The East Carolinian, January 15, 1985






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.3l
Tuesday January 15, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
New Communications Major
Approved At Friday Meeting
Snower Blower Thrower
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lab
ECU students want it to snow so bad. they've hired this magnificiant piece of machinery to to the job.
All you have to do is cross your fingers and blow north, okay?
� .
SGA Passes New Legislation
Aimed At Athletic Director
B GREG RIDEOl'T
MaugJag Kdllor
The SGA Legislature passed by
acclamation Monday night a bill
to advise Ken Karr. director of
athletics, to consider student opi-
nion when he makes decisions af-
fecting them. The advice comes
after the abrupt dismissal of
Head Coach Ed Emory and the
dela in renaming the Pirate
mascot.
Legislator and sponsor of the
bill Dennis Kilcoyne put the bill
on the floor after getting a
suspension of the rules. Kilcoyne
said the bill wai a reaction to re-
cent decisions by Karr.
The bill states that since Ken
Karr took office in 1980, "he has
taken several important actions
offensive to the student body
Among them are cancelling a
highly successful wrestling pro-
gram, giving the name "Pee
Dee" to the mascot and par-
ticipating in the firing of Ed
Emory.
"Such a pattern of behavior
the bill says, "is undesirable in
such a high-profile administrative
position The bill suggests that
Karr give "more thought to the
opinions of students when he
takes such major actions
The bill, titled "Ken Karr,
Wake Up and Smell the Coffee
is only the second to pass by ac-
ByHAROLDJOYNER
AataUal Newt Mho,
The authorization to establish
a bachelor of science program in
communications at ECU was ap-
proved Friday by the UNC Board
of Governors' Committee of
Educational Planning, Policies
and Programs.
Eugene Ryan, dean of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences, said the
program will be in its final stages
and should be available to
students by the Fall of 1985.
"The BS program will be official-
ly offered once it is listed in the
catalog he said.
The new degree will involve
two tracks: one in print jour-
nalism and the other in broad-
casting. "The departments of
English and Theatre Arts already
have the faculty members and
facilities in place to begin the pro-
gram Ryan said, "and the ad-
dition of courses will be reviewed
in the upcoming weeks.
"We are really anticipating
getting the program started and
everything is looking very
positive at this point. The faculty
members have worked very hard
in getting this proposal passed
and I'm sure they'll be working
even harder to get it im-
plemented
A center will be organized on
the first floor of Whichard An-
nex in the next few weeks, Ryan
said. A director for the program
will be named soon, he said, and
information for interested
students will also be available.
"This center will be a focal point
for the new major Ryan said,
"so students who are interested
in the program may inquire about
it there
William Bloodworth, chair-
UNC President's Replacement Sought
man of the Department of
English, said he believes this new
degree will invoke a new interest
in communications. "This is an
exciting program in which
students will be able to obtain
skills training in various areas of
communications he said. "We
hope the program will prepare
them for careers in this area.
"The communications degree
will be very broad Bloodworth
said, "in the sense that it will pro-
vide students with a sound educa-
tion background. The program
will encounter many aspects of
the media including new
technologies, public relations and
advertising
Edgar Loessin, chairman of
the Theatre Arts department,
said there would not be "any
radical changes in the present
concentration in broadcasting
Chairman Given Key Role
Kilcoyne
clamation this school year. The
only other time was on Nov. 19
uhen tne SGA Legislature urged
Karr and the athletic department
to seriously consider changing the
name of the pirate mascot.
Repeated attempts to contact
Karr for comment were unsuc-
cessful.
By HAROLD JOYNER
Mla'aal New, Mttor
Chairman of the University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors Philip Carson was given a
key role in the naming of a suc-
cessor to retiring President
William C. Friday at last week's
meeting of the Board of Gover-
nors. Carson will head the search
committee and the selection of
committee members.
Of the 32 members of the
Board of Governors, nine will be
chosen by Carson to serve on the
committee. He will also set times
and places for the public hearings
to be held bv the committee and
serve as the board and commit-
tee's spokesman.
An advisory panel consisting
of 16 people will also be Carson's
responsibility. Members
associated with the 16-campus
university system will make up
the panel, which will include
various chancellors and faculty
members of the university
system.
"We do not intend on delaying
the procedures he told The
yews and Observer Saturday.
"We wanted to try to get a pro-
cedure to find the best person to
replace President Friday. I think
it's a good plan
Friday, 64, set a July 1986
retirement date in September. He
has been the only president of the
UNC-system since its creation in
1956.
"I think the entire board is in-
terested in serving Carson said.
"All of the board members will
be involved in one way or the
other, whether or not they're on
the search committee
According to the procedures of
selecting a new president, public
hearings will be held in order to
gather input from citizens on the
future of the university system
along with the establishment of a
timetable for selecting a replace-
i� w �nu u� me wiiiniiiiK ana rnaay, t4, set a July 1986 ment
Computer Sound System Assists Blind Chemistry Students
FCl Ntwi Bureau
An article describing the
development at ECU of
microcomputer-based sound
systems to assist blind chemistry-
students has been published in
the January issue of Chemical
and Engineering Sews, a
magazine published by the
American Chemical Society.
The article reports on the
development of two such systems
to help blind students or working
professionals in the laboratory.
One is a talking portable
microcomputer that can control
Totally Revised
instruments, acquire as well as
process data and communicate
with mainframes.
The second system is a method
to render infrared spectra into
characteristic tunes and chords
for pattern recognition to match
colors and wavelengths of the
spectra.
According to the article,
"Robert C. Morrison, professor
of theoretical chemistry, describ-
ed his work with physical
analytical chemistry professor
David Lunney, research associate
David C. Sowell, and electronics
technician Raymond T. Mills" at
the 1984 International Chemical
Congress of Pacific Basin
Societies, nicknamed PAC
CHEM '84, in Honolulu last'
month.
More than 3,700 scientists
from 38 countries attended PAC
CHEM '84 and more than 2,500
technical papers were presented.
According to the article, Mor-
rision said he and Lunney became
interested in problems of visually
impaired persons in science
several years ago when one such
student wanted to take the in-
troductory chemistry lab course.
"The two solved the problem
then by engaging a sighted assis-
tant for the student. But the ex-
perience made them realize how
inadequate that would be for a
professional scientist the article
said.
For the talking microcomputer
system, Morrison estimated that
the cost would be about $5,000
for a minimum system with two
disc drives, 64 kilobytes of
memory, minimal data acquisi-
tion power, and a low-quality
synthesizer, he said. The cost
could rise to $8,000 with the addi-
tion of more circuit boards and a
high-quality synthesizer, he said.
The two ECU chemists com-
missioned the first two pro-
totypes of the talking microcom-
puter with a Michigan firm. Mor-
rison said he expects the machine
to be ready for production in the
summer of 1985.
For the system of converting
infrared spectra into
characteristic tunes and chords,
the ECU scientists divided the
notes of eight octaves into a
range from 4,000 to 600
reciprocal centimeters, redrew
spectral curves as "stick spectra"
with straight lines at peak posi-
tions and lengths corresponding
to peak intensities, then assigned
notes to each peak.
The author of the article said
renditions of the spectra
measurements in sounds "seemed
eerie
A sound synthesizer plays the
notes as two tunes and a chord.
The chord, Morrision said, "is
almost always highly dissonant
Although designed for the
visually impaired, Morrison said
the spectra-as-music program
might be useful to sighted people
as well.
Yearbook Meets Schedule
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Ntwi Kdtlnr
The final pages of the 1984
Buccaneer went to press on Fri-
day, according to Buccaneer
editor Gary Patterson, who said
the yearbook should return from
the printer by the first week of
March.
The concept of the yearbook
was "totally revamped Patter-
son said, with just the "bare
bones of copy Only major
stories were covered in print and
the majority of the 294-page
book consists of pictures. "Most
students have indicated that they
want more pictures and less
copy Patterson said.
Patterson said by sending the
Buccaneer to press now, the
high school crunch" was avoid-
ed. A large number of high
school yearbooks are printed at
this time of year.
The first deadline has been met
for the 1985 Buccaneer and
delivery is scheduled for Aug. 18
for that yearbook. Patterson said
the delivery was scheduled so the
book can be distributed during
drop-add, a time he terms the
"most successful" for yearbook
distribution.
Portraits for the 1985 Buc-
caneer will be taken during
February and March. Senior por-
traits will be taken from Feb.
4�15. Underclassmen portraits
are scheduled for March 18-27.
Faculty portraits, which are being
taken for the first time in 11
years, are scheduled for both
months.
Patterson
Patterson added that, for the
first time, the 1985 Buccaneer
will be available for sale to
parents and faculty. The cost will
be $30 for parents and $15 for
faculty members. Further infor-
mation can be obtained at the
Buccaneer office.
2
Senior Accounting Student Dies
What Time Is It?
Those 8:00 classes are a hard habit to break. We hope someone wakes
Education class.
JON JORDAN - 1CU Photo Lab
her before her arrival to Driver's
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NmUiw
A self-inflicted stab wound to
the chest was determined by the
Winterville police to be the cause
of death of an ECU student who
died last week.
David Hayes Wall, 22, died
Thursday in Winterville. Wall, an
accounting major, was found
after another resident of the
house where he lived reported to
the police that he would not
answer his door.
"It came as a real shock said
Dan Hines, chairman of the
Department of Accounting. "He
seemed to have everything going
for him
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for Student Life, said.a suicide is
an "unusual" incident at ECU.
The last reported suicide, he said,
was "a couple of years ago
Meyer added that in the five years
he has been at ECU there have
"not been more than three"
suicides.
Wall would have graduated in
May.
On The Inside
Announcements2 the production, resulting in
Editorials4 transition for the well-known
Style6 play. See Style, page 6.
Classifieds7
Sportsg
�New Head Football Coach
�Joe Layton, producer of The Art Baker is in the process of
Lost Colony, will be leaving naming his new staff. See
Sports, page 8.
�A variety of events will take
place at Mendenhall Student
Center this semester. For a
list, see Style, page 6.
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THE EAST CAROL INI AN
JANUARY 15, 1S85
Summer Study In ltal
Navigators
Check It out The Navigators Investigative
Bible Study and Fellowship Brewster D
wing, room 102. every Tues, 7 30 p m begin
nlng Jan 8th
Ambassadors
Happy new year and welcome bach! We will
have our first general meeting ot the spring
semester on Wed Jan 16 at 5 p m In the
Mendenhall Multipurpose room We will
discuss activities and plans tor this
semester Inductions have been rescheduled
and the date will be announced at this
meeting See you there
Div. of Cont. Education
Continuing education non credit courses
Ballroom Dancing Fri , Feb I Apr 12 18
p m 10 sessions Middle Eastern Dancing
Sat . Feb 9 Apr 27. 12 30 1 30 p m 9 ses
slons Beginning Piano, Mon , Febl 11 Apr
�.� 337 30pm 10 sessions Call 757 6143 or
come to Erwln Hall
Intramurals
iHS Sport Club Council There will be an in
tramural sport council meeting Jan 23 at
p m In Brewster B 103 ATTEND!
Basketball
Reg'Stration for 5 player intramural basnet
ball will be held Jan U and 15 Play begins
Jan 21 Get your team together and enter I
Participate rather then spectate through in
tramurals
�raahdancersr
The Student AIMeftc Board is looking for
breakdanctfif aroup to perform during half
time of pirate basketball games If in
tereered, contact Pem Holt at 757 6417 come
on and Break for me Purple and Gold I! I
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the B'oxton house fi offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in developing berte'
interviewing skills for use In your iob search
A film and discussion of how to interview on
ana off campus will be 4r.�refl these se
sions will be held in the Career Planning
room at 3 p m on Jan 23 and 29 and
Feb 7,11 and 19 On Jan 28 an evening ses
slon will be held at 7 p m Seniors are
especially encouraged to attend one of these
sessions!
