the
schools. He said the Shep-
pard Burden exchange is the first
of the true, one-on-one
facultyteacher exchanges.
Coble says he views the pro-
gram as being a mutual benefit to
college professors and high
school teachers. "We see it as a
method for improving teacher
education in general but I think
the primary help will be received
back on our campus he said.
"What we are doing is renew-
ing our knowledge of the realities
of the public school classroom
he said. "This is an attempt to br-
ing us up to date
The exchange program is
directed by a committee headed
by Dr. Robert Barnes. Under the
guidelines developed by the com-
mittee about 10 percent of the
150 teacher education faculty
members would be involved in
the teacher exchanges each year.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials
Entertainment7
Classifieds
Sports10
�Style Editor Tina Maroschak
reviews the new play The
Diviners which opened last
night in McGinnis Theatre.
See Entertainment, page 7.
m j lidfc�dMfcMfcrfti
I
f 1


i





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY ?, 19t3
Announcements
Student Union Recreation
Committee
will meet on Moo Peb II lUpir in room
17 o� Vondenhall Student Center All
member� and interested students are urged
to atleno
Student Union Travel
Committee
will meet on Thurs . F-eb 14 at 4 p m In
room 241 of Mendenhall Student Center All
member and interested students are urged
to attend
Thirty Second Spot For
Concert Band
Join the United States Air Force Tactical Air
Command Band tor a very special evening of
musn-ai entertainment Sat Feb 23 at the
Wight Auditorulm This outstanding
muslcai group on tour �rom Langley Air
Force Base. Va win present an e�citino
program featuring selections t- om the light
tlassus and broadwav hits to stirring
patriotic specials, current vcxal hits and
even the Big Band era The program spon
sored bv Air Force ROTC and Dall Reflec
tor, is open to the public and will begin a' a
p m Fot tree tickets, contact Air Force
ROTC at 75; 4548 or come to the secono floor
of Wright Anne�
Political Science Student's
Society
will hold a meeting a 3 p m Wed Feb 13 In
BC 105 Anyone, regardless of maior. is m
vited to attend We art planning a lot of e
: t:ng events tor the future so came and be a
pat nowr
Deputy US Marshall Exam
Applicet on dates tor the Deputy US Mar
snail Exam are trom Feb 4 17 information
is available at ffie Career Planning and
PtacemenfServ.ee. Bioton House Come Dv
ano leam how to get started n a career In
this division of the US Department of
lustice
Attention Girls of ECU
a-i. jlX �pteresfeo in posing for the i�8o
G'ris of tCc Calender please contact John
D at W 3516
Rose Sa'e
Tre� !� � e'ea c a r ,re , h' Itle
S'Sters win be selling roses cr Va'entnes s
Day on Feb 6 7 In front of the Student Store
Roses are 14 earn and wii be delivered tree
ctn valentine s Da
Campus Service
TtliS Sur morning at ' the Fountain cf L'e
Christian Fellowship Mill be sponsoring
eno'her campus service The sevice writ be
held m Jenk.ns Auditor 11:1 Everyone 'S cor
d'a1' inv.ted to come and share In fhe
praises Aw don t you come out expectantly
and receive a blessing designed iust for you
Goes speaker w.h be one of ECU s alumni.
Otis Robmson
Music Courses
the School of Music encourages students to
consider enroling in the following music
courses designed tor non muse maiors dur
ing 'he fan term AUSC l'OS- Non Music
Maior Grnup voice MUSC lMe.im Non
MuS'c Maior Group Piano ' end H MUSC
2J08 VuS'C Appreciation MUSC 2218-
Orchestrai Music MUSC 2i38- contem
porary Music. MUSC J25�- H story of jaji
Music MUSC 3018� Introduction to Basic
Music Skills MUSC 3028 Music Education
m Elementary Grades MUSC 3038- Music
Education in intermediate Grades MUSC
3048- Music tor Exceptional Children
Performance organiiaficns are open to an
Students but an audition s required prior tc
registration In any performance group
unless The student has the consent of the In
S t r u c t O r
No other schev. 0 music course ottering
may be taken without pe'm.ssion of the in
structor and authorisation from fb Dean s
office
ECU Bioioby Club
SAB Meeting
There Hi be a S'udent Athletic
meeting Mon feb II at 4 in rm
Menoenhaii Student Center
Board
221 of
TKE Llf S.s Happy Hour
Yes. we had tun with our hat' happy hour so
we contured up another tun time' Valentine
Happy Hour try to answer the questions
around campus on flyers and come on down
In Olde Town inn Thurs , Feb 14 from 7 10'
Bring valentine for discount admission! I
Kappa Sigam Little
Sister Rush
Feb 118.12 Parties begin at�p m Come on
girls and party with the best' Everyone is In
vited
Student Star Search
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
will be accepting applications for ifspresen
tafion of student star search Applications
�re available at the information desk and the
Sdent un.on office. Mendenhall The date
of the Student S'ar Search presentation is
Feb 2S 8 o m Hendrrx
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
In the Bioxton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in develop,ng better
interviewing skills tor use in your 10b search
A film and discussion o how to interview on
and off campus will be shared These ses
sions win be held m the Career Planning
Room eilprn on Feb 7.11. and 19 Seniors
are especially encouraged to attend one of
these sessions 1
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
In me Bioxton House is offering one hour ses
sions 10 help you prepare your own resume
Few graduates get IOCS without some
preparation Many employers request a
resume showing your eduatlon and ex
ponence Sessions to help will be held in the
Career Planning room of the Bioxton House
at 3 p m on Feb 5. 13 and 20
Gamma Beta Phi
will hold a meeting Thurs , Feb 7 at 103
Biology at 7 p m Don't forget the S4 dues
Saw everybody there
Prime Time
Tan a study break and coma to Prime
Tlmal Sponsored by Campus Crusade for
Christ, we ate maatlng in JanWn Aud Art
Blgd , �l t p m join us for fun, fellowship
and Bible Study
Kappa Sigma Little
Sisters
Don't lorgat our Important meetings Frl at 4
and � Sate you moral
The next meeting of the ECU Biology Club
will be Mon Feb 11 The meeting will be
held in Biology BN 107 at 7 p m Our featured
speaker will be Jacqueline Hawkins, and Ad
missions Representative trom the Center tor
Student Opportunities (CSOI She will speak
about the services available to students, I e
help with reading and studying tutoring,
etc . and win also discuss the summer pro
gram offered at ECU for Pre Med students
She win also talk about a new program they
are offering All interested persons cordially
Invited to attend New memberships will be
accepted at this meeting
Weight Lifting Meet
1 he IRS in coorporation with lobbies gym Is
sponsoring the annual weight lifting meet
Registration begins Feb 1113 Themeetwlll
be held Feb 18 Come by room 204 Memorial
Gym to sign up
Swim Meet
The annual IRS swim meet will be held in
ea'iy Feb Register Feb 2 7 Get your squad
together and pool your effortsl Sign up In 204
Memorial Gym
Pirate Walk
Theie win be a meeting of all Pirate Walk
escorts and operators this Mon at 6 30 p m
in the Multi Purpose room of Mendenhall
Student Center All escorts please wear your
lackets because there will be a photographer
present to takea group shot Alter the
meet ng an who art interested in seeing the
Baskctbei' game can talk to David Brown
NC Student Legislature
will nee Mon Feb 11 at 7 In the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse we need to know who will be go
mg to the I C the 16 18 of Feb Bills will be
worked on session discussed new resolu
tions passed out plans for our Valentines
Day thappi hour) Crush, and other business
Buddhist Study
"here , oe an organizational meeting
Thurs 'her at 7 m room 247 Mendenhall
Please come
Marketing and Business
Majors
� �rf , rke'ing maior and want a
cnaMenge whv no become a member on the
StudarH 1 "iron Public Relations and Public!
iv Committee' This committee packages
publicity and coordinates total promotion tor
the Student union For more information,
contact the Student Union (room 234) at
757 6611 ext 210 Deadline to apply tor
chairperson is Thurs Feb 7
ECU Poetry Forum
The ECU Poetry Forum win meet Feb 7 in
124 Menoenhaii The forum is open to anyone
�nterestea in writing or discussing poetry
Those planning to reaJ and discuss their
poems are asked to bring eight or 10 copies of
each poem tor other members of the
workshop
Education Maiors
The Career iao ��' issue win be addressee
bv" Cecil Banks pres.dent of the NC Assocla
tion of Educators on Mon Feb 11. at 3 30
p m m room 12S� erf the Speight Building
The newly proposed 'earner salary scale
and career development w'll be discussed
Everyone is invited Refreshments will be
served Sponsored by the Student North
Carolina Association of Educators
ECU FrisbeeClub
mee'� every Tues and Thurs at 3 30 bottom
of college hlli drive Everybody is welcome
to come and play Learn new -iils or brush
up on old ones Get reed, tor the warm
weather and come iam with the IRATES
Watch for the Natural Light ultimax
Ultimate Fest 5 March 23 & 24 Ultimately
not oblong
Unitarian Universalists
The Greenville umtanna Universalists will
offer a program on Race Relations Past
and Present" on Sun Ham, Feb 10 at 499
Oak St The speakers will be Dr Sydney
Barnwen ECU School of Medicm and Dr
Chana Davis. Asst Professor of
Psychology For more information, call Car
roll Webber (7S84a06 or Susan Felker
,752 07871
ECU College Republicans
will Imeet Thurs Feb 7 at 4 In the
Mendenhall CoHehouse We win discuss the
Wolverines, make plans to attend the Duke
Elections Convention the 224.23 of Feb . and
discuss a membership table (free books,
petition, etc.) Remember to bring S (a
check to be made out at meeting for conven
tion fees)
Study Abroad In Italy
For the cost o only one semester s expenses
at ECU students who have the equivalent of
9 s r. of Italian can be placed in Italy for as
many as 11 months For details, contact Dr
R Hursey Austin 222 (phone 757 64181
Lipsinc Contest
Phi Beta Sigma is sponsoring a lipsinc con
test called Sngin the Hits' A grand prize of
140 win be awarded to the winner of the con
test We are registering individuals this
week (Feb 4 8) A S10 registration fee Is re-
quired per person per act The event will be
held 25 Fee 85 in Jenkins Auditorium at 7
pm Contact any member of Phi BetaSlgma
Frat For a registration form and further In
lormation or call W J rogers (752 3644)
Sign up now and win SSS
Beta Lil' Sis Rush
Beta Theta Pi will navt little sister rush at 9
p m on Mon and Tues night, Feb 114.12
305 E 14 St 757 0351 and 757 0711
Beta Theta Pi
There will be an Important meeting of all
brothers, pledges and little sisters at 304 E
14 st at n p m tonight Feb 7 All should at
Phi Epsilon Kappa
Meeting Thurs . Fab 7 at 6 p m. at Minges
Coliseum rm 144 All PE majors and Inten
ding maiors are welcome Wa are a profes
slonai fraternity with many Interests
Phi Kappa Phi Lil
Sister Rush
Win hold little sister ruth on Wad Fefc 6 at
the Attic and Thurs , Fab 7 at the PI Kapp
house Parties will begin at V pm both
nights Coma party with the brothers and lit
tie s.sters of PI Kappa Phi
Kappa Sigma Little
Sister Rush
Feb 114.12 Parties begin alt pm Everyone
Is Invited to come out and party
Carnation Sale
Sigma Nu little sisters will be selling carna
lions for valentines In front ot) the Student
Store Tues through Frl The cost Is St SO In
eluding a card and floral paper With the
purchase of a carnation you will receive two
tree tickets to a pre Valentine's Day happy
hour at the Elbo, sponsored by Sigma nu.
Feb 13
NAACP
We will have our regularly scheduled
meeting on Mon , Feb 11. at 5 30 in the Co
feehouse In Mendenhall Agenda plans in
elude reports on the progress of special
committees Feb prolect. Survey Protect,
and Membership If you missed us In the Stu
dent Supply Store, you may still loin at this
meeting tor the reports for Jan will be sent
to National Chapter on Feb 12
Epsilon Pi Tau
EPT will hold irs monthly meeting at Tar
Landing Seafood on Tues . Feb 12 from
5 6 30 p m Dr Ball. Director of the ECU
Counseling Center will be the guest speaker
Members and guests are welcome to attend
Quakers are Friends
Quakers lind that amidst the pressure and
noise of modern lite there is In silent worship
a healing and creative power First day
meeting Sun . Richard and Mary miller's
home 1801 C Cedar Lane (call 754 6789)
Ambassadors
We will have our next general meeting on
Wed . Feb 13 at 5 p m in the Mendenhall
Multipurpose room A big welcome to all our
new inductees You're a great group and
we're very proud you're a part of our
organization
ECU Surfing Cub
The surf lean- and Marsh's Surf ano Sea will
be sponsoring a haopyi hour at the Treehouse
restaurant this Fri from 3 4 included win
be a showing of me brand new Hawaiin surf
ing movie The Performers' as well as video
tapes of the ECU team trom last tall Guys
and gals are welcome Be there orelselll
INDT
inducfrial Technology students interested in
Northern Telecom for the summer should
contact Co op office in 313 Rawl to update ap
plication materials as soon as possible
Enviromental Health
Positions available for environmental health
student for the summer. 1945, with a major
utility In Charlotte Contact Cooperative
Education, 313 Rawl Building
Intramural Sport Clubs
The Karate Sport Club is currently having
classes for anyone yellow belt and above
The schedule is Advanced classes Mon at
7 30 pm Jim McAienaetv Thurs at 7 30
p m Chuck Johnson Wed at 7 30 p m Ann
vanLlth It you art Interested m becoming
involved drop by any session in the danc�
room of Memor.ai gym
Phi Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity
Bud Light, ano rock 93 invite you to loin us on
the courts tor the volleyball marathon tor
Easter seals or March 24.3 at Minges C01
iseum! Pre registration deadline 'or in
terested participants Is Thurs .Feb 21 ECU
students who participate will play their
games early sat morning so Spring plans
won't be Interrupted For more in formation
call the toll tree volleyball hotline at
I 800 662 9712 or wr.te Jean Gaddy Easter
Seal Society 3948 Browning Place Raleigh
NC 27609
Florida
Win a trip to Florida tor spring break Two
persons stay 4 days and three nights In
Orlando Round trip air Klnston to Orlando
transportation between airport and hotel On
sale at the studenrs supply store Feb
7,1,11 15 Winner will be announced Feb 2!
Sponsored by the ECU school of Music s
Man's Glee Club
Sierra Club
Melinda Welton, prolect coordinator for the
NC Wldlite comm in the area ot non game
and endangered species, will be the featured
speaker at the Feb 11 meeting of the sierra
Club Ms Welton will discuss the Commi
sions bald eagle and sea turtle projects as
well as other wildlife restoration and protec
tion projects In North Carolina The Sierra
Club meets at 8 p m at the First
Presbyterian Church at 14th ano Elm
Visitors welcome
University Book Exchange
Scholarship
The Department of English Invites applica
tions for the University Book Exchange
Scholars p, a S500 award based on
academic achievement, citizenship and
leadership, and potential To apply, must
(1) be a currently enrolled senior or junior
English maor (2) have an overall GPA of 3 5
or above (3) submit a one page double
spaced, typed statement of goals as an
English maior (4) submit the names of two
professors who art willing to recommend
you (5) submit a completed application
form, available at the department office
Scholarships
The Department of Military Sience (Army
ROTC) is now accepting applications for 2
and 3 year merit scholarships These scholar
ships pay lull tuition and fees plus an
allowance for books and supplies each
semester For more Information contact
Captain Lillvak or Master Sergeant Boyies
at 324 Erwin Hall or call 757 6947 or 6974
Racquetball Club
ECU Racquetball Club will hold an organiza
tlonal meeting on Wed . Feb 13, 5 p m In
Memorial Gym. r 102 All members and
anyone Interested are welcome Important
meeting
Pirate Walk
Ladles, If you don't have a boyfriend to
escort you at night, than we have the Man for
you. Call pirate walk 757 416
Omega pS Phi Frat
Presents Irs first 'Mala Anything You Can
Do Contest 1st prize S25. 2nd SIS At the
unlimited Touch. Thurs Fab. 7 There will
also be a 911 happy hour and all proceeds
will go to our National Talent Hunt Program
THE
COUNT
BASIE
ORCHESTRA
LIVE!
I
Tuesday, February 12, 1985
8:00p.m.
Wright Auditorium
ECU Campus Greenville
TICKETS AVAILABLE:
CENTBAL TICKET OFFICE
MENOENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MONDAY - FRIDAY
1 1:00a.m. - eOOp.m.
787-6611. x26�
ECU STUDENTS AND QUEST: $3.00
ECU FACULTYSTAFF AND QUEST: $8.00
PUBLIC AND AT THE DOOR: $7.00
QROUP RATES AVAILABLE
SPONSORED BY
THE STUDENT UNION SPECIAL CONCERTS COMMITTEE
The Brothers of
Saint Basil's School
preached against ice
lust and disrespect.
But that
never stopped
these guys.
Heauen help us
If God had wanted them to be angels He would have given them wings.
HBO PICTURES IN ASSOCIATION WITH SILVER SCREEN PARTNERS PRESENTS
A MARK CARLINER-DAN WIGUTOW PRODUCTION HEAVEN HELP US
ANDREW MCCARTHY MARY STUART MASTERSON KEVIN DILLON
MALCOLM DANARE KATE REID � WALLACE SHAWN
IOHN HEARD AS TIMOTHY AND DONALD SUTHERLAND- v JAMES HORNER
� CHARLES PURPURA- �' DAN WIGUTOW AND MARK CARLINER (
�x i " MICHAEL DINNER fy
R
����� 17 ifQUMUS �CC0"��'i�S
P�W�1 �� �0UU GU�����ft;
A.TRI MAR
REltASf
KIBS fn Mr FVture
jl Rjgh't B�-terve�1
STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 AT A
SPECIALLY SELECTED THEATRE NEAR YOU
ECU Trustee
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Sen L4Hx
ECU Board of Trustees
member Katie Morgan resigned
last month, following the ap
pointment of her husband.
former Sen Robert Morgan, as
director of the State Burea .
Investigation
The resignation was due
policy set by the L'NC Board of
Governors which states that no
member of the state legislature or
state employee, nor their spouse,
is entitled to hold a
the Board of Governors o
stnuent institution's B-
Trustees
F . tccUor 1
said the ia went inl
rnately
prior to tha
. .re often
I
bal . made

