The East Carolinian, January 31, 1985






�he
darolmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
New Director Nam
Pirate Walk Resumes
Greenville, N.C.
'0 Pages
Circulation 12,000
H JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nun r Jim,
Pirate Walk, ECU's campus
service, will resume opera-
riis weekend following the
ment of David Brown as
tte Walk Director.
wn, a 22-year-old senior
ironmental health major, was
minted by the Pirate Walk
of Directors, which in-
iudes representatives from the
and SRA. Brown served as
'airman of the SGA Student
V elfare Committee last year, was
member of the SGA legislature
three years and is currently a
esidenl advisor in Umstead
m.
Brown said he is excited about
the position and feels he will be
working with a good staff. Chris
Tomasic, a junior history major,
was appointed assistant director
and is a "good motivator
Brown said. Tommi Arnold will
serve as secretary-treasurer.
Pirate Walk will operate Mon-
day through Thursday from 6
p.m. to midnight. Brown said he
would like to have at least three
escorts available each shift and
eventually extend service to in-
clude Fridays and Saturdays.
Escorts are checked concerning
their employment backgrounds
and are also asked to provide
references. Brown said he feels
the volunteer escorts benefit from
the service as much as users do.
"It's good for the escorts to meet
other students he said. "In ad-
dition, it's community service
Brown said the service is
available so a "female can move
where she wants to without fear
of being harassed. A lot of people
say it won't happen to them, but
the possibility is always there
Escorts are available for the
main campus and an area two
blocks off campus. In addition,
they will serve Minges Coliseum
after the SGA Transit System
stops running.
The system has been
underutilized in the past and
Brown said he hopes to give it
more publicity this semester. He
also said he hopes to have an effi-
cient organization.
Those students calling to re-
Emory's Attorney
Initiates Lawsuit
Brown
quest escorts will usually have so-
meone available within 10
minutes, he said. Also, reserva-
tions may be made so the waiting
period is eliminated.
Applications are now being
taken for escorts and operators.
The applications may be obtained
from the SGA office in
Mendenhall Student Center. An
organizational meeting will be
held today at 4 p.m. in Room 212
of Mendenhall.
JON JORDAN � ECU Pho'o Lao
Ah h Polar Cat
Although now is a somewhat uncommon event in Greenville when
�npT.rh me' S,UdenS te"d U) IV� ,ake fU" advan,a Df �� H� uses were readily observable in the plethora of snowball fights on cam-
one o! the more creative uses of the cold white stuff. The less creative pus Monday night.
Council Considers Limiting Social Activities For Sororities
Bv BRETT MORRIS um�n - o- u� .�. �
From Staff
and �irt Reports
An attorney for former ECU
football coach Ed Emory said
Wednesday he will file a lawsuit
against the school because it of-
fered his client an unacceptable
settlement.
The attorney refused to release
the figure the university offered,
but indicated it was less than half
the amount he felt his client was
entitled to.
Emory was fired as the Pirates'
head coach Dec. 10 with more
than three years remaining on his
$50,000-a-year contract. Emory's
attorney, Marvin Blount Jr said
Emory would have received more
than $431,000 in salary and
benefits if he stayed the Pirates'
coach until his contract expired in
January 1988.
Blount said Andrew Vanore
Jr a senior deputy attorney
general, offered a settlement dur-
ing a telephone conversation
Monday. The state attorney's of-
fice is representing East Carolina
in the case because it is a state in-
stitution.
Vanore declined to say how
much was offered, but said,
"Let's say we were a long, long
way apart.
"If they figure this is what the
case is worth then I'm not in the
position of saying, 'Well, we'll
argue about it Blount said.
"To me the figure told me that
we were not going to be able to
get together
Blount said the lawsuit would
be filed in Pitt County Superior
Court, perhaps next week. He
said he did not know how much
the lawsuit would request for
damages and loss of salary and
benefits.
"I didn't want to do that, but
case
him
they left me no alternative
Blount said. "Ed Emory is a
human being, but he hasn't been
treated that wav bv the universi-
ty
Blount said he hopes the case
won't become a bitter or drawn-
out confrontation between his
client and the institution that ter-
minated his contract, but in-
dicated there are several
arguments he intends to bring up
in court that have not been made
public as of this date.
Emory is on vacation in
Florida, participating in a train-
ing camp for the United States
Football League's Memphis
Showboats, because the
"was beginning to wear
down
"I would just say that he is
very disappointed Blount said.
"I know that the whole family is
disappointed in the university's
position
According to a letter East
Carolina Chancellor John
How eh wrote Emory the day he
was fired, Emory's contract in-
cluded a section that said if his
contract is terminated, the
university would pay him a mon-
thly sum equal to his salary for
the contract's life or until Emory-
was employed by someone other
than the university.
If his salary from a future
employer was less than Emory's
salary from the university, the
university would pay the dif-
ference for the life of the con-
tract, according to the termina-
tion clause.
The contract also gave Emory
an option of receiving his mon-
thly salary through Jan. 31 and a
lump-sum final payment of
$50,000 at that time.
By BRETT MORRIS
Mafr r1tr
Panheilenic Council officials
met last week to discuss the issue
of declining grade point averages
among the members of social
sororities at ECU, a decline
which may adversely affect the
social activities of these groups.
According to one sorority
president, the overall gpa for
campus sororities dropped from
a 2.6 to a 2.47 as of fall semester.
r 'olyn Fulghum, assistant dean
and director of student life, said
the overall average for ECU
women is 2.597, while the
campus-wide average is 2.46.
Sorority members previously-
maintained the highest gpa of any
group on campus.
Fulghum said she feels grades
are dropping partially because
sorority members participate in a
variety of social activities which
she says detracts from their
academic concerns.
Laura Sweet, Panheilenic ad-
visor, said she stressed to sorority-
presidents that some social
restrictions need to be enforced in
order to create an atmosphere of
academic achievement.
"We are proposing different
ways for sororities to raise their
overall gpa's but their national
headquarters are responsible for
imposing any probationary
measues Several sorority
chapters at ECU have been plac-
ed on probation by their national
headquarters.
Fulghum said pressure from a
sorority's national office has the
greatest effect on academic per-
formance. Although sororities
are considered social organiza-
tions, they are required by their
national headquarters to main-
tain specified academic and social
Scholars Search Continues
standards.
Sorority presidents and
Panheilenic Council members
will meet soon to decide on
measures to be taken to insure
academic achievement among
sorority members.
"Something definitely needs to
be done in order to increase the
overall gpa among sororities
said Jeanne Campbell, president
of Alpha Delta Pi.
One idea to be considered is a
reduction in the scope of Greek
Week activities. Greek Week is a
designaied week during spring
semester when fraternities and
�s. i
sororities participate in social and
athletic events.
Limitation of social events will
also be discussed. One proposal
to be considered involves limiting
weekday social events to one each
month.
Martha Hudson, president of
Sigma Sigma Sigma, said she is
"in favor of any regulations that
will promote the increase in the
overall gpa for sororities" but
added that happy hours are also
considered to be fund-raisers and
are thus a financial asset for
sororities.
If the scope of Greek Week is
regulated by Panheilenic, this will
also have an effect on campus
fraternities, according to IFC
President Todd Patton. "If
sororities decide to limit their
participation in Greek Week,
then plans will have to be chang-
ed and activities rearranged
because sorority participation
and funding are essential to the
overall success of Greek Week
Patton said.
IFC and Panheilenic officials
will meet in order to discuss and
alleviate any confusion that may
now exist between the two
organizations.
E I News Bureau
Fifty-three outstanding high
school seniors from across the
state and nation have been
nominated as semifinalists for the
selection of the first five Univer-
sity Scholars awards at ECU.
The University Scholars is a
major new, privately-financed
scholarship program designed to
attract academically-gifted st-
duents with demonstrated leader-
ship potential to ECU.
Eventually the program will
support at least 20 $3,000 Univer-
sity Scholars awards each year.
The first five recipients will be
chosen this spring and enter the
university in the fall semester.
ECU officials announced that
regional screening committees
will choose no more than 24 can-
didates from the list of
semifinalists for interviews which
are scheduled Feb. 16 in Green-
ville, Raleigh and Greensboro.
Each committee will nominate
two top choices and an alternate,
according to ECU Director of
Admissions Charles Seeley.
A selection committee will
meet on March 9 to interview
finalists and choose five winners.
Seeley said any one of the 53
semifinalists not selected for the
University Scholars award
automatically will be "highly-
considered" for another ECU
merit scholarship including alum-
ni honors scholarships which
range in value from $750 to
$1,500 a year.
The list of 53 semifinalists was
drawn by screening applications
which were received by Dec. 15,
Seeley said.

