The East Carolinian, December 4, 1984






$lc �aat (EarnUntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.28
Tuesday December 4, 1984
Greenville. N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Reagan Budget Freeze Urged
By Republican Governors
� RYAN HUMBERT - ECU Photo L.b
You Are Sow Entering The Twilight Zone
T�o ECU students demonstrate what the collegiate life is reali all about.
DES MOINES, Iowa, (UPI) �
Most of the nation's Republican
Governors are urging President
Reagan to toughen plans to
freeze the federal budget by mak-
ing it an across-the-board move
that could include the defense
budget and entitlement pro-
grams.
During a meeting with Vice
President George Bush to kick
off the three-day annual meeting
Sunday of the Republican Gover-
nors Association, most of the
GOP officials called for a blanket
freeze on spending, according to
those who participated in the
closed-door session.
"We'll share in the burden. We
just want to make sure we're not
singled out said Iowa Gov.
Terry Branstad, who said he rais-
ed the issue during the meeting
with Bush and 20 GOP Gover-
nors and Governors-Elect.
"I brought up the point of an
overall budget freeze, including
defense and entitlements, to be
really effective and meaningful
Branstad said the GOP Gover-
nors want "something that will
really have a significant impact
on the size of the federal deficit
Reagan tentatively has decided
on freezing next year's federal
budget at the current level, but
certain programs, like defense
and social security, could in-
crease, while others could be cut
or eliminated.
Bush's mission to the Gover-
nors' conclave was to prepare the
GOP leaders for new spending
ceilings "across a tremendously
wide spectrum said Victor
Atiyeh, the chairman of the con-
ference. "I would say that a large
number of Governors felt that
was a real possibility.
"I would say there's a political
nicety to everyone being treated
equally bad
Pennsylvania Gov. Richard
Thornburgh, the group's Vice
Chairman, said that during the
discussion some Governors
brought up "the possible inap-
propriateness of dealing with the
military budget on an equal basis
with the balance of the budget
particularly with a new round of
U.S. � Soviet talks beginning
next month.
Bush was described as "mostly
just listening to the comments
and pledging to pass on their
views to the President
Before the meeting, in remarks
open to reporters, Bush said
Americans are "going to have to
face the fact of tough and signifi-
cant cuts in the budgetlimits
are going to have to be placed on
spending across a tremendously
wide spectrum.
ECU Health Service Holds Discussion of Infirmary Process
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Various aspects of the ECU
Student Health Service were
discussed Monday night at a
forum for Student Health Ser-
vices. The forum was open to all
students and was sponsored by
the SGA Student Welfare Com-
mittee. The guesi speakers were
James McCallum, director of stu-
dent health and Kay Van Nort-
wick, administrative manager for
student health.
According! lo McCaiium. there
are approximate! 6,000 patient
visits per month at the infirmary,
a figure he terms, "the highest
patient utilization ratio of any of
the universities in North
Carolina He added that "this
speaks well for our unit
McCallum emphasized that
"we are hired by you the student,
paid by you, and we're there to
serve you All health services
funding is provided through stu-
dent health fees, including items
such as building maintenance.
"We can render as much service
as the income from student
health fees will allow, and no
more McCallum said.
Providing the "best services at
the least possible cost" is the ob-
jective of the infirmarv, he said.
In terms of funding, fcifs
health services rank sixth in the
UNC system, but ECU is ranked
"at the top as far as the number
of services offered
For example. McCallum said,
several of the other schools don't
employ full-time physicians, or
have laboratory facilities and
pharmacies. "None give free
medication he added.
Also, McCallum said, some
schools charge for overnight
stays, while the charge at ECU is
only for food.
"We certainly need to expand
our equipment, services and
building McCallum said. "Un-
fortunately our budget does not
permit that
Services for which the center
must charge m fee arc tti�- only
source of income outside of stu-
dent fees, McCallum said. These
services, he said, are provided at
or near cost.
SGA Night Transit Extended
At Association's Approval
Bi (.KKGR1DKOIT
Minftfiag rdilor
The SGA appropriated $8,000
Monday night to the Student
Government Transit System to
keep the Night Transit buses run-
ning through May 1985. Four
thousand dollars will cover the
costs for this semester.
The bill came up Monday after
Transit Manager Marshall
Tucker and Speaker of the House
Kirk Shelley realized that a one
dollar fee increase recommended
- � the SGA last spring earmarked
ents of each dollar for Night
ansit. The Legislature had in-
c uporated the extra SI3,000 into
ts budget, though, and with the
'rival of a new Legislature this
' ill, the promise had been lost in
huffle.
SGA President John Rainey
urged the Legislature to approve
the bill, calling the system a "big
service Raines was a member
of the Appropriations Committee
which asked for the fee increase
last year. Sophomore Class Presi-
dent Staci Falkowitz, the sponsor
of the bill, also urged support
because students "like it
A voice vote approved the
measure after an amendment that
dictated the service be better
publicized. According to Tucker,
about 100 riders use the bus each
Friday and Saturday.
The UNC Board of Governors
approved the fee increase this
summer. Former SGA President
Paul Naso first asked for the in-
crease in January to keep the bus
system going and to purchase a
i
Rainey
computer.
The Legislature now has ap-
proximately SI5,000 to spend
next semester.
In other business, the
Legislature approved a rule to
penalize groups who seek reim-
bursements. Groups who ask for
money for items they have
already purchased will be re-
quired to pay it back.
Media Board Chooses Chairman
Bx HAROLD JOYNER
I Sewi Mlior
SGA Vice President Mike
McPartland will head the Media
Board for the 1985 school year.
He was elected in a Media Board
'reeling Monday.
McPartland succeeds Glenn
Conway, who resigned as chair-
man because he is no longer
president of the Inter-Fraternity
Council, making him ineligible
for board membership.
The new Media Board Chair-
man pledged to keep communica-
tion between campus media and
ECU students open. "I feel that
my SGA vice presidency and
chairmanship on the Board will
create an essential link between
'he media and students he said.
Experience with the media has
been an asset McPartland hopes
to employ during his new posi-
tion. He was former Business
Manager for The East Carolinian
and worked in the news depart-
ment of WZMB. "I'm familiar
w'th the operation of these media
in addition McPartland
and
McPartland
said, "I look forward to working
with The Ebony Herald, The
Rebel and The Buccaneer.
"Everything he said, "is
running rather smoothly with no
forseeable problems
McPartland said he hopes to
serve in an overhead capacity,
allowing various business tran-
sactions and proposals to be car-
ried out with no problems. New
policies implemented this past
summer will remain the same, he
said.
"The progress of The Buc-
caneer pleases me to no end and I
really think they've got it all
together McPartland said. "I
look forward to them continuing
to report to us McPartland also
said he was pleased with the pro-
gress The Ebony Herald has
made this semester. "I think the
newspaper is making rapid ad-
vancements and will continue to
provide coverage for minority
students he said.
Conway also said he was pleas-
ed with the smooth operation of
campus media. "There hasn't
been any major problem with the
media so far and I see that as a
reflection of the Media Board
and myself he said.
"I'm very happy to be able to
serve the campus media as best I
can McPartland said, "I look
forward to working with the
Media Heads and continuing to
bring the best possible media to
the students
A limited number of prescrip-
tion drugs are provided free of
charge because the medication is
bought thiough a state contract.
"Whether you realize it or not,
I think you're getting a bargain
because we're "ying to get you
the best care possible Mc-
Callum said. "We try to make
this an educational experience for
everv student who comes to
ECU
McCallum listed some of the
services provided by health care
staff members, including
classroom visits and small group
�4y.�tK� progiams.
Concerning future plan- for
the heith care program, Mc-
Callum said they are currently
trying to hire a full-time
psychiatrist, but are unable to
find one "that will fit our
needs This includes working
for the available salary and
demonstrating interest in student
health.
"Eventually we'll get one
McCallum said.
Acquisition of an X-ray
machine is another of
McCallum's priorities. "The de-
mand for a machine is difficult to
analyze, but I would say the need
has doubled or tripled in the last
year he said. Although a
"relatively small number, ap-
proximately 60 or 70 per
month of students arc referred
to the hospital for X-rays, the
problem comes in with those who
should have X-rays, but are
to afford it, McCallum
X-ray machine
in on-campus
an
aid
for tuberculosis,
among foreign
unable
said.
He said,
could also
screening
especially
students.
The most recent estimate plac-
ed the cost of the machine at ap-
proximately S50,000. "Future
costs would depend on infla-
tionary costs and the pricing of
supplies McCallum said.
A proposal to allow the student
health fee to serve as an insurance
deductible is still in the planning
stages, he said, "with insurance
companies arguing their point
and the general population hav-
ing hearings
At January Meeting
New Classification Considered
Reclassification of ECU as a
Doctoral-Granting University II
in the UNC system is proposed in
a package of long-range planning
requests to be submitted to the
UNC General Administration
this month.
The ECU proposals for the
UNC system's 1984-89 long-
range plan were reviewed at a
Nov. 9 meeting of the ECU Plan-
ning Commission. Under the
classification used by the UNC
General Administration, ECU is
now a Comprehensive I Universi-
ty.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
told the Planning Commission
that in view of the level of
doctoral-granting activities and
the level of research resources,
the university is proposing
reclassification as a Doctoral-
Granting University II.
ECU currently offers degree
programs at the baccalaureate,
master's, intermediate, first pro-
fessional and doctoral levels,
Howell said. In 1983-84, 41 MD's
and one PhD were awarded, sur-
passing the number required by
theCarnegie Councildassification
system for Doctoral-Granting
Universities II.
Although North Carolina A&T
recently applied for a doctoral
program, "we are doing
something of a different nature
Howell said. "All we're asking
for is a change in the wording.
since we already have the doc-
toral programs
Enrollment in the five doctoral
programs is 27, which projects a
productivity well in excess of the
required number, the chancellor
said.
A new PhD program in a basic
medical science discipline.
Pathology, is included in the
ECU requests. All of ECU's ex-
isting PhD programs are in the
basic medical sciences.
The Planning Commission also
approved a request by Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Angelo Volpe which will be to
establish a School of Social Work
independent of the renamed
School of Allied Health Profes-
sions effective July 1, 1985.
Group Makes Donation
��YAW HUMIIDT tCU Photo L.b
The ECU Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi recently made a contribution to Play Units for the Handicapped The
fraternity contributes annually to the project. Shown from left are fraternity members Bob Schultz Shelia
Edwards, Chip Hackmeister, Bob Canupp, Lovi DiChristafara and Cleland Hott.
mmmmm
�� m � �





?
.THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 4. 19R4
Meditation
Tht BiMMMtt Study MM MMinmm On
��2? Tww" �"�4 �7:� �MM MK.
Wiadom Knew win t� uikvmm Pimm
com.
STUDINTPINANCILAL
AIOMIITINO
THE ANNUAL JTOOBNT FINANCIAL AIO
M��TINO WILL 61 HBLO AT J 00 p m
ANO 4:00 em IN TH8 HBNORIX
TMiATBt AT MINOENHALLITUOtNT
CBNTK ON WED OBC.J. TNB PURPOSE
OP THE MEETING WILL II TO
DISTRIBUTE THE MM FINANCIAL AID
APPLICATION AND TO OltCUU THE AP
PLICATION PROCEDURE. ALL
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN APPLYING
POP FINANCIAL AIO ARE UROBD TO
ATTEND.
Meditation
Tha 8x�ht�r Study Md MauiTafton Group
will mwl Tum DOC 4 at 7:M In rm 111MSC.
WlMom Emtoy will M o-ltcuMM
com
Seniors
Samon �ne Oraduafa atudanti graduaflne in
F�ll U. Spring �s or Summar tS may (He, ue
� r�oi�trinon ptckd ,t m. Ctrtr Planning
�no PlocomMt Sarvica Early rafftatranon I
�ncx�oM vou Will bo ab� to racalva � JM
Cuidt which mt, poomoftt raportad to our
oNico
Alpha Phi tig .rotters
�i� oroffwr and xtr� of Alpha Phi Sororl
ry art rminoo ol our ehritrm party fhl�
Pri. night. oc. 7th starting at t at ma
Kinoaton Piaca ClubhouM Thar win tx
Oonty to drink but you might want to bring
oma liquor to rlniah things with. Decoration
commlftM will moat thara a� 4. Lat� and ma
aamaatar off right with a wild Phi Bro and
�i�tr par (data ar wolcoma)
Pi Kappa Phi
This yMr, carntmai Mrty will M WM.
night at th houM �tartlng at 7-all llttl
tiatar, arc aakM to coma out at MVJMaJ � :)
Oat raady tor ona iammm pra-raading day
party.
Institute of Govammant
Summar loot with tha ttata of North
Cariolna GPA 1$. all malora. PlaaM coma
bv me Co-op office to apply for these sum
m�r lobsi
Co-op
Fayettavllle firm wants a iunlor or senior
with good GPA. computer ana business com
Donation, laminar with using a mlcrocom
purer, and ability to program In some
lenguage like fortran 1 term starting Jan.
as. lob may possibly continue through sum
mar ��. Fay It appro U tj an hr for 40 hr
My now in Co-op oNica. Raw! 313.
Mantfanhall Studant Cantor
NAendanhali Student Center is ayallMw tor
study space during exams. Conference
rooms are available on a first come-first
serve bMis for group study There will else
be 're coffee available Ml p.m. courtesy of
the MSC snack bar (Jim Mayo. Manager)
Call 757-aill for more information and reser
vatlons.
Fail Samastar Graduates
Remember to pick up your cap and sown
from the Studnet Supply Store. ECU before
iMving school. These keepsake gowns are
yours to keep, providing the graduation fee
has been paid For thoae receiving the
Master, Degree the fM pays for your cap
and gown, but there is �n extra fM of 111 S
for your hood
Intamship Program
Pamilco sound Legal Service, ni a limited
number of unpaid internship available for
students commlftM to working for lusttce
for poor people internships Involve research
and writing and edmlnlstrstlve tasks on
social and legal issues of concern to poor end
disenfranchised people in eastern North
Carolina Students may attempt to arrange
course credit with their department For
more information, write: Community
Education Office, Pamilco Sound Legal Ser-
vice. Post Office Box 7203, Greenville.
North Carolina 27035. or, visit tha
Cooperative Education Office in rm. 311,
Rawi Building ECU Pamilco Sound Legal
Services is a non-profit organization
Minorities, handicapped individuals, and
woman ar encouraged to apply.
CCU Thaatra Arts Committaa
There will M a meeting of the ECU union
Theatre Arts Committee on Tum Dae 4 at a
p.m. In rm 241 of Mendenhell Student Center
All members and interested people are urg-
ed to attend Discussion will focus on th
'0405 season
Pra-ixam Jam
The Nupm of Kappa Alpha Pal are presen-
ting a pre-exam am this WM. night Dec. 5 at
the Wlx from 11 p.m. to 2 am There win also
M a lediei tight lean contest 1st prim Is 025.
Bus transportation begins at Mendenhell at
10 JO men to college hill at 10 45. So come on
out and really party!
Cooparatlva Education
National Park Service Is Making students
for co-op positions In MM-Atlantlc State,
SophmoTM and Juniors malortng In P.R.C
History or Biology with 2.0 GPA ar en-
couragM to apptyter summer its Contact
Co-op office 313 Kiwi Bide
Ralaasa Your Strata
Dettat Sigma That Sorority, inc. I having a
dance at th Cultural Center.Dec 7. 1004
from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Admission la .75 for
student and $1 for non-student, So come on
out and release your stress
LSS
Leisure System Study �r having a
chrlstmM recetlen open nous LSS building
Dm. S between 4-7. Bring I.D.
Tau Kappa Ipiisilon
Remember xmaa party Dm. 0 at WMtem
Steer, aim Ilka to welcome TKE exec ores.
Jack Stappy Cohen, V.P. Stefon 'Pop
Poplin, Sec Chris 'Gimp Holland, Trees
Joe 'Trtcep' Beersto Sprit laadar Don'Boy
�W kins, pledge Train. Bob 'Bert- Dwda.
Hitter William Morton.
Announcements
Pro-Mod
Attention members. PledgM and guest there
will M a Christmas party Dm. 5 at 00 at
the home of Dr Wayne Avars located at 3307
South Evans St. Bring a two dollar
miscellaneous gift to be exchangM at the
party. PTA will to providing the food Have
a merry Christmas Carpool Is possible du
to llmltM parking
Dalta Sigma Phi
Just a reminder to all brothers, sisters, and
'1M about the Christmas party this
,Dac. 5. at 0 p.m. Sm you at the
tll(BYOB)
Parto Italianor
or M you want to learn to speak Italian we
M t�. The foreign language department is
getting a class together for next fall. If In
twested. call Karln at 753-0034. or Shelr at
7S3-OH1 NOW I
Rafrigaration Raturns
For fall semester will to held on Dec , and
Dm.7, t04 Pleas return refrigerators at: 1.
On tha hill. In front of Scott dorm. 2. On the
mall, between Jervls and the Infirmary, 3.
on the circle, between Green and Garreft
Christmas Party
The ear ly childhood education club Is having
a dinner at 5:30 at the WMtern Steer on 10th
street On Tues Dsc. 4 Bring a small secret
santa gift and a poem discrlbing yourself at
teched to the gift
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship will have a short
business mMtlng and Bible study iGenesis:
on Tues Oec 4 at 7 p m In 242 Mendenhall
Afterward w will attand the Men's Glee
Club concert far more information Contact
JMk at 752 04 or Kevin at 750-0100.
Alpha Phi Omaga
APO would like to congrat the following
brothers President Dabby Wells. VP
Service-Revetah Murphy, vp membership
Wafhrly Swlnson.Sc. Ben Bute, Trees.
Errwst Roberts. Fellowship-Danny White.
Sgt. at arms Ginger Oxendlne, Historian
Donna Davis, Scouting Mark Brown.
Publicity Jlmle Heckett, Sports Devln King
INOT
Excellent opportunity for students concen
tratlng In manufacturing or graphics for six
month assignment with major local
manufacturing corporation Application
needed as soon as possible for Spring 105.
Contact tha Cooperative Education Office In
313 Raw! Building
Poraign Exchange Endowment
ThaThomaa W Rivers Forelng Exchange
Endownment Fund provide up to 02500 per
year for eligible student, to attend a foreign
Institution of higher learning or for a foreign
Hudant to attend ECU Requirements full
time student, meet admission requirements
end know language of Instruction of Instltu
tlon to be attended. Other criteria:
Academic achievement, GPA. dedication
and interest Applications ere avallMIe
from Or. Eugene E. Ryan, College of Arts
and Sciences Brewster � 102. OeMIIno:
�Ion. l (Next deadline: April 1).
Health and Human Sarvlcas
Opening for spring semester In Washington.
DC, HMlth and Human Services, Office of
the Secretary, Policy and New initiatives
Division, for student with good typing skills.
Word processing desired but not requIrM
Student will to trained to us word process
Ing equipment if needed Tuition and books
paid the MmMter following each Co-op
aulgment. Salary approximately 01,000
month. ContMt the Cop office In Rawl 313
immediately
ph ye Maors
All students who plan to declare physical
education as a major should report to
MlngM Coliseum at 10:00 a.m Thursday.
Dm. a.lRaading Day) for a motor and
Physical fitness test Satisfactory perfor
mence on mis test Is required as e prere
qulsite for a physical education major pro-
gram. Mora detailed Information Is
available by celling 757-0441 or 0442.
Any student with a medicel condition that
would contralndate participation In tha
tMtlng program should contact Dr. istmI at
757-447 Examples would Incluto Mart mur-
murs. congenital heart disease, respiratory
disorders or significant musculoskeletal pro-
blems, if you should have any significant
mMlcal conditions, please notify Dr. IstmI
if you plan to to tested
Tha Holiday Proiact
Anyone interested In being � part of the Holl
day ProlMt, volunteers mrm naadad to visit
two are facilities Dm. 4 at 4 and 4 sharing a
ChrlstmM celebration. Also, anyone who is
able to make personal donations please con
tact Dee et 757-0212.
Pancing Club
The fencing club would like to invite anyone
InterestM to attend our meetings every
WM 730 room 102 of Memorial Gym
NCIOINFO
Dr Donald Ensley will be spooking about the
N C. Summer Internships at the Co-op Infor
motion Semmlnars on Thurs. Nov 20 at 12
p.m. In room 304 Rawl Bldg Please plan to
attend and hear about this exciting wey to
spend your summer earning and learning.
���,0 & Kappa Sigma
present
10th Annual
Christmas Party
Tues. Dec. 4, 1984 8:30 til 1:00A.M
Bar Specials All Nite Adm.1.00
18 vis. $1.00
Gift Prizes & Specials All Nite
Plus A Visit From Santa
Sponsored by:
Hodge's
Bonds Sporting Goods
Ooerton j Ski Shop
Sutn-tystem Weight I ras Center
Buccaneer Moaes Sunshine Videonc.
tart 'j Delight Fast Cast Bicycles
Dominos Rocket Musklnc.
Baskm Rohhins U '�, puf,
Southern Health Spc Peps, �f Ceencille
Marsh's Surf S-Sea AllAmencan
( hocolate Chip Cookie Co.
anon
eADB-Il
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art i cQecro hop
5t8 SOUTH COTANCHE STRCE '
O�0rVH.LE. NLC. 2734
�06M
River Blu
uSpacious Affordable Luxury Apartments"
2 Bedroom Townhouse Apt. $270.00 per mo.
1 Bedroom Garden Apt. $200.00 per mo.
Rates for New Move-Ins Only
6 to 12 mo. leases
Security Deposit Negotiable
Offer Good Thru DEC. 31, 1984
� Qudlity'Mdndtjment & Maintenance
. 2 Bedroom Townhouse & 1 Bedroom Garden Aprs
� Kitchens Faiur�? Dishwashers & Disposals
� Convenient to Shopping Centers � Restaurants
� Full, Carpeted . Cable T V deluded
� Private Laundrx Facdit.e � Private Balconies
� Larvje Pool .Cu
Directions: 10th Street Extension to River Bluff Road
Next to Rivergate Shopping Center
Phone 758-4015
Student Dietetic Assoc.
Calaorafo Cfwisfmas wlffi ffta Sfudanf
Dlafatlc Association Tha final masting for
W04 will bo BOM en Doc 4 at $30 p.m In ma
dining nail. A covered dish supper will proc
ed the meeting and elections for the new
year. Come and bring a friend end your
favorite dishi Everyone Is Invltedl
Honors Program
Honors students and faculty are reminded of
the early Jan. deadline for proposals for
seminars for fall semester 105. All proposals
need to be In to Dr. Oavlo Sanders. Director
of the program, by Frl Jan. 10, 1005
Seminars should be topic or problem
oriented and may be Interdisciplinary end
team taught. They should satisfy G E re
oulrements. Call 0373 with questions. Honors
students who don't get copies of the newslet
far In class next week may pick one up at the
Honors Off lea.
National Park Servica
Has openings for Recreation. Biology and
History malors for summer loos. Positions
located In Mid Atlantic and Southeastern
States. Contact tha Cooperative Education
Office In 313 Raw) Building.
Fina Arts Tour of N.Y.
Students Interested In a fine arts tour of New
York M.O.M.A the AAet, Whifney.Gug
oenhelm, Soho and 57th St galleries,Dec
W-M. piaasa leave name and phone for
William Leidenthal at School of Art office
NAACP
On Men Nov. It the ECU chapter of NAACP
r�ed Its final meeting for the semester
Meetings will resume In Jen. We are en
couraglng all persons who had desired to ob
tain membership to do so by Dec 10th
because the annual membership report must
be sent In if you need more Information.
please contact either wilma at 753 W01 or
Carolyn at 753 0973.
Lacrosse Team Members
Those of you who still have equipment check
ed out from the Intramural Sport Clubs.
Please return the equipment es soon possi
ble, otherwise, your grades will be held
Sierra Club
Jonathan Phillips. Executive Director of the
Pamilco-Tar River Foundetlon, will present
a slide show and discuss 'Living with tha
River' at the Dec 10th meeting of the Sierra
Club. His presentation will include a discus
sion of the ecological stresses on the river In
the Pamllco-Tar Basin The Sierra Club
meets at Opm at tha First Presbyterian
Church on 14th and Elm st In Greenville. All
are welcome to attend
U.S. Army Audit Agency
Excellent opportunity for business and �c
counting or decision science students for
Spring IOOJ G S 4 salary plus travel
allowance and mileage Contact the
Cooperative Education Office in 313 Rawl
Building.
L
20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Open 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446
pucians
m;�MV�MW�wm�iliiiiimilf,ff
A Private
Club for
Members
and Guests
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Reagan F
WASHINGTON (I PI
President Reagan, whose for
policy efforts have been focu
for months by U.S. � Si
sions, diverted his attention Moi
day to the problems of ra
moil and starvation in strifi
Africa.
Academic
Appointments
university academe and
ministrative commits
1984-85 school year
made, SGA Pr
Ramey announced M
Rainey said these a
appointments he : I
president I hope
can gain a valuable c
serving on commuter
Challenges
Challenges ai
aplentv await
graduates. ECU I I
Hov.ell told ar i
mer school and
degree earners Satu.
Speaking at ECU
gram to recognize i
summer school an . .
Former Edito
B Mlkr H Mr K
Speakii i
Station Fei
Atlanta or r
Patrick � N
editor of The I .
said the
ing an early rel
looks dim
O'Neill is .
minimum � I I
part in an April
do, Fla where
broke into a Mai
plant and desl
shing missile comp
test me
One re - fi
creasing the in :
ly parole ua- his jnvo
alerting the press ? ��
brutality of pi
towards I,50fj c
being held in the A i
Prison.
According to O'Nei
Cubans were p:
that thev wer
beyond their sch I
date Prison offk
responded
prisoners from : .
security unit to desti
containing the Cur
belongings.
Because he spoke I
representing the Cuba
the permission ol pi
O'Neill was recently a
days in solitary confineme
In addition, he
Mgil which wa h�
prison warden
said, was helpful in pi
second occurence.
Cubans started to
time. 1 noticed tna: e . �
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 4, 1984
Discount
Facultv
ion
nmong
rs Park
'52-14-16
Neat
Dress
Required
PARTY
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30
L NIGHT
ylate"
ZZZZ2&
t You Will
Veasure!
res Available
Reagan Focuses Attention On Africa's Racial Turmoil
WASHINGTON (UPI) �
President Reagan, whose foreign
policy efforts have been focused
for months by U.S. � Soviet ten-
sions, diverted his attention Mon-
day to the problems of racial tur-
moil and starvation in strife-torn
Africa
Reagan was to be briefed by
Assistant Secretary of State
Chester Crocker on the status of
ettorts to bring peace to South
Africa, complicated in recent
weeks by a new wave of violence
directed at the country's segrega-
tionist svstem.
Later in the day, Reagan also
was scheduled to meet with
members of a congressional
delegation that visited famine-
wracked Ethiopia. The ad-
ministration has pressed the
Marxist government of Ethiopia
to eliminate obstacles to the
distribution of tens of thousands
of tons of food aid.
Crocker was expected to report
to Reagan on the progress of
negotiations aimed at the
removal of a final 2,000 South
African troops from Angola and
efforts to bring independence to
Academic, Administrative Committees Chosen
Appointments to various
university academic and ad-
ministrative committees for the
1984-85 school year have been
made, SGA President John
Raincy announced Monday
Rainey said these are the only
appointments he makes as SGA
president. "1 hope the students
can gain a valuable experience by
serving on committees with ad-
ministration and faculty
members and can make a wor-
thwhile contribution to the
university community he said.
Membeis of the Academic
Committees are: Admissions.
Alan Hargis; Career Education,
Donna Boiiinger; Course Drop
Appeals, Lisa Horn; Faculty
Computer. Edward Lewis;
General College, Jennifer Jen-
drasiak; Student Scholarships,
Ken Scruggs and Teaching Effec-
tiveness, Laura Frazzelle and
Bradley Wheeler.
Administrative Committee
members are: Alcohol and Drug
Education, Chris Hight; Interna-
tional Student Affairs, Rhonda
Hall; Canvassing and Soliciting
on Campus, Tara haircloth;
Residence Life, Pam Riddle;
Minorities, David Whitley and
Jody Cannady; Status of
Women, Britt Lowder and
Stephanie Paul; Student Health
Services, Alissa Ostrow; Housing
Appeals, Anne Scarborough;
Parking and Traffic, Melody
O'Brien and Scholars' Weekend,
Lanny Wilson.
Nanibia, which lies between
