The East Carolinian, January 8, 1985






3he
(Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
JVol.59 No.J9
Tuesday JMOM1 AJMflL
Greenville, NC.
Cifiuiatitfa UJttfl
Martin Seeks United Future
At Inauguration Ceremony
By GREG RIDEOUT
MaaaglB UH�
RALEIGH � James Grubbs
Martin became North Carolina's
65th governor Saturday, saying
that the "future calls us together
in a spirit of unity North
Carolina Supreme Court Chief
Justice Joseph Branch ad-
ministered the oath of office at
12:30 p.m and the 49-year-old
former Congressman officially
took charge of the state's highest
office from James B. Hunt Jr.
In an 18-minute speech, Martin
sought to heal the divisiveness
resulting from the recent bitter
election season. "For today we
are all Democrats, we are all
Republicans Today, we are all
North Carolinians, one united
state
Martin emphasized his com-
mitment to business. "I believe
deeply in our system of private
enterprise, based on traditional
principles of self-reliance the
new governor said. "Yes, 1 am
for business. We all should be �
that's where jobs come from
Martin stressed his concern for
North Carolina's traditional in-
dustries � textiles, furniture and
tobacco � saying "we must
make a special effort to cham-
pion their interests as they face a
rising level of subsidized competi-
tion from other nations. Martin
also recognized outgoing Gov.
Hunt's leadership in bringing
high-technology firms to the
state.
The pomp and circumstance of
the day, which included a
thundering 19-gun salute and the
flying over of three C- 130s and 14
helicopters, was lightened up by
laughter as Martin and the coun-
cil of state officials injected
humor into the affair. Martin,
only the second Republican
governor this century, jokingly
pointed out that former Gov.
James E. Holshouser, who was
sitting on the dias, would no
longer have an asterisk by his
name.
The inauguration of Martin
capped a Cinderella campaign
that capitalized on a bitter
Democratic gubernatorial
primary and a landslide re-
election win by Ronald Reagan.
The six-term congressman ran on
a conservative, pro-business plat-
form and indicated in his speech
his plans to remove "unique
taxes that impose a competitive
disadvantage on North Carolina
businesses and workers
The Iredell county resident
takes office from Hunt at a time
when the state Republican party
is at a zenith. The new governor
hopes to make his party com-
petitive with the Democrats in the
state. Martin's speech emphasiz-
ed this and the bipartisanship
necessary for Martin to get pro-
posals passed by the Democrats
in the General Assembly.
Martin said he, like his
predecessors, would be an
"education governor He stress-
ed the need to pay good teachers
more money. "We must carefully
develop incentives for excellence
that will win the confidence of
teachers: that the better they are
and the better they become, the
better they will be paid
The ECU Marching Pirates
played their copyright version of
the National Anthem during the
ceremonies, fulfilling a campaign
promise made by Martin during a
visit to ECU in July.
3ABY PATTERSON - ECU Photo L�o
Jim Martin was sworn in as the state's 65th governor Saturdav in Raleigh. The Kl Marching Pirate.
played at the inauguration, fulfilling a promise Martin made while visiting ECU last summer.
Financial A id Director
Retires After 20 Years
BvHAROLDJOYNER
l Nno E4Uor
After 20 years as ECU's first
financial aid director, Robert M.
Boudreaux is retiring.
Before cormug to ECU,
Boudreaux served 20 years in the
U.S. Marine Corps, retiring at
Cherry Point. He came to ECU
in 1965 and received his BS
Degree in Social Studies and later
his master's degree in Education.
Boudreaux said he enjoyed
helping students obtain financial
aid, knowing they would be able
to further their education. He
also said he enjoyed working with
the students and developing a
close relationship with them, as
well as with the various depart-
ments on campus. "The business
office, and in particular, Vice-
Chancellor Gil Moore, have
helped the financial aid office
tremendously. I really ap-
preciated their cooperation he
said
The financial aid office has
seen many changes during its 20
years on campus and Boudreaux
said there is more money today
for the student than 10 to 15 years
ago. Also, the amount of money
GARY PATTERSON - ECU Photo Lab
Marching Pirates Play It Up
Boudreaux
given out by the financial aid of-
fice has changed. Four years ago,
according to Boudreaux. students
relied on gifts of money to sup-
port their education. "Today,
more than half of the money
given out is through loans he
said.
The small staff has had to en-
See BOUDREAUX, Page 3
B HAROLD JOYNER
MU(ot Nrwi t dilor
One of newly-elected governor
James G. Martin's campaign pro-
mises was that if he was elected,
the LCI Marching Pirates would
plav at his inauguration. He kept
his promise and last Saturday
thousands of people across the
state saw and heard the ECU
Marching Pirates performing
beside Martin.
"This was probably the biggest
moment for the band in my four
years with them said Mike
Pollard, head drum major for the
Marching Pirates. "It was a big
honor for us to be asked and a
bigger thrill for us to be there
The band also received additional
exposure and many people got to
hear ECU's copyright version
of the National Anthem, he said.
The Marching Pirates en-
countered a small problem when
they were asked to cover for the
Charlotte Symphony, which
could not play due to the
weather. "We weren't the least
bit nervous Pollard said, "and
we winged it off with no pro-
blems The band was prepared,
as usual, and entertained the
crowd with various show music
performed during ECU football
games. "We always look out for
the unexpected Pollard said.
Martin was impressed with the
Marching Pirates when he visited
one of ECl "s football games, ac-
cording to Thomas Goolsby,
faculty advisor to the band.
"Gov. Martin ha always had
some music Goolsbj
aio "He was a tormer musician
for the Charlotte Symphony and
he has cor d arrang
music tor his church ! am g
the 1 -� �' � ' � I � - cv "s � s �
and I'm also realh prwud ol their
performan �
Pollard also said he was very
proud of the band's performance
and complimented them on the
their unity "We take pride in
being one big happy family. I am
glad they were able to partake in
this exciting eent
Major Attractions Committee Continues Search For Bands
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Srvi fAHor
Due to scheduling conflicts and
the unavailability of bands, the
ECU Major Attractions Commit-
tee is once again having difficulty-
booking a spring concert.
According to committee chair-
man Mike McPartland, bands
have been lined up to perform
twice, but have been unable to
sign contracts both times. The
latest band to back out is The
Kinks. McPartland said the band
was tentatively scheduled to per-
form Jan. 22, but due to travel
problems will not be able to per-
form then.
McPartland said booking a
band involves a great deal of ad-
vance planning. Minges Coliseum
must be available and many of
the open dates do not coincide
with the open dates for bands.
In addition, McPartland said,
the Major Attractions Committee
has a limited budget with which
to work. The last major concert
held at ECU was in October
1983. The Charlie Daniels Band
and Marshall Tucker performed
a less-than-successful concert,
leaving the committee with a
deficit of $13,545. This money
was taken out of the committee's
budget.
As a result, any expenditure
over the limited amount of
money available will have to be
approved by the Student Union
Programming Board, a process
McPartland says is also time-
consuming.
As an example of the problems
the committee has had,
McPartland said a number of
bands were pursued last semester.
"We tried Jimmy Buffet because
we had gotten a lot of positive
feedback from committees and
students, but when we tried to
book him, he had changed agen-
cies and his tour dates were not
available. We were ready to go
when that fell out from under
us he said.
"The Kinks were supposed to
be available for this month and
they were the number one choice
of the committee However, the
band did not want to travel from
Atlanta to perform on Jan. 22.
McPartland said whenever
there is a date scheduled, the
committee has to arrange to ob-
tain Minges Coliseum. "Ken
Karr and Bill Cain have done and
excellent job working with us
McPartland said. "Cain has
cancelled classes and practices to
try to work for the Kinks show
The Kinks will be available to
perform in February, but there
are problems with Minges being
booked for basketball games.
"Often the committee is in a
powerless position McPartland
said.
In addition, he said, "it's often
not a big incentive for a band to
come and play here when they
can get double the capacity in
Raleigh or Greensboro. Bands
aren't playing the college circuit
as much
The committee is currently
rock'n'roll oriented, McPartland
said, "but we haven't turned
away from other alternatives. We
need to get a top band in to
sat isf y a majority of the
students
The major problem,
McPartland said, lies with out-
side factors, such as the fees
charged by bands. He also said
that "if the next show is not a
success, I can't see how the com-
mittee can keep going � we're
not in a position to lose money.
"It's frustrating to get psyched
for a concert and for it to fall
through, but I don't give up
hope he said.
Emory Seeks $431,000; Negotiations Resume This Week
By RANDY MEWS
Stats EHor
Negotiations are scheduled to
resume this week involving more
than $431,000 former ECU head
football coach Ed Emory is seek-
ing in salary and benefits from
the university.
Emory, who was fired Dec. 10
with three years remaining on his
contract, said the figure was very
conservative and did not include
money he could have made from
his football camp or "the damage
they have done to me, my family
and my profession
Emory's lawyer, Marvin
Blount of Greenville, came up
with the $431,000 figure after
disputing a letter Emory received
from ECU Chancellor John
Howeil on how the contract
would be settled.
Howeil said the contract pro-
vided that if Emory was fired, the
university would continue to pay
the full amount of his salary if he
remained unemployed, or an
amount that would make his
monthly income equal his current
salary if he took a job paying
less.
Emory also had the option of
taking a lump sum of $50,000 on
Jan. 31, 1985. However, he also
found that option unacceptable.
Although Howell's letter pro-
vided Emory with the salary he
would have received had he not
been fired, Blount said there were
"consequential damages" that
were not covered by the contract.
The following is a breakdown
of the amount Blount says Emory
is entitled to over the next three
years:
� $156,000 in salary.
� $144,000 for Emory's televi-
sion show.
� $45,000 to buy out the remain-
ing years of Emory's state retire-
ment fund so that he can draw
full benefits from the system.
� $40,500 for two University-
owned vehicles which Emory us-
ed.
� $15,660 for the continuation of
Emory's present medical in-
surance plan.
� $13,950 for speaking
engagements.
� $7,800 for radio fees.
� $3,000 for commercials with
Nike shoe company and Wilson
sporting goods.
� $2,700 for club dues.
� $2,658 for reimbursements
from a coaching clinic Emory an-
nually attended.
The salary and benefits total
$431,268, although Blount said
University lawyer Dave
Stevens said the school
does plan on buying out
Emory s contract, but
Blount warns if an
acceptable amount is not
offered, "we will file a
lawsuit
the figure could be used to
negotiate a possible settlement.
University lawyer Dave Stevens
said the school does plan on buy-
ing out Emory's contract, but
Blount warns if an acceptable
amount is not offered, "we will
file a lawsuit
Negotiations are expected to
last for several weeks due to the
enormous difference between the
amount Emory is seeking and
that offered by the university.
But in the meantime, many
observers are still wondering why
Emory was fired.
Proponents of the former ECU
graduate said Emory was given
no warning, no opportunity to
defend himself and no explana-
tion for the action. In fact,
Emory himself said he was given
every assurance two months ago
by Tom Bennett, board of
trustees member and athletic
committee chairman, that his
position was secure.
"Tom Bennett came to see me
after the Southern Mississippi
game (ECU's last game of the
season) and said everything was
fine Emory explained. "He
said he just wanted to share his
support and wished me well in
recruiting
Emory compiled a 26-29 record
during his five years at the Pirate
helm and had been given a con-
tract extension after the 1983
season when he posted an 8-3
record and vaulted his team into
the Top 20.
This year, however, ECU con-
cluded their worst season in more
that a decade by falling to 2-9,
but university officials emphasiz-
ed that the record had little to do
with Emory's dismissal.
The decision to actually fire
Emory came as a result of
meetings between Howeil,
Athletic Director Ken Karr and
the five-member athletic commit-
tee of the board of trustees. The
athletic committee originally
made the recommendation to fire
Emory, and two weeks later the
action was carried out in the form
of a prepared statement issued by
Howeil:
"After considering the current
status of our football program
and contemplating the future of
that program, we have decided to
make a personnel change in the
head football coaching position.
Consequently we have met with
Coach Ed Emory and terminated
his services as head football
coach
See Sports, Page 13
Emorv
On The inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features9
Classifieds12
Sports13
f





THIr EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, IS8S
Announcements
Sigma Phi Epsilon
T h� brothers ana golden hearts ot Sigma Phi
Epsilon would lih.e to extend a cordial mvlta
tion to anyone interested in attending our
rush parties on Jan 7 23 We are located at
�5 E 5th st across from the Jenkins art
building Please teel tree to drop by the
house any time betorehand and meet us
because we re looking forward to meeting all
ot you 752 N4l or 752 4502
ECU Biology Club
AH btoloby club members and prospects
please mark your calender (or Von Jan
Uth Please note that our meetings nave
been changed to Mon nights so as to
facilitate larger attendance and fewer con
tlicts with other campus organnations The
meeting will be held in room BN 102 m the
biology building at 7 00 p m Our featured
speaker will be a representative o the Lions
Club who will give a presentation on how to
become an organ donor Members first of
'he semester attendance is a must
Public Safety
& Traffic Services
II s anticipated that the Department of
Public Safety anc Traffic Services will move
from the Howard Mouse 1001 east fifth st , to
the large white house at 409 east 10th st dur
ng the period Dec 17 31 I9&4
At this time it s planned that the Traffic
Serves ottice will open tor business as
usual on Jan 2, 1985 at the new location
However ndividuais may experience some
difficulty in contacting the office by
telephone until about Jan 15 i85
Comunn. aions and some police operations
will remain at the Howard House until a new
communication center is completed at the
10th street location
Your cooperation is solicited
ECU Frisbee Club
The ECU frisbee club and the intimate
"ates pla frisbee every Tues and Thurs
af 3 the bottom of college hill drive Anybody
?hat hkes to play frisbee -s welcome to ioin
Ski Snowshoe
Spring Break
Beginners mbetweeners and hofdog
gers one and all enroll In Phye 1150 begin
nlng snowsklngi and spend your spring
break on the slopes at Snowshoe West Va
having the time ot your lit learning to �kl. or
sign up for Phye 1152 (advanced) There's a
course tor all levels There will be an
organizational meeting on Jan 8 at 4 p m In
memorial gym room lot tor all Interested
persons Non credit participants are
welcome aboard also Come see the slide
show register for the trip and talk sklng with
your buddies Contact Ms Jo Saunders at
757 4000 memorial gym 205 for more Infor
mation
Community Calendar
Fri Jan 11 Film "Not a Love Story 7 p m
in Gross Chemistry Auditorium at Duke
University Sat , Jan 12 Symposium "Is
There a Relationship Between Pornography
and Sexual Violence"
Both events sponsored by Pornography
Awareness Inc In cooperation with Duke
University Women's Studies Program
Event ij free open to the public over age 18
Episcopal Worship
A student Episcopal service of Holy Commu
nion will be celebrated on Tuesday evening,
Jan 8 m the chapel of St Pauls Episcopal
Church 404 4fh st lone block from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5 30 p m with
the episcopal Chaplain the Rev Bill Had
den celebrating Supper will follow
n Be there or be oblong
Alcohol and Drug Program
Help promote responsible drinking1 Becor-ie
a part of CADP The firs' meeting of the IM ��
,ear will beg- a' t c " on Thurs Jan :0.
n Erwin Hall roorn ;18 All interested per
sons please a"ena
Haircuts
Only IS by Heas up Wed Jan 9 and Thurs
Jan 10 from 4pm to 8 p m in room 205 at
the Allied Health Building sponsored by the
East Carolina Student Committee Occupa
fionai Therapy Assoc All proceeds go to the
United Cerebral Palsy Telethon
IFC
There will be an IFC meting Tues Jan 8th at
5 m ttie Mendenhail multi purpose room The
main topic of discussion will be rush All
fraternity presidents and representatives
must attend
Student
Homecoming Committee
The Student Homecoming Committee is
responsible for planning, promoting, and
presenting the annual Homecoming ac
tlvltles This festival of events Is one of the
largest programs happening at the Unlversl
ry each year Among the responsibilities of
the committee are the following securing
bands for the parade, conducting the parade,
arranging half time activities �; the football
game, securing iudges for the floats and
house and residence hall decorations, and
presenting entertainment
The Student Homecoming chairperson Is
the individual who has overall responsibility
tor Homecoming Students interested In be
Ing considered for the position ot Student
Homecoming Committee Chairperson amy
pick up application forms at either MSC In
formation desk or the Taylor Slaughter
Alumni Center The deadline for applying for
this position is Jan 28
Honors Seminars
All faculty members (and Honors students)
are reminded that the deadline tor submit
ting proposals for Honors Seminars for fall
semester 195 Is Mon , Jan 14 Proposals
should be made on a form similar to that us
ed for course proposals, stating objectives.
texts, and requirements Interdisciplinary
topics are encouraged Honors students have
requested a seminar in the 1940s If any
faculty are interested in teaching such a
seminar, contact David Sanders, 212
Ragsdale(6373)
Phi Sigma Pi
Congratulations Phi pledge class' New
brothers Inducted Fall. 1984. are Leigh Ann
Doub, Clara Ellis, Kathryn Llndsley Melody
O'Brien, and Leann weeks Great job guys!
Navigators
Check It out The navigators investigative
bible study and fellowship Brewster D wing,
room 202. every Tues , 7 30 p m .beginning
Jan 8th
Presidential Parlez- Vous
LES TODD - ECU News Bureau
SGA President John Rainey met with INC system President William Fridav at a recent meeting held
at ECU. Friday will retire this summer and the search has begun for a successor.
Need A Book?
See Page 7
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Corner 10th & Dickinson Avc
We Buy Gold & Silver
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All Transact inns Confidential
Buy�Sell�Trade
752-0322 5Ls!faiJ"s!r
Professor, Student
Chosen For Seminar
ARTHUR MERRILL McGLAUFLIN
ATTORNEY AT LAW
:WI rRAFFIC OFFENSES
t�LD SUPPORT AND CUSTODY
KPARATION AGREEMENTS
RESIDENTIAL LOAN CLOSINGS
PERSONA! INJMRY&
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757-1055
101 W. 14th St. Greenville, NC
MASTERCARD VISA ACCEPTED
t ees u
�in
I l ! V� H
A School of Business professor
and an ECU senior majoring in
management have been selected
to participate in the annual Beta
Gamma Sigma national seminars
which bring together the nation's
top business school faculty and
students for intensive study.
Selected from ECU's School of
Business are Dr. Edward W.
Wheatley, professor and chair of
the Department of Marketing,
and Joan Gillette, a management
major in the School of Business.
Beta Gamma Sigma is the na-
tional scholastic honor society in
the field of business and manage-
ment, with 225 chapters and a
membership in excess of 205,000.