Colleges Fear Losing More Students
ST. LOUIS (UPI) - The com-
bination of decreased public fun-
ding and a smaller number of
traditional college-aged students
is forcing colleges and univer-
sities into the business world, a
mareketing expert says.
James Lichtenberg, senior vice
president with the public rela-
tions firm of Hill and Knowlton
Inc said for the first time in cen-
turies colleges are faced with the
fear of going out of business.
Over the past four years,
Lichtenberg has helped more
than two dozen colleges develop
marketing plans to meet the in-
creased competition.
"Ten years ago it wasn't the
case, but today higher education
is a competitive environment
he said. "Colleges have begun to
realize they, like a business, are in
a marketplace that is not par-
ticularly favorable
To remain competitive,
Lichtenberg said, schools have to
realize that education is a
business and that they must
market themselves properly to
meet increasing competition.
"It's frightening
Lichtenberg said. "Even though
marketing is taught in most col-
leges, as institutions they don't
have any experience in dealing in
a competitive market. This has
scared a lot of people
Lichtenberg said the concern is
valid, pointing to current
estimates that indicate as many as
10 percent of the 3,000 colleges
and universities across the nation
will close their doors by the turn
of the century.
Lichtenberg advises schools to
define what kind of institution
they want to be � including what
type of students they want to at-
See COLLEGES, Page 3
� � yy - �
yv. w,
� - - � r"
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lab
Shredded Shards
If one wishes to believe what people say. seven years' had luck Is in store for the unfortunate student who
broke this mirror. Of course, for some of us, that would be an improvement.
The
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment6
Classifieds7
Sportsg
�SGA President John Rainey
announced Wednesday that
very few organizations have
registered to participate in the
SGA Budget Conference to be
held Feb. 6. Organizations
wishing to receive funding
must attend the conference
and registration ends today.
'
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
-UARY31, 1985
School of Nursing
Alt students who plan to declare nursing a
malor and wisn to enroll In the sophomore
nursing courses in tall semester I9t5 should
pc up an Intent to Enroll Form In the n 'S
In� building, room 157 and return by Fee 1
This applies particularly to present
freshmen However, this form must also be
submitted by students who wish to re enroll
In the nursing program
Scuba Diving Adventures
Spring Break Dive In the fabulous Florida
Keys with Ray Scharf and Captain Slate.
ECU graduate class of 1971, from the Atlantis
Dive Center on the only coral reef In the con
tinentai United States
Dive program includes five days of diving,
dally boat trips, lodging and full breakfast
For registration and Information call Ray
Scharf, Olrector of Aquatics at 757 &441 or
7S�erae Total cost isS335 and includes a S100
non refundable deposit Non diver cost is
tin
Swim Meet
The annual IRS swim meet will be held in
early Feb Register Feb 7 l Get your squad
together and pool your efforts' Sign up in XU
memorial gym
Weight Training Clinic
lm rec services will offer a free weight train
Ing clinic on Jan 79ft,30 from 8 9pm To
become a part register in room 204
memorial gym The limit is 15
ECU Student Union
Needs You
Help us plan concerts, trips, movies, dances,
art exhibitions, minority programs recrea
tion activities, and other special events! Ap
plications for committee chairpersons are
available a' Mendenhali Student Center's In
formation desk Applications are being ac
cepted from Jan 21 Feb 1 For more infor
matlon contact the Student union office at
757 tan. ext 210
The Student Union visual Arts committee
will meet on Thurs, Jan 24 at 4 p m in room
241 of Merdenhell Student Center All
members and interested students are urged
to attend
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee
will meet on 1'jes Jan 29 a' 5 p m n room
241 of AAenoenhall Student Center All
members ana interested students are urged
�o attend
N.C. Student Legislature
The NC Student Legislature will mee
Mon . Jan M al 7 in the Mendenhali cot
feehome We will discuss �undrismg pro
lects, such as the Happy hour crush for
Valentines Day Our session bHs wM also be
discusser1 The IC win be great!
Math and Computer
Science Jobs
Deadlines for many o� the math and CSCI
iobs in Coop tor summer and tall are soon
One of best jobs for someone who has com
Dieted COBOL has Jan 75 deadline! II you
have not registered with Co op, come now to
Raw! 313 to register if you have registered
make appointment to see your coordinator
as soon as possible1
Summer Jobs
Thomas Nelson inc has ooaitons available
for tna up coming summer Students in
terested in having a summer ioe mat win
give valuable iob experience and good
money should attend one of the following
meetings Thurs. Jan 31 in Brewster D wing
at 1, 3 30. 7 in room 102 A grade point
average of 2 5 is required
Women's Indoor Soccer
Tournament
to be held March 15 17 tor all organized in
oependent teams Contact Ginger Vann at
752 9772 or Vanessa Higdon a' 757 6064 if you
ere interested 15 entry tee
Women's Soccer Club
am women interested m participating m the
dub, must attend an organizational meeting
Thurs Jan 31 at 7 in 105 B Memorial Gym
Spoleto Festival-
Charleston, SC
Remember the deadline for application is
Feb 1 If you are interested, please contact
the Co-op office as soon as possible
Business, Music, theatre arts. English and
Writing, ar and Home Economics maiors
are encouraged to apply Salary is $125 per
week, free housing. $50 paid toward
transportation cost
Alpha Phi Big
Brothers
The next meeting of the big brothers of
Alpha Phi Sorority will be this Sun night at
9 30 at the Alpha Phi house Attendance is
require from all brothers and semester
dues are due (dues are due???)
Announcements
ADVERTISING
Banking Positions
interested in banking as a career? Local
financial institution seeks career minded
students majoring In business, finance, ac
counting for Spring.summer I9�S Students
sould be graduating seniors Contact me
Cooperative Education Offlceln 313 Raql
Building for more Information
Air Products
Nationwide producer of Industrial chemicals
andgases offers summer program with
headquarters and regional offices Rising
Seniors with good GPA and maiormg In
chemistry, business, accounting, or com
puter science Invited to apply For more In
formation contact the Cooperative Educa
I0J1 Office in 313 Rawl Building
Summer Jobs
With major food service corporation having
facilities throughout the Southeast Food and
Nutrition maiors interested In career related
experience paying M 50 $5 per hour Contact
Cooperative Education Office in 313 Rawl
Building
Travel Committee
Needs Members
Like to travel and plan trips? Why not
become a member on the Student Union
Travel Committee The Student Union
Travel Committee plans and promotes the
following types of trips weekend excur
sions, trips stheduled during holidays and
breaks The committee also sponsors the
Travel Adventure Film Series For more In
formation contact the Student Union (room
234) at 757 6611. ext 210
Economics Assoc
The new Economics Association will meet
Wed . Jan 30 at t p m in room 212
Mendenhali All economics majors and
minors are invited to attend this meeting and
learn the practical side of economics We
want to nelp you!
International Student
Assoc.
We have a very important meeting on Feb 2
at 6 p m in Mendenhali 721 We are going to
vote and we need your opinion Also the
tickets for the international Dinner will be
available to an members Don't forget It
ECU Playhouse
Ushers Needed tor the play 'Diviners' to run
Frb 6 thru 9th ushers get to see the play
free! If interested sign up at the Messlck
Arts Theatre Center
ECU Surfing Club
The first meeting of the spring semester will
be Wed, Feb 6 at t in the Mendenhali Cof
teeriouse i in the basementi Team t shirts
will be on sale and a video of last fall will be
shown Guys and gals and all newcomers are
welcome
All Nursing Students
Graduating
Spring Semester
in order to receive your nursing pin by April
22. I9�5 orders must be placed in the student
supply store. Wr.Qht buildine. no later men
Feb 4 Orders should be placed at me
lewelry counter Orders must be paid in full
when the order is placed
AFROTC Scholarships
Available
Air Force ROTC is looking for students
seeking education, opportunities, and ex
perence AFROTC offers scholarships to
qualified individuals, to pay for tuition
books and $100 a month
The Air Force Officer Qualifying
TestlAFOQT' is offered on Mon . Feb 11
from 1pm to 6 30 p m This is nessassry m
order to be considered tor scholarships for
the Fall semester of 1985 All mfrested
students are urged to visit AFROTC on the
Second floor of Wright Annex (next to the
Student Store) or call 757 6598 for more in
formation
Lambda Alpha Epsilon
is having its first meeting of the spring
semester on Mon , Feb 4 at 7 p m in room
103 of the Belk building Lambda Alpha Ep
silon is open to all majors and intended ma
jors in the field of Corrections
DONTHEA
STYROHEAD
Let's face it, a daily diet of tasteless Go for the fresh alternative! Get a
burgers in styrofoam boxes can turn fresh, delicious Subway sandwich or
you into a dull person salad for a change. You '11 love it.
208 JM11 - lililifriAfA
E. Fifth St. CU-iw-lOjM 758-7979
Lacrosse Club
There will be a lacrosse meeting held on
Feb. 4 at 7 p m In 105 B Memorial gym All
Intending to play must show For further in
formation contact Sal Anello at 75 3178
Attention Girls of ECU
Any girl Interested in posing for the 1916
Girls of ECU Calender please contact John
D at 757 3316
Rose Sale
Treat your sweetheart to a rosel ZBT little
sisters will be selling roses for
Valenfines'sDay on Feb 6 7 In front of the
Student store Roses are U each and will be
delivered tree on Valentine's Day
CAOP
There will be a meeting Thurs . Jan 31 at 4
p m In Erwln Hall, room 210
SAB Meeting
There will be a Student Athletic Board
meeting at 4 In room 221 of Mendenhali Stu
dent Center on Feb 4
Student Star Search
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
will be accepting applications for it's presen
ration of student star search Applications
are available at the Information desk and the
Student Union office. Mendenhali The date
of the Student Star Search presentation Is
Feb 20 8 p m Hendrix
Circle K
ECU Circle K Club Invites you to come out
and join us this coming and every Sun. night
at 7 p m In Mendenhali room 221 for fun and
socializing Hope to see you there!
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you In developing better
Interviewing skills for use In your ob search
A film and discussion of how to Interview on
and off campus will be snared These ses
slons will be held in the Career planning
Room at 3 p m on Feb 7,11. and 19 Seniors
a �specially encouraged to attend one of
these sessions I
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
In the Bloxton House is offering one hour ses
sions to help you prepare your own resume
Few graduates get lobs without some
preparation Many employers request a
resume showing your eduatlon and ex
perience Sessions to help will be held in the
Career Planning room of the Bloxton House
at 3 p m on Feb 5. 13 and 20
ECU College Republicans
will meet Thurs. Jan 31 at 6 in the
Mendenhali Coffeehouse at 7 We will storm
up to Hendrix Theatre to invade, pillage, and
view Red Dawn All conservatives of good
standing are required to participate in this
Wolverine activity Until then
Wolverines.uuuuuu
NC Student Legislature
will meet Mon , Feb 1 at 7 in the Mendenhali
Coffehouse We will further explore our
billtopics for session Anyone interested in
being secretary contact James at 752 5662 if
interested 'Wolverines' will meet before this
meeting at 5 in SGA room 231
Groove Phi Groove
Will be having their spring smoker Thurs .
Jan 31. at Mendenhali Student Center Coffee
House at 3 p m
Prime Time
Take a study break and loin us for Prime
Tlmel Sponsored by Campus Crusade for
Christ, meeting In the Jenkins Aud ArtBldg
at p.m Join in on the tun. fellowship and
Bible Study
Pi Kappa Phi
The next PI Kappa basketball team play will
be next sun and mon nights Both games at
6 at memorial gym All brothers, pledges, lit
tie sisters and all interested art urged to
comeout and watch the PI Kapps on their
climb to the top
Counseling Center
This program Is designed to aid students In
choosing an academic malor In a small
group format Each participant will also
receive individual aid from the group leader
if desired Group participants will Increase
self knowledge of their Interests, values and
abilities, learn how these relate to majors
and career areas at ECU. and narrow their
options through a systematic career decision
making process The Malor Decision Group
will meet Feb 6.8,11.13- 3 4 p m Wright
Annex
Although advance registration is not re
quired, we would appreciate advance
notification of interest to Insure that we have
adequate materials on hand Please contact
the counseling Center In 307 Wright Annex
(757 6661) for further information or to let us
know you plan to attend
Kw.twzyww�� �
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th
Colleges S
Continued From Page 1
tract � and then develop a plan
to reach their goal.
"You've got to have a game
plan to survive he said
He advises schools against
overreacting and adding new
"trendy" courses designed to at-
tract students, but which would
hurt the overall image of the col-
lege
"A lot of colleges don't know
what their marketplace is so they
begin looking to change their
traditionally good images in an
:
GOP Stud,
B HAROLD JOYNEK
MMIIII Srwi tduw
Four ECU studer
among 52 other N C ,ege
Republicans who braved sub-zerc
temperatures to attend P
Reagan's inauguaration
month.
"I was disappointed when i
heard the mauguaral paraae
cancelled said Sand Ha
23, a senior majoring
Senior political s
Dennis Kilcoyne said the ti
made possible throu-
lege Republicans.
Car. lina br jght rr. -
Re" ibhcans than i
statv Kile yne, 22, sa
belies pal
young people showed
Republican Part thai yo . .
people intend to remain with
par'
ECU Student !
Dies Of
Natural Causes
Robin .Ann Steele, a da)
dent at ECU. died Tuesday. Jan.
22 of natural causes.
According to Stan Harris,
chief medical examiner a: Pitt
Memorial Hospital, Steele col-
lapsed in her apartment and was
rushed to the hospital by a rescue
-�quad
Attempts at resuscitat
began at the scene and were con-
tinued at the hospital -a here she
was pronounced dead an -
later.
Harris said her death was caus-
ed by "a rare type of heart
disease in which hereditary
tors are involved
Steele was a junior Parks and
Recreation major.
Harris said Steele's death ua
"a one-in-a-million occurence "
Course Offers
Varied Studies
By HAROLD JOYNER
Because of its popularity, a
special course offering medieval
and Renaissance studies will be
taught next semester, according
to Douglas McMillan. English in-
structor and director of graduate
studies.
"We taught the course last fall
and it went over really well with
the students he said. "We felt
it should be offered again
because it offers a broad
coverage of this topic The pur-
pose of the class, McMillan said,
is to provide an interdisciplinary
introduction to the world of
Western Europe from about 500
A.D. to 1600 A.D
"This class may be taken by in-
terested students as an elective or
to satisfy the humanities require-
ment for general education We
will approach the medieval and
Renaissance worlds through the
use of art, literature, history,
music, philosophy and foreign
languages he said. Occasional
guest lecturers from those
disciplines will help McMillan
Ht
i

