The East Carolinian, November 27, 1984






mt fEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.26
Greenville, N.C.
Tuesday November 27, 1984
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Job Market Looks Positive
For ECU's Fall Graduates
This robot, valued at more than $100,000, was recently donated to the ECU School of Technology by
Black and Decker Corp It is similar to robots used in many industries and will be used at ECU for instruc-
tional purposes.
Corporation Donates Robot
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
New Kdilor
Yet another advance in modern
technology was made at ECU last
week when Black and Decker
Corp donated a robot valued at
more than $100,000 to the School
of Technology.
The robot is a Unimate and is
essentially "a big arm used in in-
dustry for welding and assembl-
ing according to Barry DuVall,
chairman of the Department of
Industrial and Technical Educa-
tion. DuVall said many industries
use robots such as this to perform
tasks such as welding parts on car
Bodies.
The robot will be used to assist
in the department's High
Technology Automated Systems
Lab, which DuVall terms the
"first of its kind in the nation
The School of Technology
already has several other robots
of the same type although they
are smaller. The new robot is ap-
proximately 5 12 feet tall,
DuVall said.
In order to learn how the robot
can be used most effectively in
teaching, two instructors from
the department will attend train-
ing sessions to learn how to
operate it. DuVall said the
department is also working with
the state to investigate the
possibility of acquiring a mobile
trainer.
Faculty members may also go
to Black and Decker in December
in order to observe a robot area
there.
The robot is "a very expensive
piece of hardware we would
never have been able to afford
DuVall said. He said it should be
functional by March 1 and
courses in robotics will most like-
ly be offered within a year.
"The impact of robots has ex-
tended to every industry he
said. "We're all very enthusiastic
� I think, in terms of educa-
tional institutions, we're going to
lead the state in that area
By HAROLDJOYNER
Aialitaal rwt Kdltor
ECU students graduating in
December may have minimal
problems locating jobs, provided
they prepare ahead of time and
research all potential sources
thoroughly.
"Today's job market is very
competitive said Furney
James, director of ECU's Career
Placement and Planning Center.
"Graduating students must start
looking early for employment in
order to find the best opportuni-
ty December graduates should
have already prepared for this,
James said, because a graduating
student cannot wait until the last
minute to make such important
plans.
However, James said, students
graduating in December will pro-
bably have a better chance of get-
ting a job because competition is
not as stiff in the winter as it is in
the spring.
Many businesses from local
and national firms have already
visited ECU to look for future
employees, James added. "A lot
of these companies have already
Drop-Add Lines May Vanish
interviewed these students,
thereby increasing their chances
of securing a job before the year
is out
Nursing majors pursuing a
baccalaureate degree will usually
find a job within one month of
graduating, according to ar in-
formal survey done by Emilie
Henning, dean of the School of
Nursing. "The jobs are out
there she said, "and the nurs-
ing roles have changed
somewhat No longer are nurses
as closely related to the hospital
as in the past, but new fields have
opened up in areas of community
health and home health care.
A student graduating with a
degree from the School of Allied
Health has a better chance of lan-
ding a job, said Ronald Thiele,
dean of the School of Allied
Health and Professions. "While
general areas of allied health are
good, there are some area that
are excellent he said. "In areas
of Occupational Therapy and
Physical Therapy, the outlook is
very good because these fields are
in need of competent people will-
ing to fill these positions Thiele
said.
Some students may opt for at-
tending graduate school instead
of seeking employment. The dean
of ECU's graduate school,
Joseph Boyette, said students are
more apt to seek higher education
and work at the same time. "I
don't think there is an increase of
students in graduate school only
because they can't find a job he
said
The Carter Placement and
Planning Center strongly urges
May graduates to begin thinking
about registering with the office.
"We provide many serices
James said, "that will help a stu-
dent better prepare himself for
the job market. We don't intend
to get the job for them, but we
see ourself as one of the many
resources available to the student
in search of employment
An example of programs pro-
vided by the center is a caeers day
held for nursing students in order
to expose them to many job op-
portunities. Hennings said many
nursing students took advantage
of the opportunity to make con-
tacts and arranged for interviews
during Thanksgiving break.
On-Line Registration Planned
Survey Reveals Colleges' Faults
(CPS) � Most Americans
think colleges are doing a good
job, but they're worried colleges
are getting too expensive for
them to afford, an annual survey
of U.S. attitudes about higher
education savs.
"The 1984 surve shows that
Americans continue to be highly
supportive of higher education
notes Walter Lindeman, presi-
dent of Group Attitudes Corp
which did the third annual survey
of some 1,000 adults for the Col-
lege Board, the American
Association of Communitv and
Junior Colleges and the Council
for Advancement and Support of
Education.
But it also "shows that
Americans have major concerns
about the expenses associated
with a college or university-
education Lindeman adds.
Moreover, the majority is
counting on the federal govern-
ment to help it meet college bills.
"To them Lindeman says,
"the solution to the problem of
financing higher education rests
largely with the government
About 60 percent of the
respondents expected to pay all
or part of their kids' college
costs, but 75 percent said they
wouldn't be able to send their
children to college without low-
interest student loans.
Ninety percent favored increas-
ing the federal budget for pro-
viding low-interest loans.
Four of ten adults thought
Democrats are more likely to help
them finance college, compared
to some 36 percent who favored
the Republican Party. The re-
maining 24 percent was unsure
which party is best for education.
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
If all goes as planned, ECU
may be the first major educa-
tional institution in the state to
utilize the IBM-PC computer
system for on-line computer
registration, thus sounding the
death knell for long waits for
computer cards.
"Nothing is concrete at this
time said ECU Registrar Gil
Moore. "Preliminary plans have
been discussed. We have to get
everything connected and make
sure communication will be ade-
quate. We also have to get per-
sonnel trained and familiar with
the matters. No exact date can be
given
Moore added that faculty and
staff members are "very excited"
about the planned installation of
the system. "It will be very, very
good for the students once the in-
itial phase is gotten over
A planning task force has been
working on designs and plans for
Friday's Successor To Be Discussed
CHAPEL HILL (UPI) - The
first meeting to discuss who will
succeed retiring University of
North Carolina President
William Friday will be held in
secret, members of the
university's Board of Governors
said Monday.
