The East Carolinian, November 29, 1984






(Fhe
darnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.27
Tuesday November 29, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,(KM)
Modified Bench Press
� RYAN HUMBERT - ECU Wloto Lab
It seems that evenlime ou turn around, someone else is getting into the fitness craze. This is one of your
more innoatie methods of keeping in hape.
Gallagher Cancels Show
Mendenhall Student Center
officials announced Wednes-
day that the Dec. 5 Gallagher
show has been canceled. Jon
Curtis, assistant programming
director, said the comedian
backed out for the second time
to do commercials. Curtis said
they would not try to
reschedule the appearance and
considered the cancellation a
slap in ECU's face.
The Cental Ticket Office
will be giving refunds to peo-
ple who have already purchas-
ed tickets; the hours are 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. P-funds can be
obtained through January, but
Curtis urges all students to get
theirs before the semester
ends.
Curtis said the cancellation
broke a valid contract between
the school and Gallagher. The
programming office, he said,
will get compensation from
Gallagher for time, posters,
advertising and incidentals
that were expended in pro-
moting the concert.
Curtis said he is hoping to
get another comedian because
of the sell-out response to
Gallagher.
Book Exchange Program
Planned For January
A book exchange program
nsored K the SGA and The
East Carolinian will swing
action next week hoping to help
students pay less for their :ets
According to Melinda Davis.
SGA coordinator of the pro-
gram, the program would enable
students to sell back books for
more money and buy them for
less.
The ad in The East Carolinian
will be free and will appear in the
Jan. 8, 1985 issue of the paper.
To place an ad. a student fills out
a form at the front desk at
Mendenhall Student Center or
the SGA office anytime during
business hours. Also, Dec. 3-7, a
booth will be set up at the Stu-
dent Supply Store at selected
hours to fill out the ads. On the
form a student will fill in the
course number, title of the book,
instructor's name, his or her own
name and phone number and the
price of the book.
Davis said there will be display
ads in today's and Tuesday's East
Carolinian letting students know
more about the program. The ex-
change is open to any student and
each individual must contact the
student they wish to buy a book
from directly. Any questions
about the service should be
directed to the SGA office.
Patton SucceedsConwav
New IFC President Chosen
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nr� Editor
1 eaderhip of the ECl Inter-
Fraternity Council changed Tues-
Jay as Todd Patton was elected
resident of the organizai
succeeding Glenn Conway.
"I'm very excited and I'm
king forward to it Patton
-aid, adding that he felt rhi-
wear's elections were especially
�d due to the large number of
lents vying for positions.
Patton said he intends to make
academics his primary concern
vear. "I'd also like to con-
centrate on alcohol control at all-
campus parties and during rush
in addition to improving Greek
Week he said
By concentrating on these
areas. Patton said he would like
to "try to improve the Greek im-
age on campus
As-ociate Dean and Director
of Student Services Ronald
Speier, who advises the Greeks,
said he was pleased with Patton's
selection. He also said the issues
of alcohol and the Greeks' image
would be important for Patton to
address during his tenure in of-
fice. "I'd like to see him address
the issue of alcohol use in frat-
sponsored functions, including
rush and chapter parties Speier
said. "I'd also like to increase
positive publicity on campus.
Conway said he feels Patton
will do a good job. "Todd did a
fine job as president of his frater-
nity Conway said. "In addi-
tion, he has a lot of innovative
ideas
Increasing Greek membership
and unity were areas stressed by
Conway as important for the
Inter-Fraternity Council.
"There s always room for im-
provement he said. "I'd also
like to see more emphasis on
academics
Conway said he feels the issue
of wet versus dry rush may sur-
face again and this may be the
biggest issue facing the IFC.
"That issue will be voted on by
the fraternity presidents Patton
said. "I feel there was an increase
in members with the wet rush,
but it should be more controlled
to make sure no one gets in trou-
ble.
"I would like to continue the
great 'job that Glenn has
started Patton said.
Other officers elected were:
Kevin Greanev, executive vice
president; John Agnew, ad-
ministrative vice president;
Duane Wiseman, treasurer and
Mark Simon, secretary.
More Federal Budget Cuts Planned
(LPI) President Reagan was
handed a lergthy list of proposed
domestic and military programs
that can be cut or eliminated "to
reduce the deficit to target
levels a spokesman said.
Reagan met with the budget
working group, headed by direc-
tor David Stockman, and receiv-
ed what has been called a package
Of what one official called
Draconian cuts" in federal
spending. The goal is to slash the
deficit in half or to around $100
billion by 1988.
In advance of the meeting,
deputy press secretary Larry
Speakes said that the president
would receive "a lengthy list of
domestic and military programs
that could be reduced or
eliminated to reduce the deficit to
target levels
During the meeting with his
chief fiscal advisers, Reagan was
to "provide guidance" on the
spending levels for some of the
programs, but not all, he said.
Speakes declined to discuss tne
proposed cuts that aides say are
across-the-board except for
Social Security.
The Washington Post said the
deficit-reduction plan will allow
Reagan to continue his military
buildup but at a slower rate.
Foreign Relations Post Filled;
Helms Stays On Agriculture
RALEIGH (LPI) � Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-N.C, will forgo his
chance to head the powerful
Foreign Relations Committee
despite intense pressure from
New Right conservatives, his
chief spokesman said Wednes-
day.
Helms decided to stick by his
campaign promise to stay
Agriculture Committee chairman
after Wednesday's election of
Sen. Robert Dole of Kansas as
Senate Majority Leader,
spokesman Claude Allen said.
"He's made his decision. Sen.
Helms is going to remain as
chairman of the Agriculture
Committee Allen said. "That
was his intent all along and he's
sticking by his guns
But Allen said Helms would
have considered switching to
Foreign Relations if Sen. Richard
Lugar of Indiana had won the
secret balloting for majority
leader.
"We're glad that bridge was
burned before we got to it. It
would have been a tough choice
and we're relieved that he doesn't
really have to make a choice
Allen said.
Howard Phillips, chairman oi
the 600,000-member Conser-
vative Caucus, refused to accept
Helms' decision and vowed to
press ahead his campaign to con-
vince the senator to switch.
"As far as I'm concerned, it's
not over until it's over Phillips
said.
The Conservative Caucus has
launched a mail and advertising
campaign in North Carolina urg-
ing Helms' supporters to per-
suade the senator to switch to
Foreign Relations.
"I hope that if there is a
massive outpouring of support
from North Carolina, the senator
will conclude that they want him
to go to Foreign Relations
Phillips said.
The narrow defeat of 18-year
Senate veteran Charles Percy of
Illinois left open the chairman-
ship of the Foreign Relations
Committee and Helms is next in
line.
Lugar ranks next in seniority
followed by the moderate Sen.
Charles Mathias of Maryland, it
lugar had won the majority
leader position, he would hae
been precluded from taking any
committee chairmanships
During his tooth-and-nail
reelection campaign against Gov.
James Hunt, Helms promised the
state's tobacco and peanut
farmers that he would stay-
Agriculture Committee Chair-
man.
"It's clear that Sen. Helms'
concern was that Mathias is too
liberal to chair the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee Allen said.
'Now that Dole has been picked,
the senator feels more comfor-
table with Lugar as Foreign Rela-
tions Committee chairman
Phillips said Lugar is unaccep-
table to the Conservative Caucus
because of his close ties to Presi-
dent Reagan
"While I like Sen. Lugar as a
man, he is first and foremost a
partisan Republican. Jesse Helms
if first and foremost an
American. He will support the
president when he is right and op-
pose the president when he is
wrong Phillips said.
North Carolina's farm
representatives praised Helms for
his decision.
"It's gratifying to know that
he will rematn said Jim Wilder,
executive vice president of the
North Carolina Soybean Pro-
ducers Association.
"I felt he would neer abdicate
that position I've always found
Sen. Helms to be quite
straightforward and he has
always followed up on his pro-
mises Wilder sajd.
"I'm sure that farmers will be
pleased with this news said
Carlton Blalock, executive direc-
tor of the North Carolina Tobac-
co Growers Association.
"They will feel more comfor-
table with the senator in that
spot. " Blalock said.
Dole Elected Majority Leader
WASHINGTON (UPI) � Sen
Robert Dole of Kansas was
elected Senate majority leader
Wednesday, defeating four col-
leagues in a bitter five-way fight
to take control of GOP forces in
the 99th Congress.
Dole, a potential 1988
presidential candidate, won the
powerful and prestigious post by-
edging assistant Republican
leader Ted Stevens on the fourth
and final ballot. Dole succeeds
Howard Baker of Tennessee who
is retiring.
The Senate majority leader's
office confirmed that Dole had
won the hectic race, one of the
most intense for the majority-
leader's job in recent times.
Dole, a three-term veteran,
defeated Stevens, who has bee"
"whip" since 1977, 28-25.
Dole, 61, wa.s first elected to
the Senate in 1968. He was the
OOP's vice presidential can-
didate in 196 when incumbent
Gerald Ford was defeated by
Jimmy Carter for the presidency.
Known for his quick one-liners
and acerbic tongue, he is married
to Elizabeth Dole, the secretary
of Transportation.
Twenty-seven votes, a majority
of the Republicans' 53 seats in
the Senate, were required for vic-
tory.
At the end of the third round
of balloting in the ornate old
Senate chamber, Dole and
Stevens were tied with 20 votes
each.
TV �-�-� -dates, Sen.
Jame? McCIure of Idaho, the
choice of the New Right, Sen.
Pete Domenici oi New Mexico
and Sen. Richard Lugar of In-
diana were eliminated, one each
in that order, during the I
three rounds.
McCIure was eliminated from
the race on the first ballot, receiv-
ing only 8 votes from the 53
senators and senators-elect, a
leadership aide said Domenici
fell on the second ballot, drawing
only 10 votes. Lugar fell in the
third round with 13 votes.
Dole, the chairman of the
finance committee, led from the
stan, getting 14 votes in the first
See NEW, Page 5
Jahmmin'
MARK BARBER - ECU Photo Lob
Mary Lou Dingman, programming director and assistant general manager at WZMB plays some of the
album-oriented rock WZMB is renowned for.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4 ' discussion J student
Features6 � services will be held
Classifieds 7 Monday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. in
cDOrts o Room 244 of Mendenhall. All
students are invited to attend
and provide input on student
health care.
mm





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1984
Announcements
TIM
ftata Kappa Alpha
i Kappa Alpha Civepter of Financial
I Meoclefien will not t� havino
tfiefr acnadulad meeflno on Thur Nov. 79
Study tsars' tor your exam and haw a good
you m Jan. for am
Lacraua Taam Mambars
Those of you who still hava oqulpmant check
ad out from tha Intramural Sport Club.
roturn tha oojulpmont aa aeon possl-
i your pradaa will t
Chaartaaaars
All CCU atudanta aro it�JNe to tryout for
tha m-s Ootd squad for basketball season.
First moottng la Nov. 1 at 5 � at Minpaa
Coilaaum. mala and famalaa ere watcomad.
Saa you Thurs. and bo raady to practical
Oamma Bata Phi
Tha first semi-annual who ara you. Whar
your name?' party for Oamma Bata Phi
members and thalr guests will ba Frl Nov.
