The East Carolinian, January 17, 1985






�he
Carolinian
Serving the Eastarotina campus community since 1V25
Vol.S9No.32
Thursday Januarv 17, 1985
(.reenville, .c.
16 Pages
('imitation 12.(KM)
Hard At Work
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lat
Despite
tified oa
in front
the cold weather students hae endured this week, this uniden-
mpus police officer bravelv keeps the traffic flowing smoothh
of Whichard Building during lunch and afternoon rushes.
side from the lack of parking spaces on campus, it's comforting to
know that something is going right for a change. Keep up the good
work.
Spring Semester Enrollment Increases
By ELAINE PERR1
suff Wniff
Enrollment for the 1985 spring
semester is up, according to ECU
Registrar Gil Moore. The Official
count for this semester is 13.015,
up 512 student from last spring.
"This is a definite improvement
and a new record for the spring
semester Moore said.
Drop-add also ran more
smoothly this year, Moore said.
"Each department worked
harder in opening up more
courses instead of waiting for
drop-add he said. "In addi-
tion, more seats were offered in
different sections.
"The departments worked
Money Stolen From Jones;
No Leads, Suspects Yet
B M.AINEPKRM
stiff Wrwr
'It is an unfortunate
situation said Ira Simon, direc-
tor of dining services at ECU,
referring to the theft of $2,600 in
cash from Jones Cafeteria.
"There are a whole lot of honest
people, but a dishonest one took
advantage of the situation
The theft of the money and an
undisclosed amount of checks
took place on J?n. 5. A red
BB&I bank bag was left on a
table in the dining hall. Accor-
ding to Detective Gene McAbee
of the Department of Public
Safetv. "Investigators are at-
tempting to locate the money
bag The bag may contain 50
checks payable to Servomation
Anyone locating the bag or the
checks is requested not to touch
the articles and to notifv the
Department of Public Safety im-
mediately.
A monetary reward is being of-
fered for information leading to
the recovery of the person and in-
formation leading to the return
of the checks. All information
will be confidential.
In other campus news, two
D.H. Conley High School
Students were arrested and charg-
ed with breaking and entering
and larceny.
Jimmy Harris and William
Harris of Greenville were each
charged with one count of break-
ing and entering a motor vehicle
owned by Douglas Johnson of
Aycock dorm and one count of
larceny in the theft of $540 in
stereo equipment and cassette
tapes.
The arrests were the result of a
stakeout. Both suspects were
placed under $3,000 bond.
March Tornadoes Result
In City Emergency Plan
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
S�l K4llor
A drill last week involving
Greenville's new Emergency
Management Plan was a success,
according to Greenville City
Manager Gail Meeks.
Meeks said the plan deals with
disasier preparedness and was
devised following the tornadoes
which hit Pitt County last March.
"The program was started in
April 1984 with a task force of ci-
ty employees and adopted by the
City Council in December
Meeks said.
The primary focus of the pro-
gram is those city employees not
given specific duties during an
emergency. "The police and the
fire rescue squad are concerned
with the immediate safety of
those involved in a disaster she
said. "The others come in if the
situation goes beyond immediate
emergency assistance
One specific area involving city
employees in a disaster, Meeks
said, would be the responsibility
of helping the homeless. Also,
there is a need for assistance with
transportation and evacuation.
Under the plan, each city
employee has predetermined
responsibilities.
Last week's drill was run so
"we would know city employees
were prepared and capable of
dealing with disaster Meeks
said. During the drill, 92 percent
of the city's employees respond-
ed. "Three hundred eighty-seven
employees showed up in 45
minutes she said.
The employees were then tested
in 60 different situations, in-
cluding destroyed homes, down-
ed trees, injuries, malfunctioning
traffic signals, broken glass, an
emergency landing at the airport,
fires and a chemical spill caused
by an overturned truck.
"The drill was very
successful Meeks said.
mou o take care of some of the
students' needs instead of letting
them fight it out
In prior semesters, students
faced long lines waiting for
classes to be dropped. This year,
the sections were opened when
the departments were notified of
the students' needs Additonal
sections were also opened. Man
students found they did not have
to go through drop-add as a
result
Moore felt "the math depart-
ment should be commended.
Normally, the math department
has a long line. This semester, the
problem was totally eliminated
Elementary
NEIL JOHNSON - ECU Photo Lab
looking through the eyes of love, this diligent student tries to
find a wa to sa I do.
New Organization
Proposed By SRA
By HAROLDJOYNER
The Student Residence
Association gave support
Wednesday to a proposal that
would organize ECU Resident
Advisors.
"There is a lack of freedom
among the RA's said Jack
Mooney, a Scott dorm RA.
"Right now, we have to go
through the House Council
anytime we want to program
something Currently, anytime
a residence hall holds an event,
the house council is responsible
for what goes on However if an
organization was formed, the
responsibility of the programmed
event would be that of the RA,
Moonev said.
Another advantage of having
this new organization, according
to Mooney, would be better com-
munication between staff and the
residents "Ideas for certain
events could be shared between
residence halls he said, "and I
reallv do think planned programs
would be more successful if we
unite
' As an organization he said,
feel the Department of
Residence Life, SRA, and SGA
would pay more attention to our
needs Other schools compen-
sate their RAs more than at ECU,
Mooney said, and "because of it.
a lot of good RAs are quitting
because they are not being paid
enough. RAs are on the job 24
hours a day, but they are not get-
ting paid for that amount of time
they put in
SRA President Debbie Gem-
bicki agreed s;th the proposal bv
saving, "there isn't enougl
munuation between SRA
meetings and the residence ha
By having this organization,
RAs would have more input
what the residents would need I
know and it would help fill it
communication gap
"We would not be acting i
opposing unit to the il
Council Moont,
organization would be geared I
the student and the bene
would be through the succes
programming events
The recommendation �
be reviewed b u
Fulghum, associate � u
director of Residence Life
will then decide further i
Area Reside n ce l
Presidents reported
held before Christmas anj :
for the new year, (err �
pus president Dan Walsh
Trival Pursuit Cont
organized, with area I
donating prizes
College Hill pr
Kleiner: reported las;
exam study period at !
was a success and ' ve
it again at the end
semester. We had a my a
people to come b I
Air-band conte? ts, fas!
shows, and a barbeque at
store for the Vs esla
president Elizabetl SI
also reported a lar.
last semester' exan
sion.
I'msiead and loi
halls will plan m e
Super Bowl � i
residents. acc
presidents.
Campus Drug Program
Adds Different Facet
B DALESWANSON
stiff � rller
ECU's student-operated
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Pro-
gram is headed for an exciting
and productive semester as a
recently accepted chapter of the
national organization Boost
Alcohol Consciousness Concern-
ing the Health of University
Students. According to CADAP
President Regina Edwards,
membership in the national
organization has already increas-
ed the effectiveness of the cam-
pus program with new ideas,
literature, and promotional
material
Edwards, who recently stepped
down from her position as presi-
dent, is working with the new
president, Fave Sauders, in
becoming more familiar with the
demands of the presidency and
the new materal supplied bv
BACCHUS. CADAP applied for
membership in the national
organization last October and
was accepted officially late in
December.
"Our purpose is not to con-
demn and lecture the people who
are sent to us Edwards said,
"We are only trying to promote
responsible behavior in the use of
alcohol The program,
established in 1979 bv Ferry,
terhos after a study d i
uv :m?! a program a
henifici i is run almost
b students who volunteet
time to work with other
found to have some pr
substance abuse Stude:
referred to 'he program I
mandatory two meeting
Associate Dean for Student S
vices. Students may iis
red by dorm I RA'
through a Ds i
dent participants an-
other Monday in a large gi
where the emphasis is on ale
and drug education. The a
meet independently with a st
dent volunteer peer counsel
"The main purpose o the p
counselor is aimed at helpii �.
student to assess hi- pi b
Edwards said. "The) a'c not i
tual counselors Once the p
blem has been assessed the
dent may be referred I
AA, NA. or Met raJ He ill
depending on his needs
Along with the refen .
gram, CADAP operates
alcohol education progra
as the annual Alcohol Aw
Week. The most recent of these
week-long educational pre:
See CAMPUS. Pa
ge
African Policy Sparks Demonstrations
I wn tt ics Service
nd Suit Report
"Nothing happens in the
winter lamented Dumisani
Kumalo of the American Com-
mittee on Africa, referring to the
scarcity of student protest against
South African racial segregation
during the beginning months of
1983.
But now, in the dead of winter,
the student anti-apartheid move-
ment has suddenly heated up,
surprising even movement
leaders.
Fueled by Jesse Jackson's
ongoing anti-apartheid crusade,
South African Bishop Desmond
Tutu's recent winning of the
Nobel Peace Prize, numerous
marches on U.Sbased South
African diplomatic offices, and
the arrests of some 200 protestors
since late November, 1984, the
campus South African movement
is going strong, leaders report.
"A lot more students, because
of the media attention South
Africa has been getting among
the general public, are suddenly
becoming aware and interested in
stopping apartheid notes
Joshua Nessen, ACA student
coordinator.
Nessen, who in the past has
tried to spread the word by
associating it with more highly-
publicized causes like the anti-
nuclear movement, thinks he may
have turned a corner.
"You know the campus move-
ment is gaining momentum
when, in the midst of Christmas
vacation at Berkeley, you have
1,000 students marching on the
administration building, locking
arms and demanding
divestiture he says.
Indeed, in just the last seve d
weeks students on dozens of cs
puses across the country h
protested the plight of the hi
majority in South Africa, deman-
ding that their colleges stop in-
vesting in U.S. companies which
do business with the white
supremicist government there.
During the Dec 7 march at
Berkeley, for instance. JJj
students were arrested as over
1,000 protestors encircled the ad
See STUDENTS, Page 5
A
T
� imii m, �� �.��. � ifi �a X �i �,
On
f
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THE EAST CAROLINIANJANUARY 17. 1985
Navigators
Crwo it out The Navigators Investigative
Bible Study and Fellowship Brewster O
wing room 702 every Tues 7 X p m begin
nlng Jan tth
intramurals
iRS Sport Club Council There will be an in
tramural sport council meeting Jan 23 at 4
p m in Brewster B 103 ATTEND!
Basketball
Registration tor 5 player intramural Basket
bail win be held Jan 14 and 15 Play begins
Jan 21 Get your team together and enter!
Participate rather then spectate through in
tramurais
Breakdancersl I
The Student Athletic Board is looking tor
breakdanong groups to perform during halt
time o pirate basketball games If in
terested contact Pam Holt at 757 4417 Come
on and Break for the Purple and Goldl! I
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
In the Bloxton house 'S offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in developing better
interviewing ski Us for use m your job search
A f'lm and discussion of how to interview on
and off campus win be shared These ses
sions will be held in the Career Planning
room at 3 p m on Jan 23 and W and Peb
II, and 19 On Jan 28 an evening session
will be held at 7 p m Seniors are especially
encouraged to attend one of these sessions1
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placemen' Servce
n 'he Bloxton nouse is offering one hour ses
sions to help you prepare your own resume
cew graduates get iobs without some
preparation Many employers 'eaves' a
resume showing your education and ex
perience Sessions to help will be held In the
Career Planning room at 3 p m on Jan 21
and 3' An even,ng session will be held at 7
p m on Jan 30
Free Faculty & Staff Aerobics
Classes are held ever, Mon wed Fri at 12
noonin Memorial G�m loe No experience is
necessary Mows the time 'o star' on that
new year s resoiu'ion to get In shape and
have a good t,me See you there
Also ban room dance classes are offered at
12 noon on Tues and Thurs in Memorial
Gym log Ge' a partner ano come on dowr
for some fun No experience -5 necessary
and it's free
Spring Break at Snowshoe
it's snowing right now In West Virginia ti
s'opes win be In great shape for our annual
sor ng trip to snowshoe W V Sign up wi'f
Mrs jo Saunders to reserve your space
Price varies according to your ski package
Transportation available on first come first
serve basis Phone 757 aoOO or go by Mrs
Saunors office a' 3 p m any day for more In
formation
Application for Student
Homecoming
Committee Chairperson
The Student Homecoming committee s
responsible for planning, promoting, and
presenting the annual homeconvng ac
tivities This festival of events ;s one of the
largest programs happening at the Universi
ty each year Among the responsibilities
parade arranging half time activities at the
football game, securing ludges tor the floats
and house ano residence hall decorations
and presenting entertainment
The Student Homecoming Committee
chairperson is the individual who has overall
responsibility for homecoming Students in
terested In bemg considered for the position
of Student Homecoming Committee
Chairperson may pick up appl cation forms
at either MSC information desk or the
Taylor Slaughter Alumn. Center The
deadline for applying for 'his position is Jan
28
Motel Management
interested in learn.ng motel management
with a major cham' Position available In
Greensboro for Spring, 1985 Con'ac
Cooperative Education 313 Rawi bldg for
more information
Spoleto Festival
Charleston SC
Remember the deadline' for application Is
Feo 1.1985 if you are interested please con
tact the Co op office as soon as possible
Business, music, theatre arts, english and
writing, art and home economics maiors art
encouraged to apply Salary is $125 per week
free housing, 150 paid toward transportation
cost
Camp Day
Do you like to work with children? Enjoy the
outdoors? Then this opportunity may be for
you! Representatives from camps
?hroughout the east will be on campus Jan
22, 1915 to interview students for summer
positions Counselors, instructors, life
guards, and more positions available See
the Co-op office, 313 Rawl Bldg to sign up for
an interview and for more information
Air Products
Nationwide producer of industrial chemicals
and gases offers summer program with
headquarters and regional offices Rising
seniors with good GPA and majoring in
chemistry, business, accounting, or com
puter science invited to apply For more in
formation contact the Cooperative Educa
tlon Office In 313 Rawl building
Banking Positions
interested in banking as a career? Local
financial institution seeks career minded
students majoring in business, finance, ac
counting for spring, summer t�t5 Studnets
should be graduating seniors Contact the
Cooperative Education office in 313 Rawl
building for more Information
Summer Jobs
With malor food service corporation having
facilities throughout the Southeast Food and
Nutrition maiors interested in career related
experience paying U SOU per hour Contact
Cooperative Education office In 313 Rawl
building
Honor Board
The university honor board will meet Thurs
Jan 17th at mendenhall student center room
241 we will continue our regular schedule
for the rest of the spring semester
Announcements
Rugby
Interested in playing this intense sport? It's
a college experience you don t want to pass
up North Carolina has one of the best rugby
unions in the USA and ECU has been a very
respected member �,nce 1975 We've toured
up and down the east coast and Bahamas,
always representing ECU well on the field
and at the traditional aftergame rugby par
t'es No experience is needed Practice
begins Wed , Jan 23 at 4 behind the Allied
Health bu'ldmg We'll be having a team
meeting Tues Jan 22 at 5 downstairs in
memorial gym if you re interested, come on
out For more info , contact Bill Zimmer
menn 758 4459
Foreign Students
individual and group tutoring In english as a
second language will be offered in the
english writing center, A 309 at noon on
Mon wed and Fn and at 2 on Mon Inten
sive work on writing and speech are also
avalable For more into, come by the
center
Zeta Party
Ze'a Ph: Bete sorority Inc will be sponser
�ng a party on Fr Jan IBth form 10 until 2
at the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center Ad
mission price is 75 for students, non
students $1
ECU Lacrosse
There will be an important meeting Thurs
the 17 at 7 30 p m r memorial gym in room
105 AH persons interested in playing lax this
semestersnou'rt be there Also, there will be
electors tor a new o'esident and
v,r� orendent tcr T's uc con: ng year of
�ft5 So tor everybody who is interested, be
'here'
Christian Fellowship
There v- " be campus service Sun , Jan 70th
at II a m m Jenkins aud'torium in the art
bj'idmg Th.s win be the first campus of the
semester ano the new vear why not come
out ana plan to a'urity the lord with us
N.A.A.C.P.
The NAACP win be having a party in
edonia Wright Culture Center Sat . Jan 19
Come out and eniov
Ice Hockey
There win De a practice and scrimmage with
UNC m Fayetteville on sun , Jan 70 at 11
am You will be back for the superbowl (if
football s your thing)! Please call George at
752 8525 for more info Also we need lots of
new players'
Delta Sigma Theta
Spring Rush
DST win be hev.ng the.r 1985 spring rush on
Thurs . Jan 17 at 7pm in the Multi Purpose
room In Mendenhall AM interested ladies
are encouraged to attend it takes a lady
All Nursing Students Graduating
Spring Semester
In order to receive your nursing pin by April
22. 1985. orders must be placed in the student
supply store, Wright building, no later then
Feb 4 Orders should be placed at the
ieweiry counter Orders must be paid in full
when the order 15 placed
School of Nursing
A!i students who plan t0 declare nursing a
maior ano wish to enroll in the sophomore
nursmg courses In fall semester 1985 should
pick up an intent to Enroll Form in the nurs
mg building, room 15? ano return by Feb 1
This applies particularly to present
freshmen However, this form must also be
submitted by students who wish to re enron
in the nursmg program
International Student
Association
We wil! have our first meeting Sat the 19th
Jan a' 4 p m in Mendenhall 221 See you
there1
Sales Posistions
The East Caro'inian now has 2 immediate
openings tor sales personnel Previous sales
experience ;S helpfull But not necessary Ap
plication deadline Frl . Jan 18
ECU FrisbeeClub
The Irate flafbaii team is glad to announce
their victory over UNC W's Gale
Force (thanks to help from Bear, j
Quassar and Andrew Jackson The final
score was 21 13 There is practice every
Tues and Thurs at 3 til 4 30 There will also
be a meeting Tues night at 8 30 in
Mendenhall
Alpha Phi Big
Brothers
The first meeting of the semester will be this
Thurs afternoon at 4 30 at the house All big
brothers are urged to attend happy hours. In
turmurals and elections will be decided
upon Try to please have your dues at this
meeting
I rates
Lers keep the stoke up' Just because we
whipped up on Wiim doesn't mean we can
slack off now Practice today at 3 and Sun at
Mem gym il Be there or be oblong New
players welcome
Sigma Nu Rush
I, Eric Wenninger, rush cahirman of Sigma
NuFraternity, cordially Invite the men of
East Carolina University to our rush parties
beginning Mon , Jan 21 with mexlcan fiesta
night (bring your own sombrero)
Tues night rock, stock, and funk night
followed by the famous Sigma Nu Laua Wed
night All parties begin at 9 p m Call 75 7640
for rides and information I'll see you there!
Super Bowl Party
The knights of Sigma Nu extend an open in
vitation to all ECU students for Sigma Nu's
2nd annual all campus Super Bowl party at
3 X p.n Sun , Jan 20, The house is located
on the corner of 13th and cotanche streets
(behind PTA pina) BYOCIbring your own
chips) For information, rides, or directions,
call 7S8 7440
SGA
SGA is now accepting applications for pirate
walk director All interested persons can ap
ply at the SGA office at Mendenhall The last
day tor accepting applications is Tues , Jan
22nd
Need a Massage?
Come to the physical therapy massage clinic
on Tues , Jan 29 from 4 30 10 in the physical
therapy department 1st floor Belk building
The charge Is tl tor every 10 minutes of
massage
Party for Relief
Come on out and have a little fun at the
Cultural Center Sat from 10 til 2 and support
a good cause too NAACP and dream team
will be providing a dance with the malorltv
of the monies raisedbelng sent to help the
Ethiopian Relief Fund Admission prices
are Students 50 and non students $1
Resident Advisors
The Department of residence life is now ac
cepting applications from students who wish
to apply for resident advisor positions
Students need to have the following
qualifications (l) to be a full time student,
(2) to have a minimum grade point average
of a 2 2, (3) to have a clear ludiclal record,
(4) to have a time schedule that is free of
other committments that conflict with work,
(5) to have lived in a residence hall environ
ment, (4) must reside In residence hall dur
Ing employment Application deadline for
emloyment for Fall 1985 is Jen 25,19t5 If in
terested in applying for a position, appllca
tions are available In 214 Whichard and any
residence hall office
MSO
There will be a meeting of the Minority Stu
dent Organiiatlon on Thurs Jan 17. at 4 30
p rn In the coffeehouse of mendenhall stu
dent center Your attendance Is of great im
portance
SAB Meeting
There will be a Student Athletic Board
meeting Mon . Jan 21 at 4 In room 221 in
Mendenhall
SME
The Society of Manufacturing Engineers
will be holding their first organizational
meeting for the spring semsester on Mon
Jan 21st at 5 p.m in Flanagan room 104 We
urge all members and interested people '0
attend
CADAP
You can help promote responsible decisions
concerning drugs and alcohol. Become a
trained volunteer! There will be a meeting
Thurs . Jan 17 at 4 p.m. in Erwin Hall, room
210 All interested persons please attend
ALI Campus Party
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity is sponsoring
an all campus party after happy hour this
Fri , Jan 18 at their house on tenth st
BYOB
Kappa Sigma
An Important meeting will be held for an
brothers and little sisters Fri , jan 18th at 3
p m Wear your letters
Gamma Beta Phi
The Gamma Beta Phi honor society will hold
it's first meeting of the semester on Thurs ,
Jan 24af7pm In biology 103 The executive
council will right before the general meeting
at 4 p m We have lors of new activities and
we need everyone to come out and par
ticipate!
Pi Kappa Phi Little
Sisters
Sun , Jan 20 is the superbowl party at the At
tic Wear your letters and have a fun time
with the brothers Also. Mon �Thurs Jan
21 24 Is Pi Kapp Brother Rush Please be at
the house at 8 p m Let's help the brothers
make this the best rush yeti
Sig Eps
Rush workshop tonight
Prime Time
Pnme Time, sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ will be meeting in a new place ano
at a new time Old Joyner Library rm 221 at 8
p.m Please join us for bible study, fun and
fellowship
Student Star search
Check next week's announcements tor more
details.
ECU Women's Glee Club
Presents a Happy hour at the Tree House
Jan 24th 44 30 pm See you there!
N.C. Student Legislature
The N S Student Legislature is the students
link with the law making general assembly
We study present and future issues impor
tant to N C and propose solutions and bills
Over 45 percent of our bills become state
law We meet Mon at 7 in the mendenhalf
coffeehouse or call 752 5442
N.C. Student Legislature
The N.C Student Legislature will meet
Mon . Jan 21 at 7 in the Mendenhall cof
teehouse We will finalize plans for the Jan
25 27 IC New resolutions will be In also
Please remember to distribute the faculty
letters and handle any work you volunteered
for
Shambhata Dharma Group
The Six Perfecting Practices, a seminar in
personal growth consisting of lecture,
discussion and guided meditation Deals
with subechj generosity, ethics, patience,
enthusiastic effort, concentration and
wisdom Taught by Jim Dougherty, a
Tibetan Buddhist monk for ten years
Thurs Jan 24 and Frl Jan 25 from 7�
p m , Sat Jan. 24, 10-12 a.m 2-4 p.m Old
Brown and Wood auto dealership, Dickenson
Ave and 14th st For Information or to
preregister contacty Or Don Brown, phone
355 4410
Div. of Cont, Education
Continuing Education Non Credit Courses.
Dreams� Tues Feb. 12; Mar. 14 6:30-930
p m. 6 sessions Guitar Wed tev. 13-Apr. lf
6:30-7:45 p.m I sessions. Conversational
German- Thurs feb u Apr 75, 6-7:30 p.m
10 sessions. Register at Erwin Hall or call
7576143
Travel Committee
Like to travel and plan trips? Why not
become a member on the S'udent Union
Travel Committee The Student Union
Travel Committee plans and promotes the
following types of trips weekend excur
sions, trips scheduled during holidays and
breaks The committee also sponsors the
Travel Adventure Film Series For more in
formation, contact the Student Union (room
234) at 757 6411, ext 210
College Loan Funds
College loan funds are still available for spr
ing 1985 academic terms trom college toun
datlon, Inc The foundation has financial
commitments from North Carolina Banks In
excess of it's current estimates on loan needs
for funding through the N C insured student
loan program and N C PLUS iparent 1 loan
program for 1984 85 The N C state eucation
assistance authority provides the guarantee
Sign Language Club
Welcome Back! This Thurs Jan 17th will Be
our 1st meeting of the semester Hope you all
come out and ioin us: We are going to have
an action packed semester and we'll need
every ones help to make this our Best
semester ever1 No previous sign language
sklls art needed, so come on out and oln us
In the fun 1'
Kappa Alpha Psi
The kappa Alpha Psi fraternity inc will be
accepting donations for Kenneth Bat'ie who
is a cancer patient in need of a Done arrow
�ransplant Kenneth will hopefully be
transported to John Hopkins hospital with
�he help of your donations
Cancer
is cancer affecting your life or the life of so
meone close to you' If so, you may benefit
from involvement In Positive image, a sup
port group for individuals experiencing
cancer The group provides mutal support,
assistance with problem solving, and
teaches methods for reducing stress
Regular meetings are held at a central
downtown location cor more ,normatlon
abou' becoming involved in the sroup, can
either Gene Eakes RN, MSN (Wl 757 6041,
iH) 756 6065. or Rita F.nnen RN. MSN (W;
757 4471, (HI 758 8097
Tutoring
if you need help writing a paper from a one
page summary to a one hundred page disser
'eflon iust come By the engiish department
office A 124 and sign up to see a tutor in 'he
writing center it's free!
New Policy
Because of limited space and time to devote to
announcements, the following guidelines are
heretofore to be followed by groups or depart
ments submitting announcements:
�All announcements submitted will be printed if
space allows.
�When space limitations exist (as they often do),
the most recent announcements of the following
list (which is in descending order of importance)
will be printed. There will be no deviation from
these rules.
�Campus organization meetings.
�Academic announcements (guest lecturers
etc.).
�Intramural and club sport announcements.
�Co-op employment announcements.
�Church and religious announcements directly
pertaining to students.
�All-campus parties not devoted to profit.
�Club or fraternity or sorority parties that are
devoted to charities.
�Other announcements not covered under the
above rules but that are group-related.
THERE will be absolutely no congratulation
messages printed in this section. Also, The East
Carolinian reserves the right to edit an-
nouncements for non-essential material, gram
mmar, punctuation, spelling, obscenity or libel
This policy is effective Jan. 15, 1985.
r
SPRING RUSH '85
Mon Jan. 21- Kappa Sigma's Famous Plavbov Bunny Night
Tue Jan. 22- Elbo Dance Night at the Kappa Sig house
Wed Jan. 23- Greek Letter Night. Parties begin at 9p.m.
700 East 10th Street Phone: 752-5543
M
�"�
�IB ' � ���i
�in �
� '� �
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A void Infection Throd
Health
Column
i
i
i
it m
Hepatite
I
Viral hepatn
one million Amc
Many of those who .
are college si
young adults He;
flammatior:
caused b . �

