The East Carolinian, January 22, 1985






�he lEaHt (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.5 No.33
January 22, 1M85
Greenville, N.C
10 Pages
( inulation 12.000
Campus Experiences Big Chill
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
But Hill It Start?
Winter finallv made its arrival to ECl this past weekend and this
unidentified student prepares her car for a safe and warm excur-
sion.
From Staff and Wire Reports
The coldest weather ever
recorded in North Carolina stung
the state Monday, knocking out
power to thousands and packing
shelters with the shivering
homeless.
Daybreak brought sunny skies
across North Carolina but the
arctic blast that was blamed for
three deaths Sunday kept a grip
on the state, and forecasters
predicted no relief until at least
Tuesd y.
"We're easily the coldest we've
ever been in recorded weather
history said Mike Sabones of
the National Weather Service in
Raleigh. "Just about every city
had all-time record lows and
most of these weather records
start in the 1870s. It's really a
dangerous situation North
Carolina's lowest temperature
was 34 degrees below zero,
recorded at Mount Mitchell Mon-
day morning.
The cold wave from C anada
swept down the middle of the na-
tion Saturday and punched into
North Carolina before daw n Sun-
day, pounding the state with
snow and winds blustering to 40
mph.
Two women were killed when a
tractor-trailer plowed into their
wrecked cars on icy Interstate 85
in Randolph County and another
woman drowned when her car
slid off a road near Scotland
Neck and overturned in a swamp.
Businesses and schools stayed
closed Monday and authorities
urged people to stay home. But
the brutal cold knocked out
power Sunday night for some
25,000 homes in the Raleigh area
alone.
ECU opened two hours late on
Monday. Chancellor John
Howell said this was because "we
usually want to be sure we have
sand on the walkways before the
students arrive for classes
Howell said the last time ECU
opened late was approximately 2
years ago.
Many students were hampered
by stalled cars and the
unavailability of the SGA Transit
System. SGA President John
Rainey said the system was not in
operation Monday because the
buses were unable to run. The
newer buses would not start, he
said, while the older ones had
malfunctioning compressors.
There was some question concer-
ning whether the buses would
operate today.
According to James Lowry,
director of the physical plant,
there have been no major pro-
blems on campus due to the
weather and no damage. There
was a loss of heat at the Brody
Building early yesterday morn-
ing, according to Wayne Smith,
director of the Physical Plant at
the School of Medicine. He said
the heat was restored but the
boiler was operating "at its max-
imum capacity and it is not as
warm as we would like
Most area power companies
were hampered by an unusually
high demand for electricity.
Charles Home of the Greenville
Utilities Commission said the
weather resulted in "a higher use
of electricity and a higher peak
demand than ever before
Home said that, although
there were few problems with
water or sewer lines, the supply
of natural gas was limited
because of the cold. The
temperature caused low pressure
and therefore inadequate
amounts of gas were available.
Power outages in the Green-
ville area were scattered and short
in duration. Home said. Most
power was restored within one
hour.
At 6 a.m. Monday, he said, an
emergency load reduction was
ordered and a 5 percent voltage
reduction was made. Major users
of power were requested to cut
back on their use.
Home said he felt this would
be "sufficient" to avoid power
outages, although he fell
Carolina Power and Light, one
of GUC's major suppliers, might
be having more difficulty supply-
ing power. However, he did not
foresee any major power losses in
the Greenville area.
The 1,500 residents of Hatteras
Island awoke to icy homes and
officials opened emergency
shelters.
"We have a temperature of 7
degrees and a wind chill factor of
15 below zero said Denise
Jones of the Dare County
Sheriffs Department. "The
whole island is without power
Asheville's temperature plum-
meted to 16 below at 5 a.m. EST,
smashing the record 7 below set
in 1966 and 1983. The wind chill
was 54 below.
In Raleigh, the temperature fell
to 9 below, colder than the record
2 below set in 1899. Charlotte hit
5 below, tying a record set in 1880
and 1899, and Greensboro dip-
ped to 8 below, beating the
record 7 below set in 194V
"This weather is more typical
of North Dakota than North
Carolina said Kermit Keeter of
the National Weather Service in
Raleigh. "People here have got
to respect this weather. If you are
out unprotected in this cold for
any length of time at all, you can
get yourself killed he said.
Symposium Papers Announced; Wide Variety Selected
B HAROLD JOYNER
M�ma�i Sew, rUlo
Preparation for the 10th an-
nual Phi Kappa Phi Symposium
is in the final planning stages,
said Trenton Davis, committee
chairman and professor of En-
vironmental Health.
"So far. we have chosen nine
faculty paper- and one student
paper Da:s said. "The other
student paper has yet to be deter-
mined and will be announced at a
later date Davis noted that this
year was the largest response the
symposium has received from
students and faculty "Because
there were so many entries, it
took more time to review the
papers and announce the win-
ners
The theme of ihe February
symposium, What's Right With
America � What's Wrong? of-
fers a more broad and general
theme for the papers. "These
topics may apply to an ECU stu-
dent Davis said, "and they
ma be interested in attending
one of the presentations Davis
also said faculty members may
see the relevance of a particular
presentation to a class they are
teaching and encourage students
to attend that lecture in lieu of
class.
Susan Tacker's paper.
Westmoreland . CBS; Modern
Media and Traditional Freedom
of the Press, was one of the two
student papers selected. Tacker,
along with the other student
whose paper is chosen, will
receive $100 and present the
paper at the symposium, Davis
said.
The faculty members' papers
SGA Passes Money Bills
Computer Funds Approved
By GREG HIDEOUT
The SGA Legislature ap-
propriated $6,110 Monday for
five projects, leaving the bodv
with less than $8,200 for the re-
mainder of the year. All bills
were passed by consent.
Half the money will be spent
on a computer for the Executive
Council. SGA President John
Rainey said the $3,000 ap-
propriated will be used to buy
both the computer and software.
It will be used by the Executive
Council, Legislature, Student
Transit and SGA Refrigerator
Rentals. Rainey said the machine
is a major step forward for the
SGA, and believes the Zenith
computer is "the best deal we can
get
Another $1,124 was given to
the Executive Council to finance
a trip to Texas A&M University
for a meeting of the Congress Of
Student Government Associa-
tions. Three members of the SGA
will attend the February conven-
tion: Lisa Carroll, freshman class
president; Mike McPartland,
SGA vice president; and Dwayne
W iseman, appropriation commit-
tee member.
Rainey, who attended the
COSGA meeting last year, said
the seminars and exposure to new
ideas are advantageous. The
Freshmen Aide Program is a
result of attendance at last year's
meeting, Rainey said.
The third big money bill ap-
propriated $1,235 to the Inter-
Fraternity Council to help with
spring Rush and pay the registra-
tion costs of an upcoming con-
vention. Buses to take prospec-
tive Greeks to the different
fraternity houses will use up $500
of the money, a two-page ad
which ran in the Jan. 17 issue of
The East Carolinin used $535 and
$200 will pay for the registration
costs at the Southeastern Inter-
Fraternity Council meeting.
The Political Science Club
received $450, and the Inter-
national Student Organization
got $400.
ECL' News Bureau
ECU announced recently it is
moving to strengthen its interna-
tional studies programs on cam-
pus and abroad and appointed a
well-known faculty geographer to
coordinate the effort.
Ennis Chestang, a member of
the faculty since 1965 and chair
of the Department of Geography
and Planning for the past 10
years, has been named assistant
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences and Coordinator of In-
ternational Programs.
He will fill a position to be
"devoted entirely" to coor-
dinating and securing grants and
other support for the university's
many interdisciplinary area
studies programs in international
studies, according to Eugene
Ryan, dean of Arts and Sciences.
ECU's interdisciplinary area
studies programs on campus
range from Asian and African
area studies to the Renaissance,
and overseas it has a long
established Latin American
studies program in Costa Rica
and a new, one-year old program
at Ferrara in Italy.
"East Carolina University has
been making significant progress
in strengthening its international
programs, and off-campus, in the
Costa Rica and Ferrara, Italy,
programs said Angelo Volpe,
vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs.
Volpe said University of North
Carolina president William Fri-
day has directed that UNC
system constituent institutions in-
crease efforts at "worthwhile
programs which are international
in character
Such efforts should include
"offering appropriate courses
and intercultural programs on
campus, offering opportunities
for overseas study and travel pro-
grams and assisting students
from abroad to study on our
campus Volpe said.
In a letter to Chestang express-
ing pleasure at the new appoint-
ment, Volpe said "you will be
called upon to assist faculty
members to learn about poten-
tially valuable international ac-
tivies and to secure resources for
these activities
He added that Chestang will
"be in a position to keep the
faculty informed about the pro-
gress being made in our interna-
tional programs
I look forward to it
Chestang said. "I've long had a
strong interest in the area of in-
ternational studies. You can't be
a geographer and not be in-
terested in these studies
went through the same process as
the students "We were pleased
to hear From so many faculty
members and we appreciate their
participation The following
facultv members and their paper
topics are as follows: Robbie Ed-
wards. Nursing, Water � How
Do We Keep It Clean?, Rita L
Saldanha and John C. Moskop,
Medicine, Caring For Handicap-
ped Infants: An American Dilem-
ma, WD. Bulloch, English, The
Break-L p of the Bell System.
What Might America Gain? Or
Lose?, Evelyn McNeill,
Medicine, Space and Faces in
America, Karl Rodabaugh, Con-
tinuing Education, The Sew
Middle Class: Architects of
Modern America.
Martin Schwarz, Foreign
Languages and Literatures,
Patriotism ersus Chauvinism:
The Fducator's Mission
Richard B. Miller, Philosophy,
Fducation and Democracy,
David W. Glascoff, Business, �r-
change. Expectations, and the
Right to Choose: A Marketers
View; Jeanne S. Scafella,
English, H hat's RightWrong
with American S'ens Media:
Some Ethical and I ega. I ons-
siderations of the Right to
Privacy v. the Public's Right ,c
Know.
The two-day lecture wiJJ begin
Feb. 26 at 9 a.m. with a presenta-
tion of six papers. The remaining
papers will be presented the
following day.
"This is the only university-
event of this nature that presents
scholars from all disciplines
Davis said, "and we hope to con-
tinue this expansion of interest
Offttf 2
ECU International Studies Program
Strengthened Through Faculty Input
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
How Cold Is It?
These two students took time out today to pose for the camera, while other students continued to walk
faster than usual across campus as temperatures remained below the freezing mark.
Computer System Delayed
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Wr1�r
A computerized circulation
system will be the first part of a
minicomputer system to be in-
stalled at ECU.
According to Ruth Katz, direc-
tor of academic library services,
the LS2000 Data General system
was purchased in the fall.
The first installation was
scheduled for January. However,
due to a delay in the acquisition
of software, the system will not
be installed until late spring or
early summer.
Katz said students will notice
changes as soon as the first in-
stallation is completed. When
checking out books, computer
labels and student ID's will be us-
ed. A small, pencil-like object
picks up the codes on the labels
and automatically records the in-
formation in the computer. In-
formation about the borrower
will be taken from the ID code
label.
Library staff members are cur-
rently working on changing the
book numbers.
The new system will allow
students to have access to more
information and to search more
conveniently, and provide
libraries with more accurate
record-keeping, Katz said.
On The Inside
Announcements2 �So you didn't get to go to see
Editorials4 Bruce Springsteen in concert?
Style6 Well, we can offer you the
Classifieds7 next best thing to being there.
Sports8 See Style, page 6.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 1985
Announcements
intramural
IRS Sport Club Council There will be an In
tramural sport council meeting. Jan 23 at 4
pm In Brewster B 103 ATTEND!
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning ana Placement Service
in the Bloxton houM l� ottering these one
hour sessions to aid you in developing better
Interviewing skills tor use 'n your ob search
A tllm and discussion o how to interview on
and ott campus win be shared These ses
sions will be held in the Career Planning
room at 3 p m on Jan 23 and N and Feb
7 11 and IV On Jan it an evening session
will be held lUpm Seniors are especially
encouraged to attend one of these sessions!
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
m the Bionton Mouse is ottering one hour ses
sions to help you prepare your own resume
Few graduates get lobs without some
preparation Many employers request a
resume showing your education and ex
perience Sessions to help will be held in the
Career Planning room at J pm on Jan 21
and 3! An evening session win be held at 7
p m on Jan X
Application for Student
Homecoming
Committee Chairperson
The Student Homecoming committee is
responsible tor planning promoting, and
presenting the annual homecoming ac
tivities This festival of events is one of the
largest programs happening at 'he Universi
tv each year Among 'he responsibilities
parade arranging halt time activities at the
tootsaii game securing judges for the floats
and house ana residence hall decorations,
and presenting entertainment
The Student Homecoming Committee
chairperson ;s the individual who has overall
responsibllity for homecoming Students in
terested m being considered for the position
of Student Homecoming Committee
Chairperson may pick up application forms
a' either VSC information desk or the
Taylor Slaughter Alumni Center The
deadline for applying for this position is Jan
7t
Motel Management
interested in learning motel managemen
with a maior cn�i"7 Position avai'able in
Greensboro for Spring 1985 Contact
Cooperative Education 313 Rawl bldg tor
more mtorma'ion
Spoleto Festival
Charleston SC
Remember 'he deadhne for application is
Feb 1 1985 if you are interested please con
'act the Co op office as soon as possible
Business, music, theatre arts, english and
writing art and home economics majors art
encouraged '0 apply Salarv is V25 per week
free housing ISO paia toward 'ranspor'ation
cost
Camp Day
Do you like to work wi'h children' Enjoy the
outdoors7 Then this opportunity may be tor
you1 Representatives from camps
throughout the east will be on campus Jan
22. 1985 to interview students tor summer
positions Counselors instructors life
guards, and more positions available See
the Co op otf.ee, 313 Raw; Bldg to sign up to-
an interview and for more information
Air Products
Nationwide producer of industrial chemicals
and gases otters summer program with
headquarters and regionai offices Rising
seniors Nritfl gooc GPA and majoring in
chemistry business accounting, or com
puter science invited to apply For more m
formation contact the Cooperative Educa
tion Office m 313 Rawl building
Banking Positions
interested in banking as a career' Local
financial institution seeks career minded
students majoring in business, finance ac
counting 'or spring, summer 1985 Studne's
should be graduating seniors Contact the
Cooperative Education office in 313 Raw1
building tor more ntormation
Summer Jobs
With maior food servce corporation having
facilities throughout the Southeast Food and
Nutrition majors merested in career related
experience paying t4 50 S5 per hour Contact
Cooperative Education office m 313 Rawl
building
Tutoring
If you need help writing a paper from a one
page summary to a one hundred page disser
tation iust come by the english department
office A 124 and sign up to see a tutor in the
writing center It's free!
Foreign Students
individual and group tutoring in english as a
second language will be offered in the
english writing center. A 309 at noon on
�Won Wed and Fri and at 2 on Mon mten
sive work on writing and speech are also
available For more into, come by the
center
All Nursing Students Graduating
Spring Semester
in order to receive your nursing pin by April
22, 1985. orders must be placed in the student
supply store. Wright bunding no later then
Feb 4 Orders should be placed at the
jewelry counter Orders must be paid in full
when the order is placed
School ot Nursing
All students who plan to declare nursing a
maior and wish to enroll in the sophomore
nursing courses in fall semester 1985 should
pick up an intent to Enroll Form in tte nurs
ing building, room 157 and return by Feb 1
This applies particularly to present
fre�hmeti However, this form must also be
submitted by students who wish to re enroll
In the nursing program.