Resume Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement Service
in the Bloxton House is ottering one hour ses
sions to help you prepare your own resume
Few graduates get tobs without some
preparation Many employers request a
resume showing your education and ex
penence Sessions to help will be held in the
Career Planning room at 3 p m on Jan 21
ana 31 An evening session will be held at 7
p m on Jan 30
Free Faculty & Staff Aerobics
Classes are held every Mon Wed Fri at 12
noonin Memorial Gym 108 No experience is
necessary Now's the time to start on that
new year's resolution to get in shape and
have a good time See you there
Also ball room dance classes are offeree at
12 noon on Tues ana Thurs in Memorial
Gym 106 Get a partner ana come on down
for some tun No experience Is necessary
ana it's tree
Spring Break at Snowshoe
its snowing right now in West Virginia The
slopes win be in great shape tor our annual
spring trip to snowshoe W V Sign up with
Mrs Jo Saunders to reserve your space
Price varies according to your ski package
Transportation available on first come first
serve basis Phone 757 6000 or go by Mrs
Saundrs office at 3 p m any day for more in
formation
Application for Student
Homecoming
Committee Chairperson
The Student Homecoming committee is
responsible for planning, promoting, and
presenting the annual homecoming ac
tivltles This festival of events is one of the
largest programs happening at the Universi
ty each year Among the responsibilities
parade, arranging half time activities at the
football game, securing judges for the floats
and house and residence hall decorations,
and presenting entertainment
The Student Homecoming Committee
chairperson is the individual who has overall
responsibility for homecoming Students in
teresfed in being considered for the position
of Student Homecoming Committee
Chairperson may pick up application forms
at either MSC information desk or the
Taylor Slaughter Alumni Center The
deadline for applying for this position is Jan
28
Motel Management
interested In learning motel management
with a maior chain? Position available in
Greensboro for Spring, I9J5 Contact
Cooperative Education 313 Rawl bldg for
more Information
Spoleto Festival
Charleston SC
Remember the 'deadline' lor application is
Feb 1.1985 If you are interested, please con
tact the Co op office as soon as possible
Business, music, theatre arts, engi-sh and
writing, art and home economics majors art
encouraged to apply Salary is SI25 per week,
free housing, 150 paid toward transportation
cost
Camp Day
Do you like to work with children? Enoy the
outdoors? Then this opportunity may be for
you! Representatives from camps
throughout the east will be on campus Jan
n. �85 to Interview students tor summer
positions Counselors. Instructors, life
guards, and more positions available See
me Co-op office. 313 Rawl Bldg. to sign up for
an interview and tor more Information
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
�10 GranvMr �td
24 hour Tow.na, Service
I HmI Rentals
rlTibat
Announcements
N.C. Student Legislature
The N C Student Legislature Is beginning a
membership drive for students Interested In
N C issues We have students In a wide
variety of maors Over 45 percent of our
legislation Is passed in some form by the
N C general assembly, which has granted
us a $10 000 grant this year We meet Mon at
7 In the mendenhall coffeehouse or call
James at 752 5662
LSS Society
The LSS Society will hold It's first meeting of
the semester on Wed Jan 16. In the LSS
building at 7 p m All LSS members are en
c our aged to attend
ZBT
An Important workshop will be held on Fri,
Jan 18th All brothers and HI sisters should
plan to attend This workshop will start at 3
pm In Mendenhall 221 Guest speakers will
be in attendence Your attendence and
cooperation will make the difference
Alpha Phi
The tirst meeting of the semester will be this
Thurs afternoon at 4 30 at the house All big
brothers are urged to attend this meeting so
we can start planning for this semester
International Student
Association
We will havt our first meeting Sat the 19th
Jan at 6 p m m Mendenhall 221 See you
there!
Air Products
Nationwide producer of industrial chemicals
and gases offers summer program with
headquarters and regional offices Rising
seniors with gooa GPA and majoring in
chemistry business, accounting, or com
puter science invited to apply For more in
formation contact the Cooperative Educa
tion Office in 313 Raw! building
Banking Positions
interested in banking as a rareer? Local
tinancial restitution seeks careet mindea
students maloring in business finance, ac
i-ounting for spring, summer 1985 Studnets
should be graduating seniors Contact the
Cooperative Education office in 313 Rawl
building for more information
Summer Jobs
With maior food service corporation having
facilities throughout the Southeast Food ana
Nutrition majors interested In career related
experience paying 14 50 S5 per hour Contact
Cooperative Education office in 313 Rawl
building
Honor Board
The university honor ooard will meet Thurs
Jan 17th at mendenhall student center room
241 We will continue our regular schedule
tor the rest of the spring semester
Student Union Recreation
Committee
The department of university unions studnet
union recreation committee Is sponsoring a
bingo and ice cream party on Tues , J�n.
15th at 7 30 p m In the college hill cafeteria
(Jones) Admission Is only 25 and all ECU
students, faculty, staff, their guests and
dependents are welcome Play eight dlf
ferent bingo games for priies and eat
delicious Ice cream Bring a friend!
Tutoring
If you need help writing a paper from a one
page summary to a one hundred page dlsser
tatlon lust come by the engllsh department
office A 124 and sign up to see a tutor in the
writing center It's free!
Rugby
Interested In playing this intense sport? It's
a college experience you don't want to pass
up North Carolina has one of the best rugby
unions In the USA, and ECU has been a very
respected member since 1975 We've toured
up and down the east coast and Bahamas,
always representing ECU well on the field
and at the traditional aftergame rugby par
ties No experience Is needed Practice
begins Wed , Jan 23 at 4 behind the Allied
Health building We'll be having a team
meeting Tues . Jan 22 at 5 downstairs in
memorial gym If you're interested, come on
out For more info . contact Bill Zimmer
mann. 758 4459
Foreign Students
Individual and group tutoring in english as a
second language will be offered in the
english writing center, A 309 at noon on
Mon , Wed, and Fri and at 2 on Mon Infen
sive work on writing and speech are also
available For more info, come by the
center
Zeta Party
Zeta Phi Beta sorority, Inc will be sponser
ing a party on Fri , Jan 18th form 10 until 2
at the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center Ad
mission price Is 75 for students, non
siudents It
ECU Lacrosse
There win be an -rnpoitait meeting Thurs
the 17 at 7 30 p m In memorial gym in room
105 All persons interested in playing lax this
semestershouid be there Also there will be
elections for a new president and vice presi
dent tor this up coming year of 1985 So for
everybody who is interested be there!
Gospel Choir
To all interesting students who would like to
lOin the ECU gospel choir, you are invited to
come out Jan , 15 Wed at 5 p m In the
Ledoms Wright Culture Center If you enioy
singing good gospel music here is your op
portunij See you there
Christian Fellowship
There will be campus service Sun ian 20th
at II a m In Jenkins auditorium in the art
building This will be the first campus of the
semester and the new year Why not come
out and plan to glorify the lord with us
Public Relations
The student union public relations and
publicity committee will meet on Wed Jan
16, I9t5, at 5 p.m. In room 23 of Mendenhall
Student Center All members and Interested
students are urged to attend
AMA Meeting
There will be an AMA meeting on Tues .Jan
IS at 3 p.m. In Rawl 130 Everyone Is welcom
edt
AMA Wine and Cheese
Recaption
Any AMA members not receiving an Invlta
tlon to the marketing faculty and AMA
member social on Jan 24th please stop by
Dr Lemleys office R 227 and pick one up
Thank you!
Delta Sigma Theta
Spring Rush
DST will be having their ms spring rush on
Thurs , Jan 17 at 7 p.m. IntheMultl Purpose
room in Mendenhall. All Interested ladies
are encouraged to attend It takes a lady
All Nursing Students Graduating
Spring Semester
in order to receive your nursing pin by April
22. 1985, orders must be placed In the student
supply store. Wright building, no later then
Feb 4 Orders should be placed at the
jewelry counter Orders must be paid in full
when the order is placed
N.A.A.C.P.
The NAACP will be having a party .
Ledonia Wright Culture Center Sat , Jan 19
Come out and enjoy
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship
We're alive In '85 and lti time to find out
what we're all about! We are me inter
Vanity Christian Fellowship and we offer
fun, friendship, faith, and much morel But
come loin us and saw for yourself this Wed at
7 p.m. In room 110. Rawl Building, and bring
a friend. OK 7
Ice Hockey
There will be a practice and scrimmage with
UNC in Fayettevllle on sun , Jan 20 at 11
am You will be back tor the superbowl (it
football's your thing) I Please call George at
'52 8525 tor more Info Also, we need lots of
new players! Call the above number for
more Info
KYF
There will be a king youth fellowship
meeting on Tues . Jan 15th at 7 p m in 242
mendenhall Vlstors and new members
welcome
ECU Catholic Newman
Community
invites you to be Involved with us in 8S Fine
out whaTs going on ioin us this wed tor
worship service, then our group meeting ana
m�yte a surprise or two! It all starts Wed �'
5pm at the ECU Newman Center on East
10th st (lust past the music building) Se,
you there1
Early Childhood
Ed. Club
Early childhood education duo is meetng
Jan IS. Ml at 4 30 in room 129 Speight Hope
to see you there!
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Eta Sigma win be having a m�ef,ng or
tues.Jan 15, at 5 15 This will be trie firs'
meeting of the new semester Sweatshirts
are in so please try to attend Checx at the
Oesk at Mendenhall tor the room number
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
Ar;f Combination Special:
yf&7Y . Shrimp, Trout & Deviled Crab
FF or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw & Hush Puppies - $3.99
105 Airport Rood 7 58-0327
Jtf the body shopL
Join us now during our New Year's Spec a
1 month
membershipreg 24.00
$19.95
3 month
membershipreg 60.00
$49.95
Corner of i AtK. Bring in this ad and get an extra week on your membership.
and Greenville Blvd. Call Or Come By For A Free Visit 758-7564
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New P
B BRETT MORRls
Maff �m�
ECU will again be offering a
program of summer stud) in Ita-
ly. The program will be the
equivalent of a summer session at
ECU and will last from May 12
� June 18. The session has been
arranged through the University
degli Studi de Ferrara and the
College of Arts and Sciences
Geraldine Laudati ol the ECU
music faculty and Simon Baker,
chairman of the Department of
Geography and Planning, will be
attending the tnp a instructors.
There will also be program dr
tors
LniM
Lmv
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rJurinl
ly. C
art
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I
Studies Re
(CPS) - Students this year have
more financial aid dollars to use
for college than any time since
the 1981-82 school year, but,
after weighing inflation's effects,
the total actually works out to a
15 percent drop in financial aid
since the Reagan administration
took office, two new stuc
report.
Students and their families also
are shouldering more of the
financial burden for their educa-
tions because much of the aid
money available must be paid
back eventually, the studies
found.
In all, students will get near
SI8 billion in federal, state and
institutional aid this year, about
the same amount as in 1981-82
and up Si.6 billion from
1982-83 low, according to a new
student aid trend report by the
College Board's Washington of-
fice.
With those funds, most
American college students have
no trouble financing their edu
tions, another survey of over
1,700 colleges by Peterson's
Guides concludes.
More than 9' percent I b
year's freshmen are getting some
kind of aid money, and they're
using it to cover an average of 85
percent of their financial needs,
the Peterson's survey shows.
About 65 percent of all
undergraduates get some form of
financial aid, a significant in-
crease over last year in light of
soaring college costs and tuition
levels, notes Peter Hegener.
Peterson's president.
While most of the S18 billion in
aid this year will go to students
with demonstrated financial
needs, over Si 13 million will go
toward so-called merit aid pro-
grams based on students'
academic standing and perfor-
mance, the survey also pc
out.
The average merit aware r.
creased less than 8 percent over
the past year - to Si, 112 - while
the average "need-based" award
grew by almost 11 percent - to
SI,377 - the survey found.
"These statistics suggest that
merit awards are not being given
at the expense of needy students,
as many have feared Hegener
says.
But the statistics do suggest all
students, regardless of need, have
suffered from the repeated
federal student aid cuts in recent
yeai
A I
cial
15
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EXHIBI
Art P
and Coi

DATE
PLACE: M
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:
Special Fea
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Matting Availa
m�mnpftpimiffti(U-iiJ ����'�'��'�: �A
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e Tan

ATE
79

s
5 E.IOth St
758-9102
;ies
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ee Meals
STER PLAN
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i
Summer Study In Italy
HE EASTC AROUNIAN IANLARV 1
K BRb H MORRls
Program Offers Study, Travel
l
Staff Hnifi
fc I will again be offering a
n ol summei studs m ta
program will be the
aleni oi a summei session ai
and will lasl from 1a 12
ls rhe session has been
ged through the Universita
- Studi d� Ferrara and the
ol ts and Sciences.
l reraldine I audatj ol the ECU
fa� Lit and Simon Bakei
' the Department of
i �Ph and Planning, will be
'�ng the trip as instructors
be program direc
tors and professors from the
I niversitj of Ferrara and the
I niversit of Bologna
Ivvo courses will be ottered
during the six-week session in lta
1. One vnll concentrate on fine
arts and social sciences Students
will also be required to take daily
classes in conversational Italian.