The Board of Governors will
meet behind closed doors Friday
in Southern Pines to start the
process of picking a replacement
for Friday, head of the university-
system since 1956.
Former Gov. James
Holshouser, a board member
from Southern Pines, said the
unusual private meeting is design-
ed "to make sure everyone is able
to speak his or her mind without
feeling inhibited
Friday announced Sept. 14 that
he will retire in July 1986, a few-
weeks before his 66th birthday.
Friday had planned to retire in
1985 but delayed his departure
when members of the board said
they needed more time to find a
replacement.
The process is expected to be
touchy with the large number of
interest groups on the university
system's 16 campuses and board
members were hesitant to discuss
the agenda for the Southern
Pines meeting.
"How can I predict what 31
other people are going to want to
talk about?" Board Chairman
Philip Carson of Asheville said.
"Really, the best I can do is to
say the purpose of the meeting is
to begin the presidential search
process
Carson said his goal "is to
have the framework for selecting
a president at least begun" when
the meeting is over.
Carson said the meeting will be
held in private "because it's hard
to believe there'd be a session like
this without names coming up. I
know enough about how many
people have mentioned names to
me to know it's almost certain to
happen
Holshouser said naming Fri-
day's successor will be difficult
because of the large number of
campuses the board will be tring
to please.
"I feel Chairman Carson
wants to give everybody a
chance, with no other agenda
pressing for their time, to say
whatever they're thinking about
how this search process should
go Holshouser said.
Gov. James Hunt, who leaves
office in January, had been men-
tioned as a leading contender for
the job but he has said he is not
interested. Holshouser said
Hunt's announcement leaves the
field of candidates open.
"Before Gov. Hunt made his
announcement that he wasn't in-
terested in the job, I would have
expected his name to be talked
about a good bit Holshouser
said. "I really haven't given any
thought to who else in North
Carolina might be a possibility.
To be honest, I think everybody's
been kind of holding back
because we know how difficult
it's going to be to replace so-
meone like Bill Friday
"We want someone experienc-
ed enough to do the job, but not
near retirement age. That certain-
ly narrows the field a lot he
said.
Friday is the only non-board
member invited to the meeting
but he said he will not be among
those dropping names.
"My involvement, if any, will
be as a resource person, someone
to help the board look a bit into
the future, determine the role and
function of the university and the
type of person needed to lead it
Friday said.
"I certainly don't want to do
anything that even remotely
looks like I'm trying to influence
the choice of my successor. That
wouldn't be fair to anyone in-
volved he said.
Scholarship Not An Aid In Decisions
(CPS) - A recent survey of
op high school students indicates
the hotly-debated no-need finan-
cial aid grants colleges use to at-
tract top students don't do much
good.
High school students don't pay
much attention to them when
choosing a college, the survey
concludes.
The survey, compiled by
researchers Randall Chapman of
the University of Alberta and Rex
Jackson, president of Applied
Educational Research of
Princeton, N.J was released at
an October 29th College Board
meeting.
Based of a sampling of 1183 top
Scholastic Aptitude Test scorers,
the study found six of every ten
of the top students chose to at-
tend the number-one college on
their list, regardless of aid.
Of the remaining 39 percent,
half cited money as one reason
for enrolling at a college that
wasn't their first choice.
"An equally important factor,
however, is contact with the in-
See MONEY, page 3
the system since 1976. A team of
seven people designed the pro-
gram, which, according to Pro-
ject Manager Freda Pollard, is
unique because it was tailored
specifically for the needs of ECU.
In addition, a steering commit-
tee defined the system by giving
input concerning the services they
wanted it to provide.
Since there was no package in
existence which would meet more
than 50 percent of ECU's re-
quirements for a system, a new
program was then developed.
"Several stumbling blocks
caused more delays, with the ma-
jor one being equipment
Pollard said. "Now, we are try-
ing to work out the implementa-
tion details
Once the system is operational,
a student should be able to go to
a department and find out im-
mediately the times and locations
of course sections available.
"The system would be more effi-
cient for academic units and par-
ticularly for students Moore
said.
The use of on-line registration
will also make later registration
possible, allowing students to
make "more knowledgable deci-
sion about classes Moore said.
Gone would be the days of
waiting in line for class cards �
when a student dropped a class,
the opening would be available
immediately via the computer
system.
Funds to cover the major costs
of the on-line registration system
have already been allocated, ac-
cording to Angelo Volpe, vice
chancellor for Academic Affairs.
Fifty of the IBM-PC terminals
have been purchased, he said,
"eventually, we will have the pro-
gram
One major hold-up in installa-
tion of the system has been the
lack of a mainframe, the nucleus
of the system. "Once the main-
frame was gotten, then
everything could be hooked up
Moore said.
Don't Rock The Boat "jr?1
There are times, especially at the end of the semester, when a slight
misstep can spell disaster. A word to the wise, in many situations,
tread carefully.

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JHE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 27, 1984
'
i
t
Announcements
HMltti and Human Sarvlcas
Opening for spring samasfxr In Washington,
DC Haalttt and Human Sarvlca. Oftlca of
ttw Sacratary, Policy and Naw Initlativaa
Division, tar studant wltti good typing skills.
Word processing dasirad but not raqulrad.