South Africa and Angola.
In an interview last week with
the Washington Times, Reagan
said Crocker has "made quite a
bit of progress" in his efforts to
help mediate an agreement that
would link a South African
withdrawal to the departure of
25,000 Cuban troops from
Angola.
Their withdrawal has been at
the center of Reagan's approach
to the Namibia question.
In the same interview, Reagan
said formal recognition of
Angola by the United States in
the event of such a settlement is
an issue subject to the negotia-
tions involving the U.S Angolan
and South African officials.
A parallel concern to the
United States, officials said, is
the recent escalation of domestic
turmoil in South Africa, which
began over two months ago and
mushroomed last month with the
arrests of 13 black labor leaders.
The arrests sparked a series of
demonstrations at the South
African Embassy in Washington,
where more than a dozen con-
gressmen, labor officials and civil
rights leaders were arrested since
protests began a day before
Thanksgiving.
Organizers of the protests said
that they would spread to the six
consulates the South African
government has in New York,
Boston, Los Angeles, Chicago,
Seattle and Houston.
Challenges Await Today's College Graduates
K t Srvn Bureau
challenges and opportunities
aplenty await today's college
graduates, ECU Chancellor John
Howell told an assembly of sum-
mer school and fall semester
degree earners Saturday.
Speaking at ECU's first pro-
gram to recognize and honor its
summer school and fall semester
graduates, Howell said, "I
believe thai complexity in our
so iety will utter one of the most
difficult challenges
In recent years, Howell said,
man's reservoir of knowledge has
increased greatly and "within our
lifetime, the rate of change has
become almost tidal in propor-
tion This, he said, "will be a
driving force throughout your
careers
"In coping with complexity
and a technological society we
must guard against the trend to
depreciate the human element
Howell said. He added, "I am
confident that you will use your
knowledge to find solutions in a
way that places the human side of
our work and lives in the
forefront
Former Editor Does Not See Early Release
By M1KEHAMER
M�ff W nxrt
Speaking from the i akew i j
Station Federal Penitentiary in
Atlanta on Friday evening,
Patrick O'Neill, former news
editor of The Fast Carolinian,
said the possibility of his obtain-
ing an early release from prison
looks dim.
O'Neill is currently serving a
minimum o two years foi his
part in an April protest in Orlan-
do, Fla where demonstrators
broke into a Martin Marietta
plant and destroyed some Per
shing missile components to pro
test the deployment of the
One reason O'Neill cited as in
creasing the improbability ol eai
ly parole was his involvement in
alerting the press of the suspected
brutality of prison officials
towards 1,500 Cuban prisoners
being held in the Atlanta federal
Pris n.
According to O'Neill, the
Cubans were protesting the fact
that they were being detained
beyond their scheduled release
date. Prison officials, he said,
responded by sending in
prisoners from the minimum
security unit to destroy lockers
containing the Cubans' personal
belongings.
Because he spoke to lawyers
representing the Cubans without
the permission of prison officials,
O'Neill was recently given four
days in solitary confinement
In addition, he organized a
vigil which was held outside the
prison warden's house. Fhis, he
said, was helpful in preventing a
second occurence. "When the
Cubans started to riot a second
time, I noticed that the prison of-
ficials didn't ask the workers
from my prison to go over there.
I Mar policy stopped O'Neill
said
Bill Noonan, public informa-
tion officer tor the Atlanta
Federal Penitentiary said Mon-
day that the prison "did take the
personal property away from the
Cubans. We did remove the
lockers from the cellsand some
of the lockers could have been
damaged
Noonan explained that there is
no release time for the Cuban
prisoners. "They're being held
under the jurisdiction of the U.S.
Immigration Service and the
prison is merely detaining these
prisoners
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WZMB is accepting ap-
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QUre �aat Olariiltotati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Camper Hunter Fisher, - �
Greg Rideout, �,���, Et�0,
JENNIFER JENDRAS.AK. .�, J.T. PlETRZAK
RANDY MEWS, s� - ANTHONY MARTIN, Umm mmm
Tina Maroschak. � tom Norton, o- m.
Bill Austin. o. Bll, Dawson
Doris Rankins, skm, mikf Mav�
MIKh MAYO. Advening MWdM
December 4. 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Goodbye
7b Hunter We Say Thanks
Tradition usually dictates that
an outgoing editor write an
editorial filled with wisdom as he
puts his final paper to bed. At The
East Carolinian this is usually done
by a managing editor, who
oversees the editorial side of the
paper. But within our structure we
have a general manager who sits at
the top. He is not an aspiring jour-
nalist, but usually a budding
businessman sitting for the first
time in the management seat.
This is the last issue for our
general manager, Hunter Fisher.
Since custom does not tell him to
write a 30 column as he packs
his bags to go, we will do so for
him.
Hunter has been in the hot seat
now for more than a year. During
this time he has always strived for
two things � a quality production
and an increase in revenue. These
two things result in, in the end, a
better newspaper for every student
to read on Tuesdays and
Thursdays. By motivating the sales
force and selling more ads, The
East Carolinian can give you more
news � with better quality.
Without the hard work and the
constant care of Mr. Fisher, the
newspaper would not be what it is
today.
If Hunter were writing this, he
would probably want to say the
following things. (He has said
them to us before.) First, he would
thank the whole staff. He has
always listened to us, and without
his personable leadership to grease
the newspaper's wheels, the show
would have been off the road long
ago. Second, he would tip his hat
to Dean Rudy Alexander and Vice
Chancellor Elmer Meyer. Their ad-
vice he has valued greatly. Next,
thanks would go to the
Mendenhall staff � especially our
secretary Doris. She, he says, has
been a Godsend.
Hunter would go on to say
thanks for the opportunity to serve
the students. In return, we thank
him. We wish him the best of luck
in the future; he'll do the universi-
ty and the newspaper proud.
You're just too casual not to.
Campus Forum
Nazis, Klan True Patriots
Student Forum. . .
Monday's SGA-sponsored Stu-
dent Health Service Forum provid-
ed yet another example of an event
students should get involved in but
don't.
The forum was provided for the
students so they could learn about
campus health care and, most im-
portantly, ask questions and voice
concerns. Almost every student on
this campus has had some contact
with the health care service, and
we're sure many have complaints.
Unfortunately, the only way to
effect change is to speak up and
make yourself known. The dozen
students who attended the forum
did that, but they can't possibly
represent the interests of all the
students on campus.
The Student Welfare Committee
picked the topic for the forum
because they felt it was something
that directly affected students. It
is, so why did only a dozen show
up?
The SGA plans on holding more
of these forums next semester. We
think students should keep in mind
that the purpose of college is
education, and hopefully,
somewhere down the line, to aid
you in becoming a responsible
citizen.
The next time you're given a
chance to voice your opinion and
learn more about the issues that
directly affect you, use it.
I find it to be surprising that many
people still bewail the extinction of five
Communist scum in Greensboro Nov.
3, 1979, more than five years ago.
"Those dirty Nazis" and members of
the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan per-
formed an act of true patriotism and
valor, far above and beyond the call of
duty.
These brave soldiers of our nation
and of the great cause of the South
came to Greensboro on that day, mere-
ly to define our right to freedom of
speech and of the press. Yes, these men
brought weapons to the scene of the
shooting because it had been rumored
that the violent, Soviet-sponsored
Communist Workers Party was
waiting in ambush to murder all the
patriotic forces, which in fact turned
out to be true. In fact, it has been
discovered that the federaJ government
gave weapons to the Communist
Workers Party which they used in their
attempt to assassinate our soldiers.
Our men were fired upon first. In self
defense, our men returned the fire. It
had to be done. There was no other
choice. Our soldiers reacted calmly and
professionally under enemy fire and
surrendered afterward peaceably to the
authorities.
Lysa Hieber, I am sorry to say you
are ignorant of the facts. The members
of the NSPA (National Socialist Party
of America) and Knights of the Ku
Klux Klan acted as professional
soldiers must and acted in self defense
only. Afterward, they were in-
carcerated for almost one year under
terrible conditions and subjected to
two unfair trials by the Jewish
kangaroo court system, subjected to
double jeopardy and in both trials were
found by the juries to be not guilty.
You speak of freedom of speech. What
freedom of speech was the Communist
Workers Party going to grant us?
Death! Only the death by the gun. True
to the dictates of Chairman Mao who
said, "political power grows from the
barrel of a gun The Reds tried to
blow away the American patriots who
came to oppose them, but the side of
the right was prepared and faced the
enemy with bravery and skill that was
superior to theirs, and we won.
I was not there, partly because I lack
the military expertise to be effective in
such an emergency, and possibly
because I am a coward. Most of the
men there were seasoned veterans of
Vietnam and other wars.
I do not have to hide behind a hood
or a robe or a mask or a uniform. We
are full-blooded Americans working to
save our country from destruction by
Communist scum and their puppets. I
do not have to sign my name here for I
speak on behalf of the silent majority
who realize the truth that the only good
Communist is a dead Communist. It's
a damn shame we couldn't kill them
all.
Our men paid the penalty of suffer-
ing, prison, economic rejection by the
Kosher system, poverty, and peril
against their lives. They were not
afraid to risk death. Death threats
come to us every day. They paid dearly
for their loyalty to Christ, race and na-
tion.
We shall fight on for our rights, and
for our homes and for our country �
and we shall never surrender!
God save America.
Rev. Richard Becker
Greenville
Plank Defended
This letter is in defense of that con-
troversial and much-maJigned comic
masterpiece we have come to know as
"Walkin' the Plank I personally
think it is hilarious, but that is not the
issue here.
What is important is that we all en-
joy basic fundamental rights that few
other nations share. One of the most
important of these is a free press. As
educated adults, we have the oppor-
tunity to make our own decisions
regarding such matters.
To sum it up, the solution to this
problem is simple. If "Walkin' the
Plank" is offensive to you, simply
avert your eyes.
Guy Cantonwine
Music
Christmas Cheers
1 would like to take this opportumtv
to thank WZMB DJ's (Kirk Letter-
man, in particular. for his ingenious
promos), area merchants and especial-
ly our listeners for making "Christmas
in November" a success. Sure, there
were problems. Our sleigh bells were
from a scratchy sound effects record,
we had problems distributing 5,000
flyers, and an eight-year-old won a
membership to Piquant Alley. But
aside from the small problems, I know
that WZMB has opened a lot of eager
ears to alternative music.
When you are promotions director
for a 282-watt, college radio station,
you have to think big, and think big we
did. We've gained a whole new au-
dience since we began almost three
years ago. During "Christmas in
November" we had winners with an
'84 ID number as well as avid listeners
with a '68 prefix. It's nice to know that
new students as well as ECU graduates
can enjoy alternative music at its best.
For those of you who keep your dial
on 91.3 FM, thanks and congratula-
tions for having a discriminating ear.
For those of you who read this letter
and don't know what in the world I'm
talking about, well, you've missed a lot
of good music and your chance to win
great Christmas gifts. You can't enjoy
the music unless vou tune us in! All it
takes is a flick of the wrist and steady
fingers to set your receiver on your
campus radio station: WZMB FM.
Once again, thanks to everyone who
made "Christmas in November" possi-
ble.
Mary Lou D. (Montana)
Promotions Director, WZMB FM
Hiring Equal?
It recently came to my attention The
East Carolinian was taking applica-
tions for production manager. In-
terested in this position, I applied.
I have two years of experience in
newspaper production: two years as an
East Carolinian layout artist and
another at a magazine. To my surprise
I was never interviewed and the job
was given to a fraternity brother. The
question I would like to raise is: "Does
The East Carolinian hire on an equal
opportunity basis? Looking at the
managing positions makes one
wonder.
The majority of the high-paying
positions are held by members of a
single fraternity. In fact, the general
manager has been of this fraternity for
eight semesters.
I hope that in the future the Media
Board and deans will take steps to
assure any student wanting a chance to
work at The East Carolinian will have
equal opportunity, being judged on his
or her merits rather than fraternal ties.
Geoff Hudson
Jr Bus.
Former E
Guilty of
Crime
Column
Maurice Lamar Kennedy,
formerly of Aycock dorm, was
found guilty of two counts of
misdemeanor breaking and enter
ing and one count of assault on a
law enforcement officer b Judge
Bun Aycock in District Court in
Greenville on Nov. 19. Kennedy
was handed three 12-moi
sentences with the N
Carolina Department of Correc-
tions.
Kennedy's attorney, Robert I
Shoffner of the local Public
Defender's office imme
appealed the sentence and
case is now pendin,
Superior Court in Gree
Kennedy was origma
ed with two counts of first de�
burglary, one count of assaur
a law enforcement officer and
one count of possession
juana. The charge- -temmed
from an incident in Greene dorm
on Oct. 26 in which ECenni
allegedly entered two
rooms while the occpa.rr
asleep Aycock found no pi
bable cause in the charges of fir
degree burglary si nee the
Despite Student Prci
Military
(CPS) � Despite a recent
resurgence of student pre
against military and Centra In-
telligence Agency recruiting on
campuses, military officials are
confident they wont be exclu
from colleges as they were
just a few years ago.
Most students support
military, and the demonstrs
comprise only a small mine
they say.
But a lens sit-in at Tufts and
protests of military recruiting ar
Oregon and Minnesota in just the
last two weeks amount to the
most an ti-military activity on
campuses in years.
Students at Cal-Davis, Illinois
and about 20 other colleges also
carried anti-military recruiting
signs as they demonstrated at
one-year anniversaries of the
American invasion of Grenada.
Minnesota students, moreover,
plan a bigger protest when CIA
recruiters come to Minneapolis
this month.
Military and CIA officials,
however, dismiss the activities as
merely bothersome and in some
cases even beneficial
Marine recruiters at the
University of Oregon, for exam-
ple, say demonstrations mere
"give the Marine Corps front
page publicity and save us adee-
ming dollars
"We recruit on-campus once a
week, and there are three or four
protestors who are there e-
time we're there Marine C
B.J. Toynbee comme:
"They're not violent, we know
them all by name, and the re
nice guys
Trouble erupts only when
other groups show up to protect
against the protestors, he adds
"The anarchists show up a-
scream at the protestors for not
getting violent Toynbee ex-
plains. "Then the communist
youth group shouts 'Down with
the U.S and the pro-Reagan
group screams at the com-
munists.
"Then we're stuck there wat-
ching the show he says
Most students simply aren't
concerned about the military.
agrees Lt. Col. James Baker.
University of Wisconsin ROTC
director.
"They're apathetic about the
military he insists. "There arc
other things they're more in-
terested in
Five demonstrators, however,
were arrested at UW in October
for digging a "grave" in front of
the ROTC training building
But Baker says most of the 50
protestors, and four of those ar-
rested, were not students.
"It was supposed to be pan of
a nationwide anti-nuke protest
he adds, "but they latched onto
ROTC for their demonstration
because we're all there is. There
are no military bases around
here
It got nastier at Tufts Universi-