Board
h Kinse- V
Colleges Get Fundin,
Increase From State
(CPS) � States have increa
their funding for colleges shd
over the last two vear
The improvements follow a
two-year period in which sLa
increased their college budge'
a record-low pace, an overvie �
state funding b lllin
L'niversitv has found
Summarizing the higher ec .
tion budgets of all 5'
M.M. Chambers of ISl"s Center
for Higher Educatioi
that state college funding i
average oi 16 percent higher
ing the 1983-84 biennium tl
was during the prior two ve
S ates increased their b .
by an average of 16 percei
the past two yearv
the 11 percent increase fi
to 1983.
The faster rise in state
education funding, how
not mean the deep budge" c
the recession are over. Chambers-
adds in an analys of the data
published in the Noven
December issue of Grapevine
newsletter focusing on higher
education funding.
He notes economy . . � are
unstable, and e c o n o n
disagree about whether a new
recession is pending.
Further, the boost in fund -
may not last long if r.
temporary response to the Fluxi
of recent reports dea
decline in eduation q
Chambers notes.
"Many of these (educat
reform) proposals re
Conference
Discusses
Funding
Continued From Page 1
plans must accompanv the
it is to be considered.
The SGA receive- M 75 in
from each student. This lun
sum is initially spent on SGA
operational costs and cuher Su
programs. Eighty-five percenl
about $85,000 which is genera
left over, is divided among the
various student organizations ac-
cording to need. Since appropria-
tions are made in the spring, the
legislature must base the amount
of money distributed on pro-
jected enrollment. Because ol
this, the legislature tends to act
conservatively in appropriations
so the funds do not run short in
the fall.
serious a'
few 51
some
mor

per
i
Ma
-
Bangladesh � Singapore � A u n ait �
2
s:
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3
Q
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VSa
I
I
1 ' I
INTERNATION
Feb. 15 at 6:
Mendenhall Stu
Multipurpose
Tickets: $5.00 Adults
Call 752
Sponsored by: International
� Hongkong� Peru � i.S.A. � Qatar � Spal
?
J
- - - I, ii � a ajpMMa.grn r r i- r v � �
!
� �� � mmmmattmtttmm
' I. m J)j���� - J'mi ju
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 1985
RA
uary 12, 1985
turn
Greenville
M
s
help us
iHs W would have given them wings.
R M Rf f PMUNFRS PRESENTS
W PRODI I TKHE WEN HELP US
AKI � � . rERSON KEVIN DILLON
D WALLAC sHA,V
THrRlAvn- IAMESHORNER
KNWICl rOW AND MARK CARUNER j
! DINNER
A. TR) s!M?
RElEASi
FEBRUARY 8 AT A
ID THEATRE NEAR YOU
ta
ECU Trustee Member Resigns
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Una MM
ECU Board of Trustees
member Katie Morgan resigned
last month, following the ap-
pointment of her husband,
former Sen. Robert Morgan, as
director of the State Bureau of
Investigation.
The resignation was due to a
policy set by the UNC Board of
Governors which states that no
member of the state legislature or
state employee, nor their spouse,
is entitled to hold a position on
the Board of Governors or a con-
stituent institution's Board of
Trustees.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
said the law went into effect ap-
proximately 12 years ago and
prior to that time, members of
the state legislature often served
as trustees. "The rule was pro-
bably made to try and keep
politics out of the system
Howtll said.
Boird of Trustees Chairman
Ralph Kinsey said Mrs. Morgan's
resignation was effective when
Sen. Morgan took his oath of of-
fice. Kinsey said he hopes Mrs.
Morgan will continue to take an
active interest in the university
and to interact with the Board of
Trustees.
Mrs. Morgan said she was
sorry she had to resign, although
she added that her term would
hav been up this year. She was
appointed by the Board of
Governors to serve a four-year
term and would have been eligi-
ble for a four-year reappoint-
ment. "I can still contribute to
ECU she said, adding that she
"loves the campus and the people
here. It's been a wonderful ex-
perience
Mrs. Morgan's replacement
will be selected by the Board of
Governors, which meets mon-
thly. Kinsey said he hopes the
Board will be able to address the
subject at its March meeting.
r
Colleges Get Funding
Increase From States
ATTIC
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concetti ,
Cross
(CPS) � States have increased
their funding for colleges sharply
over the last two years.
The improvements follow a
two-year period in which states
increased their college budgets at
a record-low pace, an overview of
state funding by Illinois State
University has found.
Summarizing the higher educa-
tion budgets of all 50 states,
MM. Chambers of 1SL "s Center
for Higher Education calculates
that state college funding is an
average of 16 percent higher dur-
ing the 1983-84 biennium than it
was during the prior two years.
States increased their budgets
by an average of 16 percent over
the past two years, compared to
the 11 percent increase from 1982
to 198?.
The faster rise in state higher
education funding, however, may
not mean the deep budget cuts of
the recession are over, Chambers
adds in an analysis of the data
published in the November-
December issue of Grapevine, his
newsletter focusing on higher
education funding.
He notes economic signals are
unstable, and economists
disagree about whether a neu
recession is pending.
Further, the boost in funding
may not last long if it is only a
temporary response to the flurry
of recent reports decrying the
decline in eduation quality.
Chambers notes.
"Many of these (education
reform) proposals received
serious attention from some state
governors and legislators, and a
few states have already enacted
statutes designed to implement
some of the recommendations
Chambers writes.
"This unprecendented wave of
thoughtful discussion, if it can be
maintained with its initial
momentum, may bring signifi-
cant positive effects
Chambers' data, which cover
funding tor operation costs only,
aKo demonstrate states still are
well below the levels of increases
they gave during the boom years
oi the '60s.
During the 1968-69 biennium,
for example, funding increased
43 percent, mostly due to
mushrooming support for com-
munity and two-year colleges.
Funding increases averaged 24
percent throughout the late '70s,
before tailing off sharply. The
average two-year increase during
the '80s is r percent.
California, forced to slash col-
lege funding by the Proposition
13 tax cut, may have dragged the
national average down to its
record low during the 1983-84
school years.
For the two-year period ending
this fiscal year, California
lawmakers increased funding for
higher education by 16 percent,
the nationwide average.
Massachusetts awarded the
highest two-year increase � 36
percent � while Oklahoma col-
leges got the lowest increase � at
4 percent, the report found.
THURS. WZMB3rd
Anniversaiv J
PRESSURE �
� BOYS �
Free Beer
While ii lasts!
Saturday Feb. 9
Doors Upen At 8:01
Concert At 9:00
�ATii DIAMONDS.
February Birthdays get in FREE
BIRTH DA Y SPECIAL
at Greenville's Oldest Restaurant
Carolina Grill
Celebrating our 85th anniversary
Come by on your birthday and eat
breakfast FREEH
Breakfast anytime. From the Student
Center take 9th St. West �just a quarter
mile.
CORNER of 9th & DICKINSON
MONSAT. 6 am-3 pm Phone 752-1 188
Buy One Chicken Biscuit, French
Fries, and Medium Drink & Get
Chicken Biscuit FREE
Exp. 3-1-85
Buy One Sausage Biscuit
or Ham Biscuit with Drink
99c
Conference
Discusses
Funding
Continued From Page 1
plans must accompany the bill if
it is to be considered.
The SGA receives $8.75 in fees
from each student. This lump
sum is initially spent on SGA
operational costs and other SGA
programs. Eighty-five percent, or
about $85,000 which is generally
left over, is divided among the
various student organizations ac-
cording to need. Since appropria-
tions are made in the spring, the
legislature must base the amount
of money distributed on pro-
jected enrollment. Because of
this, the legislature tends to act
conservatively in appropriations
so the funds do not run short in
the fall.
r
rrt
rj
NQghtclub
1 hursdav
Meet the Me
of Avcock!
omc jam In the tunes I the One & ()nl
Dadd)ool
.mil Pai t w ith I I �� 1 inesl
PARTY
with Campus Marketing
YOUR BEST DEAL TO FLORIDA
v
H.i Houi from 8 00 " 10
with 5CM ilr.iti SJ 00 pitchers - for 1 Highballs
YOU DRIVE (TO THE PARTY)
I ,ii. I in llu l jiolin.i I .i-t I I nil.
I'll.m.
U.
, � � � I -
Guests art welcome
1 rniav (ml � rlw Month Begin Be rhere
t cWj � i '
WE DRIVE (THE PARTY STARTS HERE)
$159
Bangladesh � Singapore � Kuwait � Palestine � Philippines � Indonesia � Japan