substance- s .
chemical1 and it .
There are a
hepatite
viruses: Hq
B. and Non-A, Noi
Hepatite r .
fece, the
contact
Large Fam
(CPS) - Larg
ing motl
are to blai
college entrai
new
S t u d: e
however
' decline
fell yearh
begmr. .
'60s s
educa-
discip
nuciea- t�
Bui
blame
in the '50s !
Tes' .
� B .
Frar�,r . nta ded
released ei � . h
"Small chi ir
from their r'er not fi
ings tie explain
in a fan
stimulation b
Frar.ke clain SAT n
siblings in larg
children receive c
personal attenl
average of T
vV he f ducaviorv TeMvnj
vice recarche Wilharr. Fetter
agrees Franke- si
accurate, a new ETS -
the low .ore- on decreased
pha- 5 academic- .
school senv
H i g h d r opo u 1 rates
students displeasure w I
schools' academic qualm
gest that the ma i I
trtbuttng to test score dec
a decreased acaden
the educational r cess
study says.
Franke stud) is a
of University of Michigan F
fessor Robert Za
report, which tied the c sapp
ting test scores to fami f sia
jonc predicted score- -
stabilize, then rise in th
'80s when children of the W -
smaller families hit . .
When Zaionc's e?e:tej 2!
point rise in 1984 te res
ed out to be only four p
Franke began exam
minimal increase
"I cast around for thing
would affect test sec
says. "I went back to Z
theory to get effects, an
summer looked at the impact h l
ween parents and kids
Franke found the pi
-ie in test scores ca-ec: - �
i
Spr
19851
Jan
42
7:
�Jfflv
i






I HI I M -k'i IM s
JAM AKN
!
olicy
to devote to
guidelines are
ps or depart-
be printed if
(as thev often do),
of the following
- of importance)
iition from
lecturers,
nents.
fs directly
fit.
�hat are
under the
� filiation
The East
edit an-
gram-
or hbel.
I-
'85
!abo Bunn Night
appa Nig house.
5 begin at 9p.m.
752-5543
i

!
A void Infection Through Caution
Hepatitis Affects Students
Health
Column
Viral hepatitis affects about
one million Americans each year.
Mam of those who get hepatitis
are college students and other
ing adults. Hepatitis is an in-
timation of the liver that is
ised b viruses or by non-viral
stances such as alcohol,
chemicals, and drugs.
There are at least three types of
hepatitis caused bv different
viruses: Hepatitis A. Hepatitis
B, and Son-A, Non-B Hepatitis.
Hepatitis irus is excreted in
ces, therefore direct or indirect
tad with the infected person's
feces, eating utensils and dishes
can cause infection. Drinking
water and food including raw or
steamed oysters, clams and
mussels may be contaminated
with Hepatitis A.
Hepatitis B viruses are found
in all body fluids and secretions.
It may be transmitted by blood
transfusion, mouth-to-mouth or
sexual contact, and puncturing of
the skin by contaminated in-
struments such as those used for
tattooing, ear piercing, or
acupuncture.
The spread of Non-A, Non-B
Hepatitis is poorly understood.
Blood tranfusion is the major
known route of infection.
The most common symptoms
of hepatitis are fatigue, mild
fever, muscle or joint aches,
nausea, vomiting, loss of ap-
petite, mild abdominal pain, and
sometimes diarrhea. Many cases
go undiagnosed because the
symptoms resemble a flu-like i
lness or may be very mild or ab-
sent. Some individuals may
notice dark urine and light col-
ored stools, followed by jaundice
� the skin and whites of eves ap
pear yellow.
If you suspect you Have
hepatitis you should consult your
physician who will pertorm a
physical examination, order
blood and other tests to confirm
the diagnosis, and advise you
about diet, rest and activities.
Your contacts should be advised
of your infection and the need tor
preventive medication such as
gamma globulin. A vaccine to
prevent Hepatitis A is currently
under development but is not
available for human use at this
time.
A vaccine for Hepatitis B is
no available for individuals at
high risk for contracting the
disease, including people
undergoing dialysis or frequent
blood transfusions, health care
Professionals, and individuals
w'th a large number of sexual
contacts. Two doses of the vac-
cine given one month apart
followed bv a third dose six mon-
ths later are needed to achieve im-
munity which lasts for at least
five years. Hepatitis B vaccine is
expensive (around $100 tor all
three doses), but has been proven
to have a high effective rate.
1 lr more information about
Hepatitis call the Student Health
Servip at 757-6841.
Large Families Lower Scores
(( PS) - large families, work-
s mothers and bad high schools
are to blame for the decline in
ege entrance exam scores, two
. studies assert.
-studies over the years,
vever, have traced the long
ine in average scores -
Mastic Aptitude Test scores
�ell yearly since 1963 before
cginning to level off in 1982 - to
60? social upheaval, television,
education budget cuts, lax school
.pline and even atmospheric
nuclear testing.
But people would do better to
blame the large families popular
in the '50s for the drops in SAT
and ACT (American College
Testing) scores. 1 oyola College
ol Baltimore researcher Richard
Franke contended in a report
released over the holidays.
"Small children learn better
from their parents, not from sibl-
ings he explains. "Lots of kids
in a family dilute the effect of the
stimulation by the parents
Franke claims SAT scores of
siblings in large families, where
children receive less individual
personal attention, can drop an
average of 20 points per child.
While Fducanon Testing Ser-
vice reearchc- William Fetters
agrees Franke's study probably is
accurate, a new FTS survey pins
the low scores on decreased em-
phasis on academics among high
school seniors.
High dropout rates and
students' displeasure with their
schools' academic quality "sug-
gest that the major factor con-
tributing to test score decline was
a decreased academic emphasis in
the educational process the
study says.
Franke's study is an offshoot
of University of Michigan Pro-
fessor Robert Zajonc's 1976
report, which tied the disappoin-
ting test scores to family size. Za-
jonc predicted scores would
stabilize, then rise in the early
'80s when children of the 1960s
smaller families hit college age.
When Zajonc's expected 25
point rise in 1984 test scores turn-
ed out to be only four points,
Franke began examining the
minimal increase.
"I cast around for things that
would affect test scores he
says. "I went back to Zajonc's
theory to get effects, and last
summer looked at the impact bet-
ween parents and kids
Franke found the projected
rise in test scores caused by
smaller families was counteracted
by decreased parent-child contact
as more women entered the work
force.
"Working mothers are secon-
dary factors in determining test
scores Franke contends. "It ex-
plains almost all variance in the
decline and in the subsequent
rise
Franke discounts the effects of
separation and divorce on the
scores because "remarriage also
has risen
But as the percentage of work-
ing mothers shot from 10 percent
in 1968 to nearly 40 percent in
1984, more children received only
minimal adult attention, he
notes.
"Children with two working
parents face the same problems
as children from large families,
and with the same results: lower
college test scores Franke says.
The ETS study, based on Na-
tional Center for Education
Statistics research begun in 1972
which tracked high school
students' curriculum choices and
achievement test scores, recom-
mends schools try to raise test
scores by improving academic
standards, but not at the expense
of programs for disadvantaged
students, researchers stress.
But the study ignored 1984's
improved scores, although Fet-
ters says a current ETS draft pro-
posal credits a "little upturn in
the amount of homework" for
the slight score increases.
Despite Fetters' and Franke's
research, many experts remain
unconvinced by study conclu-
sions about either test score
declines or the 1984 revival.
"We don't absolutely know
why scores have risen com
ments George Hanford, president
of the College Board, which ad-
ministers the SAT.
"It's naive to conclude in the
context of the decline he adds,
"that national attention to the
quality of education is no longer
necessary
But Franke argues educators
should look at the test score
decline in "the broader perspec-
tive of intellectual incline
"The U.S. history of this cen-
tury is a history of substantial in-
tellectual gains he adds. "The
decline of college entrance exam
scores is only a blip in the
perspective of the twentieth cen-
turv
A dvertise
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ir
eaui
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END OF THE WEEK JAM
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Fraternity
Spring Rush
1985
Jan. 21-23
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757-3516
ABORTIONS! P
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OAKWOOD HOMES
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THE PIRATES AND
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Jus' hke ECU Oat- �� . � � .
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752 1294
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
&
Student Union Vice President
for the 1985 - 1986 Term
Any full time student can apply.
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: January 18, 1985
0
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WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR!
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Thursday, Jan. 17th
III!
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HAPPY HOUR AFTER 11:30
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Pnviiti�b 41 �L PrratHs
1 i 1 ,� � 1 m emm a i i
i