� at Papa Katx. Party tlma start at .S0
p.m. and laat til c toeing Admiaaion Is SI for
both member and puoat. Happy hour
prlcaa will ba charpad attar tha froa
beverage Is conaumad. Naw inductoas and
complaints ara walcoma. Soa you fharal
Uthars
Coma saa Stapa Door fraal All you hava to do
is ba an uahar for tha anew and you pat to see
tha snow for fraal Slpn�up ahaafs ara
locatad In ma Maaalcfc Thaatra Arts Bidg
Stapa Door runs Tuaa. Nov. 27 through Sat
Tha Holiday Proiact
Anyona Intaiaatad In baina a part of tha Holi-
day Proiact, voluntaoi1 ara naadad to visit
two araa faclllttoa Ooc. at 4 and a sharing a
Chrtatmaa caiabratlon. Also, anyona who Is
abet to make parsonai donations plaaaa con-
tact Oaa at 7S7-OJ11
Epsilen Pi Tau
EFT will hold Its tall Initiation banquat for
naw mambara at 5 p.m on Nov. 2 at tha
Western Staar on lOtti st. All mom bar and
Inltlataa should attand.
hot Kappa Alpha
Tha Pata Kappa Alpha Chaptar of Financial
Management Association will not ba having
thalr schadulad maatlng on Thurs Nov. J�.
Study hard for your exams and hava a good
holiday. Saa you In Jan. for our naxt
Siarra Club
Jonathan Phillips, executive Dlractor of tha
Pamiico-Tar Rlvor Foundation, will praaant
a alMa anew and discus 'Living with tha
Rlvaf at tha Ooc. tOth mooting of tha Siarra
Club HI praaantatton will Includa a discus-
sion of tha acotaglcai itriaaa on tha rlvor in
tha Pamlko-Tar Basin Tha Siarra Club
moats at apm at tha First Praabytarlan
Church on 14th and Elm st. In Oroonvllla. All
ara WMCOlTM to �tfVd
Happy Hour
Tha um� sistar pladga claaa of Oalta Sigma
Phi Is having a happy hour frl. Nov. 30 at tha
Blua Moon from P-1. Happy hour prlcaal
Coma party with tha bast.
O.K.
Alpha Omicron Pi
All you Bata Gammas. Oat paychad for
�II U Sat. night 71 Pre party at Lisa
and Dana's 4. This Is your night so NTs all
gat radical I
Maditation
The Buddhiat study and maditation group
will meat Toes, Dec 4 at 7:30 In rm. Ill
MSC. 'Wisdom Energy' will ba discussed.
Plaaaa coma.
Happy Hour
The big brothers of Alpha Phi aororlty will be
having a 'drink til you pass out party' at
Grumpy' tonight starting at �. Happy hour
prlcaa will run all nlght-como on out and par-
ty with tha big brothers and sister of Alpha
Phi. Also big brother are reminded that the
next meeting will be Sun. �:J0pm. at tha
NCIOINFO
Or. Donald Ensiey will be speaking about tha
NX. Summer internship at the Co-op infor-
mation Semmlners on Thur. Nov 7 at 12
p.m. in room 3te Rewl Bldg. Please plan to
attend and hear about this exciting way to
spend your summer earning and learning.
Blood Driva
West area residence Council will be hosting a
Blood Driva, Thurs Nov. 2t, from 12 to �
p.m. In tha lobby of Clement Dorm. Prize
will be given away.
U.S. Army Audit Aaancy
Excellent opportunity for business and ac-
counting or decision science student for
Spring ia5. G S 4 salary plus travel
allowance and mileage. Contact the
Cooperative Education Office In 313 Pawl
Building.
INDT
Excellent opportunity for students concen
tratlng in manufacturing or graphics for six
month assignment with malor local
manufacturing corporation. Application
needed a soon as possible for Spring ISsS
Contact the Cooperative Education Office in
313 Rawl Building.
National Park Sarvica
Has opening for Recreetlon, Biology end
Hlstorymalor for (ummer tts. Positions
located In Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern
States. Contact the Cooperative Education
Off let In 313 Rawl Building.
Woman's Handball
There will be an organizational meeting on
Men Ooc. 3rd at S p.m. In room 105
Memorial Oym. We will discuss future tour
namants In D.C. and Wast Polnt.We will also
decide whan practice times will ba for the
Spring asmeater. To those girls who ployed
in D.C. lest weekend- Congratulation for a
good gamat
NAACP
On Men Nov. 2 the ECU chapter of NAACP
had Its final meeting for the semester
Meetings will resume In Jan. We ara en-
couraging all parsons who had desired to ob
tain membership to do so by Doc. 10th
because tha annual membership report muat
ba sent In. If you need more Information,
pieeaa contact either Wllme et 7S2-V201 or
Carolyn at 753 OfTl.
Studant Diatatic Atsoc.
Celebrate Christmas with the Student
Dietetic Association. The final meeting for
IPS4 will be held on Dec. 4 et 5:30 p.m In the
dining hall. A covered dish supper will proc
ed the meeting and elections for the new
year. Coma and bring a friend and your
favorite dish! Everyone I Invltedl
Honors Program
Honor student and faculty ere reminded of
the early Jan. deadline for proposal for
seminar for fall semester IMS. All proposals
need to be In to Dr. David Sanders, Director
of the program, by Frl Jan. 10, lts.
Seminars should be topic or problem
oriented end may be Interdisciplinary and
taam taught. They should satisfy G E r
qulrements. Call 373 with question. Honor
�tudent who don't get copies of the newslet
ter In class next week may pick one up at the
Honors Office.
SPAN
The Student Planning Association and Net
work(SPAN) It iponsoring a aerie of alum
nl panel during rW4-l5 to celebrate the tenth
ennlversary of tha B.S. In Urban and
Regionel Planning and twenty year of
undergraduate planning education at ECU
The second of these panels will be held on
Mon Dec. 3, In Breweter Bidg , room D 70S,
from 13 to 1:30 p.m. The penel will dltcuts
the value of planning Internship and a
graduate education in planning. The
panelist ere: Buddy Blackburn,Director of
Planning and Community Development.
Southern Pine. N.C ; Mike Wilson, Town
Planner, Apex, N.C ; Brltt Stodderd. Com
munlty Plenner, Wek County Planning
Dept Raleigh, N.C; Melbe Thompson
Laney, Community Development Specialist,
N.C. Dept. of Natural Resource and Com
munlty Development, Wilmington. N.C ;
Jack Slmoneeu, Plennlnc Technlclen, City
Plennlng Dept . Grienvllle, N.C.
All interetted peron ara Invited to at
tend. For eddltlonal Information contact
Mike Walker, SPAN President, or Pro
i wubnohor Hankln at ,
Pra-PraffaMlanal Haalth
Pre-Protf�aslunal Health Alliance will hold
if loaf mooting of tha asmeater Thurs Nov.
� in room 294 In the Mandonhall Studant
Center at 530pm All member and in
forested guests are encouraged to attend
Happy hour
Delta Sigma Phi lltfte sister pledge dees is
proud to announce a happy hour at the Blue
Moon Coto ml Frl neght. Nov 30. � 1 Come
party with usl I
ISA
Laat meeting before chrtstmea
end low u at Metidonhali
Doc 1. at apm
room 231. Sat
ATastaof Italy
All the beer and pizza you want' Com to me
American Marketing Associations so: � at
Kingston Place Clubnouie on Thurs . Nov
2V. 4 30 pm Member 31. guest 37 Get your
tickets In Dr. Lemley' office r m or ask
any AMA member
- Country Cooking
Daily Specials $2.25
Sunday Specials
Turkey & Dressing $2.95
Meal Plans and Christmas Party
Catoring i callable
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs - 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ll:00am-8:00pm
nmrrmsr
Haifa d Tart
TlRE CENTER
�ATVMOAV
�;�AJlt.ai�JM.
aai.
�:aAJMS:taPJL
' 'Consider us your cars'
J Home Away From Home '�
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 Waal

Student Supply Store !
WRIGHT BUILDING I
Owned and Operated by hast Carolina University
For a Lasting Gift this Christmas f
r
Qive afBook
We have just received a large selection ot
books suitable for giving as gifts.
Categories include art, crafts, animals,
nature, sports, antiques and many
others. Original list prices have been
reduced as much as 65 on many titles.
This great sale is in progress now.
a Qr 3 N H
OOK
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At Wednesday9s Ma
Don
By HAROLD JOYNER
Aaatetaai New, Mltor
The Student Residence
Association heard reports at their
meeting yesterday from ECU
residence hall representatives
concerning end of the year ac-
tivities and use of SRA funds.
The West area will he sponsor-
ing a blood drive today from
noon to 6 p.m. in the lobby of
Clement residence hall, according
to area Vice President Emma
Green. Prizes will be awarded for
the most participation and all
students are welcome to par-
ticipate, she said.
Other residence halls are in-
volved with Operation Santa
Claus, an annual Christmas drive
sponsored by the Pitt Cou
r
cu
C
c
RJ
I
Pi
I
SGA Comm
Support of
B ELAINE PERR i
srr�rsw
The SGA is now accepting ap-
plications for positions on three
new committees designed to "get
students more involved accor-
ding to SGA President
Rainey.
Applications are being ac-
cepted by the Special Projects
Committee, the ECU Board of
Trustees Committee and the
Greenville City Council Commit-
tee.
The Special Projects Commit-
tee will deal primarily with major
student concerns, such as the cost
of books and the lack of campus
parking. Also planned by the
committee are an auto repair
guide and a renter's guide. This
committee is essentially a task
force of the legislature, Raine
said.
a��accaooaoo
I Catch T
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U1
Custom crafting
&
Jewlery Repairs
fair prices
guarantied wmtk
Bring This Ad for
1 2 Off
14K Chain Repairs
by ta Jcwitry
JXE.StMStrwat
7SS-2127 10-5 Tuag.Sat.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
410 (
'e-JU3 - urns
24 hour Tewing Servjc
I -HsaJ Resitab
Ai
Lookin
RIN
At The Cm
WISKIVG 'Mil LIVED AT THi
AUAILAoLL" fCR OCCUPAHQ
ON REWTAL ?R PURCHASE.
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dU ednesday s Meeting
Dorms Report Activities
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B HAROI DJOWFK
�he Si uden i Kc. idcnce
Association heard reports at then
meeting yesterda from EC I
evidence hall representatives
concerning end ol the yeai ac
1uiIh'v and use ol sRA funds
the S fs- area ill be sponsoi
- .� blood drive toda from
�n to 6 p m in the lobb !
sidence hall, according
ai ea Vice Pi esideni Emma
; cs w iii be awarded for
most participation mk all
- are welcome to par
alls arc in
Jperation Santa
as drive
Pitt 1 ountN
Health Association. All the
dorms are collecting articles from
residents and the items will be
donated to Operation Santa
C laus until the end ol the
semestei
Plans were announced tor
residence hall members to attend
the National Association of C ol
leges and Universities Residence
( onvention to be held at I enoii
Rhine College Feb 1 through
Feb 1 ska President Debbie
Gembicki encouraged everyone
to consider attending, "because
we need to show the other schools
thai ECl exists and is willing to
participate Also, it's going to
help us when we put in oui bid to
have the convention here next
spring
SGA Committee Needs
Support of Students
As a result ot a communk ation
error, problems resulted in the
painting ol the sidewalk in from
oi the Student Supply Store
"We aren't the only organization
that has had then design pee!
off Gembicki said "Main
people did not know se were sup
posed to put an oil bast- covering
on the sidewalk before applying
latex paint and as a result,
design popped off
Ronald Speier, associate dean
and director ol Student Sen
informed Gembicki ol the ;
blem through a letter, and
Student Services would p
the cosl ol the paint Meml
the SR. appropriated
mone to pas an artist ti
the SKA logo tot the third tin
The SR membei :
involved in a surve dist buted hr
by Gembicki, who is ,1 membei � �
a national committee on - �t
apath) Sb
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Off 4
You 'd Better Watch Out!