Studant will ba tralnad to usa word process
Ing equipment It naadad. Tuition and books
paid me semester following each Co-op
assigmant Salary approximately 11 r��
month Contact the Co op office In Rawl 313
immediately
Good Humour
Anyone who thinks they have a good sense of
humour and would like to do stand up com
edy Please contact Ed at 753 3534
NC Internship Program
Opportunities are available tor summer
employment with North Carolina State
Agencies A wide variety of positions for
many maors are available statewide Ap
plications should be completed by early Dec
Contact the Cooperative Education Office in
Rawl 313 tor Information regarding this pro
gram
Pre-Season Basketball
Register now for one of the most successful
Intramural events of the Fall Registration
tor the turnament sponsored by Miller High
Life, is on Nov 26 37 Play begins the 30th
lust in time to let it all out before exams
Register in room 204 memorial gym or call
757387
Fear of Finals
The ECU Counseling Center is offering a free
Preparing For Finals" Workshop to assist
students who experience high levels of sti ess
which interfere with test performance
Methods of relaxation will be taught and
practiced, and strategies for taking various
types of finals will be covered The workshop
will meet on Nov 2J, Dec 3, Dec 5. 3 4 p m
305 Wright Annex Since the workshop will
involve skill building, students should plan to
attend all sessions For more Information
Call the ECU Counseling Center at 757 6M1
or stop by 307 Wright Annex
All Greek's
P Kappa Phi III sis pledges will sponser a
most eligible bachelor contest Come by and
vote in front M the Student Supply Store on
Mon. Nov It and Tues Nov 27 The winner
will be announced Tues Nov 27 at Beau's
Happy hour starting atlpm Wear your let
ters
PriYEMaiors
All students who plan to declare physial
education as a malor should report to
Minces coliseum at 10 00 a m . Thursday.
Dec A,(Reading Day) for a motor and
physical fitness test Satisfactory perfor
mance on this test is required as a prere
qulsite tor a physical education major pro
gram More detailed Information Is
available by calling 757 6441 or 6443
Any student with a medical condition that
would contraindate participation in the
testing program should contact Dr Israel at
757497 Examples would include heart mur
murj, congenital heart disease, respiratory
disorders or significant musculoskeletal pro
blems if you should have any significant
medical conditions, please notify Dr Israel
If you plan to be tested
Ambassadors
We will have our final general meeting of the
semester Nov 2fl at 5 p m In room 221 of the
Mertdenhali Student Center We will review
upcoming activities, discuss Christmas
caroling, and make plans for the pig plckinl
This is a very important meeting See you
there1
Beta Kappa Alpha
The Beta Kappa Alpha Chapter of Financial
Management Association will not be having
their scheduled meeting on Thurs , Nov 29
Study hard tor your exams and have a good
holiday See you In Jan for our next
meeting
Cheerleaders
All ECU students are eligible to tryout for
the r9s4'ts Gold squad for basketball season.
First meeting is Nov 29 at 5:30 at Minges
Coliseum Male and females are welcomed
Sea you Thurs and be ready to practice!
PreMed
Attention officers, members and pledges:
There will be an Important meeting Tues.
Nov 27 In Flanagan 307 at 7 p m The discus
slon of meeting will ba the symposium and
other matters concerning the symposium
Lacrosse Team Members
Those of you who still have equipment check
ed out from the Intramural Sport Clubs,
please return the equipment as soon possl
ble, otherwise, your grades will be held
Gamma Beta Phi
The first semi annual 'Who are you. What's
your name?' party for Gamma Beta Phi
members and their guests will be Frl , Nov
X at Papa Kati Party time starts at 9 30
p m and lasts til closing Admission Is SI for
both members and guests Happy hour
prices will be charged after the free
beverage Is consumed New Inductees and
complaints are welcome See you therel
ECU Newman Community
The ECU Newman Community Invites you to
loin us tor our weekly prayer service and
meeting We will have it all at 5 p m Wed at
the ECU Newman Center I Come on by and
bring your frlendsi
Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship
Fun, friendship, faith thafs what Inter
varsity Christian Fellowship is all about!
Join us and find out for yourself this Wed
night at 7 In the Jenkins Art Building
auditorium
Ushers
Come iee Stage Door tree! All you have to do
is be an usher for the show and yu get to see
the show tor free! Sign�up sheets are
located in the Messlck Theatre Arts Bldg
Stage Door runs Tues Nov 77 through Sat
Dec I
Kappa Alpha Psi
Come on out for a night of fun and entertain
ment this Thurs night Nov 29 at the Wli
beginning with a ladles lock In from 10-11
with male strippers! Then the party starts
with a oody talk contest to be held at 12 mid
nignt with a 150 00 first place prize Bus
transportation will be provided along with
free beer Admission will be SI 50 student
and S3 non student We hope to see you there!
The Holiday Project
Anyone interested in being a part of the Holl
day Prolect. volunteers are needed to visit
two area facilities Dec 6 at 4 and 6 sharing a
Christmas celebration Also, anyone who is
able to make personal donations please con
tact Dee at 757 0212
Phi Kappa Tau
Brothers and pledges, there will be a man
datory meeting Thurs , Nov 39 at 7pm In the
party room See Todd for more details!
Ambassadors
We will nave our final general meeting of the
semester Nov 2� at 5 p.m , in room 231 of the
Mendenhall Student Center We will review
upcoming activities, discuss Christmas
caroling, and make plans tor the pig plckinl
This Is a very Important meeting See you
therel
Beta Kappa Alpha
The Beta Kappa Alpha Chapter of Financial
Management Association will not be having
their scheduled meeting on Thurs , Nov 29
Study hard tor your exams and have a good
holiday See you In Jan for our next
meeting
NCIOINFO
Dr Donald Ensley win be specking about the
N C Summer Internships at the Co�op In
formation Semmlnars on Tnurs Nov 29 at 12
p.m. In room 30 Rawl Bldg Please plan to
attend and hear about this exciting way to
spend your summer earning and learning
Blood Drlva
West area residence Councel will ba floating
a Blood Drive. Thurs Nov. �, from 12 to
p.m. In the lobby of Clamant Dorm. Prlia�
will be given away.
ECU Biology Club
The ECU Biology Club will have It's naxt
meeting on Nov 2t Please not mat the
meeting will be at 6 30 instead of the usual
maetlng time of 7 Dr Nancy Rich from NC.