Membership is an honor which
must be earned through
scholastic achievement. Only
schools which are accredited by
the American Assembly of Col-
legiate Schools of Business are
eligible to operate a Beta Gamma
Sigma chapter and nominate
faculty and students for member-
ship.
Each year out of approximate-
ly 25,000 business school faculty
members only 10 are selected to
participate in the national
seminars. Faculty participants
are selected by the National Pro-
grams Committee from nomina-
tions submitted by Beta Gamma
Sigma chapters, deans of chapter
schools, and members of the
Board of Governors of Beta
Gamma Sigma. Attention is
given to the faculty member's
present position, education, pro-
fessional and scholarship record,
noteworthy program a p -
pearances, research projects, and
publications, and to the faculty
member's proposed seminar
topic and evaluation of its
significance and timeliness.
Student competition is equally-
intense. Thi year 52 students
were selected nationally from the
over 225 Beta Gamma Sigma
chapters. Each Beta Gamma
Sigma chapter is eligible to
nominate one member student
with the approval of the Dean.
Selection of student participants
by the National Programs Com-
mittee of Beta Gamma Sigma is
based upon scholastic achieve-
ment and consideration among
the major fields of study, and a
desire to involve chapters which
have not been represented in
prior seminars.
The 1984 November Seminars
will bring together in Orlando,
Fla and San Diego, Calif Beta
Gamma Sigma student members
and outstanding Beta Gamma
Sigma faculty members for a
three-day program. The seminars
focus on concepts and research
findings on topics which are not
only contemporary and signifi-
cant, but will continue to play an
important role in determining the
actions of managers in the future.
These issues reflect a broad spec-
trum of disciplines and interests
represented by the faculty and
student participants. The size of
each of the seminars is limited by-
design to allow for maximum
participation and interchange.
Dr. Wheatley' s seminar
presentation will be entitled
"Should Professionals Market?
Ethical and Operational Con-
siderations for the 1980's
"Joan Gillette and I are
grateful to School of Business
Dean Ernest B. Uhr and Dr.
James H. Bearden, Assistant to
the Chancellor and Director of
BB&T Center for Leadership
Development, for their informa-
tion and support during the com-
petitive selection process. Dr.
Bearden's experience and visibili-
ty as national treasurer for Beta
Gamma Sigma were extremely-
helpful in preparing the seminar
proposal. It is a privilege for
Joan and me to represent East
Carolina University and the
School of Business in this na-
tional setting
m
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Just like ECU Ookwooa Henrys has been
a part of the growth of GreenvWie ana eastern
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� the hallmark oi two great institutions 8o'h
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ECU
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THERE INN
LS floorescent sweats hooded sweats LS T-S
ON DISPLAY AT MARSH'S
east Carolina
dinixig service
- COLLEGE HILL
DINING HALL
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SNACK BAK,
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�m � m m �
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Grad Studen
To Central Aj
B.JKSMIKHJKNDHASIAK
Vr�� Kiiu,
Saving lives of residents along
the Nicaraguan-Honduran
border and affecting ! s foreign
policy are two of the goals of an
ECU student spending this
semester in S . . a, a par.
ticipant in the s itness for Pr
program
Mike Hamc: d graduate stu-
dent in the Department of
hnglish, will be ipend ng :he next
six months in Nicaragua w�th the
program, ivhid he Cid was
started in the wnen
members of the American clerg
visited Nicaragua to
tion along the ; :Cr
"The Nicaraguan people said
that while the Amei -ere
there, the contra -n't
coming a � :er and
killing an- r blowing
libraries a:
ed the Amei
Hamer said
Hamer work w ave t�
facets, he
sin,
presence and monitoring
on the border
Finitely not be the fur, par
he said, adding
members have
discover :tin
Hamer other pui -
share his experien
"I hope � . lowi
i
intei
Boudreaux
Reflects On
ECU Career
( ontinued trom Pae One
counter mans students seek .
financial aid. Some
he said, "don't unde- a
the financial aid office has
follow certain federal regula-
tions. A stuaent � financial re-
quest may be denied, dimply
because of some regulation
Students who think they may
qualify, but don't, often become
very upset, Boudreaux said. "We
ply explain the situation and
-emulations to them and give
hem our sympathies Most of the
-tudents u; re's
always a few who d
Currenth
ment proposa I
the amount oi fina
dent can receive each
Boudreaux -ad he fee
not affect ECL a mucl
private universities "Be
tuition is often highei
universities than a: pur
he said, "the studi
have to receive monej
to help defray the cosi
tion if this prop
Boudreaux said he
everyone to apply �pe
of financial aid during
iege career "Some, stud
no idea thev qua � I
assistance and bv no: tn i
they'll never know
Boudreaux
mediate plan- foi
but is enjoving the res
vear- of work He hit
may find some part-time e
ment to keep him occupie
right now, I've got mv ey�
couple of fishing poles and 1
to make full use of then
soon he said
Boudreaux was presented with
a plaque in appreciation oi h 5
vears of service at a recent s
meeting of the Divisi
dent L lfe. Dr Elmer Mever. Jr .
vice chancellor for Student I
said, "for 20 vears he ha- g
much of his h'e to the complex
financial aid needs of
students V e wish he would stav.
but we are grateful for the manv
years of outstanding -ervice he
has rendered to the univerMtv and
its students
Meyer said Karen Barbee.
long-time assistant dire-
Student Financial Aid. would
serve as acting director until a
successor to Boudreaux is named
Read
The
Classifieds
HI
teres
mg
"If
nectl
cessj
if y

tha
that
is ml
hunj
H
Met
Har
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-


I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, 1985
Announcements
Sigma Phi Epsilon
The brother ano golden heart ot Sigma Phi
Epsilon would UKe to enteno a cordial invlta
tion to anyone Interested in attending our
rush parties on Jan 21 23 We are located at
SOS E 5th st across trom the Jenkins art
building Please teei tree to drop by the
house any time beforehand and meet us
because we re looking forward to meeting all
of you 7S2 2�41 or 757 6502
ECU Biology Club
AH bloloby club members and prospects
olease mark your calender tor Mon Jan
14th Please note that our meetings have
been changed to Mon nights so as to
facilitate larger attendance and fewer con
flicts with other campus organuations The
meeting will be held in room BN 102 in the
biology building at t 00 p m Our featured
speaker win be a representative of the Lions
Club who will give a presentation on how to
become an organ donor Members first of
the semester attendance is a must
Public Safety
& Traffic Services
it is anticipated that the Department of
Public Safety ano Traffic Services will move
trom the Howard House 1001 east fifth st, to
me large white house at 409 east loth st dur
ing the period Dec 17 31 194
At this time it is planned that the TraHic
Services office will open for business as
usual on Jan 2. I9&5 at the new location
However individuals may enperience some
difficulty m contacting the office by
telephone until about jan 15 1915
Comunications and some police operations
will remain at the Howard House until a new
communication center is completed at the
10th street location
Your cooperation is solicited
ECU FrisbeeClub
The ECU fnsbee club ano the Ultimate
rates play fnsbee every Tues ano Thurs
a' 3 the bottom of college hill dr ve Anybody
?hat hkes to piav trisbee s welcome to ioin
In Be there or be oblong
Alcohol and Drug Program
neip promote responsible drinking1 Becopie
a part of CADP The first meeting of the new
rear will begin at 4 p m on Thurs , Jan 10.
n Erwm Hall room 218 AM interested per
sons please attend
Ski Snowshoe
Spring Break
Beginners mbetweeners and hotdog
gers one and all enroll in Phye 1150 i begin
nlng snowtklngi and spend your spring
break on the slopes at Snowshoe West Va
having the time of your lite learning to ski. or
sign up tor Phye 1152 (advanced) There's a
course tor all levels There will be an
organizational meeting on Jan I at 4 p m In
memorial gym room lot for all Interested
persons Non credit participants are
welcome aboard also Come see the slide
show register tor the trip and talk sking with
your buddies Contact Ms Jo Saunders at
757 �000 - memorial gym 205 tor more Intor
mation
Community Calendar
Fn Jan 11 Film "Not a Love Story' 7 p m
in Gross Chemistry Auditorium at Duke
University Sat Jan 12 Symposium "Is
There a Relationship Between Pornography
and Sexual violence"
Both events sponsored by Pornography
Awareness, Inc in cooperation with Duke
University Women's Studies Program
Event is free open to the public over age II
Episcopal Worship
A student Episcopal service of Holy Commu
nion arid be celebrated on Tuesday evening,
jan 8 in the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th st (one block from Garrett
Dorml The service will be at 5 � p m with
'he episcopal Chaplain, the Rev Bill Had
dec celebrating Supper will follow
Haircuts
Only 15 by Heads up Wed Jan 9 and Thurs
Jan 10 from 4pm toBpm in room 205 at
the Allied Health Building sponsored by the
East Carolina Student Committee Occupa
tional Therapy Assoc All proceeds go to the
United Cerebral Palsy Telethon
IFC
There will bean IFC meting Tues Jan �m at
5 in the Mendenhali multi purpose room The
main topic of discussion will be rush All
fraternity presidents and representatives
must attend
Student
Homecoming Committee
The Student Homecoming Committee Is
responsible for planning, promoting, and
presenting the annual Homecoming ac
tlvltles This festival of events Is one of the
largest programs happening at the Unlversl
ty each year. Among the responsibilities of
the committee are the following: securing
bands tor the parade, conducting the parade,
arranging half time activities aj (he football
Bame, securing iudges for the floats and
house and residence hall decorations, and
presenting entertainment
The Student Homecoming chairperson Is
the Individual who has overall responsibility
for Homecoming Students Interested In be
ing considered for the position of Student
Homecoming Committee Chairperson amy
pick up application forms at either MSC In
formation desk or the Taylor Slaughter
Alumni Center The deadline tor applying tor
this position Is Jan 28
Honors Seminars
All faculty members (and Honors students)
art reminded that the deadline for submit
ting proposals for Honors Seminars for fall
semester I9�5 Is Mon , Jan 14 Proposals
should be made on a form similar to that us
ed for course proposals, stating objectives,
texts, and requirements. Interdisciplinary
topics are encouraged Honors students have
requested a seminar in the 1960s It any
faculty are interested In teaching such a
seminar, contact David Sarders, 212
Ragsdale(6373)
Phi Sigma Pi
Congratulations Phi pledge class1 New
brothers Inducted Fall. 1984. are Leigh Ann
Doub, Clara Ellis. Kathryn Llndsley. Melody
O'Brien, and Leann weeks Great iob guys!
Navigators
Check It out: The navigators Investigative
bible study and fellowship Brewster D wing,
room 202, every Tues , 7 30 p m beginning
Jan tth
Presidential Parlez- Vous
LES TODO - ECU News Bureau
SGA President John Rainey met with UNC system President William rrida at a recent meeting held
at ECU. Friday will retire this summer and the search has bejjun for a succevsor.
Need A Book?
See Page 7
Professor, Student
Chosen For Seminar
ARTHUR MERRILL McGLAUFLIN
ATTORNEY AT LA W
OWI TRAFFIC OFFENSES
� CHILD SUPPORT AND CUSTODY
� SEPARATION AGREEMENTS
RESIDENTIAL LOAN CLOSINGS
PERSONAL INJURY
PROPERTY DAMAGE
rifvihlf
Orfkr- Ho.
757-1055
101 W. 14th St. Greenville. NC
MASTERCARD VISA ACCEPTED
Fees upon
Request
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS
All Transactions Confidential
Buy�Sell�Trade
Stereos 757-01?? Musical Instr
Televisions 'fwzn 35mm Cameras
Cassette Tapes Hn-wmm m�i Bicycles
EC! Nrw Bureau
A School of Business professor
and an ECL' senior majoring in
management have been selected
to participate in the annual Beta
Gamma Sigma national seminars
which bring together the nation's
top business school faculty and
students for intensive study.
Selected from ECU's School of
Business are Dr. Edward W.
Wheatley, professor and chair of
the Department of Marketing,
and Joan Gillette, a management
major in the School of Business.
Beta Gamma Sigma is the na-
tional scholastic honor society in
the field of business and manage-
ment, with 225 chapters and a
membership in excess of 205,000.
Membership is an honor which
must be earned through
scholastic achievement. Only
schools which are accredited by
the American Assembly of Col-
legiate Schools of Business are
eligible to operate a Beta Gamma
Sigma chapter and nominate
faculty and students for member-
ship.
Each year out of approximate-
ly 25,000 business school faculty
members only 10 are selected to
participate in the national
seminars. Faculty participants
are selected by the National Pro-
grams Committee from nomina-
tions submitted by Beta Gamma
Sigma chapters, deans of chapter
schools, and members of the
Board of Governors of Beta
Gamma Sigma. Attention is
given to the faculty member's
present position, education, pro-
fessional and scholarship record,
noteworthy program ap-
pearances, research projects, and
publications, and to the faculty
member's proposed seminar
topic and evaluation of its
significance and timeliness.
Student competition is equally
intense. This year 52 students
were selected nationally from the
over 225 Beta Gamma Sigma
chapters. Each Beta Gamma
Sigma chapter is eligible to
nominate one member student
with the approval of the Dean.
Selection of student participants
by the National Programs Com-
mittee of Beta Gamma Sigma is
based upon scholastic achieve-
ment and consideration among
the major Fields of study, and a
desire to involve chapters which
have not been represented in
prior seminars.
The 1984 November Seminars
will bring together in Orlando,
Fla and San Diego, Calif Beta
Gamma Sigma student members
and outstanding Beta Gamma
Sigma faculty members for a
three-day program. The seminars
focus on concepts and research
findings on topics which are not
only contemporary and signifi-
cant, but will continue to play an
important role in determining the
actions of managers in the future.
These issues reflect a broad spec-
trum of disciplines and interests
represented by the faculty and
student participants. The size of
each of the seminars is limited by
design to allow for maximum
participation and interchange.
Dr. W'heatley's seminar
presentation will be entitled
"Should Professionals Market?
Ethical and Operational Con-
siderations for the 1980's
"Joan Gillette and I are
grateful to School of Business
Dean Ernest B. Uhr and Dr.
James H. Bearden, Assistant to
the Chancellor and Director of
BB&T Center for Leadership
Development, for their informa-
� and support during the com-
petitive selection process. Dr.
Bearden's experience and visibili-
ty as national treasurer for Beta
Gamma Sigma were extremely
helpful in preparing the seminar
proposal. It is a privilege for
Joan and me to represent East
Carolina University and the
School of Business in this na-
tional setting
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
Combination Special:
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FF or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw & Hush Puppies - $3.
105 Airport Road 7584)327
NAUTILUS
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758-9564
Let Nautilus of Eastern Carolina
Get Your Body In Shape For Summer!
OUR GYM HAS:
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A Complete Nautilus Circuit
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Tuesday 1000am -1000pm
Wednesday 1000am - 1000pm
Thursday 1000am -900pm
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RATES:
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� Ask About Our Group Rates "
Add S50 00 For Semester ot Unlimited Aerobtcs
'or men and womer
i�l I . . -a run
Bring This Add For A
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in Aerobics
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and $5.00 Off Semester
Membership
o
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m
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Just like ECU OokwooO Homes has been
o part of the growth oi Greenville and eastern
North Carolina for years, Quality and service
- the hallmark of two great institutions �' Both
helping friends to a better life
o
II
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527 w. 21 St. Norfolk Va. 23517
(804) 627-2068 622-1861
C O
Jim Crowley
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Scott Hall 415 C
ECU
752-9092 or 752-6159
is our
SUBTECT
east Carolina
K 9
.0V
THERE INN
LS floorescent sweats hooded sweats LS T-S
ON DISPLAY AT MARSH'S
dining service
- C0LLEGElttLL
DINING HALL
- MENDENHALL
SNACK BAR
- BUFFET DINING
- GALLEY
- CATERING
T
mmm
Grad Studen
To Central
B JENNIFER JKNDRAS1AK
Saving lives of residents along
the Nicaraguan-Honduran
border and affecting U.S. foreign
policy are two of the goals of an
ECU student spending this
semester in Nicaragua as a par-
ticipant in the Witness for Peace
program
Mike Hamer, a graduate stu-
dent in the Department of
English, will be spending the next
six months in Nicaragua with the
program, which he said was
started in the fall of 1983 when
members of the American clerg
visited Nicaragua to observe ac-
tion along the Honduran border
"The Nicaraguan people said
that while the Americans were
there, the contra-rebels weren't
coming across the border and
killing anybody or blowing up
libraries and schools, so they ask-
ed the American: to come back
Hamer said
Hamer's work will have two
facets, he said The first will be
simply appearing as a non-violen:
presence and monitoring atta.
on the border "This
definitely not be the fun par-
he said, adding that some .
members have been the first to
discover victims � cf atta
Hamer's other purpose will be to
share his experience with others
upon his return to the states.
"I hope to go down as a
reporter with an open mind and
interview a lot of people he
said.
Boudreaux
Reflects On
ECU Career
Continued from Page One
counter many students seeking
financial aid. "Some students
he said, "don't understand that
the financial aid office has to
follow certain federal regula-
tions. A student financial re-
quest may be denied, simply
because of some regulation
Students who think they may
qualify, but don't, often become
very upset, Boudreaux said. "We
simply explain the situation and
regulations to them and give
them our sympathies. Most of the
students understand, but there'
always a few who don't
Currently, there is a govern-
ment proposal to place a limit on
the amount of financial aid a stu-
dent can receive each year
Boudreaux said he feels this will
not affect ECU as much as it will
private universities. "Because
tuition is often higher at private
universities than at public one-
he said, "the student is goinw
have to receive money elsewhere
to help defray the cost of ed
tion if this proposal is passec
Boudreaux said he encourage-
everyone to applv for some type
of financial aid during their col-
lege career "Some student have
no idea they qualify for finar.
assistance and bv not � j
they'll never know "
Boudreaux said he has no im-
mediate plans for his retiren
but is enjoying the rest after ?
years of work. He hinted that he
may find some part-time emplov-
ment to keep him occupied, "but
right now, I've got my eve on a
couple of fishing poles and 1 p
to make full use of them verv
soon he said.
Boudreaux was presented a
a plaque in appreciation of his
years of service at a recent stal
meeting of the Division of Stu-
dent Life. Dr Elmer Meyer. Jr .
vice chancellor for Student Life
said, "for 20 years he has given
much of his life to the complex
financial aid needs of ECU
students. We wish he would stay.
but we are grateful for the manv
years of outstanding service he
has rendered to the universitv and
its students
Meyer said Karen Barbee.
long-time assistant director of
Student Financial .Aid. would
serve as acting director until a
successor to Boudreaux is named
Read
The
Classifieds
?
