The East Carolinian, January 24, 1985






Stye �aHt (EarnUntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.34
Thursda January 24, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Alterations
Ebony Herald To Change Name, Format
No Sitting Allowed
J�� JORDAN � ECU Photo L�b
The recent cold snap to Greenville has made some places on campus extremelv hazardous. This bench in
front of the biologv building is one example of where not to sit. Break out the suntan oil.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nrwi hdllor
Changing both the name and
the image of The Ebony Herald,
ECU's minority student
newspaper, will be the goals of
Ruben Ingram, who was ap-
pointed general manager of The
Ebony Herald by the ECU Media
Board Monday.
Ingram said he is changing the
name but the paper will still be
geared toward minorities.
However, he stressed, "we are
not just a black paper He said
he feels the paper's primary focus
should be on minorities, but it
will cover topics of interest to all
students.
Because the paper is only
published monthly, Ingram said
there have been problems with
the "timeliness" of news. Due to
this fact, he plans to change the
paper's format to "something
more along the lines of a digest
instead of a newspaper
Included in the paper, he said.
Ingram
will be things such as features and
poetry. "We're looking for sug-
gestions he said. "Student in-
put is very important. We want
the paper to reflect students'
ideas
Ingram plans to start an adver-
tising campaign to inform
students that the paper "will be
new and not just aimed at black
students He also wants to
solicit suggestions for the new
name.
Former General Manager
Chrystal Fray resigned recentlv,
citing a lack of student interest
and participatior s the major
reason for her decision. Ingram
said he does not anticipate pro-
blems in these areas.
"There is student interest, it's
just a matter of going out and
getting it Ingram said. He add-
ed that he has hired almost a
complete staff for this semester,
although some positions are still
open.
One problem Ingram sees with
The Ebony Herald is a "lack of
continuity He hopes to
alleviate this problem by develop-
ing ongoing policies. Policy
manuals and administrative rules
covering all areas of production
are now being developed.
In addition, Ingram has
developed the position of ex-
ecutive editor, a position
available for an undergraduate to
ensure continuity.
"Making mention of the fact
that something is wrong doesn't
make it better he said
N.C. Student Legislators Meet; Proposals, Debates Planned
Bv HAROLDJOYNER
WriM Nf� l-dttor
The North Carolina Student
I egislature will hold its monthly
Interim Council meeting at ECU
this weekend. Among scheduled
events is debate on resolutions
such as the repeal o' the added
value tax and school praver.
"We discuss present and future
issues that we feel are important
to our state said delegation
chairman James Caldwell. "The
NCSI debates bills wed like to
see changed in state law. We
write them up in the proper form
and present them to the General
Assembly More than 45 per-
cent of the bills the NCSI passes
are vent to the state legislature
and are passed into law, he said.
ECU's 30 members will host
the January meeting at Jenkins
Auditorium Saturday from 9
a.m. until 4 p.m. with the
meeting concluding on Sunday.
Caldwell said anv interested per-
sons may attend the meeting to
find out how the process is car-
ried out. "By being a member of
the NCSL, students are having a
say in the agenda setting
process he said.
N.C Rep. Fd Warren (8th
District Pitt and Greene Coun-
ties) will talk at the meeting and
discuss matters upcoming in the
1985 N.C. General Assembly,
particularly educational and
budgetary matters.
A proposal made by the
ECU � NCSL concerning the
repeal of the North Carolina add-
ed value tax on manufacturers'
Keeping Campaign Promise,
Rainey Prepares For Meeting
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Sfwi Mil
SGA President John Rainey
announced Wednesday that he is
planning to fulfill one of his cam-
paign promises by scheduling a
budgeting conference for all stu-
dent organizations.
The conference will deal with
developing and presenting
budgets to the SGA and is man-
datory for all student organiza-
tions wishing to receive SGA fun-
ding.
Included in the conference,
Rainey said, will be the pro-
cedures for receiving funding and
the deadlines for submitting
budget proposals. The con-
ference will be held Feb. 6 at 5
p.m. in Room 221 of Mendenhall
Student Center. Rainey asks that
all organizations wishing to par-
ticipate confirm attendance bv
Jan. 31.
SGA members running the
conference will be Rainey,
Speaker of the Legislature Kirk
Shelley, Treasurer Georgia
Mooring and Appropriations
Chairman Lisa Roberts.
inventory will be discussed at the
meeting. "North Carolina is at a
competitive disadvantage in its
bid for new industry because
states bordering us do not impose
this tax Caldwell said. "I sup-
port the use of surplus state
revenues to replace county
revenues lost from the repeal of
the inventory tax
Other discussion centers
around opposition to prayer in
school. If this proposal is passed,
the NCSL will state that they go
on record "as opposing anv
amendment to the U.S. Constitu-
tion that would allow the use of
school time for prayer or medita-
tion in public schools
Another issue the NCSL will
discuss is "the denouncing of any
action bv the Reagan administra-
tion to militarily intervene in
Nicaragua, unless that action is
approved by a majority of the
members of Congress, or unless
Nicaragua takes an offensive ac-
tion against the United States
The NCSL is a non-profit.
non-partisan, student-run
organization that includes 25
North Carolina universities, ac-
cording to State Treasurer Gor-
don Walker. "The N.C. General
-ssembly has recognized this
state organization in the form of
a grant. Our advisory committee
consists of former governors
Terrv Sanford and James
Holshouser He also noted
that MM alumni include SBI
Director Robert Morgan, former
governor Jim Hunt and presiden-
tial candidate Jesse Jackson.
Subject To Approval
Dorm Rent May Increase
By HAROLDJOYNER
uiiUal Nrwi Mlli
Rainey
Rainey said the conference
should be "something that gives
organizations a framework" in
which to develop a budget. He
also hop - it will "make budgets
more . .eessibk to student
organizations and let them know
we do have funds available
ECU dorm residents can expect
a $30 per year increase in room
rent effective next fall if the
school's Board of Trustees ap-
proves a proposal made by the
Office of Housing Operations.
Director of Housing Opera-
tions Dan Wooten announced the
proposal at Wednesday's Student
Residence Association meeting.
"The 3.3 percent increase in
room rent is very reasonable
Wooten said. The proposed in-
Student Interest Encouraged
crease is to allow for salary,
maintenance and inflation in-
creases, although there is also an
allowance for a reduction in utili-
ty costs. "We wouldn't make this
increase unless we felt it was
necessary Wooten added.
The current housing budget
stands at approximately $5
million. With the proposed in-
crease, this figure would be $5.3
million, with 94 percent of each
dorm resident's dollar going
towards room rent.
The major expenses for the
housing office come from per-
sonnel compensation, utilities,
repairs and phone service. "The
budget is designed in accordance
with how many students are liv-
ing in dorms Wooten said.
"Over the last four years, the in-
crease has been approximately
$25 per semester. Students are
definitely getting the best buy for
their money at ECU "
Wooten said that, of the 16
universities in the UNC system,
ECU ranks at about the middle in
terms of room rent.
By DALESWANSON
Staff Wrlirr
Plans are now being made to
rejuvenate the Ledonia Wright
Afro-American Cultural Center
at ECU, according to Wilma
Case, president of the ECU
chapter of the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People.
Case said students interested in
changes in the center should at-
tend the NAACP meeting Jan. 28
at 5:30 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse. Ideas and opinions
drawn from this meeting will be
taken to a meeting of the Ad-
visory Committee for the
Cultural Center.
"The existing Cultural Center
Cultural Center Expands
has become too small for the
black population on campus
Case said. The committee
originally requested room in the
new wing planned for
Mendenhall Student Center, but
this request was denied. Current
plans call for improvements for
the facility now being used.
Case said a major considera-
tion in making the improvements
will involve a decision on whether
the center should be used
primarily as a cultural center or
as a social center. She said a
move toward a more culturally-
oriented building would involve
repairing the floor and plumbing
and possibly adding carpeting
and display cases. If the building
were to be used as a social center,
the same repairs and possibly new
furniture and room restructuring
would be involved.
The Advisory Committee con-
sists of representatives from all
minority organizations at ECU
and various faculty members, in-
cluding Ken Hammond, universi-
ty unions program director, Ron
Speier, associate dean of students
and Rudy Alexander, dean of
student activities.
The Cultural Center is now us-
ed by groups such as black frater-
nities and sororities, the NAACP
and choral groups. Any students
wishing to voice opinions concer-
ning use of the facilities are urged
to attend Monday's meeting.
Students9 Protest Attempts Futile
DURHAM (UPI) - Duke
University students could not
persuade school President Terry
Sanford to cancel classes in pro-
test and hold "teach-ins" if the
United States increases its
military involvement in Central
America.
Central America Solidarity
Committee members said San-
ford would not agree Tuesday to
their petition, signed by 683
students, professors and alumni,
but did agree to be on a discus-
sion panel if teach-ins are held.
"We had known before we had
the meeting with him that he
could not endorse a boycott
said Dori Drachman, a senior
and one of the committee
members who gave Sanford the
petition. "We hoped he would go
a step further and not penalize
students who decided to go to the
teach-ins. He said he could not
infringe on the rights of pro-
fessors
Despite San ford's refusal to
call a halt to classes, the teach-
ins, or public lectures, will be
held if there is a "major escala-
tion" of U.S. intervention in
Nicaragua or El Salvador, com-
mittee members said. Students
can cut classes to attend the
teach-ins at their own academic
risk, members said.
Sanford could not be reached
for comment.
Drachman said a Central
American war is becoming a
reality to the 6,000 students at
Duke.
"Most people do not like that
See PROTEST, Page 5
What's Wrong? �"JOmDAH ecu �
Even though the owner of this bicycle took great measures to secure his transportation adequately so-
meone still took advantage of the situation and stole the front tire. Anvone having anv knowledge to'this
crime, please contact the Office of Public Safety.
On The Inside
Announcements2 -There will be another movie
5d,torials4 sneak previewing at
Entertainment6 Mendenhall Student Center
Classifieds7 SOOn. For details and for an
sPorts8 interview with Lt. Gov. Bob
Jordan's daughter, see Enter-
tainment, page 6.
�Aerobics is not just for the
bikini and beach bound
anymore, even the ECU foot-
ball team is participating. The
ECU basketball team will be
facing Navy this weekend. See
Sports, page 8.
r
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�lEEASTCAROJJNIAN
Announcements
School of Nursing
All shxfenf who plan to declare nursing a
maior and wish to enroll In the sophomore
nursing courses In fall semester, leaj should
pick up an infant to enroll Form In the nun
Ing bulkflng, room 157 and return by Fob 1
This applies particularly to present
trainman However, mis form must also be
submitted by students who wish to re enroll
In the nursing program
Resident Advisors
The Department of residence life is now ec
ceptlng applications from students who wish
to apply for resident advisor positions.
Students need to have the following
qualifications: (1 to be a full time student.
(I) to have a minimum grade point average
of a M, (3) to have a clear ludlclal record,
(4) to have a time schedule that Is free of
other committments that conflict with work,
(5) to have lived In a residence hall environ-
ment. (4) must reside in residence hall dur
Ing employment Application deadline for
emloyment for Fall 1915 Is Jan 25, 1915 if m
terested In applying for a position, appllca
tkws art available in Jl4 Whlchard and any
residence hall office
ECU Women's Glee Club
Presents � Happy hour at the Tree House
Jan I4th 4 a 30 p m See you there!
Div. of Cont. Education
Continuing Education Non Credit Courses.
Dreams� Tues , Fob 17 Mar 1 6:�9 30
P m � sessions Guitar Wed , fev 13 Apr 10
4 30-7 45 pm i sessions Conversational
German Thurs , feb 14 Apr 75, 6 7:30 p m
10 sessions Register at Erwln Hall or call
757143
Scuba Diving Adventures
Spring Break Dive In the fabulous Florida
Keys with Ray Scharf and Captain Slate.
ECU graduate class of 1971, from the Atlantis
Dive Center on the only coral reef In the con
tlnental United States
Dive program Includes five days of diving
dally boat trips, lodging and full breakfast
For registration and Information call Ray
Scharf, Director of Aquatics at 757 4441 or
75 9339. Total cost Is S335 and includes a $100
non refundable deposit Non diver cost Is
tin
Ski Club
Lef s rip the North Carolina mtns together
Trips to be planned this spring Equipment
will be auxttonedl For example. Caber Ex
cellerator sklboots, slie 9. �50. end much
more Contact Kevin Mussler, 7$g 4459
Phys. Ed Majors
All students who plan to declare Physical
Education as a maior should report to
Mlnges coliseum at 13 p m Wed . Jan 30 tor
a motor and physical fitness test Satlsfac
�ory performance on this test is required as a
prerequisite for official admittance to the
Physical education maior program More
detailed information Is available by calling
757 6441 or 6442
Any student with a medical condition that
would contralndlcate participation in the
testing program should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 Examples would Include heart mur
murs, congenital heart disease, respiratory
disorders or significant musculoskeletal pro
blems it you have any significant medical
conditions, please notify Dr Israel if you
plan to be tested
NAACP
The NAACP next meeting will be held on
Mon . Jan 2tth In mendenhall student center
in the coffeehousse at 5 30 p m Everyone is
urged to attend
Swim Meet
The annual IRS swim meet will be held In
early Feb Register Feb 2 7 Get your squad
together and pool your efforts! Sign up In 204
memorial gym
Weight Training Clinic
im rec services will offer a free weight train
ing clinic on Jan 7930 from 19 p m To
become a part, register In room 204
memorial gym The limit Is 15
ECU Student Union
Needs You
Help us plan concerts, trips, movies, dances,
art exhibitions, minority programs, recrea
tton activities, and other special eventsi Ap
plications for committee chairpersons are
available at Mendenhall Student Center's In
formation desk Applications are being ac
cepted from Jan 21 Feb 1. For more Infor
metlon contact the Student union office at
757611, ext 210
The Student Union visual Arts committee
will meet on Thurs Jan. 24 at 4 pm In room
241 of Mendenhall Student Center All
�ambers and Interested students are urged
to attend
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee
will meet on Tues , Jan 29, stjp.m in room
J41 of Mendenhall Student Center. All
members and Interested students are urged
to attend
Pornography Discussion
Slated
A public forum, 'Pornography and Social
Policy, will be held this Sun . Jan. 27th. at 11
am at Fellowship hall. 499 s oak St The
three presenters will be Elizabeth Mori
toomery. Cookie Teer, and Tlnsley Yar
trough Moderating will be Dr John
Moafcop. member of the humanities faculty
of the ECU School of Medicine
ECU College Republicans
Will meet Thurs .Jan 24 at � in the
mendenhall coffeehouse We will have our
pictures taken for the Bucaneer. discuss pry
iecto for this semester, tallk about the Feb
convention and party next Thurs All
members ere urged to attend
N.C. Student Legislature
The N.C. Student Legislature will meet
Mon Jan. � at 7 In the Mendenhall cof
teahouse We will discuss tundralslng prty
tacts, such as the Happy hour crush for
valentines Day. Our session bills will also be
J The IC will be great I
Political Science Student's
Society
Will meet on Tues.jan. 30 at 3 p.m. In BC
Ms. We ara planning a lot of groat events
future so come and be a part now!
KYF
There will be a moating of the King Youth
Fellowship on Jan. J� at 7 p.m. in 2M
Mendenhall Anyone interested contact Jack
at 751 101
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Golden Hearts
Thare will be an emergency mooting on
Thurs Jan. 24th at 7 p.m. In the back house
�try to attend
Army ROTC
There will be a Marauder mooting on Wed ,
Jan 30 at � in room 221 at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Up coming events will be
discussed
Law Society
'he ECU Law Society would like to extend
an Invitation to all members and the general
� to attend Ifs first meeting this
semester We will be meeting on Tues Jan.
� at 7 p m In the multipurpose room at
mendenhall Plans will be discussed for our
�prlng trip to Washington DC For more In
formation, call Mike Gardner 750 1640
Omega Psi Phi
There will be an essence Interest meeting in
mendenhall student center of Sun , Jan. 27 at
7 p m in the coffeehouse. All Interested
women are encouraged to attend.
Math and Computer
Science Jobs
Deadlines for many of the math and CSCI
lobs In Co op for summer and fall are soon
One of best obs for someone who has com
pleted COBOL has Jan 25 deadline) If you
have not registered with Coop, come now to
Rawl 313 to reglsterl! if you have registered
make appointment to see your coordinator'
as soon as possible!
Calenders
The ECU Biology Club In association with
the Department of Biology ara offering for
sale Scanning Electron Mlcroscoplst for the
department These calenders are not only
functional pieces of Biological Art, the pro
ceeds will also raise money for Research
Presentations and for the publication of a
Pre Professional Handbook authored by
members of the Biology Club The calenders
are available through the Biology Depart
mental Office or at the Student Supply Store
and UBE Thank you tor your continuing
support
Gamma Beta Phi
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society will
hold Irs first meeting of the semester on
Thurs , Jan 24 at 7 p m in 103 Biology
Building The executive council will meet at
� pm We've got lots of activities planned for
Spring as so everyone come out and get in
volved
SAB Meeting
There will be a Student Athletic Board
meeting Mon , Jan 28. at 4 In room 221 in
Mendenhall Student Center
Honor Board
There will be an important mandatory
meeting tonight after the honor board cases
All alternates are required to attend The
meeting is at � p m sharp
Div. of Continuing
Education
Continuing Education Non Credit Courses
Speed Reading� Thurs Feb 14 Apr 11. 79
P m I sessions
Beginning Italian� Tues and Thurs . Feb
14 Mar 26, MM p m 10 sessions
Camera I � Tues , Feb 19 Mar 26 7 9pm 5
sessions
Register at Erwln Hall or call 757 6143
Ambassadors
Old and New Our induction ceremony will
be Sun Jan 27 at 7 p m In room 244 of the
mendenhall student center New am
bassadors should meet outside room 244 at
6 45 p m to line up Dress nicely and
remember inductions Is mandatory for all
ambassadors A reception will follow
Amabassadors
We will have a general meeting Wed . Jan 30
at 5 p m in the mendenhall multipurpose
room This Is a very Important meeting
Hope to see everyone there.
All Teacher Education Students
Applying for Upper Division
The department of Speech Language and
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be pro
vldlng the speech and hearing screening for
all students eligible for admission to the up
per division of teacher education on Mon
Jan 2t Jan X
The department will be testing from 57 on
the days listed above No appointment is
needed Do Not call their office for an ap
polntment The LOAP department is located
in a trailer adlacent to Balk building on
Charles St
Agaln.no appointment Is needed
Assert! veness Training
Workshop
A three part workshop offered to students at
no cost by the University Counseling Center
Thurs , Jan 31, Feb 7114 All three sessions
will be conducted from 3-4 p.m. In 306 Wright
Anne" (7576661)
The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their asser
tlve, aggressive, and nonassertlve
behaviors Participants can learn how to ex
press themselves directly and openly, and
respond to Interpersonal situations in a man
ner which neither compromises Individual
beliefs nor offends others. Please call
Counseling Center for registration.
Coping With Stress
A free mini class offered by the ECU
Counseling Center for students: You can:
Identify sources of stress, make positive
changes manage your response to stressful
situations, learn to relax improve self con
fidence Wed. Thurs, Mon. Tues. Jan. 30,31,
Feb 4.5 � 3 4 p.m 305 Wright Annex (at-
tend al four meetings) No advance regisfra
tlon Is required Call or stop by the Counsel-
ing center for further Information (307
Wright Annex. 757 661)
Attention
Any ladles who Ilka to be a part of a great
sisterhood should come and meet the ladles
of Sigma Gamma Rho sorority. Rush will be
held Thurs ,Jen 24 In the Coffeehouse. For
further Information contact Tlnger Simmons
at 752 1029
Field Hockey
interested In playing a fun and exciting
sport 11 All Interested participants welcome
no experience necessary For Info contact
Ann Narvaez at 7Si 97
MCA
Will hold a moating Thurs Jan. 24 at 3 p -
In Rawl W. A speaker from Merrill Lynch
will be present All interested parties
MpMSaMMk
Phi Eta Sigma
There will bo a business mooting of Phj Eta
Sigma on Jen 29 at 5:15 p m In the Multlpur
pose room at Mendenhall
Pi Kappa Phi
Little Sisters
Our next moating will be on Sun , Jan 27 at 6
P m. Exec will meat at 5 Thanks for a super
III sis turn out at brother rush.
Prime Time
Prime Time sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ will be meeting In a new place at a
new tlmr Old Joyrter Library rm 221 at t
P m. Please oln us for Bible Study, fun and
fellowship.
NAACP
NAACP will meet on Mon , Jan 20, at 5 30 In
the coffeehouse. We art encouraging as
mar students es possible to attend for
topics of discussion will Include suggestions
fo the Advisory committee regarding
development of the Cultural Center, various
scholarships available through NAACP. and
other up coming events So come on out with
a friend and find out what you've been miss
Ing.
ECU Biology Club
The next meeting of the ECU Biology Club
will be on Mon Jan 21 The meeting will be
held In room BN 107 at 7 p m. Our guest
speaker will be an ECU student
Herpetologlst who will enlighten us on field
of Herpefology and will have live specimens
on hand for demonstration purposes This
promises to be a very interesting meeting
?hat will appeal to anyone with an Interest In
the Biological Sciences memberships will
be accepted at this meeting
Blood and Organ Drive
There will be a Red Cross Bloodmoblle and
Lions Club Organ donor drive held on the
campus of ECU on Tues , Jan 29 and Wed
Jan 30 from 12 noon to 6 p m In Mendenhall
244 There will be a representative from the
Lions Club on hand to answer any questions
you may have on the subiect of organ dona
tlons and be accepting eyewlll and other
organ donor committments on these days
The Bloodmoblle and Organ Drive are soon
cored by the ECU Biology Club Please
students and faculty, give the gift of life and
support this worfhwlle cause
Something That You Will
Always Treasure!
Low Prices Av�iibte
$10 OFF
ALL
RINGS