State will be speaking on the use of live
animals for wound lab research Dr, Rich l�
the director of the NX. Network tar animals.
Members please do not target to bring the
drawing tickets you have sow to this
meeting. These tickets are due on Frl. Nov.
30 All animal lovers and Intresred parson
are encouraged to attend this intrestlog and
informative meeting.
Puzzle Answer
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Non-Students Arrested
Education Majors
Student NC Association of Educators
(SNCAE) maetlng begins at 3 p.m. on
Thurs , Nov 37 James Westmoreland will
present an Interview Skills Workshop. We
will meet In the Bloxton House beside Green
Residence Hall. Join usl
THE BOYS A T STA TE NEVER HAD IT
QUITE SO GOOD
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL
Whole Sub
No. 6 Roast Beef with cheese
Corner of Reade & 4th
In store onlv
For ONLY
$3.39
FREE DELIVERY
752-2183
Fencing Club
The fencing club would like to invite anyone
interested to attend our meetings every
Wed 7 30 room 103 of Memorial Gym
Epsilon Pi Tau
EPT will hold irs fall Initiation banquet for
new members at 5 p m on Nov 29 at the
Western Steer on 10th st All members and
initiates should attend
Bike Club
The bike blub will have a meeting wed Nov
28 at 4 in Brewster D 104 All newcomers
welcome Officers will be elected- at that
time After the meeting pictures will be
taken of five members of our club Ones who
can, bring your bike and riding gear Please
be present
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Eta Sigma will be having a meeting on
wed Nov 28, 19(4 at 6 30 p m The meeting
will be held at Parker's barbecue
restaurant The cost Is S5 for all you can eat
Our guest speaker will be Dr Westmoreland
on the subject of Career Planning All
members should plan to attend.
Sa1ft
llo.il.i) (�rwliil&s
Custom crafting
&
Jewlery Repairs
fair prices
guaranteed wotlt
Bring This Ad for
1 2 Off
14K Chain Repairs
by L� J�wi�ry
120 E. 5th Street
759-2127 10-5 TimS.
Ebo
TUE
Sigma Nu & Pabst Light present
Breakin Contest
AVVNVXXXVVWVVXVVVXVVVVWVV
1 Desert dweller
5 Strike
9 Timid
12 Float in air
13 Comfort
14 Beverage
15 Punctuation
mark
17 That man
18 Male sheep
19 Snare
21 Retains
23 Persevere
27 Diphthong
j 28 Old-womanish
JJ29 Negative
31 Flap
34 Kind of type
abbr
35 Abstract being
37 Openwork
fabric
ij39 Chinese
distance
measure
40 At present
42 Small child
44 Measuring
device
46 Apart fiom
48 Dealt secreily
50 Last
53 Encounter
54 Goal
55 Above
57 Handles
61 Consumed
62 Evaluate
64 Disturbance
65 Rocky hill
66 Goddess of
discord
67 Portico
DOWN
1 Viper
2 Fish eggs
3 Swiss river
4 Easily broken
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
Tues. Nov. 27. 1984 8: JO- 1:00am
Adm.S1.00 ,8yrs.$2.00
)l)CS(1(-( ialcara All Night
HOC Reg. ran
Prizes
1 st 50.00 cash & prizes 2nd 25.00 cash & prizes
Lntries can sign up at the club or call EN House
cV.o WED
jVv d)KT presen
Goldfish Eating Contest
Wed. Nov 28. I4 8: JO-1:00am
Adm.$1.00 I 8 vrs. $2.00
Prizes
1 st 50 r)0 cash 2nd 25.00 cash
3rd 15.00 cash & Pepsi jacket
. . � Prpsi-I .). .B.E Hedges,rim's Xest A bor Heads Onlts
Entries can sign up at the club or call 758-4591
-Ji
5 Style of
automobile
6 Note of scale
7 Hard-wood tree
8 Sly look
9 Thoroughfare
10 Pile
11 Sweet potatoes
16 The East
20 Play on words
22 Apiece abbr.
23 Son of Adam
24 To and upon
25 Symbol for
nickel
26 Vast age
30 Mollify
32 Toward shelter
33 Flying creature
36 Drunkard
38 Seesaws
41 Marvel
43 Scottish cap
45 Initials of 26th
President
47 Note of scale
49 Apportions
50 Exploit
51 Toward and
within
52 Entice
56 Equality
58 River island
59 Also
60 Music as
written
63 Agave plant

1084 United Feature Syndicate
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International Employment Directory 1984
Saiesme
Crime
Column
During the past month, ECU
Public Safety officers have ar-
rested two non-students for sell-
ing magazines in the residence
halls on campus. Both of the
salesmen were young and not
from North Carolina. Their com-
panies were based in Missouri
and Florida.
Informal conversations with
the salesmen indicated that
several such companies are work-
ing in the Greenville area at this
time.
Chances are that the com
panies involved in the sales are
legitimate representatives of
publishing companies contracted
to solicit subscriptions to their
publications; however, when
deciding whether to purchase
goods or services from these
door-to-door salesmen, a student
should ask himself: "Does a
legitimate business routinely
violate local and state stau.
and campus regulations in order
to make a sale?" These com-
panies do.
State law forbids an type c
solicitation on the ground" d
public educational institution
without written permission from
the person actually in charge of
the school. Persons violating I
statute may face a fine not to ex-
ceed $500 and not more than
months in prison.
Greenville ordinances require
that anyone soliciting or asking
for contributions of any type
within the
with t he I
Failure to
fine of y
thirty day!
UniversJ
any type ol
tion in th�f
eludes th
bills whi
residence
Person
activities
privac) i
and the vj
universi-
When'
from door
would-be
in mmd ti
monc
check, mo
number i
be easily k
the tw
one salesr
lived in O?
was base
salesmar
worked s
past two
was re I
salesman
and wh
Flo:
. .a-er
be '
to the hoi
home cor
some
may not
salesman

reseni
this
Money Influ
Continued From Page 1
stitution Jackson noted in a
telephone interview. "A school's
interest in the student, and cam-
pus visits could be productive
ways for schools to attract
students
"Merit money" can persuade a
student to switch to another
sctAXri if trie amount is great
enough, Jackson admits.