�M
H
teres
ing
"It
nectl
cess
if y
! n�
that
that
is ml
hun
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Me)
Har
Mai,
bore
hosrj
Am
HI
volvl
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are
HI
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V






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, 1985
.v
iv at a
L6S TOOO - ECU Newi Bureau
revert! meeting held
hCoins4 Pawn
ft Dickinson Ave
Id A Silver
ASH LO A IN S
5 Confidential
I�Trade
322 Musical Instr
TZ1�35mm Cameras
Bicycles

IG SEAFOOD
Special:
& Deviled Crab
I otato,
usn Puppies - $3.99
758-0327
y
lOD HOMES
SUPPORTS
IATES AND
ROtlNA
o
d service
ions I Both
IRATES"
� � I
MES
e Svd 756 5434
our
rolina
service
E HILL
HALL
NHALL
IK BAR
DINING
LEY
:ring
y�iifttiinnwniM minm�ii i nuii
$

Grad Student Goes
To Central America
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Saving lives of residents along
the Nicaraguan-Honduran
border and affecting U.S. foreign
policy are two of the goals, of an
ECU student spending this
semester in Nicaragua as a par-
ticipant in the Witness for Peace
program.
Mike Hamer, a graduate stu-
dent in the Department of
English, will be spending the next
six months in Nicaragua with the
program, which he said was
started in the fall of 1983 when
members of the American clergy
visited Nicaragua to observe ac-
tion along the Honduran border.
"The Nicaraguan people said
that while the Americans were
there, the contra-rebels weren't
coming across the border and
killing anybody or blowing up
libraries and schools, so they ask-
ed the Americans to come back
Hamer said.
Hamer's work will have two
facets, he said. The first will be
simply appearing as a non-violent
presence and monitoring attacks
on the border. "This will
definitely not be the fun part
he said, adding that some groip
members have been the first to
discover victims of attacks.
Hamer's other purpose will be to
share his experiences with others
upon his return to the states.
"I hope to go down as a
reporter with an open mind and
interview a lot of people he
said.
Boudreaux
Reflects On
ECU Career
Continued from Page One
counter many students seeking
financial aid. "Some students
he said, "don't understand that
the financial aid office has to
follow certain federal regula-
tions. A. siuaem financial re-
quest may be denied, simply
because of some regulation
Students who think they may
qualify, but don't, often become
very upset, Boudreaux said. "We
simply explain the situation and
regulations to them and give
them our sympathies. Most of the
students understand, but there's
always a few who don't
Currently, there is a govern-
ment proposal to place a limit on
the amount of financial aid a stu-
dent can receive each year.
Boudreaux said he feels this will
not affect ECU as much as it will
private universities. "Because
tuition is often higher at private
universities than at public ones
he said, "the student is going to
have to receive money elsewhere
to help defray the cost of educa-
tion if this proposal is passed
Boudreaux said he encourages
everyone to apply for some type
of financial aid during their col-
lege career. "Some students have
no idea they qualify for financial
assistance and by not trying
they'll never know
Boudreaux said he has no im-
mediate plans for his retirement
but is enjoying the rest after 40
years of work. He hinted that he
may find some part-time employ-
ment to keep him occupied, "but
right now, I've got my eye on a
couple of fishing poles and I plan
to make full use of them very
soon he said.
Boudreaux was presented with
a plaque in appreciation of his
years of service at a recent staff
meeting of the Division of Stu-
dent Life. Dr. Elmer Meyer, Jr
vice chancellor for Student Life
said, "for 20 years he has given
much of his life to the complex
financial aid needs of ECU
students. We wish he would stay,
but we are grateful for the many
years of outstanding service he
has rendered to the university and
its students
Meyer said Karen Barbee,
long-time assistant director of
Student Financial Aid, would
serve as acting director until a
successor to Boudreaux is named.
Read
The
Classifieds
Hamer said he first became in-
terested in the program while do-
ing work to help feed the hungry.
"If you see clearly there is a con-
nection between political pro-
cesses and hunger then it's good
if you can do something about it.
I have a pretty deep conviction
that to affect political processes
that are repressive toward people
is more important than the actual
hunger work he said.
Following a month spent in
Mexico City studying Spanish,
Hamer will train for two weeks in
Managua and then be sent to a
border area where he will also
host visiting delegations of
Americans.
He stressed that the people in-
volved in the program are "not a
bunch of radical leftists, they are
mostly religious people who have
actually done work in Nicaragua
or other Central American
areas
Hamer said he also hopes to be
able to study the music of the
area, saying the arts are "very
alive" in Nicaragua. "I'm very
anxious to shed light on the situa-
tion as a writer and a musician
he said.
Some of Hamer's experiences
" appear in a column in The
East Carolinian this spring.
Mendenhall10 till honr
10th and College Hill5 till hour
College Hill4 till hour
Mlngeson the hour
Allied Health3 after hour
Greenville Square5 after hour
The Plaza6 after hour
Farm Fresh11 after hour
Kroger13 after hour
Hargett Drags17 after hour
Cannon Court24 after hour
Eastbrook25 after hour
River Bluff29 after hour
King's Row26 till hour
Village Green24 till hour
Memorial Gym22 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hour
Scheduling Changes
In Student Transit
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
A scheduling change has been
made in the SGA student transit
system, according to Transit
Manager Marshall Tucker. This
change was effective Monday.
Tucker said the evening route
has been expanded to serve more
areas. The Gold route will leave
Mendenhall Student Center at
5:30 p.m go to Farm Fresh and
Kroger and then pick up the
apartment complexes on the Pur-
ple Route. The bus will then run
on an hourly schedule until ap-
proximately 8:50 p.m.
"If people are using it, we will
keep the route that way. If not,
we will run every 30 minutes,
dropping the Purple Tucker
said.
Tucker said the change has
been made to accomodate
students who do not want to
leave campus at 5 p.m. He said
anyone with suggestions or ques-
tions should contact him at the
Transit Office in Mendenhall.
HAIRCUTS: ONLY $5 00
FEATURING HEADS UP
WEDNESDAY, JAN 9 AND
THURSDAY,JAN 10
AT THE ECU
ALLIED HEALTH BUILDING
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE
UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY TELETHON
YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE
SPONSORED BY THE EAST CAROLINA
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION
��:�:�:�:�:�:�:�;�:
WK�s�S5x-x-?:at
SCHOLARSHIPS
AVAILABLE
Over S100.000.000 in college scholarships are available from.
business and industry professional associations, trade unions
religious and civic groups ana thousanas of other sources As college
costs escalate at a double digit pace you wi'i want to obtain them
Your chances of receiving full or partial scholarships are excellent if
you know where to look and start now
Our publication "Scholarships Are Waiting" evtll introduce you to
thousanas of sources that have scholarships grants ana other forms
of assistance and will instruct you on how to contact them. For your
personal copy, send $7 95 check or money order to
NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP SERVICE
4200 Wisconsin Ave N W � Surte 106 Box 284 � Washington D C 20016
Friendly Hair Designer's f I

Lisa Wright Pat Williams
Emna Ange Van Nichols
Kit (Griffin) Brouwer
WISHING VOU LIVED AT THE TOWERS? VOU STILL CAN. WE HAVE A
FEW UNITS AVAILABLE FOR OCCUPANCY BEGINNING SECONV SEMESTER.
CALL FOR VETAILS ON RENTAL OR PURCHASE. 756-S410 OR 355-2695
1 Mon Wed Fri. - 9am-5pm
Thurs - 9am-until
Sat. - 9am-lpm
Appointments are helpful
walk-ins welcome
Precision Cuts
Perms
Sculptured nails
Tanning booth
I L
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus
East Carolina University
Rioggold Development Co Inc.
10) Commerce Street
PO Drawer 568
Greeo�01e. NC 278M
919) 35-269�
i
119 West 4th St. Greenville 758-3181
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Rates for New Move-Ins Only
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� Kitchens Feature D;shu K-rs & D sposals
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Laroe P
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Directions: 10th Street Extension to River Bluff Road
Next to Rivergate Shopping Center
Phone 758-4015
ROCKIN' 50'S -60'S
WITH
$
LADIES'
ean
Nightclub
presents
Wednesday
THE ALL NEW
LOCK-UP
Daddy Cool
Playing the Hottest Dance Music Down East!
All Indies Admitted Free From 8 10
With Free Draft & Wine Plus $1.00 Highballs
Guys In At 10:00
C'mon out to Greenville s Hot Hits Nightspot
The one the only Beau s of course'
Phone 756-6401 Located in the Carolina East Centre
Beau s u a private rlub fw members and lata guests All ABC Primus Memberships available at the (tool
Guests are welcome.
Watch for details on the Ms. Beau's Contest � Coming Soon!
Thursday, Jan. 10th
Plus Rock 93's Greg Allinson
spins solid gold rock and roll
from our own '57 Chevy
It's Your Night, ECU!
FREE BEER TILL 11:30!
(BRING YOUR BEST BEER MUG)
Happy Hour on cans and drinks after 11:30
and
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2U?e �aat (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, an it m
Greg Rideout, inmmraiir
'1 NNIFER JhNDRASIAK, UmStfnr J.T. PlETRZAK, Dtnctorof Anum,
Randy Mews, .���td�or Anthony Martin, ���� �Ml
TinaMaroschak, AMMifiMMr John Peterson, owttMoaww
Bill MlTCHEl I , emulation Uanaitf Bill DAWSON, Prmim lion Manager
Doris Rankins, $�, John Rusk, a im
January 8, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Gov. Topics
Advice For Gov. Martin
North Carolina crowned its con-
sen atism Saturday with the swear-
ing in of James G. Martin as the
state's 65th governor. Our state
got in Martin what it really wanted
in the Senate: a cross between
Helms and Hunt. Martin is
smooth, well-educated and good-
looking like Hunt and conservative
and schooled in the free enterprise
system like Helms. The new gover-
nor is riding a wave of popularity
as he happily starts his term, but
the time is now for a little advice.
First, he should continue the
trend of compromising he has
started by his cabinet appoint-
ments. If Martin is to accomplish
anything, it will be done by give-
and-take.
Second, he should look closely
at the taxes he plans to repeal.
Sure, people don't like to be taxed.
We at ECU surely don't. But we
r now it is a necessity for buildings,
services, roads and, yes, educa-
tion Our tax burden is not too
high. Neither is that of the cor-
porations that operate in our state.
Don't have a tax cut just for the
ake of cutting taxes. Cut taxes if
the state can afford it and if the
people are being taxed unfairly.
s Martin indicated in his in-
auguration speech, he must take
special care of our education
ystem. Money is badly needed in
rural counties to attract better
teachers and to build better
facilities. Martin, who holds a
Ph.D. in chemistry, knows the
value of our university system. His
support is essential if young North
Carolinians are to continue to get a
chance at a first-rate education at
cut-rate prices.
Martin must continue to bring
industry, both high- and low-tech,
to our state. But do this not out of
favor for big business, but out of
concern for the working families
of North Carolina. We know Mar-
tin said we all should be for
business, but we say only if that
business is for us.
Martin must bravely initiate
agricultural reform. We must stop
producing tobacco. We must stop
turning our heads to the fact that
we produce a substance that kills
people. Our fertile lands can grow
better things. Martin must con-
vince our farmers of this.
Martin must continue the move
to link up our major cities with
super highways. Interstate 40 and
U.S. Highway 264 must be im-
proved. Roads are important to
people and commerce.
For us to be that "united state"
that Martin talks about, the new
governor must not try to trample
the Democratic traditions of the
state. He must be innovative like
his predecessor. He must continue
to exhibit integrity. And mostly he
must be caring. We believe he has
these qualities, but it doesn't hurt
to caution.
The Pirate
The East Carolinian would like
to take the opportunity to welcome
The Pirate to ECU. We are glad
you are back; we missed you.
While, you were away some phony
stole your body and gave it a
childish name. The students were
outraged. They rose up in protest
against the injustice, and finally,
after months of prodding, the ad-
ministration decided rescuing you
was the wise thing to do.
What your success story should
tell us is that it is worth it to fight
the powers-that-be. Do not let an
indignation stand, no matter how
small. As long as you have right on
your side, the battle is a worthy
one. The East Carolinian, in at-
tempt to inform the students on
how they had been trampled over,
began the fight. But, we would
have never won without the sup-
port of every student, or without
the support of the Student Govern-
ment Association.
One good thing that came from
the battle was a look at the athlet
department. We were exposed to
the way they deal with things. We
were shown the inner-workings of
a power structure that seems to
care very little for the average stu-
dent. And although they ultimately
made the right decision, we assume
it was the bad publicity more than
a nobleness that resulted in the
change.
We hope this attitude is not
prevalent over in Scales Field
House, and if it is, we hope it is a
thing of the past and is beginning
to change. A decision has been
reached by the administration that
our football program must take a
new direction. A new course has
been charted for the Pirate pro-
gram and a new captain named.
Let's hope this new direction, with
The Pirate as its mascot, is one
that includes the concerns of the
student body.
So now, both Ed and Pee Pee
are gone. One will be missed and
one won't. One was dismissed in a
poor manner. The other was pro-
tected unjustly and finally let out
on its own. Let's hope this fresh
start is a happy and prosperous
one.
&
&&
IHF FASTt AROl INI
Afghan Anniversary, Famine
World Topics Treatised
While you were away
The fifth anniversary of the Soviet in-
vasion of Afghanistan passed without
much notice. Yes, who would have
thought that after five years, the war-
riors of Islam would still be giving
bloody noses to the armies of imperial
communism? And at such a high price!
The war has spawned nearly eight
million refugees (four times
Nicaragua's population), thousands of
horrifying deaths by exotic chemical
weapons and other means of mass ter-
ror and, recently, the USSR has begun
to starve the freedom fighters out of ex-
istence by destroying Afghan
agriculture. Entire sections of the coun-
try have become depopulated. So far, a
million Afghans have died. The United
Nations is silent while the communists
are committing genocide.
From The Right
Dennis Kilcoyne
M&mn,wm$ei$Ml,Wkiwmp&i�R
WHAis �m on arou�v; mErt, ,m ?� mm '
And now our president, called
warlike by his critics, wants to break
bread with Chernenko, the man who
has ordered the step-up of the killing in
Afghanistan. Under pressure from the
United States left-wing establishment
and so-called pragmatists in his own
party, Reagan has apparently decided
that an arms control treaty would be an
achievement which could earn him a
place in history. He may get it, but he'll
be remembered as another president
who decided to place his trust in the
Soviets rather than to lead the
American public to confront what
Moscow is really up to: the revival of
detente. To us the term means the eas-
ing of tensions. To the Soviets, it is the
"intensification of the global class
struggle (Translation: the hastening
of their march to world domination.) In
other words, the Soviets look on a com-
ing era of arms control � for America
but not for them � as an opportunity
to lullaby the victim to sleep and so to
remove us as the last obstacle to their
ultimate victory.
The American public � as opposed
to its intellectual class � has a basic
suspicion of the Soviets. Yet, the con-
tinued indifference to the holocaust in
Afghanistan shows that Americans
don't understand the true nature of
Soviet tyranny and the threat it bears to
open societies. Educating America to
those facts should be Reagan's top
priority in foreign policy.
Also while you were gone, 1984 end-
ed with a rash of bombings at abortion
clinics. After eleven years of failing to
force passage of pro-life legislation,
frustrated individuals are taking the
route of terrorism. Fortunately, no one
was injured in the abortion mill bomb-
ings last year, and this proves these
bomb-throwers aren't interested in
fighting murder with murder. No sane
person can cheer the destruction of
private property, even of these
dungeons of death. Yet who can blame
them? Many of you readers may be pro-
abortion, yet if you were pro-life and
held the unshakeable conviction that
abortion is murder, could the thought
of some sort of retaliation not cross
your mind? After all, not only are 1.5
million innocents exterminated yearly,
but no abortion method has been devis-
ed yet in which the fetus does not suffer
a horrible and painful death. And have
you read the label on your shampoo
lately? If it contains collagen, a natural,
gelatin-like protein, chances are that the
substance came from the bodies of
aborted children, which for the
cosmetics companies are a plentiful and
cheap source of collagen. (Mary Kay
Cosmetics is the only company which
has sworn it does not use such
collagen.) It reminds one of how the
Nazis used the skin of death camp vic-
tims to make handbags and lamp-
shades. Hell, if we're going to use a
child's collagen to strengthen our hair,
we might as well drink the child's
blood. Blood is nutritious, no? Why let
such a useful substance go to waste?
Of curse, you all remember the exam-
week firing of Coach Ed Emory. How
could we forget? Despite last year's 2-9
record, Emory retained the students'
faith in him. The alumni had faith in
him. But the administration fired him.
Why? Emory had recently signed a
five-year contract, and then he was
bounced. That action itself was bizarre.
Yet, over Emory, a relentless recruiter,
a fierce Pirate loyalist, a proven success
story, and a man loved and respected by
his players, the administration chose
uncertainty. Emory was crushed by the
decision, coldly announced just before
Christmas. Insult was added to injury
when, just days after getting the ax,
Emory was replaced by a former assis-
tant. The replacement came so quickly
that many are suspicious that the new
coach, Art Baker, had been hired
before Emory's termination. Last word
was that Emory is talking to Lawyer
Marvin Blount.
Chancellor John Howell and Athletic
Director Ken Karr took a lot of heat,
yet they craftily avoided what could
have been strong denunciations from
The East Carolinian by announcing
their decision after the semester's last
edition of the paper had been publish-
ed. About the entire incident there is a
fishy odor.
The African famine is getting worse,
despite the hundreds of million: of
relief aid pouring in. Much of the aid
has been going through under the
scrutiny of the Marxist Ethiopian
government, which, by cutting off relief
to rebel provinces such as Tigre and
Eritrea, is using international aid as a
political weapon. And remember, the
Ethiopian government spent tens of
millions of dollars, in the midst of the
famine, to celebrate the tenth anniver-
sary of the overthrow and murder of
former Emperor Haile Selaisse and the
installing of a communist regime. Other
developments over the holidays include
1) A Reagan administration request
for an additional $235 million in famine
relief. As Congress is likely to approve.
American government aid to famine
victims will reach an astonishing $1.1
billion.
The United Nations, over the objec-
tions of the United States, decided to
spend $73.5 million to construct a neu.
U.N. building in the Ethiopian capital
of Addis Ababa. Were this money spent
on famine relief rather than another
bureaucratic playpen, millions of starv-
ing families could be given food and
medicine, thousands of wells could be
dug, crops planted, etc.
3) The Reagan administration has an-
nounced it will condition further aid on
the adoption of free market
agricultural policies by the countries
affected. Capitalist agriculture won't
make rain, of course, but it would cer-
tainly bolster local food production,
thus making those countries less depen-
dent on American generosity.