!
mmmwmm
mmmmm

i
I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 4. I9M 5
�lf
&t
'at riots
ich-maligned comic
: e come to know as
the Plank I personally
ous, but that is not the
ssue .h.ere
nportant is that we all en-
.ridamental rights that few
ther nations hare One of the most
� these is a free press. As
adults, we hae the oppor-
0 make our oun decisions
natters
l up. the solution to this
rie It 'Walkin' the
to you, simply
Christmas Cheers
�e to take this opportunity
k wZMB DJ's (Kirk Letter-
majv, m paxwcvilar , tor Vs ingenious
hants and espccial-
icrs for making "Christmas
ess. Sure, there
sleigh bells were
sound effects record,
distributing 5.000
. : an eight-year-old won a
Piquant Alley. But
ie mall problems, I know
ZMB has opened a lot of eager
ear' i ternative music.
are promotions director
a 282 watt, college radio station,
think big. and think big we
gained a whole new au-
e began almost three
During "Christmas in
N member" e had winners with an
M :D number as well as avid listeners
h a '68 prefix. It's nice to know that
idents as well as ECU graduates
alternative music at its best.
For those of you who keep your dial
FM, thanks and congratula-
� ing a discriminating ear.
those of you who read this letter
and don't know what in the world I'm
. about, well, you've missed a lot
)d music and your chance to win
gifts. You can't enjoy
the n nless you tune us in! All it
is a flick of the wrist and steady
ingers to set your receiver on your
campus radio station: WZMB FM.
e again, thanks to everyone who
'Christmas in November" possi-
lade
ie
Mary L ou D. (Montana)
Promotions Director. WZMB FM
Hiring Equal?
It recently came to my attention The
Carolinian was taking applica-
tions for production manager. In-
ested in this position, I applied.
I have two years of experience in
newspaper production: two years as an
Fast Carolinian layout artist and
another at a magazine. To my surprise
is never interviewed and the job
was given to a fraternity brother. The
question I would like to raise is: "Does
The East Carolinian hire on an equal
opportunity basis'7 Looking at the
managing positions makes one
wonder
The majority of the high-paying
positions are held by members of a
single fraternity. In fact, the general
manager has been of this fraternity for
eight semesters
I hope that in the future the Media
Board and deans will take steps to
assure any student wanting a chance to
work at The East Carolinian will have
equal opportunity, being judged on his
or her merits rather than fraternal ties.
Geoff Hudson
Jr Bus.
Former ECU Student Found
Guilty of Assault Charge
Crime
Column
Maurice Lamar Kennedy,
formerly of Aycock dorm, was
found guilty of two counts of
misdemeanor breaking and enter-
ing and one count of assault on a
law enforcement officer by Judge
Burt Aycock in District Court in
Greenville on Nov. 19. Kennedy
was handed three 12-month
sentences with the North
Carolina Department of Correc-
tions.
Kennedy's attorney, Robert
Shoffner of the local Public
Defender's office immediately
appealed the sentence and the
case is now pending trial in
Superior Court in Greenville.
Kennedy was originally charg-
ed with two counts of first degree
burglary, one count of assault on
a law enforcement officer and
one count of possession of mari-
juana. The charges stemmed
from an incident in Greene dorm
on Oct. 26 in which Kennedy
allegedly entered two coeds'
rooms while the occupants were
asleep. Aycock found no pro-
bable cause in the charges of first
degree burglary since the state
was unable to prove the defen-
dant's intent upon entering the
room. Aycock reduced the
charges to misdemeanor breaking
and entering and found Kennedy
guilty of two counts of that of-
fense and one count of assault on
a law enforcement officer. The
state elected not to proceed on
the charges of possesion of mari-
juana. Kennedy's new trial date
has not been set.
Campus crimes for Nov. 24 -
Dec. 1 were:
Nov. 24, 1:15 a.m. � Kimber-
ly McRoy of Greenville was ar-
rested for DWI. 4:45 p.m. � A
larceny of $200 in cash and a
jacket was reported at 416D Scott
dorm.
Nov. 25, 12:10 a.m. �
Franklin Knill of Aycock dorm
was arrested for being intoxicated
and disruptive east of Scott
dorm.
Nov. 26, 12:55p.m. � A vehi-
cle was reported vandalized on
the east side of White dorm. 2:30
p.m. � A larceny was reported
from a room on the second floor
of Cotten dorm. 6:10 p.m. �
Anthony Bunch of Garrett dorm
was arrested for failing to appear
in court.
Nov. 28, 12:30 p.m. � A
wallet and a pair of sweat pants
were reported stolen from the
basketball court of Memorial
Gym. 8:30 p.m. � A power
booster was reported stolen from
a vehicle parked in the 5th and
Reade St. freshman lot. 11 p.m.
� A 1973 Toyota Corolla was
stolen from the west side of Gar-
rett dorm. The vehicle was being
operated by a delivery man from
Domino's Pizza and the keys
were left in the vehicle. 11:40
p.m. � A necklace was reported
stolen from a room on the sixth
floor of Greene dorm.
Nov. 29, 2 p.m. � A set of
hubcaps was reported stolen
from a vehicle parked in one of
the 9th St. lots. 10:30 p.m. � A
larceny from a vehicle was
reported in the 14th and Berkley
freshman lot.
Nov. 30, 12:30p.m. � Money
was reported stolen from an
unlocked safe at the circulation
desk in Joyner Library. The
money had been collected by the
library staff as a donation to the
Pitt County Foster Children's
Fund. 4p.m. � A set of keys was
reported stolen from a room on
the second floor of Cotten dorm.
5:27 p.m. � A break-in was
reported on the third floor of
Greene dorm. 9 p.m. � A break-
in was reported at a room on the
first floor of Belk dorm.
Despite Student Protests
Military Recruitment Continues
(CPS) � Despite a recent
resurgence of student protests
against military and Central In-
telligence Agency recruiting on
campuses, military officials are
confident they won't be excluded
from colleges as they were until
just a few years ago.
Most students support the
military, and the demonstrators
comprise only a small minority,
they say.
But a tense sit-in at TuCts and
protests of military recruiting at
Oregon and Minnesota in just the
last two weeks amount to the
most anti-military activity on
campuses in years.
Students at Cal-Davis, Illinois
and about 20 other colleges also
carried anti-military recruiting
signs as they demonstrated at
one-year anniversaries of the
American invasion of Grenada.
Minnesota students, moreover,
plan a bigger protest when CIA
recruiters come to Minneapolis
this month.
Military and CIA officials,
however, dismiss the activities as
merely bothersome and in some
cases even beneficial.
Marine recruiters at the
University of Oregon, for exam-
ple, say demonstrations there
"give the Marine Corps front-
page publicity and save us adver-
tising dollars
"We recruit on-campus once a
week, and there are three or four
protestors who are there every
time we're there Marine Capt.
B.J. Toynbee comments.
"They're not violent, we know
them all by name, and they're
nice guys
Trouble erupts only when
other groups show up to protest
against the protestors, he adds.
"The anarchists show up and
scream at the protestors for not
getting violent Toynbee ex-
plains. "Then the communist
youth group shouts 'Down with
the U.S and the pro-Reagan
group screams at the com-
munists.
"Then we're stuck there wat-
ching the show he says.
Most students simply aren't
concerned about the military,
agrees Lt. Col. James Baker,
University of Wisconsin ROTC
director.
"They're apathetic about the
military he insists. "There are
other things they're more in-
terested in
Five demonstrators, however,
were arrested at UW in October
for digging a "grave" in front of
the ROTC training building.
But Baker says most of the 50
protestors, and four of those ar-
rested, were not students.
"It was supposed to be part of
a nationwide anti-nuke protest
he adds, "but they latched onto
ROTC for their demonstration
because we're all there is. There
are no military bases around
here
It got nastier at Tufts Universi-
ty in Massachusetts, where 19 stu-
dent protestors ran a CIA
recruiter off campus and forced
the administration to keep the
agency awav, at least temporari-
ly.
The press misrepresented the
incident, Tufts spokesman Curtis
Barnes states.
Newspaper reports claim Tufts
officials banned CIA recruiters
from campus following the pro-
test.
But Curtis says "it is a suspen-
sion, not a ban. We won't invite
them back until we determine a
speaker policy
The CIA could face further
dissent this month at Minnesota,
where the Central American
Working Group plans to picket
CIA recruiters to protest the
agency's role in Central America.
"We've organized a forum and
demonstration while CIA
recruiters are on campus group
spokeswoman Sarah McConnell
reports. "We're trying to help
students understand the issues
McConnell's group also
organized a recent demonstration
to mark the first anniversary of
the Grenada adventure.
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Sportswear & Novelties make great
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Save Additional dollars on the BEST
selection of sportswear in town.
CLIP SAVE CLIP SAVE $
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I






nit
KOI INI
DfcCl Mil! k 4 1984
Racism Continues to Haunt
Various Campus Groups
( PS) sm siii! haunts
blacks and othei minorities at
mo es, tMit the
� in face
. stait talking
Siso i.tiion ol
illeg - study sa
i ' black-white
leni i. taking
hlSt

sent Is
i
.
I
says
ta, authoi ol the
md
stion
and
Ha
"
� �
in do
howevei,
teaching ' "and "How does it al
feel my students' learning ?"
Black students, she says, also
need to establish "support
groups" to share feeling ol is 1 i
Mn and frustration, "a. cept the
i.k; thai tetimg then degree a
foui oi tic goal and noi let
acism detei them from thai
i! " "understand the
ol
racism on theii ampus
he san
d its rej ai
puse
integrating theii
Bla( k and w hit sororiti s and
fraternities al the University ol
a ' � oted
to . undei one . rung
ncil aftei years ol having
separate coun
"We're vei positive ah.mi thi

dent o 1 Georgia's new
it lnt nit) i
"People are finally starting
realize the benefits we all
k stud �
nil
have from this, We will be
strongei for uniting
At the University ol Arkansas,
three minority students have
pledged at three ol the campus'
traditionally-white fraternities
and sororities
1 ast year, eighl Arkansas
sororities lost privileges granted
organizations for
refusing to -ij.n a pledge DOl to
riminate They eventually
led the pled la; January.
1 'ni ersil ol I (vas Austin
dents, too, have t een struggl
'�" in i hen greek
systems
All th houses at i I have sign-
ed the universil y's non-
discriminatory agreement "and
there are some mteg.ated frater-
nities with a few, blacks leports
� � I �. I i aternity
� u
� (.�: black and whil houses "(till
function undei separate govern-
ncils, V eber s I
Exam Schedule
8:00 MWF
8:00 TTH
9:00 MWF
9:00 TTH
10:00 MWF
10:00 TTH
11:00 MWF
11.00 TTH
12:00 MWF
i i
I Season's
i
M w ft
m 1
11-1, Thursday, Dec. 1312:00 TTH
8-10, Wednesday, Dec.121:00 MWF
2-4, Friday, Dec. 71:00 TTH
2-4, Monday, Dec. 102:00 MWF
2-4, Tuesday, Dec. 112:00 TTH
2-4, Thursday, Dec. 133:00 MWF
2-4, Wednesday, Dec.123:00 TTH
2-4, Friday, Dec. 144:00 MWF
8-10. Friday, Dec. 74:00 TTH
8-10, Monday. Dec. 10
8-10, Tuesday, Dec. 11
11-1, Friday, Dec. 14
8-10, Thursday, Dec. 13
8-10, Friday, Dec. 14
11-1, Friday, Dec. 7
11-1, Monday, Dec. 10
11-1, Tuesday. Dec. 11
11-1, Wednesday Dec. 12
Greetings I
ij-rsteccsCsiti
" W 1 u
a bla k si Mem
vhite i impus,
al i his
id from
nib she
. black
frx$&zsto
�(PSSg!�!��
S
X ine
Cheese
CoHe
NS
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i eas
GoUfTTWl Ut�
Bring this ad in for $2.00 off!
A gift basket.
(ireenviUe Sq. Shopping C'ir.
(Nexl to Cargo Furniture)
756-1889
ials!
his oi
are
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� 'lie I I �
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Our '85 after ski boots are in!
ALLIGATOR
FOR SALE

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r
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Now $21.95
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HOURS 10-6
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Located around the corner from
Parkers Barb-Q, on Trade St.
i
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h
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tor a Good Look
� 1 Hour Photo Lab
$ CAROLINA EAST MALL � Belk's)
& M nSat !0am-9pm 756-6078
ADVENTURE
EXCITEMENT
ROMANCE
For the Spring Break to remember
Travel Associotes puts you right in the middle of
the hottest action in
Florida�Daytona Beach.
Your Sunbreak package includes:
Round-trip transportation via deluxe motorcooch
Seven nights accommodations at one of Daytonas
finest beachfront motels
Two poolside parties with complimentary beverages
A volleyball tournament with prizes
Optional transportation services to
Oisneyworld and EPCOT r � .
aii hotel taxes Contact. Dean or Kevin after 4p.m
s:xrro,nt�,o,es on se Mh s- �v 752.9732
Date: March 2-9
While Promotii
Blrrib
(CPS) � Snugly ensconced in
an elegant downtown Denver
hotel room, Lisa Birnbach, road-
and fidgety, devours equal I
of ice-blue throat lozenges p
Vantage cigarettes
Her new perm has failed, and
e cold she's fighting is winning
But while this promotional
ur for her new book, The Col-
lege Book, is taking a toll, Birn-
ch is resolutely cheerful and
outspoken.
Birnbach has been on the road
for much of the past four years.
first promoting her 1981 best-
seller. The Preppie Handbook
then researching and promoting
The College Book, released thi�
September
In the last three ears, she I
run an exhausting gauntlet,
plonng nearly 300 campu
States for the book
The results are review
schools' programs environmei
and student popuia-
terspersed with charts, g
quizzes and essays designed I
help students weather the
Of higher education
While college ofl
California to Florida
ing The College Book as a "si
py, inaccurate piece of �
and calling it "frivoto
silly the author this moi
started a national ?our of
to promote it.
Even the schools disrr
work as sloppy and abysmal
inviting her back, anticipating
updated edition in 1985.
Birnbach, for example, last
week handily charmed an au-
dience at Indiana University of
Pennsylvania, which she'd con-
demned in her book as home of
the ugliest male students in
America.
"A lot of schools that aren't
happy with what I wrote are
assailing my research techniques
and condemning the book
Birnbach admits. "But I have not
been disinvited, uninvited or con-
demned to the point where they
don't want me back.
"I think the book tiptoes a fine
line between being informative
and amusing she contends.
"lt"3 a fvin book and VouA Yc
read as a fun book. But there are
some serious points.
"Everything in terms of values
is so different she sighs.
"Money is the biggest factor in
the lives of .American college
students right now. In the TOs,
when I attended college, a great
job was to work at PBS in
Boston. Now, a great job is simp-
ly something that pays $24,000
upon graduation
But a certain amount of direc-
tion is good. Birnbach concedes.
"It's better than no direction,
which is what a lot of us had in
the '60s and "0s
The idea for the book came to
ECU Alumni
Will Host
UNC Program
A laje attendance is an-
ticipated Tuesday evening for a
public program on the University
of North Carolina system which
is to be hosted by ECU.
The event, scheduled to begin
at 6:30 p.m. in Mcndenhall Stu-
dent Center, is the fourth of a
series of seven statewide meetings
sponsored by the UNC Board of
Governors and UNC President
William C. Friday.
The program is free and open
to the public. ECU officials em-
phasized that there will be no
charge for light refreshments dur-
ing a social hour preceding the
presentation of a multi-media
slide show, in stereo sound and
color, showing and explaining
programs of instruction, research
and service on the 16 campuses of
the university system.
UNC official said attendance
at regional programs held thus
far has ranged from 700 to 1.000
I persons in Winston-Salem,
Charlotte and Raleigh.
Alumni of any UNC institu-
i tion, friends and supporters of
the university system and the in-
terested public are invited to the
program at ECU. The Greenville
meeting is to cover a region con-
sisting of 15 counties in the nor-
theastern and middle eastern sec-
tions of the state.
n
.
a
.