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Colleges See Decline In Enrollment
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tract and then develop a plan
to reach their goal.
"You've got to have a game
rlan to survive he said.
He advises schools against
overreacting and adding new
"trendy" courses designed to at-
tract students, but which would
hurt the overall image of the col-
lege
'A lot of colleges don't know
what their marketplace is so they
begin looking to change their
traditionally good images in an
effort to attract students.
"All too often, unfortunately,
those market needs will
fluctuate he said. "You will
find that the wind has shifted
again but you lack your tradi-
tional strengths to fall back on
Lichtenberg noted that after
years of emphasis on professional
and vocational training, a general
liberal arts education background
is becoming popular again.
"We have a number of liberal
arts colleges as clients that have
remained true to that kind of
education and are now beginning
to enjoy the fruits of unswerving
dedication and strong reputation
that they have built he said.
Still, colleges might be forced
to change some aspects of their
programs, Lichtenberg said.
For example, institutions will
have to take into consideration
that by 1996 there will be a
million less of the traditional
18-to-22-year-old students.
The decline has yet to affect
college enrollment, he said,
because people are going to col-
lege at an older age.
"The yuppies are taking up the
enrollment slack left by the pass-
ing of the baby boom he said
Lichtenberg said there is no
way to tell if this trend will con
tinue, but he advises colleges to
take note of it when developing
future recruitment efforts
GOP Students Recall Proud Event
B HAROLD JOYNER
Four ECU students were
among 52 other N.C. College
Republicans who braved sub-zero
temperatures to attend President
Reagan's mauguaration this
month
"1 was disappointed when 1
heard the inauguaral parade was
cancelled said Sandy Hardy.
23, a senior majoring in history.
Senioi political science major
Dennis Kilcoyne said the trip was
made possible through the Col-
lege Republicans. "North
( arolina brought more ollege
He- iblicans ;han anv Qthei
state Kilcoyne, 22. said he
believes this participation of
young people showed the
Republican Party that voung
people intend to remain with the
party.
ECU Student
Dies Of
Natural Causes
Robin Ann Steele, a day stu-
dent at ECU, died Tuesday, Jan.
22 of natural causes.
According to Stan Harris,
chief medical examiner at Put
Memorial Hospital, Steele col-
lapsed in her apartment and was
rushed to the hospital by a rescue
squad
Attempts at resuscitation
rcgan at the scene and were con-
tinued at the hospital where she
was pronounced dead an hour
later.
Harris said her death was caus-
ed bv "a rare type of heart
disease in which hereditary fac-
are involved
Steele was a junior Parks and
Recreation major.
Harris said Steele's death was
"a one-in-a-million occurence
Kilcoyne also said he was
disappointed with the cancella-
tion of many outdoor activities.
A deep sense of pride in this
country was what Hardy said he
felt while in the nation's capital.
He also said he enjoyed all the
events, especially the Youth Ball,
which was attended by more than
8,000 people. "We were about 10
or 15 feet from Reagan and we
were interviewed by The New
i'ork Daily News and Time he
said.
Sam Donaldson, a reporter
from ABC News, was booed by
the young students, Hardy said.
"He smiled and looked around
he said, "wondering if he should
leave, I guess
Also attending the event, was
21-year-old Kirk Shelly, a junior
political science major. "I was
disappointed when we heard the
news of the cancellation, but
once we got outside, I was glad. 1
talked with band members from
Washington State who told me it
wasn't too cold for them, but the
band members from California
were very glad the parade was
called off
Bands appearing at the Youth
Ball included North Carolina's
own Skip Castro. Shelley said
tickets for the dance were $75 a
person, but "compared to the
ball at the National Air and
Space Museum where tickets
were $500 apiece, I think we got
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Course Offers
Varied Studies
B HAROLD JOYNER
Vwi�i�ai Sewi hdttor
Because of its popularity, a
special course offering medieval
and Renaissance studies will be
taught next semester, according
to Douglas McMillan, English in-
structor and director of graduate
studies.
"We taught the course last fall
and it went over really well with
the students he said. "We felt
it should be offered again
because it offers a broad
-overage of this topic The pur-
pose of the class, McMillan said,
is to provide an interdisciplinary-
introduction to the world of
Western Europe from about 500
A.D. to 1600 A.D.
"This class may be taken by in-
terested students as an elective or
to satisfy the humanities require-
ment for general education. We
will approach the medieval and
Renaissance worlds through the
use of art, literature, history,
music, philosophy and foreign
languages he said. Occasional
guest lecturers from those
disciplines will help McMillan .
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Cindy Mills, a 124-year-old
political science major, said she
was impressed with the president
and his wife. "President Reagan
told the group that the youth of
America were "the best damn
kids in America. The crowd real
lv roared after he said that Mills
said she felt the experience was
made more memorable because
of Reagan's attitude towards
youth. "Voung people look up to
him and see him as a hero she
said.
Another event enjoyed by the
visiting ECU students was the
National Leadership Forum held
at Constitution Hall. There, they
heard Vice-President Bush.
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s
Qtye iEaat Qlutaliniun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. (�r�Manager
Greg Rideout, �in-ium
Jennifer Jendrasiak. �. ate Tom Luvender. ��. 4��
Scott Cooper, asn&,�� Anthony Martin. �.�.��� ���,
Tina Maroschak. f�(Urts t�w John Peterson. �r�- rtmngw
Bu l Mitchell. amMo Manager Bill Dawson, awaka Mfl�af,r
Doris Rankins. $�, Rick Mccormac. co-em&&
A. Guy, (vi�w John Rusk. Admg -��
January 31. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Tickets
Problems Need Solutions
Some serious matters have come
to our attention about campus
parking rules. Several instances
have been relayed to us concerning
the conduct of public safety of-
ficials when dealing with students
and about parking and ticket
regulations which are unfair.
At the beginning, we wish to say
that students do give campus cops
a hard time on occasion. But with
this as a given, we would like to ex-
press some problems and suggest
some solutions.
First, we wish to address the
condescending behavior of one
cop. We know of only one in-
stance, but it is verified. We are
sure more like it exist. We don't
feel pamphlets need to be thrown
during a conversation about a
ticket. Public safety officers are to
explain to students the rules and be
understanding of the parking pro-
blems that exist on campus. Like
all other university employees, you
are here to serve us. Many do a
fine job, but some, unfortunately,
in some instances, fall short.
Second, real problems exist with
the university's attitude towards
students who choose not to register
their cars. Campus Public Safety
feels, and we assume the ad-
ministration feels, that every car
should be properly registered. This
should not be the case, however.
Some students live very close to
campus and choose not to register
their vehicles. This would be a
waste of the valuable student
dollar. Obviously, if a car without
a sticker is parked in a space
designated for staff, faculty or stu-
dent, it should be ticketed.
But, the problem is with the
meter spaces. Sometimes, these
students need to rush on campus,
and should have the ability � just
as anyone not affiliated with the
school � to use a meter space.
Yet, we cannot. There is absolutely
no logic to this rule. We can use
meter spaces in town and we are in-
habitants of Greenville; we can use
meter spaces in Raleigh and we are
North Carolinians. So why can't
we do so on campus?
The same problem exists with
non-registered cars from the main
campus which students wish to
drive to visit the medical school.
They can't. You say, "Why not
use a visitor space at the front of
the Brody building?" Well, no
luck. You can't. But your neighbor
next door on Fifth Street can �
provided he's not a student. How
are you supposed to visit, walk?
Another problem is students be-
ing forced to pay for siblings'
tickets because both cars are
registered in their parents' names.
Why should you be responsible for
your teenage brother who goes to
Rose High? Obviously, we should
onlv be responsible for ourselves,
right?
We suggest the committee that
deals with traffic rules make this a
high priority. The students of ECU
expect these unfair practices to be
looked into and corrected.
, rSsSFJ
'
Cjtage eis Service
cap vttHmm;$ miihrv spends n&m mt
The Prez Says
The Campus Forum last week
featured a letter criticizing the SGA for
several appropriations that were made at
its meeting on Jan. 21. The letter in-
dicated that many legislators were
unaware of where the monies were going
since it was not debated and consent was
granted to the appropriations bills.
The work of most any legislative body
is done in committees. The same is true
in the SGA, and the floor is where ques-
tions are asked and bills are debated.
When the members are in agreement to
legislation, they usually pass it by con-
sent. The writer seems to feel that the
appropriations bills were "railroaded"
through the Legislature last week, but
there was ample time for anyone to ask
questions regarding the bills.
Nearly every student organization that
receives funds have line items for adver-
tising its organization. The Inter Frater-
nity Council bill had been in the Ap-
propriations Committee since the last
SGA meeting of the fall semester, and it
had only been considered at the second
meeting of the Legislature on Jan. 21.
The question of merging routes in the
SGA Transit system is designed to better
serve the student body, and this depart-
ment has a totally separate budget from
the SGA. The Legislature has provided
funding in the past for the Friday and
Saturday night downtown bus service
and continues to do so this semester.
Our transit system is the best in North
Carolina and it is constantly looking for
ways to better serve the student body.
The writer also wonders if the SGA
Appropriations Committee looks at and
examines all the budgets it considers,
and I wish to respond to this by inviting
Mr. Farris to attend a meeting of the
SGA Appropriations Committee. They
are always open to all students as are the
regular Legislative meetings. As a past
Appropriations chairman, I know the
amount of work that is required in con-
sidering budgets, and this committee
often meets more than once a week in
appropriating funds. I can assure you
that this responsibility is not taken light-
ly by any member of the SGA.
Johnny Rainey
SGA President
Act school a$ mmme&,wmm, tom-
M6NT OFflCSS W HOOSaODRK ARE OHAWO-HOVRPUAy,
Public Cuts Free Speech
By GREG RIDEOUT
Lately, the press finds itself in the
position of using the "public's right to
know" argument in First Amendment
cases when that very same public
doesn't even give it support. Recent
polls show journalists and journalism
are perceived unfavorably by many
people. We are in a "feel good" mood
in America, which leaves no room for
reporters, who often expose the other,
not-so-feel-good, side of a story.
All signs seem to portend the gagging
of the press. People view reporters as
intrusive, and the present administra-
tion sees the press only as a thing to
manipulate and blame. If these men in
high places scream the press is bad,
even if just for political reasons, the
mood of the nation today will make the
people believe it is really so. But it is
not.
Objective journalism is alive but lim-
ping. The 'ew York Times, The
Washington Post, The Wall Street
Journal � all strive daily for the
highest ethical standards. They seek to
inform the public for the noble purpose
of enhancing debate. Their columnists
are thoughtful and insightful. But they,
as all papers do, make mistakes. Usual-
ly they are self-correcting. But they
can't, with all their power, correct
misperceptions cast lightly for partisan
reasons by the Agnews of the world.
People somehow believe the press is
not working for them. They wish to be
informed only to the point that the
press doesn't pick on someone they
like. Take the Grenada invasion for in-
stance. In every conflict America has
fought in, reporters have been allowed
access to the front lines; there, they can
send back accounts of the action to the
people who the generals and soldiers
serve. The Pentagon, after being held
accountable for its actions in Vietnam,
saw fit to exclude the press from being
at the front lines in Grenada. Censor-
ship. But, even worse, the public over-
whelmingly thought these generals were
right. How were they to inform the
public when the public, ostensibly,
didn't give a damn?
This erosion of public support, along
with other actions, is chipping away at
the constitutional right of free speech.
One such other action is President
Reagan's National Security Decision
Directive 84. Under this lifetime censor-
ship agreement, government employees
with access to top-secret information
must sign contracts in which they pro-
mise to submit for review any
manuscripts containing intelligence in-
formation. And although Congress
passed legislation blocking the lifetime
nature of the agreement, a General Ac-
counting Office report says 156,000
have signed the contract.
This effort extends pre-publication
review to former government
employees, thus curtailing expression
that would contribute to public debate.
This is censorship that strikes at the
heart of the ability of our citizenry to be
informed. If employees submit to this
trespass on their First Amendment
rights and the nation allows the White
House to gag its duty to be informed,
then what can be done?
What this does, according to Sen
Charles Mathias, R-Md is to consign
thousands of men and women "to a vir-
tual silence on some of the crucial issues
facing our nation What will happen,
according to newspaper editors, is the
country's public debate will be turned
over to censors whose political momes
will be suspect.
These two attempts to curtail infor-
mation and gag the press can be coupl-
ed with a third recent phenomenon: The
inability of the press to override govern
ment mistakes during the era of the
"TV Presidency The leader of the
free world, Ronald Reagan, is often
quite loose with the facts. This is well-
documented. But when the press cor-
rects the president, which it has
countless times, it is often ignored or
lambasted for being picky.
What Reagan, or any other president
for that matter, counters by being able
to treat lightly the press is accountabili-
ty. The use of media events and televi-
sion to constantly manipulate the way
his presidency is viewed by the public
condemns the public to ignorance and
blissfulness. Reagan is not responsible
for his actions because we can't and
won't hold him accountable. He has in-
augurated the new idea of the Teflon
Presidency.
Unfortunately, unless Mr. Reagan
makes a monumental mistake the trend
ot restricting speech will continue. The
Federalist Papers pointed out aim si
200 years ago that the right to free
speech is more important than govern-
ment itself. Maybe President Reagar.
and the rest of the nation needs to read
them.
Anti-Abortionists Gather Steam
Abortion is suddenly in the forefront
of the news. For years it has not been a
headline matter. Now, The East Caroli-
nian has written on the subject, and this
columnist is editorializing on it. Presi-
dent Reagan has addressed an anti-
abortion gathering at the recent in-
augural, and big time TV newsmen �
Tom Brokaw of NBC, Dan Rather of
CBS and Geraldo Rivera of ABC �
concede that the movement has become
sophisticated in presenting its case and
is building momentum.
The ?ight Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
First, a brief retrospective. In 1973
the Supreme Court legalized abortion.
Overnight, what had been a crime
became a constitutional right. A ma-
jority of justices gave some people a
license to kill. Many people were shock-
ed by the decree. They had presumed
that the law would always back their
belief that abortion was morally wrong.
But they operated in the framework of
the American way; they soon got a
movement underway to undo the deci-
sion of the Court by protesting and try-
ing to convert a majority to their way of
thinking. At first their attempts sput-
tered. They had never been involved in
such an effort before, and they did not
know how to proceed. They could not
find a voice. They were full of zeal but
lacked political and public relations
skills, while their foes were often the big
verbalizers. However, they kept the
faith; they persisted. Liberal Sen.
Robert Pack wood, R-Ore patroniz-
ingly dismissed them as crazies, with
lots of fire and heat but destined to
burn themselves out like a nova in the
sky. That was about six years ago. Now
they are afire with ever-brighter life and
have branded Packwood "Sen.
Death
During the inauguration, they
assembled for their annual parade and
protest, 72,000 of them, in
Washington. The icy blasts of that
frigid day were too much for other peo-
ple in the capital, but not for these
believers. At the same time, they push-
ed a couple of well-done propaganda
films, which were realistic but skillfully
done.
In my opinion, these folks will have a
very hard time if they try for the total
ban on abortions, but they will succeed
in putting severe restrictions on abor-
tion laws. In the last few years their
public education efforts have won con-
verts to their cause; now, almost one-
half of the population supports them,
and no doubt that figure will go higher.
Knowledgeable people who once
predicted the demise of the movement
are now admitting that it is full of
vigor. Take leftist columnist Mary
McGrory, who appears in the Raleigh
paper. Last week she admitted, with a
tear, that the anti-abortion forces are
making big strides. She is eating some
of her words uttered years ago.
In the beginning of the fight, pro-
abortion apologists had everything go-
ing for them, and they seemed only to
need to shout a few slogans to win the
day. But with time their foes have built
up a strong case and riddled the
arguments and knee-jerk claims of the
pro-abortionists. They have become ef-
fective in showing the public what really
happens when the life of an unborn
child is taken.
First, they showed that a fetus (a
lumpish word that sounds like a label
for something inanimate) is a small and
unborn human. It is amazing to know
how even the unborn at a few weeks of
age is not a mere "thing" or an "it
The baby has life, is sentient. Research
in the development of the human in the
womb has uncovered new truths; the
child responds to music, even has
preferences, and it reacts to a varitey of
other sounds. Armed with such facts �
and there are many more of a like kind
� we can see how shallow is the
mindless shibboleth, "A woman has a
right to her own body In most cases,
yes, but not when she carries a child.
No civilized society permits its members
absolute rights where a second being is
involved. The anti-abortionists step in
at this point and insist that society with
its laws must protect the life of the
small and helpless.
To drive home their points, the pro-
life people now have two excellent
films, even though one of them, in one
place, is harrowing to watch. It shows
an actual killing. With the dispassionate
voice of a narrator describing the last
struggle, you see the unborn child
writhing in desperation to escape the
deadly probing and grasping in-
struments of the doctor, who tears out
the limbs of the victim and crushes its
skull so to better remove it from the
mother's body. By the way, the device
used in the life-and-death struggle is
called a "power forceps something
you may want to know about. Such a
gruesome destruction sounds like
something from centuries ago when
humans were drawn and quartered. We
are, with abortion, back in those days.
A dozen generations of human progress
is being pushed back with the more than
1,500,000 abortions per year in this
country.
Think about an analogy that pro-life
people often point to. Some Americans,
blacks, were before 1863 not thought of
by the law as human beings; they were
cattle, mere property. At first, a
minority of believers, called trouble
makers and fanatics by their foes,
began the struggle to secure full human
rights for the slaves, victims of the old,
cruel laws. They, of course, eventually
won, but only after a hard fight.
Abortion is big business now in this
country. It involves thousands of peo-
ple and megabucks. As a vested interest
it will fight back. But the pro-life peo-
ple earn nothing for their efforts as they
work to save the lives of the un-
protected. In hope, they look to the
Supreme Court, which in the next few
years may get several new justices
dedicated to using the law to extend
constitutional guarantees of life to un-
born Americans.
Killing
I would like to thank the
movie committee for selecting
to show a movie so powerful
and emotional as The hilling
rields. This movie reinforced
in me the horrors that war can
inflict on people � people
who have nothing to do with 1
the war itself, innocent bv 1
standee While watching this
my thoughts turned to Central
America and the conflict that
is brewing down there It made
me realize how qui I
can break out, unsuspectingly,
even in an area where sup
posed I v one is not being plann-
ed
1 remember seeing the .�
fering on the faces of the
bodian people i
the hospital
someone to stop the
or ease the pain fi
wounds and their
when the trie;
their homes to flee she
bombing I am hapj
that there are .
United States and around
World tha realize the I
ot war �.
Larcenies Fr
Crime on the EC 1
somewhat limited dui .
eek. although
vehicles nue. The
for Jan. 24 � 29
Jan 24, i. �� Mark
Taylor of Belli i rn
larceny of a bank card from
room. 8 p.m. - Jedd Bi 1
ycocl
dolph Fan w wa butinj
advertisements in j
without authonzat;
Jan 25, 1:15 a m � D i
Happy
Birthd
Co
VHave A
The Aerobic Worksh
Aerobic Classes every S
February from 1-2 p.m.
everyone � non memb
Prizes and a Free rV
given away each Sundc
to the American Heart
The Aerobic Wc
Located Downft
417 Evans St.7:
Aer
BEfi
NIGH! i
Satui il.il
AN EVENIN
THE T V
WRAI 's own l
Raleigh's Hot
v ith Mapp� Horn (rod
vnih MM drat! 12 00 pin hen
Plus IdiW s Mystery (
ihamr to vin r Bl l'l
totaled in the Carolina
H.m i I orgci W �i!ii
& fndo ifchl v Vhai
with latld i oi Sptni
. � i
l��pi�1 �WMif�h .guru
mm
?