ECU FrisbeeClub
The Irate fiafban team is glad to announce
their victory over UNC W's Gale
Force (thanks to help from Bear. J ,
Quassar and Andrew JacksonThe final
score was 21 13 There is practice every
Tues and Thurs at 3 til 4 30 There will also
be a meeting Tues n.ght at 8 30 In
Aiwndenhall
SGA
SGA is now accepting applications for pirate
walk director All Interested persons can ap
ply at 'he SGA office at Mendenhatl The last
day for accepting applications is Tues . Jan
M
Cancer
is cancer affecting your lite or the lite of so
meone close to you? If so. you may benefit
from Involvement In Positive Image, a sup
port group for individuals experiencing
cancer The group provides mutal support,
assistance with problem solving, and
teaches methods tor reducing stress
Regular meetings are held at a central
downtown location For more Inormatlon
about becoming Involved In the group, call
either Gene Eakes RN. MSN (Wl 757 6041.
(H) 7S6�Of5. or Rita Flnnen. RN. MSN (W)
757 4471 (M) 7S8 8097
Need a Massage?
Come to the physical therapy massage clinic
on Tues Jan 29 from 6 30 10 In the physical
therapy department. 1st floor Beik building
The charge Is SI tor every 10 minutes of
massage
Resident Advisors
The Department ot residence life Is now ac
cepf ing applications from students who wish
to apply tor resident advisor positions
Students need to have the following
qualifications (1) to be a full time student.
(2) to have a minimum grade point average
of a 2 2 (3) to have a clear judicial record.
(4) to have a time schedule that is free of
other committments that conflict with work
(5) to have lived in a residence hall environ
ment 6 must reside m residence hall dur
ing employment Application deadline tor
emloyment tor Fall 1985 is Jan 25.1985 If In
terested in applying for a position, applica
tlons are available in 214 Whichard and any
residence hall office
ECU Women's Glee Club
Presents a Happy hour at the Tree House
Jan 24th 4 f 30 p m See you there!
N.C. Student Legislature
The N S Student Legislature Is the students
link with the law making general assembly
We study present and future issues Impor
tant to N C and propose solutions and bills
Over 45 percent of our bills become sta'e
law We meet Mon at 7 In the mendenhall
rotteehouse or call 752 5642
Shambhala Oharma Group
The Six Perfecting Practices, a seminar in
personal growth consisting of lecture
discussion and guided meditation Deals
with subjects generosity, ethics, patience
enthusiastic effort concentration and
wisdom Taught by Jim Dougherty, a
Tibetan Buddhist monk for ten years
Thurs Jan 24 and Fri Jan 25 from 7 9
p m . Sat . Jan 24, 10 12 a m . 2 4 p m Old
Brown and Wood auto dealership, Dickenson
Ave and 14th st For information or to
preregister contacty Dr Don Brown, phone
355 4410
Div. of Cont. Education
Continuing Education Non Credit Courses
Dreams Tues. Feb 12. Mar 16 4 30 9 30
p m 4 sessions Guitar Wed , fev 13 Apr 10
6 X 7 45 p m 8 sessions Conversational
German Thurs . feb 14 Apr 25 6 7 30 p m
10 sessions Register at Erwin Hall or call
757 4143
Travel Committee
Like to trave and plan trips' Why not
become a member on 'he S'udent Union
Travel Committee The Student Union
Travel Committee plans and promotes the
following types ot trips weekend excur
sions. 'rips scheduled during holidays and
breaks The committee also sponsors the
Travel Adventure Film Series For more in
formation, contact the Student Union (room
234) at 757 4411 ext 210
Student Union
The student union special events committee
will meet on Wed . Jan 23 at 4 15 p m in
room 238 of Mendenhall student center. All
members and interested students are urged
to attend
Weight Training Clinic
� m rec services will offer a free weight train
ing clinic on Jan 29130 from 89 pm To
become a part, register In room 204
memorial gym The limit is 15
Intramurals
IRS Sport Club Council There will be an m
tramural sport council meeting Jan 23 at 4
p m in Brewster B 103 ATTEND!
Scuba Diving Adventures
Spring Break Dive In the fabulous Florida
Keys with Ray Scharf and Captain Slate.
ECU graduate class of 1971. from the Atlantis
Dive Center on the only coral reef In tfte con
�mental United States
Dive program Includes five days of diving,
dally boat trips, lodging and full breakfast
For registration and Information call Ray
Scharf, Director of Aquatics at 757 4441 or
754 9339 Total cost Is S335 and Includes a $100
non refundable deposit Non diver cost Is
$182
Rugby
Interested in playing this intense sport? No
prior experience Is needed, lust good
physical condition Is required Team
meeting tonight. Tues Jan 22 at 5,
downstairs in memorial gym For more Info
contact. Bill Zimmermann, 758 7030
Ski Club
Let's rip the North Carolina mtns together
Trips to be planned this spring Equipment
will be auxtloned! For example, Caber Ex
cellerator sklboots. size 9 150. and much
more Contact Kevin Mussler, 758 4459
Phys. Ed Majors
All students who plan to declare Physical
Education as a major should report to
Minges coliseum at 12 p m Wed , Jan 30 for
a motor and physical fitness test Satlsfac
tory performance on this test is required as a
prerequisite for official admittance to the
physical education maior program More
detailed Information is available by calling
757 4441 or 4442
Any student with a medical condition tha'
would contralndlcate participation in the
testing program should contact Dr Israel at
757 4497 Examples would Include heart mur
murs. congenital heart disease respiratory
disorders or significant musculoskeletal pro
blems If you have any significant medical
conditions please notify Dr Israel if you
plan to be tested
Lasagna Supper $1
P'esbyterian students and 'heir friends are
invited 'o a lasagna shipper tonight altpm
at the First Presbvterian Church of Green
vllle. located on the corner ot Elm and Utn
sts Cost is only II Sponsored by the
Presbyterian Campus Ministry
Ambassadors
Don't forget our New York visitors will be
here Jan 22 24 All ambassadors are re
guested to attend a reception in their honor
on Tues . Jan 22 at 7 30 p m at the Alumni
Center Lef s really welcome our guests to
ECU and Greenville This Is really an honor
for our organization See you Tues
Omega Psi Phi
Will be having it's Spring Smoker on Wed
Jan 23 at 8 p m in Mendenhall 5'udent
Center in Rm 244 Also there will be � par
a'the Unlimited Touch Thurs Jan 24 There
will be a 9 11 happy hour and all proceeds
will go to Greenville s Ronald McDonald
building fund
NAACP
The NAACP next meeting win be held or-
Mon Jan 28th in mendenhall studenf center
in the cotfeehousse �� 5 30 p m Everyone is
urged 'o attend
Psi Chi
Tnere will be an important business meeting
of all Psi Chi members on Wed , Jan 23 at
6 30 p m in SP 202 i Psi Chi library) All
members are urged to attend
ECU Newman Catholic
Community
Invites you to join us this Wed for our week
ly prayer service and group meeting Who
knows? We may have something you'd like
to help us with in '85! come on by and find
out Wed at 5 pm . at the ECU Newman
Center on east 10th stliust past the music
building)
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship
We're alive in '85 and we want you to join us!
The inter'varsity Christian fellowship pro
vldes students with an opportunity tor fun.
friendship, faith, and even a few surprises!
But why not see for yourself? Join us Wed
night at 7 in the auditorium. Jenkins Art
building,and bring a friend, ok?
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert CargUl
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenville, NC
758-4927
DRAFT NITE
TUE. JAN 22,1985 8:30-l:00am
Adm $1.00 18yrs. $1.00
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
ALPHA PHI
BIG BROTHERS
Present
DRAFT NITE
WED. JAN 23,1985 8:30-l:00am
Adm. $1.50 18yrs. $1.00
. 10 DRAFT ALL NITE
Co rec Bowling
its doubles time! Get your gals and guys
together to make some alley action!
Register In room 204 Memorial Gym from
Feb 4 5 The lanes will light up on Feb 11
Swim Meet
The annual IRS swim meet will be held in
early Feb Register Feb 2 7 Get your squad
together and pool your efforts! Sign up in 204
memorial gym
Arm Wrestling
It's coming! IRS and Budwelser Is sponsor
ing the annual arm wrestling competition
All participants will receive t shirts Dlvi
sions for men and women are avllable!
Register Jan 28 30 in room 204 memorial
gym
Video Games Tourney
The IRS Is sponsoring a video games tourna
ment to be held in Aycock game room The
competition begins Jan 23 Register In
memorial gym Jan 21 23
Racquetball Doubles
Register for Intramural racquetball doubles
from Jan 28 30 Mens and womens divisions
are available Register In room 204
memorial gym
3tu
�i
FRANK'S PIZZA
LOCATED AT THE PI.A.A
take outs available 756-8798
I 1.00 OFF
Any whole
pizza purchase
1 r
I I
I I
I I
I I
.50 OFF
An whole sub
j Fxp. March 1, 1985 JExp. March 1, 1985
Greenville
Flower Shop
758-2774
Corner Evans & HTh St.
TJREV OF WAITING FOR A BUS TO KUPUS
HAVING TO WAIT JN LINE FORA � PA
WHEN VOU VR1VE TO CLASS? R 7
IS AS CLOSE TO CLASSROOMS AS S
PORWS. COME LIVE WITH US AW El
ADVANTAGES OF OFF-CAMPUS LU'l: WITrl
CONVENIENCE OF LIVING RIGHT AT 7- I i
RINGGOLDTOvVFRS
At The Campus 'East Carolina Ui
I'Jiyi 555-2698
MON. Pizza Night 409 Elizabeth St.
TUE. ECU "Golden Girls" 752-4379
WED. Sorority Night Catch the bus and ride
ALL PARTIES 9-UNTIL IP's will be checked
BARNES LOW PRICES make
NURY AFFORDABLE!
LADfES DIAMOND
EARRINGS
$1095
Suggested Retail$29 95
. LADIES 7 DIAMOND
?cluster ring
Va Carat T.W.
12 Carat T.W.
1 Carat T.W .
2 Carat T.W .
S219.00
&345.00
699.00
I99 �
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ALL GENT'S
AND LADIES
WATCHES 30 O off
'BULOVA�PULSAR
?CITIZEN-HAMILTON
.cmzEN -hamilTon Suggested Retail
We do all types of jewelry repair, including ring sizing and remounting on the premises.
arnes
Diamond
Gallery
kx II ; t Ni) ' .)! ()sH N' �
Open Mon s,m in M to 9 I'M
( �h-l juuii -Bank i .ir.1
Of Sinxr I hat
Phoiw 7S6 f.fi96
Morgan
RALEIGH (UPI) Attorne job MJ
General l.ac Thornburg Mon gre J
day named former I S Sen in j
Robert Morgan a the State I
Bureau of Investigation's new re
director, and Morgan said he will ma
stay in office during Thornburg's steppin
four-year term Morgan is the politi
husband of ECU Board of said
Trustees member Kane Morgan to
Morgan, who also was the
state's attornev general for six givetty
years, said he would not run for 'he m
any public office in 1986. in- ment p
eluding a possible bid to a i M (
Sen. John East R-S , because to Thi
of his commitment to his new througj
'New Begin
WASH IN' ft pij
President Reagan, taking
public oae in a
ceremony ndoors b �
tic temperai M o n I
delivered a- i igural addre
which he called for a freeze
federal spending next ea-
nation has reached "a morr
for hard decisions
Addressing a
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 1985
IK'S PIZZA
AT THK PI AA
ailable 756-878
J .50 OFF
w An whole su
m85j lvp March 1, 1
o!f
b
1985
!2
Rizabeth St.
179
the bus and ride
ill be checked
make
It f f "
I0ND V lA
IGS
ies 7 diamond
STER RING
219.00
T � -i 34 5.00
699.00
V 1999.00
OFF
lii
rnounting on the premises.
Plaza
Mon Srft io AM to 9 PM
Phon�- 7i6 f�696
,
T
Morgan Named To SBI Post
RALEIGH (UPI) Attorney
General Lacy Thornburg Mon
day named former U.S. Sen.
Robert Morgan as the State
Bureau of Investigation's new
director, and Morgan said he will
stay in office during Thornburg's
four-year term. Morgan is the
husband of ECU Board of
Trustees member Katie Morgan.
Morgan, who also was the
state's attorney general for six
years, said he would not run for
any public office in 1986, in-
cluding a possible bid to oust
Sen. John East, R-N.C because
of his commitment to his new
job. Morgan was a one-term con-
gressman when East defeated him
in 1980.
"Now, 1 also want to lay to
rest at this time any idea that I
may try to use this position as a
stepping stone to any further
political advancement Morgan
said. "I come to this assignment,
to this opportunity, but with one
thought in mind and that is to
give the people of North Carolina
the most effective law enforce-
ment possible.
Morgan said he is committed
to Thornburg to "help him
throughout his term, or as long as
he needs me
"To that end I tell you now
that 111 not be a candidate for
any public office in 1986 and that
includes the United States
Senate he said.
Morgan replaces Haywood
Starling, who stepped down as
director Jan. 5 after heading the
bureau for eight years. Court of
Appeals Associate Justice Gerald
Arnold swore in Morgan as his
wife Katie and daughters Mary
and Margaret looked on.
Since his Senate defeat,
Morgan has been practicing law
with the Lillington firm of
Morgan, Bryan, Jones and
Johnson. Morgan reportedly has
a lucrative practice, but friends
say he has been itching to return
to public life.
Thornburg described Morgan,
who has served in public office
for 26 years, as an unselfish man
and called him "the father of our
modern-day SBI
"I make this announcement
with total confidence in Robert
Morgan's ability and his integrity
and fully convinced that he will
serve the people of North
Carolina with honor and distinc-
tion in this important position
WHO CARES
ABOUT RISING HEALTH CARE COSTS
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information regarding the early detection of many
conditions such as loss of sleep, headaches, industrial
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WE CARE
Dr. Steven I Cohen
Mill Street 756-8160 Winterville NC 28590
'New Beginning' Promised By Reagan
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Reagan, taking his
public oath of office in a
ceremony forced indoors by arc-
tic temperatures, Monday
delivered an inaugural address in
which he called for a freeze on
federal spending next year as the
nation has reached "a moment
for hard decisions
Addressing a standing crowd
packed into the rotunda of the
Capitol, Reagan and Vice Presi-
dent George Bush repeated their
oaths of office in a public
ceremeny that had been forced
inside by frigid temperatures and
gusting winds that also scrubbed
the traditional inaugural parade
down Pennsylvania Avenue to
the White House.