Your Official ECU Class Ring
, RESEARCH
Send $2 for catalog
of over 16,000 topics to
I assist your research ef-
forts For info . call toll
free 1-800-621-5745 im II
J llnols call 312-922-0300)
Authors Research Rm 600-N
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PjprIAM " Time:
PUr Student Supply Store-Wright Building
Buccaneer
THE YEARBOOK OF EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
rcJv

oriraih 1985
SCHEDUL E
All Dotes; 9-l2om 8, 1-5pm
eniors
February 4-15
(Sign up now at the yearbook office)
VJnd
cr aassmen�March
(Also late seniors & makeups)
Q h W'2?
JtlCUlty � AH above dates
(No appointment necessary)
5 pose
No Charge
Questions? 757-6501
2nd floor �
publications building
�:
S
'
�ii � m a I, i
Free And Confid,
Cou
B BRETT MORRis
Among the many items fundeo
by student activ,t fees j, one mm
vice which is often overloo ,
the Counseling Center The EC Ll
Counseling Center prov.dej
general counseling serv
designed to assist student
aspects of college life, including
personal, social and acadc
development
According to Will Bali. I
center's director, one maior func-
tion of the center is to assist
students in choosing a majoi
Drug Usi
(CPS) � Drug use amon g
school seniors � th;
lege freshmen � declined foi
fifth consecutive :984 for
all commonly-used di g
cocaine, the results of a
wide survey relea
dicate.
According to the survey
percent of the high schoc
questioned last sprint
cocaine in the most re.
up from 4.9 perco
year. Among studeni
theast section of the com
figure jumped from I
cent.
But use of all otr
the survey � �
PCP. cigarettes, alcohol, n
juana. sedatives and tranqui;
� was down.
The percentage of rej
marijuana smokers, for e
dropped one-half a pera
point to five percent, down fi
the 198 peak of 11 percent
ECU Trustee
As Association!
James H. Maynard, vice-
chairman of the ECU B-
Trustees, was elected presiderv
the N.C. Restaurant Asa da)
at their 38th annual meeting
week in Raleigh.
Maynard. a 1965 graduate
BCT owns the Golden CorraJ
Corp and the Oh! Bnai Corp
restaurant chains. He serve
president and chairman of r
corporations.
Maynard was appointed to I
Board of Trustees bv former
Gov. James B. Hunt. Jr.
term will expire this June.
Buddist Monk
Presents Talks
To Campus
Buddhist monk Thubten Pende
will be in Greenville today
through Saturday to conduct
seminars in "personal growtt
people active in the world
Pende. formerly known as Jim
Dougherty. was a college fool
player, but became a monk 10
years ago and has undergone an
intensive program
philosophical studv and medita-
tion under many distinguished
Tibetan masters.
Pende later �as named as coor-
dinator of spiritual and educa-
tional programs at Nalanda
Monastery in France He is now
attempting to spread "happiness
by enabling others to balance
their internal and external af-
fairs, which in the Buddhist tradi-
tion is embodied by the bodhisat-
tva, the role mode! of Mahayana
Buddhism.
Pende will teach 77i�r Six
Perfecting Practices tonight and
tomorrow night from 9 p.m.
and Saturdav from 10-12 a.m.
and 2-4 p.m. Prcregistration will
be held at the former site of
Brown-Wood Pontiac on the cor-
ner of Dickinson Avenue and
14th Street, which will also be the
location of the discourses
SPRING
BREAK
Help us sponsor your
Ft. Lauderdale trip
and you go for free!
(800)368-2006 TOLL FREE
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fhLdndConfidential Services
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 24. IMS 3
Counseling Center Assists Students
TT unooic
By BRETT MORRIS
SUM Witltr
Among the many items funded
by student activity fees is one ser-
vice which is often overlooked,
the Counseling Center. The ECU
Counseling Center provides
general counseling services
designed to assist students in all
aspects of college life, including
personal, social and academic
development.
According to Will Ball, the
center's director, one major func-
tion of the center is to assist
students in choosing a major or
career. The center aids in career
placement and development and
has access to educational and oc-
cupational information.
Workshops are also offered in
many areas such as time manage-
ment, study skills and asser-
tiveness training. Skills building
groups and support groups are
available to assist students in
many areas of university life.
For those students who wish to
discuss concerns on a more per-
sonal basis, individual counseling
is available. Included in this area
are personal relationships, family
problems and social activities.
The Counseling Center staff
consists of five permanent
members, each with an extensive
background in dealing with col-
lege students.
Ball said he feels many
students can benefit from the
center's programs. A major pro-
blem for students, he said, is that
they become impatient with their
college lifestyles. "We try to help
students manage their time more
efficiently and create a balance
between all aspects of college
life he said.
Ball stressed that "it is just as
important for a student to get in-
volved in social activities as it is
for them to excel academically
One area of interest to most
students is the selection of a ma-
jor. Ball said in order to help
students make a decision, staff
members meet with them on a
personal basis, help them reassess
their values, goals and
achievements and then try to
select a suitable program.
Programs and workshops for
this semester will begin soon. In-
terested students should contact
the center, located in Wright An-
nex, as soon as possible. All ser-
vices are free and confidential.
Buy, Sell
And Trade
With Classifieds
9m������)���mm
Drug Use Declines For Freshmen
(CPS) � Drug use among high
school seniors � this year's col-
lege freshmen � declined for the
fifth consecutive year in 1984 for
all commonly-used drugs except
cocaine, the results of a nation-
wide survey released last week in-
dicate.
According to the survey, 5.8
percent of the high school seniors
questioned last spring had used
cocaine in the most recent month,
up from 4.9 percent the previous
year. Among students in the nor-
theast section of the country, the
figure jumped from 6.9 to 11 per-
cent .
But use of all other drugs on
the survey � including LSD,
PCP, cigarettes, alcohol, mari-
juana, sedatives and tranquilizers
� was down.
The percentage of regular
marijuana smokers, for example,
dropped one-half a percentage
point to five percent, down from
the 19"8 peak of 11 percent.
The continuing decline stems
from an increasingly widespread
view that drug use is risky and
unacceptable behavior, says
survey director Lloyd Johnston
of the University of Michigan.
"In the long run, this may be
the only battle in the war against
drugs that society can really
win Johnston says of the bid to
change students' attitudes toward
drug use. The attempts to control
the supply and price of drugs are
likely to fail he says.
But others, while accepting the
validity of Johnston's
methodology, suggest other fac-
tors may account for the continu-
ing decline.
"The use of achiever drugs,
such as cocaine, is going up,
while the use of relaxing drugs is
going down notes Kevin Zeese,
director of the National
Organization for the Reform of
Marijuana Laws, which
discourages the use of controlled
substances but favors making
marijuana legal.
"We're not so much solving
the drug problem as changing
it Zeese says.
Joanne Gampel, director of the
Center on Marijuana and Health,
suggests that students' increased
emphasis on learning marketable
skills is changing drug use habits.
"People want to be
energized she says. "Mari-
juana doesn't do that. Students
can't work while on marijuana,
but they can while on cocaine
There are even signs of an in-
creasing cocaine habit among
ECU Trustee Elected
As Association President
politically conservative college
students, not normally drug ex-
perimenters, Gampel says.
"One student at the University
of Maryland told me the word on
campus is that students don't feel
cocaine is a drug Gampel says.
"It's just something that gives
you strenth and energy. They
want to get ahead in the world, so
using something that gives you
energy is okay
Johnston dismisses these ex-
planations, arguing the increase
in cocaine use nationwide since
983 is statistically insignificant.
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Just like ECU Oakwood Homes has been
a part of the growth of Greenville and eastern
North Carolina for years Quality and service
- the hallmark of fwo great institutions I Both
helping friends to a better life
"80 PIRATES"
�OAKWOOD
HOMES
626 W Greenville Blvd . 756-5434
� ����o �"�� "�i aiiiwn5 i7oj is biciu.Mii.ajiy lnsiKnmcant
DONNA EDWARDS
James H. Maynard, vice-
chairman of the ECU Board of
Trustees, was elected president of
the N.C. Restaurant Association
at their 38th annual meeting last
week in Raleigh.
Maynard, a 1965 graduate of
ECU, owns the Golden Corral
Corp and the Oh! Brians Corp
restaurant chains. He serves as
president and chairman of both
corporations.
Maynard was appointed to the
Board of Trustees by former
Gov. James B. Hu.it, Jr. His
term will expire this June.
Buddist Monk
Presents Talks
To Campus
Buddhist monk Thubten Pende
will be in Greenville today
through Saturday to con -ict
seminars in "personal growth for
people active in the world
Pende, formerly known as Jim
Dougherty, was a college football
player, but became a monk 10
years ago and has undergone an
intensive program of
philosophical study and medita-
tion under many distinguished
Tibetan masters.
Pende later was named as coor-
dinator of spiritual and educa-
tional programs at Nalanda
Monastery in France. He is now
attempting to spread "happiness'
by enabling others to balance
their internal and external af-
fairs, which in the Buddhist tradi-
tion is embodied by the bodhisat-
tva, the role model of Mahayana
Buddhism.
Pende will teach The Six
Perfecting Practices tonight and
tomorrow night from 7-9 p.m.
and Saturday from 10-12 a.m.
and 2-4 p.m. Preregistration will
be held at the former site of
Brown-Wood Pontiac on the cor-
ner of Dickinson Avenue and
14th Street, which will aJso be the
location of the discourses.
Dick Blake, assistant to the
chancellor, said Maynard is "one
of the finest board members we
have and a good leader. We hope
he will be reappointed" when his
term expires.
Blake also noted that Maynard
is a major contributor to univer-
sity academic and alumni foun-
dations and athletic programs.
PET
VILLAGE
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New Shipment of
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presents
Thursday
PRE WEEKEND BLOW
with
The Alpha Delta Pi Pledges
Featuring the Wildman
Daddy Cool
Playing the Hottest Dance Music Down East
H"PPy Hour from 8:00-9:30
th50� draft $2.00 pitchers & 2 for 1 Highballs
Cmon out & part with the A AII pledges
at vour favonte club Btau s n course
Located in the Carolina East Centre Phone 756-6401
M ABC Prrnuii �-�� iIj1M �� m
Guests are weliome
Watch for details on the Girl of the Month Contest!
( oming in February'
An. F,m���. Soro1. Dornutor. �( wulung to lu.e � �Xi�.
Mpp. Bou, pri, fn lmmmm ciL )of jj,
$7aTcHd3
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SPRING
BREAK
Help us sponsor your
Ft. Lauderdale trip
and you go for free!
(800)368-2006 TOLL FREE
Chick&nEMSCUits
HANGOVER SPECIAL:
Buy one,get one free
Chicken biscuit
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ATTIC
FRI, FEB. 1st
ALL MALE DORMS
The dorm with the best
attendence on Fri. afternoon
and night wo will win free
admission to the ATTIC until
AUG. 20, 85 for their entire
dorm.
THE IFC AND THE ATTIC PRESENT VIDEO
ROCK HAPPY HOUR EVERY FRIDAY ON
THE NEW 15' TV SCREEN -SHOWING
CONCERTS, COMEDY, SPORTS, GREEK
EVENTS, AND MUCH MORE -ALL ON A
STATE OF THE ART VIDEO AUDIO
SYSTEM.
& "Watching the Super Bowl lifesize on the ATTIC's TV made it more exciting,
more like being there and much more fun than on my 12" TV - NED
JEFFERIES
&"Their Big Screen is like a magnate - even the ads were fun to watch ANNA
DAUGHERTY
,jV"The saying 'The Bigger the Better' definitely applies to the ATTIC's new TV-
HARVEY AND SHANNON
-jjj- "The TV adds a whole new dimension to nightclub entertainment, the uses are
limitless and 'Dead Time' is completely eliminated TOM HAINES (ATTIC
OWNER)
Vjr"We've seen a lot of big screens up and down the East Coast-but none with a
better picture than the ATTIC'S - NANTUCKET
THURS THEATRICS and RUSH on video
FRI. SAT STRATUS and THE WHO on video
SUN SKIP CASTRO and POLICE on video
PLEASE: Would the individual who stole the BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN
poster from the ATTIC this past Sunday please return it. The poster
means a lot to the ATTIC and is virtually irreplacable. No Questions
Asked. THANK YOU.
WfcssfcssW ����
ajwaa - i � �
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�te �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, u����,�,�,
Greg Rideout, �,��, Ed
Jennifer Jendrasiak. b. Tom Luvender, oimmAmm
Scott Ccxper. � td,lor Anthony Martin, �,��, M,nW,
Tina Maroschak. m. m� John Peterson. cm
Bill MlTCHEL L. Cta A��,r, BILL DAWSON, Produ,�on Managfr
Doris Rankins. s, r,ck Mccormac, o�� mm,
A. Guy, u,�, jGh n R usk , d�.��,ng r�-�,r,a�
January 24, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Farming
Plight Must Be Reversed
The recent protests of farmers in
the Midwest is a last-ditch cry from
our pastoral, agricultural past for
help in this time of agribusiness
and modern corporations. Farmers
are going bankrupt. Land tilled for