Each course will carry three
credit hours and ma be used to
fulfill general education re
quirements. In some cases, these
courses maj be applied toward a
student's major or minor, depen
ding on their field of stud
I he cost of the program, which
includes lodging, dail main
meal, language classes, field trip
expenses and travel within Italy is
$500. I he tuition will be
equivalent to the cost ol alien
ding a summer session at E( I
Airfare to and from Italy,
passports, light meals and pel
sonal expenses will be the respon-
sibility of the student.
Along with the courses
scheduled, there will be overnighl
field trips to Milan, Venice,
Florence, Ravenna, Bologna and
Rome. Each trip will consist ol
Msits to various points ol interest
such as churches, art galleries and
museums I he sessions will end
with a four-da) visit to Rome.
Applications ma be obtained
at the office ol theollege of
Aits and Sciences ,r from
1 audati in the Music 1 ihrar
1 he application deadline is ch
1 A deposit is due at the same
tune as the application Due to
limited enrollment, all applicants
will be interviewed and notified
of selection b f eb 20 I ul!
refunds will be available for those
not selected
Additional information son
cerning the program can be ob-
tained b contacting 1 audati 01
I nnis hestang ol the Depart
meni ol Geography and Plann
inc
4 '
SHORT
,gh,club I 1
Wednesday
KAPPA SIGMA
SHORTS CONTEST
Daddy Cool
ALSO
LADIES'
Studies Report More Financial Aid
ls Students this vear have
nancial aid dollars to use
ege than anv time since
he 1981 82 school vear, but,
i weighing inflation's effects.
total actually works out to a
15 percent drop in financial aid
�'�' the Reagan administration
fl ce, two new stu
s idents and their families also
�uldering more of the
��� burden to: their educa
cause much of the aid
� available � ist he paid
eventually, the studies
idem - . nearly
illion in tederai. state and
ial aid this vear, about
the same amount as in 1981-82
llion from
1982 83 low according to a new
l 1 trend report bv the
eg� B a � v as! .
fice.
ts have
hie I . , ica-
vear s
Allowing for inflation, finan-
cial aid funding this year is down
15 percent from its peak 1980-81
level, while college costs have
urown more in the last three years
than in the 17 vears between 1963
and 1980, the College Board
studv shows
Federal aid. in particular, has
failed to keep pace with inflation.
In constant dollars, federal stu-
dent aid has fallen nearlv 20 per-
cent in the last four vears, the
studv shows, and dropped as a
proportion o all aid from 83 to
"s percent.
Even more alarming to College
Board officials - as well as manv
other aid experts - is the shift
from grants and other non-
repayable forms of aid to loans
and work-study awards.
Grants now make up only 4
percent of all financial aid
awards, the study reports, com-
pared to over 80 percent in
1975-76.
The greater emphasis on loan
not only means students incui
siable debts, but "way down the
road loans could also end up
costing (the government) more
than grants claims Lawrence
dladieu.x, executive director of
College Board's Washington of-
Greenville
Flower Shop
758-2774
Corner Evans & 11 Th St.
fice.
If interest rates rise significant
ly, the fedei . . .eminent could
a "significant" amount of
ney financii . 5t, low-
' loans, he warns, conse
quentlv spending more than if the
money had been awarded as
ts and scholarships.
LOCK-UP
�v � hrr Draft md Wine Plus 2 1
'�u v � In at Id ()(i
ls! '� '�: I ' ttsU br Awarded
Phone ' 56 640 1
I b I
Wanted Immediately
urve ner
Peterson's
('Uide des
M an 97 pg,
ire getting some
�� � '� monex. and thev 're
cove: an a' erage
heir final aJ needs,
Peterson '5 survey shows
b � 5 rcr. en; ol all
' in-
:rease over last vear in light
1 tuition
Pete: Hegener,
Peterson 's president
of the SIS billion in
his year will go to students
nstrated financial
SI 13 million will go
tiled merit aid pro-
n students'
iden ; standing and perfor-
� also points
�rage merit award in-
. S percent over
� $1,112 - while
� ig "need-based" award
: percent
the survev found.
"These :s sUgges; that
1 ai : are being given
' e expei eedv students,
many have feared Hegener
But the statistics do suggest all
students, regardless ol need, have
suffered from the repeated
federal student aid cuts )n recent
The East Carolinian is now taking applica-
j tions tor the positions o Director of Advertis-
ing and Advertising Representative. Applica-
tions can be picked up at The East Carolinian
l
j oft ice across from Joyner Library. Applications
I should be submitted no later than 3 p.m. on Fri- j
1 day, January 17.
W
fo
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Just like ECU Oakwood H mes I
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helpmg hiends to a bef't" � �
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EXHIBIT AND SALE
Art Prints, Laser Prints,
and Contemporary Photo Art
DATE: January 14-18, 1985
PLACE: Mendenhall Student Center
TIME: 9 a.m 5 p.m.
Special Features: Rock Star Photos
Movie Star Photos
Wildlife Prints
Buttons
Matting Available, Silver and Wood Frames
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PRIVATE CLUB FOR MEMBERS AND GUESTS
ALL ABC PE
I





2Ue 3Eaat (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, c,������
GRE(i RlDEOUT, Hanagmg Eduor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mm em. Anthony Martin, �,�, ���.
Randy Mews, v.� &� John Peterson, cm .�
I 1NA MAROSCHAK, RHM fitter Bit I DAWSON, Producon Manage
Bu l Mitchell, omum v.� John Rusk, .tdW,u�, r�tM
Doris Rankins. s�r,(,rv
January 15, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Geneva
TaArs TVeec Foresight
The media blitzes by high of-
ficials on both sides of the Geneva
table Sunday reflected one major
point of the negotiations: The
Soviets want one thing and one
thing only from the talks between
themselves and the United States
� the death of the Star Wars
defense. Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko made an unusual
television appearance in a blatant
attempt to sway U.S. opinion.
The snag in the dealings in
Geneva is a thorn in the president's
side, who desperately wants to
achieve an arms agreement with
the Soviets for historical reasons.
If he fails to reach an accord with
the Soviets, he'll be the only presi-
dent in that category since before
John F. Kennedy. Secretary of
State George Shultz, under direc-
tions from the president, wishes
the negotiations to go further
under three separate categories:
medium range missiles, strategic
missiles and space weapons. The
Soviets don't plan on listening
unless the first two are linked to
what they want to stop �
Reagan's Strategic Defense In-
itiative.
'Without reaching an accord,
simultaneous and interrelated in all
three directions, there can be no
advancement in the realization of
what was agreed upon in Geneva
Gromyko said. "One would like
that fewer frivolous statements of
this kind come from the United
States of America He also at-
tacked the research as "devious,
and, generally speaking, perfidious
stratagem
This posturing is to be expected
anytime the two countries get
together for high-level talks. But
this time the stumbling block for
both sides appears formidable.
The methods the Soviets took to
present their argument to the
American people underscores the
intransigent nature of their
bargaining position. President
Reagan, of course, is just as ada-
mant about not giving up the Star
Wars system. Most of the plan, ad-
mittedly, is just being researched.
But the project is a darling of
Reagan and Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger. Both honestly
believe that the production and in-
stallation of such a system will pro-
tect the United States. Others say
the project will only serve to
escalate the arms race.
There are many reasons for the
United States not to build the
system, but appeasing Gromyko is
definitely not one of them. The
cost itself is prohibitive (and is pro-
bably one of the reasons the
Soviets want it stopped). The idea
is very farfetched, with the
technology for completion way in
the future. But, we cannot refuse
to bargain just because we don't
want to lose international face. It
takes an honorable nation to
realize that the dangers of a
nuclear holocaust take precedence
over pride. To advocate an agree-
ment that might be seen as giving
in is better than leaving the world
without an agreement and a little
less safe in the long run.
We do want to emphasize that
we understand the way the Soviets
operate. We are not naive. They do
not keep agreements and usually
use them to their advantage. But,
hope should not be lost that both
sides really don't want a nuclear
war. That maybe, in a matter as
important as this, the Soviets will
forego trying to build warring
machines in space if we do the
same. If we only get each other to
stop for a little while, maybe in the
interim we will realize how foolish
and insane the whole arms race is.
So, now that we've decided on
what to talk about, let's not
jeopardize that because of the
Soviet Union's methods. While
negotiating we should not do
anything to harm our security, but
we should not let the Soviets force
us into escalating an arms race that
could destroy the world.
We only wish that reason
prevailed in world politics. It does
not; power does. But maybe this
time, with the globe sitting in a
nuclear oven, the power will
overheat and the reason will win
the battle.
If your schedule indicated that
you had CSCI 1584 � 005 on
Tuesday and Thursday in Austin
325 at 0800 � 0915, when would
you go to class? In the morning, of
course. Well, think again. What
you signed up for was a night class.
We just thought we'd let you know
about this scheduling brilliance.
Maybe next time the powers-that-
be will think about putting an
asterisk or something.
Campus Foru
Economic Quagmire
Right Economics Wrong
Hysterical weeping and the gnashing
of teeth can be heard in the outer
darkness. Within the corridors of the
bastions of "New Deal Liberalism"
pundits from Americans for
Democratic Action can be seen fran-
tically plucking at their lips and pun-
ching meaningless equations into dime
store pocket calculators. Intermittantly,
they drool on themselves and giggle
distractedly. Throughout the country
many speak of a realignment in favor of
the Republican Party and the return of
ideological conservatives such as Pat
Buchanan and William F. Buckley Jr.
Four more years of Ronald Reagan and
another round of assaults on the
welfare state, aggressive flatulence in
the Third World, hyper inflated
defense budgets, glad-handing of cor-
porate front men and the force feeding
of swill via presidential proclamations,
courtesy of CBS (Jesse's station), loom
on the horizon.
From The Left
Jay Stone
What does it all mean? Has God for-
saken our once fair and intellectually
fertile land? Take heart fellow pro-
gressives. We are only in the grip of the
ideology of regression and retrogression
for a short while. Think of how the ad-
ministrations of Hoover and Coolidge
followed the Progressive Era and en-
shrined notions of nostalgia and laissez-
faire until the stock market crash of
1929 re-established the country's for-
ward momentum in the long run by ex-
posing the bankruptcy of laissez-faire
dogma and heralding the New Deal.
Now, as then, certain structural
changes are taking place within both the
national and the global
economicpolitical system that are ex-
posing the flawed nature of current
social and institutional arrangements.
Change in our institutions is, therefore,
imminent. The only question which re-
mains to be answered is: "What direc-
tion will that change take?" Let us hope
that we can avoid repeating the disaster
of 1929. The problems which confront
American society today cannot proper-
ly be understood by piecemeal analysis.
Some of our most pressing problems
are: l)sluggish economic growth; 2) the
destruction of the environment and
diminishing natural resources; 3)rising
unemployment after each successive
recession; 4)a decrease of productivity
in the economy; 5)the international
debt crisis (in which third world coun-
tries are indebted to private banks in the
West for hundreds of billions of
dollars),and should these countries col-
lectively default, they threaten the fiscal
Other changes exhibit a similarh
structural character. The demise of the
Bretton Woods System in 19"1 is inex-
tricably related to the current instability
of the international economic system
and the international debt crisis
The finiteness of resources, the trend
toward increasing population and en-
'Four more years of Ronald Reagan and another round
of assaults on the welfare state, aggressive flatulence in the
Third World, hyper-inflated defense budgets, glad-
handing of corporate front men
solvency of much of the world's bank-
ing system; 6)endlessly escalating
defense costs and a dangerous arms
race; 7)increasing restiveness among
Third World countries, threatening
vested economic interests and certain
security interests and 8)decreasing op-
portunities for all of us, but particularly
for certain groups which, because of
past discrimination, bear the brunt of
the decline in opportunities.
More than anything else these pro-
blems point out the fundamental struc-
tural changes taking place within our
current institutions and within society
at large. They poignantly illustrate the
fact that current institutional ar-
rangements are inadequate to deal with
contemporary realities.