3tje iEaat (ilarultnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom MrkPTrfT. rrriffrfMniimiii
CiRKi RlDEOUT, MtoMtimCriHar
Jennifer Jkndrasiak, vv &&�� RickMccormac, (spom &&�
Scott Cxpi r, (� s,�r, em Anthony Martin, mm Haw
Tina Maroschak, Amm eo, John Petfrson, �
Bll.l MlTC'HH 1 .IfTttfaftOfl Vfa� BlI I DAWSON, Production 1tinagf
Doris Rankins. smmq John Rusk, wwum ��
lanuarv 17, 198S
Opinion
Page 4
Degree
New Journalism Program Good
The new bachelor of science
degree in communications to be of-
fered next fall is a giant step in the
right direction. Communications
� both print journalism and
broadcast journalism � is a rapid-
ly growing and transforming field,
one which ECU should prepare its
students for. But several things
must be considered; just offering
the program isn't enough. Today's
reporters in all media need special
preparation and valid instruction if
they are to compete in a very tight
job market.
One obstacle in attracting
students is a place just up the road
� the School of Journalism at
UNC-Chapel Hill. It offers
students more than a degree. There
a reputation for excellence has
been established that enables
chairs to be endowed and guest lec-
turers from the "real world" to be
salaried. The program is better.
But ECU has some unique aspects
that need to be stressed to incom-
ing journalism students.
One is the easy access to a
newspaper. The Daily Tarheel has
countless more students clamoring
for jobs than there are slots to fill.
At Chapel Hill, many students go
through the journalism program
without the chance to practice
what they are learning. The East
Carolinian always needs writers
and gives every student a chance
who is willing to put in the time.
It's a shame that of all the jour-
nalism minors at this school, we
only see a handful walk through
our doors. To be competitive with
the valuable pieces of paper from
UNC, ECU students need clips,
not grades.
The classes at ECU need to be
improved. A more demanding cur-
riculum must be adopted, and a
stressing of basic style rules and
grammar need to be a cornerstone
of the early courses. The jour-
nalism program here cannot be
academic in nature. It must stress
professional skills that will land
students jobs. The teachers must
have experience at a newspaper if
they teach print courses or a TV or
radio station if they teach broad-
cast journalism.
Lastly, teachers must emphasize
the learning aspect of the campus
newspaper and radio station.
These places offer students a
chance to learn and experience the
day-to-day pressure of the profes-
sion they want to enter. If we don't
realize our mission, we won't reach
our goals.
M.VIAY5 TITflNG
TO RUSH U5?
I'D 5W WE'RE
MOVING ALONG
AT A NICE
PACE
World WW III Words
Soviet Deceit Displayed Again
Last week, during a lunch hour, I wat-
ched a discussion on Cable News Net-
work about the upcoming U.SSoviet
arms talks. Joining the discussion was a
conseratie commentator and the
editor in chief of Foreign Policy
magazine, a prestigious liberal
periodical in which former Democrat
foreign policy lords, such as Cyrus
Vance and Robert McNamara, try to ex-
plain away their failures.
The Right Word
Dennis Kilcoyne
Naturally, the central theme of the
discussion was the president's Strategic
Defense Initiative (SDI), dubbed "Star
Wars" by the hostile media. The conser-
vative and the liberal agreed that the
president's full-speed-ahead approach to
SDI research is what persuaded the
Soviets to return to the Geneva arms
talks. But then the liberal uttered a naive
line that went something like this: "The
Soviets know 'Star Wars' can't work,
but they are afraid that if they cannot
persuade the Reagan administration to
cancel the research, their own military
establishment will press for the wasteful
spending of billions of rubles on a
similar research effort
Well! How nice it must be to be so
blissfully naive. But the world is a
dangerous place where the uninformed
often get lost in the swamp of reality.
So, dear reader, let's trudge through
that swamp and discover some things
about arms control.
The statement just quoted is er-
roneous in two important ways. First of
all, what makes this guy think the
Soviets "know" that the SDI won't
work? Does he base this assumption on
the public statement: of Soviet officials?
If so, he should be more careful, because
the Soviets say what they want the
American public to believe. Publicly,
they repeat President Reagan's line, "A
nuclear war cannot he won Private-
ly, however, they believe fervently in
their prospects for winning a nuclear
war. If you question what I say, examine
the sections on nuclear strategy in Soviet
military encyclopedias � then ask
yourself why thev have added four
strategic missile systems in the past 15
years (zero for the I nited States during
that time) and are experimenting with
three more. Thev may be wrong on
believing they can win an atomic war,
but knowing that doesn't lessen the
danger.
No, the Soviets are assuming the
worst for us: that the American SDI
research will be successful and that
decades of their painful and costly ef-
forts at achieving strategic superiority-
will go down the tubes. The Soviets
know that without the dazzling array of
American technology they have bought
and stolen, their military capabilities
would be no where near what they are.
The Soviets have a great respect for our
military research-and-development
record. They know they must stop SDI
before it is deployed and renders Soviet
strategic weapons obsolete.
The second part of the quote is even
more naive. The fellow assumes that the
Soviet "military establishment"
operates like the Pentagon in lobbying
and exerting pressure on the political
leaders for more defense funds. This is
false. The Soviet military has no real
power of its own. Its power is channeled
through the political elite, which con-
trols the military through an impressive-
ly effective system: a massive network of
secret police agents permeating all units
of the military. Even if they wanted to,
the armed forces could never assert any
independence or throw any political
weight around amongst the civilian
leaders, for they are paralyzed by the
same omnipresent fear, cultivated by the
KGB, that keeps all Soviet-dominated
countries within the communist empire.
But if what we are truly concerned
about is arms control, then all this talk
doesn't matter. Because arms control is
a fantasy that has never worked. Oh
sure, maybe someone can find a treaty
somewhere in the dusty pages of history
that contributed to arms control, but
nothing has worked with the Soviets.
Example: In the past 34 years, they have
signed 18 alliances. They have violated
15 of those, particularly the Helsinki Ac-
cords on Human Rights.
When asked to name a successful
U.SSoviet arms-control treaty, the
liberals always say, "The Test Ban Trea-
ty of 1962 That agreement banned at-
mospheric tests of atomic devices. It was
successful because it was fully verifiable
� neither side could explode a nuclear
bomb in the open without the other
side's knowing. But what did it really ac-
complish? Both the United States and
the Soviet Union merely began testing
their weapons underground and now we
have thousands more of these deadly
bombs.
Other arms-control treaties have had
dangerous consequences for the United
States. While our government faithfully
abided by the terms of SALT I, the
Soviets violated it by adding two new
ICBMs to their inventory, the SS-18 and
SS-19; they are the world's most deadly
and threatening missiles. Our govern-
ment also followed the terms of the An-
tiballistic Missile Treaty by completely
dismantling our missile defenses. The
Soviets, on the other hand, recent
completed construction of the Pushkin
Antibalhstic Radar Base, a direct viola-
tion of the treatv, and our preside-
nothing.
I could go on listing more exarr;
but what's most important is
Soviet's attitude. True to the teach. .
of Lenin, they practice negotiant:
form of warfare, not of peace A I ei
said, "Negotiations are a mear I
delaying a crisis while demoralize .
enemy And as Brezhnev said,
Soviets are achieving with - .
"what our predecessors failed to achieve
using the mailed fist
What is really shocking is that Re
and Secretary of State George Shultz.
both of whom should know better, are
attempting serious talks with a man �
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromykc V
diplomat, Gromyko has deal: �
American counterparts for 40 vearc He
knows every crati and cscry e w Y�
book. Indeed, just before the
Missile Crisis, Gromyko -at in front
President Kennedv and i�� ed him
there were no Soviet mb in iba �
this happened when Kervdv a.readv
had the intelligence photo- confirming
the missile presence. Despite that blatar
lie, or maybe because of it. Gromyko
has continued rising in stature Moral.
The Soviets cannot be trusted
Sorry to have to take you
distressing trek through the swamp B
now you should know there will he
real arms control reduction treal
Reagan probably knows this and rr.a be
pushing for good PR. The presidei
usual, will only offer proposals that are
verifiable and fair and. of course, the
Soviets will turn ther noses It
wrong, then by golly. I'll reg
Democrat!
South African Situation Exhibits Greedy Side of U.S.
By DARRYL BROWN
A combination of forces have brought
the nation of South Africa into the
media limelight lately, along with
American policy toward that country.
But it is likely that, barring a ground
swell of popular outcry such as has not
been seen in this country in a dozen
years, the U.S. government will not
learn the lessons of supporting unjust
regimes whose practices are contrary to
American values and ideals.
Time and again, the United States has
backed, funded, even installed govern-
ments in other nations whose policies
and morality we deplore, solely for the
satisfaction of political and economic
exigencies. The policy is usually endors-
ed more heartily by conservative ad-
ministrations but hardly limited to them;
South Africa is an example. The Reagan
administration has lessened pressure on
that government for change, but policy
has been too accommodating for
decades, including under Democrats
Kennedy, Johnson and human rights en-
thusiast Carter.
Conservative endorsement of such
repressive, unjust regimes as South
Africa's comes from a basic respect in
conservative philosophy for corporate,
strategic and military interests, at the
sacrifice, if necessary, of human and
civil rights and basic American
democratic principles. But how can our
nation not undermine its self-image as
the beacon of freedom and equality, as
the hope for justice and prosperity
through democratic institutions, when it
is willing to sacrifice these values for
economic and strategic considerations?
There are examples time and again of
such American policy, and these in-
cidences, though each somewhat dif-
ferent from the other, can serve as a
paradigm and caveat for South African
policy. American officials are often
dumbfounded when, after a populist
revolution (not infrequently spearhead-
ed by Marxist leaders) overthrowing an
unjust, U.Sbacked government, the
new government spurns America and its
economic aid. Such was the case in
Nicaragua. For decades the United
States steadily supported the Somoza
regime, though it was antithetical to
every American ideal. It was a family
dynasty without a hint of democracy
which kept its citizens in poverty except
Nobel Prize Winner
BISHOP DESMOND TUTU
Waghorn
for a small landowning class, headed by
the Somoza family, who controlled
everything from the banana plantations
to the car dealerships. Human rights
were widely violated for generations.
Anasiatio Somoza Garcia even kept, in
cages at his estate, his political enemies
next to his exotic wild animals. But the
United States, through Democrats and
Republicans alike, supported the
regime, including aid for the unsuc-
cessful attempt to stop the 1979 revolu-
tion that brought the Sandanistas to
power.
We supported that regime because it
protected American corporate interests
and permitted development of our
military and strategic interests, though
we had to sacrifice our ideals of
democracy, freedom, private land
ownership, and civil and human rights
to do it. When the Sandanistas came to
power and were offered U.S. aid,
American officials could not understand
their refusal to go along with American
requests. The reason they would not is
because America, for 40 years, had sup-
ported a regime that impoverished and
sometimes brutalized its citizens. The
Sandanistas worked to overthrow that
regime, and they were opposed by the
United States.
The same is true of other places, other
times. Lyndon Johnson was repeatedly
baffled when Ho Chi Minh and the
North Vietnamese refused huge
economic aid packages in exchange for a
halt of the Vietnam War. They wanted
to replace their long history of foreign
intervention by China, Europe and
America with a nationalist home rule.
Ho Chi Minh turned to communism to
achieve this, but he was first a Viet-
namese nationalist, and one who put na-
tionalist ideals above political bargain-
ing. He was not accustomed to, as was
LBJ, of accepting pork-barrel projects
in exchange for cooperation. We all
know our country learned that lesson the
hard way.
Iran is hardly an ideal model for
anywhere else, but here again are
similarities. The United States backed
the Shah for decades though he was
cruelly unjust and fabulously wealthy at
the expense of his citizens. The revolu-
tion that brought Khomeini to power
was pan of an Islamic fundamentalist
revival and nationalist fervor that is easi-
ly anti-Western anyway, but the backing
of the Shah instead of pressing him for
reforms of basic human and civil decen-
cy surely aggravated anti-American sen-
timent in Iran.
There are plenty of other such ex-
amples from this century around the
world in which the United States backed
regimes that eventually fell to a new
government hostile to the United States
and not infrequently communist. In
practical terms, it is not good politics in
the long view, because we eventually lose
not only an ally and influence in a coun-
try but also corporate and strategic ad-
vantages as well as American values of
justice and freedom. On an ethical level,
we forsake our moral high ground when
we sacrifice the ideals we hold dear �
and those that provide decent, fair lives
for all people � for political exigencies.
How can we represent democratic
justice, equality, prosperity and freedom
for all people when we allow these things
to fall in exchange for the obedience of
an ally?
South Africa has much in common
with this pattern of error. The United
States supports the white government,
which is less than 20 percent of the
population and denies voting rights,
government representation and many
civil and human rights to its vast black
majority. We aquiesce to a regime that
not only detests majority rule, but doe-
so on racist premises, thus killing two
.American values with one stone. Hous
mg and whole cities are segregated, and
blacks are frequentlv paid much less
than whites for equal work What little
property blacks have can and often is
taken by the government, and black- are
frequently stripped of citizenship and
placed on impoverished "homeland
they have never seen (habituallv set up
on some of the worst land in South
Africa).
Still, we continue to support this raci
minority government which turns everv
American value upside down. We sup
port it knowing it is quite likely to even
tually be overthrown, perhaps by violent
revolution. How can blacks, which out-
number whites more than four to one.
stay repressed by the white government
forever? When and if blacks seize
power, do we really expect them to con-
tinue to be friendly allies when we en-
dorsed their suppressors for years? Will
they believe our ideals when we have for-
saken them? No, American officials will
probably be dismayed once again when a
popular revolution throws out the op-
pressive regime they supported, and
when the new rulers, who know the in-
justice caused by American policy, reject
U.S. overtures for aid and cooperation
We need to learn that American
values need not be forsaken for
economic and political interests; indeed,
in the long term they mav be dependent
on one another.
(Darryl Brown is an alumnus of ECL
and a former staff member of The East
Carolinian. He is currently doing
graduate work in American Studies at
The College of William and Mary.)

In South African Proh
Students
demc
Rj
millu
milhc
workl
� -
Li
war
the;
mentj
busn
press
amer
V-
i
Continued (rum Page 1
ministration huildm � -rec
hours.
The dav before. seeral hun-
dred University of Maryland-
College Park students, locked out
of a planned sit-in i i�j.
ministration building, boarded
buses and marched em
President John Toll's office to
protest the systen U million
in South v- -j jn.
vestments
Likewise, a gi up
ty of Texa chanting Board
Regents, ou hide. t
charge you wit �
tested outside i board
regents mee- - . ferna . . :he
UT system se
million in South
stock hoid .
And m a
radical lactic 12 van
Oberlin College! Studc
tion Against v
successfu � hut dou
campu- . - : .
hold it I
sold of: its $30 million in
African � uaies.
fccc ustomed i
organized trie
tests during the wan
months.
taneous uprising
even a.v i act
surprise.
"Id k an)
pected (the campus pi -
be this big me Nes
reveals. "I don't knov vha
would have happened
Berkeiev, for instance. �
the national foe
b people like Tutu and
Jack
"We th tight it would bt
on our pan ecause
rent interest, not l capitalize
it admits former M
Blacik Student Union Presick
Charles Bell, a fc
Campus Bene
Continued From Page 1
tis was Oci i -c � .
structor from the East Care
School ot Bartending &ae a
demonstration of altername
non-alcoholic drinks Edwa
said she is also trying get a
speaker for a lecture tl -
open to the public la:e:
semester.
The BACCHUS pi g
founded a: the thriven
Florida in 19"6. was the rr
motivating force be-
establishment of CADAP
Dean of Student Affairs a:
University of Florida pree-
the program for use a: UF du- .
a symposium on a
abuse at ECU. The conca
ed by the symposi m p npted
the Vice Chancellor for P ax
and Administration. Dr R Holt
to appoint an alcohol tasl
to study the extent ol
problem at ECU The W
studv of students ar.d fa
found the drinking hafa
campus community showed
need for an education
counseling program The
establishmcrd of CADAP �a
answer.
Bevt
vse
pee!
e c
I
-
IPek
Chin
Greenville
Featuring the
SUN
Curried Beef
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Sweet and Sour PI
Chicken Cantonel
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R �Mixed Beverages
Hours Monday thru Thursda
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Friday �nd Saturdav I M
Sunday 12 Noon to I
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7
,�.�� �








II
. I'D SW WE'RE
MOVING ALONG
AT A NICE
fCE

d A gain
he other hand, recently
action of the Pushkino
Akm Base, a direct viola-
u president says
- more examples,
wrtant is the
i rue to the teachings
:e negotiations as a
' peace. As Lenin
are a means for
c demoralizing the
�hne said, the
� ing with negotiation
rs failed to achieve
"
ng is that Reagan
State George Shultz,
: know better, are
ks with a man like
Irei Gromyko. As a
iromyko has dealt with his
� anierparts tor 40 years. He
every craft and otrv lie in the
ideed, jus; before the Cuban
Gromyko sat in front of
kenneds and assured him
ere no Soviet missiles in Cuba �
: when Kennedy already
ie intelligence photos confirming
presence Despite that blatant
mabe because of it. Gromyko
nued r ng in stature. Moral:
.ani ' be trusted.
i nave : e you on that
ring trek through the swamp. By
-Id know there will be no
arms control reduction treaty.
in probably knows this and may be
g 1 PR The president, as
will onl offer proposals that are
and fair and. of course, the
will turn ther noses. If I'm
g, then bv I'll register
Democrat'
U.S.
s majority rule, but does
tl ra I premises, thus killing two
�mencan values with one stone. Hous-
ing and whole cities are segregated, and
-lacks are frequently paid much less
�nan whites ror equal work. What little
�pern blacks have can and often is
taken b the government, and blacks are
frequently stripped of citizenship and
placed on impoverished "homelands"
hey have never seen (habitually set up
some of the worst land in South
Africa).
Still, we continue to support this racist
minority government which turns every
American value upside down. We sup-
port it knowing it is quite likely to even-
tually be overthrown, perhaps bv violent
revolution. How can blacks, which out-
number whites more than four to one,
stay repressed by the white government
forever1 When and if blacks seize
power, do we really expect them to con-
tinue to be friendly allies when we en-
dorsed their suppressors for years? Will
they believe our ideals when we have for-
saken them9 No, American officials will
probably be dismayed once again when a
popular revolution throws out the op-
pressive regime they supported, and
hen the new rulers, who know the in-
justice caused by American policy, reject
U.S. overtures for aid and cooperation.
We need to learn that American
values need not be forsaken for
economic and political interests; indeed,
in the long term they may be dependent
n one another.
(Darryl Brown is an alumnus of ECU
and a former staff member of The East
raroliman. He is currently doing
graduate work in American Studies at
The College of William and Mary.)
A
f
X
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 17, 1985
I
In South African Protests
Students Continue Action
Continued From Page 1
ministration building for three
hours.
The day before, several hun-
dred University of Maryland-
College Park students, locked out
of a planned sit-in at the ad-
ministration building, boarded
buses and marched on system
President John Toll's office to
protest the system's $6.3 million
in South African-tied in-
vestments.
Likewise, a group of Universi-
ty of Texas chanting "Board of
Regents, you can't hide, we
charge you with genocide pro-
tested outside a recent board of
regents meeting demanding the
UT system sell its estimated $600
million in South African-linked
stock holdings.
And in a somewhat more
radical tactic, 12 members of
Oberlin College's Student Coali-
tion Against Apartheid tried un-
successfully to shut down the
campus computer system and
hold it hostage until the school
sold off its $30 million in South
African-tied companies.
Accustomed to a regular,
organized series of student pro-
tests during the warmer spring
months, this winter's spon-
taneous uprisings have caught
even anti-apartheid activists by
surprise.
"I don't think any of us ex-
pected (the campus protests) to
be this big at this time Nessen
reveals. "I don't know what
would have happened at
Berkeley, for instance, without
the national focus given the issue
by people like Tutu and
Jackson
"We thought it would be naive
on our part, because of the cur-
rent interest, not to capitalize on
it admits former Maryland
Black Student Union President
Charles Bell, who helped
organize the recent College Park
demonstration.
Ruled by a minority of five
million whites, South Africa's 22
million blacks arc forced to live,
work, play and attend school on-
ly with other blacks.
Campus anti-apartheid leaders
want to force colleges to sell off
their billions of dollars in endow-
ment stock holdings in some 350
U.S. companies which do
business with South Africa.
Such "divestiture they say,
will force U.S. companies to
pressure the government to
amend its racist policies or lose
American business.
"It's too soon to tell if (this
winter's campus protests) are ac-
tually resulting in more colleges
divesting of South African-tied
stock says Knight.
"But they are going to find it
harder and harder to stall as long
as there is continued student pro-
test and as more states and
localities enact divestiture legisla-
tion
In the last few years, Brown,
Northern Illinois, Wesleyan and
the City University of New York,
among others, have either par-
tially or fully divested of South
African-tied stock in the face of
mounting student pressure and
dnestiture legislation.
Others, such as Minnesota,
Yale and the entire Michigan
higher ed system, have sold stock
in companies which refused to
honor the Sullivan Principles, a
set of six guidelines business must
follow to guarantee equal treat-
ment of black workers.
But while some schools have
divested, most continue either to
avoid the issue entirely, or con-
demn divestiture as an ineffective
and unfair method of opposing
apartheid.
Southern California, Illinois,
Pitt and Stanford, to name a few,
consistently have refused to con-
sider selling their stock in IBM,
Motorola, Black and Decker,
Newmont Mining, Ford, Coke,
Mobil Oil and other firms in
South Africa.
Even after hosting a visit last
month by Nobel Peace Prize win-
ner Bishop Tutu, Harvard stead-
fastly refuses to consider
divestiture of millions in South
African stock holdings in its en-
dowment fund.
Harvard President Derek Bok
has publicly charged that
"divestiture will not succeed and
will cost the university money
"It's a controversial issue on
campus confesses Harvard
spokesman David Rosen, "an
issue on which students and
faculty are deeply divided
"With publicity at a high level,
it will be vital to follow up with
protests and demonstrations on
campuses this spring ACA's
Nessen explains.
"With an extensive campus
network already in place he
predicts, "we're planning a
record year of student protests
and civil disobedience on cam-
puses nationwide" during the
movement's March 21-April 6
"Weeks of Action
Meanwhile, ECU has not yet
seen any protests concerning
either apartheid or divestiture.
ECU Political Science major Jay
Stone said he feels this is for two
reasons. "On the one hand, 1
think the facts of South Africa
aren't clear to students he said,
adding that he feels students are
unaware of such things as the
disparities in infant mortality
rates between white and black
South Africans.
Stone also said he thinks
students are "numb The
students who would protest, he
said, tend to be those who are
more politically liberal.
Campus Benefits From Program
Continued From Page 1
tions was Oct. 1-5 when an in-
structor from the East Carolina
School of Bartending gave a
demonstration of alternative
non-alcoholic drinks. Edwards
said she is also trying to get a
speaker for a lecture that will be
open to the public later this
semester.
The BACCHUS program,
founded at the University of
Florida in 1976, was the main
motivating force behind the
establishment of CADAP. The
Dean of Student Affairs at the
University of Florida presented
the program for use at UF during
a symposium on alcohol use and
abuse at ECU. The concern rais-
ed by the symposium prompted
the Vice Chancellor for Planning
and Administration, Dr. R. Holt,
to appoint an alcohol task force
to study the extent of the alcohol
problem at ECU. The two-year
study of students and faculty
found the drinking habits of the
campus community showed a
need for an education and
counseling program. The
establishment of CADAP was the
answer.
The program, funded by both
the SGA and the Alcoholic
Beverage Control board, is doing
well now but Edwards said new
peer counselors are always
welcome. New members go
through an "in service training"
period before working on their
own with students. Members also
attend the regular meetings where
they discuss alcohol education
and other relevant topics.
"Anyone with an interest in help-
ing others is welcome to join
Edwards said, and although most
of the members are in areas of
study such as social work, there
are several from other disciplines.
Anyone interested in getting in-
volved with the program should
come to a Thursday meeting at 4
p.m. on the third floor of Erwin
Building, or call Regina Edwards
for more information. With the
material from BACCUS it should
be a very productive semester for
CADAP.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1985
Sexual Harassment Increases
Outside College Classroom
(CPS) - College women find
"even worse" campus sexism
outside the classroom than they
do in classes, a major college
group claims.
Discrimination against female
college students by male faculty
and administrators extends
beyond the classroom and may be
more career-damaging than in-
class sex bias, the group's new
report charges.
In fact, sex discrimination in
financial aid offices, and in
career counseling and employ-
ment centers can cause women to
"lose confidence, lower their
academic goals and limit their
career choices study authors
Roberta Hall and Bernice Sandier
claim.
The study, sponsored by the
Association of American Col-
leges' Project on the Status and
Education of Women, follows
the same authors' earlier ex-
amination of college classroom
sex bias.
It revealed "things are even
worse outside the classroom
when class rules no longer apply,
Hall says.
The earlier study charged male
faculty favored male students in
classroom situations, Hall notes.
The new report found career
and academic counselors also
often unconsciously discourage
women from taking certain male-
dominated majors, and consider
men more knowledgeable and
career-minded.
Counselors and professors also
spend less time with women
students than with men outside
the classroom, and give less en-
couragement to women who seek
leadership positions on campus,
the study shows.
"Younger women may enter
college expecting equal treat-
ment Hall explains, "and
young women who have never
been employed in the workforce
are very apt not to be aware of
the differential treatment. But
they're more likely to be
demoralized by it
"Most 18-year-old girls don't
know what happened with the
women's movement in the '60s
and '70s agrees Florence Hall,
educator and founder of New
York's Feminist Press. "It's also
true most 18-year-old males don't
know what's going on. The
results of the survey didn't come
as a surprise to me
"But it's fascinating that in
1985 we're seeing a recurrence of
some of the all-too-familiar at-
titudes that the women's move-
ment faced in the '60s she con-
tinues. "It's easy to slip back
While older women students
often are more sensitive to sexist
behavior, and are consequently
better able to survive it, study
warns subtle
can discourage
author Hall
discrimination
them, too.
"Returning women students
very often have given a great deal
of thought to their situation, like
career plans and ways in which
their sex has held them back
she explains. "But it cuts both
ways
If a severe problem persists,
such as financial or counseling
discrimination, students should
use campus grievance procedures
or administrative channels, Hall
advises.
"The earlier study sparked a
number of campus-based
workshops, programs and con-
ferences focusing on these
issues she says.
"The schools that were more
concerned about women did their
own studies, and found students
commenting on the chilly climate
for women outside the
classroom Hall notes.
The comments led to the new
study, she says.
But more than research is
necessary, Florence Hall argues-
Only one-third of all colleges
provide specialized child, health
care and crisis center services,
and even fewer offer a full range
of these services, she says.
Philosophy Professor Retires
M.$
V
T

ECU New, Bureau
Dr. Robert L. Holt, scholar,
professor of religion and
philosophy and veteran ad-
ministrator who was chief lieute-
nant to President Leo Jenkins
during years of spectacular
growth at ECU, retired, effective
Dec. 31, 1984.
His retirement closed out a
career spanning more than 35
years as a teacher and ad-
ministrator. In addition to high
level administrative and faculty
posts here for 30 years, Holt is a
former vice president of Mars
Hill College. He also taught for
two years at Wake Forest, and is
a Baptist minister and deacon.
Since 1978, Holt has held a
teaching post as a professor in the
philosophy department. His
former position as vice chancellor
for administration and planning
was abolished in a reorganization
after Jenkins retired and Dr.
Thomas B. Brewer became
chancellor.
Holt succeeded Jenkins as dean
of the college and chief academic
officer when Jenkins became
president of then East Carolina
College in 1960. Subsequently, he
was appointed vice president and
dean and later vice chancellor for
administration and planning.
During the 1960s, enrollment
at East Carolina more than tripl-
ed. ECU was granted university
status in 1967 and was brought
into the University of North
Carolina system as a constituent
institution in 1972.
At the same trustees meeting at
which Holt was elevated to vice
president in 1963, the board ap-
proved Holt-drawn blueprints for
a sweeping reorganization of
academic departments In the col-
lege which led to the drive for
university status a few years later.
The School of Education was
established. A science division
was created with departments of
chemistry, biology and science
education. New departments of
history and political science were
carved out of the old department
of Social Studies. A department
of Drama and Speech was
created. And the first director of
athletics position was created.
Holt served as second in com-
mand to Jenkins in the ad-
ministrative set-up. "It was a
time of commitment for a large
number of people Holt recalls.
"We had to make tough deci-
sions. The big problem was
overload, but everyone shared it
willingly in the best interests of
the university he says. "Good
internal communication was the
reason for our success
On his retirement, Holt said,
"Since my term of service
covered the exciting years of
developing university status and
the med school, each position I
have held was unique and offered
its own challenge and opportuni-
ty.
"But as I recall these, my
outstanding memory is of the
remarkably talented people with
whom I have had the privilege of
working. And by this I refer not
only to Dr. (John D.) Messick
(president-emeritus) and Dr.
Jenkins but also to many
dedicated faculty and staff who
made East Carolina's success
possible.
In 1958, the same year that he
was named "Man of the Year" in
Madison County, he was per-
suaded by Dr. Messick to return
to East Carolina as director of
admissions and registrar.
He is included in four
major national biographical
directories including "Who's
Who in America

oi5 js- ay 4$ '�& i
&
r
o

.

h
STARTS JANUARY 18th AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
Police
(CPS) � College students get
; drunk, try the patience of local
police and monopolize public
parking spaces, but a new surve)
of "town-gown" relations finds
most college towns take these in-
conveniences in stride
More city officials than five
years ago cite alcohol and drug
abuse as their worst town-gown
headache.
But the survey also found
many city and college officials
Occupation
By JENNIFER JENDRAS1AI
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I HI i AS IAKOI INIAN
JAM AR 17, 1985
&4
ou
HE
.
ME
INO'S
ZA
VERS
Police Tolerate College Students' Behavior
(C PS) - College students get
drunk, try the patience of local
Police and monopolize public
park.ng spaces, but a new survev
o! town-gown" relations finds
"lost college towns take these in-
conveniences in stride.
More cnv officials than five
sears ago cite alcohol and drug
abuse as their worst town-gown
headache.
But the survey also found
mam city and college officials
nov. cooperate in solving the uni-
que problems of small college
towns.
Student alcohol and drug use
was the number one campus-
related problem for 74 percent of
the 56 cities surveyed by Newark,
Del city planners and the Na-
tional I eague of Cities.
Almost all the cities listed
parking problems and off-
campus housing restrictions as
other major problems of hosting
college students.
"These are the old standrn
problems in any universii com
munity because young people
make up a disproportionate share
of the population compared to
other towns says Nancy
Minter, manager of the league's
Municipal Reference Service
In a similar 1979 survey, only
55 percent of the cities rated
alcohol and drug abuse as the
number one campus problem.
The increase in cities repor
"�g problems with alcohol may
re'lect the nationwide concern
w"h drunk driving Minter
speculates. And the raised
unnking age in some states makes
many students legally underage "
But the most dramatic change
m the 1984 survey is the increased
cooperation between city and col-
lege administrators, she adds.
1,1 the 1979 survev, only one ci-
reported a joint economic
, , � �. uauug numoer one campus problem t reported a joint
(f.C.C"F.ational Therapy Contributes Funds
development program with its
college Nearly 60 percent of the
surveyed cities had such projects
in 1984.
"The effects of back-to-back
recessions on community
finances and the effects of budget
cuts on universities make for
cooperation Minter explains.
( olleges and communities are
joining forces in such projects as
research parks, sports arenas,
-4"d sewer nroiects.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
More than $1,000 was con
tnbuted to last weekend's
C erebral Palsy Telethon by the 10
members of the Last Carolina
Mudent Community Occupa-
tional Therapy Association, ac-
cording to the group's secretary,
I aurel Hawkins.
Hawkins said the money was
raised primarily through dona-
tions collected throughout the
community and at the Brody and
Allied Health Buildings. In addi-
tion, a hair-cutting clinic featur-
ing Heads Up assisted in raising
funds.
"This is the most we've evet
raised and we're proud of it
Hawkins said. "As occupational
therapists, we'll be working with
cerebral palsy a lot, so we have a
strong interest in the telethon
ESCOTA has worked in run
Praising for the telethon for the
P;p' several vears, Hawkins said,
addin8 thai this is their main
community function.
Occupational rherapy, she
said, consists of the use of
Physical activity to aid in ail areas
01 Physical development while
working with the physically and
psycho-sociallv disabled.
buildings, mass transit, student
internships, and small business
research and development, she
adds.
"Cities have lots of respect for
universities and want to get along
better Minter stresses. "We
didn't conduct the survey to draw
attention to universities and
students as problems, but to
determine what problems
municipalities face having a col-
lege in town
xWASH KOU
r-
Welcome Back Students
Wash your clothes and
have Fun at the
WASH HOUSE
Nachos-cheese, ideos,BEER
Snacks, Fountain Drink
Fluff and fold
Largest Laundromat in Greenville
HT&&&& BUS SCHEDULE CHANGI & ��
I he Following (,old Route now combines PrDlr a, 550 p.m.
and runs on an hourly schedule. The laM bus leaves
Mendenhall at 8:30 p.m
Coupon
1 PREE WASH
when using another
washer
1 per visit
Expires Jan 15th
E.Uth Street
one Biock from the Mil
Mesdeahali
10th ud College Hill
College Hill
Minges
Allied Health
(�reenville Square
The Plaia
Fana Freah
Kroer
Hargeti Drugs
Cauaon Court
Fast brook
River Bluff
King's Row
Village Green
Memorial Gym
Mendenhall
10 till hour
5 rill hour
4 till hour
on the hour
3 after hour
5 after hour
6 after hour
11 after hour
13 after hour
17 after hour
24 after hour
25 after hour
29 after hour
26 till hour
24 till hour
22 till hour
10 till hour
AT.TIC
It's Picture Time
Now is the time for all seniors to drop b the Buccaneer office in
the Old South Building and sign up to Ket their senior pictures
taken. Get �hot!
Kapps
Super Bowl on
a 15ft TV
HAPPY HOUR
after every score
present
DON HENLEY
ling The Perfecl Beas
J
st
f �?jv&& &a �fou.
:�r 'fc
SkzAFAffflX
h
V
MMER JOB OPENINGS � , Ml NSELORS at Camp Sea Gull (boys)
1 Camp Seafarer girls). erving as a camp counselor is a
challenging and rewarding opportunity to work with young
people, ages 7-16. Sea Gull and Seafarer are health and
character development camps located on the coast of North
Carolina and feature sailing, motorboating, and seamanship,
js many usual camping activities including a wide variety
of major sports. Qualifications include a genuine interest
in young people, ability to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references. For further
information and application, please write a brief resume' of
training and experience in area(s) skilled to Don Cheek,
Director, Camps Sea GullSeafarer, P. 0. Box 10976, Raleiqh
North Carolina 27605. '
BUILDING THE PERFECT BEAST
� � . �
" ' � lot� � Feat � � .
Boys of J
General PUBLIC
�P
6660
LOST.
The excitement of
hearing new artists is the
best part of our Jobs at
RecordBar.Thafswhywe
devote time Jots of it
to exposing and playing
newalbums in our stores.
To get you interested,
we offer great incentives
like sale prices on new
albums we think deserve
to be heard. Not every
new group may fit your
taste, but if you like
rock-rwoll, Record Bar
thinks you'll love at
least one of these new
albums.
ALL THE RAGE
� - -��.�- - � . � : .
taker and M
tares th . � r md S
IRS.
THE AWAKENING
roptheneedk ituffria tebutalbun
ii � . be rewarded wit! � lie hard i
eat r for a md that tackle
each s glikethen � � . .
' �'� " �
����
� ������. . . ji To The Hean
MCA RECORDS
AGE OF CONSENT
ki Beat is the hot act
�"� '��.���� i styk f music is
i ess b(e to everyone, and "Age Of
�"��� � � MewMus
� � � '� � ����
� � � ' rchek and Steve Bronski s
h �� syi ��� �� rs. Features tl
JOHNFOGERTY
CENTERHELD
RUSH EAST CAROLINA'S
OLDEST AND MOST
ESTABLISHED FRATERNITY:
RUSH Jan. 21,22,23,81 9:00
for rides and Info Call 752-6159
ON SA!� THROUGH JAN. 30TH
MOV RECORDS
CENTERFIELD
' � � ebehii JCCRretums I Fogerty
'� ' s �.�� : yea Fogerty takes
"� swamp sound" he made fa
'� ' gy to i roducear iibun � � . �
� �' � CV �� ��� ; s hi ttei produced
� iyed and sung enttrek by � � R �� �. s tht
� f � �. . �
Record Bar
RECORDS, TAPES & A LITTLE BIT MORE.
ALSO LOOK FOR SPECIAL PRICES
ON OTHER NEW RELEASES
MoUfKan
THE PLAZA CAROLINA EAST MALL

f
T
r






8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 17, 1985
The Fraternity
Experience is
Sigma Nu
WHEN YOU JOIN EAST I
CAROLINA'S GREEK SYSTEM, YOU
GET A LOT A BENEFITS, SUCH AS:
A scholarship program
�through friendly encouragement and planned activities,
vou can realize your academic potential.
A community service program
�by helping others less fortunate, you will develop the
qualities that build character.
A social program
�by exposing you to various social situations, you will
learn how to conduct your self in any social encounter
in the future.
A leadership program
�the hierarchy of the fraternity and the Inter-Fraternity
Council both provide the opportunity to excel as a leader,
as well as numerous opportunities in Student Government
An intramural sports program
�through organized competition, you will learn the meaning
of unity and sportsmanship.
The most important benefit of all is
�the building and developing of friendships that will last longer
than your college career.
Zeta Beta Tau
Jitter if i attrititu (Council
January lb, 196
Hen of t.at j:
Ob behalf I ' Intel
you back to I
to inform you of our fratan
iihich begins tfcia HtoaaWy,
� raterr. it. . � r ra
ttr ibataa I M
The : I it. r: -
coaun I t . acrvl � , m

i a 1.1
I would Ilk
1 � � ' '
t athlel
r ! I
Delta Sigma Phi
prov
that
�� �
ISl ' : '
Jed im
: I
IFC