generations by the same family is
now on the auction block, and our
past is slowly being swallowed by
our present and future.
What is happening, and what
can be done about it? Is the family
farm a thing of the past, a bit of
archaic Americana that we'll only
remember fondly and no longer be
able to experience first-hand?
Well, the sad fact is that farming
� once a way to earn a living for
millions of our countrymen � is
fastly becoming a corporate
business, full of the computers and
technical jargon that inhabit the
Wall-Street cities.
Unfortunately, farming must be
run as a business. Farmers must
realize the intricacies of inventory
and supply-and-demand theory
that all vendors do. The day of the
taciturn old man, with the weather
etched in his brown, heavy face,
sitting on a tractor contentedly
riding across wide, green fields is a
pastoral scene from yesteryear.
There is work to be done in a
work-like manner.
Farming is in a transition
period. One that is causing much
alarm to the nation and its
farmers. How can we help these
people through these tough times
as they see everything they own
auctioned off? The answer is to
slowly bring farming into the
modern business world, the way it
has already begun to modernize
technologically.
But, we must remember that far-
ming is also a state of mind, a part
of our country's sociological and
psychological make-up. To make
farming into a corporate food-
producing institution is to serious-
ly damage our collective psyche.
We must ask our great minds in
politics, business and agriculture
to find that middle ground, that
center fence that will make farm-
ing a business in touch with its
heritage.
We do not know the answers to
miny of these questions. But we
do know the experts must address
these expressed concerns. For far-
ming to once again become a pro-
fitable venture for families, the
answers must be the right ones.
Maybe then the sad story will be
over.
Campus Forum
Mad At Greeks, SGA
This past week is the first time 1 really
sat back and realized where a part of my
money goes on this campus from my tui-
tion and fees bill I pay each semester. I
do not like how part of it is appropriated
away by some very hard-working group
of students, and then so-called debated
for less than five minutes and passed so
easily that one wonders if the voters that
consented knew why and where this
money was going.
As all of us read, monies were ap-
propriated for the Executive Council for
a computer and for a trip to a conven-
tion that in the past has benefited a wide
majority of students. There was also
S850 going to the Political Science Club
and the International Student Organiza-
tion. But my main concern lies in the
lack of backbone our voting student
government body has that would ap-
propriate $1,235 to the Inter-Fraternity
Council to help with spring Rush.
An appropriation of $500 was used to
hire SGA buses to take "prospective"
Greeks to different fraternity houses.
This is ridiculous! What happened to the
Thursday night bus service to downtown
and the merger of two other SGA routes
during the all-important daytime? I
thought the SGA could not afford bus
service for the majority of students.
Wh) in the world give money for a
handful of people, something which I
witnessed Tuesday night when I saw the
buses going to Rush? That to me and
others is a complete misuse of our funds,
and I do not see how it can be tolerated
by the majority of students not involved
in Greek organizations or even "pro-
spective" Greeks.
The other $535 was given to the IFC
for an ad in The East Carolinian, that
brilliant two-page ad that was run on
Jan. 17. How can this happen? Does this
mean any organization on campus can
receive money to run an ad in the paper,
1 hope to hell not. I know when a Marine
recruiter comes to this campus he runs a
full-page ad two to three times a
semester and pays for it � not the SGA
or any other organization involved with
ECU.
With these absurd appropriations, I
wonder if the SGA Appropriations
Committee even attempted to look at a
budget of each organization, let alone
the IFC. What happens to all the
revenues after expenses such as dues,
party or social profits and other monies
generated among each organization.
Why give some organization money to
generate enrollment and save them from
declining interest when they can do it
themselves? I am not down on the Greek
system here at ECU. I think it is a major
asset to our success in the UNC-System
and our outstanding community. But to
see them use money so poorly ap-
propriated is a feeling I and other
students find very hard to deal with.
As for the SGA, I think more time
should be put into student money ap-
propriations and, if not, I shudder to
think what the campus feeling towards
you will be!
Len Farris
Soph. G.C.
Co�oge Press Service
Watching Commies
Americans Must Beware
By MANUEL MORENO RIVAS
(The following is a partial text of a
speech by a Mexican publisher with
wide knowledge on Latin American af-
fairs. The speech was given in Tuscon,
Ariz. Dennis Kilcoyne, who supplied
this replacement for his column, will
return next week.)
There is something that must never
be confused in your mind.
The happenings in Cuba, Nicaragua,
El Salvador and Mexico must be con-
sidered as little battles in the course of a
great war where the main target, the
supreme objective, the principal aim is
the destruction and domination of the
United States.
You must consider that the Central
American countries and Mexico are on-
ly partial goals, stepping stones and
beachheads in the hot and cold war that
the Kremlin is waging against your
country.
You, and only you, are the enemy.
To do away with freedom, tradition,
partiotism human rights, democracy
and religion, you must be destroyed. To
have complete control over the world's
human material resources, you must be
conquered whether by force and atomic
explosions or by total isolation and
thorough infiltration.
How much have the communists ad-
vanced in the infiltration of our institu-
tions and organizations?
Luis Echeverria, now one of the great
directors of international communism,
in a speech three months ago (February
1984) at the University of the Third
World in Mexico City, expressed the
opinion that prevails in the communist
world in regards to the progress obtain-
ed by the reds in the United States.
"The big giant is sick the enor-
mous idol that holds the capitalistic
structure has clay feet the cancer cells
that we have injected in his blood
stream are working steadily and effi-
ciently in an organism that is already
corroded by its own maladies and pla-
ques. the enemy is now in agony our
victory is just around the corner "
And I wonder
How much truth can we ascribe to
Echeverria's words?
How far have the Russian agents ad-
vanced in the penetration and infiltra-
tion of your schools and universities, of
your churches, of your labor unions, of
your political parties, of your media
and of your civic organizations?
When you see civic and religious and
racist conglomerates unite under a
single command and stage parades and
demonstrations on the same day and
the same hour in every important town
and city of the United States with the
sole purpose of protesting against the
manufacture of nuclear weapons, and
you can appraise the magnificent
organization that it takes to launch such
a campaign on a nationally synchroniz-
ed movement, you have a right to
wonder if, behind the apparent public
discontent, there is not a master hand
interested in doing away with the
strength that so far has kept the Rus-
sians from attacking your country.
When you witness the rabid attacks
launched against President Ronald
Reagan and his administration by
members of Congress and media com-
mentators and you know that what
your president is doing in Central
America is preventing the seizure of
those countries by Russia, so avoiding
the integration of enemy bases for a
later attack on the American territory,
you also have a right to wonder if those
politicians and commentators are not
the tools that the communists are using
to weaken your defenses.
When you behold that party conve-
niences and concerns supersede the in-
terests of your country, and that the
feeling of patriotism is drowned by in-
ternal antagonisms and the struggle for
selfish encumbrances, you have the
right to wonder if there is not a guiding
force bent on destroying the umt
the American nations.
When you observe the hostiliu i
youths against grown-ups. and .
don't find the cause for their rebellion
and defiance that threatens the famih
institution basis of our society; when
you witness the destruction of in
dustries, brought about by misled lab. -
unions, when you perceive that signifi-
cant political men and women of you:
nation are knocked to pieces b
scandal-seeking media; when you value
the indifference and indolence or
many Americans in regards to the
foreign affairs that threaten the secunt
of our country; when you find that your
costly and vita' technology is being sok:
to your enemies by traitors; when you
consider that manv of your misguidec
priests and ministers take part in the
subversive campaigns against your
government, you can well surmise anj
believe that masterminds and guic:
hands are working in your midst, set on
the destruction of your basic institu-
tions of the forces and strength �
make the American wav of life.
South of the border there are 1
countries that the Russians are trying
dominate either by violence or infiltra-
tion. The Kremlin is striving to leave the
United States completely alone anc
isolated. Those countries do not war.
to be communist satellites and their
people do not want to become siaves
They are impoverished and weak, and
they know that their only hope is your
strength. They know that they are
doomed forever if the world were
witness the fall of the American empire
Three hundred and thirty million
the human beings in Mexico, Central
and South America feel that their
destiny lies in your hands.
(This speech is excerpted Iron:
Washington Dateline � The Right Side
of the Sews, a conservative ne"
source.
A n ti-A bortionists
Minority Without Support
By GREG RIDEOUT
President Reagan's speech Tuesday
to anti-abortion demonstrators threw
the gauntlet down, marking a renewal
of the fight to outlaw abortion. With
protests across the country on the an-
niversary of Roe v. Wade, the case
which legalized abortion, opponents of
"the murder of innocent babies"
sought to gain the high ground with the
president's condemnation.
The low-ground, or gutter, had
already been seized. Bombings of abor-
tion clinics � including three on
Christmas day � had sensationalized
the hot issue and brought a fresh fact to
the oft-debated subject. Reagan re-
nounced the violence and called for a
"spirit of understanding" that would
lead to a realization by the nation that
abortion is wrong.
But, what Reagan and other conser-
vatives are asking to happen isn't going
to. Like many minorities, the anti-
abortionites are just a very vocal group
crying in the wilderness. Their claim,
made by Reagan, that "as never before,
the momentum is with us" is a wish not
a reality. There is no one to rally
around his call "to rededicate ourselves
to ending the terrible national tragedy
of abortion" because most Americans
do not think it tragic. In fact, most
believe the government has no right to
tell a pregnant woman what to do with
her body.
Unlike other conservative thought
becoming popular on campuses, the no-
tion that a constitutional amendment is
needed to outlaw abortion in all cases is
not "an in thing Most students who
voted for Reagan's apple-pie-
Americana outlook of our country and
his charismatic style of leadership do
forming into life, life is on the other
side of the womb. For anti-abortionists
to call this murder is absurd. Thev are
using polemics to further a cause that
extends no further than backward chur
ches and non-progressive, right-wine
thought.
John Stuart Mill denounced the
legislation of morality, for often the
'Unlike other conservative thought becoming popular on campuses
the notion that a constitutional amendment is needed to outlaw abor-
tion in all cases is not "an in thing.
not agree with his stance on abortion.
They voted for someone who toughen-
ed against the Russians, not for a per-
son who would seek removal of their
right to make a choice. If the president
feels the momentum is coming from the
young, than he is fooling himself.
No one is claiming the choice to abort
a fetus is an easy one nor that it is one
to be made callously and lightly. But,
certainly the option should be available!
Pro-life groups claim the fetus is
human. But it is not. A fetus is the pre-
born, the unliving. It has not speech or
friends; it may be human shaped but it
is not part of the after-birth world. It is
not a baby, something cuddly you
bounce on your knee. It is the unborn
morals and norms of the vehement few
conflict with the prevailing ones oi
society at large. This is the case here.
Ideas and thoughts evolve in a growing
society. It was not until 1973 that we
were mature enough to accept that
pregnant women were in control of
their own destiny. Most Americans
have accepted and concur in the judge-
ment of the Court. But a few are cling-
ing to archaic notions. Unfortunatelv
one of these people inhabit that big
white house on Pennsylvania Avenue.
Let's hope the power that resides there
is not able to force something on us that
we don't want.
'