w
5
g
s3
0
��
INTERNATIONAL DINNER e
Feb. 15 at 6:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
Tickets: $5.00 Adults $4.00 Children
Call 752-0578
Sponsored by: International Student Association
�Hongkong � Peru � U.S.A. � Qatar � Spain � Thailand � Bangladesh � Kuwait
INCLUDES:
� Round trip motor coach transportation to beautiful
Daytona Beach (WE DRIVE Pockoges Only) We use
nothing but modem htghwav coaches
� FREE refreshments available on the motor coach on the
way down (to begin the party
� tight Florida days seven enaiess nights at one of our
exciting oceanltont hotels located right on the Daytona
Beach strip Your hotel has a beautiful pool sun deck an
conditioned rooms color TV and a nice long stretch or
beach
� A full schedule of FREE pool deck parties every day
� A full list of pre-arranged discounts to ave you money m
Daytona Beach
� Travel representatives to insure a smooth trip and a
good time
� Optional side excursions to Disney World Epcct deep
sea fishing parry cruises, etc
� AJi taxes and tips
THE GREATEST TIME - THE BEST PRICE
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
I AND SIGN UP
Contact BOB at 752-9320
Sponsored by Campus Marketing tmmmm
MMMNM �� coul� �o��
� l
i I

?
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wmmmmm
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Ft
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3i?e iEaat (Earolinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, cm �w
Greg Rideoit. n�w� fh�
Jennifer Jendrasiak. � ����� Tom Luvender, m,� m,
Scott Cooper, i �-� �M Anthony Martin, m ��,��
Tina Maroschak, s.a John Peterson. �� �a�,f�
Bill Mitchell. diit� Wdutrr Bu i Dawson, r���t-i wmmii
Doris Rankins. hcnn Rick Mccormac. v.m fd��,
Daniel Maiirer, GMwanawi em John Rusk, ww r�Man
February 7. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Tax Cuts
Examine Gov. Martin's Proposals
Tuesday marked the opening
day of the North Carolina General
Assembly, and the Democratic-
controlled Legislature let it be
known quickly that popular
Republican Gov. James G. Martin
was in for a battle over the tax cuts
he's planned for the state. On day
one, state Senate Democrats
pressured Martin to send his
budget over earlier, signaling
everyone that the Democrats were
out to establish who's boss.
The move was definitely
discourteous to the state's second
Republican governor this century,
but necessary if the Democrats are
going to overcome Martin's
popularity. What the Democrats
.tre telline Martin is, "Hey, the
honeymoon is over. It's time to
show you who runs this state
But the Democrats need to be
careful. The Republican victories
this past fall may not have been a
mandate for Martin, but it was cer-
tainly a warning to get the job
done in a more conservative man-
ner. Martin wants Reaganesque-
type tax cuts for the state.
Democrats concede tax cuts will
occur, but of what type and to
alleviate whose burden are the
primary points of difference.
Martin, as he said in his in-
auguration speech, is for business.
He plans on asking the Legislature
to repeal the state sales tax on food
and non-prescription drugs as of
Jan. 1, 1986 and the intangibles tax
as of July 1, 1986, with the state
reimbursing the counties for all
lost revenue. He wants to cut the
inventory tax in half by July, 1986,
and eliminate it by July 1, 1988
(also replacing lost revenue to the
counties). Martin, Mr. Business,
argues that the taxes burden the
state's economy; they act as a
disincentive to businesses that are
considering moving to the state
and chases away rich retirees who
want to move to the state.
But House Speaker Liston B.
Ramsey says Democrats aren't go-
ing to buy it. By his figuring, Mar-
tin's proposals could cost the state
$443.5 million in lost revenue.
That's a lot of money. There is no
way the state could endure cuts
that deep and still be able to con-
tinue efforts to improve education
and make other improvements
necessary to move the state for-
ward.
Everyone who pays taxes would
like a tax cut. And maybe North
Carolina can afford to lighten its
citizens tax burden slightly. But
cuts this deep are out of the ques-
tion � and the General Assembly
knows it.
Obviously, there will be a com-
promise between the two parties
and the two branches of govern-
ment, but let's hope the plan won't
compromise education � a key to
any success in the state.
Gov. Martin needs to reassess
his cuts. Yes, we believe a slight
rollback or even a repeal of the
food tax would be a good idea.
After all, it would affect everyone
and alleviate a heavy burden on the
poor of the state. Some relief for
business may be in order, but not
without a look at the middle-
income taxpayer. He deserves his
fair shake, too.
Also, Gov. Martin says business
growth in the state is being stifled.
Well, then, how come more and
more industries are relocating to
our state. We are attracting our
fair share of new enterprises to the
state. Our tax system is not scaring
off a substantial number of them;
our growth is not dropping off and
causing the state hardship. The
system ain't broke; don't fix it.
Gov. Martin should not repeal
taxes just for the sake of saying he
repealed taxes. There needs to be
justification. In our eyes, his
reasons aren't good enough. A
slight easing of the burden, yes.
But not so big a cut that important
programs that help our state are
lost.
Did you know? � The U.S. na-
tional motto, In God We Trust,
was designated as such by Con-
gress in 1956. It originated during
the Civil War as an inscription for
U.S. coins, although it was used by
Francis Scott Key in a slightly dif-
ferent form when he wrote The
Star Spangled Banner in 1814.
The slogan came about when
Union morale was shaken after
battlefield defeats. The Rev. M.R.
Watkinson, of Pennsylvania,
wrote to Secretary of the Treasury
Salmon P. Chase suggesting a mot-
to saying we trust in God be in-
scribed on our coins. Chase
ordered coins designed with In
God We Trust on them, and it ap-
peared on some coins in 1864. It
was on various coins up to 1955,
and Congress ordered it to appear
on all coins and paper money in
1956.
a rmt Coeoe Pre$s Sefvce
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F�tfW, SAUJNHRAN UFfc SQUADS R&VOKT SUCCESS 1V1 TrfcR POPUIOTOM-
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Campus Forum
Abortion
The Debate Goes On And On
Dennis Kilcoyne's Jan. 31 column
on abortion requires some clarifica-
tion. He cited a 1973 Supreme Court
ruling which he says legalized abortion;
"Overnight, what had been a crime
became a constitutional right This
dramatic generalization overlooks: 1.
Abortion under certain circumstances
had generally been legal in even the
most strictly anti-abortion states
before 1973. 2. Not all states had laws
severe enough to be reversed by this
Court action. 3. What the Court over-
turned was just the states' right to deny
abortion during the first trimester, but
it affirmed the states' right to limit se-
cond trimester and continue proscrip-
tion of third trimester abortion.
Most laws concerning abortion in
this country did not appear until
around 1830, and then they were in-
tended as much to prohibit the
dangerous surgery as over concern
about its morality. Time, however, has
shown abortion is sought whether or
not it is legal, while advances in
medicine have now made legal abor-
tion safer than childbirth for the preg-
nant woman.
Mr. Kilcoyne's editorial also claimed
the human fetus is sentient, which is
true, but true as well of bacteria, plants
and many other organisms. The ques-
tion should not be whether or not the
human fetus can be made to respond to
stimuli, but rather if the quality of the
response is sufficient to indicate the
fetus is an independent, viable human
life from conception.
Finally, Mr Kilcoyne's analogy to
the victimization of blacks in pre-1863
America is useful only as analogy. 1
could a5 easily point to the 19th
Amendment (which gave women the
vote) and say, in Mr. Kilcoyne's words,
"Overnight, what had been a crime
became a constitutional right This is
an interesting observation, but, as Mr.
Kilcoyne might quickly point out, is ir-
relevant to the issue of abortion.
I do not doubt Mr. Kilcoyne's
sincerity, but sincerity is not a license
to cloud issues with generalizations and
irrelevancies, perhaps aimed more at
emotion than reason. Anti-abortionists
have legitimate concerns, many of
which are reflected in the proper bann-
ing of late term abortion. However,
until viability from conception is prov-
ed, abortion should remain a legal op-
tion in early term pregnancies.
David Lewis
School of Art
Against
So now the word is viable. A person
must be independent and viable to
avoid being aborted. I strongly
disagree with David Lewis' assertions
about what life is.
Independence means not relying on
other people. Does a one-month-old
infant rely on others? Does a one-year-
old rely on others? I believe that some
people never become independent.
Should all dependent beings be
dismembered as are dependent pre-
natal children?
Viable is an interesting word. It is
derived from the French word meaning
life. Webster's defines it as "capable of
living Any child, in or out of the
womb, is capable of living.
Please stop inventing guidelines as to
who should live and who should not.
Words and man-made standards can-
not justify the silent scream of a
developing child as its limbs are sliced
from its body.
Bill Green
Sr Finance
Don't Judge
In this day and age, I guess I wasn't
surprised to read about Dennis Kil-
coyne's Jan. 31 article which supported
anti-abortionists. His description of a
"megabucks business" grossly
overlooked the existence of women's
clinics (of which more than a few are
non-profit organizations) throughout
the country which provide a thoughtful
and compassionate environment, a
well as the vital emotional support of a
counselor who is present before, dur-
ing and after the abortion.
The ethics involved are not limited to
a black and white decision of life vs
death, but a more complex considera-
tion of the quality of the life in ques-
tion. Surrendering to the moral decree-
of governmental bureaucracy more
than threatens the individual's right to
make conscious, moral decisions. Who
else but the mothers or potential
parents are most capable of deciding
whether they can provide the healthv
environment a child deserves?
Transferring the power of this decision
to the federal government would be a
sad commentary on individuals'
responsibility to themselves and a
future generation.
Jackie I oesche
Anatomv staff
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorts). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Reagan's FY '86 Budget Addresses Problem
It's budget time in Washington. The
wars of appropriation have started and
the opposing forces, after a few opening
skirmishes, have begun to fight. The an-
nual war promises to be especially bitter
this time because big cuts in spending are
called for. Every interest group is rally-
ing to protect its money. The Democrats
may soon be offering a budget of their
own, and Republican Senate leaders
have vowed to do the same. But, of
course, all the present chattering con-
cerns President Reagan's proposed
budget, described by foes as dead on ar-
rival. How worthy is it of consideration?
The flight Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
���������������������������1
It is probably the best budget Reagan
has submitted to Congress since he took
office. For years, he bragged that he had
reduced federal spending growth from
17 to six percent. But this budget calls
for an increase of merely 1.5 percent. Of
course, federal spending needs to go
down, not up. But this budget is a big
improvement.
In his first day of testimony before the
Senate Budget Committee, budget direc-
tor David Stockman tried to cultivate a
sense of controlled alarm about the
deficit. "The day of reckoning has arriv-
ed he solemnly announced. The pro-
posed cuts show that Stockman is com-
pletely serious. If the president's pro-
posals are passed, sacrifices will be made
across the board. Farm subsidies, stu-
dent loans and aid, Amtrak and public
housing would be drastically trimmed.
Reagan's growing conviction is that the
deficit is so serious that everyone must,
for the sake of the country's good, bite
the bullet and hold back the tears. Sure,
the cuts will hurt in the short run. But in
the long run, nothing hurts the poor and
middle class people, the overwhelming
majority of the population, more than a
federal deficit stifling economic growth
and reducing job opportunities.
Unfortunately, but not surprisingly,
Congress doesn't appear to be in as
courageous a mood as the president.
Those pitiful congressmen are behaving
so typically. They talk grandly about the
need to balance the budget and cut spen-
ding � yet when someone proposes to
do just that, they cave in to the howls of
the selfish special interest groups.
Dismaying. Those fellows have Jell-O in
their spines.
Despite the fact that congressional
budget-cutting goals are insufficient,
there is no question that Congress will
adopt some big reductions. Many con-
gressmen are wisely reading the message
sent by the American people last Nov. 6
and are rallying around the president's
call for deep cuts. But the big area of
disagreement is defense spending.
Reagan has called for a 12.5 percent
increase in the military budget. Congress
is saying that the Pentagon must also
make sacrifices. Both sides may be right.
On the one hand, we have the Presi-