"The time has come for a new
ACROSS
1 Secret agent
4 Be defeated
6 Lad
1 1 Portico
12 Sole
13 Veneration
14 Babylonia
deity
15 Small rug
17 Longs 'or
19 Priest s
vestment
21 Silent
23 Yellow ocher
24 Actual
26 Proverb
28 Repair
31 Chinese pagoda
33 Stitch
35 Pronoun
36 Proceed
38 Serving dish
4 1 Agam pretix
42 Poem
44 Stalemate
45 Obstruct
47 Hebrew month
49 Attempt
51 Partner
54 Algonquian
Indian
56 Perch
58 Still
59 Climbing palm
62 Lamprey
64 Japanese
drama
65 Exist
66 Toll
68 Black
70 Armed conflict
71 Dispatch
72 Sticky liquid
DOWN
1 Vap.d
2 River in Italy
3 Sweet potato
4 Tree of forget-
fulness
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
5 In contact with
6 Crafty
7 Organs of sight
8 Cereal grass
9 Possess
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141 16I 'TP
1920 �2122� .1
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� 1984 UnKdf�atur� Syndicale
10 Affirmative
11 Scorch
16 Forenoon
18 Direct at target
20 Baseball club
22 Experts
25 Once around
track
27 Moist
29 Direction abbr
30 Owing
32 In music, high
34 Marry
36 Tibetan gazelle
37 Unusual
39 River island
40 Male sheep
43 Christian
festival
46 Springtime
48 Rodent
50 Give up
52 Choir voice
53 Short iacket
55 Headgear pi
57 Symbol tor
tellurium
59 Uncooked
60 Macaw
61 Born
63 Permit
67 Article
69 Symbol for
banum
American Emancipation � a
great national drive to tear down
economic barriers and liberate
the spirit of enterprise in the most
distressed areas of our country
Reagan said after proclaiming
tha: the "new beginning" he
sought four years ago has been
accomplished.
Reagan, at 73 the oldest person
sworn in as the nation's chief ex-
ecutive, told a national television
audience "our nation is poised
for greatness. We must do what
we know is right and do it with all
our might
"Let history say of us these
were golden years � when the
American Revolution was
reborn said the president in
speaking of his next four years in
office.
Reagan, with Republicans and
Democrats in the audience of
mostly public officials, said the
unlimited future of the country
can only be reached by imposing
limits on the federal government.
"We must not repeat the well
intentioned errors of our past"
by abusing "the trust of working
men and women, by sending their
earnings on a futile chase after
the spiraling demands of a
bloated federal establishment
He told Americans they elected
him in 1980 "to end this prescrip-
tion for disaster. I do not believe
you re-elected us in 1984 to
reverse course
Discussing the economy and
the massive federal deficit,
Reagan declared: "We have
come to a turning point, a mo-
ment for hard decisions
"I will shortly submit a budget
to the Congress aimed at freezing
government program spending
for the next year he said in one
of the few specific items raised in
his inaugural address.
"Beyond that we must take
further steps to permanently con-
trol government's power to tax
and spend said Reagan, who
renewed his pitch for requiring
the federal government to
operate under the restrictions of a
balanced budget, just as most
states must.
SOFT CONTACTS
DAILY WLAR UO.OOpalr
EXTENDED
WEAN $60.00pair
I INT LI) $70.00P�'f
(blue aqua,
green, brown)
STUDENT ID REQUIRED
I he Atoe piht do not in, hide fees tor professional s�TKes
Professional ti-es depeiul oi lens type and sour ptvxKWs sou
Jens eerieiue
Call for more information � 756-9404.
onowcrwc
�Y�CAAEC�MTCR
Drs Holhs Vt Svibal
I ipion Annex 228 dreenvillv Bivd

1SS
Wanted
The East Carolinian is now taking
applications for the position of
Advertising Layout Technician. Ex-
perence is not necessary but helpful.
Artistic ability a must. Intersted per-
sons may pick up an application at
The East Carolinian office located on
the second floor of the Publications
building across from Joyner Library.
ightclub
presents
Wednesday
THE ALL NEW
ladies' Mifl
LOCK-UP
Featunng
Daddy Cool
Playing the Hottest Dance Music Down East'
All ladies Admitted Free From 8 10
With Free Draft & Wine Plu� J1.00 Highball,
Guys In At 10:00
Phone 756 6401
Cmon out to Greenville s Hot Hits Nightspot
ne one the ontv Beau j of course'
I-ocated in the Carolina East Centre
Br.u j u t pnv.i, ,ub t,� mrmhs lnd ,� lu , . Aai. .
Su-iu u aw. rftmui MrtnXrrili.pi av.ii.tMr � ihr Oooi
Guests are welcome.
Watch for details on the Ms Bemus Contest - Coming Soon'
Something That You Will
Always Treasure)
Low Prices Available
Your Official ECU Class Ring
rw,JAN. 23-24 Tim. 9:00-4:00
PJmr .Student Supply Store-Wright Building
STUDENTS y IT

MENS AND WOMENS OVERCOATS
TRENCH COATS
MEN'S SUIT VEST
NEW SHIPMENT Just In !
NEW SHIPMENT OF SWEATERS
9.95 up
5.95
2.95
5.95
CORDUROY SHIRTS (REG.4.95)
BUY 4, GET 1 FREE
S?
3.95
SPECIAL
MEN'S JACKETS (cord,plaid,tweed,solids) 9.95
FREE BUTTON DOWN SHIRT WITH EACH CO A T
SUPER SPECIAL
WOMEN'S BLAZERS (some from 40's and 50's) 9.95
FREE BLOUSE WITH EACH BLAZER
Of course, JEANS, SHIRTS, CAR COATS, WINDBREAKERS,
LONGJOHNS, SKIRTS.SKI JACKETS,AND MUCH MORE.
COIN AND RING MAN
Corner Evans and 4th St.
�S Recycled Estate Clothing From H'i v Bos Philadelphia, etc.
���. � m m m m e � �
�i m .� "i '
" �� MX ��-�
� ii iiejteefcaje�tttsst
'l� �ll 4��
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�hz �aat Olarnluiian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. ammmtmmmtm
Greg Rideout. itmmpm, tdM
Jennifer Jendrasiak. �� s. Tom Luvender. o�c0�.f
Scott Cooper. c w� mm. Anthony Martin. �,��� a,�
Tina Maroschak. km e� John Peterson, cm m
Bui Mitchell, ommm w.� bill Dawson, ���. � �
Doris Rankins. s�, r,ck Mccormac. � m�,
JOHN RUSK, Advrnaing Trcllnuian
lanuars 22, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
SGA
Legislature Needs More Action
An East Carolinian reporter has
attended every SGA Legislature
meeting this year. In fact, one of
our reporters has been covering the
beat for more than two years.
We've seen several different ver-
sions of the Legislature. This year
it is different. The quality of activi-
ty is not the same. And someone
needs to light a fire underneath its
members.
The Legislature is passive, very
passive. In the true spirit of
democracy, a legislative body
argues questions of substance that
affect all they serve. A legislature
is a deliberative body that en-
ourages argument and debate,
that champions minority causes
and concerns and that fosters free
speech and independence. Ours
tails short of these ideals.
Yes, we know the SGA is a lear-
ning experience. But education too
is not passive; it is active. Last
night, for example, the Legislature
spent $6,100 of student money
without a single no vote. All bills
were passed by consent. The three
major appropriations bills received
less than five minutes of debate �
if what they did was indeed debate.
Most speakers just asked meek
questions about the facts. We're
not saying that the money wasn't
well spent, we're just saying that it
seemed like the Legislature didn't
care who got the money.
Cold
Greenville is paying the price.
Ah, those balmy, summertime-like
temperatures in December are
haunting us now. But there's
always the time to pay up, and the
time is now.
Winter, Old Man Winter, has
descended on us. And boy, oh boy,
has he brought the full arsenal of
cold with him. Record
temperatures have hit ECU like an
iceberg slapping the Titanic. What
could have caused it?
Why are students huddling in
hallways wrapped in more layers
of clothing than an Arctic ex-
plorer? Insiders with the National
To us, it seems, most members
of the Legislature are being slack
in their duties. You are not a rub-
ber stamp. Sure most work is done
in committee. The Appropriations
Committee, we knov works long
and hard and deserves praise for its
accomplishments. But a body that
just sits there, flaccid, while stu-
dent money is being given out, is
not doing its job.
Some legislators may feel they
have done a good job. Some have.
Student forums and other things
have been wonderful ideas. Some
may feel they are being unduly
criticized. Well, heck, you are in
the public eye. You are responsible
to your constituents, and the job
you are doing, at least on the floor,
is not adequate. Is there not proper
study going into each issue by
every member? Do legislators just
want to "get it over with and g.o
home?" Are some legislators not
serious enough? Each of you
should answer these questions.
Maybe the Legislature is a
reflection of the apathy on cam-
pus. Maybe each of you are just
exhibiting the inability or unwill-
ingness to question that has grip-
ped the student body as a whole.
We do think, though, that as stu-
dent leaders each legislator should
be the exception rather than the
rule. Remember that the next time
someone wants a thousand bucks.
Weather Service secrectly slipped
us the scoop. You see, this mass of
colder-than-heck air has been
waiting, waiting for the right time
to get even. "What?" it says.
"You ECUers were sunning
yourselves on Christmas Day. I'll
get you
So, alas, we are taken to shiver-
ing in our boots. We are broken
down to sniveling underneath our
scarves. It is the price we pay. Just
pray the nasty Old Man doesn't
decide to pitch camp here. If he
does, it's time to sign him up for
the football team.
IfBQUTE TO QUIT CHEATING
IF YOU PONT STOP LAUGHING
I WONT SIGN MOF THESE
Court Ruling Bad Policy
By GREG RIDEOUT
The Supreme Court ruled Jan. 15
that public school teachers and officials
can search students if there is
"reasonable grounds" that the search
will yield evidence of a law infraction or
a violation of school rules. The decision
in New Jersey v. T.L.O. steered a mid-
dle course through two adversarial
views of the relationship between the
Constitution and the public schools.
The 6-3 Court decision rejected the
argument that the Fourth
Amendment's limitations on search and
seizure do not apply at all in the school
setting. Associate Justice Byron White,
in writing the majority opinion, also
denied that the amendment's limits ap-
ply in full. White said the doctrine of in
loco pa rent is was "in tension with con-
temporary realities and the teachings of
this court But, the Court said, main-
taining order in a learning environment
necessitated easing normal restrictions
"to which searches by public
authorities are ordinarily subjected
The case which spurred the opinion
involved a Piscataway, N.J ninth-
grade student who in 1980 had her
purse searched after a teacher saw her
smoking in the lavatory. The search
yielded rolling papers, marijuana and
written evidence that the girl was selling
the drug. The Court said that a girl
caught violating a no-smoking rule in
school can have her purse searched � if
a teacher or other administrator sees
her smoking. The Court didn't
elaborate on whether evidence obtained
could be used in court nor if searches of
lockers or desks were "reasonable
The narrowness of the decision does
not evade some troubling facts. The
Court is sanctioning, by upholding as
constitutional, what lower courts have
allowed for years. Now, over zealous
teachers will be able to search many
students for the most trivial of matters
relating to school policy. A conser-
vative Court can be expected in future
years to chip away further at a student's
rights and broaden the definition of
"reasonableness As Associate Justice
John Paul Stevens said in his partial
dissent, searches "for curlers and
sunglasses" will be tolerated to enforce
school dress codes under the sanctity of
the Constitution.
The Court has erred. Their decision
to sit on the fence will give them and the
nation only splinters, which future
courts must pick out. Sure, school ad-
ministrators need a little leeway to en-
sure that an adequate environment for
learning is maintained, but only in the
gravest of circumstances and under the
most narrow of rules is the Fourth
Amendment to be bent for this pur-
pose. The three dissentors, Associate
Justices Stevens, William J. Brennan
and Thurgood Marshall, all agree that
the Court went too far. Brennan said
the departure from the "probable
cause" doctrine that has historically
been allied with the Fourth Amendment
to a "reasonableness" standard is
"unclear, unprecedented and un-
necessary
The Court seems to be getting closer
and closer to freeing absolutely the
perpetrators of searches of any stan-
dards of conduct. To a student, a purse
is very personal property. Being seen
smoking is not a very good reason for
the courts to allow a purse to be search-
ed. Just like being seen speeding is not a
good reason for a cop to search a
motorist's trunk. What is the dif-
ference?
The Court answers that keeping the
academic setting conducive to learning
gives principals and teachers the right to
do something a policeman can't. But
this reasoning is unfounded. Smoking a
cigarette in the bathroom is not the step
before a riot or full-fledged drug pro-
blem. Smoking a cigarette in the
i �: - �t�
Jill
bathroom is not going to cause a -�
dent to flunk a math test or cu
teacher. Sure, the drugs were founc
this one girl, but what about the nev"1
Should she be subjected to the ransack
ing of her personal belonging1- for i
pack of cigarettes? What's next, aftei
broadening of the rules, a strip jeai
in the gym lockerroom"1
The rule the Court should have Hand-
ed down should be the one
Stevens gives in his dissenting Oj
A search is warranted only when i
uncover "evidence that the studerr
violating the law or engaging in cond .
that is seriously disruptive of sch
order This should be taken t
that a student can be searched if he
she is highly suspected of dealing if
or carrying weapons. Only then is an ii
fringement of the Fourth Amend
to be allowed in the nation's $ch
Our country is a state proud of the
rights it has bestowed on our citizenry
We are a civilized nation that �
the sanctity of the person and h
belongings. For the Court to aim
recklessly disregard them to give 5ch
authorities more power than necessan
is an unprecedented move with . �
rant. If our school system is ro be
prevented from turning mio a rmmavwc
police state, we must protest �
sion and advise the other branch
our government to nullify the da
JgOACKMS
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BMsSfc �T 15 v
Economic Solutions From Both Sides Of Fence Off Mark
The universe of discourse has become
unecessarily restricted. The people of a
great nation have been duped into
believing they must whore their values to
the exigencies of the moment. On the
right, people are heard insisting that, for
the sake of encouraging excellence and
initiative, social cruelities such as high
unemployment, race- and gender-based
discrimination and poverty in the midst
of affluence must be tolerated. (We are
told that the magic of the market will
make these problems simply disappear
From The Left
Joy Stone
in some interminable long run.) From
the center comes the somewhat muted
suggestion that we have reached "an era
of limits" in what government can do
about social injustice and, therefore, we
must encourage economic growth so
government can afford to maintain the
status quo. (You can't get more slices
out of a shrinking pie and all that.) Yet,
implicit in this notion is the idea that we
must learn to accommodate ourselves to
ugly necessities and social injustice. Ah
� the cruelty of the facts when
measured against a soul's yearning
There comes a time in the affairs of
men when flaccid-brained swill must be
rebelled against and overcome. The time
is now. Let us rebel in unison, for the
human spirit demands a constant ex-
ponential increase in its capacity for the
experience of compassion and the drive
for social progress, not its atrophy.
Last week, I examined eight fun-
damental structural changes that are
profoundly altering our society and the
nature of our social problems. Briefly,
they are: l)the transition from an in-
dustrial to a post-industrial economy,
2)the collapse of the Bretton Woods
system and the demise for the interna-
tional economic order, 3)de-
industrialization and corporate flight,
4)limits to growth � the finiteness of
resources and the capacity of the en-
vironment to sustain disruption, 5)the
concentration of poverty among single,
female heads of households, 6)the grow-
ing prevalence of national liberation
movements and economically motivated
revolutions in the Third World, 7)the in-
creasingly technological and dangerous
nature of the arms race and 8)the in-
creasing trend toward oligopoly and
conglomeration in the economy,
democratic and humanistic values must
be the starting point in all blueprints for
restructuring our social institutions.