For example, the transition from an
industrial to a post-industrial economy
is, in part, responsible for rising
unemployment as technology replaces
labor in certain sectors of the economy
and labor-intensive sectors such as tex-
tile and steel atrophy (due largely to
foreign competition), while capital-
intensive and labor-depreciating sectors
such as micro-electronics and robotics
grow. The transition from an industrial
to a post-industrial economy also ex-
acerbates the trend toward a loss of
good jobs. (For example, research by
labor department economists reveals
that the 20 fastest-growing occupations
pay annual wages averaging $5000 less
than the 20 jobs in decline.) To be sure,
other factors figure into the rise in
unemployment, such as globalization of
the economy, de-industrialization, cor-
porate flight and not enough people
able to consume the products that are
being produced. These factors are
themselves structural changes.
vironmental pollution and the limited
capacity of the natural environment I
sustain disruption as illustrated b �
Club of Rome studies, "Limits I
Growth "Mankind at the Turn ng
Point" and "Reshaping the Interna-
tional Order show that the wa we
conceptualize and promote econonlie
growth must change if the very integ-
of civilization itself is to be preserved
The feminization of poverty (the fact
that the majority of families living
below the poverty line are headed b
single women) belies current
conservative right-wing attacks on the
welfare state and speaks of the need for
new social institutions to deal with this
problem.
The growing prevalence of national
liberation movements and economically
motivated revolutions in the Third
World underscores the necessity of con-
structing a new foreign policy which
responds to political change with flex-
ibility and imagination.
The increasingly technological and
hence dangerous and costly nature of
the arms race makes some kind of
serious attempt at arms control im-
perative. This effort should be related
to the formulation of a new foreign
policy.
My intent has been to clarify the
nature of the social changes that are
taking place in America and around the
globe. Admittedly, this has been done
in a cursory fashion. In subsequent ar-
ticles, I will analyze each particular
change in greater detail and examine its
political implications.
(Jay Stone, a senior political science
major, joins The East Carolinian staff
as a columnist.)
Helms' Reasons For Attacking CBS Unfounded, Absurd
By GREG RIDEOUT
If I'm your broker and I say, "Harry,
it's a great deal. There are zillions of
reasons to buy stock in CBS. One, only
20 percent of the employees are conser-
vatives. Two, the employees say 'okay'
to homosexuals who want to teach in the
schools. And, three, eight out of 10 peo-
ple in the company voted for Jimmy
Carter What would you do? My guess
is you'd laugh in my face and go to Mer-
rill Lynch.
This is exactly what our senior
senator, Jesse Helms, is doing. Of
course, he doesn't want you to buy stock
for economic reasons, he prefers you in-
vest your money for political reasons.
Helms wants to end "liberal media
bias a catch-all term used by conser-
vatives every time a reporter poses a
tough question or wants to investigate
one of the right's "sacred causes By
being Dan Rather's boss, Helms says in
a letter he plans to send to more than 1
million people, you can give America a
"fair" media.
Helms targeted CBS because it is the
"most anti-Reagan network Our il-
lustrious senator cites a TV-guide story
that found 52 percent of CBS's stories
during the election season critical of the
president or his policies. This is not bias.
First of all, a sitting president is accoun-
table for more. During the campaign,
'Journalists respect words.
They carefully care for and nur-
ture them. Each one presents a
point
there were bombings in Beirut, a
military invasion in Grenada, an at-
torney general-designate under in-
vestigation and a vice president in hot
water with the IRS. All these were
legitimate stories. Conservatives could
label them "anti-president
And, Helms, the Democrats did not
escape unscathed. Vice Presidential can-
didate Geraldine Ferraro ran the press
gauntlet for her taxes, and her husband
is still page-one material for his shady
n��i -state dealings. But there are just
more stories on a sitting president, and
consequently, there will be more cast in
a negative light. Helms and his offspring
use the word 'bias' casually, stamping
anyone or any story with it that doesn't
ring out the virtues, as they see them, of
God, state and motherhood.
Journalists respect words. They pain-
fully care for and nurture them. Each
one presents a point. "Fairness" and
"bias" are accorded high respect by
reporters and editors. And the good
ones, like Dan Rather or Bob Wood-
ward, remember the rules while the
game is going on. Helms doesn't. Rather
won his libel case last year and Wood-
ward, whose new book Wired has in-
spired tounge lashings from John
Belushi's friends, has yet to have a
lawsuit come his way. The truth hurts.
Helms would prefer we get our news via
political commercials.
What the senator wants you believing
is that all media behave like vultures,
circling and waiting to pounce on all
conservatives, especially the president.
This takeover bid is a ploy; media time is
what Helms wants. He just wants to call
attention to another unsubstantiated
claim. Helms knows he can't buy CBS.
But he can make us believe its reporting
is biased. Yet, he gets precious air time
because CBS is doing its job: reporting
news, and famous people doing
something absurd is defined as news.
He's seeking to influence opinion with
false accusations. Sure there is bias, but
it is the exception, not the rule. Helms
and his money bags can do it, too. After
all, if he and his Congressional Club
cohorts can make Robert Morgan a
liberal and Jim Hunt gay, he can make
us believe that Dan Rather and Bill
Moyers are communists.
So, what can be done? Well, the best
thing is nothing. Let him try and fail,
and point out along the way why he is
wrong. Editorial pages should denounce
it, and news pages should report it. But
it should stand as a warning to the few
bad apples who give journalism a bad
name. Although Helms' attack is super-
ficial and unfounded, it is a caveat to the
profession to make sure ethics and
fairness remain the most important
bywords of journalism.
We must police ourselves, or soon the
courts will damage the Constitution and
do it for you. Helms has every right to
try to buy CBS. If he wants he could
make it the New Right New Service. He
probably would; in fact, if you've ever
read any conservative papers that pur-
port to "report" the news, you might
understand what news is to the new
guard. Journalists must strive to be fair,
and let others decide if what is happen-
ing is right, left or wrong.
If the Helmses of the world are to be
prevented from defining fairness and
bias, and if they are to be fought as they
try to legislate our lives and destroy our
rights, journalists must treat him and
everyone else according to the highest
standards of the profession. The sad
thing is is that Helms really believes that
news that doesn't adhere to his defini-
tion of news is biased. If journalists
don't keep on their toes and let their
guard down, if they try to put opinions
on page one, then they'll get a right from
Jesse Helms. Journalism and the Con-
stitution might stay down for the count.
Giggling, Dr
Come en. Dennis, all libei
jrc not just idiots searchinf
!he ' id facts of reaiity
1 here are those who cai
more than giggle, stare, tume
and drool when debating
� gn poli
Is just as myopic and
superficial to blame .ties
on Marxist philosoph) and
munist aggression as ii is to
the
� ol national traged
listed 0j jan
10
There .an be no debate that
many communist regime- have
committed some of th- t
human rights violati
history The Khmer R .
I ambodia .arned out a horrid
massive genocide that matches
Stalin's and Hitie:
record of torture, impri
ment and denial of civil t .
is atrociou ou are right
list goes on.
But the I nited States
ported rightist or anti-
communist regimes that are
sometin ad. and for
that we car, . our
government. Pinochet in Chile,
whom we ht. tall a doen
vears ago. has a long record of
repression and cruelty that in-
cludes murder, torture.
klisting and imprisonment
The inep of leaders wc
backed in South Vietnam were
as 1 id a the North
Vietnamese at human rij
violations, and the:
were considerable at times
Somoza n Nicaragua, whom
e � for A
likewise violated
American ideal and
human decency b keeping
e in poverty, his polii
enemies imprisoned, civil rij
curtailed and his own bai �
count full. After w�
the regime that in
generate iffei
aguan people, it
wonder the Sandani
not be boughi fl -
package This st,
on
We undermine
credibility and our
tv when we I
our nation itan i �
democratic goveri
respeel tor human rights, fc
Former SGA
Presidents In
Job Dispute
B (,RK, RIDHH I
Managing UMH
Two former SGA pi
and current ECU studer
suspended from jobs in the N (
Insurance Department
a possible conflict bctw
and a full-time job. The
sions came during the
transition between outg . In-
surance Commissioner John In-
gram and incoming C
sioner Jim I ong
Timothv K. Sullivan. :�
Vincent Bret:� Melvin, 26. were
pended without pav durin
investigation that ended M
Melvm. SGA lent dui
the 1979-1980 school vear. was
reinstated with ba �
"no conflict" was found.
Sullivan, who held the top SCA
po-t in 1976-1977, resigned after
he was suspended, calling
suspension political in a
dreenshoro eu Record a
cle.
Insurance Department Pe-
nel Director Ronnie Condrey -
the suspensions were no: political
and were a matter of "are thev
able to do their job" while going
to school Both Sullivan and
MeKin inspected mobile homes
from a Greenville base
Sullivan had worked in the ill-
fated gubernatorial campaign
Ingram as a paid staffer. Melvin
worked as a volunteer, lor.
Felker, assistant professor ol
political science, said Melvin was
a part-time student in the depart-
ment's Master of Public Ad-
ministration program Felker
said Melvin had completed the
classroom instruction part of the
program
Melvm did a required intern-
ship tor his degree in the In-
surance Department He
responded to consumers" com-
plaints about mobile homes, and
Sullivan inspected new mobile
homes on dealers' lots. Sullivan
earned $16,464 per year; Melvin
still earns the same amount
Melvin or Sullivan could not be
reached for comment.
V I
undl
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poll!
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'ere
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k'l.
v
I
Wrong
a similarly
demise of the
1971 is inex-
ni instability
mic Astern
SIS
ces, the trend
ind en-
m and another round
1f flatulence in the
budgets, glad-
w
the
: limited
lment to
b) three
imits to
Turning
Interna-
a we
te economic
he er n
nt
preserved.
(the fact
families living
- r.eaJed by
current
acks on the
he need for
ith this
' rational
economically
'he Third
� � ofcon-
. v. which
ange uuh flex-
I
In hie
hnological and
tngerous and . nature of
le kind of
irms control im-
should be related
1 a new foreign
u een to clarify the
the s anges that are
Vmerica and around the
Uy, this has been done
fashion. In subsequent ar-
each particular
� iter detail and examine its
mpiic i
�r political science
The East Carolinian staff
Absurd
fe must police ourselves, or soon the
p a U damage the Constitution and
for you Helms has everv right to
i CBS It he ants'he could
le it the New Rlght News Service. He
Jably would; in fact, if vou've ever
any conservative papers that pur-
to "report" the news, you might
brstand hat news is to the new
Id. Journalists must strive to be fair,
llet others decide if what is happen-
s right, left or wrong.
the Helmses of the world are to be
ented from defining fairness and
and if they are to be fought as they
lo legislate our lives and destroy our
Is. journalists must treat him and
yone else according to the highest
lards of the profession. The sad
is is that Helms really believes that
that doesn't adhere to his defini-
of news is biased. If journalists
t keep on their toes and let their
down, if they try to put opinions
ige one, then they'll get a right from
Helms. Journalism and the Con-
kion might stay down for the count.
Campus Forum
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 15, 1985
Giggling, Drooling Not In Liberal Repertoire
Come on, Dennis, all liberals
are not just idiots searching for
'he hard, cold facts of reality
'here are those who can do
more than giggle, stare, fume
and drool when debating
toreign policy.
11 is just as mvopic and
superficial to blame all cruelties
on Marxist philosophy and
communist aggression as it is to
"blame America first" for the
htanv of national tragedies
listed in your editorial of Jan
10.
There can be no debate that
many communist regimes have
committed some of the worst
human rights violations in
history. The Khmer Rouge in
Cambodia carried out a horrid
massive genocide that matches
Stalin's and Hitler's. Castro's
record of torture, imprison-
ment and denial of civil rights
is atrocious. You are right, the
lisl goes on.
But the United States has
supported rightist or anti-
communist regimes that are
sometimes just as bad, and for
that we can justly criticize our
government. Pinochet in Chile,
whom we helped install a dozen
years ago, has a long record of
repression and cruelty that in-
cludes murder, torture,
blacklisting and imprisonment.
The inept series of leaders we
backed in South Vietnam were
as least as bad as the North
Vietnamese at human rights
violations, and their trespasses
were considerable at times.
Somoza in Nicaragua, whom
we backed for 40 years,
likewise violated every
American ideal and standard of
human decency by keeping his
people in poverty, his political
enemies imprisoned, civil rights
curtailed and his own bank ac-
count full. After we supported
the regime that imposed
generations of suffering on the
Nicaraguan people, it is little
wonder the Sandanistas would
not be bought off with an aid
package. This list, too, goes
on.
We undermine U.S.
credibility and our own morali-
tv when we forsake the ideals
our nation stands for �
democratic government,
respect for human rights, basic
Former SGA
Presidents In
Job Dispute
B (,RK(, HIDEOUT
Managing Ml I or
Two former SGA presidents
and current ECU students were
suspended from jobs in the N.C.