"�" �����
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mmmmmmmmrtm
Students
(CPS) � The mcreasinglv stri-
dent debate over how colleges
ith predominantly-white stu-
dent enrollments should ac-
comodate their biack student
population mav erupt anew in the
coming weeks as a guide that
grades college racial climates ap-
pears in bookstores.
Author Barrv Beckham expects
to sell 10,000 copies of his Black
Student s i.uide to (alleges
published Dec 14, 1984, or about
on- for everv 25 black students
enrolled next fall.
The guide assesses 158 cam-
puses' efforts to meet bla.
students' needs. C urncular offer-
ings, counseling semces. social
atmosphere and interaction with
the local community are among
the factors evaluated
As with his first edition,
published in 1982, Beckham
pects the guide to produce a
of complaints from
ministrators who feel theii
schools have been slighted
But more significantlv. the
guide, bv focusing on
geared to biack student
underscores the debate ova
universities should treat mm
students' special needs
Colleges need to meet n
needs if blacks are ever to r
the same opportunities as ofh
Beckham sa)
"If you're a white Christian
male, you can do
Beckham asserts, 'it you'n
Protest Group
Political Petitid
Continued From Page 1
idea she said, "roc
don't want to get killed. Also,
there's the fact that after the si
Vietnam era, people learned that t
lighting a war that is essentially a
guerrilla war against a popula-
that is going to hold on to wh ,
has got would just mean death $
with nothing else C,
Eighteen of the petition, signc
were members of the scho-
ROTC unit, she said.
She said the committee nt
prepare its teach-ins and hold pa
them if there is a flare-up in the
troubled area, such as "a navai h
blockade and quarantine, selec-
tive bombing b IS aircraft.
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xtive news
Support
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il rtionists
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right-wing
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wing popular on campuses,
lament is needed ro outlaw abor-
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the prevailing ones of
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s evolve in a growing
lot until 1973 that we
ure enough to accept that
ien were in control of
Most Americans
: accepted and concur in the judge-
lent of the Court. But a few are cling-
Ig to archaic notions Unfortunately,
V of these people inhabit that big,
te house on Pennsylvania Avenue.
j nope the power that resides there
not able to force something on us that
don't want.
Students' Needs Assessed In Guide
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1985
i SF3L The increasingly stri-
nh lte over how coe8
with predominantly-white stu-
dent enrollments should ac-
comodate their black student
population may erupt anew in the
coming weeks as a guide that
grades college racial climates ap-
pears in bookstores.
Author Barry Beck ham expects
to sell 10,000 copies of his Black
Student's Guide to Colleges
published Dec. 14, 1984, or about
one for every 25 black students
enrolled next fall.
The guide assesses 158 cam-
puses' efforts to meet black
students' needs. Curricular offer-
ings, counseling services, social
atmosphere and interaction with
the local community are among
the factors evaluated.
As with his first edition,
published in 1982, Beckham ex-
pects the guide to produce a raft
of complaints from ad-
ministrators who feel their
schools have been slighted.
But more significantly, the
guide, by focusing on services
geared to black students,
underscores the debate over how
universities should treat minority
students special needs.
Colleges need to meet those
needs if blacks are ever to have
the same opportunities as others,
Beckham says.
"If you're a white Christian
male, you can do anything
Beckham asserts. "If vou're'a
Jewish male, you can do a bit
less. If you're a black male, you
can do still a bit less
Opponents of special programs
to meet those needs, however,
argue the programs can be unfair
to white students or can isolate
black students from
predominantly-white student
bodies.
Regardless of the programs' ef-
fectiveness, mostly-white colleges
are having a harder time
recruiting enough black students
to meet their integration goals.
The number of black college
students declined slightly from
1980 to 1982, the most recent
period for which federal govern-
ment statistics are available.
University administrators are
particularly worried the subjec-
tive evaluations in the black
students' guide could further hurt
their recruiting efforts.
"We did get a little pressure to
change things after the first edi-
tion came out Beckham, an
English professor at Brown
University, says.
Beckham has changed his
methodology to answer adm-
nistrators' concerns.
For the second edition, the
number of students who filled
out the questionnaires was in-
creased from five to an average
of eight per campus.
University administrators got
to select the students who filled
out the questionnaires.
Protest Group Circulates
Political Petition A t Duke
Continued From Page 1
idea she said, "mostly, they
don't want to get killed. Also,
there's the fact that after the
Vietnam era. people learned that
fighting a war that is essentially a
guerrilla war against a population
that is going to hold on to what it
has got would just mean death
with nothing else
Eighteen of the petition signers
were member, of the school's
ROTC unit, she said.
She said the committee will
prepare its teach-ins and hold
them if there is a flare-up in the
troubled area, such as "a naval
blockade and quarantine, selec-
tive bombing by U.S. aircraft.
r
sending troops, cutting off
diplomatic ties, or other
belligerent acts
The committee collected all the
signatures on its petition during
the two weeks between
Thanksgiving and winter breaks,
� just after "rumors that
Nicaragua was receiving MiG
fighters (Russian planes)" started
circulating, said alumni commit-
tee member Tom O'Connor.
Sanford "did express sym-
pathy with our cause O'Con-
nor said. "He was definitely sym-
pathetic. He repeatedly stated he
was impressed with our action.
He said it was the first political
petition he'd received since the
early 1970s.
I
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"Administrators are less likely
to be on the defensive this time
Beckham hopes.
Although the changes convinc-
ed almost twice as many schools
to participate in the second edi-
tion, more than 200 schools still
refused to assist Beckham.
Among them were the Univer-
sity of California at Los Angeles
(one UCLA student was quoted
in the first edition as saying
UCLA has "an atmosphere of de
facto segregation"), Amherst
College and Jackson State
University.
Administrators at other
schools may wish they hadn't.
The guide says:
�Many black students "feel
unhappy and disenchanted" with
the University of Arizona at
Tuscon, and not even black
students and black professors get
along.
�Black athletes at the Universi-
ty of Idaho at Moscow are
revered as "demi-gods but
other black students are assumed
to be at the school because they
have learning disabilities. The
surrounding communitv js
described as an area "Not yet
reached by the civil rights move-
ment
�Black students have trouble
adjusting at Wright State Univer-
sity in Dayton, Ohio. One black
student says the favorite words of
black alums are "I'm glad to be
out
On the other hand, the guide
says Oberlin, Stanford and St.
Joseph's University in
Philadelphia are predominantly-
white campuses on which black
students can be more comfor-
table.
The book includes statistical
data about each of the schools
profiled, but the subjective
judgements are likely to attract
the most attention, particularly
since some schools that provided
a range of services just for
minority students in late '60s and
early '70s are cutting their pro-
grams.
Harvard, for one, now thinks
the best way to serve minority
students is to ignore their race,
says Undergraduate Dean John
Fox.
"The potential problem with
programs that use race as a
primary or sole organizing factor
is that there is always the
possibility that some students will
read an implicit message into it:
that race is a determinant of abili-
ty to function in an institution
Fox believes.
Beckham's guide gave Harvard
a generally positive review.
Harvard initially had refused
to help collect material for the
guide's first edition, changing its
mind only after learning other
Ivy League schools were
cooperating.
Fox's reservations about
Beckham's methodology were
not ameliorated after he read the
guide's first edition.
"It's hard to appreciate the ef-
forts we are making here if you
start with the assumption that it's
important to offer separate ser-
vices Fox says.
But running a university like a
melting pot does not reflect reali-
ty, Beckham says.
"The fact is we haven't
melted he claims.
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INVITES YOU, ECU
to our
FREE KEG PARTY
Thursday, Jan. 24th
with Richmond's own
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Bring your favorite
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mi HSI CAROl IMAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 24, 1985 Page 6
Politician's Daughter Finds Home At ECU
By TONY BROWN
Maff Wrtlrr
"It was hard to be happy said Janie Jordan,
looking back on the night her father was elected as
North Carolina's new lieutenant governor.
"Everybody else was so sad she remembers.
Janie. an ECU student, was at the Democratic
ate election headquarters in Raleigh with her
tather, then state Rep. Bob Jordan, when the
returns were being counted.
"By the time we finally found out my father
had won, which was about 1:30 a.m everybody
else was depressed because Governor Hunt and
Rutus Edmisten had lost.
"We were very nervous all night Janie added,
"because at midnight the election was still so
close. It was hard to think about all the work we
Had put in on the election onlv to face the
possibility of having done it for nothing
That work included a lot of campaigning by
Janie for her father, mostly on the major North
Carolina college campuses. "I withdrew from
N.C. State in February and started campaigning in
May Janie said. "I wrote letters on his behalf,
handled mail outJ, and hand-delivered TV spots.
"I made speeches in Elizabeth City, Greenville,
Raleigh and other cities, mainly to college
Democrats' clubs. Most of the people I spoke to
supported my father, but 1 noticed his support was
stronger as I traveled east.
"A lot of people knew mv father through his
ties with the Methodist church Janie
remembered, "and a lot more knew about his
Jon Jordan
Janie Jordan
strong stand for better educational opportunities
and improving conditions for teachers in order to
attract and keep good ones in North Carolina
"I think my father won because of this and also
because the voters saw through his opponent's
campaign tactics, mainly the ad that said my
father supported child abuse because he voted
against a proposed law on the issue.
"That same law would have given judges the
right to send the victim of child abuse to an in-
stitution for psychological treatment without
regard for their own desires
Janie also believes the losses by Hunt and Rufus
Edmisten were due to the coattail effect of Presi-
dent Reagan's popularity, but that it just wasn't
strong enough to go beyond the governor's race.
Janie, now a sophomore and commercial art
major, feels she has some influence upon her
father's stand on some issues, especially educa-
tion. "He's always asked me questions about ways
to improve different aspects of education " she
stated. "He listens, too
As for her own educational background, ECU
is the fouth college Janie has attended. She has
spent time at Meredith, Stanley Tech and N.C
State, but now feels she has found a home at
ECU.
"The people seem friendlier here she said.
"It's harder to meet people at State, but in the
short time I've been at East Carolina I've gotten to
know a lot of people.
"Another thing I've found here that changed
my opinion of ECU was the difficulty of the
courses. Some of them seem to be harder than at
State. A lot of people think it's easy here, but it's
not. Greenville's nice too, because it's similar to
Mt. Gilead. It's not too small and not too big
During 1984 the Jordan family had quite a
number of exciting events occurring within their
ranks. In addition to the difficulties of studying
while working part time on the campaign, Janie
had her debut, her brother got married and her
father had to start looking for a house in Raleigh.
Janie had the honor of being in the North
Carolina inaugural parade and then sitting in the
review stands to watch the rest of the event "The
parade was fun she said. "I got to meet Gover-
nor Martin, too. He's a nice man
As to what her father's future political plans
are, Janie feels it depends on how successful Gov.
Martin's administration is, but he will run for
governor. "It's only a question of 1988 or 1992
she believes.
"I don't think he will run for an office which
would take him out of North Carolina though
she said. "He's dedicated to serving the state and
also has to operate Jordan Lumber, which is head-
quartered in Mt. Gilead
Now that things are getting back to "normal"
in Janie's family, she thinks she'll be able to get
back to the books. After a lot of indecision, she's
firmly set on a career in advertising and hopes to
design artwork for a commercial firm after
graduation.
"My involvement in the advertising aspect of
my father's campaign got me into it she said. "I
think that area has a lot more variety and excite-
ment � and that's what I want
Hold
Carowinds theme park will
kick off the New Year with a five-
city talent search for performers
for the park's 1985 live shows.
Singers, dancers, musicians,
specialty acts and technicians are
invited to take center stage during
the first audition on Sunday, Jan.
27 at Carowinds.
Auditions will also be held on
Tuesday, Jan. 29 at the Universi-
ty of South Carolina in Colum-
bia; WednesdayIan 30 at ECU;
Friday, Feb.l at the University of
North Carolina in Greensboro;
and Saturda, Feb. 2 at the North
Carolina School of the Arts in
Winston Salem.
Mike Hamrick, Carowinds
entertainment manager, and
representatives from Kings Pro-
ductions in Cincinnati will be pre-
sent at all auditions. They will be
auditioning performers and
technicians to fill approximately
100 positions for Carowinds seven
live shows as well a for other
Kings Entertainment Company
(Carowinds parent company) ,
theme parks.
"Naturally, we are looking for
talent Hamrick said, "but we
are also looking for that
something extrathe show, the
sparkle
Auditions should last no longer
than two minutes each and are on
a first-come, first-served basis.
Everyone who auditions should
be at least 16 years old.
Singers should bring sheet
music for two selections in the
correct key. A piano accompanist
will be provided. "We prefer a
portion of a ballad and a portion
of an up-tempo song Hamrick
said.
Dancers should prepare an ex-
emplary routine "in a dance style
they perform best or are most
comfortable with he said. He
added that they prefer dancers
who can perform a combination
of tap, jazz or modern dance.
"Musicians should prepare a
short piece that brings out their
particular technique or training
Hamrick said. They may also be
asked to sight-read or plav a
variety of music style
Carowinds is specifically using
the following instruments in its
live shows this year: piano,
guitar, bass and drum.
Variety performers should be
able to perform a combination of
the following acts: juggling,
mime, ventriloquism, magic,
stand-up comedy and unicycling.
Interviews for experienced
technicians will be held Saturday,
Feb.2 at the School of the Arts in
Winston-Salem.
Technicians, costumers,
characters, guards, guardettes,
ushers, and usherettes will also be
interviewed on Sunday, Feb.3 at
Carowinds.
Hamrick said that most
Carowinds performers have had
training or experience in com-
munity, high school or college
shows, although some have not
had any experience.
What's important Hamrick
said, "is their ability to sell
themselves in an audition setting.
Their show or stage presence is
what gets them hired
Hamrick said that the audi-
tioner's biggest goal is to make all
auditionees feel comfortable. He
offered these words of en-
couragement, "An audition can
prove to be very educational.
Even if somebody doesn't feel
they are ready, it's a terrific lear-
ning experience
He mentioned that Kings
Entertainment Company offers
other post-seasonal opportunities
such as overseas tours through
the Department of Defense and
performances on cruise ships, in
industrial shows, the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade and
Winterfest at King's Island.
Carowinds live show alumni
are currently performing on
cruise ships, on Broadway and in
Broadway touring shows. One
alumnus is a dance captain in the
touring show of "Seven Brides
for Seven Brothers Hamrick
said, and there are several past
Carowinds performers dancing in
the Broadway hit 42nd Street.
The Jan. 30 auditions at ECU
will take place in A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall from 2 p.m. to 5
p.m. For more information call
The East Carolinian, Features
Department, 757-6366.
WANTED: singers, dancers, musicians, specialty acts
Dinner Theatre Serves Neil Simon
How 'California Suite' It Is
A sneak preview of "The Killing Fields" will be playing in Hendrix Theatre on
Sunday at 7 and 9:30p.m.
Neil Simon's 15th comedy hit,
California Suite, will be the next
attraction at Mendenhall Student
Center as part of the Student
Union Productions Committee's
Dinner Theatre series. The play
will be performed by the Alpha-
Omega Players (Repertory
Theatre of America), a national
touring company headquartered
in Rockport, Texas.
Hailed as the Western bookend
to Simon's earlier success, Plaza
Suite, the newer comedy consists
of four playlets that take place in
the same suite of the posh Berver-
ly Hills Hotel.
Drexel H. Riley, artistic direc-
tor and founder of the well-
known touring company which is
returning to ECU for their tenth
production, has chosen a cast of
four actors to portray the various
visitors to Hollywod: Diana Kirk,
Jeffrey Whitman, Kimberly
Finley and Kent Whipple.
In the first playlet, Hannah
Warren (Kirk) is a visitor from
New York. She has gone West to
confront her divorced husband
about the problems of their
liberated 17-year old daughter
who left mama in New York and
fled to be with her moviewriter
father, William Warren (Whit-
man). They are brittle and
sophisticated people whose sparr-
ing becomes more bitter as thev
try to hide the wounds of the
past.
The second playlet will feature
Marvin and Millie Michaels
(Whitman and Finley), a
Philadelphia couple who come to
Los Angeles for a bar mitzvah.
He has arrived first, and wakes
up with a comatose blond cutie in
bed beside him. He can't
remember how she got there and
finds it impossible to dispose of
the passed-out body before his
wife arrives at the door.
Play number three has Diana
Nicholes (Finley), a British ac-
tress on her way to the Academy
Awards, sober, edgy and return-
ing drunk and Oscarless with her
much abused, sexually-
ambiguous husband, Sidney
(Whipple).
All four characters will per-
form in the last play. They will
appear as two Chicago couples
bringing their three-week
Hollywood vacation together in-
to a hostile finale of flying glass,
cut fingers, concussions, and
hammerlock holds.
Tickets are on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall
and will be $8.50 for students and
$12 for faculty, staff and the
public. Tickets will not be sold at
the door.
According to Productions
Committee Chairperson Liz
Deupree, the dinner will begin at
6:30 p.m. and the show will start
at 8 p.m. The Dinner I heatre will
be Jan. 31-Feb. 2.
ut jau. i-rcu.
'Killing Fields' Recalls Haunting Memories playhome To Perf�rm Tale Of Rural American Farm Life
B ROBIN WHALEY
Suff �rtlr
Don't miss it! You can see a
Student Union special preview
screening of The Killing Fields
Sunday evening in Hendrix
Theatre at 7 and 9:30. Hailed
by Pat Collins of CBS Morning
News as "Unforgettable. A
movie to haunt your memory.
One of the ten best of the year
the story brings to the screen an
intensely personal story of friend-
ship and survival amidst the tor-
ment of war.
Sam Waterston stars as Sydney
Schanberg, a New York Times
correspondent who went to Cam-
bodia in 1972 to cover the grow-
ing war between the country's
revolutionary Khmer Rouge and
the Lon Nol government. His
assistant, who soon became his
close friend, was Cambodian-
born Dith Pran. But when Khmer
Rouge troops entered capital
Phnom Penh on April 17, 1975,
their lives changed. Dith Pran
saved Schanberg's life when he
convinced the Khmer Rouge
troops that Schanberg and other
foreign correspondents were
neutral journalists. Pran,
however, was ordered into the
countryside with other Cambo-
dians, and his friends were
powerless.
What followed for Cambodia
and her people was horror: out of
a 1975 population of seven
million, an estimated three
million were massacred by the
Khmer Rouge or died of starva-
tion or disease. The once-rich
Cambodian countryside now
bore the name "the killing
fields
It is from these horrors that
Sydney Schanberg translates the
compelling true-life story of his
quest for his comrade and strug-
gle to survive. The result?
Possibly the best film of the year
according to some critics.
The Killing Fields is free to all
on a first-come first-served basis.
The Diviners, a folk tale of
rural American farm life, is the
next offering of the East Carolina
Playhouse, Wednesday through
Saturday, Feb. 6-9at 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre.
Winner of the prestigious
American College Theatre
Festival, The Diviners takes place
in the 1930 s, in the homes, fields
and public gathering places of the
mythical southern Indiana town
of Zion, which boasts a popula-
tion of 40 inhabitants, but has no
preacher. Living there is an inno-
cent 14-year-old boy graced with
the ability to divine water,
although he himself is deathly
afraid of the life-giving liquid. A
stranger arrives in town � a
former preacher who has lost his
calling and has decided to live
"an ordinary life The drama
focuses on the innocent lad's
trusting friendship for the disillu-
sioned ex-preacher, a trust that,
through no intended fault of the
preacher's leads to a dramatic
climax.
The New York production,
which opened in 1980, received
excellent notices describing the
play as "refreshing, un-
sophisticated enough to appear
untouched by the contemporary
spirit and "simple, charming
and innocent as a ballad
According to director Donald
Biehn, "This is a heartwarming
family play that deals with a
serious subject, but yet rich in
folklore, humor and a joy for
life Biegn went on to comment
that much of the action revolves
around the young boy, a 16-year-
old girl, two families living a far-
ming life, and members of the
community who want a new
church. Said Biehn. "It is a plav
in which students and older ac-
tors excel. Their combined talents
and feeling for this story will, I
think, make this a very moving
experience for the audience
During the course of the ac-
tion, the story moves from place
to place; in fact, ten different
locals (including a river) are
represented. This has provided a
significant challenge for scene
designer Robert Alpers. Said
See GETTING, Page 7.
Doonesburi
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UM R 24, !�8
Page t,
At ECU
rilead It'
I
hei Je
people think it's eas here, but it's
nice too, because it's similar to
o small and not too big
�rdan famil) had quite a
tits occurring within their
le difficulties of studving
i1. the campaign, Janie
tha got married and her
king for a house in Raleigh
1 being in the North
rade and then sitting m the
a ch the rest of the event. "The
'1 goi to meet Gover-
He's a nice man
tuture political plans
- how successful Go
but he will run for
on ol 1988 or 1992
office which
I though
- the state and
ber, which is head-
1
B � ! tck to "normal"
ks she'll be able to get
x sion, she's
g and hopes to
?mmercial firm after
the adv g aspect of
� got me in: said. "I
ct and excite-
� at 1 want
id it ions
dancers, musicians, specialty acts
Suite' It Is
"ess on her way to the Academv
'ber, edgy and return-
� .ink and Oscarless with her
used, sexually-
bigu us r.usband, Sidnev
h pple).
foul -naracters will per-
the last play. They will
'wo Chicago couples
8 their three-week
Hollywood vacation together in-
hostile finale of flying glass,
fingers, concussions, and
hammerlock holds.
Tickets are on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall
and will be $8.50 for students and
S12 for faculty, staff and the
public. Tickets will not be sold at
the door.
According to Productions
Committee Chairperson Liz
Deupree. the dinner will begin at
6:30 p.m. and the show will start
akes
iein
:an't
and
- p.m. The Dinner Theatre will
ac- be Jan. 31-Feb. 2.
American Farm Life
life Bicgn went on to comment
that much of the action revolves
around the young boy, a 16-year-
old girl, two families living a far-
ming life, and members of the
community who want a new
church. Said Biehn. "It is a play
in which students and older ac-
tors excel. Their combined talents
and feeling for this story will, 1
think, make this a very moving
experience for the audience
During the course of the ac-
tion, the story moves from place
to place; in fact, ten different
locals (including a river) are
represented. This has provided a
significant challenge for scene
designer Robert Alpers. Said
ve
am a
lad's
lillu-
hat,
the
ttatic
lion.
Jved
the
un-
)ear
buy
ling
aid
rg
a
in
Ifjr
See GETTING, Page 7.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1985
Getting Things Right For A 'Divine' Show
Doonesbury
POLITICAL TRANS
MB rECNNOL06
�Ai I V REPRE
f 'V TROUGH
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
f-
5
.
X
fe
.A7 Hit CAN Gt T HAR1
HtAPEDNES AITHOt 7 HART
�LAR7EDNESS INTOOJRPOLJTIO,
' 5 A RtRUPlATKJN OF the
� -v IMPERFECTIBIUTY
Lr � &
c f ' 'V
MAN