The conservative response to struc-
tural changes, such as the ones outlined
above, is generally to let market forces
address them. Government, however,
may provide incentives such as taxes on
consumption or tax subsidies for invest-
ment to help prod market forces along.
The problem with the conservative solu-
tion is it often has been the very market
forces associated with an oligopolistic
economic system and economic institu-
tions in which power is organized hierar-
chical that have caused many of our
current problems. Decision making by
elites based upon the profit motive is
often short-sighted and counter to the
public interest. Examples are the failure
of the steel industry and automobile in-
dustry to innovate until faced with
financial ruin. The dumping of hazar-
dous wastes in this country and the ag-
gressive marketing in Third World coun-
tries of pesticides such as DDT and other
toxic chemicals and corporate support
for despotic governments abroad that
express contempt for human rights and
democratic values are other examples.
The conservative speaks in hushed
and reverent tones for the freedom of
the owner of property to dispose of his
property as he sees fit. Sometimes he
even suggests that property rights are in
God's plan for us. Meanwhile, the
freedom of the employee is to refuse to
work for one employer and look for
another job or go hungry and the
freedom of the consumer is to buy,
boycott or do without; to have a clean
environment or a healthy economy, but
not both. In such a circumscribed
universe it seems clear the conservative
notion of freedom is freedom for a few
and servitude and powerlessness for the
many.
The liberal solution attempts to ad-
dress the problems which conservatism
ignores by calling for government
regulation of and limited involvement in
the economy. (The liberal call for a na-
tional industrial policy as well as en-
vironmental and consumer protection
regulations are examples of this.) The
problem here, however, is the public sec-
tor ends up footing the bill for subsidiz-
ing or policing industry as well as for the
extraneous costs of production such as
environmental pollution, unemployment
and, sometimes, corporate failure.
Meanwhile, the public does not actually
realize any of the benefits from its in-
vestment in the form of wage or job
guarantees from industries which profit
from this public spending, nor is the
public afforded an enhanced input into
economic decision-making (such as
whether a new factory will be built in
Taiwan or in a depressed region in the
United States where people need jobs.)
In addition, business frequently
manages to weaken and circumspect
government regulations that protect the
public and workers so as to render them
impotent. Morevover, because the
public fails to perceive a direct benefit
which accrues to it from many welfare
state programs and resents paying for
them, the political will to maintain the
welfare state can erode. Social welfare
programs which benefit the weakest
members of society are generallv the
first to come under the knife since they
have no powerful lobbies and are poorlv
organized.
The solution from the Democratic left
to our difficulties consists, first and
foremost, in the call for an extension of
the democracy which we enjoy in the
political sphere into the economic
sphere. The fundamental premise here is
that those who are affected by economic
decisions should have a say in the
decision-making process. This idea has
ramifications, not only for the domestic
economy, but for the global economv
and foreign policy as well. In this man-
ner, the adversarial relationship between
business and labor is transformed and
productivity is increased without
sacrificing some of the nobler values
which populate the American psvehe.
Another idea stressed bv the
Democratic left is that an emphasis upon
economic growth must be harmonized
with the necessity of respecting the limits
of the natural environment. This does
not mean the goal of economic growth
in the abstract must be abandoned. It
means that certain ways of going about
pursuing growth are inappropriate to
contemporary realities.
Campu
(CPS) - It's been a year now sii
a court order broke up American
Telephone and Telegraphs com
munications monopoly into one
long-distance service ana seven
regional earners
And it's been an unusual and
occasionally rough year for
students as their campuses strug-
gle to cope with the changes by
testing new phone systems and
sometimes even becoming their
own phone companies
Moreover, a number of col-
leges "don't know hat thev're
doing one consultant charges
Other observers, mure
don't see the skua . .
much in 1985
For State University of
York at Binghamton (SI B)
students, 1984 was a year of dead
lines, charges for ex'ra services
and higher phone rates
"The university installed
system in good faith say? M
jories Leffler. the student govo
ment presideni They hoped to
provide cheaper service -
phone com par
It hasn quite worked out on
other campuses yet. either
The jury is still out on college-
owned telephone system
Michael Toner, president of the
Association of College and
University Telecommum ft
Administrators.
Some schools considei .
telecommunications equipm-
purchases till are appraising the
mistakes of colleges that have
already ventured to becor-
own phone compames
"Most (systems) have bee:
service for less than :o years
Toner notes. Some scho
had the old Centrex (Bell-owi
system would have been be-
off not to switch as Bel:
decreases have made souk
nate systems more expen-
While most schools - ne
systems to save monev, expense
for new staff and equipmerv
mount up quickly, he adds.
Teacher Exam
Above National
;
- -
Teacher education -tudents
ECU scored well above
minimum standard on a thi
part examination give:
spective teachers.
The studer.
undergraduates, took par-
National Teacher Examinatic
Students taking Core Ba- tei
and II compiled mea
654 and 656 re-
students taking Core Batten
passed. 98 percent of tl
taking Core Battery I passed
NTE Core Battenes 1 and II
measure a student's communica-
tion skills and genera acad
knowledge acquired m the I
two years of college Pas .
scores are required for en
a teacher education p . a:
ECU
ECU students taking Core Ba-
tery III. which measures rro:e
sional knowledge about teach .
and learning, also scored �
above the cut-off pom u
some 93 percent passif
Students must score 644 set-
ter to achieve teacher certifica-
tion in North Carolina
The scores were announces
Charles Coble, dean of the ECU
Karr Responds
To Action
Director of Athletics ken karr.
who last week was bj :he
SGA Legislature to seek student
opinion when making import
decisions, said he will alwavs seek
input from students if time per-
mits.
"Depending on the nature of
things, if we find we have the op-
portunity to have student input
karr said, "we try to have
students' input karr said some
instances have a time fad
preclude student involvement
The athletic director said he is
always eager to listen to students
and respond to their concerns
� - � -
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INT STOP LAUGHING
SIGN ANT OF THESE!
rut fAsr C AROI IMAS
JAM AfO 22, 1VX
Policy
cause a stu-
" cuss at a
found on
the next?
ransack-
- : �gs for a
A next, after a
trip search
I have hand-
le Justice
ng opinion:
hen it will
indent is
aging in conduct
ptive of school
I tx taken to mean
searched ii he or
lealing drugs
a ther. is an in-
mendment
a
(
s scnoois.
id of the
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that honors
or and his
1 to almost
them to give school
than necessar)
ve without war-
i system is to be
nto a miniature
tesl this deci-
inches of
iulhfv :he decision.
i
W& TO k&p RiUilOK to POUTCS?
) Afar
programs and resents paying for
political will to maintain the
re state can erode. Social welfare
I which benefit the weakest
umbers ' society are generally the
I me under the knife since they
le no powerful lobbies and are poorly
zamzed.
The solution from the Democratic left
our difficulties consists, first and
femost, in the call for an extension of
democracy which we enjoy in the
Ittical sphere into the economic
lere The fundamental premise here is
it those who are affected by economic
:isions should have a say in the
:ision-making process. This idea has
tifications, not only for the domestic
Jnomy, but for the global economy
foreign policy as well. In this man-
the adversarial relationship between
siness and labor is transformed and
)ductivity is increased without
Infixing some of the nobler values
ich populate the American psyche.
"mother idea stressed by the
locratic left is that an emphasis upon
bnomic growth must be harmonized
In the necessity of respecting the limits
the natural environment. This does
mean the goal of economic growth
t ic abstract must be abandoned. It
ins that certain ways of going about
suing growth are inappropriate to
itemporary realities.
�������
A
J
Campus Phone Service Suffers
(CPS) It's been a year now since
a court order broke up American
Telephone and Telegraph's com-
munications monopoly into one
long-distance service anu seven
regional carriers.
And it's been an unusual and
occasionally rough year for
students as their campuses strug-
gle to cope with the changes by
testing new phone systems and
sometimes even becoming their
own phone companies.
Moreover, a number of col-
leges "don't know what they're
doing one consultant charges.
Other observers, moreover,
don't see the situation changing
much in 1985.
For State University of New
York at Binghamton (SUNY-B)
students, 1984 was a year of dead
lines, charges for extra services
and higher phone rates.
"The university installed the
system in good faith says Mar-
jories Leffler, the student govern-
ment president. "They hoped to
provide cheaper service than the
phone company
It hasn't quite worked out on
other campuses yet, either.
The jury is still out on college-
owned telephone systems, says
Michael Toner, president of the
Association of College and
University Telecommunications
Administrators.
Some schools considering
telecommunications equipment
purchases still are appraising the
mistakes of colleges that have
already ventured to become their
own phone companies.
"Most (systems) have been in
service for less than two years
Toner notes. "Some schools that
had the old Centrex (Bell-owned)
system would have been better
off not to switch as Bell rate
decreases have made some alter-
nate systems more expensive
While most schools buy phone
systems to save money, expenses
for new staff and equipment can
mount up quickly, he adds.
The University of Chicago's
three-year-old system cost nearly
$15 million to install, ad-
ministrator Carol See explains,
while the university hopes to save
only $10 million over the next
five years.
UCLA expects to save $15
million over the next 15 years
with its $19 million system, says
John Terrell, system manager.
But Larry Larson, University
of New Mexico telecommunica-
tions manager, claims UNM has
cut phone expenses by 50 percent
since its December, 1983, pur-
chase of a $6 million state-of-the-
art Nippon NEAX 22 system.
Monthly phone bills have
decreased from nearly $270,000
to about $107,000 a month, he
says.
University of Missouri officials
hope redesigning the telecom-
munications systems at all four
UM campuses will save up to $10
million in 10 years.
Beginning with its Kansas City
campus, UM officials are
developing long-distance and
local service for faculty, ad-
ministrators and students,
reports Coleman Burton, UM's
director of telecommunications.
"Another reason for the
system is to get our act together
Burton admits. "At Kansas City
there are eight different phone
systems for three different loca-
tions. With the new system, we
hope to save $3 million to $5
million at KC alone in ten years
Despite anticipated savings,
many campuses still are finding a
few bugs � and some resentment
� in their systems.
University of Tennessee dorm
residents charce the number of
available of AT&Tlines has been
cut to force users onto the
university-owned Infonet system.
Students at other schools com-
plain of high rates, poor long-
distance connections and un-
professional maintenance, but
"the issue is here to stav
predicts Phillip Beidelman, presi-
dent of Western Telecommunica-
tions Consultants, Inc. "It's
good and bad news both ways,
not an open and shut case
Schools which have purchased
their own equipment seem to be
learning to run the systems and to
solve problems that arise, he
notes.
"We anticipated problems dur-
ing the cutover to the new
system UCLA's Terrell
remembers. "One minor problem
occurred, but users didn't even
notice because our service was so
lousy before
"There are good and bad
systems ACUTA's Toner ex-
plains. "Some systems are ab-
solutely horrible. Schools putting
more work into the selection deci-
sion generally get a better
system
"Universities have to find and
train quality people Beidelman
continues. "They have to be able
to offer competitive salaries
"If my clients don't make
commitments, they fail and
there's nothing I can do about
it he adds. "They're very
aware of problems, but I can't
say they all know what they're
getting into
Schools must choose equip-
ment, services, and options based
on such things as the college's
location, the type, age and cost of
the current system, penalties for
conversion, and the school's
academic mission, Beidelman
says.
The biggest complications, he
insists, are politics and competi-
tion.
"Cost is approximately $1,000
per line he says, "and it's a
highly politically oriented expen-
diture. Pressure by vendors on
governing boards and universities
becomes hostile and extremely
competitive
But a more obvious problem,
especially to colleges selling dor-
mitory phone service, is student
abuse of long-distance service.
Colorado State University
students recently ran up $6,245 in
illegal phone calls by breaking
assigned long-distance codes.
Two students face felony com-
puter fraud charges for calls of
more than $200.
The University of Oklahoma's
six-digit billing codes have temp-
ted some students to charge long-
distance calls to as many as 30
different codes.
"Students like to try to find
ways to beat the system Wayne
Olson, OU telecommunications
manager observes.
But OU officials quickly
caught the culprits, Olson says,
and withheld their transcripts and
admission approvals until the
charges were paid.
20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Parkview Common
Actom From Doctors Park
oEar �
V5btk
plicians
Otxn 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446

ECU - LET PIZZA HUT
DELIVER TO YOU
ARTHUR MERRILL McQLAUFLIN
ATTORNFA'AT L�W
� :MfcTRAFFK. OFfcfcNSES
� � HILO SUPPORT AND CUSTODY
�-SEPARATION AGREEMENTS
. RESIDENTIAL LO
� PERSONAL INJURE
� PROPERTY DAM
IQLOSINGS
Flexible
Qftic- Hours
757-1055
101 W. 14th St. Greenville, NC
sypun
Requett
MASTERCARD MSA ACCEPTED
Teacher Exam Scores
Above National Average
Fl I Nm Burrau
Teacher education students at
ECU scored well above the
minimum standard on a three-
part examination given to pro-
spective teachers.
The students, all
undergraduates, took parts of the
National Teacher Examination.
Students taking Core Batteries 1
and II compiled mean scores of
654 and 656 respectively. All
students taking Core Battery II
passed; 98 percent of the students
taking Core Battery I passed.
NTE Core Batteries I and II
measure a student's communica-
tion skills and general academic
knowledge acquired in the first
two years of college. Passing
scores are required for entry into
a teacher education program at
ECU.
ECU students taking Core Bat-
tery III, which measures profes-
sional knowledge about teaching
and learning, also scored well
above the cut-off point, with
some 93 percent passing.
Students must score 644 or bet-
ter to achieve teacher certifica-
tion in North Carolina.
The scores were announced by
Charles Coble, dean of the ECU
Karr Responds
To Action
Director of Athletics Ken Karr,
who last week was advised by the
SGA Legislature to seek student
opinion when making important
decisions, said he will always seek
input from students if time per-
mits.
"Depending on the nature of
things, if we find we have the op-
portunity to have student input
Karr said, "we try to have
students' input Karr said some
instances have a time factor that
preclude student involvement.
The athletic director said he is
always eager to listen to students
and respond to their concerns.
School of Education. Tne
students took the test batteries in
late October.
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
jflfJ'� Combinot:�n Special:
yflj&ftt2 Shrimp, Trout & Deviled Crob
3rTSDC
FF or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw & Hush Puppies - $3.99
105 Airport Rood
Fresh, Hot and Always Fast
Delivery Area: All ECU Dorms
Cyprus Gardens Cannon Ct Kings Row
College View Last brook River Bluff
Cherry St. Forest Manor V illage (.reen
Wilson Acres Tar River Estates Greenmill Run
Pia Hut Reserves The Right To 1 imit Defiverj rea.
HOLRS: SunThurs. 5:00-1:00. FriSat. 5:00-2.00
752-4445
East 10th St.