A Si,000 grant increases the
possibility of a switch in only
four percent of the cases.
The probability increases to 70
percent with a grant of S5.000.
but the researchers found a
second-choice school need" to of-
fer S6.300 just to give itself a
50-50 chance of attracting a stu-
dent who wants to go elsewhere.
Other studies claim larger
grants can convince a student the
school is hard-up for applicants,
but Jackson says his study found
"no adverse effects of larger
awards
A growing number of colleges
now use merit schlorships to at-
tract top students.
A study by Washington-based
financial expert Bob Lcidei
claims nearly 1,000 colleges now
offer some type of merit aid.
"In the mid-to-late '70s,
studies suggested 60 percent of
colleges were offering no-need
aid Jackson says. "Recent
studies show it's now over 80 per-
cent
"Everybody's doing it con-
firms Michael Luton. Case
Western Reserve University
financial aid director. "It's get-
ting more and more
competitive
Case Western awards 50 to 60
new academic grants each year
from private gifts and en-
dowments, he notes.
The grants "certainly do at-
tract a lot of high quality
students Luton adds.
"The average SATs of our in-
Soviet
Defense
Discussed
A leading British authority on
the Soviet Union will lecture at
ECU Wednesday, Nov 28. Ray-
mond Hutchings will give two
programs, one at 3:30 p.m. in
Brewster D-210 on the "Perfor-
mance of Soviet Economy and
the other at 7:30 p.m. in the
Biology Auditorium on "Soviet
Defense Spending
Both programs are open to all
interested persons. Hutchings'
visit is sponsored by several
departments.
cor e
dramatici
year
Tea- I h
lid j
NU
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NOVEMBER 27, 1984
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I
Non-Students Arrested
Salesmen Violate Policies
Crime
Column
During the past month, ECU
Public Safety officers have ar-
rested two non-students for sell-
ing magazines in the residence
halls on campus. Both of the
salesmen were young and not
from North Carolina. Their com-
panies were based in Missouri
and Florida.
Informal conversations with
the salesmen indicated that
several such companies are work-
ing in the Greenville area at this
time.
Chances are that the com-
panies involved in the sales are
legitimate representatives of
publishing companies contracted
to solicit subscriptions to their
publications; however, when
deciding whether to purchase
goods or services from these
door-to-door salesmen, a student
should ask himself: "Does a
legitimate business routinely
violate local and state statutes
and campus regulations in order
to make a sale?" These com-
panies do.
State law forbids any type c
solicitation on the grounds ol a
public educational institution
without written permission from
the person actually in charge of
the school. Persons violating this
statute may face a fine not to ex-
ceed $500 and not more than six
months in prison.
Greenville ordinances require
that anyone soliciting or asking
for contributions of any type
within the city limits be registered
with the police department.
Failure to register may result in a
fine of $50 and not more than
thirty days in jail.
University regulations forbid
any type of door-to-door solicita-
tion in the dormitories. This in-
cludes the distribution of hand-
bills which are placed under
residence hall doors almost daily.
Persons who participate in these
activities routinely violate the
privacy of dormitory residents
and the visitation policies of the
university.
When considering purchases
from door-to-door salesmen, the
would-be purchaser should keep
in mind that they are presenting
money in the form of cash,
check, money order or credit card
number to a person who will not
be easily located in the future. Of
the two arrests made on campus,
one salesman was from Texas but
lived in Oregon and his company
was based in Missouri. The
salesman stated that he had
worked several states within the
past two weeks. A similar story
was received from a second
salesman who was from Georgia
and whose company is based in
Florida.
" at as- . ance does the pur-
chaser have that these peole can
be trusted to deliver their money
to the home company even if the
home company is legitimate? In
some cases, the home company-
may not even exist. Though the
salesman may present some type
of official photographic iden-
tification showing he is a
representative of the company,
this is no guarantee of the
legitimacy of existence of the
company and no guarantee that
the salesman will not pocket the
money himself.
A person making a purchase
from a salesman should never
supply a credit card number to
him. These numbers can be used
by anyone to make charges on the
account of the card owner.
How can a purchaser deter-
mine if the company and the
salesmen are legitimate? A
legitimate door-to-door sales
company will probably check
local ordinances since they know
most communities control their
activity. Whether the salesman
contacts the purchaser on campus
or off, they should have a
photographic identification card
issued by the Greenville Police
Department and signed by the
Chief uf Police or his designee. If
they do not have this card, they
are violating local ordinances.
The presentation of this iden-
tification card should lend some
credibility to the salesman.
Out-of-state salesmen may not
be aware of the laws pertaining to
solicitation on the property of
public educational institutions in
North Carolina. Dormitory
residents should report anyone
selling merchandise door-to-door
in the residence halls to the public
safety department in order that
the salesmen can be advised of
the law and university policy.
Precautions against losses to
unscrupulous door-to-door
salesmen should be taken before
the purchase is made. After-
wards, chances are that the
salesmen will not be found in our
area.
Money Influences Choices
Continued From Page 1
stitution Jackson noted in a
telephone interview. "A school's
interest in the student, and cam-
pus visits could be productive
ways for schools to attract
students
"Merit money" can persuade a
student to switch to another
-ciioof if the amount is great
enough, Jackson admits.
A SI,000 grant increases the
possibility of a switch in only-
four percent of the cases.
The probability increases to 70
percent with a grant of $5,000,
but the researchers found a
second-choice school needs to of-
fer $6,300 jus to give itself a
50-50 chance of attracting a stu-
dent who wants to go elsewhere.
Other studies claim larger
grants can convince a student the
school is hard-up for applicants,
but Jackson says his study found
"no adverse effects of larger
awards
A growing number of colleges
now use merit schlorships to at-
tract top students.