Insurance Department because of
a possible conflict between school
and a full-time job. The suspen-
sions came during the bumpv
transition between outgoing In-
surance Commissioner John In-
gram and incoming Commis-
sioner Jim Long.
Timothy K. Sullivan, 28, and
Vincent (Brett) Melvin, 26, were
suspended without pay during an
investigation that ended Monday.
Melvin, SGA president during
the 1979-1980 school year, was
reinstated with back pay after
"no conflict" was found.
Sullivan, who held the top c 3A
post in 1976-1977, resigned after
he was suspended, calling the
suspension political in a
(treensboro Sews & Record arti-
cle.
Insurance Department Person-
nel Director Ronnie Condrey said
the suspensions were not political
and were a matter of "are they
able to do their job" while going
to school. Both Sullivan and
Melvin inspected mobile homes
from a Greenville base.
Sullivan had worked in the ill-
fated gubernatorial campaign of
Ingram as a paid staffer. Melvin
worked as a volunteer. Lon
Felker, assistant professor of
political science, said Melvin was
a part-time student in the depart-
ment's Master of Public Ad-
ministration program. Felker
said Melvin had completed the
classroom instruction part of the
program.
Melvin did a required intern-
ship for his degree in the In-
surance Department. He
responded to consumers' com-
plaints about mobile homes, and
Sullivan inspected new mobile
homes on dealers' lots. Sullivan
earned $16,464 per year; Melvin
still earns the same amount.
Melvin or Sullivan could not be
reached for comment.
civil freedoms and equality
under the law - by supporting
governments that violate every
one. We are tempted to such
policy by economic imperatives
and strategic or military in-
terests, but only by insisting on
respect from our allies for the
basic values we hold dear can
we maintain our credible case
against communist agression.
To maintain the world's faith
in the values our nation
represents, we must live up to
those values. When we have
cleaned our own house, our
case against Marxist policy is
all the more credible.
Let's have coffee sometime,
Dennis. I haven't majored in
political science like you, but I
can do more than giggle and
drool
Darryl Brown
ECU Alumnus
Progress Sad
Progress forges ahead at
ECU. Although I can unders-
tand the need for a new
building on campus and the
limited space available, it sad-
dens me that the location of the
new building will remove one
of the few areas of beauty on
campus. I have spent many a
tranquil hour in that grove
behind the Biology building.
Someone in the past must
have been aware that students
need more than florescent
lights and brick buildings
because there is a gazebo and
picnic table. It's the only picnic-
table I've seen on campus.
With their shouting numbers
over the intercom at
Mendenhall, I am always ex-
pecting that any moment so-
meone will stand up, shout
bingo and walk away with a
lamp. Not everyone cares for
"cafeteria" atmosphere.
Native Americans felt that
sitting on the ground brought
one closer to God. When sitting
on those grassy slopes, the sun
illuminates and warms my
heart, the squirrels make it
dance; the grass and insects
make me sensitive to the
dimensions of life not keenly
visible to the eye. I am sure
others will miss this place as
well. This brings to mind
another Indian saying: "Where
the white man touches the
earth, it is sore
PJ. Klinger
Soph Pre-OT.
Transit Blues
I am appalled at the universi-
ty's inconsideration of the
students who use the bus
system at night. The only bus
that goes to Pitt Plaza and
Greenville Square is the Gold
bus and that is only at night.
Many students rely on the Gold
bus to buy their groceries and
need to put the perishable items
away without them being spoil-
ed. With the new bus schedule
that combines both the Purple
and the Gold route at night, the
Gold bus arrives on the hill and
at Mendenhall once an hour
rather than every half hour. It
has already encouraged
students to skip meals rather
than take the extra time to go
food shopping. As many peo-
ple know, many students do
not eat properly as it is.
Since the availability of the
bus is now limited, it is a real
shame that so many people
(especially females) who usual-
ly ride the bus and live on the
hill now walk to and from the
library at night alone. Since the
last bus leaves Mendenhall by
8:30 p.m. rather than 9:30
p.m students also have less
time to study at the library if
students want to use the bus to
return back to the dorms.
I realize that the change in
schedule is to save money, but
the new schedule discourages
many students from using the
bus at night and encourages
more students to have cars on
�TZ-�,h' condon
� uteVmaCtHeatn and
Mitt Street 2ft590
campus.
Sheila Moore
Jr Corrections
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
SI9(1 bortion from 13 to 18 weeks ai addi-
uo.iaJ cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information caJI 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9A.M and
5P.M. weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917WMtMor9onS�.
RoMqIi.NC
SOFT CONTACTS
4��f jfa lVAn YUI-AR $40.00pair
C

KXTr.Nb! I)
WEAR $60.00pair
TINTED $70.00Pair
(blue aqua,
tfreen. brown)
STUDENT ID REQUIRED
I he abof prkes do ncN m, luj�- tees tor professional seri f,
IVoUv.ion.xl fee depend on Ions tyi- r�d your previous soli
lens expenerx t
Call IWmore information � 756-9404.
onoMerwc
�YECAR�C�MT�R
Drs Holl.s W Scibal
I ipion We 2jW (ireenviBe tthd
soup
scXad
Si
Now Offering: Stuffed Baked Potatoes
or Quiche Lorraine
"xSrWSS
NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
General Manager
Needed For
Ebony Herald
Interested persons
may apply at the Media
Board Office - Located
in the Publications
Bldg.
Phone: 757 - 6009 Fiirjg Dates: iio-85 thru 1-18-85
AID
PAPA
KATZ
COt PON
V
30 OFF
ALL FRAMES
IN STOCK
Must present coupon with order for
j discount Not good with other adver-
tised s
1984
peciais ExpjreS Feb 8
L
COUPON
SOFT
I
Sf�'
contacts; 20 OFF i
DY.UU I All NonPrescription
Sunglasses
Expires Feb 8,1985
Includes care
kit at
this price.
viui. j.i
J
Phone
756-4204
OPTICAL
PALACE
YZ
VL
I 703 Greenville Blvd (Across From The Plaza. Next To ERA Realty)
1 G�ry M Hams Licensed Opiician Open 9 30 am to 6 p m Mon Fr.
L
Iff
PRESENT
WEDNESDA Y
NIGHT
LADIES LOCKOUT
THE ORIGINAL IS BACK HOME!
Free Wine & Beer
FOR LADIES FROM 8:30-10:00
MEN ADMITTED AT 10:00
WITH HAPPY HOUR Prices TILL 1100
MEMBERS $2.00 GUESTS $3.00
MEMBERSHIPS AVALABLE
AT THE DOOR FOR ONLY $1.00
FRATERNITY WITH THE MOST GUYS
AT 10:30
GETS A SPECIAL GIFT
GIRLS FROM AZD
10th St. Ext. At
Riverbluff Rd
Papa Kati Is A Private Ouh
For Members It Gv�
W� Hove AM ABC Perm

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style
Layton Breaks A way From The 'Colony'
hint's li
Talks I:
( ivil Pn
Joe 1 ayton, foi 2 sears dues
toi and choreographei ol The
I"� olonx. said in a prepared
st ate men t released b a
spokesman from ew York, that
his association with the Paul
Green outdoor drama "has come
I avto I in his state
meni ed "an in
sol ,1 � flict" between
nsell � Mar k Sumnei, the
produce pla who took
over t
M Fmma v M
show 's opening la
V M a ho
R � c
�'4 show "a
musical, Harrigan 7i' Hart I his
summer will be the tust since
I964 that he will nol travel to much . � ,
Manteo to re stage The I ost ol
ony. a 10b he has long vailed his
annual "labor ol love "
In his prepared t.it t-m t-nt
! aon said, "The ' olony' I ho.id �
debul n. 11h I he Sound ol M
Mine to 111111 the
tion ovei to anothei dii
enti u I with gisinj
'new look' in 2 '
I a ton said thai thi
marks his silsei annm
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Exciting Drama.
Intrigiurxg hisUny, uraottii mystery
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statement
' tht ween him i
r) is such as
ake a ition
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vi k : N e v
been a big wn ol nw life foi 21
ycai s I fell in love with ih ; i
and with beautiful Roanoke
Island righl from ilu ita I I've
even made m home there Still,
the onh thing thai is coi
change
I as-
ms careei has
l demanding
ol nn travel
ol whai 1h, I ostolon
be seems t ha
the stewardship ol its new
ducei
The directoi - tatei
on, "I had h
vMth Tht I ostolon
more yea
friends wl
the show
The I ���
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Presented on North Carolina'sHjtei Ba
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1985 Spring Semester Schedule
Student Activities
&
DATK
Tuesday, Jan �
Thursday. Jan. "
Monday, Jan. 2H
Thursday -Saturday
Jan. H Teh. 2
Tuesday, Teh.
Mondas, Teh. II
Thursday. I eh. 14
Wednesday. Teh 27
Sunday -Saturday,
March 3-9
Wednesday, March t
Monday, March 25
Tuesday, March 26
Wednesday, April 10
EVENT
H I Is IS SI h'll s
iennahoir Hoys
THT MKI Ris
"Oh. Mr Faulkner, l) ou
( HAMBER II sn i
The I os Angeles Piano Quartet
hi f r
( alt forma Suite"
TRAIT I API I II HI HI f
Surprising Southern Africa
ith Kenneth Richter
( HA MM R II Sin AI
1 he H estern H ind
(Ideal Sextet)
TRAVFA ADM Ml Ri i u t
"Sri I anka Resplendentevlon
with Ralph (.erstle
ARTISTS SI Rlf S
Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra
TRAVFA OMMll II l
Bahamasruise
ARSS SI Rll s
Marvis Martin, Soprano
TRAM I ADURi III M
"Around the Bay of Saptes"
with Art Wilson and I red Keiffer
THEATRE ARTS
Ballet (,ran Folklorico de Mexico
( HAMBER Tl Sin Al
Theomposers String Quartet
IM ACT
rium
IIMr

Nation Salutes King
k :
Vl (H: 15 I
1 m
.S(
ft6: W p.m.
cr. Room 224
Hendri.x Theatre MSIS p.m.
lit ndrt.x 1 ht itrt .Ss p.m.
Hendrix 1 � MS(m.
H nht Auditorium8 p.m.
Miami, f lorida
iind the Bahamas
m right luditoriumS p.m.
Hendrix 1 heat re MSIS p.m.
McCtinnis theatres IS p.m.
Hendrix Theatre f sr8 p.m.
Hai
C j r c

-
low
nghi ead
King's I
.is a federal h
tion an oppon
celel b boi
whites
s orei ta Scott K .
the eve ol King's
V. kl, s 'Jt, -
! Trivia, Trivia, Trivia 1
l
. Who sold Alaska to tht I S in IHt
I iihi1 u'iir was rht 'r
I honotilm. shown h it, � heatre 1
I ty? '
I
. H her, is the mh place in tht h
lush river hanks all in one location
I 4. H hat professional sport did M tl
in '� baskt I
ball?
I
I V � hen Has the first I . s, r
� Whit h Milwaukee- Atlanta o, hit 75.5 . uni and,
I the I tour times u
I
I . What is the average television viewing time per week for all nr
I sons (according to 1982 estimatt p
v. What 1982 informal television special won an I Kar'
I
I Id. Whuh I .S. President h.vn born in Raleigl '
- � �� � � � � � i- .
A P

S






;
�a
&k
a ton.
ination
Sugar-
�u that
eef noo-
: mg. of
an cheese'
per sermg.
s 195
t ass while
470
. : canned
s95
le wit I
�ean;
i Kentucky
i whopp-
lium?"
"Most
�� mg. of
their
studj suggests
jown to
rtnall) use in
ice gradually
jjj sal: before
Rer high
�alt con-
h of
ssiblc �
isc "ree times as
- rig as the
King
k
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 15, 1983
i l a 11 o n
if the
I King Junior
HI.
King ic federal holi-
e on the third
irting next
pportunity to
is celebration
11 across our na-
. eral hundred peo-
I he ceremony, in-
.mber of school
�he holiday
. ' a black holi-
i holiday for all
I
want all Americans to fly
jA.mencan Hag on Jan. 20,
Martin Luther King was
a patriot who marched
the colors of his country
commission members
�et KIM, s. Page 7.
3 Trivia
and tor ho much money?
d-on-film motion picture,
it at Rnoli Theatre, V. Y. Ci-
that has a forest, jungle and
Xhamherlam play after basket-
ed issued?
r hit 755 home runs and led
tng time per week for all per-
ial won an Emmy Award?