Greenville
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
" : etchei Mus . I � j. Re la! Ha
Wednesday � km, � 2 5PM
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
Greensboro
Elliot University i let tf Alexander Room
Friday February 1
Singers 1 3 PM. Dancers 4 5 PM
Instrumentalists & Specialty Acts 1 3 PM
Technician Interviews will be held at North Carolina School of
the Arts in The Workplace Dance Studio 615 on Saturday
February 2 from 1 3 PM. am; Carowinds n the Midway
Music Hall on Sunday February 3 from 1 4 PM
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists
Technicians � Variety Performers �
$190 $270 week
� ' :�?' a : ; : � � � � ; .
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:� � I . �.
KINGS ISLAND � KINGS DOMINION
CAROWINDS � CANADA S WONDERLAND.
GREAT AMERICA � HANNA BARBERA LAND
?
rr
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
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tie Ommtk w�d
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24 hour To�iag Service
IHmI ReiMifa
p��enie7rF TSctTcSrT
Homestyle Cooknq
AlUouCan Eat
breakfast 7J00-9530
lunch: 11:00 V- 30
dinner: 4:30-600
It xsrolina dining ser
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity
Rush
If
For those who know it is
not enough to do everything
you must do everything well
Mendenhall Student Center
January 2 -23from 7-1lp.m.
�' � � -j�
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I






I HI- I AM i AKOI INIAN
style
JAM ARY 22, I9R? Page
The Boss Proves Unbeatable On 'USA' Tour
B DAI F SHANNON
Nl�ff Wnln
"No one's better than Bruce
said Betsv lewis, a UNC-G stu-
dent and graduate of Springs-
teen's own alma mater in
Freeport, New Jersey. "But it's
not the same as seeing him in
Jersey. There's just no com
parison she said Well. Pve
never been to New Jersey myself
so 1 didn't exactly know where
she was coming from. 1 kne v
that in his introduction to "Pink
Cadillac" he described the
Garden State as the original loca-
tion of the Garden of Eden. But
I've also picked up another image
of Jersev in his songs, one that
reminds me of man other nor-
thern manufacturing towns
places I knew growing up and
people whose faces I aw in many
of his songs. Freeport, Hoboken,
Darlington County and all o the
other places that he sings about
are trie common, everyday things
and dreams of everydav people,
and Bruce Springsteen romances
and enobles those lowlv things to
make them universally ap
phcable. He ma be better in his
hometown, but he didn't let
anyone down in Greensboro this
past weekend.
From the moment he appeared
on stage in his well- worn motor-
cycle boots, faded blue jeans and
blue work shirt with the sleeves
rolled up over his bicepshe
made sure that every person
possible in that coliseum got his
money's worth. While he spent a
good deal of his time front and
center, he also made sure to tour
the sides and back with more
than enough regularity. And
when "The Boss" was involved
at the front of the stage, there
was always the tall, heavy set
figure of saxophonist Clarence
Clemmons whose jovial charisma
almost equaled Springsteen's
with the rear view crowd.
After the anthemic "Born in
the U.S.A he pushed his band
relentlessly on through "Out in
the Street" and "Darlington
County" and didn't stop for a
breather for two more songs after
that When he finished "Atlantic
City" he finally walked out to the
edge of the stage and said to the
tireless fans standing on their
chairs. "You guys can go ahead
and sit down. We're going to be
here a while Not too surpris-
ingly, everyone in the coliseum
sat down. When The Boss talks,
people listen, and that night he
did a lot of talking. It seemed like
every other song was introduced
with a ten-minute long dedica
tion, but instead of becoming
bored with his sometimes long
winded accounts, the crowd hung
on his every word.
He dedicated "Shut Out The
Lights" to a Vietnam Veteran
who wrote "The Fourth Of
July and followed that with a
long eulogy to Elvis Presley
which included the account of
how he had jumped the gate at
Graceland during his "Born to
Run" tour. He dedicated "Bye
Bye Johnny" to the late king of
rock'n'roll. The house-busting
"Forty Days" was played in
honor of sax player Clarence's
43rd birthday, and "Promised
land" was dedicated to Martin
Luther King Jr.
One of the most effective
monologues of the night was his
introduction to "Your
Hometown He talked about
how he had discovered respon-
sibility for himself and how all of
us, as Americans, should realize
our own responsibilities and help
make our country better. Out in
the lobby, he said, there were
people from the Food Bank of
northwestern North Carolina and
any money that could be spared
would be appreciated. Later, as
snow iivu
. - Y
Now under new management. Nantucket, is working towards the release of a new album, antucket V.
Faulkner Story Full Of Heart
By DANIEL MAURER
And
ROBIN WHALEY
The only thing worth writing
about is the human heart in
conflict with itself. "
This advice from American
novenst William Faulkner forms
the basis for the one-man plav
Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do You
Write? Performed Thursday
evening in McGinnis Theatre, the
show is co-written and performed
by John Maxwell.
With the help of writer Tom
Dupree, Maxwell recounts the
life of the Pulitzer Prize-winning
author. Faulkner's unique brand
of wit and wisdom enliven the
stage as he relates his misadven-
tures as a postmaster, Hollywood
screenwriter and novelist.
The show begins when the au-
dience, in the guise of reporters,
is curtlv ushered into Faulkner's
private study. Within this in-
timate setting, Maxwell creates a
stunning portrait of the can-
tankerous yet lovable writer. He
is alternately human and
humorous He moves us to tears,
then dries those tears with
laughter. Repeatedly, we see
Faulkner in self-conflict. He
ponders whether to attend the
film premier of Intruder in the
Hind, and later, whether to
travel to Stockholm for the Nobel
Prize.
Maxwell's characterization is
genuine right down to his gentle
Mississippi drawl. Likewise, the
set is a near-perfect replica of
Faulkner's study. Through the
efforts of set designer Jimm,y
Robertson and set dresser Jack
Stevens, the study is transplanted
from Oxford, Mississippi to the
stage apron.
Despite its stark simplicity, the
set conveys an atmosphere of in-
timacy. This feeling is heightened
by the warm lighting effects of
David Downing which draws us
farther into Faulkner's charmed
circle.
In Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do You
Write? we share the man's
tragedies and triumphs. We
witness his soul-searching, and
finally accompany him to the pin-
nacle of his career � the Nobel
Prize. The performance is con-
cluded with the delivery of
Faulkner's famed acceptance
speech. "Man will not merely en-
dure he says. "He will
prevail
In Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do You
Write? both John Maxwell and
W'illiam Faulkner most certainly
prevail.
Tennessee 'River' Runs Deep
By TINA MAROSf HAK
iMIitn Kdttor
Oscar-winning
cinematographer Vilmos Zsig-
mond has broken away from his
Close Fncounters of the Third
Kind to make a close encounter
of the L ittle-House-on-the-
Praine kind � The River. This
flowing film combines the talents
of Australian hero Mel Gibson
and Oscar winner Sissy Spacek,
resulting in a plot of danger,
misfortune, and most of all, sur-
vival.
Gibson and Spacek portray
Tom and Mae Garvey, a farm
couple whose love for the land
and its history is as strong as their
love and support for each other.
Along with their two children
(Shane Bailey and Becky Jo
Lynch), the Garveys unite and
weather some of life's toughest
storms � damaging floods and
pressure from modern
technology.
Joe Leutz (Scott Glenn)
represents so-called progress. The
River revolves around Leutz' at-
tempts (both cruel and
unbusiness-like) to force Garvey
and his neighbors to sell their
land so that he can erect a
hydroelectric power plant. We
see folks leaving their homes and
auctioning off their loved posses-
sions, all "in the name of pro-
gress Joe Garvey doesn't give
in, however, and he and Leutz
battle it out to the end.
Although probably not Oscar
material, The River moves along
smoothly and brings to life 444
acres of Tennessee's beautiful
land in the Great Smokey Moun-
tains. To make the movie, several
things had to be constructed � a
farmhouse, hayloft, equipment
shed, corn crib, chicken coop and
stone pumphouse.
All in all, The River is definite-
ly worth seeing, especially if
you're in the mood for some
wholesome, down-to-eath enter-
tainment.
The River is now playing at
Plitt Theatres in Carolina East
Convenient Center.
people were leaving, I noticed
that the large jars on the tables
set up by the Food Bank were
overflowing with one, five, and
ten dollar bills. The Greensboro
News and Record reported the
next day that Bruce Springsteen
himself had donated $10,000 of
his own on top of the uncounted
money from the concert. It's
fascinating the way a simple elo-
quent guitar player can pull out a
person's compassion. It would
have been a lot easier for most
people to just walk on by the
tables, but when The Boss talks,
people listen.
Another notable dedication
was made to Robin Davidson (the
Chapel Hill cheerleader who was
injured in a fall recently and re-
mains in a coma) during the first
encore � "Can't Help Falling in
Love With You He followed
with "Born to Run but return-
ed again to the old classics with a
medley of "Baby With the Blue
Dress On "Deep Sea Diver
and "Playin' In A Travelin'
Band and rounded out the
testimony of his musical roots
with a pseudo-Hendrix finish. As
the band vamped on "Twist and
Shout" he introduced two special
guests, Gary U.S. Bonds and
Robin Thompson, who turned
out to be the only dissapointment
of the night. They basically stood
around and sang along while The
Boss jammed with Clarence.
That night Bruce Spr-
ingsteen took charge of the au-
dience and gave them their
freedom at the same time. The
first verse of "Thunder Road"
was sung entirely by the crowd,
and the stories he told seemed to
come directly from his heart. To
the audience, he was sharing a
special part of himself. It didn't
seen to matter that he has been
performing a relatively identical
show for the past few months of
the tour. When he did "Racing in
the Streets we were there with
him in his old convertible
Camaro on the turnpike. And we
were with him in those
"Badlands" too. When the band
was taking their bows, Bruce
looked back and forth at the.
whistling, clapping, and cheering
fans to the front and rear. He
strolled up to the microphone
and said, "Do you really think
you can handle any more?" And
although most everyone was ex-
hausted from the three-and-a-
half hours ot non-stop rock, thev
all cheered for more As the last
few notes of "Ram Rod"
screamed on past and Bruce Spr-
ingsteen and the E Street Band
left the stage for the last time, I
thought about how I was going to
write an objective review of that
show I decided I'd just try and
fit in as much as I could about his
performance He was the typical
image of masculinity in his shirt
with the sleeves rolled up to the
shoulders. But at the same time,
he was fun, like when he jigged
around the stage during "Hungrv
Heart" while Clarence wailed on
the sax He was also a perfect
gentleman as the tall brunette he
pulled out of the audience during
"Dancing in the Dark" could tell
you. Most of all he was honest
with the audience and didn't
pander to them or abuse them
like a few other heavy metal
bands I've seen at the Greensboro
Coliseum.
Over and over again his songs
express the "hunger" that people
feel today, both phvsicaliy and
spiritually For the people who
were there, he gave a feast of
emotion, and for the poor and
starving elsewhere in the state,
there was his gift to the Food
Bank The Boss makes sure
evervone is happy.
Nantucket Rocks The Attic
By TONY BROWN
M�ff �rllf
Regional favorite rock band
Nantucket recharged its energy
during a short break from the
Raleigh studio where they are
currently recording their fifth
album by voyaging to
Greenville's Attic for their last
North Carolina appearance this
month.
Hard rocking from the start,
with only a couple of slower
segments tossed in, Nantucket
powered through a nonstop
20-song barrage of selections
from their previous albums,
along with a few cuts from their
upcoming antucket V lp.
The group seemed to have a
new sense of purpose with the
thrill of producing what they feel
will be their best album yet � the
one that could break them as a
nationally-recognized act � and
they spread the enthusiasm to
new fans and old.
The brain-jarring pounding of
"Can't Stop Rockin followed
by the equally emphatic "Ten-
nessee Whiskey" seemed design-
ed to set the tone for the perfor-
mance as the band continued a
blitzkrieg-like attack all through
the night, with three guitarists
leading the charge.
Long-time member Tommy
Redd assaulted his penny-clad
rhythm guitar like a Japanese
hari-kari pilot from WW II, us-
ing common teaspoons as im-
plements of destruction on his
guitar strings. He then tossed
spoons and guitar picks to the
jam-packed crowd.
David Johnson's guitar work
was very effective as his solid
bass lines highlighted "Quite
Like You which also featured a
hard-hitting, rapid-fire chorus.
Lead singer Larry Uzzell, who's
been with the group since their
Jacksonville, N.C. "beach
music" days, gave his tam-
bourine a serious beating while
the fever-pitched excitement con-
tinued to build in the Attic.
Pretty-boy Alan Thornton, a
summer '84 addition to Nan-
tucket, displayed his lead guitar
prowess as he jammed with Redd
while Uzzell described what the
group likes about "women with
pretty legs Thornton's all-
black leather outfit contrasted
sharply with Redd's well-worn
trenchcoat and sunglasses � with
a copper ring hanging from them.
"Ready For Your Love" con-
tinued the frantic pace as group
leader Eddie Blair stepped away
from the keyboards for a
featured saxophone break. As his
hot sax took over, the three
guitarists joined him at
stagefront in a mass formation,
which brought a roar of excite-
ment from the large crowd.
Drummer Richard Gates did a
fine job keeping the tempo steady
throughout the evening. He
didn't get noticed much because
of the attention the three
guitarists, but he got the job
done.
As the concert continued, a
melodic "Lies" prefaced the only
real change of pace all night as
Redd drawled a near-perfect
Nashville-type rendition of the
countryish "Tell Me with its
typical tale of the hazards of
picking up women in honky tonk
saloons.
This tune could very easily be a
top country hit � but it was
definitely the only song of the
evening , other than ab-
solute rock and roll While it
would be misleading to typify
Nantucket as a heavy metal band,
they are beyond any question a
hardrocking outfit.
Johnson's strong bass marked
the beginning of the old Manfred
Mann classic "Doo Wah
Diddy the only non-original
tune in the set. From the reaction
of the audience, it would seem to
be a strong candidate for inclu-
sion in Nantucket's new album
and a possible single release.
Larry Uzzell let the crowd sing
that historic phrase from 1965 �
"doo-wah diddy, diddy dum did-
dy doo
Redd started the regional
classic "It's A Long Way to the
Top" with obvious relish as the
three blazing guitars took com-
mand again. The intricate in-
terplay of guitars raises the ques-
tion of why this song wasn't a top
hit in the U.S.
"Time bomb, sitting on a time
bombbeware" rang out as the
guitars and keyboards combined
to give the pulsating effect of a
ticking bomb, reminiscent of
lOcc's "Clockwork Creep
Through the remainder of the
performance the high velocity
rock continued. "Is It Wrong (To
Rock and Roll)" was one of the
highlights of the last half, while
the 1978 southeastern regional hit
"Heartbreaker" was clearly the
top crowd pleaser of the evening.
Nantucket seemed much more
intense than in their last few gigs
at the Attic and other area clubs,
probably as a result of their cur-
rent recording efforts for the
Nantucket V album. They used
this opportunity to showcase
some of the new tunes, but are
reserving most of the material
from live performances until the
album's completed
"Ain't It A Shame" was the
best new cut they played. With
the repetitious nature of the
chorus, it has the potential for
making the national charts. Ac-
cording to the group, the new
album will be the strongest one
vet.