:il �H1( H��D B1UO � l
n
H
-o
'&es
GO GREEK
t�fl
deP ECU RUSH, JANUA
3
�.
f
21st�23rd.
Bus Services Provided Fro
College Hill 9-lp.m.
Phi Kappa Tau
e
Kappa Alpha
�OH
ID's Will Be Checked

SsCV
Pi Kappa Phi
Intramurals
"
& tSr�1
IFC officers pictured left to right: Mark Simon-Sec, Todd Patton-Prev.
Kevin Greaney-Exec.V.P John Agnew- Adm.V.P Dwayne Wiseman-Tres.
RUSH LOCATIONS
yit
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A
dfp
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�p
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 17, 1983
3lntcr3rratteriutl) (Council
I i Ivl legc to wi CUM
I .ik. this oppoi i un 11
t pci iod, "RUSH
take t hi i in, t U't
t 'n (ml- it ious
mime tus
aenl
in'ing
�! the uroup
.� s �� i 1 1 be runn :n to al
a. tfed �- 1 :00 p.m. Ue
JcdJ ndbtfn.
Ml .
I'Hl M- u .
� R H S
Beta Theta Pi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Lambda Chi Alpha
A sense of belonging
GO GREEK
Ao
U RUSH, JANUA RY
21st�23rd.
5 Services Provided From
College Hill 9-lp.m.
�Sti Tau Kappa Epsilon
Vv
Block Parties Sigma Tau Gamma
ID's Will Be Checked
Scholarship
I

i
a. �
lot1
Sigma Phi Epsilon
0a
VV
Kappa Sigma
Sig-Ep Volleyball
officers pictured left to right: Mark Simon-Sec, Todd Patton-Pres,
reaney-Exec.V.P John Agne Adm.V.P Dwayne Wiseman-Tres.
1. Alpha Sigma Phi
422 W. 5th St.
2. Beta Theta Pi
305 E. 14th St.
3. Delta Sigma Phi
510 E. 10th St
4. Kappa Alpha
500 E. 5th St.
5. Kappa Sigma
700 E. 10th St.
6. Lambda Chi Alpha
500 Elizabeth St.
7. Phi Kappa Tau
409 Elizabeth St.
8. Pi Kappa Phi
803 Hooker Road
9. Sigma Nu
1301 Cotanch St.
10.Sigma Phi Epsilon
505 E. 5th St.
11 .Sigma Tau Gamma
508 W. 5th St.
12.Tau Kappa Epsilon
951 E. 10th St.
13.Zeta Beta Tau
Mendenball Student Center
Sig Tau Tug-a-war
mmmtmm
mm


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IHf HSI AROI IMN
Entertainment
JAM ARY 17, 1985 PagelO
Warming Up For A Superb Super Bowl XIX
Football � One Big Bash
B USA MAROSCHAK
ftiium Mltoi
How about those 4S)ers! And
ets hea foi the Dolphins! We
- 1 ditors may not know a
football (although
ame in second place
ster's college picks),
know a lot about foot-
peciall) Super
s- it past years are
idication of what's to come,
ei Bowl l will be as jam-
i
where can sou go? If
be around a large
-N you can whoop
a . little more, you
head downtown.
e, The Attic will be
the game on its nem
x foot) television.
is SI for EC I
� and $1.50 for the general
Patrons will receive a
earing the color of their
c team when they enter,
he game the winners
- 'Me for a drawing. Pi
will also be sponsor-
ng .it half-time featur-
mated by local mer-
Tom Haines, owner of
a there will be free
. game and a
i h i ntil
he next posses-
v - t.iie. a local
uals, will provide
Another bar, Grog's, will be in
the Super Bowl spirit as well.
Half the bar will be decorated in
Miami colors and the other half
in San Francisco colors. In addi-
tion, the bartenders will be clad
in jerseys from each team and the
doormen will be wearing referee
uniforms. Doors will open 30
minutes before kick-off and ot
course the main attraction will be
the television.
Beau's is also showing the
game. From 4 p.m. until 12 mid-
night happy hour prices will be in
effect on beer and various drinks.
For the second year, the Sigma
Nu fraternity will be having an
all-campus Super Bowl party.
The festivities, which will begin
at 3:30 p.m will take place on
the corner of 13th and Cotanche.
Undoubtedly this is by no
means a comprehensive list. I'm
sure dorm students will gather for
what seems to be the historical
event, and I'm certain friends will
cram into one apartment, dash
for the last seat on the coach and
throw down a few beers. And
then there will be others that will
go to their favorite bar or maybe
even to the laundry mat. Some
will watch it whether they want to
o: not, just because everyone else
is and because it just isn't
"patriotic" not to. Whatever the
case, I'm sure there will be plenty
of eyes glued to the set, plenty of
munchies and beer, and un-
doubtedly many sore losers.
Dorm Room Decor
Think you've got the coolest looking dorm room on campus?
Is your loft the funkiest around? How about those wall
hangings, are they like no other? If you have a unique looking
dorm room, let us know. We'll feature you and your
room in an upcoming article entitled "Dorm Room Decor
Just contact the Fast Carolinian's Features Department in the
Publications Building or call 757-6366.
Armchair quarterbacks work out hard in preparation for this year's Super Bowl.
Big Business
(UPI) � Ok. Ok. It's a big
event. But big enough to warrant
production of a thousand
counterfeit tickets? Big enough to
point guns at someone's head and
steal their real tickets? Big
enough to kidnap your kids' Cab-
bage Patch dolls and offer them
in trade for one ticket?
What's going on? What is this
event that has turned dull in-
surance salesmen in London Fog
raincoats into raving lunatics for
a chance to be there to see it?
Dolly Parton attempting to
play the accordian9
Nope.
Bill Shoemaker trying to slam
dunk a basketball0
Nope.
We're talking about a football
game. Sixty minutes worth of
large men grunting and trying to
hurt each other's knees in
something called the Super Bowl
this Sunday.
But for the craziness it has
brought to San Francisco, you'd
m :hink Evil Knievel was jumping
the Golden Gate Bridge in a
row boat.
Months ago, the ticket scalping
began. People offered $200 to
buy the $60 tickets before they
even knew who was going to play
in the game. And the scalpers
held out for $300.
Then, the local boys made it.
The San Francisco 49ers were in
See SUPER, Page II.
Silent Film Sounds Great
By DANIEL MAI RER
The advertisement in the
newspaper featured a robot. Its
eyes were glowing white orbs fix-
ed in a sinister stare. The body
was that of a mature woman's.
The smooth metal curves produc-
ed an unmistakably teminine
figure that seemed to shine in all
the right places. "Just another
cheap science fiction flick I
thought to myself as I reached for
the next page "Odd, 'Raquel the
Robot' looks strangely familiar
It was then that I took note of the
movie's title � Metropolis
My heart sank like a stone.
Metropolis was once the title of a
1926 silent science fiction film by
the German director Fritz Lang.
The film was so monumental in
the 20s that Lang's techniques
became a touchstone for film-
makers of the time. Photographs
and short clips of Lang's trip to
the future can still be found in
some of Germany's film
museums. The thought of
Hollywood making a futile,
bloated-budget attempt at
recreating such a work was too
much to bare. Reading on, I was
relieved to find this was not the
case, for the advertisement read
"Fritz Lang's Metropolis
Hollywood had not chosen to
remake it, but to resurrect it.
This seemed highly unusual to
me because I knew there was little
money to be made from it. Even
though Metropolis became a film
legend, it was (as are most artistic
films) poorly recieved at the box
office. In fact, the film proved so
costly that UFA studios went
bankrupt and was forced to sell
out. Resurrecting a financial
disaster is not Hollywood's style,
so why, or better yet who? The
"who" turned out to be Film-
makercomposer Giorgio
Moroder of Flashdance fame.
What Moroder did was literally
reconstruct Lang's Metropolis
When the German film came to
the United States it was edited
(some say butchered) to suit the
American public. Some of the
edited scenes were lost forever;
others found their way to
museums or private collections.
Moroder gathered these remain-
ing pieces and, with Lang's script
in hand, began to restore the film
to its original glory.
Taking the project one step
further, Moroder added color to
the film and assembled establish-
ed rock musicians to produce a
popular soundtrack. With
today's technology it was possi-
ble to tint the film shades of blue,
red and amber. In some cases,
most of a scene was left black and
white while specific objects in the
picture were colored so as to
stand out. The overall effect is
extraordinary.
Contributions to the flim's
musical score were made by Bon-
nie Tyler, Freddie Mercury of
Queen, Pat Benatar, Billy Squire,
Adam Ant, Loverboy, Jon
Anderson of Yes and Cycle V.
When the smoke finally cleared,
Moroder produced a colorful
90-minute music video that re-
mained faithful to Lang's film.
But Moroder has invested quite
a bit of time and money in a pro-
ject that doesn't seem very
lucrative. Even with a popular
soundtrack, the film will only see
a limited release in small houses.
The big question then, is why? It
seems to me that Moroder is hav -
ing fun bucking Hollywood's
typically money-minded ideas.
He has apparently been pro-
moting a few ideas of his own.
Could this be � dare I sav it �
art for art's sake? If so, Moroder
and his Metropolis have a place
in my museum.
Old Sayings With A Twist
Spr sai to nr
l�-i t troluuan
The art of obfuscation can be
fun and profitable. If you can
identify the 20 cliches below, you
can be eligible to win an East
Carolinian T-shirt. Just send
your answers to the East Caroli-
nian, care of the Features Dept
by Jan. 23. Include your name,
address and phone number. The
winner will be announced in our
Jan. 24 issue.
1. A revolving lithic con-
glomerate accumulates no con-
geries off a small bryophitic
plant .
2. Exclusive dedication to
necessitous chores without in-
terludes of hedonistic diversion
renders John a hebetudinous
fellow.
3. Neophyte's serendipity.
4. Individuals who make their
abode in vitreous edificies would
be advised to refrain from
catapulting petrous projectiles.
5. Male cadavers are incapable of
yielding any testimony.
6. Eleemosynary deeds have their
incipience intramurally.
7. A plethora of individuals with
expertise in culinary techniques
vitiate the potable concoction
produced by steeping certain
coupestibles.
8. Sorting on the part of men-
dicants must be interdicted.
9. Where there are visible vapors
having their pervenance in ignited
carbonaceous materials, there is
conflagrations.
10. All articles that coruscate
with resplendence are not truely
auriferous.
11. The temperature of the
agueous content of an unremit-
ting ogled saucepan does not
reach 212 degrees F.
12. Eschew the implement of cor-
rection and vitiate the scion.
13. It is fruitless to attempt to in-
doctrinate a superannuated
canine with innovative
maneuvers.
14. The stylus is more potent than
the claymore.
15. Freedom from incrustations
of grime is contignous to rec-
titude.
16. It is fruitless to become
lachrymose over precipitatelv
departed lactate fluid.
17. Pulchritude possesses solelv
cutaneous profundity.
18. Surveillance should precede
salientian.
19. Members of an avian species
of identical plumage congregate
20. Scintillate, scintillate, stenod
minific.
Bill and Rush fcdmundson
'Glory' Is Not What It Used To Be
(UPI) � Steve Tisch has high
hopes that Call To Glory will find
a happy home in its new time slot
among the grownup shows.
Tisch, an executive producer of
the series that has received high
critical acclaim and low Nielsen
ratings, is optimistic now that
ABC has switched the series from
Monday nights at 8 p.m. Eastern
time to 10 p.m. on Tuesday
nights.
"That's a fairly radical
move Tisch said of the time
change that took place this week.
"I feel we'll be appealing to a dif-
ferent audience at 10 p.m. I hope
it's an audience that has a lot of
passion for this kind of drama.
"I'm not a seasoned television
producer in the series area, but
my gut instinct tells me we've got
a better shot at the audience
we're looking for
Tisch knows more about televi-
sion movies than series . The two
other productions he was
associated with recently were
both well received � The Burn-
ing Bed and Silence of The Heart.
What makes Tisch optimistic
about the time switch is the kind
of shows that have found a home
at the late end of prime time.
Traditionally these are the more
adult shows, often including
themes that would not be accep-
table during what was once called
television's "Family Hour" from
8-9 p.m. Eastern time.
"This is the time period for
shows like Hill Street Blues
Tisch said. "I think this audience
may be more inclined to watch
reality-based drama, rather than
fantasy-based shows like
Scarecrow and Mrs. King, and
Bloopers, where you don't have
to sit back and think about what
you're warching � it does your
thinking for you
Tisch has nothing but praise
for ABC executives, who he says
have been most supportive, con-
sidering the show's poor ratings.
"Under other circumstances
he said, Call To Glory at this
point would be just a memory.
But they have let us make the
show we want, and they have not
told us that because our ratings
are not what they hoped that we
had to spice it up or mold it into
something we never intended it to
be
There wil be some changes in
the show, however.
"To generalize he said, "the
direction we're taking the show is
to de-emphasize the hardware
aspect of it � the military angles
We will cut down on the flying
and the reliance on action se-
quences to sell the show. Instead
we will emphasize and really start
to develop the personal stories,
the relationship between Craig
Nelson and Cindy Pickett
Super
Continued from Page 10.
the uper Bowl, and people were
out of their minds. Two guvs held
travel agents at gunpoint this
week and swiped 50 tickets A
couple talked eight friends into
putting up an $800 deposit on
tickets from a man who furnished
a computerized bill of sale, and
then, according to police, took
the monev and went to India
People are advertising their m-
sanitv in the local newspapers'
classified section.
First, there are the cut and
dried big monev dc
49ers fans need 4 tickets V.
av S600 each.
Two tickets for sale S700 t
all 9 a.m11 a.m. Illinois time
These people, for 'he most
part, are bonkers A thousand
bucks for one seat to one foe
game. In a stadium where um-
brellas have been banned by the
National Football League'1 In
San Francisco0 In the rainy
winter season?
For a thousand bu
could buv a new color 1
Classified
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE Your �wci csca
launch. serv ce P'oess ora
ser :e aoe' -g n
Pick uc anc aes .erT G e Ja �
The computer answer ng ac ne a
ca 7 58 3087 DON BE
SCARED eae ,acn a essage
anc save5C Aer ou haw
launder : eanec
WAPIT: iocge S - st� -eiM'
sive hosp tality for outd
hjrers $15 per De's
breaxtas' 'owes nensandli rcheti
privileges S min c Sir-
Sugar 704 898 9895
IPROFESSIONAL YPiNG
tronic fvpewr ter Seasonal e -a'es
CaM Janice at TSe ot ee ;s ar
752 6106 days
HOUSE PORTENT Sea'
ty. 3 bedrooms dining roorr
Evans S' $24C 758 529c
RENT: 2 Dec-oc ac Ft .
nishec Rmoooic Towe-
752 8945
Ca
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All Typing neec
758 8241
WANTED
NATIONS SECOND LARGEST CO
Seexs mature. srarc nd � :a s
Worn your own hours Ge fv
deTails oy calling G .ones after -
p.m. aT 758-4155
HELP WANTED: Aes'ern S n
now accepting apD cations F1
Between 2 30�5 30 S: Dhoe ca s
please 2903 E 10th S'
NEEDEDIMMI DUTEuy r
ENERGETIC RE$PCSBLE
PERSONSFOR SAuES-
TiONSAPPLY A"r THEEAST
CAROINIAN- DEAD St. -s
18, 1985
FEMALEroommate Wonted
immeaatey tor K ngstonCor
jominu m$150 monthly$5
aeposit�jtilities For more
nation:ai.egh a '52 1088
BAHAMAS: Two spaces e for Spr
ing Break. Trip Call Tooa '5: 7136"
Las chance
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE: Needed tor 5Th St Ac
LocaTec directly across caous
Call 758 9527 between 3 5 or ae-
p.m $120 per month $'20 aecos
util.
DESPERATE: 2 girls neec a - oe c
Chapel Hill, Friday ItM 8 or Sa'
19th to Greensboro tor Spnngstee-
concert! Call 752 9900 or '�52 1378
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Tains Quarters Apt 21 $230
deposit Call Donna a' 58 5901
p .s
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I biocx trom campus
Call 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Rent $115 a monTh utilities included
GreaT locaTion 8. great roommates
Call 758 6224
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The
Brothers and Golden Hearts ot
Sigma Phi Epsilon would IHn to ex
Tend a cordial invitaTion to anyone
interested in aTtending our rush par
ties on Jan. 21. 22, and 23 We are
located at 505 E 5th St across trom
the Jenkins Art Building Please teei
tree to drop by the house any Time
beforehand and meet us because we
are looking forward to meeting an of
you. For more info call 752 2941 or
752 6502
k
,? 11
FT
�l liH��rjrO-�







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1985
11
;w
Page 10
wlXIX
Big Business
(l Ph - Ok. Ok. It's a big
event. But big enough to warrant
production of a thousand
counterfeit tickets'1 Big enough to
point guns at someone's head and
steal their real tickets0 Big
enough to kidnap your kids' Cab-
bage Patch dolls and offer them
in trade for one ticket"1
What's going on1 What is this
event that has turned dull in-
surance salesmen in London Fog
raincoats into raving lunatics for
a chance to be there to see it?
Dollv Parton attempting to
plaj :he accordian?
Bill Shoemaker trying to slam
dunk a basketrv.
Nope
wVre talking about a football
iarr.e Sixt) minute- worth of
� gi anting and trving to
knees in
V;per Bowl
he craziness it has
Francisco ou'd
K evel was jumping
ate Bridge in a
kei scalping
ffered S200 to
kets before they
- e a who was going to play
"� i the scalpers
J .
j local boys made it.
49ers were in
See M P1K, Past' 11.
wit I
pddie Mercury of
� Benatar, Billy Squire.
nt, Loverboy, Jon
Yes and Cycle V.
Ke finally cleared,
produced a colorful
� b mask video that re-
J to 1 ang'v film.
Moroder has invested quite
' me and money in a pro-
doe o- eem verv
�: � a popular
k, the film wiil only see
ted release in small houses.
� - then, is why? It
ai Moroder is haw-
king Hollywood's
money-minded ideas,
apparently been pro-
- a few ideas of his own.
ould this be � dare 1 sav it �
: for art's sake? if so, Moroder
I his Metropolis have a place
museum.
ist
. re potent than
I re.
m incrustations
contignous to rec-
fruitless to become
over precipitately
I lactate fluid.
Pulchritude possesses solely
aneou1- profundity.
� ance should precede
v ennan
f an avian species
identical plumage congregate
ntillate, scintillate, steriod
linifi
o Be
old us that because our ratings
lire not what they honed that we
Md to spice it up or mold it into
omething we never intended it to
be "
There w,J be some changes m
Ine show, however.
"To generalize he said, "the
nrection we're taking the show is
to de-emphasize the hardware
bpect of it � the military angles.
Ve will cut down on the flying
id the reliance on action sc-
iences to sell the show. Instead
�ve will emphasize and really start
lo develop the personal stories.
�he relationship between Craig
Jelson and Cindy Pickett

4
Super Bowlers Go Bonkers
Continued From Page 10.
the Super Bowl, and people were
out of their minds. Two guys held
travel agents at gunpoint this
week and swiped 50 tickets. A
couple talked eight friends into
putting up an $800 deposit on
tickets from a man who furnished
a computerized bill of sale, and
then, according to police, took
the money and went to India.
People are advertising their in-
sanity in the local newspapers'
classified section.
First, there are the cut and
dried big money deals:
49ers fans need 4 tickets. Will
pay $600 each.
Two tickets for sale. $700 each.
Call 9 a.m11 a.m. Illinois time.
These people, for the most
part, are bonkers. A thousand
bucks for one seat to one football
game. In a stadium where um-
brellas have been banned by the
National Football League? In
San Francisco? In the rainy
winter season?
For a thousand bucks you
could buy a new color TV and
hire Curt Gowdy to sit in your
living room for the afternoon.
Then there are the fairly crazy,
who want to lay out hard cash for
the right.
24K gold necklace. Paid $2200.
Will trade for good Super Bowl
tickets.
Four Super Bowl tickets
wanted. Will trade week at Lake
Tahoe cabin and week at Hanalei
Bay, Hawaii, deluxe condo.
Will trade '68 Pontiac Bon-
neville convertible for two Super
Bowl tickets. (How's this guy go-
ing to get to the game?)
We will refinish your hardwood
floors for two Super Bowl
tickets.
These people are the kind who
would eat at the best restaurant in
town and then wash the dishes to
pay for the meal. Every Saturday
night.
Then we have the folks who
have gone over the deep end.
These people are desperate. They
would trade in their grandmother
for a chance to see the Super
Bowl.
Classifieds
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service. Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick-up and delivery Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
call. 758 3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save S.50 when you have your
iaundi y cleaned.
WAPIT: Lodge Ski Hostel: inexpen
sive hospitality for outdoor advert
turers. $15 per person includes
breakfast, towels, linens and kitchen
privileges. 5 min. to Beech and
Sugar 704 898 9899.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 756-4664 evenings, or
752 6106 days
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near Universi
ty. 3 bedrooms, dining room. 1217
Evans St $240 758 5299
RENT: 2 bedroom apt Fully fur-
nished, Ringgold Towers. Call
752 8945.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs; 758-5488 or
758 8241
WANTED
NATIONS SECOND LARGEST CO
Seeks mature, sharp individuals.
Work your own hours Get full
details by calling G. Jones after 6
p.m. at 758-4155.
HELP WANTED: Western Sizzlin
now accepting applications Friday
between 2:30�5:30. No phone calls
please. 2903 E. 10th St.
NEEDEDIMMIDIATELY: 2
ENERGETIC, RESPONSIBLE
PERSONSFOR SALESPOSI
TIONS. APPLY AT THEEAST
CAROLINIAN DEADLINEJAN.
18 1985
FEMALEROOMMATE: Wanted
immediatey for KingstonCon-
Jominium. $150 monthly, $50
deposit, Miutilities. For moreinfor-
nation callLeigh at 752 1088.
BAHAMAS: Two spaces left for Spr
mg Break trip Call trday: 752-7136
Last chance
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM-
MATE: Needed for 5th St. Apt.
Located directly across campus.
Call 758-9527 between 3-5 or after II
p.m. $120 per month, $120 deposit, Va
util.
DESPERATE: 2 girls need a ride to
Chapel Hill, Friday the 18th or Sat.
19th to Greensboro for Springsteen
concert! Call 752-9900 or 752 1376.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
tains Quarters Apt. 21, $230 plus
deposit. Call Donna at 758 590.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus.
Call 758-3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $115 a month utilities included.
Great location & great roommates.
Call 758-6224.
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The
Brothers and Golden Hearts of
Sigma Phi Epsilon would like to ex-
tend a cordial invitation to anyone
interested in attending our rush par-
ties on Jan. 21, 22, and 23. We are
located at 505 E. 5th St. across from
the Jenkins Art Building. Please feel
free to drop by the house any time
beforehand and meet us because we
are looking forward to meeting all of
you. For more info, call 752-2941 or
752 6502.
HAPPY HOUR: The little sisters of
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Alpha Sigma
Phi invite everyone to the am-
minest, if not THE MOST jammin'
Happy Hour TONIGHT AT
BEAU'S! The party begins at 9
p.m Come out and party with the
best!
STUDENTS: Do you ever get the
munchies during class? Collect your
change! Golden Hearts bake sale
Jan. 17. We not only look good but we
cook good too!
PHASE TWO AT THE WHIZ:
Thurs. Nite Video goes to Friday
nite. Free brew with $1 admission
for ECU students. John Denver
Video Recording Services and
another Mills Bros. Production
presents Kappa Alpha Psi, live in
video color. Register to win a
cassette in-dash stereo, speakers,
and a 150 wart power booster at The
Wiz. See you friday nite to iam at
The Wiz, 264 by pass, Thanxs for
your support.
McKENNEY: Or should we say Neff
JrYou're all in the bag and shit!
The Beta Phi's.
SUPERBOWL HAPPY HOUR: The
brothers of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
will be having their 4th annual
Superbowl Happy Hour at the Attic
this Sunday starting at 4:30. Come
out and enjoy Happy Hour prices
while watching the game�it's the
biggest Superbowl party in Green-
ville.
KAPPA SIGS: We will be having our
annual Superbowl Party this Sun-
day. Everyone should plan to attend.
Be ready to party
ALPHA SIG LITTLE SISTERS: Be
ready to throw down TONIGHT!
We're looking forward to an ex-
tremely wild time! The Slg Ep
Golden Hearts.
DEMIGOD: Birthdays are special
and so are you. I hope your double
deuce is the best ever! Love, A.
P.SWhich one of your presents do
you want first?
GREG W Congratulations Ex-
ecutive! Baby, I love what I'm see-
ing in you- AMBITION! I know you
are going to do the best job possible.
Remember I'm thinking of you-
missing you in St. Lous.
KAPPA SIGMA: ALL CAMPUS
PARTY. Friday, Jan. 18, 1985. After
Happy Hour at the Kappa Sigma
house. B.Y.O.B.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
?10 Gfonlk Hvd
1M-JMJ - 14 MBS
24 hour To�m Serviot
IHmI Rentals
Aak
Will trade $1700 in fine Calif,
champagne for Super Bowl
tickets.
Will trade Cabbage Patch Kids
for Super Bowl tickets.
Do you need a new roof? Will
trade contractor's liscense
course.
Need two tickets. Offering
roundtrip, first class, to Paris or
Nice, Air France.
Will trade concrete work for
Super Bowl tickets.
And last, and least, we have
the dentists. Guys who, on the
average, pull in more than
$100,000 a year by pulling teeth.
They won't pay a cent for a
ticket, but they'll do a root canal.
Trade quality dental service for
Super Bowl tickets.
Trade dental services for your
Super Bowl tickets.
Trade quality children dental
service for Super Bowl ticket.
Ok, so you've traded in your
Pontiac, handed over the keys to
the condo in Hawaii and arrang-
ed for psychiatric counseling for
your children, who have just wat-
ched their Cabbage Patch Kids
handed over to a stranger who
threw them into the trunk of his
car.
You get to Stanford Stadium,
and you get arrested. Seems those
tickets you have are counterfeits.
Two of some 1,000 that police
say were produced. You are
booked for possession of stolen
property, and not only don't you
see the game in person, you don't
even see it on TV.
A word about the quality of
the counterfeit tickets: Bad. The
real tickets have small seat
number numerals over a picture
of the Golden Gate Bridge with a
purple sunset background. The
fakes have a blue background
and giant letters and numerals.
At least the counterfeiters got
the bridge right. But in this city
gone mad, you get the distinct
impression that peopl would pay
500 bucks for a Super Bowl ticket
with pictures of the Eiffel Tower
and Harpo Marx on it.
SIGMA NU BROTHERS: Can't wait
until Sunday's Superbowl Party.
Hope ya'll are hungry. Good luck
with Rush! Love- your Little Sisters.
PUNKIN' HEAD: Hope ya don't
party too hard while I'm gone. Be
ready to play Saturday I I love you
and know we're going to have a
great semester. Always, Baby's
Breath.
LAC: Love is a song for the heart
that Is free. Think about us as you
dine by the sea. We hope that your
birthday wish comes true. And your
sheets are covered in red, white, &
blue! SAE 8. SAC.
BETA PHI'S: You made it but the
"work" is not over. Always
remember to stick together. Don't
forget that you are one with the best,
and think about every thing that you
do. You guys are the best! Sku de
dull
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Long,narrow, oblong-shaped
iridescent metal earring with set-in
silver ball. Lost in Hendrlx Theatre
or campus area between
Mendenhall, Art Bldg. 8. 5th St Call
Pat Pertalion, Ext. 6390 or 752-5528.
Get A Taste Of SuccessZBT!
Rush ZBT Jan. 2123 MSC Coffeehouse 7-11 p.m.
FRANK'S PIZZA
LOCATED AT THE PLAZA
take outs available 756-8798
r
lr�
1.00 OFF
Any whole
� ruy rrnuic
; pizza purchase
j Exp. March 1, 1985
i r
i
i
i
.50 OFF
I Any whole sub
JExp. March 1, 1985
ATTIC
Thurs
THE
NEXT
pay what you want j
for draft until 7000,
I
FRI
CONTROL
GROUP
.85 admin, .85 Beer
.85 Beer Huggers
Sat in concert NANTUCKET
Sun -SUPER BOWL then
THE USUALS
fj
Thursday N
BEER WAR'S
The I ittle Sisters of the Alpha Sima Phi
& Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternities
�� � � .
Daddy CtHtl
�� :�:� H �� .�
Itappj llillll (foil! K tHt '� It)
villi ")� irIl 12 OO ililwf� ft 2 Ii 1 H,ci,lK
�' ' �t m watch tht
Phone 7St h40l
Located in llu ainlin.i I atnitre
tucts jrr �rl �iu-
� �
IK l lE. , M� f, ,�
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing
is available.
Sit EVANS ST.
GBEEXMLUJE. NX. 27S34
PHONf 754-t222
aitfJWJjjVVJViJ,i,yJUJJJJJJMJiW!Ww.
�MySMSMMmiUmmMUMMWA.�
COUNSELOR POSITIONS
AT CAMP STARLIGHT
For cabin leaders with talents and skills in all Land
Sports Tennis, SwimmingXYV.S.I.), Sailing, Canoeing
Water Skiing, Gymnastics, Arts and Crafts(Ceramics)'
Music, Dramatics, and Photography at the leading
private, modern, co-ed camp in the lake area of N.E
PA. 6-22 thru 8-22. Qualified mid and upper class men
and women who are outgoing and enjoy leadership
roles with youngsters Contact Coop. Ed. Office, Rm
JI d- Kawl, 757-6977 for application and on campus in-
terview or CAMP STARLIGHT, 18 CLINTON ST
MALVERNE, NY 11565, (516) 599-5239:
NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
General Manager
Needed For
Ebony Herald
Interested persons
may apply at the Media
Board Office - Located
in the Publications
Bldg.
Phone: 757 - 6009 Last Day Fri Jan. 18 1985
Just Arrived In Paperback!
Come Love A Stranger
by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss
Amityville:
The Final Chapter
by John G. Jones
DUNE by Frank Herberty
A Passage to India
by E.M. Foster
The Tiger Lily
by Shirlee Busbee
available at
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center 0pfl 7 doy a
wMk 9:30 to 9:30
ysMMNwfooo1mm � " "
. - , n
� m � i � m m �
f






12 "lb EASTC�ROUNIAN IANUARY17,1985
Doonesbury
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Where to Go
Whenxfre in a Rush.
The Place To Go Is the PI KAPPA PHI
FRATERNITY HOUSF Jan. 21-23
Jan. 21 Burning Down the House
22 Champagne night
23 Casino night
PARTY S BEGIN
EVERY NIGHT
9:00 PM
FOR MORE INFOR
OR RIDES CALL
756-3540
Sigma
Epsilon
Your
Lifetime Experience
Second Largest National Fraternity
90,000 Awarded Each Year In Loans, Grants, and
Scholarslups through the Sigma Phi Epsilon
National Education houndabon
Three separate buildings: front house, back house
and party house.
RUSH
Mon. 21st 8:30
Tues. 22nd 8:30
Wed. 23rd 8:30
505 East Fifth Street
Acrosa Art Building S GarrettDorm
For information or Ride
dl 7S2-2941 or 7526502 CATCH THE RUSH BUS
Lad
B Rl( K Mt OkMM
The E I a rnci
team, on c
streak including tw
tones agains? E( M south
ference members
home for their next tw
Forward I isa sqUirtuei!
Vander
Bv S-01T(CX)PFH
After lea .
basketball tea
the 1983-84
Curt Vanderh rsi
his rok as th
Charlie Ha- s
The 6-1, 185
from Fayetteville, N
bright spM for I
frustrating 4-2-J sea
He averaged ll.6
and avfv .
and assists
This vea: Va
experienced etera:
ly two juniors or. .
roster He a e:e. .
tain and vav ts
he enjoys
"It's a r t
accepted Vai
behee that I'm ha td
right
Yanderho as i ag .
16 pomt pei .
the ECAC South battle aga
Dolphins
OAKI AND. a PI)
Aboard i chi
California before S p
XIX. there were tl - .
tertlies that the 1
are certain to Fed tj �eeli s
"Its still ear ' corn� ta.
Wilham Judson y
come later
To sa the Mv cha
were "loose" during
half-hour trip to Sar, Francis
would be an under�:a:en
Plaers dined on s'ea i
lobster and roamed about a
spacious, one-quarter I
400-seat "4" jetliner, joking
one another. plaing card
listening to music
Others relaxed and watchec
in-flight movie while some talked
about Sunday's Super Bowl ma: 1
chup with the NFC champion
San Francisco 4)ers -
"I think everybod is relaxed aH
and looking forward to the tic
game. Judson said. 'It's no; 2Ul
that we're taking San Francisco at
lightly because they're the best
team that we're going to pla all sail
season. He
"We're so much more confi- dav
dent than we were two vears
-MM-JMMM
MMM
� �
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i