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
fiV�g-�
� .�
4
JANUARY II, 1985
WW6 mm-
i
peech
yen
consign
a ir-
"pen,
- the
.Tied
t i ves
infor-
. coupl-
The
govern-
oi the
the
s often
is w ell -
press cor-
has
d or
dent
- able
abili-
and televi-
he way
e public
rice and
resj ' sible
and
He hav in-
reflon
Mr Reagan
end
nue. The
almost
free
u govcrn-
� Reagan
ead
i Steam
being is
�' step in
with
� the
.
pro-
excellent
in one
nows
nate
binf 'he last
� bom child
. ape the
� : grasping in-
ears out
.hes its
from the
� device
ith struggle is
"lething
it Such a
Is like
ago when
. .artered We
e days.
an progress
-more than
per year in this
analogy that pro-life
'Tie Americans,
�' - not thought of
in hemgs, they were
�V first, a
I ed trouble
al b their foes,
-cure full human
tims of the old,
course, eventually
after a hard fight.
g business now in this
1' involves thousands of peo-
: megabucks a vested interest
�ight back. But the pro-life peo-
i e earn nothing for their efforts as they
jork to save the lives of the un-
Jr itected In hope, they look to the
upreme Court, which in the next few
may get several new justices
euicated to using the law to extend
nstitutionaJ guarantees of life to un-
rn Americans.
!
J
Killing Fields 'Powerful
1 would like to thank the
movie committee for selecting
to show a movie so powerful
and emotional as The Killing
Fields. This movie reinforced
in mc the horrors that war can
inflict on people people
who have nothing to do with
the war itself, innocent by-
standers While watching this
mv thoughts turned to Central
America and the conflict that
is brewing down there. It made
me realize how quickl) a war
can break out, unsuspectingly,
even in an area where sup-
posedly one is not being plann-
ed
1 remember seeing the suf-
fering on the taces ol the Cam-
bodian people as they lie on
the hospital floors waiting for
eone to stop their bleeding
or ease the pain from their
and their confusion
he tried to evacuate
their homes to flee from the
bombing. 1 am happy to know
that there are groups in the
I nited States and around the
Id that realize the horrors
ol war and are working con-
stantly to ensure another
doesn't begin. One of the best
known groups in the U.S. is
War Resister League, 604 W.
Chapel Hill St Durham. This
group is actively working to
ease the tensions in Central
America, and 1 pray that they
are successful because I don't
think there is anyone on our
campus that could escape be-
ing affected if the present ad-
ministration decided that
direct conflict was the only
way for them to achieve their
goal o overthrowing the
Nicaraguan Government and
setting up another Banana
Republic.
I ysa Hieber
Greenville
Wolverines Howl
This past Monday, the SGA
I egislature rejected the con-
stitution of the Wolverines, a
new lv-formed conservative
group. Some misunderstan-
dings must now be cleared up.
Our constitution was writ-
ten in a witty, tongue-in-cheek
fashion. It represents the fun
our group wants to have while
we pursue our "cause which
we are serious about.
It seems odd that the SGA
could take such action. The
responsibility of the legislators
is to approve submitted con-
stitutions which meet all
guidelines, as ours did. It's too
bad some legislators, 13 to be
exact, lack a sense of humor.
So now we will rewrite our
constitution excluding any sec-
tions which have any prospect
of being anything other than
boring, which seems required.
However, the nature of our
group will not change.
Mr. or Miss Legislator, all
we ask of you is to be
recognized. Let the
Wolverines exist!
Gordon Walker
Jr. Economics
ST. PETER'S SCHOOL
Grades K-6
OPEN HOUSE, 1-3 p.m.
Sunday, February 3,1985
Larcenies From Vehicles Continue
me on the ECU campus was
somewhat limited during the past
week, although larcenies from
vehicles continue. The crime log
for Jan. 24 � 29 includes;
24, 11:45 a.m. � Mark
1 ayloi of Belk dorm reported the
arceny of a bank card from his
room 8 p.m. Jedd Brooks of
ycock dorm reported that Ran-
ph Farrow was distributing
advertisements in A y c o c k
without authorization.
25, 15 j m Daniel
Walsh of 318 Slay dorm reported
being assaulted by an unknown
black male in the lobby of Slay.
Jan. 26. II a.m. � A vehicle
owned by Bradley Frey of Scott
dorm was reported to be broken
into and two speakers were
reported stolen.
Jan. 2 2:49 a.m. � Rand
Hamilton of Scott dorm reported
a non-student had been sexually
assaulted in room 155 of Aycoek
dorm. 1:50 p.m. - - Larry Berry
of Belk dorm reported a larceny
from his vehicle parked southeast
of Belk dorm.
Jan 28. 11:25 p.m. � George
Tutwiler of Scott dorm was ar-
rested for damage to real proper-
ty in Scott dorm.
Jan. 29, 2:50 a.m. � Darren
Jones was arrested for DWI on
Campus Drive. 6:30 a.m. �
Shawn Beady of Belk dorm was
arrested for damage to personal
property west of Scott dorm.
1985-86 Applications A vailable
Meet our Teachers and Parents
Learn more about our programs
St. Peter's School 2605 E. Fourth St Greenville
Phone: 752-3901 Days 752-3529, Evenings
Happy
Birthday
Carlo
Love You,
Greg
JpHave A Hearty
The Aerobic Workshop will be holding
Aerobic Classes every Sunday afternoon in
I February from 1-2 p.m. $2.00 Drop-in for
everyone � non members welcome.
Prizes and a Free Membership will be
given away each Sunday. All proceeds go
to the American Heart Association.
The Aerobic Workshop
Located Downtown Greenville
417 Evans St.757-1608
Aerobics!
BEfiU'S
NIGHT CLUB
Saturday
AN EVENING WITH
THE TACK
WRAL's own Tack from
Raleigh's Hot 101 FM!
� . � � The Tack � � � � � � in Beach Music
ii ; iriet) Si ' Gt . Saturday Night!
Dooi S I rn .it 7 (Mt i in
,iii tiapp) Hour from 7 00 ' M)
with Vic drdfl S2. IM) pitchers A. 1 lor 1 Highballs
Plus lack n Mystery Contest with your
ihanir to win FABl lOl S PRIZES
A see Raleigh s l Radio Personality
Nighti lub Beau s of cow
Imatrri in thearolina Fastentre Phone 7,5b b401
' - � I tin ,
Don t Forget Wedaesda) Niht Indies lock I'p
& rriria Night s H ham Bam l-nd o( the Week am
with l)adr1 ool Spinning All Vour I aotite Hits"
OPEN 2a HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvill
l "Q
'ferns ana Prices
Effective thru sat
et 2 198S
KROCERINC
KROGER SKIM,
2co LOWFAT OR
Whole
Milk
2 Gal.
Ctn
ASSORTED VARIETY
KROGER DELUXE
Natural Flavor
ice Cream
HtSKHH
KROGER REGULAR
OR LOWFAT
Cottage
Cheese
HUNDREDS OF DOLLAR DAZE VALUES THROUGHOUT
THE STORE, ALL WEEK LONG! SEE OUR 8 PACE
COLOR CIRCULAR FOR DETAILS
24 Oz.
an.
KROGER OLD FASHIONED
white �v
Bread. 3
16 Oz
LVS
f
Vi Gal.
ctn.
PREVIOUSLY FROZE
20-30 CT. HEADLESS'
Jumbo
Shrimp
REGULAR OR UNSCENTED
LAUNDRY
Tide
Detergent
20 Oz.
Boxes
HOLLY FARMS CUT UP
MIXED FRYER PARTS
OR GRADE A
Whole
Fryers
"N
KROGER GRADE A
Large
Eggs
DOZ
V
J
Lb.
Lb.
LIMIT
3 PKGS
PLEASE
THIN CRUST PEPPERONI & MUSHROOM OR
SAUSAGE & MUSHROOM
Deli-Fresh j $C50
SANDY MAC
All Meat
Bologna
CALIFORNIA
Navel
Oranges
Lb.
WE WILL DOUBLE
MFGS. COUPONS (UP
TO 50c FACE VALUE) FOR
EVERY 10�� PURCHASE
NOW THRU FEB. 2, 1985. PLEASE
SEE DETAILS IN-STORE
EXAMPLE
;10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS
I20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS
1100 PURCHASE50 COUPONS
EASTERN
RED ROME OR
Red Delicious
Apples
RIPE
Golden
Bananas
Lb