"We haven't been able to do
what we've wanted to for a
while said group leader Eddie
Blair "We're just getting out of
a problem with our previous
management, so we can finallv
get back into the studio. We'll be
able to produce it the way we
want, so it should be our best
yet
"We had good support from
Epic on our first three albums,
which sold about 100,000 each"
he added, "but our last label
didn't give us as much support as
we needed. We've been laying
kind of low the last year because
of legal proceedings, but we're
real excited about the new
album
The group recognizes the need
to get on the concert road in a
much broader area in order to get
the momentum going for Nan-
tucket V, so local appearances
will be rare, if any. over the next
few months.
"W'e need to get away from
this area more said Johnson.
"We're going to take most of
Februarv to work in the studio,
also According to Tommy
Redd, who has written most of
the band's material so far, the
rhythm tracks have already been
laid down for eight of the new
tunes.
"We're going for a lot more
energy he said. "We want to
update our sound, make it less
heavy. Most of the songs we
haven't even played live yet.
We're gonna have a lot of sur-
prises on the album
One of those surprises will be
the welcome addition of Alan
Thornton as a songwriter. His
"Freedom another cut off the
new album, showed bright pro-
mise for his writing ability.
Trivia, Trivia, Trivia
1. Which letter in 'He English language is used the least0
2. What was the U est � ntmuously running police show in televi-
sion history?
3. Who were the two tronauts who landed Apollo 11 on the
moon in 1969'
4. According to theI lese Caiander which animal represents
1985?
5. What two brothers were both President of the United States0
6. Which war spanned the adminisi rat ions of five Presidents?
7. What are the Seven W nders o the World?
8. Where is the highest point in the U.S.?
9. What magazine in the I S and Canada has the largest circula-
tion?
10. On the Great Seal of the U.S what does the bald eagle have in
its mouth?
New Si
�jrJENNI MMDOk
In case you bavc
there is a new. � �
"Crossovei
which just
adds to W
classical,
with the
Christian n .
The nan �
ed "The I
Show" to �� �
and styk
"Some mus
Shea sing .
pie sa ;
the disc
Ladies 1 �
"The
doe '
music Whei
; r a
the expe
music.
over the � -
��Th,
becau �
would
as then
There a
then, but w �
Una �
fter a w
listenei
saw
gram said Si
A lot Of
have crosse
Classifi
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT a
DRY SERVICE -
3-� z � ser
serv ce bui
dck up a"c
The co: jtet msv
ca
SCARED eav
arc save S 5C a - �
laundrv � - �
FOR SALE IS
aoc r e
For informa
Slay a' 758 9741
FOR SALE TRSB V
Uble Cor.ptf Expamfc
NEA Re'a S49� red
Ca TS6 834
FOR SALE
fulls ze Decse S-
aiaze � ture a
t'Oi- es ego ar e
PROFESSIONAL
troti . typewr ter R eas
Ca a :e ai J54 4
752 6106 days
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SE
VICE ft typing net
7 58 824'
WANTED
RENT : bedroom jpi ft .
furnsnec Exec em
to c asses 4
goic TDAer5 C -
FEMALE ROOMMATE
Wa'ec mn
Coce - s s
month S5C depos I - i
For rnCre
752 1088
FEMALE ROOMVA'E
for Eas'oook apts Renl S
mon'h � ut. Ca rst
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE Aa'ec mmed �� � -
close to campus ;�
Aas" ng acr- ne Renl S&
S5C '3 ut es Ca 758
RUS
KAPP
SIGM
The Brothers , Pledges, and LittI
Theta-Pi Chapter of the KAPPA Si
nity cordiaiiy invite you to Fail Rul
East 10th Street located beside Ll
KAPPA SIGMA, a f rater ury fc-l
college life, as well as the future, el
to come by and make yoursei
Academics, athletics, social life. civl
involvement and manv other a
KAPPA SIGMA the epitome of
world. For more information axil
752-5543. 1
Remember, it's the KAPPA SICl
ty, "In the Pursuit of Excellence! M
PARTIES BEGIN AT
TONIGHT: EL BO DJ Dance r.
kappa Sigma house
m m m m m m � i m m

f
f "

i






Page r.
�4' Tour
li :ment
e I he
I
vet
ingsteen and the E Street Band
left the stage for the last time, I
thought about how 1 was going to
write an objective review of that
show I decided I'd just try and
fit in as much as 1 could about his
performance He was the tvpical
image of masculinity in his shirt
with the sleeves rolled up to the
shoulders But at the same time,
he was fun, like when he jigged
und the stage during "Hungry
' while Clarence wailed on
-av He was also a perfect
gentleman as the tall brunette he
pulled out of the audience during
ng in the Dark" could tell
Mosi of all he was honest
the audience and didn't
hem or abuse them
i other heavv metal
've seen at the Greensboro
IJTI
d aver again his songs
e "hunger" that people
' physically and
the people who
ae a feast of
on, and for the poor and
. elsewhere in the state.
vas hi� gift to the Food
The Boss makes sure
rone is happv
the
ted
se
he Attic
ompleted
Vint It A Shame" was the
I new cut they plaved With
repetitious nature of the
it has the potential for
� 4 the national charts. Ac-
the group, the new
'he strongest one
� en : been able to do
we've wanted to for a
said group leade- Eddie
'We're just getting out of
with our previous
managemer. c can finally
back imo the Mudio. We'll be
the way we
uld be our best
- 'Od support from
our first three albums,
i sold about 100.000 each"
added, "but our last label
t give us as much support as
needed We've been laying
d of low the last year because
edings, but we're
about the new
The group recognizes the need
concert road in a
roader area in order to get
lomentum going for an-
ket i so loca1 appearances
if anv, over the next
ths.
"We need to get away from
ea more said Johnson.
're going to take most of
ruary to work in the studio,
According to Tommy
Redd, who has written most of
the band's material so far, the
acks have already been
"�n for eight of the new
tunes
"We're going for a lot more
energv he said. "We want to
update our sound, make it less
Most of the songs we
ha. even played live yet.
We're gonna have a iot of sur-
prises on the album
One of those surprises will be
the welcome addition of Alan
Thornton as a songwriter. His
"Freedom another cut off the
new album, showed bright pro-
mise for his writing ability.
iviaf Trivia
I used the least?
inning police show in televi-
i vvh. landed Apollo 11 on the
which animal represents
loth President of the United States?
pninistrations of five Presidents?
?rs ol the World?
in the U.S.?
and Canada has the largest circula-
S . what does the bald eagle have in
See Answers On Paee j
New Sunday Offering
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 22. MM 7
By JENNY MEADOR
�MIWMto
In case you haven't heard,
there is a new show on WZMB �
�Crossover The program
which just started this month'
adds to WZMB's variety of
classical, jazz, rock and pop
with the sound of contemporary
Christian music.
The name"Crossover" replac-
ed "The Contemporary Gospel
Show" to keep up with the tempo
and style of today's new music.
"Some music like George Beverly
Shea singing 'The Old Rugged
(ross' just doesn't attract peo-
ple said Scott Free, formerly
the disc jockey for the Attic's
1 adies Light Night Show.
'The name 'Crossover
doesn't really denote anv type of
music. When people heard 'The
Contemporary Gospel Show'
they expected to hear just gospel
music said Sue Shatz who took
over the show two years ago.
"The show basically started
because other students and I
would come by the station and
ask them about Christian music.
There wasn't much interest in it
then, but we kept hammering and
finally they got it on the air.
After a while we did begin to get
listeners and the management
saw that it was a worthwhile pro-
gram said Shatz.
A lot of once-secular artists
have crossed over too. Dan Peek
of America, Leon Patillo of
Satana, Kerry Livgren of Kansas,
Rick Cua of The Outlaws, Joe
English, drummer with Paul Mc-
Cartney and Mylon Lefever who
toured with Black Sabbath have
all become popular top-selling
Christian artists.
Free, who has been doing the
show since last March when he
accepted Christ, took the job
because he thought it would be
fun and because he loves music
especially rock and roll. His big-
gest complaint concerns Chris-
tians who are not willing to ac-
cept the new types of music.
"I'm exposed to all the latest
music and I get burned out just
hearing old stuff all the time. But
that's why we have the show � to
let people hear the newest con-
temporary Christian music.
There are so many good artists
now. I have a hard time with
Christians who are close-minded
to the new music. Some people
think that if it's not Sandi Patti,
Amy Grant or Keith Green, it's
not any good. But the trend from
top to bottom in music is harder
rock. Christian music is the same.
It just has Christian Ivrics he
said.
Shatz never really thought of
herself as a disc jockey until the
opportunity arose, but said both
the listeners and the management
have been supportive of the
show. Not only does WZMB's
budget allow for about ten new
albums a month, but with recent-
ly changed name "Crossover
the show picked up two more
playing hours and airs from 6
a.m. to 12 p.m. every Sunday.
Such labels as Refuge, Exit,
Myrrh and Word specialize in all
types of Christian music from
new wave and rock to pop and
slow contemporary, and are
played on the show.
Answers To Tnvu Questions
uoqqu y 0
i0'Ll'i.l i��i( s,�pwo 6
�upu���v fo sojtMj 8
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sntt�ujws(j�n u ujn3osn� 3
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uoXq�g jo sujpj.) 8u(Su�h q
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iu�ui�ia 9
�ui�pv Oumf) uqof pu� sui�pV uqof t
o t
'I JPIV 3 ui�p4 Tsausnuy v ,ON (
O I
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call 758 3087. DON'T BE
SCARED leave Jack a message
and save $.50 when you have your
laundry cleaned
FOR SALE: 35 watt stereo reciever
and white and Orown rabbit coat
For information, contact Lisa in 233
Slay at 758 9741
FOR SALE: TRS 80 Model 100 Por
table Computer Expandable to 32K
NEW Retail S49S reduced to $300
Call 75 8347
FOR SALE: Sealy twin bed set, $75;
full size bed set $90, other bedroom
and den furniture all in good condi
tion, prices negotiable. 752 5678.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 756 4664 evenings or
752 6106 days.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Al! typing needs, 758 5488 or
758 8241
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES:
Needed for River Bluff Aprs. Call
758 7975 or 758-3280 ask for Kelly.
COUNSELORS: For western North
Carolina coed 8 week summer
camp. Room, meals, laundry,
salery, travel allowance, and possi
ble college credit. Experience not
necessary, but must enjoy working
with children. Only non smoking col
lege students need apply. For
application brochure write: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Drive,
Miami, Florida 33015
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
tarns Quarters Apt 21, $230 plus
deposit Call Donna at 758 5901
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus
Call 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $115 a month utilities included.
Great location & great roommates
Call 758-6224
IFC OFFICERS: Thanks for all the
great help with Rush. Greek Week
promises to be the best! T.P.
KAPPA ALPHA PSI: Will have an
informal smoker Tues. Jan. 22, 1985
in the multi purpose room, MSC
8:30 10.00.
SENIORS: Portrait time is almost
here! The dates are Feb. 4 15 at the
yearbook office. Come by and make
your reservation now. It's all
FREE! Questions? Call 757-6501.
YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
SCHEDULE: Seniors and Faculty
Feb 4 15. Underclassmen, Faculty,
and senior makeups March 18 27.
All dates 9 12 a.m and 15 p.m. Por
traits taken at the yearbook office
and it's all FREE!
COMPUTER DATING: ECU
STYLE: For more information
leaflets and posters will be located
all over ECU campus or call
752 9667 Starting date: 1 28 85
PERSONAL
WANTED
RENT: 2 bedroom apt fully
furnished. Excellent location
to classes & downtown, Ring
gold Towers. Call 752 8945
FEMALE ROOMMATE.
Wanted immediatly. Kingston
Condominiums. $150 per
month,$50 deposit4 utilities.
For more info, call Leigh at
752 1088
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
for Eastbrook apts. Rent $145 per
month � ut Call 758 5420.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM-
MATE: Wanted immediately. House
close to campus. Own room.
Washing machine. Rent $80, deposit
$50, '3 utilities. Call 758-6531.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The
Brothers and Golden Hearts of
Sigma Phi Epsilon would like to ex
tend a cordial invitation to anyone
interested in attending our rush par
ties on Jan. 21, 22, and 23. We are
located at 505 E. 5th St. across from
The Jenkins Art Building. Please feel
free to drop by the house any time
beforehand and meet us because we
are looking forward to meeting all of
you. For more info call 752 2941 or
752 6502
JILL: Bruce was a definate blast!
Thanks for the excellent time, we'll
have to do it again How about white
water rafting in March? By the way,
did you find my keys??
ALPHA DELTA PI SORORITY. Is
still missing their composite If you
have any information please call
758 5447
BETHANIE, KAREN, AND
MICHELLE: Oh, shit a bag When
is the next road trip? And a $35 bag?
Here's to good times Jan.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Long,narrow, oblong shaped
iridescent metal earring with set in
silver ball. Lost in Hendrix Theatre
or campus area between
Mendenhall, Art Bldg. & 5th St Call
Pat Pertalion, Ext 6390 or 752 5528.
FOUND: Jacket in campus parking
lot. To claim, call 752 4635 before 10
p.m.
FOUND: Set of keys found in park
ing lot behind library. Flipper Fin
ornament on the key ring Call
752 8612 & describe rest of it
RUSH
KAPPA
SIGMA
The Brothers, Pledges, and Little Sisters of the
Theta-Pi Chapter of the KAPPA SIGMA Frater-
nity cordially invite you to Fall Rush at 700
East 10th Street located beside Darryl's 1907.
KAPPA SIGMA, a fraternity for your present
college life, as well as the future, encourages you
to come by and make yourself at home.
Academics, athletics, social life, civic and campus
involvement and many other activities make
KAPPA SIGMA the epitome of the collegiate
world. For more information and a ride call
752-5543.
Remember, it's the KAPPA SIGMA Fraterni-
ty, "In the Pursuit of Excellence
PARTIES BEGIN AT 9:00
TONlGHT:ELBO DJ Dance night at the
Kappa Sigma house.
ALPHA
XI
LTA
AND
PAPA KA TZ
PRESENT
WEDNESDA Y
NIGHT
LADIES LOCKOUT
THE ORIGINAL IS BACK HOME!
Free Wine & Beer
FOR LADIES FROM 8:30-10:00
��MEN ADMITTED AT 10:00
WITH HAPPY HOUR Prices TILL 11 00
MEMBERS $2.00 GUESTS $3.00
MEMBERSHIPS AVALABLE
AT THE DOOR FOR ONLY $1.00
FRATERNITY WITH THE MOST GUYS
AT 10:30
GETS A SPECIAL GIFT
COME PARTY WITH THF
GIRLS FROM A5A
lOtSSt. Ext.At
FUtrbluffRd
Pap Ku U A Pnvc Our.
For Mamban It Giants
W� H�� AM A8C Pwiwte
nn Where toGo
Whmlni're in a Rush.
h Kappa Phi Fraltrnin
The Place To Go Is the P! KAPPA PHI
FRATERNITY HOIISE Inn 21-23
Jan. 21 Burning Down the House
22 Champagne night
23 Casino night
PARTY'S BEGIN
EVERY NIGHT
AT
9:00 PM
Hooker Rd
Turn right on 14th-Go ail the
way down 14th to Evans
turn left and go down to
Arlington Blvd. than turn right.