Raleigh, S.C.?
for Answers, S�r Ptft 7,
y
c
y
3
King's Wife
Talks Against
Civil Protests
s .iitinued From Page 6.
vsere sworn in at the King Center
tor Non-Violent Social Change
adjacent to Ebenezer Baptist
church where King served as
pastor and where his crypt is
kvated. Members of the commis-
sion include Sen. Ernest F. Holl-
ings, D-S.C; Illionois Gov. Jim
Thompson; Atlanta Mayor An-
drew Young; Clarence M.
Pendleton, chairman of the U.S.
Civil Rights Commission, and
singer Steie Wonder.
I arlier, Mrs. King told an
Atlanta gathering that civil
disobedience and other forms of
resistance may be needed to end
the cycle of poverty, hunger and
racism throughout the world.
i et us revive the non-violent
revolution she said. "It will re-
quire that we question established
values, that we question the
Trivia, Trivia, Trivia
4oi��n from Part 4.
UOSJfJDf Mjjpuy -qi
(SOd) W isoi �m fo sjapwy �ui fo XutyotX (,
sajnuiw zi 'sunou z 'g
JS9 st ooyjnj am jsaq m9jj uq 'l
uojvy jujf 9
u$i v m 's
noq.�noA p
punj.ausi(i ��
�Z6I 'I
uotjiftu z'l$ vissntf 7
strange and frightening vision
that says we must spend millions
on Star Wars weapons
"Ten million are likely to die in
Africa of hunger in 1985 she
said. "It's hard to comprehend
the devastation � more people
have died of hunger in the last six
years than died in all the wars,
revolutions and murders of the
last 50 years
Classifieds
SALE
FOR SALE: Telecaster guitar, built
s tti Dimarzio and Seymour Duncan
Mumbuckers and a schecter brass
br dge Asking $250 or best offer.
Call 758 9628 ask for Dave
FOR SALE: 1982 Silver BW Quan
ft m Wagon. 34 miles per gallon.
32 000 miles. Sfereo cassette Asking
S6 890Call 756 7768.
FOR SALE: Portable, Sears Ken
more washer ideal for trailer or
small apt Besf offer Lab Series
Gibson) LS 100 Amplifier, 100 watt
output, $350 firm 756 4136 after 5
Ask for Herbert.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec-
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 756 4664, evenings or
752 6106 days
ENTERTAINMENT NEEDS:
Ramada's house D.J. now available
for private parties. Excellent stock
of tunes and sound system to fulfill
any party needs. Call THE
TRASHMAN 752 3587
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Your own personal
laundry service Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine a
call 758 3087. DON'T BE
SCAREDleave Jack a message
and save50 when you have your
laundry cleaned.
FOR SALE: Typewriter Olivetti
Lexicon 82 electric portable. Like
new condition Interchangeable typ
ng elements including script. $200.
Phone 758 8252 after 6 p.m.
WAPIT: Lodge Ski Hostel. Inexpen
sive hospitality for outdoor adven
turers $15 per person includes
breakfast, towels, linens and kitchen
privileges 5 min. to Beech and
Sugar 704-898 9899.
WANTED
ENTHUSIASTIC AND
MOTIVATED INDIVIDUAL: Need
eo for part time exercise
instructor's job. Call between 1:15
and 2 p.m The Body Shoppe.
758 7564
RENT: 2 bedroom Apt. fully furnish
ed, Ringgold Towers. Call 752 8945.
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near Universi
V 3 bedrooms, dining room. 1217
Evans St $240. 758 5299
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2
rent, ' 2 utilities. Call 355-6933 after 5
p.m. M, W, F
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For large
Dedroom off house. Bath shared with
other person. Washer-Dryer,
microwave I block from campus.
Call Dave at 752 3022
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
mmediatly. Kingston Con-
dominiums. $150 per month, $50
deposit. M utilities. For more info,
call Leigh at 752 1088.
BABY SITTERS NEEDED: In ex
change for membership at local
health club. Must be available bet
een 8 10 a.m. at least 2 days Mon.
Sat Call 758 5065, between 9-11 p.m.
only.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: River Bluff Aprs Call
758 7975 or 758 3280, ask for Kelly.
HELP WANTED: Western Sizzlin
now accepting applications Friday
between 2:30 5.30. No phone calls
Please 2903 E 10th St.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
tains Quarters Apt. 21, $230 plus
deposit Call Donna at 758 5901
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus.
Call 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $i 15 a month utilities included.
Great location & great roommates.
Call 758-6224.
PERSONAL
ALL CAMPUS: The Kappa Sigma
Fraternity is sponsoring an all cam
pus party after happy hour this Fri
day, Jan. 18 from 9 until at their
house on tenth street (next to Dar
ryl's), BYOB
KEG: Little sisters and little sister
pledges. We are looking forward to
partying with you Friday afternoon
before happy hour. We've got a keg
for you at the house. Come by and
party with your brothers.
TRIBUTE: To the best little sisters
and pledges anybody could ever
have Thank you for your love and
support, you're the best.
�The Kappa Sigs
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The
Brothers and Golden Hearts of
Sigma Phi Epsilon would like to ex-
tend a cordial invitation to anyone
interested in attending our rush par
ties on Jan. 21, 22, and 23. We are
located at 505 E. 5th St. across from
the Jenkins Art Building. Please feel
free to drop by the house any time
beforehand and meet us because we
are looking forward to meeting all of
you For more info, call 752-2941 or
752-6502.
HAPPY HOUR: The little sisters of
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Alpha Sigma
Phi invite everyone to the jam-
minest, if not THE MOST jammin'
Happy Hour Thurs.Jan. 17th at
Beau's beginning at 9 p.m Come
out and party with the best!
STUDENTS: Do you ever get the
munchies during class? Collect your
change! Golden Hearts bake sale
Jan. 16th & 17th. We not only look
good but we cook good too!
SUPERBOWL HAPPY HOUR: The
brothers of Pi Kappa P: Fraternity
will be having their 4th annual
Superbowl Happy Hour at The Attic
this Sunday starting at 4:30. Come
out and enjoy Happy Hour prices
The biggest Superbowl party in
Greenville
KAPPA SIGMA: The Brothers,
Pledges, and Little Sisters of the
Kappa Sigma Fraternity wish
Brothers Matt Rizzolo and Stuart
Sloan a Happy Birthday!
BOY WONDER, PLAYBOY,
R TAILESS, THE VEGETABLE
JUGGLER, AND THE BEAM: We
HAVE NEVER seen a rockin' &
rollin' basketball player with the
last name Hale, had to pay $200 in
pledges just to see a party donkey
shag, had so much fun playing suck
blow while shotgunning, seen the sun
come up at 6 p.mnot 6
a.m. You're beautiful we love ya!
PS. The room is still vibrating!
Love, The "Party Ladies" of 906.
LONELY: Emotionally, physically
or intellectually, is there anybody
out there- for you, just you. Coming
soon answers to these and much
more, interesting questions. For in-
formation call 752-9667.
CHRIS: I feel so good about
useverything we're sharing
becomes even more meaningful
because it isn't for todayit's for
tomorrow. Because I know that I'll
always be in love with you. Bob
YELLOW HOUSE HACKEY
SHACK DWELLERS: Let's JAM
this semester. Jersey forget Trig ,
Financial Accounting Gumby,
Third time lucky! D.C. Rabbit,
forget it all! Let's Party! Grandpa.
SUPERBOWL BETA RUSH PAR
TY: At Olde Towne Inne Sunday
Jan. 20. Happy Hour prices No
Cover. 4-until. 757-3769.
(?!): The Alliteration was euphoric,
can't wait to have more of it.
Wednesday's the Boss, partaking of
the sauce. Research & Recreation.
Creating action and involuntary
reaction. ()
KLAH HEAD: Don't think I'm chaf
ing you. We were both just as stub
born as two cows on their way to the
meat market. Moo, chafe, klah,
shake, rattle and roll.
Sig Tau lil sisters
Present
DRAFT NITE
TUE. JAN 15,1985 8:30-l:00am
Adm. 1.50 18yrs. 1.00
SfVjw.tf DRAFT ALL NITE
YV DRAFT-
XFf J HUMP NITE
ff .10 DRAFT TILL 11:00
V .80 CANS ALL NITE
fWED. JAN 16,1985 8:30-l:00am
Adm. 8:30-11:00 1.50 11:00-1:00 1.00
18 yrs. 2.00 All Nite
COUNSELOR POSITIONS
AT CAMP STARLIGHT
For cabin leaders with talents and skills in all Land
Sports, Tennis, Swimming(W.S.I.), Sailing, Canoeing,
Water Skiing, Gymnastics, Arts and Crafts(Ceramics),
Music, Dramatics, and Photography at the leading
private, modern, co-ed camp in the lake area of N.E.
PA. 6-22 thru 8-22. Qualified mid and upper class men
and women who are outgoing and enjoy leadership
roles with youngsters. Contact Coop. Ed. Office, Rm
313- Rawl, 757-6977 for application and on campus in-
terview or CAMP STARLIGHT, 18 CLINTON ST
MALVERNE, NY 11565, (516) 599-5239!
Read The Classifieds
ADVENTURE
EXCITEMENT
ROMANCE
For the Spring Break to remember
Travel Associates puts your right in the middle of the
hottest action in Florida � Daytona Beach.
Your Sunbreak package includes:
Round-trip transportation via deluxe motorcoach
Seven nights accommodations at one of Day-
tona s finest beachfront motels
Two poolside parties with complimentary bever-
ages
' A volleyball tournament with prizes
Optional transportation services to Disneyworld
and EPCOT
' All hotel taxes
Services of Travel Associates on-site Sunbreak
vacation staff
$190.00
DATE: March 1-9
CONTACT: Dean at 752-5588
or
Kevin at 752-9732
The East Carolina University Unions
Theatre Arts Committee presents
John Maxwell in
ulhiljBr,
the critically acclaimed play about
America's Pulitzer Prize-winning
author
Thursday, January 17, 1985 8:15 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre ECU Campus
Greenville
Tickets available Monday-Friday
11:00am-6:00pm from the Central Ticket Office
Telephone 757-6611, x266
ECU Students and Guest: $5.00
Youth (age 14 and Under): $7.00
All Others and at the Door: $10.00
This program is made possible in part from a grant
and the National Endowment for the Arts through the
Southern Arts Federation, of which the North Carolina
Arts Council is a member.
?
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Lady Pirates Win Two
Bv RICK McCORMAC
I he ECU 1 ady Pirates con
tinned ihen Fine play on the road
last night with a 7-61 v ictoi)
ovei conference foe Richmond
1 he 1 ady Pirates started the
g a m e b playing their
"dynamite" full-couri pressure
defense foi the titst 15 minutes,
and then took a 46 35 advantage
aftet the lust 20 minutes
"We looked gooA in the first
halt said ECU coach Emily
Manwaring. "We hit 6i percent
ol out shots (19 ol 30 from the
field) and were really playing well
on both ends ol the court
I he 1 c I pressure defense
forced the Lady Spiders into 12
fust hall turnovers and led to
many easy baskets for the I ady
Pirates off their transition can e
1 eading the way foi 1 :( I in
the opening period was guard
1 orainne Fostei who hit 1 ol 12
shots from the floor and one of
two from the line tor 21 first halt
points.
" 1 tie ke tor us w as our
fastbreak Manwaring said
"We ran 14 fastbreaks and
scored on 10 of them while com-
mitting no turnovers. About
I orainne Foster's points came
on the end ol out fastbreak
1 ie minutes into 'lie second
uirdaS) Sylvia Bragg defends against a university of Richmond hah the Lady Spiders were abU
to pull within four points, but
I i. 1 quickly stopped the Rich-
u l a v a
Baker Names Staff;
One Position Open
mond rally
20-fooi jumpei by Monique
Pompili and two layups by Sylvia
Bragg and 1 isa Squirewell quick-
ly had the E I lead back to 10
points
Manwaring was especially
pleased with het team's defensive
performance in the second half.
"In the second half we used our
three two match-up one and
really did a good job of trapping
and helping out she said.
Foster led the I ady Pirates in
scoring finishing with 24 points
,in a 14 ol 22 shooting perfor-
mance from the field.
Also in double figures tot E 1
were Sylvia Bragg and Anita
Anderson with 15 and 12 points.
respectively.
1 isa Squirewell had her second
good game m a row scoring eight
points and pulling down nine re-
bounds. Freshman Monique
Pompili also turned in an
outstanding effort on the boards
hauling in nine rebounds.