4) If you want toheio. but don't want
your mgne kjmmeo afUVUHn
governments, here's your chance:
Relief Societv of Tigre, North America,
1736 13th St NW, PO Box 652
Washington, D.C 20009. Tigre is a
rebellious Ethiopian province receiving
no aid.
An interesting scene: Greenville on
New Year's Eve, about 11 p.m. on east
Fifth Street. Across from ECU the
police had established a checkpoint at
which they could identify intoxicated
drivers. Several parked police cars
stood ready in a iot, while two others
with blue lights flashing were in-
vestigating several stopped cars. But
downtown, on the block where the beer
joints flourish, only a few people
loitered. The place was cool. Of course,
at midnight your correspondent was not
there so there may have been more than
firecrackers going off.
(Dennis Kilcoyne is a senior political
science major who joins our staff this
week. His columns will appear every
Thursday.
Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOUT
Now, I know most of you who were away for the Holidays just couldn't
stand being without The East Carolinian. And I really know you were
about to crunch a kidney unless you had a Things I Thought Of column in
your grubby hands. So, all you faithful readers who made it into 1985
without dying, going to jail or graduating, it's time for that ultimate in
junk food for the mind � Things I Thought Of
If God's your friend, and he's all-seeing and all-knowing and that stuff,
how come he won't make that blankity blank accounting teacher give easier
tests. And if he wants you to follow the rules, and he sees you break them,
how come he doesn't reach down and yank you up. Maybe he's like Chance
in Being There and likes to watch.
How come the last exams of the fall were from 2-4 p.m. and you had to
be out of the dorms at 5 p.m.? Stuuuuuuuupid. What if you had to go to
Atlanta or Charlotte or someplace way far away? Whose bright idea was
this? Next time the morons in the housing office should keep the dorms
open until noon the next day so people don't die driving at night or have to
shell out bucks for a hotel room.
If you live in an old house, is it a rule that when it's cold outside you
have to be able to see your breath inside! Going to bed is like camping.
You have to put on two pair of socks (one the hunting kind), long and
short underwear, three shirts (one preferably plaid), a Redskins' beanie, one
glove (one hand must be free in case you sleepwalk to the bathroom in the
middle of the night) and a WWII silk scarf. Ail this sartorial paraphernalia
must be slide under two blankets and a sleeping bag. Fun, eh! I'm transfer-
ing to Florida.
Be on the alert. Due to an increase in jean splicing, everyone must carry-
around thread and a needle in case someone decides to cut your Levi's. It's
everywhere, there splicing jeans here and splitting jeans there. Now I'm
even hearing talk about atom smashing. Ouch! Geez, I'm going to get a
protective device for my atom before I'm singing soprano.
Carolyn Hunt looked pretty upset during Jim Martin's inauguration on
Saturday. She was probably thinking that if she had run head-to-head with
Dottie, hell, she could still be sleeping in the big house in Raleigh. What a
bummer! Instead of hitting the Washington social scene, with heads of state
and all that stuff, she's going to rural Wilson county. Life's a
Welcome back Pirate from Pee Pee purgatory.
(c), ns. Greg J Inc.
Campus Forum
Price Hi
The Rev. Richard Becker's letter in
support of the NSPA and Ku Klux mi
Klan presented a terribly unfortunate mr
point of view. It is the point of view of hoj
a mentally unstable person who is in- art
capable of rational problem solving, oui
and it is especially unfortunate because Kii
it promotes intolerance and violence
In this country we have rights that ple
allow for many different peoples to live
together peacefully. It's too bad that wi
the Rev. Becker can't see through his of
paranoia to the wealth and beauty of m
our diverse population. Seeing his an
diatribe against so many seems almost leti
too high a price to pay for our precious jot
right of free speech. tioi
Cltl
Sandy Willcox qu
Greenville pal
Letter Ignorant
Su
Soi
There is a saying that goes, "Against
stupidity and ignorance, even the gods
fight in vain The letter written by the
Rev. Richard Becker in the Dec. 4 issue
is a perfect example of this son of
stupidity. The shoot-out which occur-
red between the Ku Klux Klan and the
Workers Viewpoint Organization on
Nov. 3, 1979 in Greensboro was not
any "act of patriotism and valor but
the result of an organization which is
based on hatred and bigotrv � the Ku
Klux Klan.
The Rev. Becker had his facts mixed
up and should next time try and use
reliable sources. Members of the WVO
(a communist organization in
Greensboro) were 3bout to begin a
march protesting the KKK on Nov. 3.
when several Klansmen began firing at
close range into a crowd of about 100
people there for the march. Four peo-
ple were killed and at least 10 were
wounded in the shooting, which took
place in a predominantly black
neighborhood. This was no act of self-
defense on the behalf of the people in
this country, but simple, cold-blooded
murder. How any individual affiliated
with the church can condone this is
beyond my comptehension. The Com-
munist Workers Farty is an organiza-
tion based on political ideologies, and
though I don't support these
ideologies, I also do not support the
murdering of human beings because of
their different beliefs.
Remarks such as "communist scum
and their puppets "the only good
communist is a dead one" and "it's a
damn shame we couldn't kill them all"
are not only ignorant but also insane
The remark that the murderers were
"subjected to two unfair trials by the
Jewish kangaroo court system" is fill-
ed with prejudice and hate, which
makes it inconceivable that a man with
the title "reverend" could write such
trash. Does it not state in the Ten Com-
mandments, "Thou shalt not kill"
dn
mi
as I
hii
thi
dt
Gi
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I
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Prognostication C
What
By GREG RIDEOIT
The crystal balls, polished and shin- i
ed. are being set on prophets' tables
around the world, and the karnac of
the world are peering into them, trying
to see what 1985 has to offer. The
future seems always more intriguing
than the past. In our minds, we make
the years ahead what we wish them to i
be and fill each one with lasers and
space stations and robots and aliens and
time travel. The past is gone. It is
history. We can add nothing. It is not as
exciting as what's ahead I
1984 was regular shuttle flights, ar-
tificial hearts and an election landslide
It was the Tigers and improved silicon
chips. New Right. Old Left. Bombings
and Baby Fae The year was special in
that George Orwell had used it for the
title of his 1949 classic look at
totalitarianism. We looked for
Newspeak and watched out for Big
Brother. And although he didn't shou
up in the United States, odds have it
he's in at least a few countries.
So what will 1985 bring. What, in this
era of conservatism under the reign of
Ronnie, can we expect? Well, since
predictions are soon forgotten and rare-
ly right, a venture into prognosticating
is a safe move, and thus this trip to the I
future is worth the risk.
Here goes. The new year will bring a I
thaw to U.SSoviet relations. The se-
cond cold war will become a chilly
friendship as Reagan mellows ands
seeks to secure his place in history as
one of the top 10 presidents. The talks
in Geneva on whether to talk will set
times for talks and the talks will lead to
an agreement, with the United States
not coming out on the short side of the
deal for a change.



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"right idea was
�eep the dorms
die driving at night or have to
id outside you
:ng to bed is like camping,
hunting kind), long and
plaid), a Redskins' beanie, one
epwalk to the bathroom in the
M! this sartorial paraphernalia
mg bag Fun, eh' I'm transfer-
ring, everyone must carry
decides to cut your Levi's. It's
lining jeans there. Now I'm
Th' Geez, I'm going to get a
pgmg soprano
m Martin's inauguration on
ishe had run head-to-head with
big house in Raleigh. What a
�cial scene, with heads of state
county. Life's a
l rv
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Other Opinion
JAM ANY 4, 1S�H4 Page 5
Campus Forum
Price High For Free Speech
The Rev. Richard Becker's letter in
support of the NSPA and Ku Klux
Wan presented a terribly unfortunate
point of view. It is the point of view of
a mentally unstable person who is in-
capable of rational problem solving
and it is especially unfortunate because
it promotes intolerance and violence
In this country we have rights that
allow for many different peoples to live
together peacefully. It's too bad that
the Rev. Becker can't see through his
paranoia to the wealth and beauty of
our diverse population. Seeing his
diatribe against so many seems almost
too high a price to pay for our precious
right of free speech.
Sandy Willcox
Greenville
Letter Ignorant
There is a saying that goes, "Against
stupidity and ignorance, even the gods
fight in vain The letter written by the
Rev. Richard Becker in the Dec. 4 issue
is a perfect example of this sort of
stupidity. The shoot-out which occur-
red between the Ku Klux Klan and the
Workers Viewpoint Organization on
Nov. 3, 1979 in Greensboro was not
any "act of patriotism and valor but
the result of an organization which is
based on hatred and bigotrv � the Ku
Klux Klan.
The Rev. Becker had his facts mixed
up and should next time try and use
reliable sources. Members of the WVO
(a communist organization in
Greensboro) were about to begin a
march protesting the KKK on Nov. 3,
when several Klansmen began firing at
close range into a crowd of about 100
people there for the march. Four peo-
ple were killed and at least 10 were
wounded in the shooting, which took
place in a predominantly black
neighborhood. This was no act of self-
defense on the behalf of the people in
this country, but simple, cold-blooded
murder. How any individual affiliated
with the church can condone this is
beyond my compiehension. The Com-
munist Workers Yarty is an organiza-
tion based on political ideologies, and
though I don't support these
ideologies, I also do not support the
murdering of human beings because of
their different beliefs.
Remarks such as "communist scum
and their puppets "the only good
communist is a dead one" and "it's a
damn shame we couldn't kill them all"
are not only ignorant but also insane.
The remark that the murderers were
"subjected to two unfair trials by the
Jewish kangaroo court system" is fill-
ed with prejudice and hate, which
makes it inconceivable that a man with
the title "reverend" could write such
trash. Does it not state in the Ten Com-
mandments, "Thou shalt not kill"?
The Rev. Becker, your thinking is very
much like that of Hitlerism in Ger-
many during World War II. I should
hope that bigotry, hate and murder
aren't the "cause" of the South and
our nation, any more than the Ku Klux
Klan or the National Socialist Party of
America represent the American peo-
ple.
Our country is not only made up of
white Christians � it is a melting pot
of many different kinds of people �
white, black, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish,
and yes, God forbid, communists. This
letter did not speak for any "silent ma-
jority" but for murder and destruc-
tion. America grants its freedoms to all
citizens, which is what makes it so uni-
que. Fighting and killing is not
patriotic, and is certainly not the kind
of society Americans want to live in or
create.
Staci Falkowitz
Sophomore Class President
Letter Lamented
It is sad to think that there are in-
dividuals in any society so filled with
misguided hatred and violent paranoia
as the Rev. Richard Becker proclaimed
himself to be in his letter of Dec. 4 to
this forum. That letter performed a
service to the sane only by
demonstrating the quality of our
notorious lunatic fringe.
What must be calmly retained (with
difficulty in the presence of such in-
flammatory rhetoric) is that such a let-
ter is a concious provocation, much as
was the Klan march of Nov. 3, 1979 to
which it referred. The intent is to elicit
violence in response to a highly public
defamation. This would, to the pro-
vokers, justify their paranoia and sanc-
tion their reaction of premeditated
violence.
Hatred is a poison which seeks any
shelter from which to spread. Often
shielding itself behind patriotism or
religion, it corrupts the virtues of any
institution or individual it touches. It is
best met with an informed intelligence,
a cool head and a firm resolve. To rise
in anger or violence against it is to have
already lost.
David Lewis
Grad Student, Art
doesn't merit the attention of every
student on campus, but we do discuss
and pass rules and regulations that af-
fect everyone. Students living on and
off campus need to know this policy so
that their organization or business
doesn't go against university policy.
We are also aware that there is
limited space, time and people to cover
stories concerning residence halls. We
do feel, however, that we deserve ade-
quate coverage and an effort should be
made to achieve this. We would also
like to see individual residence halls
receive recognition, not just the SRA.
After all, the residence halls are what
make up the SRA.
The students in the residence hall
program support and depend on The
East Carolinian. Even though you're
an expanding paper, don't forget who
supports you. After all, that's why
you're called "The East Carolinian
Anyone who has any questions,
ideas or problems can call 758-9542 or
write me at the Department of
Residence Life, 214 Whichard.
Debbie Gembicki
SRA President
Dump Plank
Coverage Inadequate
It &s been brought to my attention
from numerous students and faculty
members that campus residents are vir-
tually being left out of The East Caroli-
nian. As president of the SRA, I feel
that it is my responsibility to bring this
complaint to you.
realize that everything we do
Over the last several weeks ! have
noticed a particular cartoon series
"Walkin' The Plank which deals'
with the earthly life of Jesus. I cannot
help but become disturbed as I read
these stories.
It is hard for me to believe that The
East Carolinian would allow this type
of article to run every week. What has
Jesus done to deserve such mockery of
his life; did he make fun of yours? Of
course not, he has loved you with
everlasting love. (Jer. 31:3)
I realize that we all must have a sense
of humor, but Jesus' life is no comedy.
I am not saying that he does not have a
sense of humor because I know that he
does, but his coming into this world to
suffer on a cross, descending into hell
for three days and nights, and then ris-
ing again for all of us is nothing to
make a joke about. Where is the
respect we have for one another? Some
may not believe that Jesus Christ is the
savior of the world and I respect that,
but respect my belief that he is the
savior.
I appeal to the integrity of the author
of this series and The East Carolinian,
asking that the series be discontinued
regardless if it is almost finished. After
all, how would you feel if someone
made a cartoon comedy about the most
important person in your life.
Thomas M. Fernandez
Senior, Nursing
Forum Rules
Prognostication Corner
What To Look For In '85
By GREG RIDEOUT
The crystal balls, polished and shin-
ed, are being set on prophets' tables
around the world, and the Karnacs of
the world are peering into them, trying
to see what 1985 has to offer. The
future seems always more intriguing
than the past. In our minds, we make
the years ahead what we wish them to
be and fill each one with lasers and
space stations and robots and aliens and
time travel. The past is gone. It is
history. We can add nothing. It is not as
exciting as what's ahead.
1984 was regular shuttle flights, ar-
tificial hearts and an election landslide.
It was the Tigers and improved silicon
chips. New Right. Old Left. Bombings
and Baby Fae. The year was special in
that George Orwell had used it for the
title of his 1949 classic look at
totalitarianism. We looked for
Newspeak and watched out for Big
Brother. And although he didn't show
up in the United States, odds have it
he's in at least a few countries.
So what will 1985 bring. What, in this
era of conservatism under the reign of
Ronnie, can we expect? Well, since
predictions are soon forgotten and rare-
ly right, a venture into prognosticating
is a safe move, and thus this trip to the
future is worth the risk.
Here goes. The new year will bring a
thaw to U.SSoviet relations. The se-
cond cold war will become a chilly
friendship as Reagan mellows ands
seeks to secure his place in history as
one of the top 10 presidents. The talks
in Geneva on whether to talk will set
times for talks and the talks will lead to
an agreement, with the United States
not coming out on the short side of the
deal for a change.
The Congress will sprout a backbone
and take on the deficit. Members will
still try to protect their constituents in-
terests, but less vigorously as they for
once try to act for the common good.
Large cuts in defense will be enacted
and Social Security and veteran's
benefits will be affected by the budget
axe. Two-hundred billion dollars is just
too much.
The Supreme Court will overturn at
least one major decision, seeking strict
interpretation of the Constitution.
Reagan will also appoint a justice this
year.
'John Rigrins will retire, and
Doug Flutie will get a Rhodes
Scholarship and be a first round
draft pick.
In the state, Gov. James G. Martin
will push for his tax cut, but the
Democratically controled General
Assembly will defeat it in favor of con-
tinued increased spending for educa-
tion. Martin will have little success in
the Legislature in 1985, but he will lay
the roots for a strong Republican party.
Out of politics, the new year will pro-
duce a more frequent use of the ar-
tificial heart, probably more than three
operations this year. The AIDS pro-
blem will be solved and drug use will in-
crease.
In sports, Detroit will win the World
Series again. Duke will win the ACC
tournament, and Kentucky will win it
all in the NCAA. The Boston Celtics
will grab the NBA crown; the Bruins
the NHL Stanley Cup. Mary Lou Ret-
ton will endorse at least seven different
products during the year, including two
toothpastes. John Riggins will retire,
and Doug Flutie will get a Rhodes
Scholarship and be a first round draft
pick. Marino will lift Miami to the
Super Bowl. McEnroe will win
Wimbledon.
In the arts, a new Picasso will be
found. The Killing Fields will win at
least two Oscars and "Saturday Night
Live" will fin-lly be canceled. Two
famous leading ladies of the screen will
die, one old and one young. Burt
Reynolds will get married; Bo Derek
will get divorced.
At ECU, there will once again be
trouble in the SGA Executive Elections,
but the Greeks will come out on top.
The new building will be delayed by
protest, and a disaster will occur in
March. No major band will play in
Minges during the Spring Semester, but
a name comedian will come to Hendrix.
A vice chancellor will leave and an out-
sider will take his place.
The basketball team will be the sur-
prise winner of the ECAC-South tour-
nament and go on to the NCAA. The
football team will only win three games,
but Baker will not be fired. The
baseball team, under new leadership,
will still be good enough to go to the
NCAA, but not win it.
If you're wondering if any of these
looks ahead will become reality, just
keep this in mind: Who, in their right
mind, would have predicted 20 years
ago that we would retrieve satellites and
repair them?
(c). 1WS, G�t i ftrtmn lac.
Cartoon Gallery
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The Year In Pictures
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M,A book exchange program.
POLS 2107
Intro, to Cotnp. Gov't.
Dr. Simon
Kirk Shelley
'50-6029
Complete set $15
Hisl. 1050
American History to 1877
lr. Parkerson
Kirk Shelley
So-6029
Complete set $25
Geography 1000
r arth and Man
Peterson
Kirk Shelley
756-6029
$15
PSYC 1051
n Piyc n
Weunach
Kirk Shelley
566029
S12
MK I 2110
Sociology
Dr. Ollenburger
Neidra Clark
758-9694
$14
SGA Book Exchange Program
SOCI 2110
Sociology, Tschetter
Shelia Benton
758-9208
$14.50
COMP SCI 2600
Kheshgoftar
Shelia Benton
758-9203
$13
PHYSICS 1050
Paul Yarlasukin
Neidra C lark
758-9694
S12 price negotiable
ISC1 3243
Managerial Economics
lr. Gulati
heri Small
'52 9002
$14
MKTG 3832
Principles of Marketing
Dr. Ray Jones
Sheri Small
752-9002
$14
MGMT 3202
Smith
Shelia Benton
758-9203
$20
MGMT 3202
Smith
Shelia Benton
758-9203
$3.50 (Study Guide)
PHIL 1100
Knowledge, Man, Existence
Michael Kegerreis
Sheri Small
752-9002
$5
SOCI 2110
(Annual Editions: Sociology
8485)
Charles E. Garrison
Cheryl Bono
758-9694
$6
ENGL 1100
English Composition
Dunn
Nell Rowerdiner
752-8308
$11
ENGL 1200
Writing: A College Handbook
Ma. Thornton
Casey Liu
757-0051
$7.45
ENGL 1200
Drama, The Heath Intro
tion
Ms. Thornton
Casev Liu
757-0051
$7.45
ENGL 1200
Poetry: Sight and Insight
Ma. Thornton
Casey Lin
757-0051
$5.95
GEOG 1000
Earth and Man
Dr. Chock Zlehr
Casey Lin
757-0051
$18.95
DRAMA 2001
Stage Scenery
Mr. Darby
David Hall
758-1377
$15
HIST 1051
U.S. History After 1870
Thorpe
Hugh
758-9940
Offer or trade
HLTH 1000
Health (Taking Charge)
Polly Edmunson
Laura Fazzalari
752-8538
$11
ENGL 3880
Technical Writing
John S. Patterson
Laura Fazzalari
752-8538
$12
SOCI 2110
Intro, to Sod.