Go down Arlington to Hooker
RdTum left. R Kappa Phi is
on left
flags Mai 0(�
FOR MORE INFOR
OR RIDES CALL
756-3540
A
m
.��

f





fHEEASI (AKDI IN1AN
'


Sports
JANUARY 22, 1985 Page H
Lady Pirates Win Another
I isa Squirewell (31) and Monique Pompili (14) hatVuBcth StStfSr�(51)
for a rebound in a 70-55 1 ad Pirate win.
Pirate Tracksters
Break Six Records
B BILL MITCHELL
St.tf Vtrltrf
The ECU men's track team
had a excellent shoving Saturday
at the Eastman Kodak Invita-
tional track meet, breaking six
school records, winning the
quarter-mile run md qualifing
three people for the i door na
tional championships
Henry Wilrraius ran the
60-yard dash in 6.25 seconds to
take second pla. 1 i e Ma I
was ttie third place finisher with a
time of 6.26. Both of their times
broke school records Further-
more, MacNeil's preliminary
time of 6.20 qualified him for the
nationals.
In the quarter mile, Chris
Brooks showed everyone his
talent by winning the race in
47.41 seconds qualifying him for
the nationals.
ECU also did very well in the
I and 300-yard runs. Julian
Anderson placed third in the 600
with a time of 1:10.14 to qualifv
for the nationals Ken Daugher
tiy and Phil Estes finished
seventh and eighth in the 300 with
times of 31.21 and 31.29 respe
tively. All three runners broke
school records.
"This was the finest perfor-
mance of the ECU men's track
team in East Carolina history
Coach Bill Carson said. "We had
the most top place finishers of
any school there (four)
The Eastman Kodak Invita-
tional is one of the largest indoor
meets on the east coast. Among
those schools competing were:
Alabama, Auburn, Florida State,
Mississippi. Miss. State,
Villanova and all Atlantic Coast
Conference teams except Duke
attended.
Craig White did well in the
50-yard high hurdles, setting a
school record with a time of 7.27
seconds. He had the fourth
fastest time in the meet and
would have had a chance at first
plaot if he hadn't been dis-
qualil � . r the semifinals foi hit-
ting m firsl huidle. Olympic
golu medalist Roger Kingdom
finished first in the event.
The mile relay team also had a
shot at a first place Finish but
were also disqualified.
"We have an extremely good
mile relay team and could have
placed high but, a St Augustine
team member knocked the baton
out of Ken Daughertry's hand
Carson said. "They were dis-
qualifed for it, but that didn't
help us much
Carson summed up the day by
saying, "we set school records in
every event we ran in Carson
continued. "To do that in the
face of so much competition and
so early in the season, shows the
exceptional shape our team is
in
ECU Results
440: Ist-Brooks, 47.41.
60-yard dash: 2nd-Williams,
6.25, 3rd MaeNeil, 6.26.
600-yaid run: 3rd Julian
Anderson, 1:10.14.
300-yard run: 7th-Ken
Daughertry, 31.21, 8th-Phil
Estes, 31.29.
By RICK McCORMAC
The Lady Pirate basketball
team continued its winning ways
with a 70-55 victory over league
foe American University last
night.
The game was tight in the
opening minutes of the first half
but ECU used their transition
game to pull away and were never
seriously challenged.
Trailing 8-7 at the 14:59 mark
of the first period Lorainne
Foster got behind the Lady Eagle
defense for a layup.
An Annete Phillips five footer
from in the lane, followed by a
Sylvia Bragg layup gave the Lady-
Pirates a six point run and
American was unable to get any
closer at any point in the contest.
Although ECU won their sixth
straight contest of the season
head coach Emily Manwaring
was not totally stisfied.
"It wasn't pretty, we played
just good enough to win Man-
waring said. "We've fought back
and are now playing five hundred
basketball.
The Lady Pirates scored on
seven of 11 fastbreak oppor-
tunities in the first half to take a
40-28 advantage into the locker-
room at halftime.
"We really attacked them in
the first half, in the second half
neither team played with very
much intensity Manwaring
said. " We did switch to a man
defense late in the game when
they started hitting from the
wings to get the game more inten-
sified and it really came through
for us
American was able to cut the
Lady Pirate lead to 59-50 at the
5:41 mark, but ECU was once
again able to connect on the full-
court pass to Lorainne Foster.
Any hopes of a Eagle com-
eback were quickly dashed by a
Alma Bethea free throw and
another Foster layup.
From that point on the game
turned into a free throw shooting
contest and the Lady Pirates were
able to convert on enough of
them to ice the game.
"Free throw shooting came
through for us tonight Man-
uring said. "One of our goals
coming into tonight was to im-
prove our free throw percentage
in the conference
ECU once again had a balanc-
ed scoring attack with four
Players in double figures. Foster
led the way with 13 points, hitting
six of ten shots from the field and
a perfect one of one from the
line.
Anita Anderson, Sylvia Bragg
and Lisa Squirewell all con-
tributed 10 points to the lady
Pirate win. For Anderson the
total marks her 11th consecutive
game in double digits and 13th of
the season.
ECU, the leading rebounding
team in the ECAC South, again
out rebounded their opponent,
by a 52-39 margin.
"The reason we're winning
these games is because we're tak-
ing more field goal and free
throw attempts than our op-
ponents Manwaring said.
"That's because we're the best
rebounding team in the con-
ference
Leading the way for the Lady
Pirates was Bragg, who led the
team in rebounds with nine, and
in assists with nine.
Anderson and Phillips both
pulled down eight rebounds to
contribute to the Pirate effort.
"Annette Phillips really played
hard tonight Manwaring said.
"She didn't score a lot of points
but that's never been her role.
She played good defense and hit
her foul shots
ECU shot 44 percent from the
field for the contest whil limiting
American to a ice-cold 25 per-
cent.
"There are some games we
aren't going to be as up for as
others Manwaring said. "But
the games aren't going to get any
easier so we are going to have to
be ready
With the win, ECU improves
to 8-8 in all games and 4-0 in
league play. The Lady Pirates
have now won seven straigt
league games dating back to last
season.
American drops to 6 6 overall
and 1-3 in ECAC South action.
Jan. 19, 1985
The Lady Pirates, in one of
their better games of the season,
trounced Geogrge Mason 89-54
in a ECAC South league game
over the weekend.
ECU never trailed in the con-
test, shooting 77.8 prcent from
the field in the first half for a
49-25 lead at halftime.
The Lady Pirates led 8-7 at the
16:13 mark in the opening half,
when Moniquc Pompili stored on
a jump shot in the lane to begin a
nine to nothing ECU run.
ECU had a 42-25 lead with
2:09 to play in the first half when
Lorainne Foster hit a 15 footer.
Pompili followed with a pair oi
free throws to increase the lead to
46-25. A Cheryl Fout layup and a
foul shot by I isa Squirewell gave
the Lady Pirates a 24 poi
halftime lead.
"We deserved to win this
game ECU head coach Emily
Manwaring said "W dominated
both ends of the court. We held
them below their season's scoring
average and scored above ours
ECU' shot 58 percent from the
field, while limiting GNU to 27
percent for the contest
The Lady Pirates a.
ed the boards, pulling down 54
rebounds to the I adv Patriot
34.
Manwaring attributed much of
her team's success in both the
shooting and rebounding areas to
the 3-2 zone defense she now has
ECU playing.
"We switched from a man to
the 3-2 match-up zone after the
break Manwaring said. "When
it works, there is somebody on
the ball as soon as the offense
gets it.
"It has allowed us to start run-
ning, our transition play has real-
Is improved since the break she
said. "Every team we play from
here on out had better be
prepared to stop the full-court
baseball pass
The long court pass was
available throughout the game
for the Lady Pirates. Sylvia
Bragg responded with passes to
Lorainne Foster for easy layups.
Foster led ECU in scoring with
5 points, hitting seven of nine
lots from the field, in only 19
�linutes of action. Alma Bethea
cored 13 points and Anita
Vnderson responded with 10.
The Pirates had 10 players
ore in the contest, and all who
ere able to play got at least eight
imutes of action.
Pompili, Squirewell and
c rstal Gner each had a game-
high total of seven rebounds,
while three other Lady Pirates
nulled down six boards
"With so many people playing
and scoring it might not help our
individual (statistical) leaders,
but that's fine with me Man-
waring said "As long as we lead
the conference in most points
-cored and fewest points allowed,
I'll be happy "
Bragg, who was held below her
season average of 11.3 ppg,
�lrushei with only eight points
for the night, but did contribute
ther ways She dished out
� - while pulling down
chounds. and committed on-
lv two turnovers
Men, Women Swimmers Beat UNC-
�Q Pominion Saturday in Minges
By TONY BROWN
Suff Wrllrr
ECU's swim teams rebounded
from tough losses to Florida
State to overwhelm UNC-
Wilmington Saturday at Minges
Natatorium. The men cruised to
a 7241 win, while the women did
even better with a 76-37 score.
ECU captured 12 out of 13 of
the men's and nine of 13 of the
women's events. Bruce
Brockschmidt, Chris Pittelli and
Kevin Hidalgo led the men with
three wins apiece, while Lee
Hicks and Scott Eagle each took
two firsts.
For the women, Caycee Poust
and Scotia Miller swam to first
place three times each, while Jen-
ni Pierson and Nancy James had
two wins.
"It was simply another fine ef-
fort by our team said Coach
Rick Kobe. "We're continuing to
swim as well as possible and get-
ting stronger. We seem to be in
fine shape for the rest of the
season if we keep swimming this
Freshman Leads Spiders Past ECU
well
The pair of victories raised the
men's record to 4-3, while the
women's mark improved to 3-3
for the season. ECU hosts Old
Dominion at Minges Natatorium
Saturday at 2 p.m.
ECU MEN'S SUMMARY
400 medley relay: 1. Kevin
Hidalgo, Lee Hicks, Bruce
Brockschmidt, Keith Kaut 3:35.4
1000 freestyle: 1. Stratton Smith,
9:54; 3. Pat Brennan 10:08.2
200 freestyle: 1. Chris Pittelli
1:45.6; 3. Andy Cook, 1:46.6.
50 freestyle: 1. Kaut, 21.7; 3.
Rolo Fleming, 22.8.
200 individual medley: 1.
Brockschmidt, 1:57.8; 3. Bren-
nan, 2:03.8.
1-meter diving: 1. Scott Eagle;
3. Luke Durkin.
200 butterfly: .
Brockschmidt; 1:57.5.
100 freestyle: 1. Pittelli, 48.2;
2. Kaut, 48.3.
200 backstroke: 1. Hidalgo,
1:59.
500 freestyle: 3. Smith, 4:51
3 meter diving: 1. Eagle;
Durkin.
200 breaststroke: 1. Hi
2:14.5; 2. Brennan, 2.17.9.
400 freestyle relay: 1. Jeff
Brown, Hidalgo, Cook. Pittelli,
3:17.7
Final score 72-41.
ECU WOMEN'S SI MMARY
200 medley relay, l. Caycee
Poust, Jess Feinberg. Ellen
McPherson, Nancy James, 1:56.
1000 freestyle: 1. Scotia Miller,
11:3; 3. Jenny Holstead. 11:36.
200 freestyle: 1. Pierson. 2:00;
3. Jill Gornfio, 2:05.5
50 freestyle: 2. James. 5.9; 3.
McPherson 26.9.
200 individual medlev. .
USt, 2:15.8.
1-meter diving: 3. Becky
Kerber.
200 butterfly: 1. Annette Bur-
ton, 2:20.9: 2. McPherson,
2:24.4.
100 freestyle: 2. James 56.0; 3.
Pierson, 56.1.
200 backstroke. 1. Poust
2:14.9; 2. Gornfio, 2 21 7.
500 freestyle: 1. S. Miller.
5:24.9: 3. Tracy Hope, 5:44.6.
3-meter diving: l. Kerber; 3.
I ori Miller.
200 breaststroke: 1. Joelle En-
nis, 2 36; 2. Feinberg, 2:38.2.
200 freestyle relay: 1. S. Miller,
Feinberg, Pierson, James, 1:43.6.
Final score: ECU 76, UNC-W
37.
By SCOTT COOPER
l o-Sportj Kdllor
Freshman Peter Woolfolk led
the University of Richmond to a
63-50 victory over ECU Saturday
night in a ECAC South con-
ference battle.
Woolfolk scored 16 second
halt points and finished with 20,
to lead all scorers. Kelvin
Johnson scored 11, while John
Davis and John Newman added
10 points each.
ECU was hot early and led for
a snort time. The Spiders then
took control and held as much as
an eight-point lead in the first
half. The Pirate's shooting went
cold as they finished the night
with a 40.4 field goal percentage.
Moreover, the Pirate defense
held Richmond to a 41.4 shooting
performance.
"We did an excellent job
defensively ECU coach Charlie
Harrison said. "The defense did
what it needed to, except for a
few times on the fast breaks
ECU held Richmond's leading
scorer (Newman, averaging 20
points per game) to just 10
points, he was three of 10 from
the floor Johnson only con-
nected on iwo of nine field goals,
but was seven of eight from the
charity stripe.
The Pirates were once again
hurt by their lack of inside scor-
ing. When Leon Bass got into
early foul trouble, ECU was un-
successful inside and failed to get
enough productivity from their
front court.
"We did have some success
getting the ball down low Har-
rison said. "But we just couldn't
seem to score when we had the
chance
ECTI was also hurt by an injury
to Herb Dixon, who suffered a
chipped bone in the wrist of his
shooting hand in Thursday's
practice. He didn't dress out for
Saturday's game and is ques-
tionable for Monday's game with
Howard.
"Herbie's injury really hurt
us Harrison said. "Scotty just
got worn down, and it cut down
on our flexibility
However, ECU did get a good
performance from sophomore
Roy Smith. He played 25 minutes
for Coach Harrison and was
three of six from the field, for six
points. He also grabbed four re-
bounds.
The Pirates got out in front
early, opening as much as a
seven-point lead seven minutes
into the game. After Bass scored
on a layup with 13:03 left in the
first half, the Pirates went
scoreless during the next five
minutes.
Richmond then went on a scor-
ing binge as ECU could only hit a
pair of free throws. John Davis
hit a free throw and a pair of
jumpshots, putting the Spiders
ahead 16-14 with 9:18 remaining
in the first half.
Curt Vanderhorst's jumper
from the corner tied the game,
but Steve Kratzer gave the
Spiders the lead, 18-16 with 6:38
left in the half. Richmond con-
tinued to build on their lead.
However, with two seconds left,
Vanderhorst scored and cut the
Spider lead to 28-22 at halftime.
The two teams exchanged
baskets throughout the first five
minutes of the second half. Then,
behind the shooting of Woolfolk,
Richmond went on to score nine
straight points and increase their
lead to 43-28 with 11:09 remain-
ing.
The Pirates then outscored
Richmond 14-6 to cut the lead to
4942 with 3:46 remaining. ECU
was unable to get any closer to
the Spiders from that point.
ECU was down by 10 points
with 1:04 remaining as they sent
the Spiders to the line three times
in the final minute of play. Rich-
mond held their lead and won
easily 63-50.
ECU was lead in scoring by
William Grady who was nine of
18 for 18 points. Vanderhorst ad-
ded 12 and Bass and Smith chip-
ped in six points each.
"Our inside game has to get
more aggressive and get more re-
bounds Harrison said. "And
when we get the ball inside on of-
fense, we have to do positive
things with it.