B ELAINI PKRm
a accepting
ns on three
�.�signed to ' 'gel
-V are be g ac
mmittec and
nmit-
vi t h
icerns, sue h as 1 �
anned I
.1 s
Ratney is a member of the
ECU Board of Trustees in order
tii represent student interests
The Board of Trustees Commit
tee will hae the responsibility ol
ensuring representation of stu
view through informing
tiev ol these views
ECU also has a delegate to the
Greenville Cits Council and
members o the Greenville City
Council Committee will work
with this delegate. Involved will
be attendance a; council meetings
and assistance in informing the
council of the needs of students
Applicants for the positions
equired to have a 2.0gpa and
e in good academic standing
" the university Applications
be picked up in the SGA I
in Mendenhall Student
(enter and should be returned as
possible Appointees will
be notified in earls Januarv
THE EAST CAROLINA
PLAYHOUSE
v presents
i.ll U
I Catch The Spirit
�V
"Tho zany story of ttsgoaamek girts who Hmtdo
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Wje Cast OIar0lmtati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, g�.���,��,�
Greg Rideout, w y
Jennifer Jendrasiak. ,�,�, j.T. Pietrzak. ��
Randy Mews. ��, Anthony Martin, �, Ma
Tina Maroschak. �,�,� ,�� Tom Norton. o- Ma�
Bill Austin, cw ��, bill Dawson, vo,� wJla,fr
Doris Rank.ns. �� MlKE Mayo �
November 29. 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Famine
Who Should Be Blamed?
Relief workers expect that
almost a million Ethiopians may
die this year alone in what could
become "the worst human disaster
in recent history
At first people who read this
may skip right over it. "Almost a
million seems to glide right by.
But you read it again and you look
at the pictures: walking skeletons
with big, sorrowful eyes, dead pil-
ed upon dead, mothers crying as
they look down on their crumpled,
dead babies. People are starving.
Dying because they have no food.
In the barren wastelands of
Ethiopia there is no food and no
water; people are just withering
away.
The first reactions of America
and her citizens were outpourings
of sympathy. More than $130
million in aid has been sent to the
country in the last year from the
U.S. government. Private relief
agencies here and around the
world have been receiving dona-
tions in record numbers. This has
to be done. Yet, we are only put-
ting our fingers in a broken dike
that the Marxist-Leninist Ethio-
pian government refuses to fix.
The Soviet Union, which con-
trols the regime of Lieut. Colonel
Mengistu Haile Mariam, didn't
give any help until the outcry came
from the West. Now they throw in
a couple of trucks to help transport
the thousands of tons of grain
from the West. Obviously, they
care not for the people. How can
they just stand by?
Mengistu and his government
are guilty of murder. They callous-
ly (an unparalleled understate-
ment) used $100 million to
celebrate the overthrow of
Emperor Haile Selassie earlier this
year. In the meantime, starving
people were dropping dead like so
many flies. The Soviets and
Mengistu are essentially practicing
genocide.
What needs to be done now
should have been done long ago.
Countless deaths could have been
avoided if some country, some
agency, had taught the Ethiopians
modern agricultural techniques. It
has worked in other countries fac-
ing famine. Of course, Ethiopia
would have had to cap its defense
build-up and assisted those who
came to help for this to work.
By some twisted, demented,
Marxist logic the Soviet Union has
sought to blame the tragedy on
"Western Imperialism Sure,
maybe we didn't react to some
signals that indicated the drought
and famine were approaching, but
neither did they. And now, when
we are giving more aid than ever
and planning to help the whole
continent of Africa in the future,
what are they doing? Sending old
trucks.
We will continue to help as a na-
tion. And we urge members of this
community to do whatever they
can to do so, too. Officials say the
refugee camps are getting more
than 1,000 people a day. And they
keep coming.
To our horror, perverse politics
were at work creating the starva-
tion that now exists. Think about
that as you give money or food to
help. You are doing something
that the Soviet Union or the Ethio-
pian government refused to do.
You are doing something of the
most humane order.
Also, think about what this
means: a baby starves to death; a
million people die because they
have no food. We hope you find it
hard to comprehend.
Ifra who m mmz�mi turn w
ctmmmimwMKwwwHoop,
Conserves
-J
Doonesbury
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
"There's always one in every crowd;
They tend to spoil the fun. They guard
the tablets lovingly and lecture Number
One. What's right is all that turns them
on; What's wrong brings out the beast.
When fighting Kemp it's best to call a
minister or priest. "
Just when you thought it was safe to
read the editorial page again, here
comes some speculation about the 1988
presidential race.
The poem above is about Jack Kemp,
a former all-pro quarterback and now a
veteran congressman from Buffalo,
N.Y and author of Reagan's 1981 tax
cut. When Kemp announces he will be a
candidate for the presidency, the
Republicans will start their first exciting
nomination battle in 24 years. As two
prominent New Right leaders have
stated, "The post-Reagan era has
begun and "the battle for the soul of
the Republican Party began on Nov
7
If you are conditioned by the media,
you are probably saying, "Hey, I
thought the New Right already controll-
ed the party Wrong. The party is still
run by country-club types like George
Bush and Howard Baker, although
their grip is slipping. If Ronald Reagan
were the embodiment of the New Right,
say his party critics, then 1) he would
have submitted balanced budgets to
Congress each year, 2) he would not be
increasing federal spending at 11 per-
cent a year, 3) he would have appointed
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
I CAN'T (XT OVER
wese FWI& Rja
SUBURBANITES lOtiT
FOR REACAN 65
10351. rUntnmi
msB.miDtrt,
CARPEAiEfiS L
54V4B.
Dunne, you
CANTlETAL.
0FTHAT65T
TO YOU.
I
OH, YEAH?
UIHYNOT?
because its oaw
ID BE A L0N6 FOUR
YEARS IF YOU PONT
Keep your sejse
Of HUMOR. ABOUT
7HIN6S1
hey i svu have my
sense of humor' bar-
TSNPER'HHALVAYACALL
A NICARA6UAN MI67 6IVB
UP? 4 PHAMH JET'

nee,
nee1
I
DON
6et
it. N
DAMMIT. MAN.
THATSUNPRO-
UNMEP FESSCNAliA
MOTHERS, 600DBARTEN-
58 70 DER LAU6HS
Hey, man.
tMJUST
FILLING
IN
more conservatives to top posts and 4)
he would not have pushed for that $100
billion tax hike in 1982.
In 1980, Reagan made many pro-
mises to the New Right in return for
their support. This year, he repeated the
same glowing rhetoric, but the New
Right wasn't buying. Groups like the
Conservative Caucus, the National
Conservative Political Action Commit-
tee and the Congressional Club spent all
their money on congressional races and
not a dime on the presidential contest.
As it turns out, the President did not
need help, but it signals something
possibly ominous for the GOP.
For years, say the GOP conser-
vatives, they consented to leadership
under party liberals such as
Eisenhower, Nixon and Ford. These
liberals never worried about upsetting
the conservatives, saying, "They've got
nowhere else to go The Right got fed
up with hearing such dismissals; so they
succeeded in nominating Ronald
Reagan, whose conservative credentials
they questioned but were comfy with.
But from the moment Reagan picked
the Eastern liberal, George Bush, to be
his Veep, he has used the conservatives.
I had only read about and heard of the
contempt some of the Reagan advisers
have for the New Right � this summer
I saw a first hand account of it.
It was at the GOP convention in
Dallas. "Kemp in 88" signs, printed
and distributed by the College
Republicans, were everywhere. The
band, set up by the established party
pols who want Bush in '88, struck up a
happy tune when Kemp was introduced
and stopped it at 10 seconds, encourag-
ing the delegates to cut short their ova-
tion. Kemp, certainly one of the most
important men in the GOP � the man
" Campus Forum
Kemp
who dominated the writing of
party's 1980 and 1984platforms - u
given a grand total of five minute- l
speak. In the California delegr
Reagan protege Gov . George Deukrr.e:
jian actually ordered the signs removed
Despite the perception of unity seer
on TV, I watched the battle lines drawn
at the convention. The long-awa
war between the party's Eas'e'r
establishment and its populist conser-
vatives is coming in 1988. My bet is tha
the conservatives will win.
They now possess all the ne.e
tools to seize the leadership -
are the core intellect of the pa:f -
have dominated the writing
three platforms and have a
on the party's new ideas. T
stitute a majority of the hard - re
tivists, who are the milita
the millions to vote. Tue. are tie
pioneers of direct-mail I .
have rivers of money to dip m Theii
right-wing revolutionary populisn a
proven electoral success A nave
Jack Kemp, a vibrant.
fellow who will face a bar: I .awn-
provoking pols for the n
George Bush. Howard Bat
Robert Dole. And he will -
the conservatives will defin
their own political partv; the) -
in case, already laying the gi - �
Whether or not there will be a
scars on the party as a re.
fight remains to be seen. If Jesse
Jackson and Ted Kennedv r
and if Gov. Mario Cuomo. D-N.Y .
throws his hat into the ring, 1 suspect
any Republican wounds will heai quick-
ly. In any case, when you start seeing
Kemp v. Bush on the evening new be
sure to crack a beer and np open a bag
of pretzels. It's gonna' be a fun figl
Chest Beating Ignorant
I am constantly amazed at the points
of view expressed in this column, as
well as the number of people who ac-
cept them. Yet when I ask these people
why they believe as they do, I receive
emotional, flag-waving, chest-beating,
grand-standing, uninformed answers.
Fanatical answers. Fanaticism in any
form � whether it is conservative or
liberal in nature, religious or non-
religious, pro- or anti-United States �
is a very dangerous thing, and anyone
who doesn't think so is merely
underlining their own ignorance and
their unwillingness to consider all
points of view on a given issue. The
idea of genuinely considering another's
point of view seems to be tagged a
"liberalist ideology" these days.
I would first like to address David
Matthews, the illustrious sophomore
who is still in general college, on his
opinion in the Nov. 20 issue. Matthews
calls himself a young Democrat who
voted the Republican ticket, and the
only reasoning that he puts forth is the
popularity of the incumbent president.
He mentions no issues nor indicates
the people sided with the Democratic
view on the majority of the issues �
yet Ronald Reagan won. Why?
Because he has a nice smile and he
looks good on TV; therefore, he must
be a good president. He tells people
what they want to hear. Walter Mon-
dale, by comparison, did not have an
impressive TV presence, and therefore,
(issues aside) would not have made a
good president. Those who think in
this way have reduced our governmen-
tal system to a beautv
pageantpopularity contest and
deserve what they get. Unfortunatelv.
those of us who do not think in this
manner must bear the consequences as
well.
To give the chest-beating conscr
vative fanatics something to think
about consider these points: How do
you think the man responsible for
more than tripling the total ac-
cumulated national deficit of 200 vear
in just four short years is going to do
the economy any long-term good?
How will he first stop the unbelievable
any consideration of such. Most woufi "efeni) endL �"2 CUUing
label him a bandwagon voter - one �3L� ���
whose opinion is as meaningful as the
latest preference poll. He mentions a
"lesson" that the Democrats should
have learned from the election, though
he is totally unclear as to what
"lesson" he is referring to.
Matthews does serve a useful pur-
pose here, however, as an illustration
of the uninformed voter, or simply, the
voter who does not care about the
issues. For all of the polls that were
taken prior to the election, it was the
general concensus that the majority of
tax increase" to "revenue enhance-
ment ' or "tax restructuring" so that
he can save face in front of his staun-
ches! supporters - the uninformed
voter.
I welcome an intelligent reply to this
from an opposing point of view, but to
the uninformed grandstander, please
just stay home and study.