I he 1 ady Pirates in addition to
winning then first two E
South league games, also won
their first two road games of the
"We deserved both of these
ies tins weekend, we played
' good defense Manwaring
said. "We won our first
carries op, the road and are really
in a good position now to do well
in the conference
B; I MRU I I
I hose
' ti
-I �
malitv -
'he :op

� - a isiness 1
'
� e have
besi
M i k� . to EC I
Iing f i the
it Murra i tte I)'( a
tnt head
:
tei om-
the K offen
r t e r b ac
Murray
i 28 16 record in ()'( ain's
ling a 9-2 fit
MV1 bad
and punter forlemson I nivei
t from 1972 '76, 0' a i 1 his
a experience as a
i tani with the I igei
77 He 'hen served as 11
I l for Baker at I he
' m 19"1 until his mine
Murray State in 1981
()'a l n is a native of
� ; a burg N where he star-
red for Wilkinson High Scho
Men's results
400 medlev relay: Kevin
Hidalgo, lee Hicks, Bruce
Brockschmidt. Keith Kaut, (EC)
3 J5.28.
1000 freestyle: Stevens (FS)
9:48 79; Boozci (FS) 9:59 99;
Andy Cook (EC9:59.17.
200 freestvle: Brockschmidt
' Fan1 Cl
. � .
.�-� 84
1 atsi ve
��s peci 1 .
� � .sponsbilites have �
. the
afl
A -s a 1 e I v
�: -
serve as a
Baket ' sta : v. �
Farrinj -
� �
( I
���
ne to 1 a ross the
mes to
ECL aftei - i me yeai as
� and defen-
estern Ken-
as a 16-yeai veteran
the estern c arolina Univer-
P wers, 40, began his
hing career at W( I in
68 is a defensive coach. He
ars w orking
tl e defensive ends and
line- before being named
ensive t . u in lv4.
He -vas named assistant head
n at v c i
g the 1983 campaign,
�'�' I made it to the champion-
ship game ol the N( A A Division
I A playoffs, finishing the yeai
ranked fourth in the nation
defensively. The Catamounts
isted the nations second best
sfense in 19"6 and again in
1979
Powers is a graduate ol Lin-
High School in I in-
. ftei a brilliant
gh school career, he went on to
earn four letters as a defensive
end at VI
Baker's announcement brings
the current staff to eight with one
defensive position still open. The
remaining coaches on the Pirate
staff include. Don Murrv, offen-
sive coordinator; John Zernhelt,
offensive line. Ken Matous, wide
receivers; Tom Throckmorton,
defensive coordinator; and
Waverly Brooks, recruiting coor-
dinator and defensive coach.
Coach Baker did not vet in-
dicate when the last position will
be filled.
(EC) 1 45.73; Waldrop (FS);
Kaut (EC) 1:48.71
50 freestvleI ris Pittelli (EC)
22 29; Acre (1 Si 22.31; Halfacre
(FS) 22 51
200 individual medlev:
Kowalsk, (FS) 2:00.29; LaPalme
(FS) 2:01.63; Pat Brennan (EC)
2:10.91.
�Jf '� -
Waverly Brooks (left) won't return to the Pirate football coaching
staff, but lom rtirockmorton will be back for the '85 season.
White Leads Tracksters
To Fourth Place Finish
By BILL MITCHELL
NUff Urllrr
t raig White led the ECU
men's track team to a fourth
place finish in the Joe Hilton In-
door Track and Field Meet over
the weekend.
White placed first in both the
50 and 60-yard high hurdles to
earn the Most Valuble Sprinter
award. Both of the wins were
school records.
in team competition, Pitt-
sburgh took six first place
finishes. North Carolina State
four, UNC three and Duke and
South Carolina each had one.
"The team really showed good
strength and what is in store for
us down the road ECU Coach
Bill Carson said. "It was also the
finest meet I've seen Walter
Southerland run (Southerland
placed fifth in both the 50 and
60-yard high hurdles)
Carson said he was "re d pleas-
ed with the entire squad and
said the players are much
stronger since putting time into a
new weight program.
Referring to ECU's trip to the
Eastman Kodak Invitational in
Johnson City, Tenn. this
weekend, Carson said "the team
is real keyed up to go next week
and hopes to have a real good
meet.
ECU Results
60 high hurdles: Craig White
(first) 7.0, Walter Southerland
(fifth) 8.0, David Parker (sixth)
8.0.
60-yard dash: Henry Williams
(fourth). Lee MacNeil (fifth),
Chris Brooks (eighth).
600-yard run: Julian Anderson
(second). Ken Daugherty
(fourth).
440: Eddie Bradley (third).
Phil Estes (fifth), Willie Fuller
(sixth).
50 high hurdies; Craig White
(first), David Parker (third),
Walter Southerland (fifth).
50 yard dash: Lee MacNeil
(fourth).
ECU-FIorida State Swimming Results
1(1 by winning theii fourth
consecutive game improves to 6
overall and 2-0 in the I At
South
fan 12, 1985
The I adv Pirates used their
running game and "dynamite"
lull-court pressure defense to
defeat William & Mary 86-5" in
their EC AC South opener.
ECU, who has now won three
games in a row, shot 54 percen!
from the field while limiting
William &. Mary to just 43 per-
cent .
The Lady Pirates pressure
defense also forced the Indians
into 22 turnovers and disrupted
their offense throughout the
game.
ECU never trailed in the con
test, and led at the half 46-29
Lady Pirate coach Emily Man
waring attributed much of her
team's success to their ability to
run their fastbreaking style ol
fense.
"We beat them down the court
for some easy scores Manwar-
ing said. "We had 2 fast brea
and scored on 16 of them
The Lady Pirates were led in
scoring by Lisa Squirewell's 21
points.
Squirewell, who has not been
as productive coming off the
bench the past three games as she
was earlier in the season, had he-
best effort as a reserve hitting her
first six attempts from I
and nine of 12 foi � ime
In addition to
points, Squirewell connected
three ol five ol her shooting
tempts from the line and pulled
down eight rebounds
I orainc foster also, sh
for the I ady Pirates hitting
oi rntie shots from the field I
both of her free '
r 14
nts
Anita Ander- ed
consistent play for II netting
12 points This w
eighth consecutive game i
ble figures for E I an I tei tl I
the sea
Monique Pompili,
her fine play pulling down I
bounds while .
points
lvia Bragg
floor game hitting I
shots from the field, while
. : � � .
it four a
v illiam & Mary
ring by Bridget Kea I
tits, while Debbie !
2 a
With -ne loss, � g V-
drops to 1-10 '� �
the E M South
The I ady P
everyone or: the i bei I e �
' � injured Jod Rodnque;
?ed � 5 and 1
the con:
Tribe Downs ECU
In ECAC Contest
By SCOTT COOPER
stiff u rim
In an ECAC South t
Keith Cieplicki red 21 nt
in leading William & Mary I a
67-53 victory over ECl Satui
night in Minges iliseum.
Cieplicki, a two-time
ECAC South selection and an
Academic All-America scored 15
second half points to finish vt
25 for the game. Junior guard
Scott Coval chipped in 14 points
by hitting all six of his shots from
the field and converting on two
free throw attempts. Kevin
i 2 5
wit 11:3 e

& Mar. text
. : point
The Pira
ng back bel ng ol
cutting
2 � vith 4:5
8
V I I
ini .i 2 !
ter a
Wil : fe Ma . ;2 22 - :
lead
" thought that we were prepared going into the
game they kicked our butts on the inside. "
�C harlie Harrison
Richardson was the only other
Indian in double figures with 14.
Herb Harris scored eight points
and grabbed a game-high eight
rebounds.
The William k Marv victory
marked their seventh straight win
over the Pirates. ECU'S last vic-
tory over the Indians came during
the '8182 season, 61-58.
ECL Coach Charlie Harrison
knew his team would have to be
ready to play with William &
Mary. "I thought that we were
prepared going into the game
ECU coach Charlie Harrison
said. "All ten of our guys played
and all made gross mistakes. I
messed up somewhere in getting
them ready, and I take the blame
for it
The Pirates lacked scoring
from their big men, and Harrison
felt that was the primary reason
for the loss. "They kicked our
butts on ihe inside Harrison
said. "Their inside game com-
pletely shut ours down
Harrison credited William &
Mary for their play. "They pro-
tected the basket very well Har-
rison explained. "They're good
shooters and play intelligent
basketball
A large crowd of 4,358 were on
hand to see ECU battle the In-
dians. However, the Pirates
started out slowly scoring just
four points in the first eight
minutes of play. Kevin Richard-
son's layup gave William & Mary
a 10-4 lead with 12:41 remaining
in the first half.
1-meter diving: Sequin (FS)
318.00; Lehman (FS) 309.00;
Scott Eagle (EC) 304.00.
200 butterfly: Barry (FS)
1:57.43; Durst (FS) 1:57.59;
Brockschmidt (EC).
100 freestyle: Pittelli (EC)
48.28; Summe (EC) (FS) 48.39;
Kaut (EC) 48.63.
200 backstroke: Kowalski (FS)
1:59.65; Hidalgo (EC) 2:01.46;
Acre (FS) 2:06.80.
500 freestyle: Halfacre (FS)
4:47.39; Cook (EC) 4:51.75;
Stratton Smith (EC) 4:53.10.
3-meter diving; Sequin (FS)
313; Lehman (FS) 28; Eagle
(EC) 266
200 breaststroke: LaPalme
(FS) 2:14.80; Hicks (EC) 2:17.67;
Frierberger (FS) 2:18.16
400 freestyle relay: FS
(Kowalski, Halfacre, Somino,
In the second half, EC I batt
ed William & Marv and cut
margin to eight points on tl
� ' occassions
Gra the lead to 34-26
15:30 remaining on a .ing
layup. Vand I and Ciep �
then traded scores. The
were able to cut the lead to e �
'� e lasi � me on a
Grady lav up with ; 4s
William & Marv v.ore
next nine points to break
game open, 430 mid
through the second half. The
closest E I could gel was 4 4
when Cradv banked in a ,
jumper with 9:16 remaining
From that point on, the Indians
maintained the lead and a
easilv 67-53.
Coach Harrison was disap
pointed with the Pirates" fast
breaking opportunities. "We
didn't get anything out of our
fast break Harrison sa
"When you hit on only one of 12
fast breaks, vou're no: going to
do too much "
For ECL, Vanderhorsl match-
ed Cieplicki with 25 points, w
Grady added 18
William & Mary ups its record
to 5-4 overall and 1-0 in EC-U
South conference play ECU
drops to 5-7 overall and 0-2 in
conference plav
The Pirates- next game will be
on Saturdav Jan. 19at7:30p.m .
when ECl travels to Richmond!
Va. to battle last vear's ECAC
South champions
Acre) 3:13.71.
Women's Result
400 medley relav FS
(Skerobiak, Bedard. Martneau
C.alhvan) 4:06 9
LOOO free McGregor (FS)
10.24.64; Scotia Miller 10:52.13
S� RESIT IS. Pagf 9
Drug
N-SH 11 I I
Big time I
to gain 'he
sought �
79th am i i
for dl .
M r
deeu
along � ' �
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N( A
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Bv IK ANSI
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If you
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Tidbits
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next week -
together "ow
Cong-
football sq
participated
Flag Football 1
I ouistana Th
ting E i an
well
� �
sUIMMIV, P(X)1 S
Memorial Pool
M-W-F "an 8
M-F 12 noon I -
M F
Sat I p.m
Minge Pool
M-W-F 8 p m
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m
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t Two
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om-
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wns ECU
Contest
.v Mai
a 25
� ��
Hoeer,
the next
B-6 ad-
i ar-
the margin
sn
remain-
ed and
e teams trad-
CovaJ sai � j 25
�� � a 3
ime
prepared going into the
butts on the inside. "
-Charlie Harrison
& Via I cut the
three
liam
14 2( Aith
Iri vins
: cki
rhe Pirates
eight
ne on a
1: 48 remain-
red the
eak the
4" : midway
nd half The
- could get was 47-34
� : in a short
remaining.
Indians
id and on
� i disap-
Pira es' fast
' � es "We
� ' of our
H said.
�ne of 12
are not going to
anderhorst match-
' c points, while
'� Mary ups its record
and 1-0 in ECAC
ference play. ECU
all and 0-2 in
u.e Pirates' next game will be
irda Jan 19 at 7:30 p.m
��els to Richmond,
�attle last year's ECAC
ampions
re) 3 n 71.
Women's Results
400 medley relay: FS
iSkerobiak, Bedard. Martneau
Gallivan) 4:06.95.