ule
� iti 11
I ! V. 1
14

fl
i
756-1889
JR
1.95
$14.50
MM
I
1
'OMANCE

emember
the middle of
test action in
?aytona Beach.
10
rch 2-9
evin after 4p.m.
ma Phi, 752-9732
While Promoting New Best-Seller
Birnbach Continues Tour
fHE EAST CAROLINIAN l c Mbt H 4 is4 J
(CPS) Snugl) ensconced in
an elegant downtown Denver
hotel room, I isa Birnhach, road-
wear and fidget, devours equal
es of ice blue throat lozenges
antage cigarettes
Her new perm has failed, and
cold she's fighting is winning.
But while this promotional
foi her new book, The Col-
ege Hook, is taking a toll, Birn-
h is resolutely cheerful and
spoken
Birnbach has been on the road
much of the past four vears,
� rst promoting her 1981 best-
er, The lreppie Handbook,
researching and promoting
He College Hook, released this
September
In the last three years, she has
i an exhausting gauntlet, ey-
ing nearly 300 campuses in 50
s for the book
results are reviews of 186
ols' programs, environments
student populations, in-
spersed with charts, graphs,
zes and essays designed to
students weather the storms
ghei education
le college officials from
� to Florida are attack
. Theollege Book as a "slop-
inaccurate piece o work"
calling it "frivolous and
the author this month
ed a national tour o schools
pr mote it.
Even the schools dismissing her
v is pp and abysmal are
ng hei back, anticipating an
iated edition in 1985.
Birnbach, for example, last
k handily, charmed an au-
ce at Indiana University of
� Ivania, which she'd con-
ned in her book as home of
ugliest male students in
erica
X loi 1 schools that aren't
� th what 1 wrote are
tiling my research techniques
condemning the book
Birnbach admits "But 1 hae not
been disunited, uninvited or con-
demned to the point where the
don't want me back.
"1 think the book tiptoes a fine
line between being informative
and amusing she contends.
�� a fim book and should he
read as a fun book. But there are
ome serious points.
"Everything in terms of values
is so different she sighs.
"Money is the biggest factor in
the lives of American college
students right now. In the '70s,
when I attended college, a great
was to work at PBS in
Boston. Now, a great job is simp-
omething that pays $24,000
upon graduation
But a certain amount of direc-
tion is good. Birnbach concedes
"It's better than no direction,
which is what a lot of us had in
the '60s and '70s
The idea for the book came to
ECU Alumni
Will Host
UNC Program
b So Bureau
A large attendance is an-
pated Tuesday evening for a
public program on the University
' North Carolina system which
is to be hosted by ECU.
The event, scheduled to begin
at 6:30 p.m. in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, is the fourth of a
enes of seven statewide meetings
ponsored by the UNC Board of
ernors and UNC President
.lliam C. Friday.
The program is free and open
c public. ECU officials em-
phasized that there will be no
-harge for light refreshments dur-
ing a social hour preceding the
presentation of a multi-media
slide show, in stereo sound and
color, showing and explaining
programs of instruction, research
and service on the 16 campuses of
the university system.
UNC official said attendance
at regional programs held thus
far has ranged from 700 to 1,000
persons in Winston-Salem,
( harlotte and Raleigh.
Alumni of any UNC institu-
tion, friends and supporters of
'he university system and the in-
terested public are invited to the
Program at ECU. The Greenville
meeting is to cover a region con-
sisting of 15 counties in the nor-
theastern and middle eastern sec-
tions of the state.
her while on a campus lecture
tour for The lreppie Handbook
"I wrote an article for Rolling
Stone about the mood on cam
puses in the 1980s she explains
"It seemed like a natural move
for me to write the book since I
was going to campuses anyway
Birnbach applied formally to
every school on her list, ap-
proaching each through official
channels and requesting time to
conduct her research.
Only one school, Washington
and Jefferson College in Penn
ylvania, refused her request.
Birnbach's critics claim she
wasn't on any campus long
enough to write credible reviews.
Others are angered bv the pro-
nouncements
Her claim that the Iowa State
campus is "fraught with
sameness" and "filled with
students who look alike" drew
howls of protest from ISU ad-
ministrators who conclude the
book is "probably filled with in-
accuracies and possibly slander
ings
Florida State University of-
ficials claim Birnbach's FSU
review listed inaccurate SAT
scores, misspelled a residence hall
name and named a "famous
murderer" as an alum when he
had never attended the school.
A Franklin and Marshall
University spokesman savs "the
factual errors are just appalling,
bad enough to call into question
the thoroughness of her research
and her credibility
Besides visiting each campus,
Birnbach waded through 5,000
nine-page student questionaires,
some with typed addenda of
students' opinions about their
schools.
Birnbach hopes her campus
lecture tour, which began at her
alma mater, Brown University,
will help her judge the effects of
The College Book.
But the book won't repeat the
runaway bestseller success of The
Preppie Handbook, Birnbach
believes. "It's not possible. It's a
much different audience
tr -

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IN A BEER. AND LESS.
c 1984 Miller Brewing Co Milwaukee Wi
���





hird In Adventure Series
Visit Thailand At Mendenhall

he I
I

� -
sfi Rooms
ring Exam
Super Spe
j 8x10 Color
'� Enlargenrv
only
- es
H.ik;kk. we have
mission to film a sight
I nevei before been hlmed
k . � I hailand t hanging
' he I merald Buddha,
ed religious relic in
housed in the Royal
Ml this and more will be
in this fasi mo ing, coloi tul
luthentic music record
mdei Karl Stein will
He has
i elogues on
prestigious
the I nited States and
. the National
S o ci e t in
I I His extensive
provide the
� fascina
A l ll
n the Central
M
? 661 exi 266)
Monda
( rickets
� � r EC 1
v
Q .

Library Schedule
I hursda. )e
Frida. Ie 7
Saturdav IH-i H
Sunda, 1)�h 9
Kn in la in
8am midnight
'Jam 11;
I p id
Mondtn I. I" " "
Iuesda l I 1 I �.m
Wednesday I ?� � 12 a in
�sdas l�.i P "am
I a ill
I a rn
I a m
l a m
Christmas Schedule
Iridav. h U
I�k 15-16
IKh P-21
I M M
p m
Study!
O-c-C-
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J
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Family Evewear
V-
We care for vour eves.
p
OnOMrTTPJC
�YeCAR�C�NT�K?
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:
cunt
OPEN LAI B
ubway after your late night fun. Try one of our
asting foot-long sandwiches. We have I? mouth water,
rkties to top off your night! We're open till 2:00 a.m.
lays a week.
�SUMMIT
�'���W apai fa
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till 10:00, with free wim
the ECU Rugby Team
Charlie Byrd spins your fav
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isportation to & from the club
Remember Thursday Nigl
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For more info call 758-5570
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 4. 1984
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Let Greenville Stu
dent Laundry Service pick up, wash,
dry. fold, hang, as well as deliver
your laundryl Dry Cleaning Too
Call 758 9087
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
years wants fulltlme typing at home.
IBM typewriter. Call 756-3660.
FOR SALE: I9fll Yamaha Special
400.New Dunlop tire back. 9,000
miles excellent cond. $1200 or best
otter 758 4932 or 758 0058 ask for Bill
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experience, quality work,
IBM selectrlc typewriter. Lanie
Shlve, 758 5301
BUYING: Brokendown, wrecked,
cars ana trucks. Bring to Aluminum
Recycling Company, 700 North
Green St behind Riverside Oyster
Bar or call 756 5037 nights
FOR SALE:
negotiable,
through Fri
Robin
l sofa, 2 chairs price
Call 756 9160. Tues
10-6, Sat. 9-1 ask for
FOR SALE: 12 inch black white TV
by Sharp. Practically brand new!
Excellent picture. Call 752-8198 or
come by 203 Jarvis Hall. Asking $50
TYPING: Will do for reasonable
rates. Call Janice at 756 4664,even
mgs or 752 6106,days.
FOR SALE: Wooden Dinette set
(table and 4 chairs) $85. Twin bed
5100 and taole lamp $15. Call after 5
p.m. 756 6672
WAPIT: Lodge Ski Hotel: inexpen
sive hospitality for outdoor adven
turers. $15 per person includes
breakfast, towels, linens, and kit-
chen privileges. 5 minutes to Beech
and Sugar 704-898-9899
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs, 758 5488 or
7588241
FOR SALE: 1980 Honda CM 400T
Good tires, luggage rack, very
clean Asking $750. Call 758 3550
STEREO: RTR loudspeaker for
sale $150 or best offer Call 758 6708
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. Spelling
electronically checked. Term
papers and dissertations at 1.75 per
oage, paper included. Call Mark
after 5 at 757 3440
PERSONAL
EVERYONE: Have you been wat
chlng that special someone from
afar, but want to get close The
NCSL match makers may be the
answer. Details coming soon.
TO ITALIAN STALLION: How
about a whipped cream party? I've
got the M 8. M's. I'll miss the pep
oerooi I love you Jap
MEY GOLDMANi The skins chafe
me almost as bad as you do. They
are going down so hard 11
PHI TAUS: Be prepared for a am
min' weekend starting Friday night
with the X mas party and ending
Sunday afternoon with a "Redskins
are deadsklns" party I
J.M. NARDEE: Just wanted to wish
you a Merry Christmas I I hope you
have a good one! I'll be missing you
over the holidays, butI'll see you In
January. Much love, "J.M.D
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Congratula
tions New Brothers! You guys did a
fantastic job and we are looking for
ward to your help In continuing our
proud tradition of N.C. Kappa.
PI KAPPS: The Happy Hour was a
success� you guys have a great
break and let's do it again next
semester. All you late night partlers
are too wildlet's go BOWLIng
again sometime) Sigma Phi Epsilon
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: Be
prepared to throw down and have
one of the wildest time ever and
remember, wear your pajamas or
nothing at all.
CINDY: From V.H. at Reynolds to
Thursday afternoon enoying each
others company. We're great chefs
knowing just what It takes to feel
and taste so good. You're fantastic
B.V.I We've shared alot together
behind to woodpile, on the deck in
Va the MB. sand or riding the
waves at A.B It's just too good not
to be right. To these and other
beautiful memoriesthis bud's for
you! I love you. From T.T.
TRIO A: To wine and dine vou is my.
cup of tea, Making you happy just
thrills me. Don't worry about the big
eight 'cause they know as I do,
you're just great. Friends come and
friends go, but you're the friend that
makes me glow. R.M.
JWJ: I love youll! TLM
MOLLY: Keep your chin up! The
semester is almost over! Love, T.M.
MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPV
NEW YEAR: To all the Chi Omega
sisters and pledges. Love, Tina
SCROOGE: We WILL have a Merry
Christmas anyway. Do we have a
date Saturday or not? I love you
HEY PETER Mc: What cha dooo
ing?! We love you J. and J.
DAWN & ROB: Congrats Who
believes it? Looking forward to an
old time Eastern St. Country Club
B.J. Bash. Love you gals, Jay.
I WANT A NEW DRUG: One that
won't make me crash my car, or
make Johnny's face break out.
SU: Loved mentally masturbating
with you last weekend. Thanx for
lunch and being your beautiful self.
BILL DAWSON: Thanx for the good
work. You're not such a chaffin'
dude. Zak.
SIT DOWN
WALDO, HERMAN, UNKNOWN:
People calling us the wild bunch.
That's okay there's no survivors. Er-
nie will be the first to go. Owee Odle
O. Ewok.
HUNTER: The East Carolinian
Staff will miss you next semester!
We wish you the best of luck
BILL D. I DAVID B Hope you're
ready to chow down on a jamman'
dinner Wed. night. Satisfaction
guarenteed Love, your little sisters.
,GANNON COURT
CONDOMINIUMS
We Invite you to compare � � �
MX
UMNGIOOM
�I ���
E99 no. popmtnl
No oocinQ coats
No points
Only $2,025 down
1,070 aquoxa feat
Emrgy efficient
FuMy equipped kitchens
Futty
Coble TV
MASTU SUttOOM
� ��II
JW� believe tfcet our product far surpasses others tn the � In bom flu to
(S. parents and investors. Recent changes In tax laws makes owning
f mf than renting not only possible but more advantageous. Wed like to
you how CANNON COURT Is the best, providing you with your own
c to live as Mi as an excellent Investment.
PLEASE COMPARE Why.pay more for less square feet?
COLLICEC MOORE
AND ASSOCIATES
UOSOUIMEVAN
919-75S-60S0
DAVID � Thanks for taking me
Saturday night�l had a blast)
You're the best shag teacher In the
world. I hope I didn't chafe you at
the end I Love, Your little sister.
CHRIS: Every day you become even
more special to me. I'm glad for all
the wonderful time we have spent
together and look forward to the
times to come. Have a great X-mas I
will miss you during break but my
love goes with you. Always, Bob
EXAMS: Cram sessions, late hours,
caffeine, study breaks, pizza, tubes,
beers, downtown, P.Bs, Bags,
windchlmes, wlndchlmes, wind-
chimes, SI0 -but hurry, only a few
left 758-7997
THE BIO BROTHERS: Of Alpha
Phi sorority extend best wishes to
the sisters that they have a pleasant
and safe break and a very Merry
Christmas. We love you all and look
forward to next semester.
FUN BUNS: It's been three wonder
ful years together. Thanks for being
my best friend. We've had some
tough times, but you're always there
when l need you, "Please Don't
Stop But when I think about it,
three years Is nothing compared to
the M (an inflnately large number)
years we'll spend together, "will
you MAR Almost, but not yet-
soon (6-M). I only suppose we'll have
a great time last night. Love, T.T.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
spilt expenses I block from campus.
Call 758 3720
JAMES: I had a lammln' time
Saturday night. Even if we didn't
shag, we did do the bumpl It was a
night to remember, 8. well worth los
Ing a little bit of sleep over. Love,
Sandy
MANY THANKS TO THE PHI
TAUS: For helping make this my
best semester yet at ECU. I love
ya'lll Sandy S.
ANY NARLTENDED: All you need
are some clean sox and a Trivial
Pursuit study guide.
GRADUATION PARTY: Has been
changed to Friday Dec. 7. 1st and
where? 1st and MEA 5:00
FOUND: Ring found In Croatan
parking lot. Call 758 4047. Must be
able to describe.
EPS: Is this personal enough or
what? Guess who
WANTED
SKI KILLINGTON: $169 gets you
everything. Dec. 16-21. Call Bob at
752 9320 for more Info.
FOR RENT: Two bed apt. Rlnggold
Towers Apt. 206, easy acess to cam
pus with laundry room on floor. Ren
ting at a good price. For more info
call 355 2698. Mrs. Ward
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Private
room in house on 3rd 6. Hickory close
to campus. Rent $75 plus V utilities.
Call 752-5690
ROOM: For rent in nice house less
than I block from campus Call
758-6708 preferrably In the morning
ROOMS FOR RENT: 2 blocks from
campus, kltcen and bath. Utilities
split with other renters. Call 758 3545
after 8 p.m.
WANTED: Female roommate to
share fully furnished and accessoriz
ed condo. Private bedroom, share
bath. Laundry facilities, night
security, bus service. Available now
Call 757 3272
MOBILE HOME: 2 bdrm W� bath,
central air a. heat, washer and
dryer. Furnished of unfurnished
Hollybrook Estates 919 326 4636 $180
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
br. apt. 2 blocks from ECU. Vi of $310
per month rent �. utilities or would
like to sublet whole apt immediate
ly. 758 0329
WANTED: Puppeteer for morning
of Dec. 14. Please call 756 2073 or
756 2244
ROOMMATES WANTED: Fully fur
nlshed, color TV (cable). v2 mile
from campus on 10th St Cypress
Gardens Apts. Call 752 1634
l�HRISTMAS BOXED CARDS
You llfhul a special yule tide
uisijor everyone on your list
Student Supply Store
Wright Bldg.
m
MiRK f,RII 11N
SPECIALIZING IN
Fashions
Interiors
Gifts
Free gift
with purchase
A-1 Imports
Open 10A.M. to 9P.M.
Greenville Square
756-5961
FFEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED: 608 Georgetown Apts (Cotan
che St.) Available after x mas
holidays, furnished, 2 bdrms, 2 bath.
etc. Contact anytime 752 2889
ROOMMATE WANTED: Furnisheo
private room behind Belk On uth
St. $140 a month Take over Jan 1st
Call after 7 at 758 7470
LOOKING: For a room nexr
semester girls? Look no further
Great place Good price Only 2
blocks from campus Call 757 0430
WANTED: Musical entertainment
for I nights listening pleasure, Fr
day. May 24, 1985 Call George
Hamilton 757 6961
NEEDED: One female to work
behind the bar part time Can
758 0058 Sportsmen's Lounge 720 N
Green St ask for Ray or Bill
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Charming
house, full appliances, washer
dryer, 2 blocks off campus,
reasonable rent, bonus secur,
deposit already paid! Available
now Call Sandi 757 0430
APARTMENT FOR RENT Cap
tains Quarters Apt 21, $230 plus
deposit Call Donna aU7S8 5?r I
ATTIC
f Wed. (also Thurs.)
Reading Day Eve
, Concert with
Stagger
Wing
jjEX.U,$l.0Q
Fri. -I 1th Annual
Christmas Part
Brice
Street
$1,000 in
iC hristmas Presents
SAT. Exam Jam Concert with
Glass Moon
Once you ve tasted
Killian's Irish Red,
you may never
go Dutch again.
Now don't get us
wrong. The Dutch
make some pretty fine
beers. But they don't
slow roast their malt
like we do.
So no Dutch beer
has the color, the
:haracter, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
of Killian's Red Ale
So the next time
you're about to order
vour favorite Dutch
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead
You may never go
Dutch again.
Exciting Band
Moving Up
B DANIEL MAI RF.R
Coming with the ne year is a
fresh and exciting ne und
from a promising young band
called Threshold The foursome
consists entirely of ECU students
and was originally formed b i I
:n 1981. Threshold couples mean-
ingful lyrics with eiet
guitar sounds and driving
rhythms to produce an original
brand of hard rock music tha' i
sure to spell success.
In '81 the band had amassed a
ioyal following while opei
Set THRKSHOI I) Pm,
fitP$Aci 5 v- ta
�i cC pfj Oft
�JL
L
SJ�E IT'S Ci-�RTTVsA�;
i
KSnsmSD
!��� WpM rl ,
npn, CoWrn I
BAHAMAS'CRUISE
SPRING BREAK '85
Ideal Christmas or Pre-Graduation Gift
Sunday March 3, 1985 - Saturday, March 9, 1985
Double Occupancy: $499.00 per person
Quad Occupancy: $449.00 per person
Prices include bus transportation, accommodations and meals
On the Funship, Carnivale, sailing to Freeport and Nassau
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: January 9, 1985
For more information, contact the Central Ticket Officp at
757-6611, �t. 266.
Sponsored by the Student Union Travel Committee
H
Pre-E
xal
���
���
m
Friday 7 th
BEAT T
$1.00
NO COVE
5-7
75M
cans