I PON'T KMu .JANATA SPtNPINb
4 MILLION SMACKS JUST TDCRiATl
om zrwur conowp a' a a
5W� ME AS Si IbHIL Y INSANt
-f.
m
COULDN'T iRl QEHt
YOUJUI SRUOW.0UI
START TROM YOU HAVt ID
CRATCH? WAIT 18 YEARS
V FIND OUT
C3 HOW THEY'LL
K f D VOTE I
Continued From Page 6.
Alpers, "We have incorporated
architectural elements of the
theatre itself with those of the set
so that there is no real separation
between the two The river is
represented by a large platform
stretching across the entire stage
with several ramps leading off in
various directions, and the
forestage will have hidden in the
floor, a "disappearance
elevator" which will be used
when characters in the play dig a
well.
f4The Divinersfl is the third
major production this season by
the East Carolina Playhouse.
Reserved seat tickets are on sale
at the McGinnis Theatre Box Of-
fice. The Box Office is open
Monday through Friday, from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m.
'
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sX:
Apparition Wanted: Experience Required
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CAN- YOU NUr 1tJNE HJHC's
v acopta change of heart
YOU MEM. WELL MOT 1HA1
UKEA FLEXIBLE L NEU
GtOREiE BUSH A CHALLENGE
REPUBiKAN HV OOPS SAKE
Acting auditions for Hamlet
have been scheduled by the East
Carolina Playhouse Wednesday
and Thursday, Jan. 30 and 31 at
1 p.m. in Room 206 of the
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
Hamlet, perhaps
Shakespeare's greatest tragedy, is
the fifth major production of the
Playhouse season with perfor-
mance dates set for April 16-20 in
IPi a rDi4ELC0Ht
��� H&W& 9 H
��� " H BA&DOl
'OUE6L t ony$ v.
'X l�sZSiPEHTXiKE AND
rUBBY0URfWS5Ua5ON
IKN0 70NJ6H7S SURGERY
TUBE SENDING IN FtRjOPfC
v BUL JT1NS PIRECT FROM THE
�OPERATING
S UNTIL THEN PLEASE. ENJOY OUR.
S HAITIAN HOSPITALITY, TEQUILA
4 AND NUTS. U6H1 SUG6E5TIVE
'� BANTER MU BE SERVED UP
) BY YOUR LOVELY AND WILLING
SIR1 CMON.HONEl
IMA !& GOTTA KEEP
C0LLE6E THESE MEDIA
PEAN BOYS HAPPY
McGinnis Theatre. The play is
about a unique and macabre rela-
tionship between a young prince
and the ghost of his father.
Under the direction of ECU
Theatre Arts professor Cedric
Winchell, the play offers roles for
30 performers, four of which are
men in their 40 s. Dr. Winchell
has asked that auditioners be
Jamiliar with the play.
"However he commented, "1
will be more than happy to work
with actors on an individual basis
on audition nights Copies of
Hamlet are in the Reserve
Reading Room of Joyner
Library. Auditions are open to
everyone and all ECU students,
faculty, staff and local residents
are encouraged to attend.
Old Sayings Find New Meanings
I A rolling stone gathers no moss
- 2. All work and no play makes John a dull boy.
c 3- Beginners luck.