Bruce Payne
Grad, Geog Plan
Students P
regi
thevl
( PS) A court okay of a law
forcing Tennessee students to
prove thevve registered for the
draft before they can enroll at a
state s.hooi could mean student-
in trier states soon may have to
prove it, too, draft opponents
But ftl the same time, the L S
Department of Education last
�eek said students' honestv
signing niiluarv registration
forms has r ;n so complete the
department won't require col-
leges to prove their students'
registration in order to get stu-
dent aid
' ntil now, students' signatures
a form swearing they'd
registered for the draft had been
of enough that the �
. ed. but ai of January 1, col-
leges themselves would have been
responsible for proving stud
who wanted federal aid had
registered.
Tennessee s new law requires
students to sign forms cernf. .
. -
just to enroll in
school, much less to M .
federal student aid.
s a result, Memphis Sta
l niversitv refused to let . �
old Thomas V'ogel start classes
because he refused to sign the
iphanee form
Vogel then sued t) -
. ;he state, claiming the
unconstitutionally involved the
-�ate in enforcing federal Se
Pointing
iliruj
� -
ment -
� r
Plans Include L A
est
Der.
II
sai(
relievl
provi
C ontinued From Pae 1
�;d. 17 in the second and 20 in
third.
Stevens received 12 s, 14
:es and 20 vote
ee ballot
Senate Democratic Leu
� ert Byrd said in a stateme
I congratulate Sen. Robert Dole
bis election i majority lea
�nc United States Senate 1
experience tha
e him
demanding and rev .
The Senate Republican tc
is expected to keep members
party happy and unified
vote in bloc, to seek mutual -
comprorr,
h the Democratic-led He
ind to help enact the pre-
�grams.
The Ser
s to call up for a
-hat measures art de
� good example this yea was
taker's refusal to he con-
a � "Grove c
ghts bill until the la la)


m
a
5555
' ' oaf5
o&
otf�
-
GREENVILLE
Greenville Square
703 E Greenville
HO
i







s
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29. 1984
M
WHOOP,
Kemp
I f the
� VkHv
n nutes to
delegation.
Vukmei
removed
seer
es drawn
- waited
I astern
1 riser-
88 M bel is that
ecessar)
ts The
art � they
- f the last
a monopoly
The con-
ird-core ac-
s who suav
They are the
undraising and
dip into. Their
populism is a
nd they hae
charismatic
i of yawn-
re nomination:
Baker and
ah; If not,
ntcly form
ey are, just
'oundwork.
be any fatal
a result of this
If Jesse
run again,
uomo, D-N.Y
c ring, 1 suspect
will heal quick-
. start seeing
ng news, be
1 r:p open a bag
I fun fight!
I
g Ignorant
'he Democratic
' 'he issues �
Reagan won. Why?
�� smile and he
erefore, he must
He tells people
Walter Mon-
n, did not have an
esence, and therefore,
jld not have made a
Those who think in
reduced our governmen-
a beauty
arity contest and
ej get. Unfortunately,
who do not think in this
ear the consequences as
eii
.hest-beating conser-
something to think
er these points: How do
)u think the man responsible for
lore than tripling the total ac-
imula!ed national deficit of 200 years
four short years is going to do
Je economy any long-term good?
jow will he first stop the unbelievable
inual deficits without cutting
jetense) spending or raising taxes?
iswer: He will change the name from
kax increase" to "revenue enhance-
ent" or "tax restructuring" so that
can save face in front of his staun-
ei supporters � the uninformed
Her.
welcome an intelligent reply to this
torn an opposing point of view, but to
e uninformed grandstander, please
� stay home and study.
Iruce Payne
rid, Geog Plan
'
Students Prove Registration
(CPS) � A court okay of a law
forcing Tennessee students to
prove they've registered for the
draft before they can enroll at a
state school could mean students
in other states soon may have to
prove it, too, draft opponents
say
But at the same time, the U.S.
Department of Education last
week said students' honesty in
signing military registration
forms has been so complete the
department won't require col-
leges to prove their students'
registration in order to get stu-
dent did.
Until now. students' signafires
on a form swearing they'd
registered for the draft had been
roof enough that they'd actually
igned, but as of January 1, col-
leges themselves would have been
responsible for proving students
who wanted federal aid had
registered
Tennessee's new law requires
students to sign forms certifying
they' gistered wth Selective
Service just to enroll in a state
school, much less to qualify for
federal student aid.
�s a result, Memphis State
University refused to let 19-year-
old Thomas Vogel start classes
because he refused to sign the
npliance form
Vogel then sued the university
the state, claiming the law
constitutionally involved the
state in enforcing federal Selec-
. - laws
a . �nti versial Ju-
( ourt i aling
Lomon Amend-
federal law which re-
Ntudents to prove they've
i,
registered for the draft before
they can get federal financial aid
� U.S. District Judge Thomas
Wiseman recently approved the
Tennessee law.
"As the nation's defense goes,
so goes that of the states
Wiseman ruled.
No one is sure how much such
laws help. "I don't believe we've
ever found a nonregistrant
because (he) refused to sign a col-
lege compliance sheet says
Selective Service spokeswoman
Joan Lamb. "There is no re-
quirement for colleges to do
anything like turn over the names
of students who won't sign a
compliance form
In fact, the Selective Service
has prosecuted only 17 of the
estimated 500,000 nonregistrants,
Lamb adds.
Both Lamb and the Education
Deparment say they're impressed
with the number of students who
have complied with the registra-
tion law and the Solomon
Amendment.
Edward Elmendorf, assistant
secretary of education, last week
said he was so impressed with
students' "honesty" that he was
relieving colleges of the chore of
proving students were telling the
truth when they signed their com-
pliance statements.
Still, registration opponents
say they expect more states will
keep trying to link colleges to the
military in other ways.
A number of states �
Massachusetts, Maine, Penn-
sylvania, California and West
Virginia among them � already
have toyed unsuccessfully with
laws to keep nonregistrants from
getting state aid, says Nora
Ley land, a spokeswoman with
the Committee Against Registra-
tion for the Draft.
"I foresee more states enacting
Solomon-like bills tying all kinds
of aid and access to draft
registration she says. "It's not
going to automatically happen in
every state because the political
horizons are so different. But I
think some states will definitely
try
The Selective Service's Lamb,
however, doubts such state laws
will affect many students.
The Solomon Amendment was
terrifically helpful (in getting
students to register) she says.
"We saw a tremendous jump in
registration in the fall when many
students were returning to school
and applying for aid
"It's very difficult at the na-
tional level to tell if the Tennessee
law has made much of a dif-
ference Lamb says, since only a
small percentage of eliglible
students have failed to register.
Indeed, Vogel is the only stu-
dent who has refused to sign the
Tennessee state compliance form
so far, says John Eubank, Mem-
phis State's dean of admissions.
Exam Schedule
8:00 MWF
8:00 TTH
9:00 MWF
9:00 TTH
10:00 MWF
10:00 TTH
11:00 MWF
11:00 TTH
12:00 MWF
11-1, Thursday, Dec. 13
8-10, Wednesday, Dec. 12
2-4, Friday, Dec. 7
2-4, Monday, Dec. 10
2-4, Tuesday, Dec. 11
2-4, Thursday, Dec. 13
2-4, Wednesday, Dec. 12
2-4, Friday, Dec. 14
8-10, Friday, Dec. 7
12:00 TTH
1:00 MWF
1:00 TTH
2:00 MWF
2:00 TTH
3:00 MWF
3:00 TTH
4:00 MWF
4:00 TTH
8-10, Monday, Dec. 10
8-10, Tuesday, Dec. 11
11-1, Friday, Dec. 14
8-10, Thursday, Dec. 13
8-10, Friday, Dec. 14
1M, Friday, Dec. 7
11-1, Monday, Dec. 10
11-1, Tuesday, Dec. 11
11-1, Wednesday, Dec. 12
Plans Include Unification
Continued From Page 1
.id, 17 in the second and 20 in
third.
5t( � i ns eceived i2 votes. 14
tes and 20 votes on the first
ee ballots.
Senate Democratic Leader
bert Brd said in a statement,
"i congratulate Sen. Robert Dole
his election as majority leader
the United States Senate I
from experience that the
efore him can be both
.Hiding and reward.ng
The Senate Republican leader
- expected to keep members of
party happy and unified so
- vote in bloc, to seek mutual-
antageous compromises
h the Democratic-led House
d to help enact the president's
�grams.
The Senate leader decides what
tils to call up for action and
at measures are set aside.
� good example this year was
taker's refusal to call up the con-
versial "Grove City" civil
ights bili antil the last days of
Congress,
demise.
guaranteeing its
President Reagan is publicly-
neutral in the leadership race,
although McClure � considered
the most conservative of the five
� was clearly the favorite of the
New Right.
anon
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703 E. Greenville Blvd.
HOURS:
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Eastgate Shopping Center
2806 Cashwell Dr.
MON-SAT10-9
Please stop by our office at
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Call for an evening or Sunday appointment.
Call 757-1971 for more information
or a ride
ALL units are 2 bedrooms, 2 and 2li baths.
1088 square feet, 2 floor plans available.
?��
�4hA0SgBl
t





I HI I AS1 k(�l INIAN
Broadway Comes To McGinnis Theatre
Style
hlilil I I � 1.1.T � i �
NOVEMBER 29, 1984
h�eft
Actresses Ham Things Up In 'Stage Door9
Bv DANK! MAI RKR
When one thinks of New
York's Broadway, visions of
beautiful starlets, standing-room-
onh crowds and lavish produc-
tions quickly gather in one's,
mind But in the Fast Carolina
Playhouse's production of Stage
Door, the audience is given a
glimpse at the other side of the
coin.
The pla deals with the lnev ot
several struggling actresses who
reside at a $12.50 a month boar-
ding house called the Footlights
Club Together they make the
rounds to all the producers,
agents and casting directors in
hopes of finding work. The story
focuses on one actress in par-
ticular by the name of Terry Ran-
Jail, p laved bv Jennifer
oungdahl.
Though Terrv is only half as
prettv as most voung actresses,
she is twice as talented. In time
Terry, while still struggling for
work, is offered a contract b a
dashing voung movie producer
named David Kingsley, plaved b
Robert Ruffirj lerry, however,
lets Kingslev know how little she
thinks of the movies when she
says, "Mothei always told me,
'The theatre has two offspring �
the stage and the bastard
Terry continues to shun the
superficiality of Hollywood and
maintains a strong faith in her
craft as well as herself. Eventual
ly her faith and determination
pav off as they bring her the lead
role in a promising new play.
Youngdahl's portrayal of
Terry is simply electrifying. From
the moment she makes her ex-
citing enterence in Act I to her
poignant exit in Act 111, she
brilliantly moves from one emo-
tional extreme to another. In
much of Act I the audience is a
little overwelmed by a barage of
characters, none of which im-
mediately take shape. As a result,
the show gets off to a slow start.
But upon Youngdahl's enterence
and Terr, 's introduction, the au-
dience as well as the production is
quickly given a shot in the arm.
Once Youngdahl provided the
audience with a central character
they could identify with, the sup-
porting roles began to take shape.
Comedy relief was provided by
three housemates named Big
Mary, Little Mary and Bernice,
played by Susan Tolar, Rosemary
Curtis and Jeanne Marie Resua.
Together they kept the audience
in stitches with humor reminis-
cent of the three stooges.
While Tolar, Curtis and Resua
were truely excellent, it was the
natural comic genius of Molly Fix
.hat nearly brought the house
down. Fix plays housemate ac-
tress Judith, a close friend of
Terry's. In one scene Fix does
some verbal fencing with Terry's
boyfriend Keith, played by Brian
Cottle. The scene started out as
funny but as it progressed, it
escalated into hilarious pan-
damonium. She milked that scene
for all it was worth, and did so
with the style and grace of a
Lucile Ball
Stage Door wilt be playing
through Saturday night. Tickets
are available at McGinnis
Theatre Box Office.