"Our lack of inside scoring
puts added pressure on William
and Curt
ollMheeeki aemPtS " " ??�SBfi
Memb
Colorado Springs, Colorado
(UPI) � The United States Cycl-
ing Federation has suspended two
of its top staff members and has
asked a board member to resign
after confirming that American
cyclists received "blood doping"
transfusions only hours before
they pedaled in Olympic events
The Colorado Springs-based
federation apohgized to the
American public. Olvm
cyclists and athletes, and to tnc
U.S. Olympic Committee "for
the pain and embarrasme:
caused by the incident
David F Prouty, the executive
director of the federation, u
the orgama m's board of direc-
tors adopted a rule banning
controversial procedure
Blood doping involves
transfusion of red blood ce
an athlete's body, suppo- .
help the athlete's performance
allowing the bloodstream to ca
more oxygen
Since the transfusions didr
violate international cycling
International Olympic Commit
tee rules, the cyclists involvec
in no danger of losing
medals, he said, addm.
"nothing houid be considcrec
have tainted any medal
"There ;s no indication n
soever that, based on past per
mance. an United States .
athlete performed at a le-
ferent than what had be
ticipated Prouty
The wmpics rr.c
bect effort e
cj iists, wl
At a news a
nounce the result
tion's investigation, Prouty
one of tne three stai
was Mike Fraysse, a -
member who was the
Intramural
Video Gam
By JEANNE iTF ROTH
There's a chill in the
you don't have to be in :
Come inside and warn
intramurals.
Play videos with Hm IR
are sponsoring the annual �
game tournament in Uk yt
gameroom. To
must register by Ja 23
204 Memorial C
conquer those aiie
Racquetbali doub ej
and women will beg:r Feb �: Be
sure to register Jan 28 �
ahead is the IRS-B�.
wrestling tournament.
will be awarded to
tvipants. Weight dh are
available for both men
women. Sign up in room 2 i
Memorial Gym.
Despite the perfect weather
conditions, the in
hockey season has been car
ed. This was due to arcum
beyond our a�
is installing a new fl -we
will not have I
year. Maybe � si id mak.
ice hockev'
Never fear, the
vou can attend on Jai 2 - !
� � � a
SWIMMING POOI S
Memorial Pool
M-W-F a �
M-F 12 noon-1 �
M-F ! ! �� - 3 p
Sat. i p.m -
Minges Pool
M-W-F Jp.n
Sun. l p.m5 p
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m. -5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m -5 p m
OAKWOOI
PROUDLY
THE PIRA
EAST CAI
UNIVEI
O-
Just hke ECU OckvA
a pan of the growth of G
North Corolma for years
- the homorfc of two gri
helping friends to o be'
'�60 PIRI

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� ' � -w��yp����
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Members
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22. 1985
Colorado Springs, Colorado
(UPI) -� The United States Cycl-
ing Federation has suspended two
of its top staff members and has
asked a board member to resign
after confirming that American
eyefasts received "blood doping"
transfusions only hours before
they pedaled in Olympic events.
The Colorado Springs-based
federation apoligized to the
American public, Olympic
cyclists and athletes, and to the
U.S. Olympic Committee "for
the pain and embarrasment"
caused by the incident.
David F. Prouty, the executive
director of the federation, said
the organization's board of direc-
tors adopted a rule banning the
controversial procedure.
Blood doping involves the
transfusion of red blood cells into
ithlete's body, supposedly to
help the athlete's performance by
allowing the bloodstream to carry
r.ore oxygen.
Since the transfusions didn't
violate international cycling or
national Olympic Commit-
ules, the cyclists involved are
no danger of losing their
ds, he said, adding that
thing should be considered to
e tainted any medal
There is no indication what-
i er that, based on past perfor-
ce, anv United States cycling
�ihlete performed at a level dif-
cn than what had been an-
ated Prouty said.
The 1984 Olympics marked the
effir: eve rr American
lists, n pine medals.
V a news conference to an-
ice the results of the federa-
tion's investigation, Prouty said
on� th rhree staffers involved
was Mike Fraysse, a board
member who was the group's
secretary last summer, and was
the Olympic team manager.
Also involved was Eddy
Borysewicz, the national and
Olympic coach, and Ed Burke,
the federation's Elite Athlete
Program director.
Prouty said Burke and
Borysewicz would be suspended
for 30 days without pay, and
would receive a letter of repri-
mand.
Fraysse was demoted from first
vice president to third vice presi-
dent of the federation and was
asked to resign from the board,
Prouty said.
After Prouty's announcement,
board member Tracy Lea � the
wife of former USCF president
Robert C. Lea, who resigned to
protest the weakness of the
federation's probe � announced
that she was resigning. She
described the sanctions as inade-
quate.
Prouty refused to identify the
cyclists or say how many were in-
volved. Previous reports listed
five medal winners among those
receiving the transfusions.
"No athletes will be held or
considered responsible for the in-
cident he said. "Those athletes
underwent incredible physical,
emotional and intellectual
preparation in preparing for, and
participating in, the ultimate
athletic event in the world
Phil Voxland, the federation's
president during the Olympics,
was elected to his old post,
replacing Lea, who became presi-
dent after the Olympics. Voxland
is from Minneapolis, where he
teaches at the University of Min-
nesota.
"We should have the rule
(against blood doping) even
though there is currently no way
we can test for it Voxland said.
hi tra murals Warm Up;
Video Games Start Up
IEANNE1 IK ROTH
Staff w rttn
. hill in the air! But,
ive to he in the cold.
� de and warm up with
il � . .�
Piaji vlc with the iRS. They
� -ring the annual video
nament in the Aycock
gameroom. To participate you
mast register by Jan. 23, in room
2(4 Memorial Gym. Go out and
conquer those aliens.
Racquetball doubles for men
and women will begin Feb. 4. Be
Mire to register Jan. 28-30. Still
ahead is the IRS-Budweiser arm
wrestling tournament. T-shirts
will be awarded to all par-
ticipants. Weight divisions are
available for both men and
women. Sign up in room 204
Memorial Gym.
Despite the perfect weather
conditions, the intramural roller
hockey season has been cancell-
ed. This was due to circumstances
eyond our control,(Sportsworld
installing a new floor), so we
will not have the co-rec event this
ear Maybe we should make it
ice hockey!
Never fear, there is an activity
vou can attend on Jan. 29-30 in
the Memorial Gym weight room
from 8:00-9:00 p.m. The IM-
REC services weight training
clinic will be held. The clinic is
tree of charge. Register in 204
Memorial Gym.
Five-on-five basketball begins
this week. Go to Memorial Gym
and cheer on your favorite squad.
They need your support. While
spectating, look for an IRS-
Miller player of the month can-
didate.
Drop the player's name and a
brief description of why they
deserve the award, in the box in
204 Memorial Gym. Then, look
for your nomination in the next
issue of Tennis Shoe Tidbits. Jan.
28 is the next distribution date.
Don't let someone else get your
copy.
On Tuesday and Thursday at
2:30 and 5:30, the IRS, in
cooperation with WZMB � your
FM alternative, is sponsoring the
Tennis Shoe Talkshow.
Highlights of IRS competition,
scores and interviews are on the
regular agenda, along with the
top picks of your favorite activi-
ty. Tune in and participate rather
than spectate, through in-
tramurals.
M-W-F
M-F
M-F
Sat.
M-W-F
Sun.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
7 a.m8 a.m.
12noon-l:30p.m.
3:30-6:30 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
8 p.m9:30p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
M-F
Minges
3 p.m7 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
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M-Th 9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
O:
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M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
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MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
o
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
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Just like ECU. Ookwood Homes has been
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"I am convinced that just having
such a rule will dissuade athletes
from doing such a thing.
"I don't think that people are
out there cheating. I think
athletes will play by the rules if
those rules are there
The news conference came as
the 25-member U.S. Cycling
Federation board of directors
opened its regular meeting in Col-
orado Springs, the home of the
USCF and the USOC.
Dr. Irving Dardik, head of the
USOC's panel investigating the
blood doping, said that "the
same individuals also were look-
ing at caffeine to improve perfor-
mance
While the IOC has set limits on
the amount of caffeine allowable
in an athlete's blood � allowing
for the consumption of coffee,
tea and soft drinks � a "handful
of U.S. cyclists, coaches and doc-
tors were invlolved to see how
much caffeine could be used, but
not illegally Dardik said.
The federation confirmed that
the experiments � using caffeine
suppositories Borysewicz brought
in Europe � were conducted, but
said there was no evidence that
the drug was used during the
Olympics.
The "blood doping" con-
troversy surfaced when Dr.
Thomas B. Dickson Jr an
Allentown, Pa orthopedic
surgeon, revealed that he had
witnessed the transfusions being
made in a motel room.
The reports of the caffeine ex-
periments came shortly after
that.
Dickson, who was cycling team
physician, first reported the
transfusions in November, saying
"what was done, in my opinion,
was second-rate and you don't
treat your athletes that way
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items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Jan 26, 1985
��$& t
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Multf-Grain
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10
HI I-ASIC AKOUN1AN
JANUARY 22. 1985
Bogues Leads Deacs
(UPI) Wake Forest's
Tyrone Bogues is the smallest
basketball player ever to compete
in the Atlantic Coast Conference,
but the 5-foot-3 sophomore is
teaching foes never to sell him
short.
Surprising Wake Forest, 11-4
overall and 3-1 in the ACC, has
reeled off six straight wins and
Bogues is leading the way. He hit
a career high 12 points, handed
out seven assists and made four
steals in Wake Forest's 91-89
upset of then second-ranked
Duke.
Bogues never left the court
during the overtime game and
held Duke's 6-foot-2 Johnny
Dawkins to onl) 8 points � the
first time the Blue Devils' top
scorer failed to reach double
figures in 52 games.
Bogues said he was "feeling
wonderful" about his play and
maintained that his height actual-
ly is an advantage in some ways.
"1 haven't heard of anyone
smaller than I am playing on this
leel Bogues said. "There are a
lot of advantages as well as disad-
vantages. To go out there and
pla these guvs, you've got to
have complete confidence and
know that thev're no better than
you - - they're just a little taller
than you.
"There's no way they can out
do me he said. "I take a lot of
pride in myself and try to use my
talents to give my best perfor-
mance all the time
Wake Forest head coach Carl
Tacy said he hopes basketball
fans start taking notice of
Bogues.
"I thought Bogues was tremen-
dous Tacy said of the Duke
game. "I don't know how long
he's going to have to play like this
before he gets the recognition he
deserves. We certainly know
what he means to our team
Bogues runs Wake Forest's
high-powered offense and darts
about the court terrorizing op-
ponents on defense.
"He's always sneaking up
behind you when you have the
ball. You never know when he's
coming Dawkins said. "He's
always creating havoc. He makes
up for his lack in size with a lot of
hustle
Bogues chuckles when he hears
opponents complain about his
sneak attacks. He said he likes to
play tricks on defense almost as
much as he likes to dish out
assists.
"Guys tend to take their eyes
off the guy behind them and just
worry about the guy in front of
them. Once they do that, I come
behind and get the ball Bogues
said. "I like to try to trick guys,
too.
"But 1 really love to pass the
basketball. It makes me feel
great. It doesn't matter to me
who scores he said.
Bogues said his strategy is to
make the most of opponents'
skepticism over his ability.
"A lot of people out there
know of me and want to see me
play, probably because they can't
believe what they're hearing.
Some of the teams don't believe it
themselves Bogues said
"That's why they come in a little
lackadaisical, so I give them
something to think about
"My goal is to try and make it
as far as possible in the NCAA
tournament. It could give a lot of
teams something to think about
with a team so small having a 5-3
guy running the show he said.
"People should not take teams
lightly just because of their size
Bogues tried wrestling,
baseball and football before swit-
ching to basketball. He was an
All-America at Baltimore's Dun-
bar High School. He was the
most valuable player of the 1983
team that went 31-0.
Ripley's Believe It or Not
newspaper column featured the
petite prep star, but Bogues said
he was unimpressed by the atten-
tion.
"Even my sister, Sherron,
played college basketball at
Towson State back home � and
she's only 5 feet Bogues said.
Anabolic Steroids Dispensed
By Former Clemson Coaches
Greenville, S.C. (UPI) �
Clemson University stength
coaches gave anabolic steroids to
football players and accepted
payments from track athletes for
the prescription drug, one of the
school's former coaches said.
Former assistant strength
coach lack Harkness, the third
Clemson coach implicated in the
prescription drug investigation,
said head strength coach Sam L.
Colson told him to dispense the
drugs.
"I was told to make the drug
available and that's what 1 did
Harkness said.
Colson and men's track coach
Stanley S. Nareueski resigned
Dec. 11 and have since issued
statements admitting they provid-
ed drugs to Clemson track
athletes
Harkness, a graduate assistant
ach, left Clemson Dec. 15 and
returned to his Mississagua, On-
tario, home. He apparently can-
not be extradited for prosection
because steroids aren't covered
by the treaty of extradition bet-
ween the United States and
Canada.
Unlawful distribution of
prescription drugs is a misde-
meanor offense carrying a max-
imum penalty of 18 months in
prison, a 500-dollar fine, or both.
Steroids are substitutes for
hormones normally produced by
the body and can be injected or
taken by pill. Doctors prescribe
Them primarily to treat muscle-
wasting diseases or after surgery
to prevent muscle atrophy.
Harkness said he gave steroids
to four Clemson linemen last spr-
ing and another this fall, but said
he doesn't remember if the
athletes had paid him for the
drugs. He did not identify the
linemen.
"The quantities were so small
that whatever the money might
have been, it wasn't very much,
so I wouldn't really pay much at-
tention to it he said.
Harkness said he isn't sure
whether coaches first approached
football players about using
steroids or if it was the player's
initiative. But he did say the word
was out that drugs were available
to interested athletes.
"I think that was the whole key-
to it � it was there if they wanted
it he said.
Another former Clemson assis-
tant coach, who wasn't iden-
tified, said Colson would talk
about the steroids in the school's
weight room while the team
worked out.
"He would comment, 'so-and-
so was on the sauce Or he would
comment, 'so-and-so needs to get
on the sauce the coach said.
"But I never saw him pull so-
meone over to the side and ac-
tually say, 'Let's get you on
drugs
Harkness, a former Clemson
discus thrower and Canadian na-
tional champion, said he and
three track team members pur-
chased liquid and oral steroids
from Colson in September.
"We just wanted something
and we got it Harkness said.
"We put our money together and
gave a piece of paper over to Mr.
Colson, and after a certain period
of time he just delivered a
package to me
Colson used personal checks to
purchase steroids and anti-
inflammatory prescription drugs
from a Nashville, Tenn phar-
macist through an old friend. The
old friend, Vanderbilt University
strength coach E.J. "Doc" Kreis
helped Colson obtain the steroids
� it was earlier reported.
Kreis took a leave of absence
from Vanderbilt when the Ten-
nessee Bureau of Investigation
began the probe of illegal
prescription drug use at the
school.
An investigation began at
Clemson in December after traces
of the anti-inflammatory drug
phenylbutazone were found in
the blood of Augustinius Jaspers,
a cross country runner who died
of natural causes in his dorm
room.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 22, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 22, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.385
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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