IMF KASI (4KOI IMAN
Entertainment
Doonesburv
JANi;AK II, IVh� Page f
Monk Candid Concerning His Philosophies
B TONY BROWN
Staff Wrllr.
A mysterious visitor from the East appeared in Greenville last
weekend but it wasn't "Karnac the Magnificent It was Bud-
dhist monk Thubten Pende, in town to teach others in the ways of
Buddhist practices.
Once a University of Wisconsin-Whitewater football player nam-
ed Jim Dougherty, his search for "clear answers to profound ques-
tions" led him on a wide-ranging quest for those answers after
graduation.
Thev didn"t come easv. though lust he traveled to Ireland to
isit the scene of his roots, but wasn't satisfied. He then headed
cast, with stops in Europe, Greece, Israel and Afghanistan without
finding the answers.
Dougherty finally crossed into India and ended up at Dharam-
sala - the home of the Dalai lama, who is the spiritual leader of
the Tibetan Buddhist refugees who tied China in 1959 after a con-
flict with the Communist government.
�s a result of a three-month introductory course in Buddhism,
Dougherty found a lot of answers and became Thubten Pende.
"It was beautiful there said Pende. "The elevation is 6,000 feet,
with 18.00(1 foot snow-covered mountains. There were 40 foot tall
rhododendrons also
"1 decided I wanted to continue learning, so 1 took six more
months of lessons, then m visa expired he said. "I went to Kat-
mandu in Nepal and took a one-month intensive course in a Bud-
dhist monastery
Pende then spent about five months meditating on Mt. Everest.
"I found it was the most natural and profound way for me to live
he said "1 began applying what I had learned and began organiz-
ing courses myself
Pende then became coordinator of the educational department at
a residential Buddhist college in northern England. After a three
vear stav, he took a similar position at the Nolanda monastery in
France.
The life of a Buddhist monk is not an easy one. according to
Pende "We begin personal practice (meditation) at 5 a.m then
begin group philosophy studies at 7 a.m he stated.
"In afternoon classes we studs toward a 'geshe which is like a
doctorate. This lasts from 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. After that we gather
for rituals and discussion, then back to private practice
Fred Greene
Basie Orchestrs o Visit
The world renowned Count
Basie Orchestra will appear in
Wright Auditorium on Tuesday,
Feb. 12 The concert, which is
sponsored by the Student Union
Special Concerts Committee, will
begin at 8 p.m.
The band is under the musical
direction of Eric Dixon, a Basie
saxaphonist for most of the last
23 years; the musicians, all but a
few of whom played under Basie,
include saxaphonist Kenny Hing,
trombonist Dennis Wilson and
trumpeters Sonny Cohn and
Johnny Coles.
The Count Basie Orchestra is a
legend in its own time, evident
from the band's continued
popularity since the death of
Count Basie. When Count Basie
died and it was decided to keep
his band going, there was a
widespread feeling that this
would be a futile effort. Basie's
brilliance and subtle direction
were so essential, reasoning went,
that without him, the band,
which had become a polished but
predictable machine, would have
no distinction. However, this has
not been the case.
Beyond this rejuvenation is the
guiding hand of Freddie Greene,
the guitarist who joined Basie in
1937 and has been in the band
ever since. Greene, dean of the
band, describes his role as
"spiritual director He keeps an
alert eye on everything that is
happening.
The pianist who has taken
Count Basie's place is Tee Car-
son. Carson manages to suggest
Basie's manners without adop-
ting it and has done an admirable
job on the keyboard.
Tickets for the concert are on
sale in the Central Ticket Office
and ae $3 for ECU students, $5
for faculty and staff and $7 for
the public. A special rate is
available for groups of 20 or
more, purchased in advance. All
tickets sold at the door will be $7.
For additional information, con-
tact the Central Ticket Office at
757-6611, ext. 266.
Lung Assoc. Offers Aid
"The American lung Associa-
tion's Freedom From Smoking
method of stopping smoking is
the most ideal method I've
found said Joan Boudreaux,
clinic instructor for the six-week
smoking withdrawal clinic she
plans to lead on Feb. 4 at the
American Lung Association's
Building (112 Pitt Street).
"By the end of the the third
week of the six-week program,
smokers have broken the
strongest part of their habit and
replaced it with new more
healthful ones Boudreaux said.
She believes that people using the
20-day method have a better suc-
cess rate for a number of reasons:
1. They learn about their smok-
ing pattern 2. They are given
specific methods by which to
change their smoking pattern 3.
They learn about a system that's
designed to help reinforce their
new habit, and 4. They learn the
value of having supportive
classmates.
Boudreaux, who quit by a
20-day method herself several
years ago, teaches the smoking-
withdrawal clinic. Although the
instruction is free, the materials
cost $15.
"Through the day we tend to chores such as working in the
garden. Sometimes we have jobs in town to help pay the costs of
the monastery. We end the day with private practice from 11 n m
to 12 p.m
Sometimes the monks travel to teach others how to achieve hap-
piness through meditation and other Buddhist practices That's
why Pende was invited to Greenville by Don Brown, whom he had
met in the East.
In a series of sessions over a three-dav period, Pende introduced
some local residents to the art of meditation and Buddhist
ideology. The mam focus was on The Six Perfecting Practices.
"Happiness is an internal mental experience said Pende, "so it
requires mental causes - generosity, ethics, patience, effort, con-
centration and wisdom
"Wisdom is broken down into three further types he added
"Conventional, ultimate and knowledge of how to benefit. We
believe that happiness is achieved by balancing internal and exter-
nal forces
The central point of Buddhism, as explained by Pende. is the
achievement of Nirvana, a god-like state with no problems It is
achieved by ridding oneself of bad "karma
Such karma is a result of breaking one of the laws of Buddhism
which tor monks, means adhering to 253 rules, chief of which is
celibacy. Not bringing harm to others is next most important.
"We rid ourselves of bad karnv. through good deeds, meditation
and repeating mantras Pende ated. "Mantras can be repeated
100,000 times for some offenses. N ou count them yourself, because
it's your soul that it affects
An example of a mantra is " m mani padme hung which is
Sanskrit, the language of India. "It has no literal translation he
said. "Each individual's voice has a different vibration. Those
vibrations also have different meanings
The purpose of ridding onesell ol bad karma through such prac-
tices is to end the cycle of dead) and rebirth, thus achieving Nir-
vana, according to Pende.
Although Buddhists avoid harming animals if possible, it's not
an absolute rule, as he explained it The monks, for example, eat
meat. Pende explained this contradictory position bv stating that
this was "okay as long as the) (the monks) had no direct involve-
ment with the death
A further point Pende explained was how the Buddhist idea of
reincarnation works. "It takes intelligence to rid oneself of bad
karma he said, "therefore it would be very difficult for animals
other than humans to achieve Nirvana. For this reason it is most
likely that a human would be reborn in the same form he said
Exactly how an animal such as a chicken would ever gain human
form and thus be able to achieve Nirvana was unclear.
"The main cause of unhappmess in the external world results
from expecting too much from worldly pleasures, according to
Pende. "This is why we work to eliminate the root cause of ur
problems, which is ignorance of reality
"What people perceive as real isn"t fie said "I ook at sexual
intercourse. What is it9 Only a momentarv pleasure How long
does that last? Sexual bliss is the greatest exaggeration
"People are so caught up in greed, hatred and confusion that
they can't see the truth said Pende. "Thev're just trving to gain
material things
n't necessanlv have to be Buddhist
tors rid themselves of bad karma
le he said.
designed to give basic instruction
like meditation through Buddhist
practices.
"Meditation starts with concentrating on an object he said.
"Then you narrow that down to one part of that object, continuing
to gain a focus on it. After mastering the elementary steps, it is then
applied to mental thought processes
There is far more to Buddhism than this oversimplication of
course, but these are some of the basic ideas of this complex
religion.
Pende also stated his beliefs regarding the situation with Ra
jneesh Bagwan, the leader of a group of "Buddhists" m Oregon.
(Bagwan established a base near Antelope, then took over control
of the town by registering large numbers of his red-clad followers).
"In my opinion, it's onl a personalitv cult Pende stated
"Bagwan moved from overseas to evade taxes 1 don't know all the
tacts, but it seems to me he doesn't follow Buddhist practices
"The 50 brand new Mercedes his followers have given him is not
necessarily against our beliefs � it's what he does with them. If he
sold them and used the monev to benefit others, that uould make a
difference Pende said.
"But who needs 50 cars?"
According to Pende, one do
to work off had karma. "D
through their work, for exan ;
Pende's teaching courses m
on how one can attain such
Professor To Lecture On Legal Case
By LISA McDONAI.D
sitff Wrlur
"Justice Vindicated: The Case
o t William L. Harper,
1930-1932 a historical case
which changed the norms of the
Southern judicial system, will be
presented by Dr. H. Lewis Suggs
on Feb.4 at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center's Auditorium
244.
Dr. Suggs, assistant professor
of history at Clemson University,
has come a long way from his
home in Winterville, N.C. After
graduating from W. H. Robinson
High School in 1959 with a class
of only 32 students, Suggs went
on to N.C. Central University to
begin his undergraduate work.
He received his PhD from the
University of Virginia.
Suggs believes his rural
background has a great deal to do
with his academic success.
"When you emanate from the
soil, you work harder he said.
When asked if his place of
birth (Winterville) had much to
do with his chosen specialization
in southern and black history,
Suggs replied that ever since his
childhood, he had wanted to
study the history of this region.
"I always knew I would he
said.
Suggs' latest research has been
on the case of William L. Harper,
a case that, in 1932, began the
change of race relations in the
southern jusicial system. Accor-
ding to Suggs, this case showed,
for the first time, that "We are
all accorded equal justice under
the law
The case involved a white
woman, Dorothy Skaggs, who
accused Harper, an indigent
black man, of raping her in Nor-
folk, Va. In his first trial, Harper
was convicted of the crime. But
in an outstanding move, the
white community of Norfolk
demanded a retrial for the black
man. He was then acquitted of
the crime, and in an un-
precedented act in southern
history, Skaggs was convicted of
purgery. It was the first time a
white woman's word was
disallowed in court, Suggs said.
The importance of this case.
Suggs believes, is that "there is a
larger issue here" "The entire
judicial svstem was at stake. The
issue of law and racial relations in
the South was forever changed
he said. Suggs cited the issue of
blacks serving on juries as one
way the courts were affected by
this case.
More can be learned about this
historical case bv attending the
lecture, which is free to all. The
lecture is sponsored by the Stu-
dent Union Minority Arts Com-
mittee and the ECU Department
of History's Richard C. Todd-
Phi Alpha Theta Series.
"The Diviners a folk tale of rural American farm life, will be playing Feb. 6-9 at 8:15 p.m. in McCinni Theatre.
Julian Worthy Of The Lennon Name With 'Valotte' LP
By DANIEL MAI RER
Amitini Knlum Kdltor
The song on the radio carried a
haunting melody. It was a new
release, yet it sounded strangely
familiar. The musical style was
simple, but extremely effective. I
was quickly reminded of John
Pennon's "Imagine a prime ex-
ample of the strength such
musical simplicity can have.
Lennon, in fact, seemed to be
written all over this song. His
keyboard techniques, musical
phrasings, and (as I was soon to
discover) his vocal style were all
evident. At first, I thought it may
have been one of John's unreleas-
ed recordings. But I recalled how
Yoko Ono had milked those dry
some time ago.
I finally realized what I was
listening to when I heard the
young singer's voice for the first
time � "Sitting on a pebble by
the river playing guitar It was
uncanny how Julian Lennon
could sound so much like his
father, John. At 21 years of age
Julian was displaying an awsome
talent that rivaled his legendary
father's.
I was really affected by
Julian's song "Valotte the title
track to his new album. More so
than most I think, because I once
knew a good friend of Julian's. It
was about the time of John's
death that my music instructor
told me about one of his more ad-
vanced students, Julian Lennon.
It seems Julian had done a lit-
tle recording of his own in his
father's private studio atop the
Dakota. Valuing my instructors
opinion, as he did, Julian played
a song for him. My instructor sat
on the piano bench next to Julian
and listened closely to the arange-
ment. And as he closed his eyes,
he told me, he could hear no one
but John. He discribed the ex-
perience as eerie, almost frighten-
ing.
"Put that away, Julian he
said. "It'll be worth something
some day In the years past, I
have often wondered if it was the
song, or the talent he was referr-
ing to.
Since John's death, many peo-
ple have exploited the Lennon
name in the form of books and
"tribute albums Julian, on the
other hand, has more respect for
the name and talent his father
gave him. Of his fledgling carreer
he told Time, "I'm doing this
because of my love of music
It seems Julian has come to
realize the "worth" of his talent,
and uses it accordingly. When it
comes to integrity, John Lennon
is a tough act to follow, but
Julian is keeping up the pace
quite nicely.
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Page 6
I
ophies
id oneself of bad
lifficull for animals
1 01 this reason u is mosl
form he said
evei gain human
t I K ic.tr
. nal world results
asures, according to
he ooi cause of our
! ook at sexual
easure How long
n
nfusion that
' irvmg to gain
he Buddhist
' had karma
struction
igl Buddhist
Ct he said
tntinuing
is then
a 'ii of
�:p!e
Kj
-ok lowers), tted
�a all the
practices !i him is not
with them If he
at would make a
ol Case
iggs said.
I this case.
hat "there is a
The entire
stem was a; stake The
I racial relations in
rever changed
he issue of
iries as one
- were affected bv
be learned about this
1 - � lending the
ill. The
b) the Stu-
rts Com-
c EC1 Department
: C. Todd-
a Series.
in MrCinnis Theatre.
alotte' LP
I. It'll be worth something
some day In the years past. I
have often wondered if it was the
ong. or the talent he was referr-
Since John's death, many peo-
ple have exploited the Lennon
name in the form of books and
'tribute albums Julian, on the
�ther hand, has more respect for
the name and talent his father
fctave him. Of his fledgling carreer
he told Time, "I'm doing this
necause of my love of music
It seems Julian has come to
-ealie the "worth" of his talent,
and uses it accordingly. When it
.ornes to integrity. John Lennon
s a tough act to follow, but
Julian is keeping up the pace
quite nicely.
k
Doonesbury
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUAK i 1,1985 7
What the Competition
Doesn't Want You to Know!
AT TELERENT
You get this much 19
inch COLOR TV for only
$19.95 per month rental.
(Weekly Rentals Available)
At Competition A
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average rental
price is
45 per mo.
At Competition B
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average renta
price is
49 per mo.
So, why should you pay more for
19 inches of color TV
tele1!
Telerent also rents VCR's, console TV's and
home stereo systems at comparable savings.
TELE RENT TV
Ask about our
Dudget Purchase Program
2905 East 10th St.
758-9102 ,S)
ECU KING Sand QUEEN S
EIGHT BALL
CHARITY CLASSIC
SPONSORED BY
SIGMA NU FRATERNITY
0er SI.000 00 in prizes More fun than skill
Singles and Mixed Doubles Registration Fee S2.00
Pick up registration forms at Sigma Nu Fraternity
or 420 Club Cotanche St.
ECU STUDENTS ONLYMUST BE 19 YEARS OLD OR OLDER
All Fees go to the National Kidnev Foundation of N C
Listen to WRQR 94.7 FM and WGHB for details
Play Begins February 4th
and Ends February 23rd
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nI AR
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to rui oneself of bad
ven difficull for animals
Foi this reason it is most
same form he said.
O cam human
K'iear
t rial world results
according to
� i cause ot our
"I ook at sexual
How long
infusion that
ying I
� be Buddhist
bad karma
ask insti iction
ough Buddhist
bjeel he said.
ect, continuing
steps, it is then
s mplk at ion of
as ol this complex
Ra
Idhists" �
xk over control
. � followers).
Pcr.Ac slated
� all the
pi act ices
- i him is not
vith hem If he
kc a
tal Case
.
� iggs said.
' this case,
"there is a
"The entire
as ai stake. The
icial relations in
ever changed
ted he issue of
uries as one
were affected by
i be learned about this
:ase by anending the
to all. The
by the Sm-
arts Com-
I I Department
hard C. Todd-
i Series.
,i,ip v
in Mrdinnis Theatre.
alotte' LP
� "It'll be worth something
me day In the years past. I
have often wondered if it was the
-ong, or the talent he was referr-
ing to.
Since John's death, many peo-
ple have exploited the Lennon
name in the form of books and
"tribute albums Julian, on the
other hand, has more respect for
the name and talent his father
gave him. Of his fledgling carreer
he told Time. "I'm doing this
because of my love of music
It seems Julian has come to
realize the "worth" of his talent,
and uses it accordingly. When it
comes to integrity, John Lennon
is a tough act to follow, but
Julian is keeping up the pace
quite nicely.
�.