S. Bullock and J. oungdahl play two strugging actresses in McGinnis Theatre's Stage Door.
Two Alka-Seltzer Tops The Christmas List
B MXTTHKW Gil I IS
simff �nm
Oh man! Am I still alive or
�oaf1 At least it's the dav after-
'istmas, and with the kind of
"istmas I had . let me tell j
I ok what the 12 dav- ol
Christmas brought me:
Twehe hours of l hristmas
television specials. They had
everything from Kenny Rogers,
Pat Boone and the Solid Gold
Dancers to the upteenth rerun of
Rudolph the Red-osed
Reindeer And of course, how
could we forge; ail those nice lit-
tle commerjiah advertising those
big Christmas sales of at least 50
percent off?
How about eleven hours every
dav of listening to Christmas
song after Christmas song! If it's
"modern" Christmas miiMt
ever) other song, then its the
dreaded Christmas carolers. Let's
face it. you get tired, after a
while, ot "Deck the Hails" and
"Jingle Bells especially when
you live in an aiea that doesn't
get mus-h snow until maybe
February!
If I sound like Scrooge, forgive
me. But it's no "humbug" that
the holidays are r o u g h
sometimes
How about the ten-pound
turkey 1 had for Christmas din-
ner. I wish I could get my hands
on the turkey who sold me that
turkey. On top of that
Count them � nine extra
pounds That's how much weight
I gained from eating that stupid
birdand the pies, and the stuf-
fingand the Christmas
candy and all the other stuff
that went with it! I guess my new
diet has been shot to you-know-
where. Hey mom, can you send
me a larger size of jeans right
away?
Then there was eight of the
stupidest Christmas cards I ever
received � I'm talking stuff that
even a kid wouldn't send!
Seven � count them � seven
days in which I have to recover,
and then back to the old grind.
Spring semester begins again.
Why couldn't I be through with
school anyway?
How about the six six-packs of
lukewarm beer that are just sit-
ting on my kitchen table. It looks
like nobody's going to drink
them, and besides that, the brand
of beer 1 received, personally, I
don't even like! 1 don't even like
beer at all, for that matter!
Five different ties, yes ties, that
1 received from five different
relatives. Thanks anyway, folks,
but I don't like them either.
hour different invitations to
four different Christmas
partiesand I didn't go to a
single one. I wasn't sure if they
were going to be any good,
butyou guessed it � they were
all great according to my friends!
Three friends that I invited to
my home for Christmas have
practically run me out of house
and home. Right now, they're all
on the floor, drunk as skunks �
but that's only because they
drank the other six six-packs of
beer that I mentioned earlier.
Two Alka-Seltzer tablets! With
the fuss, the worrying, the hurry-
ing, the food � the whole
business of Christmas � I can't
take it any more!
I also received one more item
during the 12 days of Christmas
� something very important. In
fact, it was one little reminder.
Let's not forget why we celebrate
Christmas. You've heard the
story of the little kid in the
manger and the shining star?
That same kid brought us a gift
we should remember year-round
� the gift of sharing "peace and
good will toward men
Merrv Christmas!
Clogger 's Day Celebration Set For Saturday
Touchstone, famed for their traditional Irish music, will return to the dogger's Day Celehration for its fourth appearance.
Bs MIKFH4MFR
Staff H r1u�
The ninth annual Clogger's
Day Celebration and Workshop
will be held on Saturday, Dec. 1
in Wright Auditorium from 2:30
p.m. until 11 p.m. This program
will feature the finest traditional
music performers and clogging
teams from the Eastern United
States. The event is sponsored by
the Roxy Music Arts and Crafts
organization in conjunction with
the ECU Student Union Minority
Arts Committee and the
Greengrass Cloggers.
Workshops, scheduled in the
afternoon from 2:30 to 4:30, will
include beginner and advanced
clogging, hammer dulcimer,
guitar and traditional songs.
Those attending the workshops
are encouraged to bring their in-
struments and dancing shoes.
The evening performance will
run from 8 until 11. Janice Buck,
mayor of Greenville, Gladys
Howell, 400th Anniversary coor-
dinator and Patricia Pertalion,
Arts Council president, will open
the evening ceremonies.
Several outstanding per-
formers are lined up for the even-
ing as well. Dr. Bubba's O.K.
Bayon Cajon Dance Band will
perform a spicy gumbo of two-
steps, waltzes and songs
guaranteed to cure all ills.
Mac Benford's Old Time Band
specializes in sweet Southern har-
monics as well as up-tempo
hoedown numbers. This group
features Benford's raspy voice
and driving clawhammer banjo
which have earned him cheers at
festivals and concerts all across
the U.S. and in 14 foreign coun-
tries.
Dave Holt and Burr Beard play
traditional Appalachian and Irish
tunes on Hammer dulcimer, fid-
dle and guitar.
Touchstone, a nationally
famous traditional Irish band,
will be returning for their fourth
Green Grass Clogger Day
Celebration. This band, from
Chapel Hill, N.C has delighted
Irish music fans in Eastern North
Carolina with each performance.
Besides the musicians mention-
ed above, several famous tradi-
tional dance companies will also
be performing. The Fiddle Pup-
pets, who practically stole the
show at last year's performance,
will be returning with their im-
aginative, spirited dancing.
The Cub Hill Cloggers, the
Cane Creek Cloggers and the
Swift Creek Cloggers will all
show their individual styles at the
event.
Of course, the featured dance
group will be Greenville's own
Green Grass Cloggers, who have
won national and international
acclaim for their unique and ex-
pert clogging.
Greenville Choral Society To Perform
Christmas Musical Promises Fine Offerings
On Sunday. Dec 9 at 3 p.m.
the Greenville Choral Society will
present the first concert of its
15th season in company with the
Greenville Chamber Orchestra at
the Memorial Baptist Church.
Carolyn Greene Ipock, con-
ductor of the Choral Society, has
selected the offerings from the
treasury of music for the
Christmas season. The Chamber
Orchestra, under the direction of
Candace Dixon, will present the
"Divertimento" K. 136 by
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
The concert will open with two
numbers which are examples of
late Renaissance polyphony.The
first is the motet, "Hodic
Christus Natus Est" by J P
Sweelinck, Dutch organist and
composer of the 16th century. It
will be followed by an "Ave
Maria" of Tomas Luis de Vic-
toria, a Spanish composer of the
same period whose music is ex-
pressive of essentially Spanish
passionate mysticism. This por-
tion of the program will conclude
with the "Alleluia" of Randall
Thompson. This composition
was written at the request of Dr.
Serge Koussevitsky for the open-
ing of the Berkshire Music
Festival in 1940.
The concluding choral offer-
ings will open with the 12th Cen-
tury plainsong, "O Come, O
Come Emmanuel This will be
followed by Christmas carols
from the Ukraine, Spain, France,
Sicily, Austria and England. The
concert will close with "Go Tell
It On The Mountain said to be
the "most famous spiritual deal
ing with the birth of Christ
The 16-member Greenville
Chamber Orchestra includes
outstanding high school and pro-
fessional players. Joanne Bath
serves as concert master. The
Director, Dixon, a graduate of
the ECU School of Music, was
the founder of the Pitt County
String program, the High School
Honors Orchestra and the Green-
ville Chamber players. She is past
director of the GreenvilleAll-City
High School Orchestra.
Members of the Greenville
Chamber Orchestra include: 1st
violins, Joanne Bath, Robert
Haggard, Josh Hickman, Sandra
Yarborough, and Andrea Bath;
2nd violins, Rosemary Colt, Amy
Moore, Vickie Petrie, Danielle
Nieman, and Sheila Pearson:
Viola, Katherine Jenkins, Mary
Paul Castellow and Dee Braxton;
Cello, Jennifer Lucht and Wendy
Bissinger: Bass, Mike Sheard
The Greenville Choral Society
is funded in part by a grant from
the Pitt-Greenville Arts Council
and the Grassroots Program of
the North Carolina Council of
the Arts. Tickets for the concert
may be purchased from members
of the chorus or at the door for
Glass!
.kZii;
TO LISA KRUO A I a G as r 5
get em your eres a-e -ec
near so c .e I can gra
can oc Emoec he as' 4 ear
toge'ne1- ECU and ,
See ou In E jrope Love
LINDA "ov- parties - �
organ ze eftl? Tracy ��
show up a' rhen May �
have oy own son � .
ing You' M
PRE EXAM jAMM . .
Sig E z.s a � r!
at Paa-a Boc s a " �-
prices anc ONE
Dec 2 �
aowr
Boys
SHAN
seen- � .
suppos. : � What w
drunk
anywhere n
xnow a �
CONGRATULATE
- - '
Pres Stev
Smitr trea
Sec Michae
�en � �
a grea' ,erry
CONGRATULATIONS
Ep A B C and �� �
�earns va
PI KAPPS -
- gh1
ROBERT MICHAEL
james ' : juys a
&ar. Donkeys
HAVE NEVER sre" anytt
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- a- eac ar
BETA PHIs
are in snor st
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want To gc -



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jj BEATT
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29. 1984
M4 P0t 6
Door'

P
mi� Theatre's Stage Door.
s List
he fuss, the worrying, the hurry-
ne food � the whole
ness of Christmas � I can't
� it any more!
I also received one more item
ng the 12 days of Christmas
ething very important. In
as one little reminder.
s nor forget why we celebrate
istmas. You've heard the
:or of the little kid in the
ger and the shining star?
same kid brought us a gift
e should remember year-round
the gift of sharing "peace and
good will toward men
ehnstmas!
turday
-peoahzes in sweet Southern har-
monics as well as up-tempo
hoedown numbers. This group
re Ben'ord's raspy voice
and driving clawhammer banjo
which have earned him cheers at
festivals and concerts all across
�he U.S. and in 14 foreign coun-
tries .
Dave Holt and Burr Beard play
raditionaJ Appalachian and Irish
tunes on Hammer dulcimer, fid-
dle and guitar.
Touchstone, a nationally
famous traditional Irish band,
will be returning for their fourth
Green Grass Clogger Day
Celebration. This band, from
Chapel Hill, N.C has delighted
Irish music fans in Eastern North
Carolina with each performance.
Besides the musicians mention-
ed above, several famous tradi-
ionai dance companies will also
be performing. The Fiddle Pup-
pets, who practically stole the
show at last year's performance,
will be returning with their im-
aginative, spirited dancing.
The Cub Hill Cloggers, the
Cane Creek Cloggers and the
Swift Creek Cloggers will all
show their individual styles at the
event.
Of course, the featured dance
group will be Greenville's own
Green Grass Cloggers, who have
won national and international
acclaim for their unique and ex-
pen clogging.
ferings
Paul Castellow and Dee Braxton;
Cello, Jennifer Lucht and Wendy
Bissinger: Bass, Mike Sheard
The Greenville Choral Society
is funded in part by a grant from
the Pitt-Greenville Arts Council
and the Grassroots Progiam of
the North Carolina Council of
the Arts. Tickets for the concert
may be purchased from members
of the chorus or at the door for

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H�AP. WHEN HE XtQAlNEP
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fOUNP HrtSELf MpHSOrVED
� UNTIL. PETECTlVe OfLS
CAaaE To iAiS reue .
HC Tolp cup. ifeR�j2
TO LISA KRUO With a G as in go
get em Your eyes are red, your
heart so blue. If I can graduate, so
can you Enoyed the last 4 years
together ECU and you are the best
See you in Europe Love ya, Sherri
LINDA: Those parties are hell to
organize eh I? Tracy won't even
show up at them. Maybe we can
have our own sometime! Keep smll
mg Your favorite proctors.