dent, who understands how closely tied
the defense appropriations are to foreign
policy. For years, congressional liberals
have demanded arms control talks with
the Soviets. Next month, those talks
begin at Geneva. Let's suppose Congress
enacts deep defense cuts. Then,
Secretary of State George Shultz heads
for the negotiating table and warns the
Soviets, "You had better make some
concessions or else we'll continue our
big arms build up The Soviets, of
course, would probably turn blue in the
face from laughter. They can read our
press and see how eager Congress is for
defense cuts.
On the other hand, there is probably
much waste in the defense budget. And
with the 12.5 percent proposed increase,
the projected deficit would still be $180
billion.
When asked where he would cut Pen-
tagon spending if he were permitted to,
David Stockman had an interesting sug-
gestion: "Cut retirement pensions The
Reagan budget proposes a whopping $18
billion for military retirement.
Stockman, a Vietnam-era draft resister,
shocked everyone by describing military
pensions as "scandalous He said that
too many military men are more con-
cerned about their retirement than na-
tional security. He might be right. Not
long ago, I toyed with the idea of joining
the military. .All the recruiters I spoke to
focused on the fabulous retirement
benefits. Once, I was confronted by
three Air Force recruiters telling me
about the retirement benefits. I inter-
rupted them and said, "I'm not in-
terested in the retirement. I just want to
serve my country They looked at me
like I was nuts.
Anyway, as good as the president's
budget may be, it won't pass unharmed.
Reagan seems to be in a fighting mood,
and he'll probably do better than ex-
pected, but he won't be completely suc-
cessful. However, if he is as serious
about deficit-cutting as he seems to be,
he ought to submit balanced budgets to
Congress. Such a proposal wouldn't
stand a chance, but. of course, neither
does his present proposal. If he submit-
ted a balanced budget and watched it get
defeated by congressional liberals, who
do you think would take the blame for
the inevitable deficit-caused recession
down the road?
MMMMHMMi
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'
Assaults I
�� BRF.TT MORRIS
MfVMM
Two ECU football pla �
were arrested and charged tl
assaulting Michael Joseph F
m the lobbv of Scott dorm a
proximately 12 15 p m Fet
according to pur
records
Ronald Gilhard of 204
dorm and John Curtis v
son of 116 Belk were d
the magistrate and rek I
5200 bnd on Tuesd
to Francis Edding
director of public
A court appearan ha
set for Thursday. !
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CAROLINA
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the mother or potential
�St capable of deciding
-an provide the healthy
ment a child deserves?
ring the power of this decision
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ndividuals'
to tnemseoes and a
Jackie 1 oesche
Anatomy staff
:er
I
.
Forum Rules
dge
H w Mail or
Publica-
. ' the en-
� fr ' . st-
and
' � 'lumber
�� f the authorise I etters
�� � : ' two typewritten pages,
printed. All
ii for brevi-
and no personal
r"iitted Students,
' writing letters for this
d that they are limited
� issues.
es Problem
tional security. He might be right. Not
en, long ago, I toyed with the idea of joining
the military. All the recruiters I spoke to
focused on the fabulous retirement
me benefits. Once, 1 was confronted by
our three Air Force recruiters telling me
about the re'irement benefits. 1 inter-
rupted them and said, "I'm not in-
our 'erested in the retirement. I just want to
for serve my country They looked at me
like I was nuts.
robably Anyway, as good as the president's
rudget And budget may be, it won't pass unharmed.
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still be SI80 and he'll probably do better than ex-
pected, but he won't be completely suc-
uld cut Pen- cessful However, if he is as serious
permitted to, about deficit-cutting as he seems to be,
fteresting sug- he ought to submit balanced budgets to
pnsions The Congress. Such a proposal wouldn't
topping $18 stand a chance, but, of course, neither
retirement. does his present proposal If he submit-
raft resister, ted a balanced budget and watched it get
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re more con- the inevitable deficit-caused recession
lent than na down the road?
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Assaults Lead Campus Crimes
r
THhfcASl C AROUNIAN
FI Hkl ARV 7, ISJ85
By BRETT MORRIS
Two ECU football players
were arrested and charged with
assaulting Michael Joseph Rilcy
in the lobby of Scott dorm at ap
proximately 12:15 p.m. Feb. 2,
according to public safety
records.
Ronald Gilhard of 204-1) Belk
dorm and John Curtis William
son of 116 Belk were taken before
the magistrate and released on
$200 bond on Tuesday, according
to Francis Eddings, assistant
director of public safety.
A court appearance has been
set for Thursday, Feb. 14 at the
Pitt County Courthouse.
The case involving Gilliard and
Williamson has been referred to
the Division of Student life.
David Brantlev Rhodes, a
Domino's Pia delivery man,
was assaulted on the sidewalk
outside of Aycock dorm while
returning to his car after deliver-
ing a pia. No suspects had been
apprehended as of Wednesday
evening.
In other campus crime:
Feb. . 12:30p.m. � A break-
ing and entering and larceny to a
vehicle was reported in the
freshman parking tot at 14th
Street and Elm Street
Feb. 2. 12:0 p.m. � James
Church and Joseph l.uksic of 374
Aycock dorm were charged with
the growing and cultivating of a
marijuana plant and also the
possession of marijuana and drug
parapharnalia. 2.0S p.m. � A
battery was reported stolen in the
vicinity of the northeast parking
lot at the Brody Medical Sciences
Building.
Feb. 3, 10:13 a.m � Van-
dalism to a vehicle was reported
in the area south of Scott dorm.
1 10 p.m a larceny and
breaking and entering to a vehicle
was reported in a dirt lot south of
Ninth Street. 2:30a.m. - David
Reese Tomlinson was arrested for
DW'I and consuming a malt
beverage while driving. Tomlin-
son and William Eldridge Am-
brose, both of Newport, were
banned from campus for poses-
sion of marijuana and carrying a
concealed weapon.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY?, 1985
Conservative Legislators Begin War On Pornography
RALEIGH (UPI) � The
General Assembly will be min-
ding its morals this year with con-
servatives waging war against
abortion and pornography,
legislative leaders say.
The Moral Majority has begun
a special "task force" to fight the
state's 7-year-old, $1.3 milion
abortion fund for poor women.
And the president of the Chris-
tian Action league, which is
campaigning to end pornography
in North Carolina, has been
elected to the state House.
"I think we'll have more bills
of that nature introduced than
ever before said House Speaker
Liston Ramsey.
Ramsey said he expects conser-
vatives and their supporters will
force the Legislature to limit its
abortion fund to endangered or
harmed women.
"We're going to have to put
some strings on it or lose it he
said.
Republicans doubled their
numbers from 6 to 11 in the
Senate and 18 to 38 in the House
in the Nov. 6 election. Southern
Baptists predominate in both
houses.
"A more conservative type of
legislator has been elected said
Senate Majority Leader Kenneth
Royall. "They're not way to the
right. But they're certainly not
liberal.
"It's bound to have some ef-
fect on some issues � they'll get
more attention and more votes
for their side he said.
But officials say it's not the
number of Republicans or Bap-
tists that is giving conservative
pet projects their impetus this
year. New Gov. Jim Martin cam-
paigned on promises to get rid of
the abortion fund and to put bite
in the state's obscenity law.
"The key thing is that many of
the key issues in this platform are
a part of Gov. Jim Martin's agen-
da said the Rev. Coy Privctte,
president of the Christian Action
League and newly-elected
representative.
"We've got a governor who
says state-funded abortions are
not the function of state goern-
ment. We could not agree more.
This is not so much our program
as the governor's program
Privctte said.
Lamarr Mooneyham, national
field director for the Moral Ma-
jority, has started gathering
money and grass roots support to
abolish the abortion fund. He
had hoped to get $200,000 but
has only received $10,000 so far.
But Mooneyham plans to send
out another mass mailing before
the end of February, and he said
he has signed up 430 people to
lobby against the fund.
The Moral Majority wants to
rid the state of its abortion fund
����-
unless "there is any doubt that
people in extreme cases of rape
incest or danger to the life of the
mother won't get federal funds
Mooneyham said. He said those
situations are usually covered by
Medicare
The Moral Majority opposes
state funding for abortions for
women who have been raped
Mooneyham said. He said he
doesn't believe that "destroying a
human being is going to correct
the crime of rape or incest
Computer Tampering Violates Student's Rules
LOS ANGELES (L'PI) - A
group of students apparently in-
filtrated computerized files at the
University of Southern Califor-
nia to change grades and create
phony degree, which they sold
for as much as $25,000 each, it
was reported.
The Los Angeles Times
reported Sunday that the USC
computerized transcript system
apparently was compromised by
students working with someone
in the records office buying
degrees or grade changes with
cash or cocaine.
Phony degrees may have been
created by changing legitimate
transcripts already in the USC
computer, the newspaper quoted
a source as saying. If someone
wanted a chemistry degree, for
example, students would search
the computer files for a legitimate
transcript of someone who had
graduated in chemistry.
The name and ID number of
that student would be deleted and
data on the student buying the
degree substituted. The phony
transcript would then be filed in
the computer, replacing the
legitimate degree, the source told
the newspaper.
Offering an Array of
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Unitarian-Uni versa lists
The Greenville Unitarian-
Universalist Fellowship will offer
a program on "Race Relations:
Past and Present' on Sunday, 11
AM, Feb. 10th at 499 Oak St. Call
Carroll Webber (758-4906) or
Susan Felker (752-0787) for infor-
mation.
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The allegations represent the trie newspaper
second time that accusations of
illegal tampering with the
prestigious university's computer
have surfaced since October.
"Our investigation has widen-
ed beyond grade changes USC
Vice Provost Sylvia Manning told
Has the ' 'anytime gift
A Gift certificate in the
amount of your choice.
214 Arlington Blvd. 756-4392
10� DRAFT
MONDAY NIGHTS
All Night Long
29c Hamburgers
with
Purchase of
French Fries
Daily
Blue Moon Cafe
752-1294
What
Doesn't
the Competition
want You to Know!
LOVE
LINE
5 Hill Say It All On
AT TELERENT
You get this much 19
inch COLOR TV for only
$19.95 per month rental.
(Weekly Rentals Available)
CAMP TON-A-WANDAH
Student Opportunities
We are looking for girls interested in be-
ing counselors � activity instructors in a
private girls camp located in Henderson-
ville, N.C. Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WSI), Horseback riding, Ten-
nis, Backpacking, Archery, Canoeing,
Gymnastics, Crafts, also, Basketball, Com-
puters, Soccer, Cheerleading, Drama,
Nature study, Field Hockey. If your school
offers a Summer Internship program we
will be glad to help. Inquiries � Morgan
Haynes, P.O. Box 400 C, Tryon, NC,
Valentines Day
(1.50 for non-studentst
DEADLINE
Tues. Jan. 12th
12 Noon
Come B The Newspaper
No Phone Calls
At Competition A
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average rental
price is
S45 per mo.
At Competition B
You get oniy this
much color TV
because their
average renta
price is
49
per mo
So, why should you pay more for
19 inches of color TV
Telerent also rents VCR's. console TV's and
home stereo systems at comparable savings.
TELE RENT TV
Ask about our
Budget Purchase Program
2905 East 10th St.
758-9102
TO GET INTO
SUMMER.
It vou have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this tall and
receive up to1,000 a year
But the big payoff
happens on graduanon day
That's when you receive
an officer's commission
So get your body in
shape (not to mennon your
bank account)
Enroll in Army ROTC
For more information,
come to the Basic
Camp Information
Session Tuesday, Feb.
12, from 4 to 6 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhall Student
Center or stop by
Room 324, Erwin Hall.
ARMY ROTC
BE All YOU CAN 8L
Hit t s i xkH! iU
Beasley I
B TINAMAHOSC HAK
We seen mam �- d- tl
East Carolina Playhouse
none measure up l last rug
production of The Diviners
Bradle C. Beac-
the evening. wrappe:
dience arounJ h fingei !
moment one F rtrayinf
of Buddy, Layman a 14
retarded boy
ability to ci
petrified to actua
Beasley becamt hi
From manneri n emoi
Beaslev accomp - l �.
other acton i
convince the audience tl
:he character.
The story takes p i
the 1930s in the myth
Zion. Indiana. I
the rural farm comn
But one day. an ex-prea
C. Showers Rob
stumble-
change Buddy
rid of his pas: ar .
dinary' exis c
that the
The town g Soi
shaw (Hae! Y
Goldie Shorl (TraA C
and Luella Bennett Shen
Brewer), m
action, refu i .
wants no part of hi
They play a big
- � ale
lr.
sv.e-
D