Dr. Register
Laura Fazzalari
752-8538
$12
1500
Geology
C.Q. Brown
Neil Rowerdiner
752-8308
$19
2110
Intro, to Sod. (Study Guide)
Dr. Paul Tschetter
William S. Robinson
757-1993
$3
Cfte$f
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Prices include bus transportation, accommodations
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REGISTRATION DEADLINE: January 9, 1985
For more information, contact the Central Ticket
Office at 757-661 l,ext. 266.
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HLTH 1000
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Terry Hlnson
William S. Robinson
757-1993
$9 (negotiable)
ALGB 1063 & 1065
Algebra
Joe White
William S. Robinson
757-1993
$20 (negotiable)
BIOL 1050
Dr. Knight (2 books)
William S. Robinson
757-1993
Biology (Johnson, Rayle-
Wedberg) $20-negotlable
Humanistic Approach of
Biology (Sehgal) $5
PSYC 1050
Psyc. Today-An Introduction
(5th Ed)
Dr. Charles Moore
Sandra Caskey
758-8887
$20
BIOL 1050
Intro, to Biology
Sehgal
Sandra Caskey
758-8887
$6 (Humanistic Aspects of
Biology)
ENGL 1200
English
Cognlton
Drama (Green Book)
752-4255
$4
ANTH 1000
Anthropology 3rd Ed (William
A. Havihuid)
Bunger
Sandra Caskey
758-8887
$12 or best offer
GEOG 1000
AUas For "Earth and Man"
Dr. Chuck Zlher
Casey Lin
757-0051
$2.99
FTNA 3724
Hunt
Sheila Benton
758-9203
$16
SOCI 2110
Tschetter
Sheila Benton
758-9203
$5.50 (study guide)
PHIL 1000
Knowledge, Man, Existence
Michael Kegerreis
Sheri Small
752-9002
$2.50
PSYC 3240
Adolescence Psychology
Becky Helms
Renee Felder
752-8255
$18.50
MR AD 3000
Medical Record Terminology
Kay Avery
Renee Felder
752-8255
$12.70
ENGL 1200
English Composition
Cheri Bono
758-9694
$3.75 (Poetry: Sight and In-
sight)
PHIL 1500
Intro, to Logic
Dr. Jacoby
Forrest Hinton
752-9340
$12
GEOG 1500
Physical Geology
Snyder
Forrest Hinton
752-9340
$20
D3CI2223
Intro, to Comp Sd
Hsi-Hsu
Forrest Hinton
752-9340
$25
MLSC2208
Music Appreciation
Schmit
Forrest Hinton
752-9340
$14
BIOL 2110
Fundamentals of Microbiology
Dr. Kennedy
Cheri Bono
758-9694
$19.95
SOCI 2110
Intro, to Sociology
Charles E. Garrison
Cheryl Bono
758-9694
$5 65 (On Being a Person in a
World of Groups)
ENG 1100
English Composition
Dunn
Neil Rowerdiner
752-8308
$7
DSCI 3623
Management Science
Dr. Gulati
Sheri Small
752-9002
$14
PHIL 1100
Philosophy
Dr. Ross
Neidra L. dark
758-9694
$18 for text and study guide
Each entry is listed in the
following order: Course
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8
I HI I ASTC AROl JN1AN
lANl'ARY 8, IS)8
No More Pee Dee
Name Change For Mascot
B HAROLDJOYNER
After only two years of ex-
istence. Pee Dee. the official
name of ECU's mascot, was
finally laid to rest by the Depart-
ment of Athletics last December.
The mascot's new name is now
1 he Pirate, according to Ken
karr, athletic director.
"After careful consideration
of the situation and all the cir-
cumstances surrounding it
Karr said, "the decision was
eached to drop the name Pee
Dee
The former mascot's name was
i hosen in a contest held in area
.iementarv schools and was
evealed at the 1983 ECU�NC
State football game. Controversy
surrounding the name began last
semester when editorials in The
East Carolinian expressed
displeasure with the name Pee
Dee In an Oct. 4 editorial, the
mascot's name was described as
"stagnant and unwanted
During the fall SGA elections,
students were asked to voice an
opinion concerning the name.
More than 82 percent of the
students voting did not like it and
wanted a change. Administration
officials hesitated at changing the
name, saving it would destroy
years of work on athletic depart-
ment marketing strategies.
Greg Rideout, managing editor
of The East Carolinian, said he
was pleased to hear the decision
released by Karr, although he
said he felt the decision should
have been made earlier. "I hope
the administration knows that the
students really appreciate this ac-
tion he said.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
said he was satisfied with the
decision, even though he was not
directly involved in the final
stages.
Rideout sums up the process
as, "there are times when you can
fight City Hall, so to speak; and
the little guy can come out on
top
Pee Dee's name was short lived
and 1984 will be remembered by
ECU students as the year Pee Dee
grew up and became The Pirate.
Emory's Dismissal
New Locations For ECU Offices
B El AINEPERR
Sliff � rtln
While student vacated the
ampus dining the Christmas
holidays, two ECU departments
Aere bus moving to new loca-
tions.
The Department of Public
Safet and Traffic Services has
moved from Howard House on
East Fifth Street to 609 E. 10th
St The ECU News Bureau mov-
from Erwin Hall to Howard
Mouse.
According to Gil Moore, vice
chancellor for Business Affairs,
:he location of the traffic office
suited in too much traffic in a
esidentia! area and the violation
of a special use permit.
Members of the Tar River
Homeowners Association felt
there was too much 24-hour traf-
fic in the residential area because
of the traffic office. "The
Association expressed extreme
appreciation and sincere thanks
to the university for agreeing to
find a new area for the security
offices to be housed said Dr.
David Stevens, university at-
torney.
The primary reason for the
move was the violation of a
special use permit. Upon the pur-
chase of two houses on Fifth
Street, one of which was later
torn down, the university receiv-
ed a special permit to use the
house for administrative or facul-
tv offices. The permit was then
approved by the Greenville Board
of Adjustment. During the rezon-
ing the ordinance was revised so
the permit was no longer accep-
table. �'
With the News Bureau now
located in Howard House, the
building will be renovated.
"Coach Emorj was a g
coach and a good recruiter. I
don't think he was given a chant C
by the people at the top " Buhlm
Grant, Senior. History
"1 think the decision was the
result of undei the tabl dis
sions oi top officials. 1 he
students deserve to know the
truth and giveoa h Emoi i
fan trial kellv stimuli. Senior,
Business
"It just goes to sh '� � on
powerful the administration is
However, I do think Emory's fir-
ing was the result of a power
struggle between him and Ken
Karr Jim Ford, Junior,
Geologv
"1 think there is
the Athletic Department aid.
Even though c oach Emoi got a
raw deal, hut I'll still continue to
support the vthletic
Department Shirlej M ark-
ington. Junior, Home Economics
Ford
I arkington
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Library
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until 9:30
si A i i.
ECU
WEEKEND
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MCA Recording Artists RAVYNS in concert
partial sotndtrack for Fast Times
At Ridgemont High MTV pick for 1982
OONNA t DUAROS
Owner
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' 'Consider us your cars'
Home Away From Home " B
Cog gins Car Care
756-5244
3 20 West Greenvte Blvd
Novel Inspires
Du
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Producer R
tiis ofonan I ame and
Lynch, the ecccnti
fully tali
Eraserhead and Iht I � �
Man, have ned
creative gem . �
Hollywood's n
projects With a
at S40 million pi
and I � � '
inging Dune
Herbert's
epic, to the movie
Written K
screenpia.
faithful to He �
saga takes place
plane: V �
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universe where
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pands coi
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Thoug-
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hindered b
sand won
meter Ne
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which acts i
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Confused yet0 V. a
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breeding prog: I
superbeing wl
ECU Arti
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music-mai .
they preserve are no-
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!
DATE
7 V
Jan. 10- :
Jan. In
Jan. 17-19
Jan. 24-26
Jan. 25-26
Jan
Feb. n
Feb 7-9
ret. 13
Feb. 15-16
11-23
Feb. 22-23
March 14-16
March .
March 21-23
March 2?
March 2i ;
April 3
April H-13
April U-13
April I 7
April lSt'
April 24
AprM 25-27
Tht
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.11) A-SATURDAY
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AEEKEND
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IHfc bAST I AROI INJAN
Style
JANUARY 8, 1985 Page 9
Novel Inspires Epic Film
Dune Saga Sags
By DANIEL MAURER
Producer Raffailla De Lauren-
tiis of Conan fame and David
Lynch, the eccentric but wonder-
fully talented director of
Fraserhead and The Elephant
Man, have combined their
creative geniuses in one of
Hollywood's most ambitious film
projects. With a budget estimated
at $40 million plus, De Laurentiis
and Lynch have succeeded in br-
inging Dune, author Frank
Herbert's classic science fiction
epic, to the movie screen.
Written by Lynch himself, the
screenplay is, in most respects,
faithful to Herbert's novel. The
saga takes place on the desert
planet Arrakis, better known as
Dune. It is the only place in the
universe where one may find the
spice malange, a drug that not
only prolongs life but also ex-
pands consciousness, or allows
one to be in many places at once.
Though spice is formed natural-
ly, the mining of it is greatly
hindered by the presence of giant
sand worms as long as 400
meters. Nevertheless, spice is the
basis for the glactic economy
which acts as the cornerstone for
a delicate feudal system ruled by
a power hungry and paranoid
emperor, played by Jose Ferrer.
Confused yet? Wait, there's
more to come. Add to this the
spacing guild, an organization
that uses spice to help navigate
tneir starships. Then there is the
Bene Gesserit, a mysterious
sisterhood that conducts a
breeding program in search of a
superbeing who, under their
supervision, of course, will rise to
power and control the spice. Let
us not forget the Fremen, a
nomadic people of great strength
who live in the deserts of Arrakis
awaiting a savior who will lead
them to freedom.
If you think this is the meat of
the story, you're sadly mistaken.
This is merely a summary of the
movies prologue as told to a
somewhat befuddled audience by
the emperor's daughter (played
by Virginia Madsen). The actual
story evolves around young Paul
Atreides, portrayed by newcomer
Kyle Maclachlan, who turns out
to be the superbeing sought after
by the Bene Gesserit. Instead of
fulfilling the sisterhood's plans,
Paul turns against them as he
steps into the role of the Fremen
messiah and rises to power. This
basic premise, if there is anything
basic about it, is surrounded by
treachery, intrigue, romance, and
revenge. The story has all the
elements of success, if the au-
dience can sit still long enough to
sort it out.
Lynch gathered some of
Hollywood's biggest actors to ap-
pear in the film. Among them
were Max Von Sydow (TheExor-
cist), Linda HuntYear of Living
Dangerously), Sean Young
(Blade Runner), Richard Jordan
(Logan's Run), Jurgen Prochnow
(Das Boot), and the ever popular
Sting of the Police. Unfortunate-
ly, few of these great talents are
given sufficient time to develop
their respective characters.
One of the few performances
that did stand out was given by
Prochnow as Paul's father, Duke
Leto Atreides, a man whose fate
has been sealed by the treachery
of the emperor and his cohort the
Baron Harkonnen played by
Kenneth McMillan. Prochnow
gives the condemed Duke
strength and dignity as he faces
his unavoidable death. Prochnow
succeeds in communicating a
powerful presence, something the
production as a whole fails to do.
Though there are few
characters with which to sym-
pathize, the plot's intricacy keeps
the audience's minds buzzing and
the films overall grandure widens
their eyes. Tony Masters, best
known for his work in 2001 A
Space Odyssey, is responsible for
the look of the film which boasts
some of the most spectacular sets
to ever grace the silver screen.
The film's major drawback is
its attempt to remain faithful to
the novel in two hours and twenty
minutes. Though this may seem a
blessing to most Dune fanatics,
Lynch's adherence to the novel's
intricately woven plot makes the
picture a little difficult to follow
for newcomers to Herbert's fer-
tile imagination. In short, if you
haven't read the book you may
get lost. If so, just grab the
nearest usher and ask for a road
map. I'm not kidding, most
movie theatres worth their salt,
or in this case spice, will issue
"Dune Terminology sheets
Though Dune requires a little
sifting and sorting to understand,
it remains an enjoyable film that
will undoubtedly spawn many a
sequel.
Sting as the evil Feyd Rautha in David Lynch's $40 million Science fiction epic Dune
ECU Artists Series Committee Hosts Vienna Choir Boys
For nearly five centuries the
Vfcnna Choir Soys have en-
chanted millions with their
music-making. The traditions
they preserve are not the hide-
bound curiosities one finds in
museums and libraries, but liv-
ing breathing manifestations of
a heritage dedicated to continu-
ing the glories of the past in to-
day's too-easily jaded world.
This world famous chorale will
be appearing Tuesday, Jan. 15,
1985, in Wright Auditorium at 8
p.m and is presented by the
ECU Artists Series Committee.
The Vienna Choir Boys were
founded by Imperial decree on
July 7, 1498 by Emperor Max-
imilian I to fulfill his wish to have
choristers in the Imperial Chapel.
j528'5�
Spring Movie Schedule
DATE
Feb. 15-16
Feb. 21-23
Feb. 22-23
March 14-16
March 20
March 21-23
March 27
March 28-30
April 3
April 11-13
April 12-13
April 17
April 18-20
April 24
April 25-27
TITLE
48 Hours
Rebel Without A Cause
Romancing The Stone
Chloe In The Afternoon
Pauline At The Beach
Tightrope
Bachelor Party
Pink Floyd The Wall
�Carmen
Red Dann
Bringing Lp Baby
Pat And Mike
Star Trek 111
Rashomon
Dersu L'zala
All Of Me
Purple Rain
La Cage Aux Folles
Indiana Jones & The Temple Of Doom
The Return Of Martin Guerre
Revenge Of The Nerds
Medea
The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai
Careful, He Might Hear You
The Natural
Tommy
Michael Kohlhaas
The Karate Kid
Gone With The Wind
2010
TIME RATING
From its inception, this organiza-
tion has attracted the finest musi-
cians in the West. Christoph
Wilibald Gluck, the founder of
the modern operatic form, spent
his most creative years as com-
poser to the Hapsbury court in
Vienna and wrote for the Im-
perial Chapel. Mozart did the
same in his position as Composer
to the Court in 1787. Although
Josef Haydn was not a member
of the Imperial Chape), he ex-
perienced the life of a choirboy to
the full, and many of his works
are found in their repertoire. The
most famous choirboy, Franz
Schubert, sang from 1808 to
1813. Anton Bruckner became
organist of the Imperial Chapel
in 1867 and influenced his precur-
sors.
In 1918, however, it seemed
that the collapse of the Hapsburg
dynasty and the dissolution of the
Austro-Hungarian Empire would
mean the end of the world
famous institution. Fortunately,
Josef Schnitt retained trie
chaplaincy of the Imperial
Chapel and in 1924, encouraged
by his many friends, he decided
to re-found the boys choir. It was
felt that the boarding school
method was the only practicable
one of insuring the musical train-
ing necessary for the choristers
and, despite enormous economic
difficulties, the attempt was
made. Schnitt spared no personal
expense and he alone is responsi-
ble for the salvation of this aspect
of Austrian musical tradition.
What he began as an experiment
has grown into an enormous suc-
cess and the Vienna Choir Boys,
as they are now called, began to
embark on concert tours around
the world.
More often than not, two
choirs are away on tour at the
same time, with each tour lasting
an average of three months. On
such a tour the 24 choristers are
accompanied by a choirmaster, a
tutor and a nurse who are en-
trusted with their care and
welfare. Since their first U.S.
tour in 1932, the Vienna Choir
Boys have visited America no
fewer than 39 times, have com-
pleted nine Asian tours � travel-
ing as far as Japan � and have
performed an equal number of
times in Australia. They have ap-
peared numerous times in both
South America and South Africa.
They have been received by in-
numerable heads of state, in-
cluding audiences with Popes
Pius XI, Pius XII and Paul VI.
Through their films, recor-
dings, television appearances and
tours, the Vienna Choir Boys
have entertained millions in every
corner of the world with their
programs of costumed sacred
songs, secular and folk music.
Theatre Announces Offerings
NR
NR
7, 9
9ivn b NR
7. 9PG-13 v
7, 9R 1
11R
7, 9:30PG-13
8NR v
7, 9R f
8NR I
7, 9PG f
8PG
7, 9:30PG I
12 midnightPG
8PC 1
7, 9:30PG
8NR
7, 9:30PG
In July, when the house lights
dim and a hush falls over the au-
dience as the conductor raises his
baton to give the downbeat for
the first note of the overture, the
East Carolina Summer Theatre
will begin a season of Broadway
musicals celebrating its 20th year
in Greenville.
"With Christmas just around
the corner, Broadway musicals in
July seems a bit incongruous
said Summer Theatre General
Manager Scott Parker, "but ac-
tually, the association of this
holiday with the Summer Theatre
is a long established one in the
area because so many
theatregoers give season tickets to
the shows as Christmas gifts. It's
become a tradition with a great
many families
Opening this celebration
season will be the winner of six
Tony Awards, A Funny Thing
Happened Or. The Way To The
Forum, scheduled for July 1-6.