,
l






.an
�om
� es
FFErMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED 608 Georgetown Apts (Cotan
che St Available after X mas
riotiaars furnished 2 bdrms, 2 bath,
etc Contact anytime 752 2889
ROOMMATE WANTED: Furnished
Of vate room behind Beik On UTh
1140 a month Takeover Jan 1st
Ca Bftet t a' S8 ?4?0
LOOKING for a room next
sees'e g rls? Look no further
l e Good price Only 2
ampus Can 757 0430
WANTED Musical entertainment
g pleasure. Fri
day May 24 1985 Call George
NEEDED 0"e female to work
th� bai part 'ime Call
58 0 nen s ounge ?20 N
Ray or Bill
ROOMMATE NEEDED Charming
ices washer
Its oft campus,
� � bonus security
Ava iabie

APARTMENT FOR RENT Cap
� 21 S230 plus
THE EAST CAROI IN1AN
DECEMBER 4, 1984
11
Exciting Band
Moving Up
By DANIEL MAI RER
AMteiaal Fntwn r 411m
Coming with the new year is a
fresh and exciting new sound
from a promising young band
called Thrtshold. The foursome
consists entirely of ECU students
and was originally formed back
in 1981. Threshold couples mean-
ingful lyrics with electrifying
guitar sounds and driving
rhythms to produce an original
brand of hard rock music that's
sure to spell success.
In '81 the band had amassed a
loyal following while opening for
See THRESHOLD, Page 12.
A 'Christmas Story' Of Childhood Dreams
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lot
lour members of a hot new band on the Threshold of success.
(f CPfACZ'S MAnSiOn'
TIC
Annual
Part;
Brice
Street
resents
�vert with
Glass Moon
Ve tasted
rish Red,
ly never
h again.
By TOM GRIFFIN
Staff Writer
Noses press against the display
window of a large department
store, the glass fogging from the
warm breath. Eyes bulge at the
spectacle within as their minds
rehearse the fantasies of owning
those certain items: that doll on
the stand behind the drumming
monkey or that red hook-and-
ladder fire engine over there
beside the Red Ryder 200-Shot
Fast Action Lever BB Carbine.
Reluctantly, the children pull
away � homeward bound � still
counting the days left til
Christmas.
You probably recognize this
scene � the one played out
across the world every year about
this time. Perhaps this was
similar to what you did when you
were a child. Well, you're not
alone. At least not in Bob Clark's
A Christmas Story.
Based on Jean Shepherd's
novel, In God We Trust, All
Others Pay Cash, the Him, which
is narrated by Shepherd as an
adult Ralphie, deals with the real
life situation of an eight-year-old
boy named Ralphie (Peter Bill-
ingsley of the Hershey's
Chocolate Milk commercials)
who wishes for a particular BB
gun for Christmas. His dream
suffers set-backs when his mother
tells him that he may get hurt.
Determined to get the BB gun,
Ralphie drops hints to his mother
and father hoping that they will
change their minds.
His life is much like that of any
other kid on his block. He gets
hassled by a bully (who later gets
a dose of his own medicine),
dares his friends to do crazy
stunts, and has that little brother
who tags along like little brothers
are supposed to. A striking
characteristic of Ralphie is that
he has a trememdous imagination
which manifests itself when he
and "OP Blue" � his trusty Red
Ryder Carbine � single handedly
take on the dastardly Black Bart
Gang and win.
The casting of Darren
McGavin as a foul-mouthed
father and Melinda Dillon as the
classic make-it-all-better mother
accentuates the film tremendous-
ly as does the 50-ish setting. The
filming enviromment sets the
mood perfectly.
If you are looking for a film
that will make you chuckle
throughout and will put your
spirits in the right mood for the
season, this is one you don't want
to miss.
JUST ARRIVED IN PAPERBACK
TI.I-IT
VOW IT'S
TAETiN6 To
y&�V-
Come Love
A St
ranger
By Kathleen E. Woodiwiss
WORLD'S BEST SELLING AUTHOR OF SHANNA,
ASHES IN THE WIND, AND A ROSE IN WINTER.
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days A Week - 9:30 to 10:00
S
LADIES
LOCKOUT
;s�
'85
ion Gift
9, ,985
rson
ion
�ns and" meals
nd Nassau
9, 1985
ket Office at
�mmittee
A
K
A
T
Z
Wednesday
8:30-10:00 Ladies Free with Free Draft and Wine
Men Allowed In At 10:00
Happy Hour For The Men 10:00 until 11:00
Pre-Exam Jam during Ladies Lockout Highballs $1.00 10-11 50tdraft
Thursday December 6 From 8:30-1:00
FREE DRAFT ALL NIGHT LONG
$ 1.00 For Ladies $2.00 For Men
Friday 7th 3:00-7:00
BEAT THE CLOCK Saturday 8th
$1.00 Highballs y
NO COVER CHARGE
75c 50
jeans cans
25N
fans
Doors Open At 8:30
With The
Best In Beach
and
Dance Music
Membership available At The Door For Only1.00
Papa K�iu Is A Private Club
For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Permts

i
�&��- I ���'��
T





HI S1 v AKOl ll
1�U t MHi
Keeping The
Magic In
Your Holiday
v ontinued From Pajje 9.
idles were a welcome sign
Shortly afterwards, thristmas
?ling b candlelight became
populai On (hnsimas Eve in
1931, a radio announcer, Nor
Banks, was returning home
ivork when he heard the
voice v'1 a woman singing
along with the radio When he
ed in the window he saw a
e old lad holding a candle
singing the words to a
istmas song Inspired and
d b the scene, Banks en
is neighbo join
. singing ol carols
Gil - . gan in the
v During the Calei Is
i gave honied
- that the yeai of the reci
e sweetei. lamps
� gli si
� ilth might attend
ries, there
presenting
the children.
the people
g Da.

the
- On Christmas,
itma
east in modern
Sai
- Sick"). S
v. �
ga1
tl
ai'
iiroups Help
Decorate
X-mas Tree
tinued Irom Pae 9,

I Michel � �
president 1 isa
i vor �
x e used
and I

Another ce hall
� .
en though we
the tree-
ming part e decided
n the tree
! r : : i apps, a
n and pi
tant I i instead
M H

resent' to E( I
I "ree, which -
: anyhow
a . : been
gad n, hut
decided to make
g able 1 �
al Rebe i
tan i
ii an .
� -he fell mighi he g
friend i I mine, Gin
Mead �me caligrapl
t desif -� rked
ifter several long houi
ament was finished. She and I
i � tune and effort into
. and I feel we did do a g
?b
Even the implest ol designs
an bring out the best in an orna-
nt. Three doves, a well-known
' peace, represented Alpha
Delta Phi's ornament, which won
n third place in the competi-
Donna Breedlme, a junior
narketing major and Alpha
Delta Phi's philanthropy
hairpersnn, commented, "We
ere surprised and very pleased
�hen we heard that we'd won
'nird place It didn't take lung to
;ome up with the design or work
� n it It was fun and worth the
i me
Other group' which provided
iecorations for the tree included
� oten and Greene residence
halls, the ECV Sign language
flub, the ECU Student Unions,
dnd the Occupational Therapy
( lub, just to name a few
Bringing students together to
elebrate the spirit of peace and
goodwill is what Christmas is all
aboutat least at ECU.
Hot Rand, Threshold, To begin Work On Four- Song E. P. Next Heek
i ontinued From p�k� II.
such prestigious aits as Artimus
Pile and States at the Attic in
( neem tile Ha ing ac hieved
some success in establishing
themselves in the local rock
scene, the members of Threshold
�ose to take a sabatical I hit-t-
ot the bands members, guitarist
Bari Walsh, bass playei Steve
Campbell and percussionist Scoti
Pattei son, tout ed with
popular southeast cir nit band
Drivei
A hile on the road with I )i iver,
the members ol I hreshold gained
valuable playing experience I n
fortunately, thev found little time
toi writting new material, so the
decision was made to rejoin
�ihsi lyricist Jefl Hawley and
head foi a more creative at
mosphere
I hreshold i eduled to sun
work on then first tour song
I P next week at a private studio
here in (ireenville V hile s
lions tor the I P arc still ten
tative, tour possible i uts
Slow Down "Revival
"Deliverer" and "Over rhe
Edge a song they're especially
enthusiasts about, rhe band has
made deals with both Apple
Kei ords and the Hr ord Bar for
tribution ol the 1 P which is
Ha
l
the i l' format
follow ill "
rem � � �
1 ep, I Iroi
Duncan Lee
Over Pirate
USDA Ch�i� Beef Chuck
HvMfll!
I

USDA
CHOICE
FOOD LION
These prices food thru
Sunday. December 9,1984
$148
� Lb.
Fresh Daily
Ground
We reserve the
right to limit
quantities
Lb.