V

The D
The Western Hind
B ROBIN UHAin
"There a a very powerl
force moving throug-
the same force that - i
many rock group
When t began
music. 1 suppose t had a
of some son of idea, society . one
tha: didn't submit to u
: a : o r
William Z- ol the �
ererr.ebl�. Wste-a Ujvc, W
tahms thilV f"f'N " me
group's sounc Western W
ar. a capella sextet I inded
1969. that strive to rek �e
of the art anj
capella singir
Be-
f?f r J
- �
y
The Western Wind will he perfd
'Miami Vice' Lea'
�� DANIEL MAURER
The brooding sound- o: Ph
Collins' in the Air Tonight"
an otherwise silent pre-dawr, at-
mosphere. The roar of a per to:
mance engine is layered with the
electronic hum ci synthesizer-
and the sustaining wail of guitar
chords. A pensive 0e K08
prophecies of an impending
strife, while two men race a
sports car down deserted streets
toward an unknown fate.
Shells scrape the side of a gun
chamber as they arc loaded
stock meets its barrel with a sharp
metalic click. Every sound rings
with ominous determination The
car's passanger sits back in the
soft velvet seat. He has prepared
his shotgun with deliberate care.
Destinv awaits him.
The scene 1 have just described
is from NBC's successful police
drama "Miami Vice It ex-
emplifies the program's unique
blend of popular music with com
pelling cinematography
Granted, "MTV" did it first, but
"Miami Vice" does it better
fei a
ever -
music vi
two min
ed in wi
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loonevham, national
the Moral Ma
started gathering
grass us support to
m fund He
jet $200,000 bul
S �
leyham plans to send
s mailing bel
and he said
eople to
fund
unless "there is any doubt that
people in extreme cases of rape,
ncest or danger to the life of the
mother won't get federal funds
Moonevham said He said those
situations are usuallv covered by
Medicare
The Morai Majority opposes
state funding for abortions for
women who have been raped,
Mooneham said He said he
doesn't believe that "destroying a
human being is going to correct
the crime of rape or incest
rr�
o
"anytime" gift
Gift certificate in the
imount of your choice.
. ,v Blvd.75JM392
Competition
nt Vou to Know!
At Competition B
, this
TV
eir
y
S49permo.
pd you pay more for
Df color TV
VCR s. console TV's and
at comparable savings.
TV
Ask about our
let Purchase Program
2905 East lOtri St
3-9102
GET INTO
R.
r .� ist
SIX 'A t't
t: b
��
RCT(
' ndav
� eive
immissinn
For more information,
come to the Basic
( amp Information
Session Tuesday. Feb.
12, from 4 to 6 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhall Student
Center or stop by
Room 324, Erwin HaJI.
AAMYROTt
B�AUYOUCANWL
rot i am Ro, INIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 7. 198? PMe 7
BeasleyDelivers A 'Divini'Performance
B riNA MAROSCHAk
I've seen many shows at th
i avi Carolina Playhouse, b
none measure up to last nigh
production of The Diviners.
Bradlev C. Beasles, the stai
the evening, wrapped the an
Jience around his finger fror
ment one. Portraying the pa:
ol Huddv I avman, a 14-yeai
retarded bos blessed with
ability to "find" water bu
petrified to actual) toucl
Beasiey became his char
From mannerisms to emotion-
Beasle) accomplished what �.
other actors successfully dc
nvince the audience that ht
the character.
1 he story takes place du
the 1930s in the mythical towi
on. Indiana; it centers aro
the rural farm community of
� one dav. an evpreacher. i
Showers (Robert Ruft
tumbles into the town
anges Buddy's life Hopin
d of his pa and hve an
ar eis ence, C C. d
ai the citizens want a mir
town gossips, orma H
haw (Hael F. StapL
die Shon (Tracy C. trl
id 1 uella Bennett (Sherr
er), misinterpret hi
vn, refusing to believe that 1
��.ants no part o his past :al ins
e pla a big part in th.
� ale.
In between the emotional
scenes, Melvin Wilder (Bill Rav
Tyson), Dewev Maples ill.i!
Wells) and Darlene Henshaw
(Tammv Visconti)entertained
audience with their wit a:
nerisms. Tyson, portravinc an
Arms set who knows evervthing
about "dancing, drinking and
girls and Wells, playing the
part of a good-old country far-
mhand who knows nothing about
"dancing, drinking and girls
perfected their parts to the "t
Claude B, "Kip" West played
the part of Ferris Layman, Bud-
dy's father, and Angela Ma.nor
portrayed Buddy's 16-year-old
sister Jennie Mae. Both m?ged
to touch the hearts of eve per-
son m the audience with heir
sincerity and charisma Rick
Marshall (Basil Bennett) deserves
credit for a spectacular perfor-
mance as well. Besides talent
as an actor, Marshall led
in setting the tone for tl entire
production.
The Diviners is funny, ar
there is a seriousness that
over and over again the ;
and pain of death. Authoi
Leonard, Jr. successfulh s
how the death of a loved
touches every member of :ve
tamily � even every member of
the community. Through a young
boy's eyes, we see the
heartachethe unanswered ques-
tions. And then we find the truth.
U�l. Ma.nn, �nd Roh� R,ffi� develop . special rri.tio.Khip in ,he ECl PI.yh.ouK producion of 'Wipers.
The Western Wind To Perform In Hendrix
B ROBIN WHALFY
Mart Wflut
There was a very powerful
ce moving through us. It was
ame force that was felt by so
rock groups of the time.
When we began to sing this
1 suppose we had a vision
me sort of ideal society, one
didn't submit to any dic-
' a � -1 r . ' '
William Zukof, of the vocal
le. VrWster Wind, pro-
tattnv -IV the-fc&fcWfrie
ound. Western Wind is
apella sextet, founded in
" � a- strive to rekindle a love
art and literature of a
a ringing.
The ensemble will be featured
Monday evening at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre, under the spon-
sorship of the Department of
University Unions and the School
of Music.
Western Wind consists of
sopranos Alimo Russell and
Johana Arnold, countertenor
William Zukof, tenors Lawrence
Bennett and William Lyon Lee
and baritone Elliot Levine. Their
selections range from music of
the Uniddle ages and baroque
period to Renaissance, early
American and contemporary jazz
and a cappella rock.
The group tours in the United
States and Europe and their
recordings have earned them two
Grammy nominations. They also
contributed to the film score for
'Koyaanisqatsi which is up for
an Academy Award
William Zukof describes the
group as part of the 60s
renaissnace and says, 'chamber
music is the music of
egaiitarianess
Elliot Levine elaborates,
With us, it's just the magic of
six. people coming on stage with
no instrument Adds Zukof,
'It's just like breathing
Tickets may be obtained
through the Central Ticket Office
in the Mendenhall student center.
The Western Wind will be performing in Hendrix Theatre on Monday at 8 p.m.
Miami Vice' Leads The Way For Videos
By DANIEL MALRER
rAlrrtaiaawal LuUtor
The brooding sounds of Phil
Collins' "In the Air Tonight" fill
an otherwise silent pre-dawn at-
mosphere. The roar of a perfor-
mance engine is layered with the
electronic hum of synthesizers
and the sustaining wail of guitar
-hords. A pensive voice echoes
prophecies of an impending
strife, while two men race a
sports car down deserted streets
toward an unknown fate.
Shells scrape the side of a gun
chamber as they are loaded. A
stock meets its barrel with a sharp
metalic click. Every sound rings
ith ominous determination. The
car's passanger sits back in the
soft velvet seat. He has prepared
his shotgun with deliberate care.
Destiny awaits him.
The scene I have just described
is from NBC's successful police
drama "Miami Vice It ex-
emplifies the program's unique
blend of popular music with com-
Pelling cinematography.
Granted, "MTV" did it first, but
"Miami Vice" does it better.
"Miami Vice" is the first
prime-time television series to of-
fer a music video in ever
episode. About two minutes ol
every show is dedicated to a
music video scene. During these
two mintes a popular song is mix-
ed in with the show's sound track
to compliment the action.
The results are visually ex-
citing. The music video scenes
don't hinder the stories in
anyway, yet stylisticly they raise
"Miami Vice" above all other
police dramas.
More importantly, it gives the
music video format some respec-
tability. Until now, most music
videos have been nothing but
brainless dribble that produce a
mind-numbing effect. Look, for
example, at Yes' video for the
song "Leave It" from 90125. The
song itself is wonderfully arrang-
ed and flawlessly performed, but
the video sucks out loud!
In the video the five band
members are dressed in simple
black ties and jackets.
Throughout the entire song they
stand in a straight line and sing.
Meanwhile, some lunatic
engineer in the control room uses
camera tricks to turn the band
upside down and inside out.
Neither the song nor its visual
counter part benefit from this in-
sanity.
What does "Miami Vice" have
that most "MTV" videos don't?
Let's start with a purpose. In
"Miami Vice" a scene that is
vital to the story is enhanced with
popular music. In short, th
"Vice" videos advance the stor
and thus serve a purpose. Mo
standard videos are pointless,
do concede that there are some
exceptionally good videos, but
these are few and far between.
"Miami Vice" has proven that
if given a chance, music videos
can be a very satisfying outlet for
creativity. But in order for this to
happen, they must do more than
promote a rock band. Perhaps if
the producers of these videos
started listening to the songs,
rather than record promoters, the
world of "MTV" just might be
worth watching.
CBS Takes Stab At Sci-Fi
By JEFFRY JONES
sun �niar
If you want to get to
"Otherworld turn your TV
set to the local CBS channel at
8 p.m. on Saturday nights. Or
you could wander into a
strange Egyptian pyramid at
the precise time six planets are
in exact conjunction. Or you
could go down "Brady
Bunch" Street, take a left turn
at the "Twilight Zone and
ask for directions at the "Lost
in Space" gas station.
Whichever route you choose,
go! "Otherworld" is great
fun.
"Otherworld" is a quirky
little science fiction-fantasy
show on CBS. "They were just
another American family" the
promos tell us. However,
"when they entered the Other-
world their lives were turned
upsid down Dimension
travel on a shoestring-budget
can do that to you.
The "another American
family" apparently made the
mistake of visiting Egypy dur-
ing the off-season. They also
made the mistake of trusting a
tour guide named Ahmed
whose Xeroxed brochure
shows him posing with cutout
celebrity pictures, among them
Elvis.
"You knew John Wayne
and Humphrey Bogart the
father asks the twentyish
guide.
"Yes, very well Ahmed
replies in some of the best
dialogue of the show, dialogue
that, incidentally, takes place
in this world.
The tour guide takes them
into the pyramid and deserts
them when the father heroical-
ly refuses to pay the tour
guide's extortionist price. At
that very moment, the tour
guide vanishes, leaving our
family in the dark � he took
the lantern. Suddenly six
planets aline in perfect con-
junction, and our family is
swept through a dimension
door to the Otherworld.
"Didn't I tell you this was
going to be a memorable
outing the father says as his
family trudges down an empty
highway in a strange land with
two suns, laser-spouting
rocks, and Egyptian stone
totems that conclusively prove
the ancient Egyptians did have
styrofoam and knew how to
carve it too!
After a few shots of the
family and the desert, things
happen pretty quickly. The
family is accosted by a security
officer type, and we quickly
realize he's a heavy by the
black boots he wears, his
Saturday Night Wrestling
scowl, and his band director's
uniform. He is rude and
shoots at the father with a
flashlight. It seems the family
was trespassing in the "For-
bidden Zone After over-
coming this bad guy and steal-
ing his "crystal" and wrecking
his bubble-car, the family
comes upon a matte-painting
that is the city where they will
live for their first adventure.
The city is like a mixture of
Disneyland, a shopping mall,
Alice's Wonderland, and
Grover's Corners. The Our
Town illusion is furthered by
the father's narrative voice-
over � "We could hear them
(the bad guys) out there
rumbling around like armor-
plated animals Or maybe it
was Rod Serling.
The family tries to
assimilate into this strange
new culture, but it isn't easy.
The mother discovers that the
supermarket stocks only
generic items, "GOOD
FOOD" is on all the cans. Hot
dogs are called meat puppies
in Otherworld, aspirin is
unknown. And all the men
wear leisure suits.
After a suitable length of
time (long enough for the
eldest son to fall in love with
an Otherworldlian), the father
discovers the city is populated
by androids. Meanwhile, they(
the humans)are all dying of
radiation poisoning from the
"sarlex" mines. This is also
long enough for the enraged
security chief (remember
him?) to begin tracking the
family down in order to "ter-
minate" them. Since he
doesn't get killed in the
climactic chase scene, look for
"Kommander Kroll" to be a
major plot element in future
shows. That's right, "Kom-
mander" with a "K" as in
"Kraut
The family excapes from the
city of androids with the help
of the eldest son's android
girlfriend Nova, proving that
plucky, red-blood American
fathers can out-laser hordes of
jack-booted heavies. The
tender goodbye kiss between
the eldest son and his
girlfriend also helps to prove
that androids are people too.
And so. free from the city,
the family walks into the
sunset and episode two of
"Otherworld
Watch "Otherworld The
show has a sense of humor. It
has all the camp of "V but
none of the repulsiveness. This
little series will probably
wander into the forbidden
zone of the neilson ratings, so
see it now. If nothing else, it
has value as a cultural oddity,
a "My Mother the Car" for
1985. "Otherworld"
TV TIDBITS
CRAZY LIKE A FOX: (CBS) Jack Warden stars as a retired law
officer who teams up with his lawyer-son (John Rubin) to fight
crime. The latest in comedv-drama.
MACGRLDER & LOUD: (ABC) A police drama starring John
Getz and Kathryn Harrold as two patrolmen who not only share a
squad car, but wedding vows as well.
CODENAME: FOXFIRE: (NBC) This action-drama features
Joanna Cassidy as the head of a team of female spies working for a
U.S. intelligence agency.
DETECTIVE IN THE HOUSE: (CBS) Judd Hirsch stars in this
private eye show with comedy overtones. "Detective" is scheduled
to premire in March.
SARA: (NBC) In this promising sitcom Geena Davis plays a career
woman living alone in San Francisco. Sara is said to offer a "Mary
Tyler Moore Show" for the 80s.
HAIL TO THE CHIEF: (ABC) Patty Duke plays America's first
woman president. "Chief" is scheduled to premire in March.
NIGHT HEAT (CBS) Scott Hylands stars in this police drama
commissioned especially for late night television.
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TH1 EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7.1985