A study by Washington-based
financial expert Bob Leider
claims nearly 1,000 colleges now
offer some type of merit aid.
"In the mid-to-late '70s,
studies suggested 60 percent of
colleges were offering no-need
aid Jackson says. "Recent
studies show it's now over 80 per-
cent
"Everybody's doing it con-
firms Michael Luton, Case
Western Reserve University
financial aid director. "It's get-
ting more and more
competitive
Case Western awards 50 to 60
new academic grants each year
from private gifts and en-
dowments, he notes.
The grants "certainly do at-
tract a lot of high quality-
students Luton adds.
"The average SATs of our in-
Soviet
Defense
Discussed
A leading British authority on
the Soviet Union will lecture at
ECU Wednesday, Nov. 28. Ray-
mond Hutchings will give two
programs, one at 3:30 p.m. in
Brewster D-210 on the "Perfor-
mance of Soviet Economy and
the other at 7:30 p.m. in the
Biology Auditorium on "Soviet
Defense Spending
Both programs are open to all
interested persons. Hutchings
visit is sponsored by several
departments.
coming freshmen have gone up
dramatically in the last couple of
years agrees Leo Munson,
Texas Christian University finan-
cial aid director.
Merit money "very definitely"
attracts top students, he says.
TCU gives out almost 600 merit
awards yearly.
And at Washington University
in St. Louis, competition for no-
need grants draws attention from
outstanding students even if the
students don't win scholarships,
says Ben Sandier, financial aid
director.
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helping friends to a better life
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or a ride
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f
S





f
3Ite East (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, Gr�.ro.Man�,r
Greg Rideout, ����������
Jennifer Jendrasiak, ,��, j.t. Pietrzak. n� AdwuunK
Randy Mews, � e� Anthony Martin. .��, ��,
Tina Maroschak. f�,w,���,�. Tom Norton, �m
Bill Austin, cmmm� bill Dawson. m w�
Doris Rankins. srtrr�uv Mike Mayo 4
November 27, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Cowboys
Give A thletes Some Bucks
Sometimes editorial topics are
weird. This one involves cowboys,
and believe it or not, it relates to
ECU. You see, out West, instead
of recruiting football players, the
colleges rustle up the sagebrush in
hopes of finding a top-notch
doggie-roper. About 85 colleges
now have rodeo teams; an in-
significant amount in comparison
to those schools that have football
teams. But there's something the
cowboys get that the Pirates,
Tarheels and Demon Deacons
don't: money.
That's right. Cold hard cash.
You see, somehow the rodeo
teams, even though they come
under the NCAA, don't have to
abide by the rules. You can be a
collegiate champion � on scholar-
ship � and be a professional
cowboy all at the same time. In
fact, some schools just write out a
check for thousands up front for
top-name lassoers who commit to
their institutions.
Why do we bring up this
Western sports story? Well, to il-
lustrate � somewhat � that some
athletes are getting bucks. If they
can get it, why can't volleyballers,
baseballers, basketballers or foot-
ballers? Now, we don't advocate
the money be shelled out the same
way as Big Tex gets his in Wyom-
ing. But, somehow our college
athletes need to get adequate com-
pensation.
Right now, a football player on
full scholarship gets room, board,
tuition and books but no spending
money. Now, for someone who
comes from a poor background,
that leaves him out in the cold for
simple luxuries. This is why people
cheat. After all, if you're bringing
in millions of dollars in gate
receipts, yet you can't even go to
the movies with some friends,
you'd be a little bitter. So, some
rich alumni slips you ten bucks and
bingo � the NCAA sanctions the
school.
So, what all this rodeo analogy
leads to is not let's make our
players pros, but, as UNC basket-
ball coach Dean Smith advocates,
give them an allowance every
month. He says about $100 will do
the trick, and we concur After all
they do, in a sense, work for the
university, and some form of self-
help money could be made
available for this purpose.
Our athletes give a lot to this
university. Yes, we are giving them
the opportunity to get an educa-
tion, and some people will say this
is enough. But, for the money and
publicity sports teams give to this
institution, we should at least give
each individual a little compensa-
tion.
With all the occurrences of
recruiting violations and rule in-
fractions going around, it seems
this would definitely cut out the in-
centive to cheat. Big-time college
athletics is too pressure-filled to be
under such tight restrictions. It on-
ly leads to doing things
underhandedly. We need to find a
way to prevent this � an
allowance is one way.
First, it keeps the kids in school
who might otherwise have to leave
or are lured by pro money. Se-
cond, it helps coaches keep alumni
and players from skirting the rules.
And lastly it makes the process a
little easier to hold intact.
The time for reform is now. We
advocate this method and any
other that makes it easier to ride
the ranges of the college sports
scene.
INVASION OF W CMMEM AGAIN THIS tftR
News Goes Broadway
Doonesbury
TRB
rW Htm Hrpoblk
According to Walter Cronkite,
former star of "The CBS Evening News
With Walter Cronkite the program
called "The CBS Evening News With
Dan Rather" has fallen on evil days.
It has become a "soft news" broad-
cast, part of a general trend in TV news
toward "the well-coiffed and the
vacuous This complaint might seem
nothing more than the latest longing of
"good old days" sentimentality � the
sort of thing that admirers of the CBS
of Edward R. Murrow used to say
about the CBS of, well, Walter
Cronkite.
But Cronkite's focus on "hard" vs.
"soft" news only distracts the debate
from what's really wrong with network
news � not the actual news itself, but
how it's presented. TV news means
brief "spot" stories, typically two
minutes long and sometimes snorter,
each composed of camera images edited
so aggressively that watching them is
like riding a train and watching another
barreling in the other direction on the
next track.
Most network news stories are
bulletins, and the anchor system still
dominates. The need for someone to tie
together short reports, as well as to read
late-breaking items, are the justifica-
tions that are regularly repeated in sup-
port of the need for an anchorman.