HI
9:00 PM
756-3540

ience
Fraternity
Grants, and
i Eosilon
mse, back house
�ettDorm
CATCH THE RUSH MJSl
I HI EASTCAROI INIAN
Sports
JANUARY 17, �85
Pugt 13
Lady Pirates On Winning Streak
B Kit K Met:ORMAC
1'he E I women's basketball
team, on a four game winning
�streak including two road vic-
tories against ECAC South con-
terence members, will return
home for their next two con-
ference games.
"Now that we've won four in a
row, we feel good and we know
that we can win ECU women's
basketball coach Emily Manwar-
mg said.
Manwaring feels one reason
for the Lady Pirates success in re-
cent games is a balanced scoring
attack.
"In the past four wins we've
had four different scoring
leaders she said. "It shows that
everyone is capable of scoring
and we don't have to rely on any
�ne person for our offense. If a
'earn shuts down one area, we
can have someone else come
'hrough for us
Another improved area for
EC U is rebounding, an area that
was expected to be a problem for
I �. Squirewell (31) will try lo continue EC Is fie game winning streak in the ECAC South a
live in games over the weekend.
a Lady Pirate team lacking in
height.
"We've been playing more
zone defense, and we're still try-
ing to put pressure on the ball
and people coming to the ball
Manwaring said. "It gives us
good position for rebounds and
we have been out rebounding our
opponents
Thus far this season ECU has
averaged 45 rebounds per game,
while limiting opponents to only
39.
Leading the way on the boards
for the Lady Pirates are forwards
Lisa Squirewell and Monique
Pomopili, and center Anita
Anderson.
Squirewell is averaging 8.4 re-
bounds per contest, while Ander-
son and Pompili average 6.7 and
6.4 respectively.
Anderson, 6-0, is usually
shorter than the opposing center,
however she still manages to do
an excellant job on the boards.
"Anita (Anderson) is one of
those players who has the knack
to anticipate where the ball is go-
ing to go, and she really wants
it Manwaring said.
Another area of improvement
for the Lady Pirates has been the
guard play.
"At the begining of the season,
assists were virtually non-
existent said Manwaring.
"Lately we've been sharper on
our fastbreak passes and our in-
side people have started getting
better position to receive the
ball
ECU will play two conference
games at home in hopes of exten-
ding their four-game winning
streak. George Mason invades
Minges Saturday at 7:30 p.m
while American University is
scheduled for Monday night.
"When you win, the little
frustrations seem to disappear
Manwaring said. "We've started
use that to build momentum. We
have to realize that we've got to
come out and work hard every
game
Against the Lady Patriots of
George Mason, ECU will face a
team that likes the same
fastbreaking style of play that the
Pirates enjoy.
"We expect them to play some
type of pressure defense Man-
waring said. "They axe one of the
quicker teams in the conference,
perhaps quicner than us
George Mason is led in scoring
by senior guard Linda Jones,
who averages 14 points per con-
test.
American University will pre-
sent a different type of problem
for Manwaring's Lady Bucs.
"Against American we'll see a
little more height as there front
line has a 6-2 center and a 5-11
forward Manwaring said.
American will depend on their
balanced scoring attack. They
have three players in double
figures with no starter scoring
less than eight points a game.
The Lady Pirates, who have
three players averaging in double
figures, are led in scoring by
Anderson who scores 13.9 ppg.
Sylvia Bragg is scoring 11.3
ppg . while Lorainne Foster is at
10.2.
ECU currently has a five game
winning streak in the ECAC
South, with their last loss in
league play coming last year to
George Mason.
"It seems that when you start
winning the team starts to con-
centrate on the more important
aspects of the game Manwar-
ing said "What we have to
realize is that the more successful
we are, the more the opposition is
going to want to beat us .
The Pirates are in the midst of
a three-game homestand, and
currently stand 6-8 overall and
T - �� eno. to nave success and we need to 2-0 in the conference
Vanderhorst Leading Pirates In Campaign
BS( OTT COOPER William & Man He had great Vanderhorst isn't ere whv tnn u ,u . u, L 9
M.ftwmrf � , , , vanuernorsi isn t sure why know each other s capabilities evervrm. �ic- "
rU S OTT COOPER
staff W rllfr
tter leading the ECU men's
ketball team in scoring during
1983-84 campaign, guard
' Vanderhorst has continued
role as the team's leader for
arhe Harrison's 198 squad.
The 6-1, 185 pound junior
m Laettev.ille. N.C was a
bright spot for ECU during a
.rating 4 24 season last year.
He averaged 11.6 points per game
ind was second in rebounds (101)
and assists (63).
This year Vanderhorst is the
experienced veteran as one of on-
two juniors on a young Pirate
er. He was elected team cap-
tain and says it's a position that
ne enjoys.
'It's a role that I've
accepted Vanderhorst said. "I
relieve that I'm handling it all
right
Vanderhorst was averaging
16.7 points per game going into
Lhe ECAC South battle against
William & Mary. He had great
success against the Indians last
year when he scored 53 points in
three outings, including a career-
Curt Vanderhorst
high 29 in ECU'S 67-52 loss in
Minges Coliseum. Saturday Jan.
12" was mo exception as Curt
equalled two-time all-ECAC
South selection Keith Cieplicki by
scoring 25 points.
Vanderhorst isn't sure why
he's had such success against
William & Mary.
"I don't know why I've done
so well against them
Vanderhorst said. "I'm just
motivated by playing against
them. I guess to prove I can shoot
as well as Keith (Cieplicki) can
With his 25-point effort,
Vanderhorst has extended his
double-figure scoring streak to 15
games dating back to last season.
Sophomore guard William Grady
ran his scoring streak to 11 games
with an 18 point effort against
the Indians.
The two guards complement
each other in many ways. Their
differing styles have given the
Pirates a dynamic backcourt duo.
Curt believes that Grady and
himself complement each other
quite well.
"He (Grady) usually plays well
if I don't, and vice-versa
Vanderhorst explained. "We
know each other's capabilities
Curt had a very successful
career at Douglas Byrd High
School. As a junior, he was nam-
ed all-conference and most
valuable player while earning two
varsity letters. As a senior, he was
all-conference, all-city and an all-
county selection. He averaged 15
points, 5.3 assists and 3.3 steals a
game over his high school career.
Being the team's MVP, he led
them to a No. 8 ranking in 4-A
state play.
Vanderhorst found that the
transition from high school to
college basketball wasn't real
tough. In high school there were
only two or three players that
would really stand out. Whereas
at the collegiate level, he finds the
talent is more spread out and is
more on the same level.
Curt is the Pirates' team leader
and a standout in the ECAC
South. However, he says he
dosen't really like standing out.
He would rather just be like
everyone else.
Now that Curt has established
himself as a premier talent, he
has to work harder than ever in
conference play. Being a 'marked
man' is tough, but a challenge to
Vanderhorst.
"I accept it and believe it
makes me work even harder
Vandrhorst said. "In order to
fulfill my expectations
ECU head coach Charlie Har-
rison believes Curt is an excellent
player. However, Harrison
thinks Vanderhorst could im-
prove his game.
"Curt has the skills to be a
complete player Harrison said.
"But he dosen't penetrate
enough to draw the foul Curt is
an excellent free throw shooter.
"Curt has meant a lot to the
team � his scoring isn't the only
thing either Harrison con-
tinued. "He's played more
minutes of Division I basketball
than anyone on the team
Curt's goal is for the Pirates is
to have a successful season and
play well in the ECAC South
tournament. Curt says that the
team is striving to do well and has
hopes of going to the NCAA
tournament.
Vanderhorst chose ECU
because of the nice environment
and friendly students. He also
felt that the Pirate coaching staff
was very nice, though Charlie
Harrison wasn't here yet.
Vanderhorst said that his
father had the biggest impact on
his basketball career.
"My father would always tell
me I couldn't do anyhting if I
didn't shoot Vanderhorst said.
"He used to kid me and tell me I
was a sorry player � it motivated
me
Pirate fans can continue to
look for Curt Vanderhorst's con-
sistent play throughout the year,
the next oppurtunity will be Jan.
19 when the Pirates travel to
Richmond, Va to battle last
year's ECAC South champs.
Dolphins Prepared For Super Bowl Clash With San Fran
OAKLAND. Calif. (UPI) -
Aboard a charter flight for
California before Super Bowl
XIX, there were no signs of but-
terflies that the Miami Dolphins
are certain to feel by week's end.
"It's still early cornerback
William Judrm said. "Those
-ome later
To say the AFC champions
were "loose" during a five and a
half-hour trip to San Francisco
would be an understatement.
Players dined on steak and
lobster and roamed about a
spacious, one-quarter full
400-seat 747 jetliner, joking with
one another, playing cards and
listening to music.
Others relaxed and watched an
in-flight movie while some talked
about Sunday's Super Bowl mat-
chup with the NFC champion
San Francisco 49ers.
"I think everybody is relaxed
and looking forward to the
game Judson said. "It's not
that we're taking San Francisco
lightly because they're the best
team that we're going to play all
season.
"We're so much more confi-
dent than we were two years
ago Judson said. "We've
prepared well and believe we can
win
Two years ago, the Dolphins
lost to the Washington Redskins
in Super Bowl XVII in Pasadena,
Calif. The team has been driven
by the desire to return to the Na-
tional Football League's cham-
pionship game ever since.
"This is what it's all about
Coach Don Shula said. "This is
what you work so hard for all
year long
About 1,000 well-wishers gave
the team a rousing send-off from
4 7 's just important in a game as big
as this to have enough time to
prepare and do all the things you
have to do
�Don Shula
Miami International Airport,
stopping players for autographs
and shouting words of en-
couragement.
Shula, nearing the boarding
gate, was greeted by a burst of
applause rivaled only by that ex-
tended to quarterback Dan
Marino moments later.
"What a fantastic send off we
got at the airport said Shula,
preparing for a record sixth
Super Bowl and his fifth with the
Dolphins. "I thought there
would only be a sprinkling of
people out there
Several hundred fans also were
on hand when the team arrived at
the Hyatt Regency in Oakland.
The club will work out at the
nearby Oakland Coliseum in
preparation for Sunday's game at
Stanford Stadium in Palo Alto.
Shula sent the squad through a
one-hour, 40-minute workout in
Miami before leaving.
Authorities Bust Bogus Super Bowl Outfit
MILLBRAE, Calif. (UPI) -
Authorities say they have broken
the alleged Honolulu-based
counterfeiting ring that printed
about 1,200 phony Super Bowl
tickets, but cautioned fans that
200 to 300 fakes still may remain
at large.
Millbrae Chief John Dineen
said Dean Scott Foes, 26, of
Honolulu, was arraigned Mon-
day in Municipal Court on
charges of grand theft, forgery
and conspiracy.
A second man, Harry Fishel
Jr 46, was en route to Califor-
nia after surrendering to
Honolulu authorities on Sunday
and allegedly telling them about
849 counterfeit tickets stashed in
a San Bruno drainpipe, Dineen
said.
The recovered tickets were
among 1,200 phonies printed in
the scam, leaving unaccounted an
estimated 300, Dineen said.
Don Weiss, executive director
of the National Football League,
said, "Based on the facts as we
know them, we feel that virtually
all of the tickets have been ac-
counted for
But Detective Ray Celeste said
no one knows how many tickets
were printed, leaving the number
of tickets still existing up in the
air.
NFL officials called the scam
the biggest ticket counterfeiting
scheme in Super Bowl history.
Foes was arrested Friday after
Stuart Kesselman, 23, of Mill
Valley, bought 20 of the fakes
and became suspicious enough to
contact the police.
The fakes are printed on a in-
ferior quality paper, generally
darker in color and have slightly
larger seat and section numbers
than genuine tickets, officials
said.
Two years ago, the Dolphins
had only six days to prepare for
their Super Bowl date with the
Redskins because the players'
strike of 1982 forced the NFL to
eliminate the extra week between
the AFC and NFC championship
games and the Super Bowl.
This time the club practiced
five days at home before coming
to California, where the players
will have to deal with media and
fan distractions.
Shula, who owns a 2-3 Super
Bowl record, feels the extra week
helped the team.
"It's just important in a game
as big as this to have enough time
to prepare and do all the things
that you have to do Shula said
after his team's workout.
"The extra time gives you a
chance to get your (game) plan
set he added. "Then when you
get out there (Super Bowl site)
you've got time to finalize it.
There's no sense of urgency like
there was two years ago
"It (Super Bowl) was a new ex-
perience to almost all of us two
years ago Judson added.
"Now we know what to expect
and I think we can handle it
mm
mm