Based on the Roman plays of
Plautus, Forum is a blend of
vaudeville, burlesque, mistaken
identities, swinging doors, and
old fashion musical comedy with
songs by Broadway's
"Wunderkind" of music and
lyrics, Stephen Sondheim. After
a two-and-a-half year run in New
York City (more than 1,000 per-
formances), Forum toured all
over the globe and became a suc-
cessful film starring Zero Mostel
belting out the now classic
number, "Comedy Tonight
On July 8, continuing through
the 13th, the Summer Theatre
will give birth to Baby, a recent
musical comedy hit about the ef-
fect of imminent parenthood on
three couples of varying ages. Of-
fering some of the best new songs
produced by Broadway in recent
years, Baby is a romance about
people awaiting a visit from the
stork. Immediately after its
Broadway opening, the New
York Times reviewed Baby as "A
born winner, with buoyancy,
charm and pizazz
The third offering of the
season, The Robber Bridegroom,
opens July 15 and runs through
July 20. Based on the novella of
the same name by Eudora Welty,
The Robber Bridegroom is a song
and dance folk-tale about the
backwoods romance of a tall,
good-looking gentleman bandit
in the early days of the Natchez
Trace in Mississippi. Complete
with country reels, square danc-
ing, fiddles, banjos and a rousing
southern flare for comic adven-
ture, Bridegroom is a musical
fantasy.
On July 24, the Summer
Theatre will open with what pro-
mises to be one of its most
elaborate and lavish productions
in its 20-year history: J.M. Bar-
rie's magical musical version of
Peter Pan . Scheduled for seven
evening performances (July 24-27
and 29-31), and two special
matinees for children (July 29
and 31), this musical version of
Peter Pan has become known a
one of the most endearing of alt
theatrical fantasies. It is the story
of a little boy who wouldn't grow
up; the Darling children who fly
right out their nursery window;
Tinker Bell; Captain Hook; and
Wendy and the little lost boys of
Never Never Land.
Because Peter Pan is not an
easy production to mount, the
Summer Theatre has contacted
Mr. Peter Foy of Las Vegas, re-
questing his assistance in the in-
stallation of the elaborate rigging
systems necessary to fly Peter and
the children throughout the
show. Foy is best known for
developing this sophisticated ap-
paratus first used for Mary Mar-
tin in the now world-famous New
York production of Peter Pan in
the mid 50s.
Since its founding in 1965 on
campus, the Summer Theatre has
produced 65 Broadway musicals
using the original orchestrations
and full complements of scenery
and costumes for more than one-
quarter of a million people who
come from all areas of Eastern
N.C. The theatre has grown from
a nucleus of some SO cast and
crew to more than 120 per-
formers, designers and techni-
cians who reside in Greenville
every summer.
From the first season, Edgar
Loessin has been at the helm as
producer director. He stated
See SUMMER, Page 11.
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10
THfcfcAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8. 1985
'Cop' Holds Top Spot As Murphy Shines
By TINA MAROSC HAK
Fitm F4Mo
One 23 year-old actor got a
well-deserved present over
Christmas � a box-office hit.
Eddie Murphy, known best for
his association with Saturday
Vight Live and 48 Hours, turned
what could have been an excep-
tionally common movie into a
feature full of humor and pizazz.
On top of that, his newest pic-
ture, Beverly Hills Cop attracted
crowds that surpassed even its
I
top three competitors � Dune,
City Heat and 2010. What caused
this picture to earn 64.5 million
dollars during its first 23 days?
Murphy, without a doubt. And
people are still standing in line to
see the flick.
But some eight months ago,
Paramount Pictures may have
been a bit skepticle about the
film's success. Originally,
Sylvester Stallone was to play the
lead role in Cop. Stallone left the
picture, however, and Para-
mount gave the script to Murphy.
! Trivia, Trivia And More Trivia
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Beginning today. The t'ast Carolinian hi' he running a trivia
section in its Tuesday editions. If you would like to contribute in-
teresting facts, please send questions and answers (along with your
name and phone number) to: The Fast t arolinian. Style, Publica-
tions Building, ECU, Greenville, V.C. 278.14.
1. Who won an Academy ward for his her role in Kramer vs
Kramer?
2. W ho performed music for Josie and the Pussycats?
3. How many Yes bands were there?
4. Who was the first President born in this century?
5. What actor, knighted by royalty, played the same character in
three consecutive blockbuster movies?
6. "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, " opened
what novel?
7. What east coast state was the original home of film making?
8. Pi ho started the first movie studio?
9. Who was Howdy Doodys cousin?
10. What was the original name of the Vw York Jets?
Answers On Page 11
In a review by Richard Corliss in
Time magazine, Director Martin
Bresent said, "There were seven
versions of the script that were
cut, pasted and rewritten before
each scene. We were reshaping
the material every day, and
whenever we needed inspiration,
Eddie would provide it. That the
film turned out to be coherent is a
miracle. That it is successful pro-
ves there is a God Maybe it was
a miracle, but whoever saw the
movie would probably tell you
that it was Murphy who made the
picture a success.
In Beverly Hills Cop, Murphy
Plays the role of Axle Foley, a
fast-talking Detroit police detec-
tive who spends his vacation in
Beverly Hills investigating the
death of a friend. While pulling
hilarious stunts to dissuade
resistance from the city police
department, Axle manages to un-
fold the mystery and gain tremen-
dous respect, if you will, from his
Beverly Hill "collegues Even
Rosewood and Taggart, two
somewhat goofy yet serious-
minded detectives, come to
respect him despite his "late
night supper" and "banana in
the tailpipe" trick.
Axle Foley is Eddie Murphy in
this movie. And that's probably
why Murphy does such an ex-
cellent job entertaining the au-
dience; both are very human.
Through Axle, Murphy does
what he already does best �
make people laugh.
f
SOFT CONTACTS
�S ffW l)Ain
Wl l $40.00paiH
S
EXTEND I)
Wl AH $60.00pair
UNTO) $70.00pair
(blue aqua
f green, brow n)
STUDENT ID REQUIRED
lw .hor pru.es do not intitule tees fa prott��sion,l �� i . .
Professional fees depend mi lens type and your prewous
lens ici ii-ik
Call for more information � 756 9404.
oproMerwc
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R.
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I ipion nnex IW (ireenvillv h
Firm Up And Get In Shape
With Aerobics At Nautilus
Let Nautilus get you ready for summer with
our new Aerobic classes in an air conditioned
and carpeted Aerobics room.
We offer six classes daily with a specal 9:30
p.m. after night class, class on Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday nights.
Other times will be added if there
is sufficient interest
Our rate is only $20 per month for Unlimited
Classes. Check out our specal rates for the
whole semester.
Call 758-9584 for
Information & Class times
Bring in this ad for one
Free
class and $5 off
the first month!
nautilus
FITNES:
CLUB
for men end women
1002 IviNlsmtiT
antCNVIllC NC 17014
MARATHON
RESTAURANTS
SUBS, GREEK DISHES,SANDWICHES,
GREEK PASTRIES, PIZZA
752-0326 or 752 3753
560 Evans Street
Greenville,NC
CALL US FASTDELIVERY
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Flower Shop
758-2774
Comer Evans & 1 ITh St.
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SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS at
and Camp Seafarer (girls). Serving as a ca
challenging and rewarding opportunity to wo
people, ages 7-16. Sea Gull and Seafarer a
character development camps located on the
Carolina and feature sailing, motorboating,
plus many usual camping activities includin
of major sports. Qualifications include a
in young people, ability to instruct in one
camps' programs, and excellent references,
information and application, please write a
training and experience in area(s) skilled
Director, Camps Sea GullSeafarer, P. 0. Bo
North Carolina 27605.
Camp Sea Gull (boys)
mp counselor is a
rk with young
re health and
coast of North
and seamanship,
g a wide variety
genuine interest
phase of the
For further
brief resume' of
to Don Cheek,
x 10976, Raleigh,
AEROBICS
757-1608
417 Evans St
Downtown
CLASS TIMES
MWF 9:30am
MTWTH 3:15,4:20,5:30,6:45
Fri 3:15,Sat 11:00.1:00
We Specialize in Aerobics
Come Check Us Out "
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
&
Student Union Vice President
for the 1985 - 1986 Term
Any full time student can apply.
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: January 18, 1985
ra II
� � II� � II
til�� II
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The East Carolina University Department of University Unions
Artist Series Committee
presents
The Internationally Renowned
VIENNA CHOIR BOYS
Tuesday, January 15, 1985 8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium ECU Campus Greenville
Tickets Available Monday � Friday,
11:00 a.m.�6:00 p.m from th entral Ticket Office
Telephone 757-6611, ext. 266
ECU Students and Guests: $5.00
Youth (Age 14 and Under): $5.00
All Others and at the Door: $10.00

Odyssey Contin,
By DANIEL MALRER
Master film maker Stanley
Kubrick and bestselling auther
Arthur C. Clarke rocked the film
industry in 1968 with their visual-
ly exciting production of 2001: A
Space Odyssey Now direc
torwriter Peter Hyams brings us
the long awaited scqual 2010.
Odyssey Two With Clarke's new
novel in one hand and the latest
in computer technology in the
other, Hyams set to writing a
screenplay worthy of Kubrick's
masterpiece. Hyams, while scrip-
ting the picture, remained in con-
stant communication via word
processor with Clarke, who
makes his home in Sir Lanka
The screenplay remains
faithful to Clarke's '82 novel as it
catches up with the world nine
years after astronaut Dave
Bowman's bone chilling discrip-
tion of the monolith orbiting Io.
Telefilm Takes
"Elvis Memories a one-h.
television special that looks at the
private world of Elus Pre-
through personal home mo
and rare m-performance cono
film focage, will air tonight a
p.m. on WTVD, Channel 11
This tribute to the superstar is be-
ing presented in observance of his
50th birthday celebration.
This special is narrated
George Klein, a man wh
friendship with Elvis began
high school and continued i.
Elvis' death on Aug. 16, 19"
Featured will be rare I
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1
And Get In Shape
obits At Nautilus
on read for summer with
lasses in an air conditioned
CS room.
ses dail) with a specal 9:30
s, .lass on Monday,
;sda nights.
be added if there
nt interest
month for I nlimited
ui specal rates for the
758-9584 for
i n &la times
nautilus
i
"net �ocj women
f - AN STKCCT
IKtCNVILLI u c IT)(
I Diversity s
it I iiion
I plications for
p ion President
i jie President
1986 Term
jdent can apply.
ible at Mendenhall
nformation Desk.
i (- j ?
itf, 185
��
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niversity I nions
;eniJle
:ket Office
Odyssey Continues Its Grandeur In 2010
By DANffiLMAURER
Master film maker Stanley
Kubrick and bestselling auther
Arthur C. Clarke rocked the film
industry in 1968 with their visual-
ly exciting production of 2001: A
Space Odyssey. Now direc-
tor writer Peter Hyams brings us
the long awaited sequal 2010:
Odyssey Two. With Clarke's new
novel in one hand and the latest
in computer technology in the
other, Hyams set to writing a
screenplay worthy of Kubrick's
masterpiece. Hyams, while scrip-
ting the picture, remained in con-
stant communication via word
processor with Clarke, who
makes his home in Sir Lanka.
The screenplay remains
faithful to Clarke's '82 novel as it
catches up with the world nine
vears after astronaut Dave
Bowman's bone chilling discrip-
�ion of the monolith orbiting Io,
"It's full of stars After a
computer transmition recaps the
events of 2001, the film picks up
with the life of Dr. Heywood
Floyd, played by Roy Scheider.
Floyd, once coordinater for the
failed Discovery mission, is now
relaxing as the Dean of a
reputable university. Floyd is ap-
proached by a Russian scientist
with an offer he can not refuse.
With The Soviet Union and
The United States close to war
over South America, the Rus-
sians don't want to risk another
national incident by boarding the
American spaceship Discovery
which lies in a decaying orbit
around Jupiter. Thus, a joint
Soviet-American mission is
undertaken to reach the aban-
doned Discovery and retrieve her
valuable secerets before she
crashes. Many of the mysteries
left behind by the first mission
are answered along the way,
while new and exciting ones are
brought to light.
Roy Scheider's wonderfully in-
spiring portrayal of Heywood
Floyd is matched only by John
Lithgow's preformances as the
American engineer who befriends
a Russian Cosmonaut killed dur-
ing the mission. Together
Scheider and Lithgow bring an
emotional dimension to the film
that its predecessor seemed to
lack. Keir Dullea reprises his role
as astronaut Dave Bowman, and
Douglas Rain as the voice of Hal.
Their participation in the produc-
tion lends continuity to the two
films.
In 2010 Hyams is successful in
capturing the same awe inspiring
visual atmosphere made famous
by Kubrick. Hyams has produced
an exciting film with artistic grace
and human emotions. It is truely
a sequal worthy of its
predecessor.
Telefilm Takes Personal Look At Presley
"Elvis Memories a one-hour
ielevision special that looks at the
private world of Elvis Presley
through personal home movies
and rare in-performance concert
film footage, will air tonight at 8
p.m. on WTVD, Channel 11.
This tribute to the superstar is be-
ing presented in observance of his
Oth birthday celebration.
This special is narrated bv
ueorge Klein, a man whose
rnendship with Elvis began in
gh school and continued until
is' death on Aug. 16, 1977.
Featured will be rare film
footage, most of which, until
now, has never been viewed by
the public. Also included is Elvis'
wedding to Priscilla Beaulieu; his
only "one on one" interview for
television; his induction into the
Army; his first concert in Mem-
phis; and his return to live perfor-
ming at the International Hotel in
Las Vegas in August 1969.
Aniweri to Trivia Questions
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xWASH HOUSE
Welcome Back Students
Wash your clothes and
have Fun at the
WASH HOUSE
Vachos-cheese, Videos, BEER
Snacks,Fountain Drinks
Fluff and Fold
Largest Laundromat in Greenville
Coupon
1 FREE WASH
when using another
washer
1 per visit
Expires Jan 15th E.Uth Street
one Block from the
ii
Best" Rental Prices In
Greenville
- �&� ;v
2905 E. 10th St.
758-9102
Hours M�F10�6
Closed Wednsdays
Sat. 9�5
TELE RENT TV
TELERENT also rents.
� VCR's
� Home Stereos
� Color Consoles
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
January iT ms 11
�S5S53SSS3�S5SS53SS3S
yster Bar upens
5:00 P.M- Daily
Steamed Oystersp�.s8.50
s4.75
(Large & Salty)
Half Peck
Oysters on the half shell�$3.50
�8
Steamed
Shrimp
In The Shell. One Hound
Baked Potato & Salad
5
DINNER
CREATE YOUR OWN
SEAFOOD PLATTER
S�I�ct 4 Items Of Your Choice
� Shnmp
� Flounder
� Trout
� Crab Cakes
� Deviled Crab
� Clams
� Steamed Shnmp
Steamed
Crab Legs
Shnmp Creole
Oysters
Scallops
Catfish
Barbeque
Fned Chicken
Soft Shell
3 Crabs
y 2 Large Crabs
P Choice Of 2 Vegetables
$K99

w2 Vegs
Only
5.99
5
ALL YOU CAN EAT EXTRAVAGANZA
i
� Fried Chicken
� Fried Shrimp
�Crab Cakes
� Clam Strips
(Available Any Time)
� Fried Oysters
� Trout
� Flounder
� Shrimp Creole
& Now Bay Scallops
Your Choice Of As Many As 5 Items
6��
� Deviled Crab
� Barbeque
� Catfish
$:99
� With Alaskan Crab Legs
8.99
Mon Tucs. & Wed.
(Any Time)
Fried
Popcorn Shrimp
& Trout
All you Can Eat
SC99
Steamed Seafood Feast
Alaskan Crab Legs
Steamed Shrimp
Sauteed Crab Meat
Baked Potato & Salad
$795
7
Super
LUNCH
Thursday Only
Hickory Smoked
Texas Style
J Barbeque Beef
2 Vegetables $099
�SSSSSagSSSSSE
Served
11:00-2:00 P.M.
Specials
5 0i.
Rib Eye
S350
Meats and Seafood
Scallops
Shrimp
Trout
Oysters
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Flounder
Fried Chicken
BBQ Chicken
Country Style Steak
Veal Cutlets
Hamburger Steak
Barbeque Dinner
Catfish
Vegetable Plate:
Choice of four vegetables
CHOICE OF
1 Meat
& 2 Veg.
ONLY
BssaggBsss
3.25
includes tax
& beverage
Vegetables
Beets
Slaw
Boiled Potatoes
Potato Salad
French Fries
Yams
Black-eyed Peas
Collards
Rice
Mashed Potatoes
String Beans
Apple Sauce
Brunswick Stew
Cabbage
Steamed
Shrimp
(6 Oz.)
With 2 Vegetables
sqso
Alaskan
Crab Legs
W.th 2 Vegetables
S325
Steamed
Seafood Feast
Includes Crab Legs (6 Oz.)
Sauteed Crab Meat (2 Oz.)
& Steamed Shrimp
$150
SEAFOOD DELIGHT: Choose from: Choice of three seafoods. Shnmp.
Oysters. Clam Strips. Trout. Flounder. Crabcakes. Deviled Crabs 8c Bav Scal-
lops. �
$3.99
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FOB SALE Complete iivng rt
with sleeper sota Good condition
Best offer will consider separating
Contact Stephanie or Ph
Evancho 75 6249,75 '84
FOR SALE B W TV An Afar y
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FOR SALE S vei W vata Ra, ng
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LIMITED OFFER Encyclopedia
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Easy finan ng available Only $50
tation no obhga
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STUDENT DJ SERVICE
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weekends � ot leave
Our bedroo f p
SU: Mssec oaboimg to you fr s
weexena D idn't want to can She
�"aye stened to Lu� anc got you a
phone for Xmas
JAIMIE: Looking forward to gef ng
?r know you Bruce says he wants to
mee ou i 'old him you're there
EILEEN C Hurtm for certain!
SIGMA PHI EPSILON The
Brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon
would like to welcome everyone
back to ECU and we hopp that ou
- had a e break
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS Once
again the annual PjPj part was a
success �Ve thank all of ou who
showed for helping make the night a
blur The Brothers
TRl SIGS: Thanks tor a fantastic
time at the nut and oolt social it was
a great way to end theear Looking
forward to partying with you girls
aga n this semester Sig Eps
ALPHA PHI: The big brothers of
Alpha Phi Sorority wish to welcome
back an of the sisters we hope you
all had a wonderful break this
semesters plans are going to re even
better that last one's
PI KAPP The brothers of Pi Kappa
Phi wish to welcome everyone back
this semester Especially to our lit
tie sisters who do so much for us
Thanks for the house furniture1
BETA PHI'S: How long before you
show us you're together If you can
get together real quick, you can go to
Happy Hour with us on Saturday!