And the apotheosis of the anchorman
that is at the core of network news to-
day is Cronkite's legacy. When
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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Cronkite became a national shrine �
"the most trusted man in America" �
it translated into a dominant (and since
un-duplicated) 29 percent audience
share. This means a lot of money.
According to the most current
available ratings, CBS has averaged a
13.7 Nielsen rating, as against 11.3 for
NBC and 11.1 for ABC. Although the
formula is complicated by demographic
data and other factors, each rating
point is worth roughly $10 million in
annual advertising revenues. The most
important single factor in these ratings,
according to the industrv's conven-
tional wisdom, is "audience flow" � if
the program leading into the network
broadcast has a high rating, so will the
network news in that "market But
the second most important factor is the
anchorman.
The networks can't really do
anything about audience flow � with
the exception of the five stations that
the networks actually own, the local af-
filiates are free to lead into the network
news with a program of their own
choosing � but they can do something
about the anchorman.
If Dan Rather is more popular than
Peter Jennings, he can pay for his
reported $2.5 million salary several
times over. The result is that, to an ex-
tent no one in the business will admit
(even to themselves), content simply
doesn't matter. All three networks are
engaged less in the promulgation of the
news than in the promotion of the an-
chorman.
One is more immediately impressed
by the similarities among the networks'
approaches to the news than by their
differences. Together the three anchors
(Rather, Jennings and Tom Brokaw)
present a uniform image, a Cerberus
created from our inchoate sense of
trustworthiness.
They are all white men in their 40's or
early 50's, well-groomed and business-
suited. Any one of them might be a
favorite uncle or, for the average
number of the audience, a protective
older brother. (Big Brother isn't wat-
ching us; we're watching Big Brother.)
And the news strategy that might be
called Cronkitism � short pieces of
one-and-a-half to three minutes in
length, each composed of quick images
� fortifies the seigneurial image of the
anchorman.
Amidst the dizzying welter of facts
and images, he appears as a reassuring,
omniscient presence. The nominal
"content" of the news may be: anar-
chy, disorder, conflict, terror, chaos.
But the message of the anchorman's
role and demeanor is: calm, order,
reason, reassurance. Everything's
under control. If Dan's in his heaven,
commanding reality to fade in and out
for us from the throne of his anchor
desk, then all's right with the world.
To give us the reassurance we crave,
it helps for the anchorman to be not
just another craggy face but a respected
journalist as well. The more credible he
is, the more effectively can he, in a
sense, deny the news.
Campus Forum
On the three network evening
newscasts, the legitimate news func-
tions of the anchor are extremely
limited; most of his job consists of in-
troducing the correspondents and their
stories. Now that all three broada-
use "bumper or video headlines with
an announcer's voice-over, to preview
the coming stories at the commer.
break, viewers are told twice (and. with
ABC's top-of-the-news headlines, three
times) what they are going to see in the
next half hour.
Why not simplv let the cor-
respondents introduce themselves, and
go from correspondent to correspon-
dent with what is known in the trade as
a "wipe in which one picture ex
on the left side of the screen and
another enters on the right0
And if each piece were longer. ,u)
an internal coherence raiVw Vavv one
imposed by the anchorman � a series
of mini-documemanes, if you will �
the broadcast would be both engrossing
and closer to fulfilling the mission
assigned to the networks: to enable the
average citizen to participate intelligent-
ly in public life.
Even the Great Yachtsman himself is
beginning to think it might he a good
idea to throw the anchor overboard �
to get rid not just of the blow-dryer but
of the head it heats.
"Actually Walter Cronkite told
Cleveland Amory in a recent interview
in Parade, "I've always thought the an-
chorperson personality cult was awful.
I don't think there should even be an-
chorpeople � except off the air. We
worked on that idea when 1 was at CBS,
but it didn't get anywhere
And no wonder, when you talk to
other people in television news about
the anchor format, they approach it
with a similar air of resignation.
"It's an intensely personal medium
Bob Frye, executive producer of ABC's
"World News Tonight told me. "The
dynamic of television almost requires
that you have someone who is standing
up front to present the news And
there's no doubt that if any one of the
networks were to abandon the anchor
format unilaterally, it'd get clobbered
in the ratings by the other two.
It's too bad the FCC can't simply
regulate the anchor format out of ex-
istence. But some spoilsport would be
sure to bring up the First Amendment.
More to the point in the current
political climate, we've been brainwash-
ed by free-market ideology into accep-
ting the networks' claim that the
Nielsen ratings are a great mechanism
of democracy through which the people
get what they want; and government, of
course, shouldn't get between the peo-
ple and their objects of desire.
Never mind that the Nielsens, bv
treating people as mass appetites and
not as sentient individuals, leave out
what makes democracy desirable. The
networks, those three stately ships ph-
ing the trade routes of Madison
Avenue, are not about to drop anchor.
it . 1W4.1 MM Fntan. s.ni, lac
Rules Related
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted.
'Graveyard
M I Sirs Bureau
The remains of many historic
old shipwrecks strewn along the
shores of the "Graveyard of the
Atlantic" are being located and
identified by maritime historians
following this year's series of
coastal storms
Since August, a team of ECL
archaeologists has found
evidence that the remains of 2v
vessels, some dating back as tar
as 1809, have been exposed K
surf and shifting sands in the
(ape Hatteras National
Seashore.
Recent -torms, including Hur-
ricanes Diana and Josephine,
once again covered three vessels
and the scant) remains of
another wreck apparenth nevci
seen before, the E I 'earn
reported
Each such fragment of the
Outer Banks' rich maritime ;
has been studied carefully The
team has documented details of
ship construction and noted ef
fects of the environment, ;
ticularly beach erosion, on these
beached skeletons of forgotten
ships
The ECU survey team is le
James Delgado, a National Park
Service historian on leave to c
plete studies in California, ha. .
been based at the Golden Gate
national Recreation area :
San Erancisco.