� 4 People who live in glass houses should never throw rocks.
: 5. Dead men tell no tales.
t 6 Charity begins at home.
a Too many cooks spoil the broth.
J o 8 Bcggers can't be Choosers.
� 9. Where there is smoke there is fire.
11. A watched pot never boils.
12. Spare the rod and spoil the child.
13. You can't teach an old dog new tricks.
14 The pen is mightier than the sword
15 Cleanliness is next to Godliness.
16. No use in crying over spilled milk
17. Beauty is only skin deep.
18. Look before you leap
19. Birds of a feather flock together.
20. Twinkle, twinkle, little star
� ' V � A � : �
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Walkin' The Plank
LAST vmEEK, N'Crs. vvA-5 BtA1�D
; �i'H.0Pia av A COJP'JL of
151-ftNG SPACi- VESA-TABU
AFf�R. HL COMPi.AlrsJ�D Afiouf
1H� Kic0R5 of CoilLGL UfL
�HC5 UP7 yORfAiNLY
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GLoP7 ARE WE 50PP055�D
PON'f WORRY, KiP, YOU ooNf
MAvt-fo Py-f tPwtrt -flits
-TKi5 15 -PAYHE-Hc'
PON'Y KNOCK 1, lJ
EAT;NS HUD- Q W
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Daily Luncheon Buffet $3.75 all you can eat
Free Ice Tea
Lunch Specials $2.35 (combination platters)
Hours
MonFri. 1 1:30am-3pm SatSun. 12pm-3pm
DINNER
MonSat. 5pm-10pm Sun. 5pm-9pm
DINNER STYLE BUFFET COMING JANUARY 21ST
Mon-Wed $4.95
Happy Hour Mon-Fri 5pm-7pm
2 for 1 drink$
Banquet and Party Facilities Available,
Please call for more information.
COUPON "
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10 percent off meal with this
coupon
2217 S. Memorial (Westend Circle) 756-9687
BARNES LOW PRICES make
LUXURY AFFORDABLE!
We Do All
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STOHt S IN JACKSONVILLE AND GOLOSBORO
Op�n MonSat. 10 A! .o 9 PM
Cash'LayaitayBank Cards
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Phone 756-6696
'
14
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i