PRE EXAM JAMM: Pi Kapps and
Sig Eps will sponsor a Happy Hour
at Pantana Bob's with Happy Hour
prices and ONE DAY ONLY half
price memberships, on Sunday,
Dec 2, from 8 until Come slamm
down some cocktails with "The
Boys"
SHAN: Sometimes things just don't
seem to work out the way they are
supposed to What we need is a good
drunk and a one way ticket for two
anywhere! I'm game Love, you
koow who.
CONGRATULATIONS. To the
Sigma Phi Epsilon '85 Exec Board:
pes Steve Cunanan, V.Pres: Russ
Smith. Treas Don Taylor, Corr
Sec Michael Liddy, Rec. Sec:
Kent Smothers Looking forward to
a great term
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Sig
Ep A B C and little sister soccer
'earns Ya'P are great!
PI KAPPS: Get ready to throw down
with the Sig Eps this Sunday
niQht
ROBERT. MICHAEL, JOHNNY, A
JAMES. vou guys are definately
arty Donkeys PS. James- we
HAVE NEVER seen anything like
D S S Robert Happy 21st Bir-
thday! Luv, Giadice, Sunbeam,
Meian Head and Lynaaie
BETA PHI's: Women and water
are in short supply ana there's not
enough for you ail to get high So
stead of wasting away in
Snookaville show us how far you
want to go! Huey
KATHLEEN AND CAROL: My
awesome little sisters! I Love Ya,
John
HAPPY 19th MELISSA: You're
finally legal)! Be careful and have
fun. Love always J, E, K, S
CARL: Ready for this weekend?
Stocked up on "Wesson We've got
the fruit if you have the whipped
cream. Hope you're not "bonded"
already! Love- J, E, M, K, S
KRIS AND KIM: Hope you are
ready to party with the "Alpha Don
na's" on Friday; a night of "he
touched me" and heavy consump
tion. Starting off with the "hour of
bliss ending at WHO KNOWS
WHERE!? SB. M
TUBES, MOM, BRUISER, AND
"MEREDITH It's all a divorce!
Of course, ya'll have full visitation
rights! The ACC Tavern needs
meand everything. Only call in
case of hurricane or 12 a.m.
beachin Remember: the next best
thing to being there is coke. Miss Ya.
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Let Greenville Stu
dent Laundry Service pick up, wash,
dry, fold, hang, as well as deliver
your laundry! Dry Cleaning Too
Call 758 3087
FOR SALE: 13" Color TV-SI80. Mat
chlng couch and chair $75. Kitchen
table and 4 chairs $85. Call 756-6672
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Yamaha Special 400,
new Dunlop tire back. 9,000 miles
excellent cond. $1200 or best offer.
752 4932 or 758 0058 ask for Bill
FOR SALE: "BOOT JACK Made
to take off any kind or size of shoe
without sitting or lying down. It has
ECU on the front, which could be us-
ed as a souvenier. it's a great Item
for orly $5�Call 752 8378 for infor
mation.
FOR SALE: 1980 Honda CM 400 T-
Good tires, luggage rack, very
clean. Asking $750� Call 758-3550.
FOR SALE: Waterbed�king size
mattress and frame with heater
$190 Call 758 4183
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs; call 758 5488
or 758 8241
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
years experience wants fulltlme typ-
ing at home. I BAA typewriter. Call
756 3660
WAPIT: Lodge Ski Hotel: Inexpert
slve hospitality for outdoor adven
turers. $15 per person Includes
breakfast, towels, linens and kitchen
privileges. 5 mln. to Beech and
Sugar. 704 898 9899
BUYING: Brokendown, wrecked
cars and trucks. Bring to Aluminum
Recycling Company, 700 North
Green St behind Riverside Oyster
Bar. Call 756-5037 nights
HEY I Have you been watching that
special person from afar, but want
to get close The NCSL match
makers may be the answer. Details
coming soon.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word Processing. Spelling
electronically checked. Term
papers and dissertations at $1.75 a
page, paper included. Call Mark
after 5 at 757 3440.
FOR SALE: Early American couch
folds out into a bed $60. Call 752-3497.
okay- ttT HB 6Jts Wmvt
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ROOMMATE WANTED: Furnished
private room behind Belk. On 14th
St. $140 a month. Take over Jan. 1st
Call after 7 758 7470
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
608 Georgetown Apts. (Cotanche St.)
Available after Christmas holidays.
Furnished, 2 bdrms, 2 bath, etc. Con
tact anytime 752 2889
ROOMMATE(t) WANTED: Fully
furnished, color T.V. (cable), Va
mile from campus on 10th St.
Cypress Gardens Apts. Call 752 1634
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
$90 a month! One-third utilities!
Needed immediately. Good loca-
tion! Call after 10 a.m. 752 3791
NEEDED: One female to work
behind bar part time. Call 758-0058.
Sportsmen's Lounge 720 N. Green St.
Ask for Ray or Bill.
FEMALES: Two female roommates
(non-smokers) needed now. 3 bdrm.
duplex East 3rd St. I mile from cam
pus. $145 month Includes all but long
distance. Serious student or staff
preferred. Jane 757 2688. 8-5
LUCY: The time to be chafed is
over, don't let the crabbies get you
down. We will have a lot of time to
spend together, probally more than
you care to. Remember the feeling
of being trapped and you will know
how hAr. Brown feels on the mound
with after that that little black head
ed chafe mizer gave him a bunch of
shit. You know that if you laugh the
whole world laughs with you but if
you cry you cry all by yourself.
Charlie Brown.
TOAD HILL: You have gone far and
you still have a long way to go Keep
up the good work, keep your head
out of the box, stay away from Wilm
ington,and be careful cause you may
end up working for XEROX
Seriously; Congrats on your new
position if you need anything just let
me know and I may find the time to
give you a hand , but then again I
may not Sku
NON�SMOKING ROOMATE.
Private bedroom on campus,
spacious living room and fully ac
cessorized kitchen Completely fur-
nished. $185 a month plus half phone,
utilities, and cable. Call 758-4519
&W
MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT:
For 1 night's listening pleasure, Fri-
day, May 24, 1985. Call George
Hamilton 757 6961.
LOOKING FOR A ROOM? Next
semester girls? Look no further.
Great place. Good price. Only 2
blocks from campus. Call 757-0430
LOST: A gold charm with the name
Erica on It. if found please call
758 9515. Reward offered.
FUN HOLIDAYS FOR 1985
Jan. 2-4
March 4
Ski U interijreenfrom $! 31 per person
Transportation from Greenville
2 nights lodging and lift tickets
-Sprins; Break Cruise -4 nights$305 per person
Sail from Miami to Nassau. Freeport. Dolphin
Cove aboard totallv remodeled ship
Call for brochure and bookings:
QUIXOTE TRAVEL. INC.
Coll- " Cofoneh S�.
GrMnrilU, H.C. 2734
Phone 757X1234

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FREE
BEER
Thursday November 29 From 8:30-1:00
FREE DRAFT ALL NIGHT LONG
$1.00 For Ladies $2.00 For Men
Friday 30th 3:00-7:00
BEAT THE CLOCK
$ LOO Highballs
NO COVER CHARGE
Saturday 1st
Doors Open At 8:30
With The
Best In Beach
and
Dance Music
Membership available At The Door For Only1
PAPA KATZ
Papa Katz Is A Private Club
For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Permits
10th St. Ext.
At Riverbluff Rd.
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lHt EASTCAROI INIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 2V. 1984 Page I
Lady Pirates Roll 72-60 Over Fayetteville St.
B RICK McC ORMAC
M�ff Wrllcr
The Lady Pirate basketball
team dominated the backboards
and used a balanced scoring at-
tack to defeat Fayetteville State
72-60 in Minges Coliseum last
night.
The outcome was never in
doubt as the Lady Pirates held
the Broncos to 17 first half points
and outrebounded the visitors
34-18, to race to a 38-17 halftime
lead.
All 13 Lady Pirates played and
eleven players scored. Freshman
lma Bethea led ECU in scoring
with 14 points, while Monique
Pompili added 12. Sylvia Bragg
as the only other Pirate in dou-
ble figures, finishing with eleven
points.
Fayetteville State was led in
scoring by Annetta Falcon, who
was also the game's leading
scorer with 25 points. Sabrina
Barnes was the only other FSU
player to reach double figures
with eleven.
This was the first home game
for new coach Emily Manwaring
and she was very happy to get her
first win. "After the two games
this past weekend I'm glad to get
a win she said. "This was a
total team victory as all 13
players played well
Manwanng was especially
pleased with her team's reboun-
ding and defensive play in the
first half. "We played excellent
defense in the first half. Our goal
was to hold them to 30 points and
we did better then we had even
hoped for
The final score really does not
reflect the onesidedness of the
game as the Lady Pirates led by
as many as 24 points before they
inserted their reserves.
"1 was kind of disappointed
that we had trouble holding a
lead in the second half even
though it was our reserves
Manwaring said. "1 feel our subs
should be able to play with their
starters anyway
Even though FSU did cut into
the Lady Pirates final margin
Manwaring wasn't too upset.
"Even though the final margin
was cut down to 12 points, I
would rather them whittle down
our lead and let us get to play
everybody Manwaring said.
"Its good coaching philosophy to
get everyone involved and let
them play at least a few
minutes
The Lady Pirates led FSU by
only ten with about four minutes
to go in the first half, but a Bragg
layup and foul shot, and six
points by Bethea sent the Lady
Pirates on their way to an easy
victory.
The play of Bethea, Pompili
and Victoria Watras, and all of
the freshman also pleased Man
waring.
"Those three have more
physical potential than a lot of
our upperclassmen Manwaring
saidAll three of them have ex-
cellent offensive skilK thev just
need to work on their defense
The 1 adv Pirates are now 1 2
and will travel to Charlotte to
piav UNCC on Saturdav. The
49er's took nationally ranked N
( State into overtime in the
Dogwood ClassK this past
weekend.
Vanderhorst Paces Pirate Win
Pure Gold Debuts Tonight
ECU'S new Pure Gold Dancers
will perform for the first time at
halftime of the ECU-Virginia
Commonwealth basketball game
on Thursday, Nov. 29.
The dance group, selected by a
panel of eleven judges, were
chosen from approximately 60
contestants. All of the dancers
are ECU students and modern
ia7 dance will be featured.
The Pure Gold Dancers will be
led by choreographer Lisa
1 reestone. a native of Gastonia,
C . The dancers include: Robin
Trevathan, Pinetops, NC;
Romona Brady, Clayton, NC;
shas;a Bridges, Hickory, NC;
Maria Taylor, Raleigh. NC;
i. arol Adenauer, Colonial
Heights. VA; Laurin Gibson,
Gibson, NC; Jennifer Gillikin,
Hamlet. NC: Jessica Taylor,
Smith field, NC; Pamela
McGimpsey, Morganton, NC.
The Pure Gold Dancers will be
Navv
Monday, Jan. 28
James Madison
Monday. Feb. 11
American University
Saturdav, Feb. 16
Richmond
ECU
ECU
ECU
Wednesday, Feb. 27 � ECU vs
vs Campbell
There will be 250 posters of
s The Pure Gold Dancers given
away at ECU's Jan. 3 game
vs against Boston University in
Minges Coliseum.
forming at halftime ofthe
following games:
Thursday, Nov. 29 � ECUvs
vcu
Saturday, Dec. 8 � ECUvs
Christopher Newport
Saturdav. Jan. 12 � ECUvs
William &. Marv
Saturdav. Jan. 26 � ECl"vs
ECl's Pure Gold Dancers
By SCOTT COOPER
Staff Writer
In ECU's basketball season
opener, the hot shooting of
junior guard Curt Vanderhorst
paced the Pirates to a 58-53 vic-
tory over Central Connnecticut
State Tuesday night in Minges
Coliseum.