Summer Theatre Opens Season With Tony Winner
Continued from P�k�' '�
i ecentl), " 1 he 20 years ol do
theatre in the summei hold mart)
memories Fortunately, vm sup
pic v the bad ones and recaU the
pleasant times 1 recall, to
shows and the hundred;
performers ai
ivc- been �
and gone on to Bi
othe . m
leep
the seasons
we've had
"In helj us celebrate our 20th
season, we ha-e chosen tour um
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various aspects ol humanity and
life forum, a celebration of
d 1 tlab, a poiji
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parenthood, Hridexruom, a hij
stepping celebration ol an
American Robin Hood and love;
and Peter Pan a celel
youth and 'he yo
he aid
rheatregoers may visit the
Summer Theafr- Box Office
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FHtKASTl AROl INIAN
Sports
JANUARY 8, 1985
Page 13
Confi
By SCOTT COOPER
SUff Wrti�
Dump
the fim ECACr?aSJe,ba11 tcam came "P �on in
Mon p ,fed out iTdtT ft " �
Coliseum. 'Ct0ry last ni�ht in Min�es
ijttthi Yi,s�n Ied the Patriots in �
decTon forT ar,�S YatCS� an all-ECAC South
n scorinB fo CMn1 ?SCaSOns was tied for �l
in scoring for GMU with 18 points. Freshman Brian
ed w7thw"s,0 from the ndd -d " h
Although the Pirates connected on 33 field goals
seven more than GMU), they only made three ?S
throws throughout the game. George Mason took a�
vantage of Pirate fouls and convened on 29 of 35 free
throws for an 82.9 percentage.
William Grady led the way for ECU He was 11-19
prtsthKe?h,dsrndd finiShed aS thC ��Z� U
the f HH n h 8C Wf a PCrfeCt SCVen �f SeVen from
eL h" k ,ng WUh U P01"15 and 8rabbi"g seven
rebounds (which was the game's best) in only 15
minutes of playing time. Curt Vanderhorst scored 12
points despite fouling out with 3:01 remaining. Der-
rick Battle added seven points while six other Pirates
contributed two points each. Scott Hardy was the
game s leading assist man with seven.
A vocaJ crowd of 3,950 saw a talented George
Mason team take an early lead as a Carlos Yates
10-foot jumper put the Patriots up 10-6 with 1632
ixchl 7Pefmn8fhal,f ThC teams traded baskets �d
exchanged a few fouls before a Ricky Wilson dunk
wuh 11.16 gave GMU an 18-11 advantage. After an
the n Jme�Ut' ' P'rteS Camc roarin8 back behind
the offensive play of Keith Sledge who scored six
straight points for ECU. With 5:09 left in the half
Vanderhorst hit Herb Dixon for a slam dunk which
tied the game 24-24 and caused the Minges Coliseum
crowd to erupt.
George Mason managed to hold the lead as they
scored the next four points to lead 28-24 with 4 27 re-
maining. Sledge chopped GMU's lead to 30-27 on a
long-range jumpshot with 1:45 left. Miller retaliated
with back-to-back jumpers to up the Patriot lead to
34-27 with under a minute left. Sledge tapped in a
Dixon miss to make the GMU lead 34-29 at halftime
Grady opened the second half with a 20-footer
closing the Patriot lead to 34-31. Then George Mason
began rolling as Mike Dufrene connected on a 20
footer giving GMU a 43-35 lead with 15:39 remaining
ECU made its comeback by scoring the next six
points as Grady's 15-foot jumpshot with 1329 re-
maining cut the Patriot lead to 43-41. Gradv matched
GMU as he connected on ECU's next three posses-
sions. However, ECU could get no closer than 51-47
at the 11:46 mark. The Patriots went on a 12-2 scoring
binge when Ricky Wilson hit a lavup with 7:15 re-
maining.
The Pirates did manage to cut the lead to 63-55 on a
layup by Derrick Battle, but the Patriots finished the
game with 10 straight free throws to win 81-69.
Coach Charlie Harrison wasn't displeased with his
team s effort. "We didn't play poorly Harrison
said. In certain crucial situations we just didn't ex-
ecute well enough
George Mason head coach Joe Harrington spoke of
the improving ECAC South conference. "The con-
ference is much improved Harrington said "The
atmosphere is better and should continue to
improve
oveFrn "OW ? COnference Pla and 5-5
Z wL V W,U traVel t0 Camon Indoor Stadium
ranked Del p. Jafkf� batt,e the nat'onal"
ranked Duke Blue Devils.
Baker Looking Toward New
Season As ECU Head Coach
Kei.h S.edge (24, ��. his .eapin, .bilil) � he blocks ,his ,��, S'SSSiST
Coach Seeks Reason for Dismissal
Continued From Page 1
Howell, Karr and the members
of the athletic committee refused
to give any specific reasons as to
why Emory was fired, but many
members of the team claimed it
was a conflict between Karr and
Emory.
"Three times I asked Dr. Karr
if he had instigated it Emory
said, "but he only said he had
supported the action � they gave
me no other answer. I could live
with anything if I knew whv and
who
"If it's better for the university
and somebody can explain it to
me, I can live with that Emory
continued. "They took the most
cherished thing away from me �
ECU, that's all I wanted to do.
They won't find somebodv who
will work as hard as I did
Emory went on to say he has
taken the program a long way in
the past five years, claiming he
has attracted the best athletes
that have ever played football for
ECU.
"You can still
win with people,
and I think East
Carolina has
great people
�Ed Emory
"I think that the constant
improvement and the total com-
mitment I have had to academics
and recruiting was the founda-
tion of this program Emory
elaborated. "You can still win
with people, and I think East
Carolina has great people
Emory came to ECU in
December of 1979 following the
resignation of Pat Dye. who now
serves as athletic director and
head football coach at Auburn.
A graduate of ECU and co-
captain of the 1959 Pirate foot-
ball team, Emory had been a suc-
cessful high school coach before
moving into the collegiate ranks.
He served as an assistant coach at
Wake Forest, Clemson, Duke
and Georgia Tech before moving
to Greenville.
Emory has no future plans at
the present time, but says he
wishes the ECU football team all
the luck in the world under the
direction of recently acquired
coach Art Baker (see related story
this page).
By RANDY MEWS
Sporti Milor
Despite the controversy sur-
rounding the firing of Ed Emory,
Art Baker didn't waste any time
as he accepted the head coaching
position of the ECU football
team just four days after Emory's
dismissal.
"I wish the circumstances were
different that Ed Emory had
been named head coach of the
Atlanta Falcons or something
like that Baker said. "It's the
tough part of our business, but I
feel you usually get over that pain
in a hurry � hopefully he will
too
Baker served as associate head
coach and offensive coordinator
under Emory in 1983, and was an
integral part of the team that
finished the year at 8-3 and rank-
ed in the Top 20.
While at ECU, Baker was
responsible for implementing the
highly successful "freeze option"
offense. He took that system to
Florida State when he left Green-
ville following the 1983 cam-
paign, and plans to use it during
the upcoming year.
"I've been away from East
Carolina for a year, but I see the
talent here good talent Baker
said. "Quality depth could be the
biggest problem, and we must
jump into recruiting pretty fast.
But I'm excited about the players
we have here and about coaching
these players
Art Baker
"My past years as a head coach
should be of value Baker con-
tinued. "I know how to handle
players, recruiting and all the
demands that come with
coaching � I'm ready to go
Although the recruiting season
is well underway for most of the
schools in the area, Baker feels he
still can have success in luring the
better athletes in the area to
Greenville. "One of the nice
things is that people know who
i�i � �� �"�-� lc nHiigs u mai people icnc
Why Was Head Coach Ed Emory
h;i WaSEd Emory fired as oux refused to say anvthina. a .u:�� J
East Carolina is and that it has a
good football program he said.
"I've been recruiting North
and South Carolina and Atlanta
(for FSU), so I'm pretty familar
with the people in this area. "I
know a lot of coaches promise
not to talk with the same kids
when they move on. but I told
Bobby (Bowden, FSU coach) this
is my territory now
Aside from recruiting. Baker's
primary goal is organizing a staff
that is compatible he said.
"Some of the current staff may-
be staying, some may not
Baker did not mention any
names, but it is known that four
of the current assistants are in the
first of two year contracts, in-
cluding offensive coordinator
Don Murray and defensive coor-
dinator Tom Throckmorton.
Baker began his coaching car-
eer in assorted South Carolina
high schools before becoming an
assistant at Clemson and Texas
Tech. He served as head coach at
Furman (1977) and The Citadel
(1978-82). As a head coach, he
compiled a 57-48-5 record.
Baker will receive a four year
contract starting at 55,000 a year,
with benefits pushing his annual
income to approximately 100,000
annually.
Why was Ed Emory fired as
head football coach at ECU?
The players, students, Pirate
Club supporters and all those
who follow the ECU football
team want to know.
The players demanded a
meeting with Athletic Director
Ken Karr shortly after Emorv's
dismissal to find out why their
mentor had been fired. They were
told to have a Merry Christmas
and do well on their exams. Karr
said he would answer questions
about the future of the football
program, but none about Emory.
Chancellor John Howell (it
was ultimately his decison to fire
Emory) was contacted numerous
times by various members of the
media, but merely said it wasn't
university policy to discuss
changes in personnel.
Tom Bennett, athletic board
chairman of the board of trustees
(the committee that made the rec-
comendation to fire Emory), flat
out refused to say anything.
Most of the major newspapers
across the state have cited the
following reasons for Emory's
termination:
� A potential drug problem ex-
isted among the players.
� ECU finished the 1984 season
with a 2-9 record.
� Emory's gamble of red-shirting
more than 50 players this past
season.
� A personality conflict existed
between Emory and Karr.
After exhausting every possible
source that has first-hand infor-
mation concerning Emory's
dismissal, I have come to the con-
clusion that the above reasons
have little if anything to do with
the termination of Emory's con-
tract.
1. A potential drug problem ex-
ists on every team from Pop
Warner League to the NFL.
2. It would be impossible for the
university to justify Emory's
dismissal after the 1982 or 1983
seasons when the football team
had a combined record of 15-7. if
the team had finished 2-9 in
either of those years, Emory pro-
bably would have been fired
then.
3. The only thing red-shirting ac-
complishes is giving the players
an extra year to adjust
academically and athletically to
college life (no harm there).
4. A personality conflict would
exist between Emory and Karr if
they were brothers. Emory is
outgoing and outspoken � Karr
is not.
Before going any further, I
would like to say the purpose of
this article is not to damage Ed
Emory's reputation as a football
coach. It is to provide the East
Carolina community with what I
believe are the real reasons that
his contract was terminated.
I have worked with Ed Emory
for over two years as a member
of the media. I respect 'Coach' as
an individual, a friend and as a
man who stands up for what he
believes. There is no doubt in my
mind that Emory was totally-
dedicated to East Carolina
University and the football pro-
gram.
The university will never find
another person that worked as
hard as he did. He was totally
dedicated to the program and the
Former ECU Football Coach Ed Emory
players. He was a good recruiter
and a good coach.
However, the administration
felt Emory wasn't the person to
take ECU to the top of the Divi-
sion I-A football ranks. It wasn't
that Emory didn't carry out his
duties as a coach, but that he did
not represent ECU in a way that
the administration felt a football
coach should.
Below is a brief list of several
reasons why it was felt that Ed
Emory could no longer represent
East Carolina University:
� Emory was too brash in public
when it came to controversial
issues. In 1982 he asked the
General Assembly to force the
University of North Carolina to
continue its football series with
the Pirates, while in 1983 he
jeopardized the ECU-N.C. State
series by demanding that the two
teams play on a home-and-away
basis.
� In 1982, two of Emory's
assistants were caught spying on
North Carolina's practice ses-
sions just prior to the ECU-UNC
football game. The two culprits
were identified by picures from
ECU's football media guide, yet
Emory still vehemently denied
having anything to do with the in-
cident.
� Although Emory recruited
good players, he did not always
seek all the qualities desired in a
student-athlete. Fifteen players
on the team this fall are
academically ineligible to attend
school this semester, while
countless others will be on
academic probation.
� Emory constantly used game
officials as excuses for losses, and
often times criticized host teams
when on away games.
The above reasons are not my
opinion as to why Ed Emory was
fired, but factual information ob-
tained from sources that asked
not to be identified.
It was extremely difficult for
me to publish an article of this
nature because of the respect 1
have for Ed Emory, but I felt it
was my responsibility as a profes-
sional journalist to provide the
East Carolina community with
the reasons for Emory's
dismissal.
I will always admire a man who
stands up for what he believes.
Ed Emory has done this all his
life � despite the consequences.
�Randy Mews





14
THE EASTCAROLON1AN
JANUARY 8, 1985
Women Beat Iona And Howard Over Break
By RICK McCORMAC
Suff Witter
Below is a brief summary of
how the EC I' Women's Basket-
ball team fared in its games over
the holiday break:
The Lady Pirate Basketball
team used a tenacious full court
press to set up numerous
fastbreak scoring opportunities
in defeating Iona 69-57 Saturday
night and end a five game losing
streak.
"It was a good win, we deserv-
ed it ECU Coach Emily Man-
waring said. "It feels good to see
the things you practice finally
payoff. We feel like we ac-
complished something more than
just winning a basketball game
The Ladv Pirates never trailed
in the game as they opened up an
11-2 lead in the early minutes.
Senior Anita Anderson led the
ECU charge, scoring seven of the
first 11 points on a variety of in-
side moves.
Anderson led the lady Pirates
in scoring and rebounding, with
20 points and 11 rebounds.
Lorai.ie Foster had 18 points,
while Monique Pompili added 13
points and grabbed nine re-
bounds.
In the first half, the Lady-
Pirate fastbreak was explosive
and accounted for 25 of their 40
points, giving ECU a 40-27 lead
at the half.
In the second half, the Lady
Gaels were able to get within two
points at 46-42, but Lisa
Squirewell responded with five
straight points for the Lady
Pirates.
"When they cut the lead down
to two points our 1984 team
would have died Manwaring
said,( referring to her teams pro-
blem of maintaining leads in the
second half)- "But tonight we
played as a team, and made the
clutch baskets when we needed
them
The ECU press forced Iona in-
to 25 turnovers, and limited them
to 37 percent shooting from the
field.
Iona's leading scorer Emily
Mojica averaging 17 points per
game, was held scoreless for the
night while missing all 12 shots
from the field.
Manwaring praised her teams
defensive effort and was especial-
ly pleased with the play of her
guards. "Loraine Foster and
Sylvia Bragg both played Mojica
really well when we were playing
man to man defense
ECU improved its record to
3-8, and will play one more non-
conference game against Camp-
bell University Wednesday night
in Minges Coliseum before enter-
ing ECAC South league play.
Dec. 4,1984
The ECU women got their se-
cond win of the season against
Howard University, in a 98-47
drubbing in a game com-
memorating 50 years of Lady
Pirate Basketball.
With 14:45 remaining in the
first half the Lady Pirates led
10-8, when they reeled off 13
stright points and were never
challenged the rest of the way.
ECU had four players in dou-
ble figures, with Sylvia Bragg
Pirates Top Boston
Look To Patriots
Bv SCOTT COOPER
The following is a brief sum-
mary of how the ECU men's
basketball team fared in its games
over the holiday break:
Jan. 3, 1985
After trailing Boston Universi-
ty 27-25 at halftime in Minges
Coliseum on Thursday night,
William Grady and Curt
Yanderhorst led a second half
Pirate attack that paced ECU to a
"5-62 victory.
Grady scored 17 second half
points and finished with 21.
Yanderhorst was also impressive
as he scored 15 points in the se-
cond half, and finished as the
top scorer with 25 points.
Head coach Charlie Harrison
was pleased with the Pirates play
in the second half. "Our big peo-
ple showed no aggressiveness or
emotion in the first half Har-
rison said. "The team came out
much more aggressive in the se-
cond half
The Pirates trailed the Terriers
of Boston University throughout
the first half. However, a
Yanderhorst 25-footer with 7:44
remaining in the half knotted the
game at 15-15. With 5:55 left,
Leon Bass put the Pirates up by
four (19-15) with a five foot tur-
naround jumper.
In the remaining 5:44, Boston
University outscored ECU 12-6
to take a two point lead into the
loekerroom.
ECU opened the second half
scoring as William Grady hit an
eight-footer in the lane to tie the
score 27-27 with 19:24 left to play.
The Pirates really picked up the
momentum when Vanderhorst
swished a 24-footer with 16:49 re-
maining, this gave ECU a 33-29
advantage.
The Terrier's were able to tie
the game 33-33 on a Mike Alex-
ander layup and a pair of free
throws by Tom Ivey with 15:42
left. However, Peter Dam's in-
side bucket on a Grady assist
gave the Pirates a 35-33 lead and
were never threatened thereafter.
ECU began to push the ball up-
See VANDERHORST, Page 15
Helmick's Golfers Combine
Athletics And Academics
Bv RICK McCORMAC
Suff �r1W
The ECU Men's Golf team
competed in the Gator Bowl In-
vitational Collegiate Golf Tour-
nament Dec. 17-19 at Ponte Var-
da Beach, Fla.
The tournament was played on
three different courses with na-
tional reputations. In addition to
playing at Sawgrass, the Pirates
played at the Tournament
Players Club and Oakridge.
ECU managed to finish only
seventh out of 16 teams, in what
admittedly was a weak field, but
ECU coach Bob Helmick wasn't
too disappointed.
"We went down there the day
after exams, all of our players
were busy studying and hadn't
been able to get much time on the
course to practice Helmick
said.
"We went down there for the
exposure to the golf courses
Helmick added, "We realistically
didn't expect to win simply
because we had not been playing.
Georgia Tech, led by in-
dividual winner Bill McDonald
finished first in the individual
competition, while Brevard took
second place.
Chris Czaja was the leading
finisher for the Pirate golfers.
ECU now looks ahead to the spr-
ing season which begins in Feb. at
Hilton Head, SC.
"The Gator Bowl Invitational
will help us Helmick said. "We
played on two of the top 100
layouts in the world. I was more
worried about our performance
in the classroom than how we
would do on the golf course
Helmick stresses academics a
great deal, and his golfers have
the highest grade point average of
any varsity team on campus with
a 2.71 average.
Coach Helmick feels that by
placing top priority on school
work, he does hinder his golfers'
performance on the course, but
he wouldn't have it any other
way.
"ECU is a learning institu-
tion, we give out diplomas, not
PGA playing cards Helmick
said. "Everybody who enters our
program is going to attend class
and make progress towards a
degree or he will not be on the
team
Paul Steelman is a good exam-
ple of Helmick's philosophy, in 3
semesters he has completed 45
hours of classes and carries a 4.0
grade point average. Steelman is
a possible Academic All-America
in the spring.
Helmick spoke of many golfers
who go to college just to play golf
and when they find they aren't
talented enough to make it on the
PGA tour, they have nothing to
fall back on.
"Out of the 150 PGA tour
members, only about five have
degrees. And for every one of
those 150, there are thousands
who couldn't make it on the tour
and don't have a degree to fall
back on
leading the way with 22 points.
Freshman Alma Bethea had a
career high 17 points, while
Loraine Foster and Victoria
Watras contributed 15 and 11
points respectively.