Fresh Whole Or Rib Half -14-17 lbs. Avq
Sliced FREE!
Lb.
USDA Choice Extra Lean
Chuck
�y
�k
Vw.
USDA Cho.ce Beef Chuck Bone In
Chuck Roasts Lb 1.28
Loins
Stew
tt&
USDA Choice Beef Chuck Bon
Shoulder Roasts
e In
u 1.58
y
Crisp Iceberg

i
7j
j?w,
i
Quart Sealtest
tesi
i �
Batt e
Each
Beautiful
Poinsettias
UNCC
Hv KK K M
Greenville
2 Liter Die Peps" Pepsi Free Diet Pepsi Free
Pkq of 12 12 0 Cans
Old
Milwaukee
Pkq of 12 12 0; Cins
Greenville

15 Lifer Burgundy Chafa
Fr Colombard Chentn Blanc
Taylor
Calif. Cellars
ir rw
64 Oi While House
Apple
Juice
r
24 Oz. Castleberry
Beef
Stew
6800 EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
White House
11
large Roll
m
ifi

suriinji members "till - firsi
tonight's xmt with H ��
I






Next Week
B5
cess s
"4S"
" t.
3
I
158
I Lb.
ce Extra Lean
B$tew
'Beef
Lb 1.58
I
i
349
Taylor
alif. Cellars
79�
Large Roll
Bounty
Towels m
I H� J AS! t K 1NIAN
Duncan Leads VCU
Over Pirates, 72-61
By SCOTT COOPER
I he lcl basketball team
ed :rd ranked Virginia
ommonwealth Thursday night,
and battled the Ranis to a hard
ighl "2-M loss
IVspue being down bv 14
points at the halt i.IVW), EC!
ight back to cut the VCU lead
41 V) earl) in the second halt
a Curt Vanderhorst free
irow Howeer, the game's tur-
point came with 7:51 re-
ning when Peter Dam was
ged with his fifth personal
Dam nipped a bird at the
costing the Pirates a
al foul.
vV hen Calvin Duncan con
ted the free-throw, the V(
creased to 53-43 as the
tomentum swung toward the
"The technical foul really
ur momentum Coach
� Harrison said "Peter's a
it tvpe of young man. and
' surprise me to see what
pened. Those mannerisms
icceptable � it won't hap
vain
Duncan, an honorable mention
N :a pick of a edr dgo.
he game's leading scorer
24 points Mike Schlegel, an
Sun Bell c onference second
ick in '83 was second in
. ith 21 points. Rolando
added seven, while Neil
ke scored four. Fight other
avers scored two points
The Pirates had a tough time in
irly g g, shooting an ice-
. " percent from the field
e first � he team finish-
ed the game w tl a 36 percent
irk. So ore guard William
B po:nts to lead
S coring Curt
and �' rst wasn as sharp as
le connected on just
I 12 field goals finishing
11 points Derrick Battle
had O points, and was the only
other Pirate in double figures.
Battlt . ibbcd a game-high
.Is.
The Pirates were able to match
- kets w.th VCU for the first
minutes of the game, but the
Rams then showed their talent a
they reeled off 10 straight points
took the lead 14-6 on a
-in Duncan 15-foot jump-
shot
ECU retaliated as their trans
game quickly got started
when Jack Turnbill was fouled at
the end of a Pirate fast break.
Turnbill converted on the free
nm the VCU lead to
th x 2 left in the first
period However, the Rams
ored E(1 2 to take a
23-10 lead when freshman Phil
Stinnie got free for a dunk with
6:38 remaining.
VCU applied a full-court zone
press throughout the first period.
And with 6:12 left, Scott Hardy
broke the pressure and hit Herb
Dixon for a layup. VCU
retaliated by scoring the next six
points to take a 29-15 lead with
4:13 remaining. After trading
some baskets, William Grady
sank a 20 footer with two seconds
left to cut the Ram lead to 33-19
at the half.
The Pirates came out smoking
to start the second half.
Vanderhorst and Grady combin-
ed to score seven straight points
to chop the VCU lead to 33-26
with 17:49 remaining in the
came Rolando I amb and Mike
Schlegel answered for VCU as
they made consecutive three-
point plavs. The Ram lead would
now be increased to 39-26. ECU's
Scott Hardy hit Vanderhorst for
a layup off a Pirate steal. The
Minges Coliseum crowd erupted
as thev saw their Pirates cut the
margin to seven points (39-32).
Aftr baskets by Derrick Battle
and Keith Sledge, Vanderhorst
hit a free-throw at 12:02 to cut
the lead to just four points
(41-37) the closest FCl' was
able to get. Robert Dickerson
scored on a layup and Schlegel
sank two free-throws to up the.
VCU lead to 45-37. The teams
traded baskets as VCU lead
50-43. Peter Dam's technical foul
cave the Rams a 10 point lead
(53-43) with 7:51 remaining.
VCU's inside game began to
take control as a Calvin Duncan
layup with 4:02 remaining gave
the Rams their largest lead of 17
points (64-47). The Pirates con-
tinued to play intense basketball
as thev trimmed the VCU lead to
a final score of 2-61.
"ECl played a very fine game,
and kept coming at us VCU
coach ID. Barnetl said. This
vear's (FCC) team is better and
more aggresive, but the technical
foul really broke their backs
Coach Charlie Harrison felt
the Pirates played well and
credited the VCU team.
"They'vegot a helluva basketball
team � they're capable of
beating anybody Harrison
commented. "We just didn't get
the big plays when we needed
them.
"Our goal is to get better with
every game coach Harrison
stated. "And we got better after
this one
The Pirates are 1-1 after the
loss, and will travel to Drexel
tonight in their first road game of
the young '84 campaign.
Sports
DlI MHl K 4 1984
Pc 1
William Grady's jumping ability couldn't help out the Pirates as they fell to 23rd ranked Virgin Commonwealth
UNC Charlotte Dumps Lady Pirates, 68-61
Hv RK'KMcCORMAC
sj.ff Wnirr
The he I women's basketball
�earn was victimized by a cold-
oting second half, as they
ected on only 25 percent of
shots in the second half of a
� 61 loss the INC Chorlotte
rdav night.
The I.adv Pirates, who led at
i me 36-28, only shot 29.5
ent for the game and many of
ne misses were on shots close to
the basket.
Still, the Lady Pirates managed
to keep the lead until 7:15 left in
the game when Connie Remley
scored her second consecutive
basket to give the 49ers a 47-45
lead that they would never relin-
quish.
"We out rebounded them and
had fewer turnovers, but the poor
shooting percentage killed us
ECU head coach Emily Manwar-
ing said.
Manwaring was especially
upset with the play of her
backcourtTm reallv frustrated
with the offensive performance
of the guard position, ' she said
"We have mo players at that
position who are not know
shooting up to the Division 1
level
The 1 adv Pirates were led in
scoring by Anita Anderson,
Sylvia Bragg and Lisa Squirewell
all of whom scored 12 noints.
50 Year Anniversary
Surviving members of ECl 's first women's basketball team (1934-35) will be honored at half time of
("night's game with Howard University tonight in Minges Coliseum.
Annete Phillips was the only
other Pirate in double figures
with 11.
Of those four players,
Squirewell was the only one to hit
50 percent of her shots, hitting on
four of eight attempts.
Anderson sank six of 13 field
goal attempts, while Bragg and
Phillips only made four of 15
field goals.
The 49ers were led in scoring
by Candy Lucas who scored 15 of
her game high 25 points in the se-
cond half. Kristin Williams also
contributed 16 points for the 1-2
49ers.
Manwaring felt the play of
Candy Lucas and Connie Remley
for UNCC was an important fac-
tor in the game's
outcomeRemley got a couple
of baskets inside, and some im-
portant rebounds. Candy Lucas,
there All-America candidate, got
about six of her baskets on
layups, but the rest were wi.h
people all over her
Although it's still early in the
season, the Lady Pirates have yet
to win a game on the road, even
though they've had commanding
leads in all three contests.
"Thus far this year we have
been a first half team. We usually
get the lead and then let the other
team back into the game Man-
waring said. "We need to
develop a killer instinct � even
when we beat Fayetteville State
we let them cut our lead down to
twelve points when we should
have won by 40
The Lady Pirates will play their
next two games at home m
friendly confines of Minges Col-
iseum. ECU will face a tough
Howard University team Tuesday
night, and then will battle sea
ranked Old Dominion on Fnday
night.
"We still have the potential to
be a good team, but we can't wait
much longer to get our act
together Manwaring said
"The coaches and team have to
work together to be a more
disciplined unit We reallv need
to learn how to play in an away
gymnasium and put 40 minutes
of solid basketball together
At halftime of the Howard
game on Tuesday night, their will
be festivities commemorating 50
years of Lady Pirate Basketball
Governor James B. Hunt did
Mayor Janice Buck have official
ly proclaimed Tuesdav 1 adv
Pirate Basketball Day. The pro
clamation praises the Lady
Pirates for "proudly represen: .
the University and city of Gree l
ville with the utmost respect an :
integrity
Annie Akew, a membei oi
1934-35 team, will speak ab-
the history of women's basketbal
at ECU, and a demonstration ol
how the game was played in the
first season will also be given.
Seven other members of the
original team will be present
the festivities.
In addition to the presentat:
at halftime. there will be a recep
tion for the original team
members at the Chancellor's
house before the game, as well as
a a dinner at the Pirate Club
sponsored bv women's basketbal!
supporters.
Immediately following the
game, a get-together will be held
at the Pirate Club allowing the
public to meet the seven original
lady Pirate basketball players.
Ed's Opinion Next Year
Due to a short in . fuse box
last nigh the efforts of the
sports staff were geatlv
hindered in the final phases of
production. As a result, several
files of a featured interview
with ECU head football coach
Ed Emory were lost
The story will appear in its
entirety in the next issue of The
East Carolinian, Jan. 8, 1985
In the article. Emory gives
his Mew of how his team fell
from the national limelight to
obscurity in just one short year.
In 1983, the Pirates' posted
an impressive 8-3 record and
finished the season ranked in
the Lop 20. This year, ECU
had their worst record in more
than a decade as they wound up
the season with a 2-9 record.

'