Iff
Classifieds
OINA: I'm looking forward to this
weekend. I know we'll have a good
time! By the way what belt are you
wearing?: John
SALE
WANTED
KELLY ANN
Hard Feelings!
NICHOLSON:
J.R.L.
NO
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Nonsmoker. Unfurnished
townhouse. Lexington Square next
to Athletic club. $175 per month plus
deposit, half utilities. Call Janice
Gurganus at 757 450 or 3S5-4974
after 5:30 p.m.
COUNSELORS: For western North
Carolina co-ed week summer camp.
Room, meals, laundry, salary,
travel allowance, and possible col
lege credit. Experience not
necessary, but must enoy working
with children. Only non-smoking col
lege students need apply. For
application-brochure write: Camp
Pinewood, 1006 Bob-O-Link Drive,
Miami, Florida 33015.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Nonsmoker. Partially furnished apt,
Vi rent ($143) and Mi utilities. Strat-
ford Arms Apts. call Wendy at
756 1797.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
for 3 bedroom townhouse at Windy
Ridge Condominiums. Washer,
dryer, microwave, fireplace- $145
plus y3 utilities. Call 756 9491.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share 2 bedroom townhouse at
Courtney Square. Pay V� rent &
utilities and 1st month $100 deposit.
Serious students or professionals on-
ly. Call Debra at 757 2884 or 756 9965.
2 FEMALE: Roommates needed to
share nice 3 bedroom house. $125
rent plus deposit, V utilities.
PART-TIME PERSON: Needed to
answer phone 8:30 a.m12:30 Mon
Fri. Light typing required. Call
758-6200.
CERTIFIED SPECIAL ED
TEACHER: Position available im-
mediately to teach multi-
handicapped students in a private
non prof it school. Must have N.C. A
Teaching Certificate. Send resume
and transcript to Carbell Children's
Home, inc. Box 546 Jacksonville,
N.C. 28540 Equal Opportunity
Employer.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
processing mail at home! Informa-
tion, send self addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
DARLENE: Happy 21st Birthday!
You're the best friend anyone could
have. Chico's watch out! Strawberry
Margarita's�here we cornel! Glna
HAPPY 22nd BIRTHDAVI: Je hebt
a mool day, eh. I K houd van e,
Monlque. Bernle
ROCCO P Thanks for all the smiles
you bring to my face. I can't wait to
play spoons with you in Florida. I
love you. You're the best! C.
DEAR "RUTE The mist has
departed. It is time to begin OUR as-
cent up the mountain. Let's break a
leg. Tiger
GREG: in Kit Klmbarly's English
class 8 a.m. You are being watched
by a fellow classmate who is very in-
terested In you. Look out!
CONGRATULATIONS BETA
THETA PI PLEDGE CLASS FALL
'84: Highest G.P.A. on campus.
Welcome you as brothers David,
Harvey, Meat, Marcelll, Sandy,
Caveman. Late night. Tonight. 1
a.m. Welocme our 10 new pledges.
Good Luck.
HEY KAPPA SIGMAS: Don't forget
the valentine's Dance on Saturday
night. Bring yourself and your date
and be ready to get down with your
Valentine all night long!
VALENTINE'S DAY DANCER:
Send your lady love a male dancer
with a balloon bouquet on
Valentine's day. Order by Wednes-
day, Feb. 13. Balloon Delights.
355-2961
SENIORS: The photographers are
here. Get your senior portrait now at
the yearbook office. Call or come by
now. 757-6501.
GRAD STUDENTS: Come by now
and get your yearbook protralt
made, its all free at the yearbook of-
fice. Across from Joyner Library.
757-6501. Its all free.
SMILE: Senior, graduate, and facul-
ty portraits are being taken this
week and next week at the yearbook
office. Call now to schedule your ap-
pointment. 757 6501.
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering Including free
pick-up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call. 758-3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save $.50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: Dorm-room sized gold
carpet, good condition- $20. Large
dorm refrigerator- excellent
condition- $100. Call after 5- 752-6344.
FOR SALE: Loft which meets dorm
regulations. Good condition. $70 or
best offer. Call 756-1546 between 7-9
p.m.
FOR SALE: One innerspring mat-
tress and box spring set. Used. Good
condition. Call 355-6050.
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla-
yellow, AMFM Cassette, 4-speed,
low mileage. Only one owner. Gets
good gas mileage- call after 5:30,
758-4689.
CAMPUS POSTERS: Are now
available in a limited quantity at
The Buccaneer Office (across form
Joyner Library.) Just $3 to brighten
your winter walls. We accept
checks, cash and livestock.
FOR SALE: 28 inch. Ross 10-speed
bike. Excellent condition. Call
757-1126.
ATTENTION: GRADUATES ft.
SENIORS: Special discount rates
and financing. Encyclopedia Brltan-
nlca. For free presentation call
7584155.
STUDENTS: Will do your taxes for
reasonable price. Reduced rates tor
students. $5 for state, $5 for federal.
Call Doris at 757 6557 or 355-2510
after 6.
FOR RENT: Mobile homes for rent-
2 br furn. 16, unfurn- 140, 2 br turn
135, unfurn-120. No pets, no children.
Call 758-0745 or 756-9491.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt. for rent
-t very reasonable rate. Fully fur-
nished ft access. Rlnggold Towers.
Must see to appreciate. Call 7S2-8945.
FOR RENT: Beach Apts Cater to
HOUSE PARTIES AND WORKING
STUDENTS. Ideal location rates,
ocean Drive section of North Myrtle
Beach SHORE FUN COMPANY.
Call (803) 462-7930 or 249-4903 (after 5
p.m.)
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates, please call
iu.mu after 5:30.
756-8934 after 5:30.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronlc typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 754-4444,evenings or
752 6106 days.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: IBM
Correcting typewriter. Experienced
typist will do all types of typing I Call
Debbie at 754 4333.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs; 7SMM1 or
758-5488.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
DataWorks specializes In student
document services Including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes and more. All work
Is computer-checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rales
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper. (Call for specific
rates.) Call Mark at 757-3440 after
5:30 p.m.
LOST AND
usicians Share Coi
FOUND: Claes ring- V
rin.i rMTtr CeuQors; wwr�� ��'
Mrs. Mildred Karr ��
Cleaners en Ml� �� ���"�
LOST: Or�Vlffi��;
St. Great aaiiHwantl vafve. ���
offered. Plaaet ���� �7fM m
758-295
LOST: BOOH "PllGtftlM
Sedimentary Beam An
Mail, �B4. Reward- no ���
asked. Return to Geoleay Dyt
flea. Bookstore ar UB6 wa-t
ef
ay
georges
hair designers
Minimum
Maintenance
Hairstyling
Free
Consultation
Come by and see the latest in Hair Fashion
and the
1 Indoor Tanning System
The Plaza Open until 9 p.m. 754-6200
By EBIC SANDBERG
This month, the ubiquitous
Phfl Collins will release bis third
told album, No Jackets Re-
Julred. During the past year Coi-
ns has produced gold albums
for Prida and Philip Baily, com-
posed and performed a number
bit for the film. Against AU
Ji, �and put out a top ten
album with Genesis cohorts Mike
? Rutherford and Tony Banks.
There is no doubt that Phil Col-
rfins is a commercial success, but
is he really a musical success?
AH of Collins' solo work, as
J as his recent Genesis outings,
�ve all had a bouncy, inconse-
quential quality. This is annoying
id unfulfilling for Genesis fans
4o got hooked on their earlier
jot hie sound when Peter Gabriel,
nthony Phillips, and Steve
ckett were in the group.
sis lost that majestic albeit
intricate sound in 1977 when
lackett left to do solo albums.
ie other three remaining
nbers of Genesis were starting
to write more mainstream pop,
I while Hackett continued to write
(lofty opuses that no longer fit in.
ICollins' Genesis, with the "Earth
I Wind and Fire horns" in tow,
went on to
vacuous muln-
In early 197
five album
Chrysalis Re
following six
five stunning
burs' out of ti
the grandeuij
Genesis aibms
studio produc
commercial ft
selling won
Chrysalis evefj
post-GencsisI
Strung, twici
noticed it the
Hackett's
ended with tt
Strung. It
Banks, Colli
read the
Hackett and
money But,
tegrity by apj
for the music
a world widel
predate that!
Hackett w
ly set for lift
sales of his
recently sigr
British lal
Records, to
dings in Eurj
for them
BARNES DIAMOND GALLERY
A great new book from HMam
Subtle winning wavs to tell toiconi
How TO
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ON
M,
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
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MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus.
Call 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $115 a month utilities included.
Great location ft great roommates.
Call 758-6224.
PERSONAL
LID "O You know that I only have
M.Os for you, baby! Something
about you makes my belly button
tingle! I love ya- ya beautiful!
Swerve.
JERRY, MARIE 4 JUDY: It was
great seeing you last weekend. I
hope you can make it up here soon.
Love, Steve
DAYTON A BEACH: GO with The
Best Successful trip the last 3
years. Deluxe accomadatlons at The
Kings Inn. Still have a tew available
spaces. Call Dean 752-5588 or Kevin
752-9732 for more details.
STUDENTS: Does your car need to
be washed? Is your dorm room or
apartment needing to be cleaned; or
do you have so much dirty laundry
that you can't see the carpet? Well,
the Chi Omega pledges are having a
slave auction so come out and pur-
chase one of us for 2 hours to do your
dirty work, irs Wed. at 4 at the Chi
Omega house.
BAKE SALE: The Pledge Class of
Chi Omega Is having a bake sale to-
day at the Student Store from �till.
So drop by with your spare change
and pick up some great munchies.
CHOCOLATE ROSES: If your
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IHt IASIAROl IMAS
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usicians Share Common 'Genesis Produce LPs
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Open Mon Sat 10 AM 9PM
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B FRICSANDBERG
This monih, the ubiquitous
Phil Collins will release his third
solo album. No Jackets Re-
quired During the past year Col-
lins has produced gold albums
for Frida and Philip Baily, com-
posed and performed a number
one hit for the film. Against All
Odds, i,and put out a top ten
album wnh Genesis cohorts Mike
Rutherford and Tony Banks.
There is no doubt that Phil Col-
lins is a commercial success, but
is he really a musical success?
l! ot Collins' solo work, as
well a hiv recent Genesis outings,
have all had a bouncy, inconse-
quential quality. This is annoying
and tin fulfilling for Genesis fans
a ho got hooked on their earlier
gothic sound when Peter Gabriel,
nthony Phillips, and Steve
Hackett were in the group.
ienesis lost that majestic albeit
ate sound in 1977 when
kett left to do solo albums.
rhe other three remaining
bers ot Genesis were starting
i rite more mainstream pop,
. t Hacketl continued to write
�ft opuses that no longer fit in.
ns'Genesis, with the "Earth
A nd and Fire horns" in tow.
w�nt on to produce several
vacuous multi-platinum LPs.
In early 1978, Hackett signed a
nve album contract with
J-hrysahs Records. During the
following six years he turned out
nve stunning albums. The music
burst out of the speakers with all
'he grandeur of the earlier
Genesis albms, but with superior
studio production. They were all
commercial failures � each one
selling worse than the last.
Chrysalis even released his fifth
post-Genesis album, Highly
Strung, twice because nobody
noticed it the first time.
Hackett's Chrysalis contract
ended with the release of Highly
Strung. It was not renewed.
Banks, Collins, and Rutherford
read the market better than
Hackett and made a lot more
money. But, Hackett kept his in-
tegrity by approaching the music
for the music's sake. He still has
a world wide cult of fans who ap-
preciate that.
Hackett was already financial-
ly set for life from the continued
sales of his Genesis work. He
recently signed a deal for a tinv
British label, Lamborghini
Records, to distribute his recor-
dings in Europe. His first album
for them consisted of his own
flOW TO
M
'I 111
' �� - HUHAMnti I . r :
�� : ! lOBtooc t hey I vw- y
ON
Monday
� w.int .i d.ue t r r i Iday .
racts people t ea h .ther
are .i . � . ,�. v
f � � f " j ' T.ut x�- -
� : �' P '��'�� t net 11 .is
��� I the I . t - :�mJ
t he r s, i yourself.
winning
' � � : acii t t-� : , - H ,i r t ,
� ' � v r . Laugh I at di ,
Ijrz ,vix; . Kt.t i ai, , t
�'�' out It . Worry n x. : e .
. R MoNDA � ��?, win1
hey .Ik
�autttul,
In any w,i
Pei
the il�ht
s, i i a 11
Lwayb it.
- � acting out if i hai a t t-r"
thtnj to do. 1 i rn h w to use
iake te hnique pi us many mure
�'�' ' � � ' v. : t. t (,ink of .
i e . s tt oi ot. : . e i an l xn 11 e
E�� bull
he �
)MvY
ihallnsar, f"l 125 79'JLb
; � �� - ' FLIRT ON M � A in
. . ; . ' � : ! t : t ett! i M . pa) nnt oi
. . i ; t i at handling) Is t-n-
r�tirn the b �' anytime within ten
�r for .� : v: 1. refund. Li�eon��o
� rTTTTTn I 1 ! 1 I I 1 11
I
compositions as a classical
guitarist.
This month, Hackett released
his eighth solo album, Till He
Have Faces. The music on the
album is as striking as the eerie
painting on the cover. The art
work by Kim Poor, Hackett's
wife, depicts eleven lost souls
riding a misty sea in a boat carved
out of the rib cage of some
mythical beast.
Songs like "Matilda Smith
Williams Home for the Aged"
and "A Doll That's Made in
Japan recall early Genesis
classics like "Get 'Em Out by Fri-
day from Foxtrot and "In the
Rapids" from The lamb lies
Down On Broadway.
"Let Me Count the Way's" is
at once a ballad for Kim and a
tribute to the late (Uncle Charlie)
Charles Mingus. "Myopia" is a
rocker concerned with Hackett's
severe nearsightedness. "What's
My Name" ls an intricate in-
strumental piece with a haunting
mantra-like refrain, while "Tak-
ing the Easy Way Out" is a
mystesrious ballad containing
beautiful guitar and synthesizer
overdubs to close out the album.
If you've been saving your
sheckles for the next Phil Collins
l-P, you night consider breaking
open your Garfield Bank now,
and hunting down an imported
copy of Hackett's Till He Have
taces. If you do, you'll get your
money's worth.