Dec. 7, 1984
The Lady Pirates faced
number one ranked Old Domi-
nion in Minges Coliseum, the
powerful Lady Monarchs were
too much to handle as ODU won
92-74.
The Lady Monarchs led 50-39
at the half, in the second half
ECU cut the lead to seven, before
ODU pulled away.
With 8:25 to go in the game,
Old Dominion opened a 72-58
lead forcing ECU to foul late in
the game. ODU converted on 26
of 31 attempts to put the game
away.
Medina Dixon led the Monar-
chs in scoring with 24 points,
while Marie Christian added 19.
ECU was led by Anita Ander-
son who had 20 points on 9-12
shooting from the field. Sylvia
Bragg and Lisa Squirewell added
15 and 13 points, Monique Pom-
pili contributed 12.
Dec. 15, 1984
ECU traveled to Columbia to
take on South Carolina in
another non-conference game for
Emily Manwaring's Lady
Pirates.
The Lady Gamecocks shot 55
percent from the field in the se-
cond half, while ECU only hit on
40 percent. USC went on to win
68-54.
Anita Anderson was the only
Lady Pirate in double figures
with 14 points, while Monique
Pompili had a game high 11 re-
bounds.
The Lady Gamecocks were led
by Brantley Southers' 16 points.
Dec. 18, 1984
After losing to USC on the
road, the Lady Pirates continued
their string of road games against
Moorehead State.
The Lady Pirates dropped a
77-67 decision to Moorehead
state, due mainly to ECU's 26
turnovers in the game.
Freshman Victoria Watras led
ECU with 17 points while Sylvia
Bragg and Anita Anderson each
had a dozen points.
Dec. 19, 1984
The Lady Pirates dropped their
fourth consecutive game in a
86-76 loss to Marshall University.
Once again turnovers and poor
shooting spelled doom for the
Lady Pirates, as they committed
24 turnovers and shot only 40
percent from the field.
Anita Anderson continued to
play well for the Lady Pirates
despite a painful back injury that
has bothered her all year. Ander-
son had 29 points and 12 re-
bounds in the loss.
Lisa Squirewell had 12 points
and 11 rebounds as she was the
only other ECU player in double
digits.
Karen Phelphrey led Marshall
with 23 points on 11 of 15
shooting, while pulling down 13
rebounds.
Jan. 2, 1985
ECU returned home to Minges
Coliseum to face South Carolina
for the second time in a little over
two weeks.
Just as in their previous en-
counter, the Lady Gamecocks
were victorious as poor shooting
hurt the Lady Pirates.
ECU shot only 29 percect in
the second half, while hitting on
just 31 percent of their shots for
the game.
USC had a four point lead at
the half, when a Monique Pom
pili basket cut the lead to two,
South Carolina reeled off 11 con-
secutive points and was never
challanged again.
Marsi Mcalister led South
Carolina with 16 points, while
Brantley Southers had 15.
ECU was led by Sylvia Bragg s
17 points and Monique Pompili's
12. Anita Anderson and Lisa
Squirewell each had 10 points for
the Lady Pirates.

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The Jack and Ruth Eckerd Foundation has
immediate and future openings for full time
year-round camp Counselor Teachers,
responsible for progresswelfare of 10
problem youths in live-in wilderness
educational system. Starting salary
$10,400year plus room and board. Excellent
benefits, training, advancement. Call Clarie or
David at 704-371-8355 or send resume to Jack
& Ruth Eckerd Foundation, Regional
Recruiting Office, P.O. Box 31122, Charlotte,
NC 28231. Equal Opportunity Employer.
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of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
COMET GOLDFISH 30
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing
is available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE. NC 2734
PHONf 756 1222
Copyright 1985
Kroger Sjv on
Ouantitv Bignts Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvil
Ovf�'WC 'in X'C
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Jan 12 1985
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INDIAN RIVER
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Yanderhorst
a five
Pirates
never r
Grad
while l
rick Ba
Peter
Dixon
chippedl
EC I ,
steaK
Ik I
The
fourth i
the
Hui
Willu
l
Continued From Page 14
court and showed their home
crowd an improved running
game. With 5:29 remaining.
Vanderhorst converted on a
three-point play to give the
Pirates a 54-44 lead
The Pirates were able to hold
on to the lead as the converted
on 70 percent of their free throws
in the second half. The most im
pressive statistic was the Pirates'
field goal shooting in the second
half (78.3 percent)
"We've got good chemistry
now Coach Harrison said
Dec. 29, 1984
Curt Vanderhorst led all
scorers with 22 points and grar I
ed a game-high 11 rebounds in
ECU's 70-65 victors over North
Texas State. The Pirates took
third place in the Firs! Tulsa
Classic.
After a I eon Bass lav up tied
the game 2-2 with 19:13 left in the
opening half, William Grady hit
ECU Players
Selected By
USFL Teams
B BILI MITCHKU
ECU football standouts Ste?
Adams, Ricky Nichols and He
Williams were picked up in the
USFL draft on Thursday Jan.3
Henry Williams wen: in the
third round to the Men
Showboats, who had th
ritorial rights to ECU plave-
he elects to sign with
Showboats, he will be joined
former Pirate linebacker M �
Grant.
Stefon Adams was picked
the Baltimore Stars in the fo
round and Ricky Nichols a
chosen in the seventh re
the Portland Breakers.
Don Murray, offensive .
dinator for the Pirates was very
pleased about the draft. All
three of the players are ver g
pro prospects and have a good
shot at being selected in the v
draft Murray said.
The NFL h'ods its draft on
April 30, and all hrec piayers are
eligible to be picked if thev d
sign with their respective tear
the USFL.
fmmMmmrnmMnmmnn�mmmw��MMmmMmtS
I
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SHOE
�H.L. HODGES A
TO OBTAIN DISCO
SHOE C
Buy the first pair of
Buy the second pair
Buy the third pair 01
'TEAM & SALE SHOES ARE &
SHOE of
SHOE-OF-THE-WEEK SPEC! VJ
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Special Promotion Or With A l
Pri FEATlRf
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A Group Of Clearance Shoes
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Shoes & Tennis Shoes
BOND'S
218 ARLINGTON BLVD
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er Break
ehcad
v 26
vhooting. while pulling down 13
rebounds
Jan 2, 1983
ECl returned home to Mmges
m to face South Carolina
the second tune in a little over
eek.N
heir previous en-
the lads Gamecocks
ious as poor shooting
:he I adv Pirates
onl 29 percect in
ilf. while hitting on
of their shots for
point lead at
en a Momque Pom-
the lead to two,
eled off 11 con-
- and was never
M,
?tei led South
� points, while
� 15.
� Sylvia Bragg's
nique Pornpih's
rrson and Lisa
lad 10 points for
�N KHfcAHOs
GE
(
pleie Line
ish Supplies
Goldfish 30c
d financing
511 EVANS ST
CHEENVUIE. NC 2734 I
PMONT 7U9222
IT OR
Jtti
89c
89c
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Ham
4m For
Bch
ICY
Fresh
Broccoli
88�
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RIVER
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u $48
Vanderhorst Paces Buc Wins
Continued From Page 14
court and showed their home
crowd an improved running
game. With 5:29 remaining
Vanderhorst converted on a
three-point play to give the
Pirates a 54-44 lead.
The Pirates were able to hold
on to the lead as thev converted
on 70 percent of their free throws
tie second half. The most im-
pressive statistic was the Pirates'
� eld goal shooting in the second
halt (78.3 percent).
�We've got good chemistry
now Coach Harrison said.
Det 29, 1984
Curt Vanderhorst led all
scorers with 22 points and grabh-
: a game-high 11 rebounds m
ECU'S "0-65 victory over North
i - State. The Pirates took
ird place in the First Tulsa
assic
fter a 1 eon Bass lav up tied
game 2-2 with 19:13 left in the
ning half, William Grady hit
ECU Players
Selected By
USFL Teams
B BUT MITCHKI I
s�ff � rllrf
I cT football standouts Stefon
Vdams, Ricky Nichols and Henrv
Williams were picked up in the
SF1 draft on Thursday Jan. 3
Henry Williams went in the
round to the Memphis
�" ats, who had the ter-
rial rights to FCC players. It
elects to sign with the
its, he will be joined by
irmer Pirate linebacker Mike
int.
Stefon dams was picked bv
Baltimore Stars in the fourth
md and Ricky Nichols was
�he seventh round bv
e Portland Breakers.
Murray, offensive coor-
for the Pirates was very
the draft. "All
avers are very good
ospeci and have a good
ected in the NFI
VI �. � said.
ds its draft on
pn 30, and all three players are
ked if they don't
� �' respective teams in
a five foot jumper to give the
Pirates a lead that they would
never relinquish.
Cirady finished with 12 points
while I eon Bass scored 10. Der
nek Battle added eight points.
Peter Dam. Roy Smith, Herb
Dixon and Scott Hardy each
chipped in four points. Hardy led
ECU with five assists and four
steals.
Dec. 28. 1984
The Pirates' were handed their
fourth loss 86-63 at the hands of
the nationally ranked Golden
Hurricanes of Tulsa University
William Grady led the Pirates
in scoring with 22 points. The on-
ly other player in double figures
was Curt Vanderhorst with 20
points. Scott Hardy, lack Turn-
bill, I eon Bass and Peter Dam all
scored four points each in their
effort
Dec. 19, 1984
ECU lost its third regular
season tame to Wake Forest
83-57 in Cireensboro, N.C.
William Grady led ECU's scor-
ing attack with 16 points while
Curt Vanderhorst was second
with 11 points. Leon Bass scored
eight points and grabbed eight re-
bounds.
Dec. 8, 1984
ECU proved its power in
demolishing Christopher
Newport College 104-45 in
Minges Coliseum.
ECU scored the first 11 points
of the game in route to a 52-20
halftime lead. The Pirates'
defense held Christopher
Newport to a mere 28.1 field goal
percentage in the first half.
William Grady paced ECU
with 20 points. Curt Vanderhorst
scored 18 points while Leon Bass
added 16 points. Derrick Battle
chipped in 13 and Keith Sledge
was also in double figures with 10
points. Jack Turnbill added eight
points and grabbed eight re-
bounds. Peter Dam and Herb
Dixon each scored six points.
Sandwiches & Salads
r
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Any Foot-Long Sub
with the purchase of
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Expires Jan 31,1985
208 E. 5th St.
758-7979
"WE BAKE
OUR OWN BREAD
I
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WITH
SHOE SAVINGS"
�H.L. HODGES & BOND'S OFFERS SEVERAL WAYS
TO OBTAIN DISCOUNTED SHOE PRICES. SUCH AS:
SHOE CLUB CARD
Buy the first pair of shoes at reg. price
Buy the second pair of shoes at 10 off
Buy the third pair of shoes at 20 off
'TEAM & SALE SHOES ARElxaS)
SHOE of the
I SHOE-OF-THE-WEEK SPECIALS
Every Week A Shoe Ot Several Sh
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARYS. 1985 15
AOVCRTISIQ
�JIMPOtCT
llL ?' ,h5 ,d4d m '� 'qu.rej to be r��d.u available to.
saie a. o- bUo ih� adven.sed p�c ,�, MCH A�P S.o-e View!
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llTEOPr�VETHRU SAT JANATAAPIN
UlEREDFQR SALE NOTAVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHQLESALERsI
�Tim TWgjiJJt
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Ground Beef
3 lbs.
or more
Ground
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Daily
lb.
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
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TOP
Sirloin Steak
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CALIFORNIA
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LADIES'S SAUCONY JAZZ PLUS
Reg $49.95 NOW $37.95
SALE SHOES
A Group, Of Clearance Shoes Wi.h Price. Starting At $10 - Limited Quantity
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A
mmm
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f





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, 1985
Pirate Swim Teams Successful Over Holiday
By TONY BROWN
Staff Writar
The ECU Pirate swim teams
celebrated Christmas and the new
year by powering to a 4-1 com-
bined record over the holiday
break. The men narrowly lost to
Navy, then picked up wins over
Shippensburg State and Johns
Hopkins, while the women
defeated Navy and Johns
Hopkins.
Even the loss to the always-
powerful Navy squad was im-
pressive. In the last several meets
against the Midshipmen the
Pirates were blown out of the
water by 40 or more points, but
this time only a one-second loss
by ECU's Pat Brennan and a
one-point loss by diver Scott
Eagle allowed Navy to escape
with a 60-53 win.
Bruce Brockschmidt captured
two first place wins against Navy,
while Andy Cook took one in-
dividual win and participated on
the winning 400 relay effort for
ECU. "We really got psyched for
Navy said Coach Rick Kobe.
"It's the best effort I've seen in
the last three years.
"Brockschmidt swam good as
usual and we improved on our
relays a great deal. Pat Brennan
is emerging as a top swimmer,
also Kobe added. "He was in
fourth place during the 200
breast, but came back to win.
That's the kind of attitude we
have to have with the schedule
we've got coming up
The Lady Pirates performed
impressively against Navy also
and gained a solid 78-62 victory.
Scotia Miller and Chris Holman
led the way as each had two solo
wins and a spot on the first-place
200 free relay squad.
"Caycee Poust swam well for
us in addition to Miller and
Holman Coach Kobe said.
"Jenny Pierson and Nancy
James came through in the 50
sprint, which indicates the suc-
cess of the conditioning so far
The ECU men quickly put the
loss to Navy behind them as they
scuttled Shippensburg 71-41,
with the last two events being
conducted as exhibitions with no
further points added for the
Pirates.
Scott Eagle took first place in
the two diving events as the
Pirates romped over Ship-
pensburg. ECU captured nine
first-place and seven second-
place finishes to win handily.
After Christmas the entire
men's and women's teams paid
their own way to Florida and
worked out from Dec. 27 to Jan.
3 at West Palm Beach, including
a meet against Johns Hopkins
University. Final statistics have
not yet been received, but ECU
took an easy win.
"The trip to Florida really
helped us said Kobe. "We
swam about 240,000 yards and
got into great shape as a result.
The series of meets brings the
men's record to 3-2, while the
women evened their mark at 2-2.
Florida State visits the Pirates at
Minges Natatorium Friday at 7
p.m.
ECT -Navy Results (Men)
400 medley relay: 1. Navy
3:58.43. 2. EC 4:00.73. 3. Navy
4:04.91.
800 free: 1. Greenwood (N)
8:32.80. 2. Folson (N) 8:45.50. 3.
Pat Brennan (EC) 8:45.62.
200 free: 1. Rohm (N) 1:56.86.
2. Chris Pittelli (EC) 1:58.63. 3.
Andy Cook (EC) 3:00.29.
50 free: 1. Thompson (N)
13.09. 2. Keith Kaut (EC) 24.34.
3. Hale (N) 24.51.
200 individual medley: 1.
Bruce Brockschmidt (EC)
2:09.93. 2. Etkins (N) 2:13.46. 3.
Hamel (N) 2:16.60.
1 -meter diving: 1. McCormick
(N) 308.90 2. Moore (N) 265.65
3. Scott Eagle (EC) 264.55.
200 butterfly: 1. Brockschmidt
(EC) 2:09.68 2. Coleman (N)
2:14.16 3. Gregor Wray (EC)
2:15.23.
100 free: 1. Smith (N) 53.16 2.
Pittelli (EC) 53.77 3. Beadels (N)
54.72.
400 free: 1. Cook (EC) 4:15.48
2. Fisher (N) 4:19.69 3. Chema
Larranaga (EC) 4:22.05.
200 backstroke: 1. Kevin
Hidalgo (EC) 2:12.87 2. Kauf-
man (N) 2:13.99 3. Stratton
Smith (EC) 2:18.09.
3-meter diving: 1. Scot (N)
795.60 2. Eagle (EC) 784.65 3.
Hiscock (N) 781.00.
200 breaststroke: 1. Brennan
(EC) 2:31.86 2. Lee Hicks (EC)
2:31.95 3. Rauscher (N) 2:32.96.
400 freestyle relay: 1. ECU,
Brown, Rolo Fleming, Cook, Pit-
telli 3:38.13. 2. Navy, Thomp-
son, Greenwood, Folsom, Rohm
3:42.06. 3. Navy, Staten, Mc-
Carter, Lowry, Rackow 3:44.16.
Final score: Navy 60, ECU 53.
ECU-Navy Results (Women)
200 medley relay 1. ECU
2:07.34. 2. Navy 2:09.28. 3. ECU
2:10.94.
800 free: Scotia Miller (EC)
9:37.90. 2. Pandya (N) 9:38.13.
3. Ford (N) 9:53.66.
200 freestyle: 1. Chris Holman
(EC) 2:11.06. 2. Musiek (N)
2:14.50. 3. Jenny Pierson (EC)
2:18.86.
100 backstroke: 1. Caycee
Poust (EC) 1:10.05. 2. Groves
(N) 1:11.71. 3. Lori Livingston
(EC) 1:13.20.
100 breast: 1. Jess Feinberg
(EC) 1:19.65. 2. Joelle Ennis
(EC) 1:19.09. 3. Polowy (N)
1:21.12.
200 butterfly: 1. Prideaux (N)
2:29.56. 2. Annette Burton (EC)
2:33.58. 3. Ingold (N) 2:41.03.
50 freestyle: 1. Pierson (EC)
:28.89. 2. Nancy James (EC)
:28.90. 3. Fielding (N) :29.03.
1 meter diving: 1. Michal (N)
269.60. 2. Casity (N) 263.65. 3.
Lori Miller (EC) 244.00.
100 free: 1. Musiek (N)
1:02.05. 2. James (EC) 1:03.48.
3. Fielding (N) 1:03.68.
200 backstroke: 1. Holman
(EC) 2:29.39. 2. Poust (EC)
2:35.33. 3. Groves (N) 2:36.09.
200 breaststroke: 1. Polowy
(N) 2:52.60. 2. Feinberg (EC)
2:55.44. 3. Ennis (EC) 2:56.89.
400 freestyle: 1. S. Miller (EC)
4:41.86. 2. Pandya (N) 4:42.02.
3. Ford (N) 4:52.72.
100 butterfly: 1. Musiek (N)
1:08.46. 2. Ellen McPherson
(EC) 1:09.96. 3. Burton (EC)
1:10.42.
3-meter diving: 1. Michael (N)
289.50. 2. Casity (N) 259.85. 3.
L. Miller (EC) 259.00.
200 individual medley: 1.
Polowy (N) 2:32.69. 2. Prideaux
(N) 2:33.79. 3. Poust (EC)
2:34.10.
200 free relay: 1. ECU, James,
S. Miller, Pierson, Holman
1:52.95. 2. Navy, Schultz,
Groves, Turner, Fielding 1:57.38.
20 ECU Discount
t
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
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Open 9-5:30
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752-1446
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 8, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 08, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.381
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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