I Ml- I �kM i KOI 1NIAN
Sports
1AM AR 24 1Y
.
Pirates Face Navy Aft
By SCOTT COOPER
( o-Sporu fdllut
On Saturday, Jan. 26, the
Pirates will have the task of
hosting the ECAC South's
statistical leaders from the Naval
Academy.
Sophomore sensation David
Robinson leads the Midshipmen
attack. Robinson, a 6-11, 215
pounder was last year's ECAC
South rookie-of-the-year.
This year, Robinson leads the
league in four categories as of
Jan. 22. He is averaging 22.9
ppg, 10.5 rpg, 4.5 blocked shots
per game and has a 65-percent
field goal percentage. Robinson
is second in the nation in blocked
shots behind Benoit Benjamen of
Creighton.
Sophomore guard Doug Wo-
jcik leads the conference in
assists. The 6-1, 176 pounder is
dishing out 7.4 assists per game.
Junior Vernon Butler, an all
ECAC South selection last year,
is averaging 16.9 ppg and just
over 10 rebounds a contest. Tfv
6-7, 235-pound forward was
named ECAC South Player of
the Week for Jan. 22. He scored
51 points, grabbed 33 rebounds
and hit 55 percent of his field-
goals in victories over Bethany
College, Lafayette and ECAC
South member William & Mary.
As a team, the Midshipmen
lead the conference in field-goal
percentage (55.0) and are second
in team free-throw percentage
(72.9).
To Howard
Charlie Harrison and Curt anderhorst (11) hope to sink the
Midshipmen Saturda Nighi in Minges Coliseum
Pirate Football Team Doing
Aerobic Conditioning Work
Navy owns a nine-game winn-
ing streak going into their con-
ference battle tonight against
UNC-W. It is the longest winning
streak in the history of Navy
basketball. Their only two losses
have come on the road to Penn
State and Southern Illinois, both
by three points.
An ECU victory would give the
Pirates their first conference win
in only four tries. The Pirates
know that they will have their
hands full against the Naval
Academy and coach Harrison
knows how tough a team they
are.
"Everybody has had a tough
time with them this year Har-
rison said. "Nobody has been
able to completely stop their in-
side game
The Pirates may be without
freshman guard Herb Di.xon. He
suffered a wrist injury last week
and will probably see limited ac-
tion Saturday against Navy.
"It's up to Herb (if he can
play) Harrison stated. "He'll
be limited, but his efforts would
certainly help
With the Midshipmen's power-
ful inside game, ECU will have to
play smart to be successful. The
Pirates must also take advantage
of their oppurtunities � accor-
ding to coach Harrison.
"We can't overpower them
Harrison continued. "We'll have
to be more aggressive on the in-
side in our half-court set. We're
going to run when we get the op-
purt unity
The Pirates will try to snap
their five-game losing streak after
a loss to Howard University on
Jan. 21
Fred Hill sunk a short jumper
with seconds left to lift Howard
past ECU 4H-46, in a non
conference game in Washington,
DC.
ECU had a six-point halftime
lead (25-19), but lost their
momentum in the final 16
minutes of the game Howard
then put on a comeback and even
took a three-point lead at one
time.
ECU head coach Charlie Har
rison wasn't sure why Howard
had so much success in the se-
cond half. He didn't think the
(Howard) did anything different.
"We just didn't play strong in
the second half Harrison said.
"It was a combination of things
� we missed several one-and-
one's when we needed them.
"I think our guys stopped try-
ing to win, and tried not to lose
Harrison continued. "We told
them to keep on attacking, in the
first half we got the ball in
but in the second half, we turned
it over
Through the first half o! ac
tion, the two teams traded
baskets. ECU scored first on a
turnaround jumper b 1 eon
Bass. Grady then hit two shotx to
give ECU a 6-4 edge ear
Howard tied the game at 10-10,
but a Derrick Battle tree throw
and a Curl anderhorst jumper
gave the Pirates a 13-10 iead the
would hold until late in the se
COnd half (.radv Josed out the
half's scoring with a 1 '
jumpshot at the horn
The Pirates increased their
halftime lead to nine, 29-2 with
18 54 remaining in the . i
Vanderhorst gave E I is bigj
lead (4 221 i. an outside
jumper
However, next
minute of play, the Bi
outscored 1(1 1; -i I : tl
Pirate lead to threi
finally scored tor the P
a basket b Hill and tw H
free-throw- cut I uf
40-9 with 6 4 remaining.
Howa � a three
point lead. 43-40 E I
back to tie the game at 43-43
free-throws by Grady
Vander! rst. A ��
throw. Roy Smith gave the
Pirates a 46-44
pomt play with 3:45 remaining.
1 1 m -ed some crucial free-
throws and made some � tur-
give the B
;nutes l
Howard milked tl : �
called a tit with 15 -� i :
remaining � to set up
play. H iribbled
the key and sank a jumper � tl
en secoi . The Pi: i
were unabk- n a last se-
cond jumper, and suffei
disappointing loss, 41
B TOM BROWN
5tafl Wnirr
e you eer seen 55 hulking
� t b a 11 players dancing
eetheiHave you even seen one
�� pound tackle shake a leg on
the dai . -r'1
Well, if vou visit the ECU
n ruesdays and
irsdays each week � you
Actually, you could check
all of the Pirate footballe
� on the dance floor, because
that when the entire team does
aerobic exercises
The ae: b lar ng exercises
car . as " . result ol ECl
�ngth & Conditioning Coach
Mike Gentry's efforts to make
ing in shape more enjoyable
to the team. He felt the team
1 have a more positive at-
� le � ith aerobics, rather than
u1 exercises.
a ' together with
Janice Dillon, who operates The
� ic Workshop downtown.
.1 together thev worked out the
- of exercise that would
'he team the most.
"We're particularly concerned
three things Gentry said.
"We're looking to improve coor-
dination, flexibility and car-
diovascular conditioning. I
already see some improvement in
rdination after only three
veeks.
It remains to be seen how
aerobics will help the Pirates on
the field next fall, but if there's
ever a dance competition between
:earns � watch out!
"It gives the players a lot more
motivation, doing aerobics with
� ice than simplv exercising
he added. It has also had the
unexpected effect ol improving
team unity because it's something
thev all do together
Gentry spin the team into two
groups for the sessions, with the
linemen, linebackers and other
'heavy" players in one class and
the "skill" position players in
another. The aerobic exercises
are altered somewhat for the two
sections in order to work on
specific areas applicable to each
group.
"A lot of what Janice teaches
her regular classes relates to foot-
ball exercises anyway Gentry
said, "so it wasn't a problem to
adapt aerobics specially for foot-
ball players.
"We are looking to decrease
their percentage of fat while im-
proving their flexibility. We're
closely monitoring the situation
to check what improvements are
being accomplished, also he
stated. "We don't want to over-
do it and lose the advantages
we've gained
Aerobics instructor Janice
Dillon, a seven-year veteran of
the "let's dance" exercise school,
admits she is somewhat surprised
at how easy it was to get the sup-
posedly slow linemen and others
into the flow of things.
"I'm very impressed with the
players' flexibility, coordination,
rhythm and agility she said.
"Their endurance is also ex-
cellent and they hang tough.I see
more enthusiasm than I've ever
seen before.
"The guys are willing to try
everything. They have good
lateral movement and they don't
treat it as a joke. I was worried at
the beginning about their at-
titude Dillon said, "but they
have been very cooperative
On the other hand, all players I
talked with were in awe of
Dillon's athletic ability. "She is
unbelievable said 292-pound
offensive tackle Tim Dumas.
"She just never stops. As soon as
our group finishes, she begins the
next group
Dillon started the exercises
with a series of warm-ups and
worked the guys up to the aerobic
portion. Cheers greeted the
beginning of the dancing and the
enthusiasm was tremendous as
tunes by "The Boss' and others
blared from a tape player.
Janice Dillon leads the EC I
Leon Hall, a 6'4 255 pound
defensive tackle was one of the
slickest big men, while Willie
Powell, an outside linebacker
trom Tarboro really got into it,
inspiring those around him to
work harder as he led cheers
while exercising.
Essray Taliaferro, another out-
side linebacker likes aerobics
because it's more fun. "I like
combining the music and exer-
cise. "Besides, I've got quick
feet! Bruce Simpson said the ex-
ercise helps his cardiovascular
system. "I like pain he said
(now do you really think the
football team through an aerobic
coach is gonna believe that.
Bruce0).
It's a lot easier to pav attention
to Dillon, Tim Dumas feels
Dumas was touted bv some team-
mates as the worst aerobic dancei
on the squad, but he looked like
Tinkerbelle compared to some
others.
Andy Schebal, a 295-pound of-
fensive tackle, was another can-
didate for the "least likely to
become Twinkletoes" award, but
the big fellow was no where near
as bad as his fellow hoofers gave
him credit for.
There were any number
workout earlier this week,
claimii b
the da
was Janice
She never eased off for a minute
as she outdid all the men. who
uc: " - inj : hei wake.
s the end ol the "heavy"
men's sesion dr ic ed, the
"skilled" players I arnv-
ln obvious "awe" ol the
talc the big men they were
watching, they commented oi
improvements thev saw in the
large guys' dancing ability.
Defensive back Kevii Walkci
sa d "Yeah, they've gained i �
steps
Anderson Consistent Scorer For Lady Bucs
B RK K McCORMAC done to fix it except an Fven thmiffh the I aHv P,rat,v v,�r ,rr �1; n ,�.� , �. ?
( o-Sport txtitor
Anita Anderson, the center for
the Lady Pirate basketball team,
is a consistent scorer and re-
bounder despite playing most of
the time against taller com-
petitors.
The six-foot native of Raleigh
has usually gone up against op-
posing centers three and four in-
ches taller, but she has more than
held her own, leading the Lady
Pirates in scoring and is second in
rebounding.
"It used to bother me (playing
center against taller players) but I
just had to get used to the posi-
tion Anderson said. "I get
psyched up by telling myself I can
jump higher and I do have long
arms
Anderson, who has scored in
double figures in each of the last
13 games, averages 13.4 ppg and
6.7 rebounds.
She also leads the team in shots
blocked with 20 and is third on
the team in minutes played,
despite playing with a painful
back injury.
Anderson refuses to complain
about the discomfort in her back,
which is due to a bone in her
spine that is deteriorating.
"There's nothing that can be
done to fix it except an
operation she said, " So I just
decided to play with the pain
After losing eight of their first
Anita Anderson
10 games, ECU has won six
games in a row and Anderson
feels there is a good reason for
the Pirate winning streak.
"The main reason we started
winning is that we all pulled
together as a team she said. "It
hasn't been just one person play-
ing well but a total team effort
Included in the team's six game
winning streak are four ECAC
South league wins, with two of
those being on the road, by an
average margin of 18 points.
Even though the Lady Pirate's
won those games by a fairly large
margin, Anderson is not taking
the conference foes lightly.
"I wouldn't say it was easy (to
win the games), it was just
everybody on the team wanted it
more she said. "We don't feel
like we are going to lose to
anybody, but we realize if we
don't play well anybody is
capable of beating us
This season Anderson and her
teammates have played national
powers like top-ranked Old
Dominion, nationally ranked
North Carolina State, UNC and
South Carolina.
Anderson had one of her better
games of the season against the
No. 1 Lady Monarchs scoring 20
points on a nine of twelve
shooting performance.
"Anita is the type of player
that wants to play her best at all
times ECU assistant coach Jo
Anne Bly said. "The tougher the
competition the better she is
"Playing well known teams
makes you want to play harder
Anderson said. "They get so
much recognition, whereas a
school like ECU gets very little �
we want to show them we can
play, too
Anderson had the best game of
her career earlier this season
against Marshall on Dec, 19. In
the contest, she scored a career
high 29 points and also pulled
down a career high 12 rebounds
despite not feeling well.
"I had gotten sick the morning
before the Marshall game and
wasn't sure if I was going to be
able to play she said. "1 told
team's sake Bly said. '
make the difference between win-
ning and losing for us. In a tight
situation, if we need a rebound.
scoring or whatever, she usually
comes through
Only about halfway through
her senior season. Anderson has
already blocked three more shots
"The main reason we started
winning is that we all pulled together
as a team. It hasn V been just one
person playing well but a total team
effort
�Anita Anderson
Coach Manwaring I would start
and play as much as I could. It
just happened that I played the
game of my life that night
Being one of only two seniors
(Annete Phillips is the other),
Anderson is depended upon to
not only play well but also to pro-
vide leadership for the Lady
Pirates.
"Her leadership abilities come
through in tight situations for the
than she did last year, when she
was the team leader with 17.
She is currently tied with
Lorainne Foster for most points
in a game with 29, and most field
goals made in a game with 14.
Anderson has been tne leading
scorer for the Lady Pirates six
times this season. Anderson has
only been held below double
figures three times this season.
Anderson came to 1 I from
Chow an junior college where she
was all-region, all-tournament
most valuble player and named
the team's top defensive player.
"1 always wanted to play for
ECU when 1 was little � I just
wasn't readv right out of high
school she said.
In high school. Anderson
played for three seasons at W.G.
Enloe, and was a three time all-
conference selection and twice
made all-tournament. Her senior
year she was all-metro and team
MVP and named the outstanding
female athlete at Enloe.
Anderson, a senior has two
goals that she would like to ac
complish.
"Even though my basketball
eligibility will end this year. I'm
going to definately come back
next year and get my degree she
said. "On the court I want to give
it all I've got every
play
game we
Anderson and the rest of the
Lady Pirates will be on the road
for their next two games. Thev
will face Radford University
Saturday and James Madison
Monday night in a ECAC South
league game
Classified
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE foul
launor service Profess
service launoer rg
pick up and a .�� .
the computer srsw�-
caH 758 3087 BE
SCARED ea - . -
arid saveso
laundry deai �
FOR SALE 15 wa1
and v ite - -
For inforor al
Slay a' ?se 91
FOR SALE
isolator (ant
nearer Pt
756 8 ti I
FOR SALE
rrnies 5
756 7768
WANTRi)
RENT
nished � -
classes 8. 1
Toweri.1
FEMALE ROOMvr j
mmediatl
dorr niumj v :�
depes � - � -

J
ROOMMATE WANTED
bedroom Apl
se furnished N -
7 58 43 30
FEMALE ROOMMATE
share rtew
Mos . fum sr - $150
peases Call Roch4
or 754 83' -���
U � ng
ROOMMATE WANTED
Green Aprs : 1 1
?ac Brad '58 9235
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE RC
mate Wanted n
close to rac-s Own
Aasr rtg macfi e Rer' U
S5C filities. Call 758
COUNSELORS For -
Caroi-na co ed S weet
camp Roc � l
saler travel a. chance, ar
ble college cred Expe- ece 1
necessary h s m st er
ith children Only non srr �
tege studers
appliC9'On focr'o ��
p.newooc O0GC 8 z
�V- a c a ; �
TYPING SERVICE
cesso C5 N E "
ters -neses term ra� c
cura'e dependable se
Be .a iU
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
tror rypewr er Res
Can jan :e a '5 466-� -
752 6106 oar's
TYPING Paj
reports arc res
arc ask 'or - -��-
PROFESSIONAL T Y Ps
VICE - ryping ne
758 B241
APARTMENT FORREN'
a ns Qua-e's Apl21 $
aepos' Ca Do
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Sp eDe5' -
Can 758
FEMALE ROOMMATE A4STE:
Rent si 15 a mo� I '
Great 'ocaton �. . �
Ca1 '58 6224
� NGS PJ?
EAT Ki i
UNIVE(?S-
i
Singers � Dancers � Instrurr
Technicians � variety Pertor
$t90 $270 week