East Carolina Coins & Pawn
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We Buv Gold & Silver
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THE
4
"A Spirited Folk tale of Rural America"
for the entire family
presented by
The East Carolina Playhouse
Wednesday-Saturday, Feb. 6-9, 8:15 p.m
McGinnis Theatre � ECU Campus � Greenvill
(Corner of 5th and Eastern Streets)
ECU Students: $3.00 � General Public: $4.00
Call: 757-6390
The No. 12 Chopped Sirloin
JUST RIGHT FOR
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No. 12 S1.99
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For Lunch
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Eastern North Carolina's Largest
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presents
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Bring your big beer mug!
Free Beer till 11:30
Happy Hour 11:30 till closing
Admission Only $2.00
Leave the Driving to us!
Call the liberty Ride 758-5570
Private Club � All ABC Permits
SHOE SALE!
Lotto Jacki Sorensen Deluxe
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Converse Premier Velcro (Men)
Reg. $39.95 SALE $20.00
Nike Transit (Women)
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Nike Lady Rio
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Nike Bree (Women)
Reg. $24.95 SALE $12.00
New Balance 770 (Men & Women)
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'
?






H� EAS1 l K(H INIAN
Sports
THE EAST CAROl INIAN
KFBRL'AR 7, 198'
HagelO
Pirate G
Manwaring fs Lady Pirates Win 11th Straight
By RICK McCORMAC
The Lady Pirate basketball
team won its 11th consecutive
game Tuesday night, defeating
Hampton Institute 87 IS n
Minges Coliseum.
The loss for Hampton, who
entered the game as the second-
ranked team in Division 11, as
only their second in 2? games this
season.
"Thev had some good athletes
who were really quick and could
jump ECU coach Emily Man
waring said of the Hampton ln-
stitue team. "I really thought it
would be a much closer game
ECU used a balanced scoring
attack, to take control of the
game in the opening period and
led by as many as 14 points in the
first half.
The action in the opening
moments was furious as both
teams ran up and down the court
in the first ten minutes The score
was tied at 18-18 with 10:38 re-
maining in the first half, then
ECU outscored Hampton 14 0 to
open up the biggest lead of the
half.
"I didn't want to get in a fasl
paced game with them Man
waring said. "1 looked up at the
scoreboard and saw the score tied
and 1 was afraid we might run out
of gas
The ECU spurt was led by
point guard Sylvia Bragg, ho
had a layup, a blocked shot and
three assists to ignite the ECU
transition game.
Hampton Institute, whose
nickname is also Lady Pirates,
outscored ECU 18-10 in the re-
maining minutes of the opening
half to trim the ECU lead to
42-36 at the half.
The Lady Pirates of Hampton
University were able to pull
within four points (42-38) in the
opening moments of the second
half. However, they could get no
closer as ECU scored the next six
points to take a 10-point advan-
tage (48-38).
With 8:12 remaining in the
game, ECU still maintained a
10-point lead (70-60). During the
next 4:12, ECU outscored Hamp-
ton P-6 to give the Lady Pirates
(ECU) a 87-66 lead. The 21-point
margin was the largest of the con-
test.
The ECU run was started by a
eight-foot jumper off the glass by
I orainne Foster. This was
followed b two consecutive
baskets b Lisa Squirewell.
Hampton Institute scored the
last nine points of the game
against ECU reserves, cutting the
final margin of defeat to 12
points.
ECU once again displayed a
balanced scoring attack. Four
players were in double figures
and two more finished with nine
points.
Anita Anderson and Foster
both scored 18 points. Squirewell
was next tor ECU with 14 points.
coming on six of 10 shooting
from the floor and two of two
from the foul line.
I orainne Foster scored 18 points
Hampton Institute Tuesdav night in
Barton H I P�oto lib
in the I atiy Pirate victory over
Pira
Minges Coliseum.
Foster was named ECAC South
Player of the week for her play in
three Lady Pirate wins last week.
Bragg continued her fine play
by accomplishing the triple-
double for the Lady Pirates. She
pulled down 10 rebounds and
dished out 12 assists to go along
with her 10 points.
Annette Phillips and Alma
Bcthea each contributed nine
points to the ECU attack.
"We got well-balanced scoring
with four in double figures and
two with nine points Manwar-
ing said. "You can't ask for any
more than that
Hampton Institute was led by
Carla Debro who scored 22
points, with eight of those com-
ing from the charity stripe.
Former ECU player Darlene
Chaney had 18 points on a nine
of 28 shooting performance from
the field .
Chaney was held below her
season averages in both scoring
and rebounding. Manwaring felt
there was a good reason for it.
"We didn't want somebody
who had played here before, and
left to come back here and beat
us she said.
For the game, the Lady Pirates
of ECU shot 52 percent from the
field on 36 of 69 shooting. ECU
also limited Hampton to only 37
percent on an ice-cold 29 for 79
shooting performance.
This was the third straight
game in which ECU has hit over
50 percent of its attempts, while
keeping the opposition in the 30
perccntile.
Manwaring was somewhat
suprised by the success her team
enjoyed against the nationally
second-ranked (NCAA Division
II) Hampton team.
"Our number one goal this
game was to hold them to 70
points Manwaring continued
"I never anticipated us scoring 87
points
ECU entered the contest hop-
ing to slow down the fast-paced
Hampton team, and at times
played a full-court press to do so.
"The press was used to slow
them down some Manwaring
said. "We didn't know if we
would get some turnovers, but we
wanted to take some time off the
clock.
"I really think they were one of
the best teams we faced all year
Manwaring continued. "I think
we just played a smarter game
and came through as a team We
beat them at their own game in
the end when we started beating
them down the court
ECU returns to ECAC South
action this weekend, with two
road games against teams they
have already beaten this year
Saturday night the Lady Pirates
will face American University.
On Monday they play George
Mason in Fairfax, Va.
ECU, who is currently 13-8
overall and 6-0 in the conference,
will try to lengthen its conference
winning streak to nine games
dating back to last February.
Women Tracksters Seek Improvement
Although ECL's women's
track team has had little to brag
about early in the indoor season,
the coach and athletes are both
looking for improvement as they
move toward the outdoor season.
"The indoor meets aren't our
strong point said first-year
coach Wayne Miller. "We are
competing in good meets with
teams much bigger (in squad size)
than our own. We are limited
somewhat by the small size (11
team members) of our team
However, 1 think our girls are do
ing as well as expected
The Lady Pirates rely on the
strength oi their sprinters and
that has beer the bright spot on
this year's campaign. Linda Gillis
wa- clocked at 7.04 in the
55 meter dash in ECU's first
meet this season, the Lid Lifter
Invtational held at George
Mason University on Dec. 1. The
time is a new school record and
just 18 one-hundredths of a se-
cond off 'he qualifying time for
the national indoor meet. Coach
Miller is optimistic that she in-
deed will improve enough to
qualify for the prestigious meet.
Soyna Baldwin is another
sprinter that will be counted on
heavily during the season,
however, she has been slowed by
an illness. Her return should help
the Lady Pirates in future meets.
With continued improvement
and the outdoor season still
ahead, the Lady Pirates are look-
ing for a good year in 1985. Here
is the schedule for the '85 season.
INDOOR
Feb. 17 George Mason
Invitational
March 2 UNC Invitational
OUTDOOR
March 16 N.C. State Invitational
March 22Ladv Gators,
GainesvilleFla.
March 30Georgia Relays,
Athens, Ga
April 5-6Carolina, Duke
Carnival
April 12Davidson Relays
April 20Appalachian State
April 25Penn Relays
Ma 8Specktown- Athens
May 12UVA Inviational
NCAA
Tankers Down Richmond In Last Home Meet
The Lady Pirate track team will compete in the George Mason Invita-
tional on February 17. in Fairfax, Va,
The ECU men's and women's
swimmers were successful in their
final home meet in Minges
Natatonum, the men took a
61-46 advantage while the women
won 62-51 over Richmond
University.
For the men, Kevin Hidalgo.
Lee Hicks, Chris Pittelli and
Keith Kaut took first place in the
200-meter medley with a time ol
1:38.50. The Pirates also took se-
cond place with the team of Scott
Robinson, Mike Kole, Bruce
Brockschmidt and Ronald Flem-
ing; their time was 1:39.90.
In the 1000-meter freestyle, Al
Smith and Richard Wells finished
first and second respectively.
Keith Kaut and Chema Lar-
ranaga finished second and third
in the 200-meter frestyle event.
Their times were 1:45.45 and
1:54.11 respectively.
Jeff Brown won the 200-meter
freestyle event with a time of
22.49 seconds. Andy Cook took
third place with a time of 23.57.
In th; 200-individual medley,
Pat Brennan was victorious with
a time of 2:01.47. Stratton Smith
took third place with a time of
2:08.55.
Scott Eagle and Billy Neal
repeated their success in the
1-meter diving. Eagle took first
while Neal was third.
Hidalgo got his second first
place win in the 100-meter but-
terfly. His time was 55.33
seconds. Cook's second third
place finish was with a time of
56.17.
Brockschmidt ran away with
with the 100-meter backstroke
with a time of 55.69 seconds.
David Robaczewski was the third
place finisher witha time of
1:02.99.
The 500-meter freestyle event
saw the Pirates sweep as Pittelli
was victorious in 4:48.54. Bren-
nan was second with a time of
4:51.32. Gregor Wray took the
bronze with a time of 5:05.18.
For the women, the 200-meter
medley relay team captured se-
cond place with a time of 1:54.89.
Lori Livingstone, Joelle Ennis,
Ellen McPherson and Nancy
James all swam on the second-
place team.
Scotia Miller and Tracy Hope
captured the first two places in
the 1000-meter freestyle. Miller's
winning time was 11:15.51.
In the 50-meter freestyle Nancy-
James came in first with a time of
25.94. Chris Holman took third
place for the victorious Lady
Pirates.
In the 200-individual medley
Caycee Poist finished second
with a time of 2:17.04
Lori Miller finished second in
both the one-meter and three-
meter diving competition.
ECU swept the first three
places in the 200-meter butterfly.
Annette Burton was first with a
time of 2:18.81. She was followed
by teammates Ellen McPherson
and Nancy Ludwig.
In the 100-meter freestyle Jenni
Pierson captured first place with
a time of 55.85, while teammate
Chris Holman was second.
Scotia Miller had a second-
place finish in the 500-meter
freestyle to go along with a first
place finish and another second
Jess Feinberg and Joelle Ennis
finished second and third respec-
tively in the 200-meter breast
stroke.
Frehsman Guard Dixon Establishing Himself
Bv SCOTT COOPER
Freshman guard Herb Dixon
has been quietly making his im-
pression in Pirate basketball, the
6-3, 188-pound Bath, Maine
native is destined for greatness.
"Herbie Dixon is a very, very
talented young man ECU head
coach Charlie Harrison said.
"He's probably as talented a kid
as i've brought in, since i've been
here. He might be the best athlete
on the team
Dixon says he feels good to
receive such praise from coach
Harrison. However, he believes
the only way to earn respect is to
go out and 'prove yourself
In the eyes of coach Harrison
and the Pirate coaching staff,
Dixon has been playing solid
basketball. By Dixon's stan-
dards, he hasn't played up to his
capabilities.
"I'm not fully satisfied Dix-
on said. "I don't think i've been
playing as well as I can. I think I
can be a big spark. I haven't real-
ly showed my scoring ability
yet
Dixon is currently averaging
4.8 ppg. In ECAC South con-
ference play, he is at 7.2.
However, in the last three games,
Dixon has averaged 11.3 ppg; in-
cluding a career-high 14 points
against James Madison on Jan.
28. This burst in scoring, along
with his solid floor play, has
earned him a starting role.
"At first it did affect me (not
being a starter) Dixon said. "I
felt I should be on the floor, but
I'm competetitive and worked my
way into it with hard work
With ECU struggling with a
5-12 record, Dixon isn't used to
being on a losing team. He comes
from a winning background since
his high school days. He feels
that the coaches and players have
helped him adjust to this dif-
ferent setting.
"They taught me a lot about
myself Dixon replied. "I'm
learning what it's like to be on
both ends. It's a different en-
vironment
Dixon feels frustrated by the
Pirates inability to score inside.
When the inside game dosen't
work, the opposition starts to
concentrate more on the guards,
according to Dixon.
Despite the lack of Pirate suc-
cess thus far, Dixon tries to be a
team motivator.
"I try to motivate by
example Dixon said. "I try to
let them have confidence �
because that's what we need
Coach Harrison feels Herb
Dixon is a competetitor and a
winner, and is the type of person
who hates to lose.
"He's going to make
mistakes Harrison said. "He's
not afraid. He's still learning.
"Hcrbie's an attacking type of
guard Harrison continued.
"The talent isn't what's missing,
it's experience
When he goes out on the court,
Dixon prefers to play an up tem-
po type of game. He feels that he
is best in this style of play.
"I try to do what I do best he
remarked. "I'm best in the open
court, 1 enjoy the face-paced
game
Dixon had a successful career
at Hyde Prep High School in
Bath, Me. As a freshman, he was
ranked as one of the Top 25
freshman in the country. In his
sophomore and junior seasons,
Dixon played forward for two
consecutive division champion-
ship teams. As a senior, he
averaged 21.8 ppg and 8.0 assists
as Hyde Prep qualified for the
state tournament. His athletic
ability was tested greatly as he
played center on defense and
point guard on offense, during
that year. He also earned all-New
England selection honors for his
senior season.
While in high school, Dixon
received the nickname 'Easy
His smooth pace and easy going
personality attributed to the
name.
Dixon's high school success
made him a wanted man. He was
recruited by such schools as Nor-
theastern, Duquesne, Marquette
and American University. But he
chose ECU because he thought he
could make things different for
the Pirates. Furthermore, he lik-
ed coach Harrison and felt he
(Harrison) knew a lot about the
game. Also he likes being a so-
called 'underdog
Dixon comes from a family
rich in athletic tradition. His
sister Medina was an All-America
selection at Old Dominion. His
brother Robin was a ECAC
North Player of the Yet while at
New Hampshire. Robin is cur-
rently playing professionally in
England. Another brother, Zack,
was a star at Temple University
and is a kick return specialist for
the Seattle Seahawks in the NFL.
Being one of 14 children, Herb
feels that his family has influenc-
ed his basketball career greatly.
However, he directs the most
respect toward his mother and
father.
"My mom and pop put up with
a lot of things when I was
young Dixon said. "No matter
what I did, they were always
there. They always kept their
wisdom and their ways.
"I have all the respect in the
world for them he continued.
"I hope I can repay them some
day
Going into the game against
UNC-Wilmington tonight, Dixon
feels that a win would be a con-
fidence builder for the Pirates.
"It would give us a big lift
Dixon exclaimed. "We need to
play the way that we're capable
of. We're going to have to bust
our butts to do it
ECU fans can look foward to
many more years of brilliant play
from number 21, because Herb
Dixon is like fine wine � he gets
better with age.
ECU head football coa h v
Baker announced ruesda) the
hiring of Walls Chamber- d
assistant football coach, filling
the last position on his .�
Chambers will coach the deten
sive line He comes ; Greenville
from the University
Iowa, where he �� lefd c line
coach during the �� U
seasons While at North
Chambers helped the Pantl -
a Mid-Continent confer
championship ii MM H.s
defense set a conference re
for sacks in a sing
and was second
against the run
"We are ddigl
meone of W'alK Chan
penence joining
Baker said i fei
with great credo
sive front ha ' �
which is a
statistic We 'eel ser I
to have him
Chambers a
Intramurals
Bv JEANNI ITI ROIH
It's all net in Men
these das "he ea
tightening up as
basketball seas
soar.
In recei
gals from Chi Omega
Alpha Delta Pi 22-2
Alpha Phi
OmiCTOn f '�
seems to be it
the Delta Zeto
record
L'mstead
their third game
the highly ranker W fun r
Robber. When the e
powerhouses dash, the res
hall title ma I ' �
Don't leave out the giri-
Tyler, they alwa- sea
the upsets
No. 1 ranked on campus and
tops in the mdepenJe: n.
the Thrillers are going after the
record books In a re mp
over Phi Kappa Ton til'sistet
the Thriller scored an an
85 points, tying a 1981 record
bv Tyler He Ba.i R r
son and the TnUe : I pose a
problem for the perem er
Enforcers.
The men take I
scoring upset after apse: 1 hese
upsets have changed the looks ol
the top five baske-
Road Wamon keep :heir rai �
ing as they defeated
40-34. The Brick Mai
ed the baskets awa
Sets by a score ol c-
ting a top position in their le
A battle for the be
has erupted between the n
from Garrett ar.d V - z
Aycock houses the talei
Unknowns and Silver &.�
The Unknowns blew b) the Belt
Blazers 86-U. Garret: can boas
the talents of the Five-O and
Highskyers. Garret: is one up
Aycock as the shot down the
Aycock Fiver 50-29 Scotl gets
into the action with a Jose ga
against Muggs Away 1
score: Scott Double Dnb
31 -Muggs Awe) 2'
In other action, the Cliqw
maintains their No. 1 ranking
with a 3-0 record Thev showed
their championship stripes once
again bv blitzing the Biohazardi
67-34. The Skoal Brothers
defeated Mean Machine 43-29
The Net Huggers remain
undefeated with a recent win over
Sigma Phi Epsilon-C. Several
other roundball squads post
undefeated records in the men's
independent division
Don't forget to register for CO-
rec bowling and the swim meet
today. We need more teams to
enter. Patncipate rather than
spectate through intramurals
m � � � �
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
I
with
�U-
thr .
M