�00 free: McGregor (FS)
-4 64; Scotia Miller 10:52.13.
e RESULTS, Page 9
NASHVILLE, Tenn (UPI) -
Big-time football schools figure
10 gain the autonomy they've
sought for years at the NCAA's
"9th annual convention, where a
controversial plan to test athletes
for drug use also will be debated.
More than 1,000 delegates will
decide on Division I-A autonomy
along with 144 other items during
the three-day meeting which of-
ficially opened Monday. Before
the convention closes on Wednes-
day, delegates also are expected
to elect John R. Davis, faculty
epresentatie from Oregon
State, to the presidency of the
huge association.
Davis, a former secretary-
treasurer of the NCAA, is the
choice of the NCAA's
nominating committee to succeed
John Toner of Connecticut,
whose two-year term expires this
week
The nominating committee
i so has named Wilford S. Bailey
ol Auburn as its choice for
secretary-treasurer and Arliss L.
Roaden, president of Tennessee
Tech, as Division 1 vice-
president.
busy agenda includes
neetings of the College Football
ssociation and the newly
ited Presidential Commission,
which already has called a special
V -A convention next June in
New Orleans.
Intramurals
Bv JFANNETTF ROTH
Staff WiMm
s the participants of in-
tramural activities battle it out
for the Chancellor's Trophy,
many people choose to utilize the
rmal recreation program to
satsfy their recreational needs.
Faculty, staff and students can
swim, lift weights, heck out out-
door and sporting equipment,
and play basketball in Memorial
m.
With the onset of intramural
five-on-five basketball, free play
time in Memorial will be greatly
reduced. Although the weekends
will still be available. IRS basket-
ball will occupy all the space
MonThurs. from 3:45-10:30
o ensure that all visitors
eniov their play in the gym, a few
rules and regulations should be
adhered to: � Be sure to bring
your ECU student identification.
� leave all your valuables at
home
� No f
Debated
THE EAST CAROMMAN
JANUARY 15, 1985
Uli c
.curt play will be allow-
to the demand in the cold
weather.
our conduct, language and
actions will determine whether or
: you will be allowed to con-
tinue utilizing the facilities.
� n area is clearly marked for
:emale play. Follow all the rules
posted so the ladies can enjoy the
:civilities too.
The outdoor receation pro-
gram is providing an opportunity
tor all students to go horseback
riding each Thursday. A shuttle
van, leaving at 3:45 p.m will be
sent out to Jarman's stables bas-
ed on demand. The charge is five
dollars, two dollars off the nor-
mal price, for an uninterrupted
hour of riding. Individuals, small
groups and as many as 14 people
may register in advance and en-
joy the day on horseback. The
outdoor recreation center will
also provide a camping-
backpacking or canoe trip to fit
your needs. For more informa-
tion, call the outdoor recreation
center at 757-6911.
If you have a nomination for
either IRS Player of the Month or
Employee of the Month, come by
the intramural office. Give us the
person's name and why they
deserve the award. All nomina-
tions will be reviewed by the IRS
staff. Look for your non ination
in the next issue of Tennis Shoe
Tidbits.
Remember to register for
basketball this week. Video
games tournament and co-rec
roller hockey registration begins
next week so get your teams
together now.
Congratulations to the flag
football squad Bombsquad who
participated in the sixth annual
Flag Football Tournament in
Louisiana. Thanks for represen-
ting ECU and intramurals so
well.

M-W-F
M-F
M-F
Sat.
M-W-F
Sun.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
7 a.m8 a.m.
12 noon 1:30 p.m.
3:30-6:30 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
MJnges Pool
8 p.m9:30 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
In addition, the NCAA Coun-
cil will hear Florida's appeal of
its football probation. Florida,
which finished the 1984 season
with a 9-1-1 record and its first
Southeastern Conference title,
reportedly has been slapped with
a two-year ban on television and
bowl appearances and stripped of
10 scholarships per year for two
years.
The item dealing with
legislative autonomy for Division
IA, the major football-playing
schools, should be decided early.
Its defeat at last year's conven-
tion angered many I-A officials,
who threatened to bolt the
NCAA. Under terms of this
year's proposal, the 105 I-A
schools will vote independently
of the 176 Division I-AA and
I-AAA schools (who do not play
varsity football but do play Divi-
sion I in other sports in most mat-
ters).
Division I members whose
primary sport is basketball, such
as DePaul and Georgetown, have
historically resisted attempts at
I-A autonomy for fear the foot-
ball schools would use their
money and clout to upgrade their
basketball programs and become
dominant in both revenue-
producing sports.
"They wouldn't be able to
create their own basketball or
football championship said
Davis, who helped write the
legislation and has been lobbying
the I-AA and I-AAA schools to
support it. "In addition, they
won't be able to change squad
limits in basketball, or change the
size of their basketball coaching
staffs
Another proposal, which failed
last year but is expected to win
approval in Nashville, would
allow athletes to accept $1,900 in
federal assistance under the Pell
Grant program in addition to a
full athletic scholarship.
ECU Results
Continued From Page Fight
Hillencamp 10.56.
200 freestyle: Acre (FS)
1:57.58; Belew (FS) 1:58.75; Jen-
ny Pierson (EC) 2:02.11.
50 freestyle: Chris Holman
(EC) 26.02; Nancy James (EC)
26.10; Skrobiak (FS).
200 individual medley: Mar-
tineau (FS) 2:14.03; Prozzillo
(FS) 2:21.60; Caycee Poust (EC)
2:17.49.
1-meter diving: Alexander (FS)
257; Fuller (FS) 250; Lori Miller
(EC) 177.
100 butterfly: Russell (FS)
1;01.83; Roller (FS) 1:02.02;
Ellen McPherson (EC) 1:03.01.
100 freestyle: Holman (EC)
55.29; Martineau (FS) 56.11; Jen-
ny Pierson (EC) 56.14.
100 backstroke: Lori Liv-
ingston (EC) 1:03.21; Sterrett
(FS) 1:03.73; Poust (EC) 1:04.28.
500 freestyle: McGregor (FS)
5:17.25; Hayes (FS) 5:21.0; S.
Miller (EC) 5:24.35.
3-meter diving: Fuller (FS) 266;
O'Hern (FS) 257; L.Miller.
100 breaststroke: Bedard (FS)
1:09.85; Jess Feinberg (EC)
1:11.02; Joelle Ennis (EC)
1:11.13.
200 freestyle relay: EC (James,
Pierson, S.Miller, Holman)
1:41.78.
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Carglll
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenville, NC
758-4927
Si
FRANK'S PIZZA
LOCATED AT THE PLAZA
756-8798
l?ie0ute available
� "� s? l roFT"
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� pizza purchase j Any whole sub
, Exp. March 1, 1985 Exp. March 1, 1985
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Mon-Sat 6:00am- 2:30pm
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CALIFORNIA
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 15. 1985
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Generals Seek Flutie
NEW YORK (UPI) � The
New Jersey Generals, in their
negotiations to sign Doug Flutie,
reportedly offered the Boston
College star quarterback a four-
year, non-deferred deal worth
more than $5 million according
to the New York Times.
The Times, quoting unnamed
sources familiar with the talks,
said the United States Football
League team had gone beyond
any previous non-deferred money
offer ever made to a rookie foot-
ball player and were ready to pay
the Heisman Trophy winner
about $1.3 million a year.
Quarterback Steve Young of
the USFL's Los Angeles Express
has a contract worth an estimated
$5.5 million for four years, but
some of the money is deferred.
The non-deferred part of the con-
tract is worth about $4.2 million,
and the Generals' offer is said to
exceed that, the newspaper said.
Herschel Walker, the Generals'
star running back, is believed to
have the richest contract in pro
football on a yearly basis, averag-
ing about $1.3 million annually.
Walker, also a Heisman winner,
signed that contract as a second-
year pro, not as a rookie.
Flutie and his family were in
Japan where he played in Satur-
day night's Japan Bowl college
all-star game.
Flutie said Friday from Tokyo
that he had not spoken to his
agent, Bob Woolf, in two days
and did not know details of the
Generals' offer. But he said that
"if the contract is something I
feel the NFL can't compete
with then he would not wait for
the April 30 National Football
League draft.
Woolf said he could not make
a commitment to the Generals
until he discussed the proposal
with Flutie and that he wanted to
wait to see what the NFL would
do.
Woolf said he held all-night
negotiations ending Friday morn-
ing with General's President Jay
Seltzer in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
"They are impressive figures
Woolf said of the contract offer.
"However, I don't think the
USFL is going to let it stay on the
table forever. Donald Trump, the
General's owner, has said he
would not want the talks to go on
any later than the first week of
February
The Buffalo Bills own the right
to the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft
and are permitted to negotiate
with Flutie now. However, the
Bills said Friday they still have
not decided what they will do
with the pick.
"I'm trying to give the NFL an
equal chance Woolf told the
Times, "but it's tough to conduct
business this way. I know Doug is
going to ask where we stand in
the NFL. Some clubs are trying
to get the right to talk to us
Woolf declined to say what
teams were trying to trade up in a
deal to get the top pick from the
Bills.
STUDENTS 9? IT
MENS AND WOMENS OVERCOATS 9.95 up
TRENCH COATS
MEN'S SUIT VEST
SWEAT TOP'S,BOTTOMS,
AND JACK
NEW SHIPMENT OF SWEATERS
Gators Lose NCAA Appeal,
Face Three Year Probation
5.95
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1.95-3.95
5.95
FLANNEL SHIRTS
BUY 4, GET 1 FREE
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SPECIAL
MEN'S JACKETS (cord,plaid,tweed,solids) 9.95
FREE BUTTON DOWN SHIRT WITH EACH CO A T
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI) �
The Florida Gators have lost
their appeal to the NCAA Coun-
cil and will be placed on three
years probation, including being
barred from bowls and television
for at least the next two years.
NCAA President John L.
Toner of the University of Con-
necticut said Florida was being
penalized for violations that oc-
curred from 1979-1983 � viola-
FSU Defeats Pirates
By TONY BROWN
taff Witter
Florida State's powerful swim
teams once again demonstrated
their capabilities by sweeping
past the Pirates in a dual meet
Friday. The Seminoles took the
men's competition 71-41 and the
women's 68-44.
Although at a great disadvan-
tage against FSU due to the great
difference in financial funding,
ECU put up a great deal of
resistance and actually led
halfway through the men's com-
petition, aided by a large and en-
thusiastic crowd of Pirate fans.
Chris Pittelli continued to excel
for the Pirate men, winning the
50 and 100 freestyles. Freshman
Bruce Brockschmidt was the only
other individual winner for ECU
and also swam on the sole first
place medley team.
Chris Holman paced the Pirate
women with wins in the 50 and
100 freestyles and anchored the
first place 200 freestyle relay
team, while Lori Livingston was
the only other individual winner
for ECU, taking the 100
backstroke.
"We swam as fast as we
could said ECU coach Rick
Kobe. "Almost all our times were
ahead of our previous best. We
took four seconds off our best
400 medley time for the men and
beat Florida State.
"If we swim like that the rest
of the way, we should win most
of our remaining meets Kobe
added. "We're getting into com-
petition that is more on the same
scale as we are, so we're in good
shape for the rest of the season
The losses dropped the Pirate
men's mark to 3-3, while the
women fell to 2-3. Staunch
regional foe UNC-Wilmington
visits Minges Natatorium Satur-
day at 2 p.m.
ATHLETIC WORLD
Tiger Winter Clearance
All styles of TIGER Running Shoes
Marked 20 OFF
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FALL WARM LP SUITS Reduced up to 25
Athletic World
Carolina East Mall, Greenville 756-7550
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
&
Student Union Vice President
for the 1985 - 1986 Term
Any full time student can apply.
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: January 18, 1985
tions that led to the dismissal of
head football coach Charley Pell
after the third game of the 1984
season.
Toner said the third year of
probation regarding post-season
events and television appearances
would be suspended if the univer-
sity meets "prescribed monitor-
ing conditions that will require
written reports and periodic on-
site reviews of the university's
athletics program
WAUCi�c SUPER SPECIAL
WOMEN'S BLAZERS (some from 40's and 50's) 9.95
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Of course, JEANS, SHIRTS, CAR COATS, WINDBREAKERS,
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COIN AND RING MAN
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Recycled Estate Clothing From NYC, Boston, Philadelphia, etc.
CODvngnt 1985
Kroger sav on
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Jan 19, 1985
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KROGER HOMOGENIZED,
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 15, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 15, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.383
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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