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BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUAK , 1,1985 7
What the Competition
Doesn't want you to Know!
AT TELERENT
You get this much 19
inch COLOR TV for only
$19.95 per month rental.
(Weekly Rentals Available)
At Competition A
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average rental
price is
$45
per mo.
At Competition B
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average rental
price is
$49
per mo.
So, why should you pay more for
19 inches of color TV
ItELE1!
Telerent also rents VCR's, console TV's and
home stereo systems at comparable savings.
TELERENT TV
Ask about our
Budget Purchase Program
2905 East 10th St.
758-9102 (S)
ECU KING Sand QUEENS
EIGHT BALL
CHARITY CLASSIC
SPONSORED BY
SIGMA NU FRATERNITY
Over $1,000.00 in prizes More fun than skill
Singles and Mixed Doubles Registration Fee $2.00
Pick up registration forms at Sigma Nu Fraternity
or 420 Club Cotanche St.
ECU STUDENTS ONLY MUST BE 19 YEARS OLD OR OLDER
All Fees go to the National Kidney Foundation of N C
Listen to WRQR 94.7 FM and WGHB for details
V P'ay Begins February 4th .
and Ends February 23rd
rue e�nt is MWM it r�� uaci.ua mcoiwx Man ��MMttl m
A g-j. .

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V






I Ml I M i Ki M INI N
Sports
Grady Tough Defender For Harrison's Sues
$!&
Bv sconOOPr K
u Sports ,t ��
Despite a slow ECU start,
sophomore guard William Grady
is enjoying a fine 1984 n season
leading the Pirates in scoring with
a 16.6 ppg average
1 he 6 2, 185 pound Paterson,
N I native w a - lei's
designated sixth man during his
freshman yeai He filled the role
admirably by averaging 7 6 ppg
and 2.6 rebounds He wa- a
startei in si game- ovei the
1983 84n season, but saw action
in all 2S games
His 213 total point- wa- second
highest to C urt anderhorst He
mond) to in points, and Yates
(Carlos, a two time 1-V South
selection from George Mason) to
tour ot 14 shooting trom the
the Pirate;
in games as a
freshman. He scored in double
. .res in nine of E I 's last ! 5
game- 1 his year, he has been in
hie figures in 14 of the last 15
games.
I hroughout the first hall i �l
s4 s; season, Grady has been
a consistent scorer His defense
has al-o been impressive He says
has alwavs like his defensive
H illiarn "Miad (.ratlv
field He al a gi . a gn ai
effort
irady said he enjoys the
challenge ol tak . ality op
position
"I feel that it I work ha
than the opposition, then i'll
success? t irady remarked
' 1 hat's w hat 1 rea I �
ombined foi a
$2 ppg Mil
differing
complemeni eacl - �
"I'm mon
irady said "II
; k '
pen trati i pen tl . ;
our big g
I he Pira
mittment from ri
ed during the N
ing pei I. He a
H i g 1
coach Dom Pi : Pii
w e r e able to .
the star gua el
assistant coa I ! Bai
i.ed u n. I
the same 1. .
While in I .
avei aged 15 ppj
.�� i

�� e was a
Co.
sele � . �
k and
on the Mr. Husi
.
i
41!
iiv -
on a lav up against lame- Madi-un
nit; scorer tur the Pirate- this seas
m
"1 iike defense, it's the besttoward to I -Psthe
� my game Grady said.Alter being a si� 11 � i m
. to score ofl my defense ItI iPa
ises me to play good:� � table with hi- i aWi11 � P irai
nsetarter HI
Grady 1 t an lied lefeitarting lineuin a
i ring tornce 1�' V.
EC I assistant I omrole makes him a1 1
Barissepetetive playei.
"He's always b ai � their()n the ffei le f Pirau�
Bai . aj : "Hebasketba GradvWe've got i
New man i ohn, an al'anderhorsi with n l � 1 I
from Riscoring punch, he I a hav e hen'
ECU Cheerleaders Selected
U) -
w
I
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I uci
.

i�

: ; ,
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��
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' w e
-
EC AC 5
Soccer Team Wins
Elon Indoor Tourney
1(1 soccer team w i
� the El : Ind cer
amen; las' weekend, the
won five ol -even game-
1
c' MO,
MephenBrody
route to a5 2 victoryover
:iffer( ollegein the champion-
p
Fhe 1 Pirate goals were the
he tournament.
Junioi back Pat Golden receiv-
ed the most valuable defensive
player award Joining Golden on
the Pirate roster are captain
David Skeffington, Jeff Kime,
1 arry Bennett, Torn Rechner,
B bby Ana-ta-io, Mike Murray,
Matt Hermes. John Farlow,
Kevin Biglev, Jaime Reibel and
(ieorge Padgrony.
Ihev did a super job E I
coach Stephen Brody said "1 ast
year the team was young, but
now we are more experienced and
they're starting to come
around
The field contained 24 teams
w:th the first day being used tor
seeding purposes After losing
'heir first two games to UNC-C
I Brevard, the Pirates went on
Ain their next five.
I hey defeated Elon 6 2, before
.Ming out Appalachian 1 0.
er defeating High Pointol
ECU defeated Pfeiffer han-
to take home the title.
The next tournament for ECU
is r-eb 9 in Minges Coliseum,
when the Pirates host the
Budweiser-F.CU Invitational
Tournament ECU is the defen-
ding champions The tournament
will being going on all day long,
so come on out and support the
Pirates
'
� �
� � tcement wa
ween S and Nc 20, b
"Tl i
ft
M
e worked
r�out two he said
� � � � u : be tl tight
I he Pii ate a : pan icipai
. e
lu gained this yeai I
their fit
pet ii
. igen ml e ei �ed itl a
good fini h w keep ua
gl
Pirate male :heerlead

�� Perry, I.K Ell.
San Wl id, Eri v
ris, Chucl
-� re and Bi an 1
Fema . lad me bet
Karen H dl 1 eigh Bi i N I
Reave Sara Kelly, Susanne Ban
ai : s isan Han
I he tean ached hv former
Pirate cheerleadei Jennifei
( oopei
I H HumhcM K I fh.�c, 1 ,t
I he F. I cheerleaders were recently chosen as 22nd besl in a competition involving more than n-
Lady Pirates Battle Seahawks
Lisa Squirewell (31) rebounds.
Bv RK K Mc ORM(
I p-Tl Y dtlr
I he ECU women basketball
team will try to remain unbeal
in the E( AC South, and ret
sole possessi � oi first place in
the conference standings, when
they dc; UNC-Wilmingi
tonight in Minges Coliseum,
The I adv Pirates, who are cur-
rently on an eij . une winning
streak, are 5-0 in league action.
The I adv Seahawks are
three-wav tie for second place
They have a 4-1 conference
record along with James Madison
and Richmond.
Wilmington's onlv league loss
was bv one point to the Universi-
ty ol Richmond in a game they
led bv as main as 16 points
The game promises to be a
high-scoring affair as both teams
like to run. On the season, the
1 ady Seahawks average 75 points
per game, while ECU is averaging
72.3.
UNC-W is led by senior center
Ciwen Austin. She leads the
ECAC South in scoring and re-
bounding, averaging 20 points
and 12.6 rebounds per game.
Austin also leads the league in
blocked shots (2.2 per game).
ECU coach Emily Man waring
feels the key for ECU will be how
well they defend against Austin.
"They rely so heavily on
Austin Man waring said. "If we
can keep her from getting her
points and keep her off the
boards, we should be able to shut
them down
While Austin is definitely the
leader for UNC-W, they do have
other talented performers.
Elizabeth Bell and Phyllis Ed-
wards, both freshman, are in
.
-
a team, v
the conference
percentage ng 51
n the fit d
Four of the i : I
l-goal
league play
Seahawks Bel ' � 57.
e con fei
The 1 ady P rates,
limited the.
perce I I
a variety ol del
e oach Manwaring fee
have their wo: k i
against w ilmington.
"They are such a
shooting team, we are -
have to keep pre
shooters. We cant a!tore, to leave
them open Manwaring sa d
"For us to win vve are going
have to plav sound defense, a
hold them below so percent fi
the field
Although I�(. I has been sue
cessful as of late, Manwarii
run totally pleased with the
defensive play of her squad
"What (offense) the other
team sets up in, determines what
type oi defense we plav she
said. "I'd rather us determine
what the other team does, K.
just hasn't worked out
way
The I adv Pirates, whose las;
loss in ECAC South plav wa- a
58-54 defeat at (. ieorge Mason on
Feb. 12. 1984. have a u danced
scoring attack with fou plavers
in double figures
Senior Anita Anderson heads
the foursome, averaging 1J 4
ppg. Anderson has scored in dou-
ble figures in each o the past 13