Sat.
1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. 1p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9a.m8p.m
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m
Sat Sun. lp.m5 p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.mp.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
i -i mm "
�' " ���
K limn �1�m' ' ' � � �
f ;


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Pirate Grid
Happenings
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ural
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12
1 MKi KV
IW
Coaches Should Help Athletes With Problems
I
vv �

familial
Wash- ; h c
d who OI .p
olina State.
, 'he Wolfpack's
rei �aj
� female -


�' nds
i
p

� m
him out of the problem
Remember, you're all he has B
the time m're done recruiting,
you know as much about this kid
is anyone, with the exception ol
- pai 'His
rhe easiest thing in the world
for the coach to do is to throw a
kid ofi th earn 1 hat's the easv
a ,i, to go along w ith society. the
ty, the short hair cuts and
�� piece suits. The hard thing
� to keep the kid in the program
lake the abuse, because nobody
tl mks that you're doing it for the
kid anvway. They all think you're
doing it foi yourself.
! icmember once, when 1 was
running one of mv camps, a
lathe: came in, and wanted to
: ere his son wa; He was
A he wanted to punch his
son v I al did he do? He'd taken
" the police ars
this little town the) were
So i sal him down, and 1
"Hey, 1 don't care
. '� to iii kid, but fitst
�� Love
solve the problem. First get the
kid out of the problem
See, in most cases, the parents
are more worried about the em
barrassment to themselves, the
family, that sort of thing. And a
coach has to be sure not to make
the same mistake, where himself
or his program is concerned.
I'll guarentee you that any
coach who's been coaching a
minimum of tour years has run
into situations that deal with
something between misde-
meanors and felonies. I repeat,
it's their obligation to take care
ot the young person You don't
want him to cheat or lie, but
that's part ot being young, of
growing up Hut there's no way
vou can lie to the young person.
1 ike 1 said, in most cases, you're
all he has.
Another quick story it il-
lustrate the point.
hen 1 was in my third year at
Marquette, one of my plavers got
in trouble. I always had mv
Arrives Feb. 14
Greenville Flower Shop
1027 Evans St.
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unlisted phone number at the
police station, so it something
happened, thev could call me and
I could go down right away and
short-stop the news medias
Because once it gets into the news
medias, then the kid is swimn
with the sharks, defenseless
So anyhow, 1 went down and
got the kid out of the problem,
and it was in the middle ol the
wintet, snowy and cold s we
walked out of the police station,
the kid said, "Hev give me a lift
to the dormitory I said, 'Hev,
big shot, call one of your friends
You're the campus hero " And
he said. "1 don't have a dime
He didn't That was one hell of
a lesson tor me
I ooking back, 1 think now that
the only ingredient that all
coaches who are worth their salt
have in common, is their love '
their plavers
I fhere a limit to how I i
h can go? I don't think there
is a limit, I he limit is tout years
You have adopted the person, no
mattei what the pressures.
have taken him You're
;iig with a guv who's ,c 45
Remember.
with a 17-yea 1 kid )
out and recruited, tool '
home and moved to a lifl
environment
The coach and the play
� � al! practical purpose
ned And there's no such thi .
W hen �
:ent athlete, that's it It
a �� from when he rcg '�
September I I . 'eai
when he graduates in June
"THE X$RS MOST COMPELLING LOVE STORY.
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Powerfully acted.
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performances
strong to
the core
a true story
truly told
WC TV. TOOAV
DIANE KEATON
MEL GIBSON
METR(MK)LDUYN-MAYIRmEDGARJ. SCHER1CK SCOTTRIDIN PROMOTION
AGIUiANARXbTRONGnLM'MRS.SOFFEL mattheimoolne ediardherilmaxx ��.hR0NNYSWAN
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STARTS FEBRUARY 8th AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU!
Ail bt needed was a lucky break
��. moved m.
FREE SCREENING
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10
8:00 PM
HENDRIX THEATER
sponsored by
STUDENT UNION FILMS COMM
E. CAROLINA UNIVERSITY GREENVILLE
WON
? WHY ?
St. Peter's School
� Because of our dedicated teachers
� Because of our emphasis on the basics
� Because of our concern for the whole child
� Because of our enrichment programs in music.
foreign language, and crafts.
� Because o our physical education program
� Because we welcome all religious traditions
� Because we charge a reasonable tuition and offer a signifigant
discount for enrolling more than one child from a family.
� Because we are accredited by the North Carolina Department
of Public Instruction and all our teachers are certified.
� Because we plan to offer an After School Program beginning in Fall 1985
which will allow you to have your child in a protected environmenl from
the end of the school dav until 6:00 p.m. at a reasonable extra fee
CALX NOW for an appointment to visit or tour the school.
Applications accepted from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. beginning Monday,
February 11, 1985.
St. Peter's School
(Grades K-6)
2605 E. Fourth St Greenille
752-3529 davs
752-3901 evenings





Title
The East Carolinian, February 7, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 07, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.390
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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