KINGS ISIAND � KINGS DOMINiOH
CAPOWINDS � CANADAWONOJ
GREAT AMERICA � HANNA &At?Bfct
f
I






o ward
ee throw
umper
cad thev
ie se
the
a 15 fool
i . s eased their
20 with
game.
� gae I ggesl
an outside
. v cuht
B sons
: $5 idj
ttes, but
H
came
43-43 �:
; a free-
� a n o
rids

ates
"
�lUT this Wflk.
.
ce !).
i a m
the
�h e
the
Walker
itacs
from
eg here she
irnament,
: named
player.
play for
- I JUst
ut of high
�nderson
i ons at W.G
a three time all
tion and twice
irnament. Her senior
she was all-metro and team
med the outstanding
Enloe.
a senior has two
?uld like to ac-
! hough my basketball
legibility will end this year, I'm
nately come back
and get my degree she
"he court I want to give
I all I've got every game we
-
Anderson and the rest of the
Pirates will be on the road
for their next two games. They
nil face Radford University
Saturday and James Madison
Vlonday night in a ECAC South
Mgue game.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANJJARY24, 1985
Classifieds
SALE
PERSONAL
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery. Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call 758 3087 DON'T BE
SCARED leave Jack a message
and save50 when you have your
laundry cleaned
FOR SALE: 35 waft stereo reciever
and white and brown rabbit coat
For information, contact Lisa in 233
Slay at 758 9741
FOR SALE: Sensory deprivation
isolation tank including pump and
heater Price negotiable Phone
756 8160 for more info
FOR SALE:
miles, $6500
7S6 7768
Quatum 82 32,000
Great deal! Call
WANTED

RENT:2 bedroom apt , fully fur
nishedlxcellent location to
classes& downtown, Ringgold
TowersCall 752 8945
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
immediatly Kingston Con
dominiums $150 per month,$50
deposit,1 4 utilities. For more in
to. callLeigh at 752 1088
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom Apt. Vt utilities & rent,
semi furnished No deposit Call
758 4330
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed to
share new duplex Close to hospital
Mostly furnished $150 plus half ex
penses Call Rochel 757 6426 anytime
or 756 8361 after 8pm Please keep
trying
ROOMMATE WANTED: Village
Green Aprs: $130 � ' i utilities. Con
tact Brad 758 9235
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE: Wanted immediately House
close to campus Own room.
Washing machine Rent $80, deposit
$50, "3 utilities. Call 758 6531
COUNSELORS: For western North
Carolina coed 8 week summer
camp. Room, meals, laundry,
salery. travel allowance, and possi
ble college credit Experience not
necessary, but must enjoy working
with children. Only non smoking col
lege students need apply. For
application brochure write. Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Drive,
Miami, Florida 33015.
TYPING SERVICE: (Word Pro
cessor) 105 N Elm St Resumes, let
fers, theses, term papers, etc. Ac
curate, dependable service Call
Betty Laws at 752 1454.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 756 4664 evenings, or
752 6106 days
TYPING: Papers, correspondence,
reports and resumes Call 355 2165
and ask for Yvette
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs; 758 5488 or
758 8241
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
tains Quarters Apt. 21, $230 plus
deposit Call Donna at 758 5901
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus
Call 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $115 a month utilities included.
Great location & great roommates
Call 758 6224.
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: There
will be an EMERGENCY
MEETING held In the back house on
Jan. 24th at 7 p.m If you want to see
guys take it off this weekend, at
tend the meeting and see what It's
all about!
YOl PASS OUT QUEEN: Looks as if
you lost your title! Hope your
bruises heal soon. RAH RAH'S
Roomie.
BETHANIE, KAREN, AND
MICHELLE: Oh, shit a bag When
is the next road trip? And a $35 bag?
Here's to good times Jan.
(?!): The astute & sagacious obser
vation was made. And time was
spent apart The time is now to
readless & undress How about wine
& coitus? ()
BLOND HAIRED, BLUE-EYED
NORWEGIAN BOY: Spring fever is
in the air. Drop the girlfriend and
let's start an international affair of
our own! Signed, Economical Love
LAS BAHAMAS, LAS BAHAMAS:
40 A D Pi's get psyched for the cruise
on La Carnivale, only 5 more
weeks MA.
(.1): Snow lightens the night beyond
frosted panes. Red coals cast their
warmth from the hearth. She stret
ches luxuriously across the bed and
notices that the quilt is too big for
one and her feet are cold.(?!)
SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
ALPHA XI DELTA: Get ready to
HOP, SKIP, and GO NAKED The
Brothers and Pledges of Sigma Phi
Epsilon
DOC: Good luck out west we're go
ing to miss you, especially on St.
Patrick's Day Remember to take
your rubber sheets G.M.R.
SCOTT HALL'S BEDTIME
ENTERPRISE: Coming soon.
WATCH for more details
YEARBOOK PROTRAIT
SCHEDULE: Seniors and faculty
Feb 4 15. Underclassmen, faculty,
and senior makeups March 18 27
All dates 9 12 am and 15 p.m Por
traits taken at the yearbook office
and it's all FREE!
SENIORS: Portrait time is almost
here The dates are Feb 4 15 at the
yearbook office. Come by and make
your reservation now It's all
FREE! Questions? Call 757 6501.
MCAT-STANLEY KAPLAN: Begin
ning Feb. 16 this 10 week review
course will be offered on ECU cam
pus if enough people sign up and
send in their deposit. The absolute
deadline is Feb 9. For more infor
mation contact any of the following:
The Biology Club, Dr G. W Dalmus,
Jim Ebert or Chip Oakley 752 4747
COMPUTOR DATING ECU
STYLE: For more information
leaflets and posters will be located
all over ECU campus or call
752 9667 Starting date: 1 28 85
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Long,narrow, oblong shaped
iridescent metal earring with set-in
silver ball. Lost in Hendrix Theatre
or campus area between
Mendenhall, Art BIdg. & 5th St Call
Pat Pertalion, Ext 6390 or 752 5528.
FOUND: Jacket in campus parking
lot. To claim, call 752 4635 before 10
p.m.
FOUND: Set of keys found in park
ing lot behind library. Flipper Fin
ornament on the key ring. Call
752 8612 & describe rest of it.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
A J Fletcher Music Building Recital Hall
Wednesday tanuary 30. 2 5 PM
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
Greensboro
Flliot University Center Alexander Poom
Friday February 1
Singers 1 3 PM. Dancers 4 5 PM
Instrumentalists & Specialty Acts 1 3 PM
Technician Interviews will be held at North Carolina School of
the Arts in The Workplace Dance Studio 615 on Saturday.
February 2 from 1 3 PM. and at Carowinds in the Midway
Music Hall on Sunday. February 3 from 1 4 PM
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists
Technicians � Variety Performers �
$190 $270week
One 'Oufvl trip on fore wiH be poo to hired perlrwme'S
tfTveltng over ?V miles ID f�e port
Contact Fntettomment Deportment Carowinds
PO Bo 240516 Cnololte N C 28224
Copvignt 1Q84 Kings Productions 1932 Highland Aven.jo
Ofv- inrvTti Ohio 45219
KINGS ISLAND � KINGS DOMINION
CAROWINOS � CANADA'S WONDERLAND.
GREAT AMERICA � HANNA BARBERA LAND
8
)
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat. i p.m5 p.m.
Mlnges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. l p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m. -5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1p.m5 p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10a.m12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m-5 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 9 a.m9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
n What the Competition
Doesn't want You to Know!
AT TELERENT
You get this much 19
inch COLOR TV for only
$19.95 per month rental.
(Weekly Rentals Available)
At Competition A
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average rental
price is
45 per mo.
At Competition B
You get only this
much color TV
because their
average rental
price is
49 per mo.
So, why should you pay more for
19 inches of color TV
Telerent also rents VCR's. console TV's and
home stereo systems at comparable savings.
TELE RENT TV
Ask about our
Budget Purchase Program
2905 East 10th St.
758-9102 ,S)
Kroger sav on
Ouantitv Rignts Reserved
None soia To Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
.f jr �c w� I
rT "t rtQuirtfl
�JK- �fOQ�' � n
DT ! so � �
�" ?-��" ��T.
r i �rt�r � �-
te ckj�
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Jan 26 1985
KROGER V2�o
Lowfat
Milk
Chunk
Light Tuna
Gal.
Jug
FREE! �"
�.Pka DELI
Sandwich Buns
WHEN YOU PURCHASE
2 Lb. Tub R & H
Bar-B-Q Pork
6.5
OZ.
Can
WISE NATURAL. BARBEOUE
OR CHEDDAR POTATO CHIPS
Cottage T7.8 0z
VALUABLE COUPON
WITH
COUPON
FREE
2 LITER BTL.
Coca cola
WITH THE PURCHASE OF
Wishbone Chicken
(
OR 50 PC BOX CHICKEN
NUGGETS $8.99
)
LIMIT ONE PER FAMILY
VALID THRU SAT JAN 26. 1985
BUY ONE POUND
OF DELI DIPS
GET THE SECOND
POUND
EXTRA FANCY
WASHINGTON STATE
GOLDEN OR
Red Delicious
Apples
FREE
INDIAN RIVER
FLORIDA
Red
Grapefruit
RIPE
Golden
Bananas
Lb.

n
�MMMM

H9hrt�MMfc
t
i
r1





10
hi i s r ki i i s i
M k :a iv8'
Mancini Ready For Rematch
(1 PI) Ra "Boom Boom"
Mancini jusi wants to talk about
the fight, not about whether his
against 1 i ingston
Bramble tot the World Boxing
��so� ia ghtweight title eb
! R Ne . will close his
rei
N1 m� in took a battering when
as stopped b Bramble in the
� in losing the title last
B iffalo, N bul he's
been physicalb okayed nd he's
tei
Ml e title loss, some
s of the media suggested
s' although he is on
� yeai s old 1 hat was onh his
npared to 29 wins,
tggi essie sty le
v ' � nished too
Beside- had made
hai be ei
N ' n,
thei
e to M oppo
. asked
Intramurals
H IF VNNh 1 ROIH
the NBA, with
1
"I'll answei that that nighi
maybe said Mam ini
"He gies ih indication ol not
being able to continue said
Have Wolf, Mancini's managei
"It's nd unions to loc l�
ourselves in it we lose It's noi I h
outcome, it's how he fights
"It we win, out alternative
so oh uuis and so lu I al
there's no reason to dwell on
this
Mancini could set up a ��
for the undisputed lightweight
tie against lose ! uis Ramirez
World Boxing c ouncil
pion, or one against unbeaten
aro i Pryoi, oi maybe
against Harr rroyo,
national Boxing I edei
champion who, like Man.
oungstown, ()hio
Anothei option would be '�
Mancini to quit on top I hai
challeng man fighters
unable to meet
" This is the fight hai Ra
Mancini wanted sa
the ; emati h
' Ra Ma
complishment!

C riti ��
Ol
irse, thi
ife
�� i

' uld
s h o
trail
Man
-
have been answered it the I
nol in
La -
� io Bi ti ble, Mam in
in a . .
a physi ian, I )i lefl
M. Schwartz, sa
red I
'� ii
tt it was mal
� w i Aug
by I
Ronald Hoffn an, an

d erg i
� hat Mai
Mai aid he
' ti.
i
CLEARANCE SALE!
I I R) THING Ml ST GO
�I arwesi Skilothes
40J ��
�I - - ' . V car
�1 Shin (Hooded, I ng sleeve, & Short
leeve)
50
�Baseball I ndershi
Si
�Gym Shoi I
Nil1
�NIKI Warm I p�
�K . Ra .
a
I F
eaj
'� ker
.



f
-
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1
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,
.
204 Men

nnis
� - Pan
� � � � igh in-
Pure Gold
I Da � - a
� :he I i �'
Navy ga
Ian 26, a M la lai
� the II
Ian Mad i game B tl
game �- . u 7 ?0 ;
(n 26 (the E( I
�- 1 . gam the Pun G

'�l- �� ton, a
nine ld Michael lad
; �
S heck ul the P ire i
Dan i mg with Fui
alsl ; Sal irdaj night at 7:30 in
Mingesoliseum It should b
. m n I want to miss'
rOI IPMEM
HECK-Ol IOMKR
Memorial . m 115)
M-1 )a m 9 p m
Friday 9 a m c JOp m
Sat , Sun 1pm 5 p rn
Ol IDOOR RK HI TION
CENTER
M I 9 a m I l a m
1 JO p m p m
PLAZA
SHELL
COMP1FT
A!TOMOT!K
SERVICE
m t . �
JM-Mi ' .4 HHs
I Haul k-n
Kasi Carolina Coins & Pawn
� nson A
We 1 v Silvei
INSTANT CASH LOANS
I ide 0ced
OOun - 6:0r trr Mon-Sai
��PLUS A WHOLE LOT MORE
DOWNTOWN ONLY)
SPOTTING GOODS
H.L.
HODGES
210 t If TH ST
. ;
YOU CAN WIN
A TRIP TO
v 'H
Enter the Lite Beer
tybr Spring Break
J SWEEPSTAKES
and Win a Trip for
You and a Friend
to Daytona Beach
6 GRAND PRIZES
: end Spring '��
and a friend can enjov ,
this year with this eight da
including round tr : lir fan
tions and $500 spend
50 FIRST PRIZES
� �"�' ngla
1,000 SECOND PRIZES
'� B Bn
LITE BEER SPRING BREAK SWEEPSTAKES
OFFICIAL RULES-NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
Ijted J
IMA U�
r

!? :t
d
UTE BEER SPRING BREAK SWEEPSTAKES
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 24, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 24, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.386
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57691
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