Manwa
i
ori
Manwaring
seas
"Wei
k i
I. "N
ea
. - .e have
Mai - � kes ram's
- siting .
Seal
'The way we tying, 1
know I . ivcrs
on the
� hereas w liming
have three a: any one time
n Saturday I v I ice
S o u t h I in a n o n
conference gam Minges (
iseum.
I he I dU Bra
bv senior Man Kiinew-ki who
average- 1J 4 ppg I he other I
starters foi I M are all freshman
Miracle
0 Pi) �
on it


H
. i,�

1
Intramur
Bowlini;
Bv If �NN
The purpose
-n all s
staff arxnr
Registration
CI.FAR4

IV.
s
;
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5
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��PLUS A WHO
(DOWNTOWr
SPOBTWIO OOOOS
1






s Bucs
�: a motivator
"Good things
vMth hard
i fot his ex-
� nation
H who hasn't
u ' Bansse
these
ever � both
he court
.wellent
lick first
. . and plavs
x ECU
ronment.
� all his
inge from
� . avt that
weather
.
mm a�
the
:h a
some EC AC
a .til a
d
� high
ed him
four
"He reall
He got
a:d to
years o(
from William
seen next when
I a fax, Va.
South member
cb. 2.
1
on involving more than teams.
Seahawks
Bragg ai d 1 orainne
! and 11.4
Junior for-
ell, the team's
iding mder with 8.4 re-
also in dou-
figure ring with 10.0
a.
i Pirates, who have
beaten each con-
tcept Wilmington.
been beaten since they
" ' ' ision to
larohna on Jan. 2. 1985
�n:ng streak) sure
in the morning
nwaring said. "1 have
Jem feeling, it's not a
' whether or not we
We knou if e work
in even game on
ing said thai the earlv
es didn't bother her
e don't count in the
rence standings.
v" lr t0 gain experience in
-ion-conference games she
I "No other conference team
played anv where near as dif-
ilt a schedule as we have "
Manwaring likes her team's
wees against the siting Ladv
seahawks.
"The way we're playing I
� m 111 have five good players
the court she added
"Whereas Wilmington may only
have three at any one time "
On Saturday ECU w,ll face
South Florida in a non-
conference game in Minges Col-
iseum.
The Lady Brahmans are lead
by senior Man, Khnewski who
averages i3.4pPg. The other four
starters for USF are all frcshman
Miracle Man
i
9 TML�TCAROUMANanuaRY 31. 1985
(UPI) � Doug Flutie took the
football with the letters "USFL"
on its side from a shelf in the of-
fice of his attorney, Bob Woolf.
"This is the ball they use?" the
Heisman Trophy winning
quarterback said in amazement
"It's small
Then the two men posed for
Pictures as Woolf shifted the
undennflated ball and asked the
photographer, "are you getting
USFL' in?"
Flutie, the United States Foot-
ball League's newest advertise-
ment, will start getting used to
the league and its regulation size
ball when he reports to the New
Jersey Generals' training camp in
Orlando. Fla.
The Boston College quarter-
back, whose exciting style thrilled
the nation last season, said he
agreed to terms with the USFL's
Generals. He is expected to sign a
contract that should make him
the highest paid pro football
player and the highest paid
rookie in any sport.
Woolf refused to give details of
the agreement, reportedly worth
at least seven-million dollars for
at least five years.
Flutie apparently received no
offers from the National Football
I eague. whose teams were wary
of how Flutie's high price tag
would affect their salary struc-
ture.
The 5-foot-9 Flutie. major col-
lege football's all-time leader in
total offense and passing yar-
dage said he had "no regrets at
about not playing in the
more established league, whose
scouts once questioned his pro
potential because of his height.
He also said he didn't consider
the USFL less of a challenge.
Woolf declined to say if Flutie
would be paid the full amount of
the contract if the USFL were to
fold. However, he said earlier in
the negotiations that the Generals
seemed willing to give that
guarantee.
New Jersey's investment seem-
ed to be paying immediate
dividends for the struggling
3-year-old league.
"The phones have been ringing
all afternoon said Jim Squires,
manager of the Generals' ticket
office in East Rutherford.
"We're planning to bring in
almost everybody this weekend,
some on overtime, to work the
phones he added. "We figure
that once the news gets all
around, a lot of people will be
calling about tickets
"It's going to be great said
Generals' owner Donald Trump.
"Having Doug Flutie will be
fabulous not only for the
Generals, but for their fans
Flutie followed running backs
Herschel Walker of the Generals
and Mike Rozier, who played
with Pittsburgh, as the third con-
secutive Heisman Trophy winner
the NFL has lost to the USFL.
Buffalo has the first pick in the
April 30 NFL draft. Bills
General Manager Terry Bledshoe '
had said Flutie was among the
W A -m ,��-���� �� till!
Intramural Talkshow;
Bowling Begins Soon
Bv JFAWFTTFTFnTu V?i, . . .
By JEANNETTE
SUfT Wrlr
Throughout the semester, the
intramural department has men-
tioned the Tennis Shoe Talkshow
as a source of intramural scores,
updates and highlights. Some
may wonder, what is a Tennis
Shoe Talkshow?
Sponsored by WZMB � 91.3
FM, the Tennis Shoe Talkshow is
a five-minute program produced
by the intramural department.
The purpose of the show is to in-
form all students, faculty and
staff about intramural activities.
R-cftUtration updates, game
highlights and scores, along with
exciting interviews of top
athletes, sport clubs and IRS
employees make up the format.
The show airs every Tuesday
and Thursday at 2:30 and 5:30,
making it easy for everyone to
tune in and hear the latest IRS
news. Your host, Stephanie
Luke, production manager of
W'ZMB, adds her own enchan-
ting style and music to the pro-
gram � making it informative
and enjoyable to listeners. The
program is intended to quickly
inform the listeners about all in-
tramural events. Move your dial
to 91.3 FM and get the news
quick.
Registration for the infamous
IRS swim meet begins Feb. 4.
3ool your resources and get the
wnole crowd to participate.
The IRS also wants to see some
pin action from the guys and gals
of ECU as co-rec bowling begins
Feb. 11. Registration will be held
the 4th and 5th of February. To
sign up, come by room 204
Memorial Gym between the
hours of 8am-5pm.
The IRS is offering the use of
two weight rooms on campus.
They will offer a variety of equip-
ment to meet the needs of
everyone. The Memorial Gym
weight room provides a system of
single-station fixed weights. The
Minges Coliseum weight room
houses mainly free weights,
augmented by a multi-station
universal fixed-weight machine.
Faculty, staff and students are in-
vited to use the facilities in
Minges, MonFri. 3pm-7pm and
in Memorial, MonThurs. 9am-
8pm; Fri. 9am-5:30pm; Sat. &
Sun. lpm-5pm.
Get involved in an ECU sport
club. Ice hockey, karate,
lacrosse, team handball, soccer,
archery and frisbee are only a few
of the clubs currently being of-
fered. For more information,
contact Vanessa Higdon in
Memorial Gym. She will be hap-
py to put you on a squad or help
you start one of your own. Par-
ticipate rather than spectate
through intramurals.
CLEARANCE SALE!
EVER YTHING MUST GO
�Farwest Ski Clothes
�4Wo off
�Danskin Active Wear
�30 off
�T�Shirts(Hooded, Long-sleeve, & Short-
sleeve)
�50 off
�Baseball Undershirts
�50 off
�Gym Shorts
�50 off
�NIKE Warm-Ups
�40off
�Kennex Racquets
�20 off
��PLUS A WHOLE LOT MORE
(DOWNTOWN ONLY)
oSf9 H.L.
HODGES
210 E FIFTH ST
751-4 IS
players the team was considering
taking with the choice.
"God bless him Bledsoe said
after being told of Flutie's deci-
sion. "We don't like to sec the
NFL lose any players and we wish
we never didWe've said all
along the most important thing
for us was to make the right deci-
sion, not the fastest decision
Bledsoe said his only conversa-
tion with Flutie and Woolf was
"basically in the context of 'we
haven't make up our mind
In Orlando, Walker said,
"Doug Flutie's going to be an
asset not only to the Generals but
also to the USFL
Veteran Brian Sipe, who left
the NFL to become the Generals'
quarterback last year, said, "1
will concede that Doug Flutie is a
good and talented quarterback
but right now I'm directing this
team
Flutie looks at the competition
with Sipe "as a challenge said
Woolf. "Nobody promised us
anything
He said the deal was nailed
down Thursday in talks he had
with Trump in New York and by
phone with Generals' President
Jay Seltzer in Orlando.
"I lelf everything in Mr.
Woolf s hands and when he said
he felt comfortable about it then
he left the decision in my hands,
obviously Flutie said. "AH
alongin the back of my mind I've
USFL's Latest Catch
been very confident about this
working out. It was a relatively
easy decision
The Generals acquired Flutie's
rights in the USFL territorial
draft Jan. 3. Four days later,
Seltzer made an offer that im-
pressed Woolf. Flutie, his father,
Trump, Richard, and Woolf had
lunch with Trump in New York
on Monday. On Tesday, Woolf
negotiated in Orlando with
Seltzer.
"I'm just very excited about
the opportunity and I'm a little
bit releived that this thing is out
of the way now and I can get to
work said Flutie. who hasn't
been away from football for
long.
He led Boston College to a 10-2
record last season. This included
a Cotton Bowl victory over
Houston on New Year's Day,
and the No. 5 ranking in the final
Associated Press poll. He then
played in the Hula Bowl and
Japan Bowl all-star games.
"It's been one continuous
season for me said Flutie, who
didn't think his late arrival in the
Generals' camp would set him
back that much. "I just finished
one season. How early can I get
down there?"
New Jersey opens its exhibition
season Feb. 2 against Memphis
and its regular season Feb. 24 in
Birmingham, Ala.
Woolf said the opportunity to
play for Trump and with Walker,
the non-football commercial op-
portunities in New York, and the
possibility of Flutie's college
roommate, wide receiver Gerard
r
Phelan. signing with the Generals
made the club attractive.
Woolf also represents Phelan
and said he would resume talks
with New Jersey
I

X
Styles by
PHIL JONES
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
$2.00 OFF all Haircuts
For Men and Women
752-0559
Located in Gold Leaf Warehouse
Corner of Charles Blvd and 14th St.
THE
HI.
ADULTS $IQQ TIL 5:30 �
CHILDREN f1 u
hurrmi nM

BUCCANEER MOVIES
1 -3-5-7-9 �f
-RBeverly I 'Tomboy'
Hills Coprnd" 1-3-5-7-9
g w������-
UM�
T
SW�JKW
2-4:30 7-9:15
�S
tnds
-R- Gotten Club'
hTHE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR
DrBESTDIRECTOR-DAVID LEAN.
BEST ACTRESS-PEGGY ASHCROFT
NATIONAI BOARD OF REVIEW
NEW WRK FILM C RITK'S C IRC IF
BEST ACTOR-VICTOR BANERJEE.
- NATIONAI BOARD OF REVIEW
THE BEST MOVIE OF 1984 PERFECT
PRICELESS WORK OF VKION BEAUTY
GENUINE MOVIE GREATNESS. IT IS DAVID
LEAN'S MASTERPIECE
Rt-x Reed S NIHC ATI D COl I'MMST
"1HE 3fH9f J�; XEAR AN ELEGANT
icPKSiBLvA. PASSAGE TO INDIA-
IS A MASTERWORK AND A SUPERB
ENTERTAINMENT"
Judith C n-t
"THE CRAFTSMANSHIP OF A PASSAGE TO
ci 'K,n-r. � JNr?lA ,s A MARVEL. WHAT A
SUMPTUOUS CANVAS DAVID LEAN GIVES
US, AND WHAT A SUPERB CAST'
David Amen NEWSWEI K
"SSBcVffi A�E STUNNING IMAGES -
ECHOES UPON VISUAL ECHOES�IN THIS
BRILLIANTLY ACTED FILM"
- TIME: MAGAZINF.
STARTS
Friday
Feb.lst
DAVID LEAN, THE DIRECTOR OF
"DOCTOR ZHIVAGO "LAWRENCE OF
ARABIA" AND THE BRIDGE ON THE
RIVER KWAI INVITES YOU TO COME ON
A PASSAGE.
A
FftSSAGETQlNDIA
pO wonit mug sKtsni-ai.
�� ��"L. ON �li It. mi y.
COG?
STARTS TOMORF )N
Shows 2:00, 5:00, 1:15
"The best film I've
seen this year
Joel Siegel Good Morning America ABC TV
O g
Late Shows FRI. and SAT. 11:30 p.m
SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2
starring John Holmes
EDDIE MURPHY
BEVERLYHILLS
� MUIKHMT �
s
paramount mcTuac
"A Spirited Folk Tale of Rural America" -
for the entire family
presented by
The East Carolina Playhouse
Wednesday-Saturday, Feb. 6-9, 8:15 p.m.
McGinms Theatre - ECU Campus - Greenville
(Corner of 5th and Eastern Streets)
ECU Students: $3.00 - General Public: $4.00
Call: 757-6390
Thursday
� t GREEK
WPW22WN1
Ib&J,EI!2 ��icron Pi Pledges!
fi iturvtg � .�;� � �
Daddy Cool
N: �:� g the Best Jam u I the Land
Happv Hour from H 00 9 i
rlth SO drft �2 00 pitcher, & 2 � , Highbalh
AMI I
Uxatcl in thrjr� t-ati
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'
CjU4 are wrkl,nir
Wakh l,� dr-t.nK �n ,h (,�� ,hr ln,h �ntes.
"itiing in rrbruarv
(4
�- v
in Daytona Beach
Don t m.ss Sprang Break at
Americas hottest beach You'll
bake in trie sunshine and sizzle
in the mooniight There will be
concerts games parties exhibi-
tions, loads of heebies goi ten
n s Jai Alai saving soding fish-
ng. motor racing and great mght-
ife Hop on a tour bus catc - a
flight or set out by car Just call a
travel agent 1o- free reservation
service Then pack a bag and
� id for the beach
I Send my free official Spring Break Poster
Name
City
Address
State
Z'pnr
Daytona Beach Resort Area PO Bo�2775 Daytona Beach FL 32015 I
1
I mm
V
4
�3&-
i
i :