Vanderhorst connected on nine
of 13 field goal attempts. Last
week's hero, Jack Turnbill, was
the only other Pirate to score in
double figures with 10 points.
Central Connecticut State had
a more balanced scoring attack,
while 5-9 sophomore guard
Dwayne Jones had 13 points and
freshman Tony Little added 12.
Four other players had six points
each.
CCS's defense pressured the
Pirates throughout the game, for-
cing ECU into 21 turnovers.
"Their guards were extremely
quick Coach Charlie Harrison
said. "They're probably the best
that we'll see all vear lone
Coach Harrison felt that it
wasn't the Blue Devil's pressure
that hurt the Pirates, but the un-
natural style of their defense.
"They had three quick kids
rotating Harrison remarked.
"It was their unorthodox defense
that really bothered us
Despite full court pressure
from CCS, the Pirates started the
game red hot scoring the first six
points of the game. Connecticut
got their first points of the game
on two free throws by Tony Little
with 16:15 left in the half.
A three-point play by Dwayne
Jones brought CCS to within
three points at the 13:17 mark in
the first half. However, a Curt
Vanderhorst 15-foot jump-shot
gave the Pirates a five-point ad-
vantage. CCS retaliated on a
Tony Little jumper. Then the
Pirate transition game opened as
a William Grady baseline jumper
put ECU up 16-9 with 11:46 re-
maining. This forced head coach
Bill Detrick to use CCS's first
timeout.
Both teams traded baskets un-
til the 7:11 mark when Herb Dix-
on grabbed a rebound and hit
William Grady for a transition
basket. Dixon repeated his assist
act seconds later, hitting Curt
Vanderhorst for a fast break
layup. Trailing 23-13, Central
Connecticut called for another
timeout.
ECU's biggest lead (25-13)
came when Vanderhorst canned a
15 footer with 4:25 left.
However, CCS was able to trim
the Pirate lead 27-19 on two
Renardo Mack layup's. Roy
Smith added a free throw and
Jack Turnbill hit a jumper to give
ECU a 30-19 haltime edge.
The halftime show was an
acrobatic display of dunking by
the Bud Light Daredevils. The
three daredevils used mini-
trampolines in their act to excite
the crowd with unbelievable slam
dunks. They are sponsored by
Anheuser-Busch and have toured
throughout the country.
Central Connecticut opened
the second half by scoring the
first six points and forcing
Charlie Harrison to call an early
time-out.
The game began to get close as
both teams traded baskets. Then
back-to-back buckets by Leon
Bass and Vanderhorst gave ECU
a 38-31 lead as CCS opted for a
time-out with 12:58 left in the
game.
The time-out proved to be a
useful one as CCS outscored
ECU 8-1 to deadlock the game at
39-39 with 10:53 remaining. The
Pirates responded with two
Vanderhorst jumpers and regain-
ed the lead 43-39 at the 8:30
mark. Turnbill and Scott Hardv
each hit a pair of free throws to
keep the Pirates on top.
The Blue Devils cut the lead to
52-49 with 3:31 left on a Tonv
Little dunk that came off an er-
rant ECU pass, but the Pirates
were able to hold on to the lead as
they came away with a 58-53 win.
Coach Charlie Harrison was
pleased with the win. However,
he felt that the team lacked
leadership and the will to win.
"They (the team) didn't think
they could win Harrison com-
mented. "They've got to believe
they'll win, and go out there and
create something good
Every ECU player saw action
and contribued to the team
scoring Tues. night. Leon Bass,
who didn't play m last week's ex-
hibition game, was 2-2 from the
field and made one-of-two free
throw attempts for a total of five
points. He also grabbed live re-
bounds and had a game-high four
blocked shots in his debut.
Although the Pirate- won their
first game of the -eaon, na-
tionally recognized Virginia
Commonwealth will prove to be a
much tougher test when they in-
vade Minges Coliseum tonight.
Pirates Seek To Improve After '84 Season
ECU'S Sports Information
Department has released the
following as a wrap-up on the
Pirates' 1984 football season. In
Tuesday's final edition of The
Fast Carolinian, Sports Editor
Randy fews will have Ed
Emory's view on how his team
fell from the national limelight in
1983 to obscurity in 1984.
NICHOLS WAS RED HOT: The
1984 season was a very good one
for senior flanker Ricky Nichols.
The 5-10, 170-pound native of
Chesapeake, VA, was on the
receiving end of 28 passes for 513
yards, the best season for an
ECU receiver since Carlton
Nelson caught 28 passes for 526
yards in 1982. Nichols became
only the fifth Pirate receiver since
1963 to surpass 500 yards receiv-
ing in a season, with the last be-
ing Nelson in 1982. Nichols
jumped from the No. 10 spot on
ECU's career yardage list to No.
2, finishing his career as a Pirate
with 1,206 receiving yards.
Nichols also earned a spot on the
school's all-time season list with
513 yards, good for the No. 4
spot.
His 65 career receptions now
holds down the No. 4 slot in the
school's record book while his 28
receptions tied him with Nelson
and Ruffin Odom (1965) for the
fourth best season by a Pirate
receiver.
Nichols caught four
touchdown passes in 1984, with
two covering better than 50 yards
(64 vs South Carolina and 59 vs
Georgia Southern). His other two
scoring catches went for 46 and
20 yards. He enjoyed his best
game of the season at the expense
of nationally-ranked South
Carolina when Nichols grabbed
four passes for 95 yards and two
touchdowns. His performance
earned him ECAC offensive
honors for that week.
BAKER CRACKS TOP 10:
Junior tailback Tony Baker, with
513 yards for the 1984 season,
cracked ECU's career top 10
rushers.
The High Point, NC, native
now has 1,873 yards rushing for
his three season as a Pirate, good
for the No. 9 spot on the school's
career running list. Baker will
need only 176 yards next season
to take over No. 8 from 1983
teammate Ernest Byner, now
with the Cleveland Browns; 229
yards to move into the No. 7 spot
and 283 yards to crack the top
five.
Baker, who enjoyed his best
season in 1982 with 827 yards
rushing, needs, 1,017 yards to
become East Carolina's all-time
leading rusher, a distinction now
held by former ECU great
Carlester Crumpler, who ran for
2,889 yards from 1971-73.
HEATH AND THE RECORD
BOOK: Junior Jeff Heath, with
his six points in ECU's season-
ending 31-27 loss to Southern
Mississippi, continued his assault
on the school's all-time scoring
list. The Virginia Beach, VA,
native jumped from the school's
all-time scoring list to No. 3 dur-
ing the 1984 season, as he now
has 193 career points. Heath
again finished the 1984 season as
the Pirates' leading scorer with
his 62 points, the third time in
three seasons he was ECU's point
leader.
Heath needs only 12 points to
move into the No. 2 spot on the
school's all-time scoring list and
30 points to surpass Carlester
Crumpler, ECU's all-time
leading scorer (222). Heath will
easily surpass that, barring in-
jury, during the 1985 season.
Heath also surpassed the
school career field goal mark of
26 and now owns 83 successful
field goal attempts in his three-
year career as a Pirate. Heath has
averaged 64 points a season dur-
ing his stay at ECU and also owns
the school's top three field goals
for distance (58 and 53 yards vs.
Texas-Arlington in 1982 and 52
vs Florida State in 1984).
ROAD: With its 42-24 loss to
Southwestern Louisiana in
Lafayette, LA on Nov. 3, East
Carolina finished the 1984 season
with an 0-7 road record, the first
time the Pirates have been winless
on the road since the 1948 season
when ECU posted an overall
record of 0-9.
This season was the third that
head coach Ed Emory had to play
seven games away from Green-
ville, and ranks as his worst road
effort as a head coach in five
seasons. Emory's four previous
road records were 2-4, 2-4, 3-4
and 4-3, with the 1983 season see-
ing the Pirates beat Missouri,
Southern Mississippi and North
Carolina State on the road while
losing only to Florida State
(47-46), Florida (24-17) and 1983
National champion Miami-
Florida (12-7).
ECU's worst road mark in re-
cent years before this season was
the 2-5 record the Pirates posted
in 1970 under Mike McGee (ECU
finished that season with an
overall mark of 3-8).
WORST SINCE 1970: ECU's 2-9
record was the school's worst
since the 1970 season when the
Pirates, under first-year Head
Coach Mike McGee (now AD at
Southern California), posted a
3-8 mark. It was the Pirates' first
losing season since 1981 when
ECU was 5-6 under Ed Emory
and the first time an ECU team
posted only two victories since
the 1969 season when the Pirates
were 2-7.
East Carolina has won only
two games or less only 12 times in
its 49 years of playing inter-
collegiate football, including the
just-completed 1984 season.
GETTING ON TRACK:
Although the ECU "Freeze Op-
tion" experienced its problems in
1984, the season's final game
may have given fans hope for the
future. Even though the Pirates
dropped a 31-27 decision to
Southern Miss, they ran up 505
yards of total offense, their best
showing of the season.
The Pirates set season highs for
rushing yards (373) and total
yards, and, in fact, set a trend in
the season's final three games. In
each of those contests (against
South Carolina, Southwestern
Louisiana and Southern Miss) the
Pirates set season highs for total
offense (379 vs South Carolina,
386 vs Southwestern Louisiana
and 505 vs Southern Mississippi).
LOOKING AHEAD TO 1985:
Although the 1984 season is still
in progress for some schools, the
Pirates are already looking ahead
to 1985.
Dr. Ken Karr, director of
athletics at ECU, released the
complete 1985 schedule Nov. 9.
and it features the most attractive
home schedule in East Carolina's
history. The Pirates will play five
home games for the first time
since the 1981 season, and among
those will be 1983 national cham-
pion Miami-Florida.
Five of the Pirates' 1985 op-
ponents have been ranked among
the nation's Top 10 during the
1984 season and all five are head-
ed to bowl games.
Three of the five Ficklen
biaJ oDponents are first time
visitors to Greenville, with Tem-
ple and Miami-Florida having
visited in the past (Miami in 1981
and Temple in 1984).
Kickoff times for the 1985
season are subject to change bas-
ed on television. The 1985
schedule is as follows:
SPEED AND JONES: A pro-
blem for the Pirates entering the
1984 season was inexperience at
quarterback, but that was
remedied this season.
Head Coach Ed Emory used
three quarterbacks during 1984,
and all three will return for the
1985 season. Junior Robbie
Bartlett, injured in the third game
of the season, will return along
with sophomore Darrell Speed,
who started seven games after
Bartlett's injury and freshman
Ron Jones, who started two
games, including the last against
Southern Miss while playing in
seven of ECU's 11 games.
Speed ended the season in the
No. 9 spot in career pass comple-
tions with 61 and No. 10 slot on
the season completion list with
61.