' �OASTCAROLON1ANOCTOBER 30, 1984
NEWTON, Mass. (UPI) �
The H-year-old quarterback made
up his mind to throw a long pass.
His coach didn't think it would
work. Such a daring move on the
first play of the game was
unusual.
"I finally talked him into it
Doug Flutie said. "I threw an
80-yard touchdown pass and we
won the game 6-0. That was my
way of doing things
Flutie, Boston College's inven-
tive quarterback, has done it his
way- with confidence, hard work,
a quick mind and a simple desire
for fun- ever since that Pop
Warner season with the South
Beaches Cubs in Melbourne
Beach, Fla 11 years ago.
When Flutie was a 15-year-old
in Natick, Mass after his family
moved back from Florida, his
high school team fell behing by
two points in the final minute. He
was at his own 20-yard line with
26 seconds to play.
"He completed three passes in
a row, which put the ball on their
20-yard line with three seconds
left said Tom Lamb, his coach
at Natick High. "He kicked a
37-yard field goal to win it. He
wasn't a super kicker but he was
good when it mattered
When Flutie was 22, his college
team trailed by four points.
There were just 28 seconds left
and 80 yards between him and the
end one. He cut the distance to
48 yards, but only 6 seconds re-
mained.
"Fven he didn't know he could
do that one said Jack Bicknell,
his current coach. "It's just that
he will never stop trying
Flutie did when it mattered.
The 48-yard scoring bomb drop-
ped through the Miami mist from
the story books into the history-
books Nov.23 Boston College,
against nearly impossible odds,
stunned the Hurricanes 47-45.
"When people say something
is impossible, that makes it more
of a challenge Flutie said.
He's been meeting challenges
Intramurals
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for half his life. In the traditional
rush to sports hyperbole, Flutie
has been newly anointed as "The
Magic Man" and "The Miracle
Worker
Joan Flutie knows her son bet-
ter.
"He's the same person he was
15 years ago, 10 years ago, five
years ago she said. "Once he
walks off the field and comes
back home, he's the same little
boy
In his childhood, the family
games included tiddlywinks and
flipping quarters across the room
into a glass.
"There was always something
where there would be a winner
Joan Flutie said.
Flutie and his friends would
play basketball in his house with
a ball of crumpled paper, street
hockey, any games they could
think of.
"I never stopped. I just played
sports for the enjoyment of it
said Flutie, whose odd combina-
tion of playfulness and pur-
posefulness on the field mirrors
his personality.
"A lot of parents of younger
children say you shouldn't
generate competition said
Doug's father, Richard, an
engineer. "We like the idea of
competing for everything. I think
it prepares them for life
Athletics have been in the
Flutie blood for at least three
generations. Richard Flutie's
father was an all-state football
guard ai Atlantic City, N.J
High School in the 1930's.
When Richard asked him to
sign a permission slip for high
school football, he refused
because he was still aching from
his own career.
"I went into my room and
cried to my dog all night said
Richard, who did compete in
golf, track and junior varsity
basketball in high school.
Influenced by his own missed
opportunity, he encouaged but
didn't force Doug to pursue foot-
ball.
Doug's competitive edge was
honed in his sports battles with
his brother Bill, a former receiver
at Brown, and Darren, a
freshman receiver at Boston Col-
lege. Bill is only 14 months older
but is taller than Doug, now
5-feet-9 .
"Doug had to fight for every
inch with Bill Mrs. Flutie said.
"He has to excel. It's like
something inside of him driving
him
Eventually, Doug won Natick
High's starting quarterback job
away from Bill.
"He's learned to survive and
do all those things a big kid
doesn't have to do Lamb said.
"He's so resourceful
Although his lack of height
worries pro scouts, Flutie has en-
thusiasm, a strong arm. a quick
release, good instincts, scrambl-
ing ability, leadership qualities
and an obsession with analyzing
plays he's been in or seen on
television.
Why did he gravitate toward
quarterback
"Control said his father.
"He's always had mental control
Heisman Winner
ECU Signs Prospect
(UPI) � ECU has signed its
third recruit of the early basket-
ball signing period with "dia-
mond in the rough" Al Clark.
Clark, a 6-5, 220-pound for-
ward from Alexandria, Va
averaged 12.8 points and 8.2 re-
bounds a game his junior year.
His commitment Tuesday leaves
the Pirates with one more
available scholarship.
"Al is a diamond in the
rough Pirate coach Charlie
Harrison said. "He's an excellent
athlete with great work habits.
His work habits are going to pay
off on the basketball floor
Last week ECU signed guard
Jeff Kelly of South Orange, N.J
and forward Manuel Jones of
Washington.
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and he was just drifting in the
positions of physical control. He
was always the guy who was play
ing shortstop or point guard or
quarterback
At age 7, Doug was a star in
flag football. Later, his picture
was on the cover of Pop Warner
magazines. He made high school
all-league teams in football,
baseball and basketball. As his
college successes multiplied, so
did the media's assault.
That provided plenty of fodder
for his small ego and for his
teammates' envy. Neither has
grown noticeably.
Said Bicknell: "If one time he
was a hot dog, if one time he
thought the rules were for the
team and not for Doug Flutie, if
he ever came to practice and went
through the motions, if he ever
became so impressed with himself
it was beneath him to be with his
teammates and friends, then kids
wouldn't buy it. But they see him
in practice working his tail off
They see him come through in big
games
Lamb suggests that Flutie
handles the adulation so well
because he has become so ac-
customed to it.
"He has been Superman on
every team he's played
onLamb said.
Flutie may not be tall, but he's
dark, handsome and a quarter-
back. He could play the role of a
campus hero if he chose.
"It's surprising that your peers
look at you that way he said.
"When I walk around campus, I
don't feel any different and I'm
worried about the same things
they're worrying about, like get-
ting to class
Flutie has had the same
girlfriend for six years. He still
leaves campus to spend weekends
at his family home. A Rhodes
Scholarship candidate, he worries
about missing classes.
"If you start putting your
friends aside, then you're getting
things out of perspective Flutie
said. "They're the people I grew
up with and people that have
been with me since high school
and didn't know Doug Flutie, the
Heisman Trophy candidate
Four years ago he was barely a
major-college football candidate.
Recruiters said he was too short.
Boston College was the only Divi-
sion I-A school that offered him
a scholarship- one of their last
one's that year.
Gerard Phelan, who caught
Flutie's dramatic pass in Miami,
remembers chats about their
modest hopes before their
freshman season.
"We talked about how maybe
we'll get a chance to play junior
year and if we're lucky we can
travel next year" as sophomores,
said Phelan, Flutie's close friend
and roommate.
Flutie couldn't wait. He
wanted to play quarterback but
was about to ask to be shifted to
another spot so he could play
more.
First, though, there was the
fourth game of his freshman
season at Penn State on Oct. 10,
1981.
The Nittany Lions led 38-0 ear
ly in the fourth quarter. Two
Boston College quarterbacks had
been ineffective. The regular
third-stringer was hurt.
SKI
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'
BEVERLYHIUS
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Schne
LOUISVILLE, Ky (LP1,
Howard Schncllenberger. nl
coached Miami to a nation!
football championship and the
left while he was on top, has beel
named the new coach at i
University of Louisville
The hiring of Schnellenr
who sat out this season after
deal with the United States i �
Jockette
ByJKANNfcTTKROIH
af f � nt�
The soccer plaj
began to take shape ia
with all-campus
crowned Thursda n .
As expected, the
Jockettes repeated a
formance by taking the
title awa from the
Golden Hearts The J .
defeated residen �
Rippers in semi-firm
With a victory over the Tn
the 'Golden Hea
final all-campus game
The Bone Tear
pens by capturing the
campus champion-�
residence hall divisioi
ched Uecker
in-Boone � I
defeated the I g
'Booties' to win theii
the all-campus -err firm
fraternity division �
Beta Tau met and
'Lecker's B
with the 'Bone Tearr I
tie. The Bone Team w i l
with the ail-can
ship and the IRS
The Miller-IRS
basketball tourna
this weekend in Memorial Gyrr
The games were filled -
tacular play and .
Shooting into the finals ev
Fellows and The Su .
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pes before then
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how maybe
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UPI) -
Howard Schnellenberger, who
coached Miami to a national
football championship and then
left while he was on top, has been
named the new coach at the
University of Louisville.
The hiring of Schnellenberger
ho sat out this season after a
deal with the United States Foot-
ball League fell through, had
been rumored for weeks. It was
confirmed Saturday in a meeting
of Louisville's Athletic Associa-
tion board of directors, and then
announced by President Donald
Swain.
"Very few coaches in their
lifetime have an opportunity to
take Cinderella to the ball
Named Cardinal Coach
twice Schnellenberger said
after introducing his wife,
Beverlee, and family to several
hundred cheering Louisville
boosters.
"I've been here once and I
think I have the opportunity to
do it here again. I'm not going to
promise a championship in five
years, but when we take the field
Jockettes Repeat As Champs
BvJEANNFTTFROTH -tl� c
By JEANNETTE ROTH
SUff �rtt�
The soccer playoff picture
began to take shape last week
vsith all-campus champions
crowned Thursday night.
As expected, the L'mstead
Jockettes repeated last year's per-
formance by taking the women's
title away from the Sig Ep
Golden Hearts. The 'Jockettes'
defeated residence hall White
Rippers in semi-final action.
With a victory over the Tri Sigs,
ihe 'Golden Hearts' reached the
final all-campus game.
The Bone Team fooled the ex-
perts bv capturing the men's all-
campus championship. The
residence hall division final mat-
ched L'ecker's Boys against Men-
in- Booties. Lecker's Boys
defeated the highly touted
Booties' to win their division. In
;he all-campus semi-final game,
fraternity division winner Zeta
Beta Tau met and defeated
I ecker's Boys ensuring a game
with the 'Bone Team' for the ti-
tle. The Bone Team walked awav
uith the all-campus champion-
ship and the IRS t-shirt for 1984.
The Miller-IRS pre-season
basketball tournament took place
this weekend in Memorial Gym.
The games were filled with spec-
tacular play and controversy.
Shooting into the finals were the
Fellows and The Sultans of Swat.
The Fellows were placed into the
final game by a forfeit from
John's Gang. During semi-final
action, John's Gang ended their
game with more players on the
bench than on the court as the
game was plagued with fouls.
Refusing to play the final game
of the losers bracket against the
Fellows, John's Gang dropped
from the tournament. The
Sultans of Swat went into the
finals undefeated after beating
the Fellows 33-31.
In the first game of the final
match-up, outstanding outside
shooting from Jeff Fields and
point guard Percy Edwards pav-
ed the way for the Fellows' vic-
tory. In need of a comeback vic-
tory, the Sultans of Swat slowed
the tempo of the final game sear-
ching for the perfect shot. At the
half, the score stood at 19-14 in
favor of the Fellows. The tempo
quickened in the second half as
the speed and sharp shooting of
the Fellows soured the hopes of a
'sultan' victory. The final score
stood 45-35 The Fellows �
preluding another exciting IM
basketball season.
All-campus finals in bowling
take place this week. The
Saturals, who bowled a 1203
series against top competitor The
Strikers, plan to take the cham-
pionship away from the
powerhouse Wild Women, cham-
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pions of the residence hall who
defeated the Wild Ones to place
in the finals.
The pins were flying during the
men's playoff game between the
Powerhouse and Thunder Balls.
These two teams were picked one
and two in pre-season polls. The
Powerhouse lost the one and only
game this season since the team
started, but regrouped to bowl
over the Thunder Balls. The final
bowling match-up between Sig
Tau Gamma and Powerhouse
will no doubt be one of the most
exciting events this fall.
next year, we'll do so with the
single prupose of winning every
single football game. Our goal is
to be a nationally prominent
football program he said.
The Miami Herald reported
Saturday that Schellenberger, 50,
was offered a fiv-year contract
worth at least $250,000 a year
that would guarentee him $1
million cash if he stays 10 years.
This is a sentimental
homecoming for
Schnellenberger, a former
University of Kentucky All-
American who moved to
Louisville as a toddler and 'ent
to high school here.
It's also a challenge bigger than
the one he took in 1979 when he
left a secure post as offensive
coordinator for Don Shula's
Miami Dolphins to take over the
Hurricanes.
He had been assistant during
the Dolphin's perfect season in
1972 and had helped Bear Bryant
coach Alabama to three national
championships. Schnellenberger
also had worked under Blanton
Collier at Kentucky and George

Allen in Los Angeles.
But in his one head-coaching
stint with the Baltimore Colts,
he'd been fired after just over a
year when owner Robert Irsay
ordered Schnellenberger to play
quarterback Bert Jones and he
refused.
After coaching Miami to its
championship last January and a
41-16 record in five seasons,
Schnellenberger quit to become
coach of the USFL's Washington
Federals. That fell through when
the league announced a switch to
a fall schedule and the team was
never moved to Miami.
Since then, the name of the
man who pulled off the "Miracle
of Miami" on Jan. 2 by beating
Nebraska in the Orange Bowl has
been mentioned in connection
with dozens of jobs.
Powers Wins Expert Title
Scott Powers took the honors
in The Panel of Experts football
picking contest, holding off a late
charge by Chuck Wingo, who
picked under the name of Sad
Sam, to win by three games.
Finishing behind them were
Randy Mews and Tina
Maroschak, who tied for third six
games off of the pace, and Jen-
nifer Jendrasiak, who despite a
blazng late week comeback,
wound up 13 games out.
It should be no surprise to
anyone that this year's cellar
dwellar award went to Greg
Rideout, whose futility was an
embarrassment to all of us
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25, 1984
Page Pounds Coetzee To Take WBA Title
SUN CITY, South Africa
(UPI) � American Greg Page
shook off a tarnished reputation
and pounded champion Gerrie
Coetzee of South Africa to the
canvas in the eighth round of a
tumultuous fight to take the
World Boxing Association
heavyweight title.
During a furious battle,
Coetzee and Page taunted each
other in the ring, wrestled along
the ropes and traded stunning
blows.
Page appeared narrowly ahead
on points when the end came sud-
denly through a left-right com-
bination that knocked Coetzee on
his back.
"They told me I was through,
they told me I was washed up
Page shouted jubilantly. Earlier
this year, he lost to Tim Withers-
poon and David Bey in lackluster
fights.
There was much confusion,
however, as to when the
knockout occurred. Well before
Page decked Coetzee, journalists
at ringside were shouting at
timekeeper Phil Swart that the
three-minute round had ended.
There were estimates that the
eighth round actually went as
much as 40 seconds too long.
Swart said later the round
lasted 3 minutes, 3 seconds, in-
cluding the 10-count.
The Coetzee camp did not
lodge an immediate protest.
Page, 26, of Louisville, wasn't
concerned with that.
"Ah, it's tough Coetzee said
as he walked from the shambles
of his first defense since he won
the title by knocking out Michael
Dokes on Sept. 23, 1983 in the
10th round. He drove away with
his wife, Rina, and children
without speaking to reporters.
South Africa lost one cham-
pion but gained another as Peit
Crous, a 29-year-old insurance
claims manager, upset WBA
junior heavyweight champion
Ossie Ocasio of Puerto Rico in an
earlier bout before 7,500 people
at the Sun City gambling resort.
Page knocked Coetzee down
for a mandatory eight count in
the seventh round and both
fighters had knocked each other
wobbly with powerful rights
earlier in the bout.
Page hurt Coetzee in the fourth
round with two rights and a left,
and in the fifth round with a
right. But the South African
came back, stinging Page with
lefts.
Page caught Coetzee, 29, with
a left that sent him back toward
the ropes in the eighth. The
American moved in with another
Morrison Gets 1984 Coaching Award
left and a right that sent Coetzee
sprawling. Coetzee was counted
out by referee Issidro Rodriguez
of Venezuela.
"I told you it wasn't going 15.
They told me 1 was through.
They told me I was washed up
a jubilant Page shouted to the
crowd as he headed toward his
dressing room.
"That's my boy. He has a lot
more in him than what you saw
tonight said Page's manager,
Janks Morton.
There was very little reaction
from the white crowd in this
white-minority-ruled country,
but blacks mobbed Page, who is
black.
Since the Dokes fight, Coetzee
ran into one contractual problem
after another until he finally got a
challenge from Page. The new
champion earned $500,000.
Coetzee, who was contracted to
be paid in South African rands,
received the equivalent of just
over $800,000.
Coetzee lost to Mike Weaver
and John Tate on his way to the
championship. His record now is
29-3-1. It was the first time he
was knocked out after stopping 18
opponents.
Page now is 24-3. Coetzee
became his 19th knockout victim.
Crous, 179 pounds, stalked
Ocasio from the start and never
appeared in danger from
Ocasio's counter-punching tac-
tics as he won a unanimous deci-
sion over 15 rounds.
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UPI)
� South Carolina Coach Joe
Morrison, who directed his team
to a 10-1 record and a No. 7 na-
tional ranking this season, has
been named the Walter Camp
Football Foundation's 1984
Coach of the Year.
The selection of Morrison,
who reversed last year's 5-6
record, was announced Saturday
by Walter Camp Foundation
President Vincent T. Farricielli.
"It isn't often that we get the
opportunity to honor a dedicated
football coach such as Joe Mor-
rison, who is described as a no-
nonsense type of person that goes
about his business in a quiet, pro-
fessional manner said Far-
ricielli in a prepared statement.
Morrison will be honored dui-
ing the foundation's annual ban-
quet Feb. 2, 1985 at Yale Univer
sity in New Haven. He will be
joined by members of the 1984
Walter Camp All-America team,
which includes Player of the Year
Doug Flutie of Boston College.
"Of course I'm very honored,
but I look upon this as a reflec-
tion of the hard work of my
assistants and our players Mor-
rison said. "The award is also
significant to me because of my
long-time admiration of the folks
with the Walter Camp Football
Foundation
Morrison took over the South
Carolina program in 1983 after
coaching stints with Tennessee-
Chattanooga and New Mexico.
Pure Gold Dancers
will appear Saturday, Dec. 8, at half time of the ECU
� Christopher Newport basketball game. Over 200
posters of the team will be distributed at the Boston
University game on Jan. 3.
FUN HOLIDAYS FOR 1985
Jan. 2-4
March 4
Ski X intrrs?reenfrom $131 pr person
Transportation from Greenville
2 nights lodging and lift tickets
-Spring Break Cruise -4 nights$305 per person
Sail from Miami to Nassau. Freeport. Dolphin
Cove aboard totallv remodeled ship
Call for brochure and bookings:
QUIXOTE TRAVEL, INC.
Coll- 319CotoneheSt.
Greenville, N.C. 27814
Phone 757-0234
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 4, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 04, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.380
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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