10
THEEAS1 CARPI 1N1AN
JANUARY 31, 1985
Classifieds
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service Professional full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call 758 3087 DON'T BE
SCARED leave Jack a message
and save50 when vou have your
laundry cleaned
FOR SALE: Fender Mustang Two
pick ups, tremolo, blue with mir
rored pickguard, case and strap in
eluded Call 752 0998. ask for Robert.
FOR SALE: Sensory oepnvation
isolation tank including pump and
heater Price negotiable Phone
756 8160 for more info
FOR SALE: 1971 VW Bug Excellent
condition Call 756 8294 after 6 p m
FOR SALE: Furniture Dresser,
wicker chair, end table lamp. Also
Dexter Wesfern Boots. Call Patfi at
758 6619
FOR SALE: Raaio Shack TRS 80
Model 100 portable computer New.
Retail S599 Price $325 Sears Ken
more Compact Refrigerator Price:
155 Call after 9 Dm. 756 8347.
FOR SALE: Small dem
refrigerator Good condition $60
Call 752 8435 ask for Janice
TYPING: Papers, correspondence,
reports and resumes Call 355 2165
and ask for Yvette
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: A typing -eeds 758 5488 or
758 8241
TAXES Win -lo yoir ?, or
reasonable price Reduced i-tes or
students $5 for state $5 for federal.
Call Doris at 757-4557 or 355 2510
after 6
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Nonsmoker Unfurnished
townhouse uexingcn Square next
to Athlete dub $175 per month plus
deposit, �aif utilities Can Jan'ce
Gurganus at 57 6650 or 355 6974
afpr 5 30 p m
ROOMMATE WANTED: Graduate
stuoent aesires roorrnate fo share
NICE, partially furnished duplex '2
rent ($150) and '2 utilities lm
mediate occupancy! Call 756 6633
RENT: 2 bedroom api , 'ully fur
nisriea & acces R.nagold Towers
Excellent location to downtown 8.
classes Call 752 895
MALE OR FEMALE Roommate
wanted o share expenses at
Eastbrook Apt 758 7180
DELIVERY PERSONS: Needed for
fast food delivery service Part time
hours Ham 2pm 5pm 7pm
and possible nours in between. Call
"The Jokes Or, Us" 757 1973
FEMALE: Roommate wanted for 3
bedroom townhouse a? Wincy Rioge
Condominiums. Washer, dryer.
microwave, fireplace $145 p'us '3
utilities. Call 756 9491
29' Hamburger
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Blue Moon Cafe
with
French Fries
752-1294
ROOMMATE: Needed immidiately
Georgetown Apts '3 renti utilities
Female, semi private room Call
Kathy 758 6386
MALE : Dancer
deliveries. Serious
Reply to Dancer,
Greenville, N.C.
for balloon
inquiries only
P.O. Box 1967,
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed for
2 bdrm. apt at Eastbrook. Va rent
and utilities 752 2719.
soon Male
2 1st month's
ROOMMATE: Wanted
preferred ' 2 deposit, '
rent $275 Va utilities. Cable includ
ed. 756 9910
WANTED: 2 students to work part
time handing out Dr. Pepper
samples at local supermarkets. If in
terested come by Mendenhall , room
243, on Feb 5th from 10 a.m. to 12
noon
COUNSELORS: For western North
Carolina co ed week summer camp.
Room, meals, laundry, salary,
travel allowance, and possible col
lege credit Experience not
necessary, but must enjoy working
with children Only non smoking col
lege students need apply. For
application-brochure write: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Drive,
Miami. Florida 33015.
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT: 2 br.
turn. 16, unfurn 140, 2 br. turn. 135,
unfurn 120. No pets, no children.
Call 758 0745 or 756 9491
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
tains Quarters Apt. 21, $230 plus
deposit Call Donna at 758 5901
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus
Can 758 3?20
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $115 a month utilities included.
Great location & great roommates.
Call 758 6224.
PERSONAL
JOHN, GREG, BJORN, KANUIT,
and KEVIN: The snow will be fall
ing, the Schnapps will be flowing, as
jve ski oown the slopes, the wind will
be b'owing The ride up to
Wintergreen, sure won't take long,
cause when you snow ski wtb Chi
Omegas, you just can't go wrong!
Looking forward to this weekend!
CARLA ANN: Happy Birthday 23,
wow, now you're older than me
You're doing great Let's celebrate
Maybe we'll eat an egg. I Love You,
Greg
CONGRATULATIONS: Mikie and
the rest of the Alpha Sig "A" team!
Fantastic game Monday night!
Love All of the Little Sisters.
DOC: While you are gone, why don't
you grow back your mustache so
we'll have something to do gradua
tion night. Gool Luck! G MR.
FISH: Happy Birthday number
twenty two. I hope it is the best one
for you. Love, RABBIT.
DEAR HUGH: Roses are red,
violets are blue, Hugh loves Sandra,
and I love you.
BILL S Surprise! Happy 21st.
Sorry I couldn't be here this
weekend maybe next weekend.
Raise hell this weekend, save some
of that GIN for me. P.W.
PHI TAU'S: To the best fraternity
on campus, brothers, Beta Phi's &
new pledges of Phi Kappa Tau, your
little sisters are making big plans
for an unforgettable semester! Get
ready Love, Your Lil Sisters.
DON'T YOU WISH YOU WERE GO-
ING ON A CRUISE FOR SPRING
BREAK?: There is one place open
for any interested girl on the Car
nival Cruise to the Bahamas. Please
contact Michele at 758 7244 TODAY
or by 4 p.m. Friday.
ATTN: PARTY ANIMALS: The
Beta Gamma pledge class of Alpha
Omicron Pi sorority is having a hap
py hour at Beau's Thurs night.
Come throw down with us and get
radical!
LAS BAHAMAS, LAS BAHAMAS:
Partv, oarty ifh never ending rum,
watch out "La Carnival" 'cause
here the A D Pi's come. Only 4 more
weeks 'til Fun in the Sun Beth 8,
Cari
GRAD STUDENTS: You haven't
been forgotten Have your portrait
made during the senior portrait ses
sion Come by and sign up now. It's
all FREE
FRANK'S PIZZA
LOCATED AT THE PLAZA
take outs available 756-8798
I
1.00 OFF .5o OFF "
Any whole
pizza purchase An whole sub
xp. March 1, 1985 Exp. March 1, 1985
F.xp
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th &. Dickinson Ave
We Buv Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
Ster
Tm eOs All Transactions Confidential -cM
C�fi'�ns Buy�Sell- -Trade c'
6 res 752-0322 ?$&
&
Ryrtu THE
HEADHUNTER
Men's Hairstyling
Rivergate Shopping Center
Hours: MON�FRI 8:00-6:00
SAT 8:00-12:00
no appointment necessary
Jack Dixon 752-8855
HAPPY BIRTHDAY RICHARD:
Hope you get rich in AC, Don't
forget what good friends we are!
Kris.
F.PA front seat encounter, im
agine that! I always thought the fun
was in back
Lipsmashing led to hipsmashing
Yes, there was more
I guess you could have called it
Fore on the Floor!
FACULTY PORTRAITS: Are back
for the 1985 Buccaneer. Just come by
from 9 12 a.m. or 1-5 p.m. during
Feb. 4 15th. No appointment
necessart and no waiting.
GRADUATE STUDENT POR
TRAIT SCHEDULE: February 4 15
at the yearbook office (2nd floor
Publications Bldg.) Come by and
sign up now.
K.L.L Thanks for nearly three
years of the best times in my life. We
had our bad times as well as good
times, but love always reigned
supreme. I miss you. I still love your
and care for you. Always remember
the dunes and never give up hope
You're the only one who ever really
knew me at all. J.R.L.
MCAT-STANLEY KAPLAN: Begin
ning Feb. 16 this 10 week review
course will be offered on ECU cam
pus if enough people sign up and
send in their deposit The absolute
deadline is Feb. 9. For more infor
mation contact any of the following:
The Biology Club, Dr G.W. Kalmus,
Jim Ebert or Chip Oakley 752 4747.
CERTIFIED SPECIAL ED
TEACHER: Position available im-
mediately to teach multi-
handicapped students in a private,
non profit school. Must have N C.
teaching certificate. Send resume
and transcript to Carbell Children's
Home, Inc. Box 544, Jacksonville,
NC 28540. Equal Opportunity
Employer.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Yellow gold 3 mm add a bead
necklace lost in the library. Reward
offered. Call Tiena at 753 3254
A great new book from HUKAMjuejac c Ion
Subtle winning way to tell aomeone they like you!
How TO
ON
ITL Monday
If you want a date for Friday.
Nothing attracts people to each other
like certain subtle tl�nais. YOU can
learn uhjt thev are and how to use
themwith COMIUtNCL to make some-
fine feel you're special, benefit as
you enjoy reading of the first-hand
experiences of others, like yourself,
itrylng to attract someone they like.
kNo, you don't have to be beautllul,
wealthy, popular or unique In any way
I these listed winning ways do work
If or everyone wl'llng to trv thetr
We know how you feel about first encounters. Mavbe you
are afraid to approach someone � scared you will be
rejected, or worse yet, laughed at or put down. Per-
haps you're missing your chance to meet someone that
you find Interesting because you don't know the right
way to go about it. Worry no more.
"HOW TO 1LIRT ON MONDAY" was written especially
for you to overcome these fears and to give you
new self-assurance. Discover how to make shyness
work for y.u. Know why "acting out of character"
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the "verbal handsax.e" technique plus manv more
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Read how a mere glance, scent or smile can Ignite -
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uncover many sensitive ariis
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but we tell it like It is
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this book is a must! You won't
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ON DAY
Box 1091, Shallaar, FL 32579L
Please send a copy of HOW TO FLIRT UN MuNDAY in a
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"Tzszzr rTTTir: : : i : i i i i i i
i
i
siittitii'cSpecialties
w7ainiiiy 9
Fried Chickenibs
Country Style SteakPork Chops
Meat LoafPork Tenderloin
Fried FlounderTurkey & Dressing
Chicken & PastryHome Cooked
Beef TipsVegetables & Bread
B.B.Q. ChickenCoiiards
all Vou can eat 10 Free Meals
0.3f9 piusrax SEMESTER PLAN
AT SAMMY'S!
Plus Tax
512 East 14th St - Near Dorms
Call for Take-Outs. 788-047
Open 7 Days a Week: 11 am 'til 8 pm
PM.OOOff Any 5.00
I
b
Or More Purchase!
This coupon can be used for This coupon good on All-you-
1 or more customers. can- Eat Specials over $5.00
I
I
a
15
Service Led by This Way Up
including
Testimonies of Participants
& Sermon Entitled
"What's Wrong with The Gospel"
Immanuel Baptist Church
1101 S. Elm St.
Sunday, Feb. 3, 1985
7:00 p.m.
This one's for you
the STUDENTUNION
NOW is the time to apply for the positions of chairperosns
and committee members. We've got a place for you!
MAJOR CONCERTS FILMS
SPECIAL EVENTS FORUM
MINORITY ARTS PRODUCTIONS
COFFEEHOUSE VISUAL ARTS
RECREATION SPECIAL CONCERTS
TRAVEL PUBLIC RELATIONS
AND PUBLICITY
Come by room 234 in Mendenhall Student Center to apply!
INFORMATION: 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline to Apply: Friday, February 1, 1985.
r-wt�B(te5 BjggfjjH
?
f





Title
The East Carolinian, January 31, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 31, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.388
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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