�h
�I






14
THE EASTCAROLON1AN
JANUARY 8, 1985
Drug Proposal In Jeopardy
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI) �
Even before it won the national
championship, the Brigham
Young University football team
nettled people for having players
who were 24 or older.
BYU and other Western
schools find themselves fighting
at today's NCAA convention to
keep the rule that permits athletes
to go on two-year church mis-
sions without sacrificing eligibili-
ty.
More than 1,200 delegates
began voting on 145 legislative
proposals. The proposals include
one that says youngsters who
spend time in the armed forces or
on official church missions will
no longer be exempt from the
five-year rule.
Also expected to draw heated
debate was a measure to ban
performance-enhancing drugs
and test players for their use.
The general eligibility rule of
NCAA schools is that an athlete
has five years after high school to
complete four years of varsity
competition.
However, many Mormon
players at western universities
serve two-year church missionary
programs that spread the com-
petition over seven years. Fifty-
two members of the BYU team
which went 13-0 and finished No.
1 in the nation had served mis-
sions and then resumed their
athletic careers, including all-
conference linebacker Marv
Allen, 24.
Proponents of waiving the ex-
emption feel schools can gain an
unfair advantage when 19-and
20-year-olds compete against
athletes four or five years older.
The rule is sponsored by the
powerful NCAA Council and
many believe it will win approval.
"This could have devastating
consequences for us said
Brigham Young Athletic Director
Glenn Tuckett. "I hate to even
think about it
The drug proposal appeared to
be in great jeopardy. One objec-
tion of many schools is that it
deals only with performance-
enhancing substances and not
street drugs.
"We believe that the problem
must be dealt with, but we just
feel like this is a poorly drawn
legislation Big Ten Commis-
sioner Wayne Duke said. "There
are many flaws
John Davis, faculty represen-
tative from Oregon State Univer-
sity and an unopposed candidate
for NCAA president, said action
may be delayed until the 1986
convention.
"I sense that the membership is
going to be faced with a tough
choice Davis said. "People
were agonizing about it because
we want to get a message out that
we're committed to doing
something about the problem
Davis said one option would be
to adopt the drug measure "in
hopes the NCAA executive com-
mittee, before the effective date
next August, could make ad-
justments
Many physicians consulted by
the NCAA have disagreed with
the lengthy list of banned
substances, which includes co-
caine and anabolic steroids.
"Many feel that for every drug
we list as banned, there is a readi-
ly available substitute Davis
'85 Football Action
Acquired By CBS
ASHVILLE, Tenn. UPI) �
The Atlantic Coast Conference,
miffed because only one of its
games was televised in last year's
College Football Association
package, has gone its separate
way.
ACC Commissioner Bob
James announced his eight-team
league had signed a two-year
agreement with CBS. An induu
source said the contract
guarantees the ACC 14 ap-
pearances for 3.5-million dollars.
The 63-member CFA will begin
negotiations with ABC this
month without being able to of-
fer one of its five conferences.
CBS had already signed a two-
year, 18.5-miIlion dollar deal
with the Big Ten and Pac-10 con-
ferences.
James said all eight conference
schools will continue as active
members of the CFA and that he
did not believe the CFA's
bargaining strength would
necessarily be harmed by the
ACC's defection.
"I don't see how losing that
small number of appearances
could hurt them he said, ad-
ding that no decision was made
on the CBS offer until after the
CFA meeting in Nashville prior
to the NCAA convention.
"There is just not enough op-
portunities for 63 schools to ap-
pear he said. "I'm not sure
that what we're doing is not real-
ly in some measure helping their
situation. They have eight fewer
schools to satisfy
"They've been straight up with
us and we have no complaints
with them he said. "We hope
they have none with us
Neal Pilson, executive vice
president of CBS, confirmed that
the network also was talking with
some CFA schools which are in-
dependents.
"We are talking with some in-
dependents about the possibility
of buying some extra games
said Pilson. He declined to iden-
tify the schools but reports persist
that Miami, another CFA
member, has been in contact with
CBS. The Pac-10 and Big Ten are
the only major-college football
powers not aligned with the
63-member CFA.
"Reaching the agreement with
the Atlantic Coast Conference is
a major step in fulfilling our goal
of broadening our base of
agreements with the Big Ten and
Pacific 10 Conferences giving
our future schedule a truly na-
tional perspective Pilson said.
CBS also has signed a two-year
agreement to broadcast the an-
nual Army-Navy game. Both ser-
vice schools are CFA members.
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said. "There is also a feeling that
we could be brought into conflict
with some state laws
Delegates also seemed divided
on a move to restrict playing
seasons and contests in several
sports, including baseball, soft-
ball, swimming and wrestling.
The measure is sponsored by the
NCAA Council.
"It seems that the Council
wants everybody to be exactly the
same Tuckett said.
There also is sentiment to
postpone action on the drug
measure until the special NCAA
convention, which the newly
formed Presidential Commission
has scheduled for June 20-21.
"That is certainly a
possiblity Davis said. "Most
people feel there is a need to fine-
tune the language. The objections
are from a professional and a
technical standpoint, not a con-
ceptional one
"Voting to bring the drug
question back to next year's con-
vention said Thomas J.
Frericks of Dayton, "should not
be interpreted as saying the pro-
blem docs not need attention
The Western Athletic Con-
ference, of which BYU is a
member, is officially opposed to
changing the eligibility waiver on
church missions.
"The way it's been explained
to us is that the NCAA staff was
looking at its eligibility rules to
see where they can eliminate ex-
ceptions and make things as stan-
dard as possible WAC Com-
missioner Joe Kearney said.
"They (the NCAA) point out
that all church missions are
voluntary
Kearney said BYU and Utah
would not be the only Western
schools affected.
"The Idaho schools have many
students who go on Mormon mis-
sions he said. "So does the
state of Washington. It could im-
pact any institution that has a
Mormon student-athlete
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
A J FletcAj Music Building. Recital Hall
Wednesday. January 30, 2 5 PM
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
Greensboro
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Friday feDruary1
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Musk v i n Sunday FeDruary 3 from 1-4 PM
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists
Technicians � Variety Performers �
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Niner
STANFORD. Calif (UPI) -
Coach Bill Walsh of San Fran-
cisco believes that, ith offenses
like his own 49ers" and Miami's,
it'll take about four touchdowns
to win the Super Bowl.
Don Shula. his counterpart
with the Dolphins, doesn't go in
for such numbers games And
Walsh's own defense thinks more
of itself than to surrender even
one point to Miami quarterback
Dan Marino before Sundays
kickoff.
'We're not conceding
anything linebacker Keena
Turner said as national Super
Bowl attention began mushroom-
ing in and around San Francisco
Walsh's 49ers, behind
quarterbacking of Joe Mon'c
posted a 15-1 National Con-
ference record during the season
They're a four-point fav
over the Dolphins. 14-2
AFC under the record -
passing of Marino.
Philadelp
Cunningh
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) -
Coach Billy Cui ghan
red-hot Philadelphia "6er said
he's not going to reiax.
his teams 11 -game wim . -ea
that is tops in the National
Basketball Association ll
season.
In fact, the Sixers have
more games ;n a row �-
than any NBA team did �
season (the Boston Celt,
nine), and are gettinj
Philadelphia's longes-
victories. 14, in 1982 "
have won 22 of the i : I- I i -
31-6 mark, with the sc I
a third over
Puffing on a sixr.cr
after a closed 90-minute pra?
Cunningham admitted he was
"very concerned tboul the S �
ers' tendency to fall behind in the
first three quarters and then a e
bounding back to snare a
in the closing minutes.
That happened in the Sixer-
last game Sunday when they
overcame a 16-poin; del c I
defeat the Washington bullets
�415-104. a 27-pomt sw;r.
"We're getting into a habit
where we think we car. tui
around anytime we war' :
Intramural
Require Or�
B JEANNETTE ROTH
With the onset ol spring -
tramural activities, some peer e
may be confused about the evac:
procedures that need to be
followed in order to offic
enter into an intramural v"
For individual and dual e �
complete the entry forms I
in the conference room of
Memorial Gym. Include
names of the participant. a- well
as student ID and pi"
numbers. List the specif act
in which you wish to participa i
and the level oi competition
For team sports, instant
scheduling will be used. The team
captain must attend the team cap-
tain's meeting where information
concerning available play days
and times, division of competi-
tion, team name and team
members' names and ID
numbers.
If a team needs to postpone a
contest, they must submit a
postponement request form. The
form needs to be submitted a
minimum of 24 hours in advance
of the originally scheduled con-
test. If the monsoon season
strikes, call INTRA-ACTION
(757-562), and they'll let you
know if your game has been
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SWIMMING POOLS
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WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
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SPORTS MEDICINE
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M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
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'
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Niner Defense Ready For Marino
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANLARV 17. 1985
15
STANFORD, Calif (UPI)
Coach Bill Walsh of San Fran-
cisco believes that, with offenses
like his own 49ers' and Miami's
it'll take about four touchdowns
to win the Super Bowl.
Don Shula, his counterpart
with the Dolphins, doesn't go in
tor such numbers games. And
V alsh's own defense thinks more
of itself than to surrender even
one point to Miami quarterback
Dan Marino before Sunday's
kickoff. '
'We're not conceding
anything linebacker Keena
Turner said as national Super
Bowl attention began mushroom-
ing in and around San Francisco.
Walsh's 49ers, behind the
quarterbacking of Joe Montana
posted a 15-1 National Con-
ference record during the season.
They're a four-point favorite
over the Dolphins. 14-2 in the
AFC under the record-setting
passing of Marino.
"It could be a game in which
24 to 28 points will win it. I think
that many points would be need-
ed to win it Walsh said.
When the Dolphins' night
from Miami arrived, Shula told a
news conference in neighboring
Oakland, "I don't get into those
kinds of assessments. I'm not the
kind of coach that goes out and
tells my football team, 'OK, if we
score three touchdowns and hold
them to two touchdowns and a
field goal, we're gonna win
Walsh said he believes San
Francisco is capable of playing as
good a defense as the Dolphins
have seen this season, "but I cer-
tainly don't think we can shut
anybody out
"The guys on our defense feel
differently safety Dwight
Hicks said. Then he hedged a bit.
"I don't say we can shut 'em
down completely. They've got a
very good offense � very
sophisticated, much like our
own.
"So we're just going to try and
keep the gains to a minimum, try
and keep the big plays to a
minimum, and hopefully we'll
keep the score to a minimum
Walsh said he wasn't con-
ceding points so much as yards
"because they throw the ball so
much. The hope is that they get
toward the goal line, and they'll
be forced into field goals Then,
with a shrug of resignation, the
San Francisco coach added,
"That's pretty hollow talk
because every time they get near
the goal line, Marino throws a
touchdown pass
He threw 48 of them during the
season, 12 more than the
previous National Football
League record, and seven in the
playoffs including a record four
(three of them bombs of 40, 41
and 36 yards) in the AFC title
game against Pittsburgh.
"He's going to have to work
for everything he gets Turner
said. "You can't go into a game
conceding anything as a defense.
You do and you're defeating
your whole purpose.
"For a defense, you'd much
rather have an offense working
for 75 yards � working, work-
ing, working for everything they
get, and looking for a turnover,
rather than having them throw
one long pass 75 yards for a
touchdown. The odds are in the
defense's favor if they have to
grind it out
Dwaine Board, too, hopes to at
least rein in the Miami quarter-
hack, if not silence him.
"Nobody's shut Marino down
this year the 49ers' defensive
end said. "We'd like to, but we
know he'll probably get off one
big one on us
"Personally, I like it this
way Board said of the talk
which has concentrated on the
Marino-Montana matchup at the
expense of the teams' defenses.
"Let them overlook our defense.
Maybe we can catch them sleep-
ing
With the Dolphins passing 70
percent of the time, Board was
asked, is it fair to expect San
Francisco to be in a passing
defense 70 percent of the time?
"We're gonna play some kind
of defense 70 percent of the
time he said with a smile. "But
you can't play prevent all day
Best of allZBT!
Rush ZBT Jan.21-23 MSC Coffeehouse 7-11 p.m.
w� �� mm rmsourgn. wnich has concentrated on the
Philadelphia Win Streak Best In NBA;
Cunningham Seeks Consistent Play
PHILADELPHIA l?Pn ' .ha � . �
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) �'
Coach Billy Cunningham of the
red-hot Philadelphia 76ers said
he's not going to relax, despite
his teams 11-game winning streak
that is tops in the National
Basketball Association this
season.
In fact, the Sixers have won
more games in a row this year
than any NBA team did last
season (the Boston Celtics won
nine), and are getting close to
Philadelphia's longest string of
victories, 14, in 1982. The 76ers
have won 22 of their last 24 for a
31-6 mark, with the season about
a third over.
Puffing on a six-inch cigar
atter a closed 90-minute practice,
Cunningham admitted he was
"very concerned" about the Six-
ers' tendency to fall behind in the
first three quarters and then come
bounding back to snare a victory
in the closing minutes.
That happened in the Sixers'
last game Sunday when they
overcame a 16-point deficit to
defeat the Washington Bullets
r-415 104. a 27-point swing.
"We're getting into a habit
where we think we can turn it
around anvtime we want to, and
that's not a good habit Cunn-
ingham said about the perils of
late escapes.
"I would like to see us get off
the blocks and get ahead earlier
in the game than we have of late,
and I will push the players as
much as I can to get that con-
sistency.
"We have to improve this
team, and that's all I'm concern-
ed about
The last time the 76ers lost was
Dec. 21, when a fourth-quarter
rally failed to overcome the
Milwaukee Bucks. Milwaukee
held on for a 104-101 victory at
the Spectrum in Philadelphia.
The Sixers went on the road
after that and defeated Detroit,
Ltah, Golden State, Portland
and Seattle. They finished the
trip in Milwaukee, coming from
behind in the last minute for a
110-106 victory.
Back home, they stopped
Phoenix, Detroit and Houston.
"They're not going to let me
relax Cunningham said about a
team that is one-half game
behind first-place Boston in the
Atlantic Division.
Cunningham, cooling down
after the practice in St. Joseph's
In tram ural A ctivities
Require Organization
By JEANNETTE ROTH
suff VfrrMrr
With the onset of spring in-
tramural activities, some people
may be confused about the exact
procedures that need to be
followed in order to officially
enter into an intramural sport.
For individual and dual events,
complete the entry forms found
in the conference room of
Memorial Gym. Include the
names of the participants, as well
as student ID and phone
numbers. List the specific activity
in which you wish to participate
and the level of competition.
For team sports, instant
scheduling will be used. The team
captain must attend the team cap-
tain's meeting where information
concerning available play days
and times, division of competi-
tion, team name and team
members' names and ID
numbers.
If a team needs to postpone a
contest, they must submit a
postponement request form. The
form needs to be submitted a
minimum of 24 hours in advance
of the originally scheduled con-
test. If the monsoon season
strikes, call INTRA-ACTION
(57-6562). and they'll let you
know if your game has been
postponed.
At times, a team member may
be unable to attend a contest due
to emergency. The timekeeper of
the sport will allow five minutes
before starting the game in which
the participant may appear on the
designated playing field. If a
team or individual forfeits for a
non-appearance, they will be
assessed a ten-dollar fine. Two
forfeits for non-appearance will
automatically drop a team from
further competition.
We hope that no one will need
to protest a game situation or
call. In case this unfortunate
situation occurs, remember: mat-
ters involving an official's judge-
ment are NOT a basis for protest.
Protests are restricted to matters
of rule interpretations and
eligibility.
The IRS Advisory Council is
set up to improve communication
between staff and participants.
ECU students may express their
views and concerns about the in-
tramural program before the
departmental heads ensuring ins-
tant action. IRS Advisory Coun-
cil meetings are held monthly.
You can improve the IRS depart-
ment either through participation
and-or input into the program.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M W-F7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F12 noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat.1 p.m5 p.m.
Mlnges Pool
M-W-F8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun.1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday9 a.m5:30p.m.
Sat Sun1p.m5 p.m.
Minges
M-F3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th10 a.m12 noon
M-Th2p.m6p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
SatSun. 1p.m5 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 9 a.m9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m. -5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1p.m5 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
MF 9a.mlla.m.
1:30 p.m5 p.m.
T-W-Th 2p.m4p.m.
� Operational hours adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
University field house, said his
main concern was to ensure the
Sixers don't become overconfi-
dent. He tries to ignore the winn-
ing streak and take every game,
one at a time.
"Every time we go on the court
we have a good chance of winn-
ing Cunningham said. "But we
must execute at the start of the
game as we do at the end. and I
will push these players as much as
I can to improve their concentra-
tion.
"We must continue to strive to
improve, and not be content with
ourselves
Julius Erving. the team's cap-
tain, said he agrees with the
coach that winning is the goal,
and gives much credit for the Six-
ers success to Cunningham.
"Billy is doing a masterful job
in rotating his players, and that is
giving us an edge said Erving,
who was uninjured in a Monday
morning accident when his car
was sideswiped by a truck while
driving his friend, former Pitt-
sburgh Steeler Lynn Swann, to
the airport.
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
LAdultstto CS
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
1:00-3:00-5:00-7.00-9:00
7th Week
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HELD OVER 4TH WEEK
Flamingo Kid-PG-13
Ends Todav
1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15
AFTER THE FALL
OF N.YR
1:153:15.5:15,7:15,9:15
Tom Selleck in
RUNAWAY-PG 13
LATE SHOWERI-sAT
Open at 11:00pm �& �
Starts at 11:30pm TEDDY BARE
NO PASSES r RATED X
CODyngnt 1985
Kroger sav on
Ouantity Pignts Reserved
None sold To Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. � Greenville
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� J t - tit" �-ogv SJ
oft m
vonvvtntfoi BuocRwHiMKHfingM
' Til- - -
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Jan 19. 1985
KROGER HOMOGENIZED,
2. SKIM. CHOCOLATE, SWEET
ACIDOPHILUS, BUTTERMILK OR
Whole
Milk
12 Gal.
Ctn.
Butter
CREAMY
Dukes
Mayonnaise
19
GREAT GAMETIME SNACK
OR HALFTIME MEAL
Veppewu
Sausage
� WlttlttMJK
THIN CRUST
SINGLE TOPPINC
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
VALUABLE COUPON
CPCC WITH
lIVCC COUPON
2 LITER BTL
Coca cola
WITH THE PURCHASE OF
Wishbone Chicken
$1129
(OR 50 PC BOX CHICKEN
NUGGETS $8.99 J
LIMIT ONE PER FAMILY
VALID THRU SAT JAN 26 1985
VARIETY IPS 20 OFF
' fabpaie "Dip
Boon Okum Dip
� ' hoKkOmu'Dip
k Kadce Vip . .
Clti� Oiueic Tfy LD
GOLDEN
Ripe
Bananas
U.S. NO. 1
GENUINE
Idaho
Potatoes
$"98
5 Lb Bag
Select Bakers
$1.38
io48c
CALIFORNIA ROYAL
Mandarin
Oranges
:or


N
J !






16 THE EAST CAROM Nil am
JANUARY 17, 1985
Mustangs Reach Elite
DALLAS (UPI) - Southern
Methodist coach Dave Bliss has a
new name for his Mustangs-
"The Road Warriors
"They have amazed me how
cool they can be in places where
15,OCX) people are against them
Bliss said after the No. 4-ranked
Mustangs defeated North
Carolina 84-82 on national televi-
sion in Greensboro, N.C.
"Maybe it's the ham in them
or whatever, but they handled the
pressure in two mighty tough
places, College Station and
Greensboro Bliss said.
SML now 14-1, defeated
Texas A&M 73-60 on the road,
then took the long plane ride to
Greensboro before beating the
Tar Heels of the Atlantic Coast
Conference.
"They say it was the first time
in 22 years that North Carolina
had lost a non-conference game
in Greensboro Bliss said. "This
game gave us the most national
exposure that we've had
"We didn't get this much when
we lost to (national champion)
Georgetown by a point last year.
That loss was a kick in the shins
to the public. It made them ask
'who is that team?' Of course,
the win over North Carolina
helps us a great deal
Asked if the victory made the
Mustangs an elite team, Bliss
replied "We might be closer to-
day than we were yesterday at
this time.
"The elite is such a fluctuating
thing Bliss said. "Players are
so much better than they have
ever been across the country
Bliss said, "A kid like Carl
Wright that has been overlooked
in Dallas can help a Methodist
school get on the map
Wright sent a resume to
Georgetown and North Carolina
but they didn't offer him a
scholarship. Wright scored 18
points against the Tar Heels.
"Things like that can still hap-
pen Bliss said. "There are still
occasions where somebody comes
out of the woodwork
Georgetown came to Texas and
watched Wright play in an all-
state game at Waco before turn-
ing him down. North Carolina
didn't bite either.
"There are probably 5,000 kids
across the country that have the
aspiration to play at North
Carolina said Bliss. "It's a
classy basketball setting
Bliss described North Carolina
coach Dean Smith as 'a classy
person "After he lost the game
he came over, smiled and said
'nice ball game Bliss said.
"For us that was terrific. He
knew it meant a lot for us to play
well against him
"It was a neat feeling Bliss
said. "We caught a quick plane
out of there and didn't even
change uniforms.
"A lady got on the plane in
Atlanta and gave us a hard
look Bliss said. "She asked in-
credulously 'didn't I just see you
guys on television'?"
Super Bowl Picks
John Rusk
Advertising Technician
49ers, 30-24
Tina Maroschak
Features Editor
49ers, 28-24
Bill Dawson
Production Manager
49ers, 42-36
Randy Mews
Scott Cooper
Co-Sports Editor
Miami, 34-27
Rick McCormac
Co-Sports Editor
Miami, 35-31
Greg Rideout
Managing Editor
Miami, 42-35
Jennifer Jendrasiak
News Editor
49ers, Don't Know
Sigma
Nu
Rush
JjWfc,
Tom Norton Gary Patterson
General Manager Editor, Buccaneer
Probably Miami, Close Miami, 28-24
Art Baker
Former Sports Editor
Miami, 35-24
Couldn't Be Reached
Pirates
An Uncommon Fraternity,
Founded Against Hazing.
Honor (not expedience)
aFraternity (not a club)
for Men (not boys)
Jan. 21,22,23 9:OOpm
13th and Cotanche
for rides 758-7640
the Knights of Sigma Nu
llSpp
a
Alpha,
KAPPA ALPHA
Home of the Southern Gentlemen
INVITES ALL MEN TO
RUSH
Jan. 21-22
8-until
THE OL D SOU!
In September of 1958, East
Carolina's first fraternity was founded.
Those same southern ideals and tradi-
tions that then made Kappa Alpha the
school's most outstanding fraternity
can still be found Unlay.
Kappa Alpha has enjoyed the en-
viable positionof being the pacesetter
in virtually every facet of fraternity life
year after year. The Brothers of KA
strive to maintain the highest standards
in scholarship, community service, in-
tramural sports competition and social
stature. Our belief in long standing
traditions is the reason for our success.
Most fratrnities will boast of what they
won last year or the year before. But if
heritage, success and tradition are
what you're made of, you owe yourself
a visit to the KA House.
If you are considering pledging a
fraternity this spring, we extend this
personal invitation to you to visit our
house and meet the brothers of KAP
PA ALPHA ORDER.
It would be our pleasure to pick you
up at your dorm room or apartment
Please call 758-9781 For Some
Southern Hospitality
For more information call: Wayne
Rouse 752-8041 or Jeff Parks
758-9781.
?

.?��'o -� ��,�
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 17, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 17, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.384
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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