1984's Best. . .Worst
THE LONG AND WINDING
First Downs
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
Rushing Attempts
Yards Rushing
Passing Attempts
Pass Completions
Yards Passing
Total Offense
Interceptions
Fumbles
Fumbles Lost
Touchdowns
Field Goals
Points
Best Game
25 vs SW Louisiana
17 vs Southern Miss
9 vs SW Louisiana
3 vs SW Louisiana
72 vs Southern Miss
373 vs Southern Miss
Worst Game
7 vs Temple
1 vs Temple
4 vs Temple
OSix times
40 vs Temple
58 vs Temple
29 vs SW Louisiana 13 vs Central Michigan
12 vs Georgia Southern 5 vs Temple
195 vs SW Louisiana
505 vs Southern Miss
2 vs Georgia Southern
6 vs Southern Miss
4 vs SW Louisiana
4 vs Georgia Southern
2 four times
34 vs Georgia Southern
67 vs Temple
125 vs Temple
0 Three times
0 vs Georgia Southern
0 Three times
0 vs Temple
0 vs Temple, NC State
0 vs Temple
Junior tailback Tony Baker moved into the No. 9 position
career rushing list with 513 yards in 1984.
on ECU's
Men An
B TONY BROWN
ed
The EC U swim teams dropped
a dual meet to always powerful 1
NC State over the break bv the
scores of 684 for the men and s
86-54 for the women
Scott Eagle . b' . -
Brockschmidt, Kevin Hida .
and Lee Hicks each .aptured in-
dividual events and the UK) free
relav members gained one n
first place for the Pirate n
Playoffs U
Ruggers Si
Bv JKANSr III KOIH
�"�'� �nia
Fall semes
with excitii .
soccer, bowling an ;
These sports ha-
upsets mak i . I
divisional champior
The lanes are
bowlers - Ian I
ponents In v�
surprise
Greene
put H� .
seat of the res,der
The Nat
powers of Tarn �
defeated Stg
setting them ag
the fin a
sion. The sororil
into the har. I �� .
Alpha Phi
The me-
free-for-all a- sevei
tured unsuspected
ranked Powerh . -
by the Thunder Ba
few volts then
� in a later mai I
hall decision seems I I
the College H
Gamblers. Four I
remain with an ur
between the met
Epsilon and A-
In recent spcr ;
ECU rugbv . il - s
Carolina's No i rani
legiate team I NC-G
dominated Greensb - - �
16-9 victory Hooker Bill Z
merman struck first with a
(equivalent tp a
worth four points). bu1 failed
the point-after attempt
Ashworth and fullback v �
Brown added six p
rout by scoring two � .
The final score came fi
meter scrum down EC! 5 s
drilled their wav r -
-
�v
BEETHOVEN
SYMPHONIES
Nos. 5 and 8
NBC Svmph
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into rhe o. 9
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position on ECU'i
Men A nd Women
i HI IAMI Ha INlAf
�A k MB! H 2) 1964
By TONY BROWN
Stmfl � rim
The ECU swim teams dropped
a dual meet to always powerful
N.C. State over the break by the
scores of 68-44 for the men and
86-54 for the women
Scott Eagle, Bruce
Brockschmidt. Kevin Hidalgo
and Lee Hicks each captured in-
dividual events and the 400 free
relav members gained one more
first place for the Pirate men.
while freshman Pat Brcnnan add-
ed two second places.
Members of the women's 400
freestyle relay qualified for the
NCAA Championships, while
freshman Chris Holman was
outstanding again. She swam to
first place in two individual
events as well as anchoring the
two winning relay events for the
women. She set a new ECU
freshman record in 54.6 seconds
Playoffs Underway;
Ruggers Successful
B JEWNETTE ROTH
V.ft �r!t�
Fall semester is winding down
with exciting playoffs ahead in
voccer, bowling and volleyball.
These sports have been filled with
sets making for unpredictable
Monal championships.
The lanes are heating up as
lers plan to pin their op
portents. In women's action, a
uprise forfeit by Bowler's
reene, the No. 1 ranked team.
Wild Women in the drivers
of the residence hall division
He Naturals, lead by the striking
vers of Tamara Franks,
ated Sig Tau Little Sister.
ing them against the Stikers in
nals of the independent divi
The sorori! finals will fall
nto the hand ol Delta eta and
Ha Phi
The men's league has become a
free-for-all as several teams cap
spected ictories. Top
ranked Powerhouse was shocked
b the Thunder Bails who took a
few volts themselves from Sig Ep
a later match. The residence
hall decision seems to be between
"he illegt I re and the
. mblers I I rnit teams
remain witl ning battle
hetween the men from Sigma Phi
or, and Kappa Sig
In recent sport clu n, the
ECU rugb club defeated North
Carolina's No. 1 ranked c
legiate team UNC-G EC I
dominated Greensboi � h a
16-9 victory. Hooker Bill Zim
merman struck first with a "try"
(equivalent tp a touchdown
worth four points), but tailed on
attempt. Carv
North and fullback Mike
Brown added six points to the
scoring two free kicks,
ore came from a five-
scrum down. ECU's scrum
ed their way forward pushing
back the weaker UNC-G line in
an attempt to move the ball over
the goalline. Second-row Rick
Musgrove pounced on the ball
for the score with Mike Brown
converting the point after. Con-
gratulations to the ECU rugby
squad, a respected member of the
North Carolina Rugbv Union
since 1975.
Intramural soccer divisional
playoffs finish up this week, so
expect a full report from Sneaker
Sam in the immediate future.
Teams expected to kick
themselves into a victory include.
Men m Booties, Sigma Phi Ep-
silon and Omni in the men's divi-
sion. The chosen ladies include
Chi Omega, L'mstead Jockettes
and Sigma Phi Epsion.
Come out and watch the excite-
ment during the annual Miller
IRS pre season basketball tour-
nament held in Memorial Gym
later this month
SW1MMIM, POOLS
Memorial Pool
Ivt-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
MF 12 noon-1:30p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat. l p.m5 p.m.
Mlnges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30p.m.
Sun l p.m5 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M Th 10a.m12 noon
M Th- 2 p.m6p.m.
in the 100 freestyle and narrowly
missed qualifying for the NCAA
post-season event.
Caycee Poust also performed
well, with a first and second place
finish, while also joining in on
two relay victories.
The ECU men fell to 1-1 for
the year, while the women drop-
ped to 0-2. Both teams face the
Naval Academy in Annapolis,
Md. Dec. 8. The men will also
swim Shippensburg State in that
meet.
Men's Summaries
400 medley relay: (NCS)
3:31.30.
1000 free: Randall (NCS)
9:31.0; Pat Brennan (EC)
9:59.11; Frederick (NCS)
10:01.7.
200 free: Asp (NCS) 1:44.7;
Toffols (NCS) 1:46.3; Pitteli
(EC) 1:46.3.
50 free: Aceto (NCS) 21.30;
Smith (NCS) 21.65; Keith Kaut
(EC) 21.9.
200 IM: Shennick (NCS)
1:56.9; Harris (NCS) 1:59.1;
Bruce Brockschmidt (EC) 1:59.2!
1-meter diving. Scott Eagle
(EC) 259.80; Wilson (NCS)
241.45; Snyder (NCS) 239.80.
200 fly: Brockschmidt (EC)
1:58.0; Gregor Wray (EC) 2:00.6;
Clopt (NCS) 2:02.5.
100 free Dragma (NCS) 46 8,
Pitteli (EC) 48 6; Kaut (E48.9.
200 back: Kevin Hidalgo (EC)
2:03.7; Stratton Smith (E )
2:08.7.
500 free: Dudley (NCS) 4:46.9,
Frederick (NCS) 4:54.4; Andv
Cook (EC) 4:54.5
3-meter diving: Wilson (N S)
288.45, Hagan (NCS) 254.10.
200 Breaststroke: I ee Hicks
(EC) 2.15.6; Brennan (EC)
2:17.3; Dugan (NCS) 2:17.9.
400 free relay: EC (Jeff Brown,
Rolo Fleming, Cook, Pitteli)
3:22.4.
Women's Summaries
200 medley relay: EC (( aycec
Poust, Jess Feinberg, Jill
Gorenfio, Chris Holman) 1:53.9.
1000 free. Butcher (NCS)
10:12.3; Williams (N S) 10:32 4;
Scotia Miller (EC) 11:03 2.
200 free: Butcher (NCS)
1:53.9; Kuchtsch (NCS) 1:58.4;
Jenny Pierson (L(2:03.6.
100 backstroke: Holman FC )
1:01.9; Dekraay (N S) 1:02 4;
Lori Livingston (E1:05 9.
100 breaststroke: Kloos (N S)
1:08.3; Feinberg EC) 111 8; len
nie Holstead (EC) 1:13 7
200 fly: 1 rapp (NCS) 2:13.1;
Poust (EC 2:14.8; nnette Bur
ATiTI
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CAROLINA EAST MALL THE PLAZA
1ffel
1 IEd
Herman van Springe long
cyclist left the others far'
the 1981 Bordeaux-Paris
covering over 362 mites
35 minutes, 18 seconds
Fall To Pack
Ion (E2 17.6
!) free: Holman (EC) 54 ft,
Smith (NCS) 5ft 2; Fierson (EC )
56.5
1-meter diving: Metko (NCS)
237.9; C.oinak (NCS) 236 1, 1 ori
Miller (EC228.9.
50 free: Steinacher (NCS) 25.7;
Nancy James (EC) 26.11; Daun
(NCS) 26.2.
200 backstroke: Poust (EC)
2:17.2; Steinacher (NCS) 2:18.8;
I mngston (EC) 2:21.3.
200 breaststroke: Kloos (NC S)
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10
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
t
NOVEMBER 29, 1984
Falcons Hope To End Streak
DONNA EDWARDS
Ownc
SUWANEE, Ga. (UP1) � Dan
Henning has about as much faith
in his Atlanta Falcon offense as
he would have in a tread-worn
tire kept in use by a multi-
patched innertube � there's a
constant threat of a blow-out.
The Falcons (3-10) have lost
seven in a row, their longest los-
ing streak since 1974, and will be
13-point underdogs Sunday when
they host San Francisco (12-1),
the hottest team in the NFL.
That game should match their
longest losing streak since 1966,
when they got off to an 0-9 start
in their first season. And there's
no reason to assume that they
won't make it nine in a row
following week when they play at
Tampa Bay.
The blame, says Henning, goes
to the offense, which not only has
averaged less than 11 points per
game during the losing streak,
but also has constantly put the
defensive unit in poor field posi-
tion.
"You expect your offense to
do more than that Henning
said. "You also expect it to give
you field position, to keep the
ball away from the other team.
Ours, for the most part, has done
none of the above
Henning blames the decline in
the offense � which averaged
over 30 points in the Falcons first
four games � on the rash on in-
juries which began in pre-season
and reached a crescendo before
mid-season.
He rejects the contention of
some critics that Atlanta's offen-
sive personnel, even before the
injuries, are wrong for the "one-
back" offense. The Falcons
got good mileage out of that of-
fense last year, averaging 23
points and 352 yards per game,
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and Henning blamed a 7-9 show-
ing on the defense.
Atlanta, which used its first
five draft picks on defensive pro-
spects last spring, has only nine
defensive performers who were
on the team prior to last season,
and Henning is convinced the
Falcons have made progress on
that side of the line.
"We figured if we could im-
prove our defense as much as I
feel we have, and at the same
time get the same sort of produc-
tion out of the offense we had
last season, we'd definately be a
contender for a playoff berth
said Henning. "As you can see,
the offensive production has all
but disappeared
Henning, who has been told by
Falcon's owner Rankin Smith Sr.
that his job is not on the line so
far as the end result of this season
is concerned, has kept his com-
posure, at least outwardly, dur-
ing the continual decline.
Watch him on the sidelines as
the Falcons self-destruct, like last
Sunday when they fell behind
21 -0 early in the second quarter at
Cincinnati. He'll bite his lip and
stare grimly onto the field. But
you'll seldom see ap emotional
outburst.
"What good would that do
asks Henning. "I find no fault
with the effort being expended by
our players. I really feel most of
them are doing the very best they
can.
"We have people playing who
wouldn't be, if others weren't
hurt and people playing out of
position because that's the expe-
dient thing to do. What they have
to face � and that's not a fun
thing to do � is that some aren't
good enough to do the job that
need to be done
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 29, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 29, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.379
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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