The studv involves a careful
visual inspection of the more
than 60 miles of shoreline in the
Cape Hatteras National Seashore
stretching along Bodie and Hat-
teras Islands on the Outer Ba: �
mapping of exposed shipwrc
and preparation of detailed,
measured drawings.
Historical accounts and the
records of previous survey
the state of North Carolina have
been compiled for comparison
with any remains encountered.
Delgado said a final report will be
published, identifying as many of
the wrecks as possible and
discussing the recurring
phenomena of periodically
emergent shipwrecks along the
"Graveyard's" shores.
The team has posimelv con-
firmed the identity of one wreck
and is working to confirm ten-
a��-vc Ulcnuficaiions of t-wo otVver
wrecks. Delga'do ;aid
Islanders have long noted the
occasional presence of the re-
mains of the four-masted
schooner G.A. Kohler in the
sands of Hatteras Island. Built in
1919 in Wilmington. Del , G.A.
Kohler sailed from Baltimore and
was involved in the coastal trade,
under the command of Capt.
George Hopkins on her last, fata
voyage. Departing Baltimore
with a cargo of dyewood bound
for Haiti, Kohler encountered
hurricane winds and rough seas
off Cape Hatteras. Hopkins an-
chored the ship off
Chicamacomico (todav's Rodan-
the) but on the evening of Aug.
23. 1933 strotig northeast winds
drove the 212-foot long. 1,400
ton schooner ashore.
Coast Guard crews from
lifesaving stations at
Chicamacomico, Gull Shoai. Lit-
tle Kinnakeet, and Pea Island
labored for hours to save the
nine-man crew and the ship's sole
passenger, a woman. When
ston
G A
far as
stranc
residel
her
fixture
maim
of Av
War.
for h(
of :he
sand,
the
recorc
in 191
covert

mam
Mai
L
�si
ABOl
TC
OFPRl
jHO Abortion fr
nonaj cost. PregnJ
and Problem Pregr
ther in forma: ior.
Number 1-800-5?
P M wicavs
RALE
- CoUMTRV
Daily Specials
Sunday Spe
Turkey & Dressn
Meal Plans and Christ
Coloring A vaile
512 E. 14th St. NearI
Call for Take Outs - 71
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 111
I
i
v
i
v






'iW
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 27, 1984
���s m WAN
IN THIS ��
way
c orK evening
mate news func-
are extremely
b consists of in-
dents and their
three broadcasts
de headlines with
�ver, to preview
at the commercial
�ice (and, with
�- headlines, three
. g ting to see in the
the cor-
mselves, and
correspon-
in the trade as
icture exists
e screen and
- h t ?
, ece acu longer, with
a net than one
rman � a series
' ou will �
b ' h engrossing
g the mission
enable the
p ite intelligent-
man himself is
ght be a good
� erboard �
ie blow-dryer but

�nkite told
ecenl interview
I -v a .ought the an-
pei til was awful.
ild een be an-
exc ff the air. We
-hen 1 was at CBS,
�.ere
- en you talk to
� ision news about
they approach it
ir ail . - at ion.
tial medium
� � �ducer of ABC's
ght told me. "The
n almost requires
eone who is standing
news And
' any one of the
indon the anchor
�, it'd get clobbered
i by the other two.
'he FCC can't simply
r format out of ex-
spoiKport would be
nj ip the First Amendment.
� ' m the current
mate, we'e been brainwash-
deoiogy into accep-
e etw �� claim that the
ratings are a great mechanism
r ugh which the people
ant; and government, of
get between the peo-
jects of desire.
mmd that the Nielsens, by
�- as mass appetites and
entient individuals, leave out
nakes democracy desirable. The
� 'hose three stately ships ply-
rhe trade routes of Madison
venue, are not about to drop anchor.
of
vjcl I.

ndn'
'�� I ��W4lniams.a4trau.lar
lated
or purposes of enfication, all let-
3 must include the name, major and
ivufication, address, phone number
1 signature of the author(s). Letters
e limited to two typewritten pages,
huhle spaced or neatly printed. All
tters are subject to editing for brevi-
i obscenity and libel, and no personal
hacks will be permitted.
i
'Graveyard' Holds Historic Shipwrecks
111 ' haaaaai� Huraln
(aaooaBaoKsaooa
ECU NlW Bureau
The remains of many historic
old shipwrecks strewn along the
shores of the "Graveyard of the
Atlantic" are being located and
identified by maritime historians
following this year's series of
coastal storms.
Since August, a team of ECU
archaeologists has found
evidence that the remains of 29
vessels, some dating back as far
as 1809, have been exposed by
surf and shifting sands in the
Cape Hatteras National
Seashore.
Recent storms, including Hur-
ricanes Diana and Josephine,
once again covered three vessels
and the scanty remains of
another wreck apparently never
seen before, the ECU team
reported.
Each such fragment of the
Outer Banks' rich maritime past
has been studied carefully. The
team has documented details of
hip construction and noted ef-
fects of the environment, par-
ticularly beach erosion, on these
beached skeletons of forgotten
ships
The ECU survey team is led by
James Delgado, a National Park
Service historian on leave to com-
plete studies in California, having
been based at the Golden Gate
national Recreation area near
San Francisco.
The study involves a careful
lsual inspection of the more
than 60 miles of shoreline in the
Cape Hatteras National Seashore
stretching along Bodie and Hat-
teras Islands on the Outer Banks,
mapping of exposed shipwrecks
and preparation of detailed,
measured drawings.
Historical accounts and the
records of previous surveys by
the state of North Carolina have
been compiled for comparison
with any remains encountered.
Delgado said a final report will be
published, identifying as many of
the wrecks as possible and
discussing the recurring
phenomena of periodically
emergent shipwrecks along the
"Graveyard's" shores.
The team has positively con-
firmed the identity of one wreck
and is working to confirm ten-
� '?i fixations of two other
wrecks, Delgado said.
Islanders have long noted the
occasional presence of the re-
mains of the four-masted
schooner G.A. hohler in the
sands of Hatteras Island. Built in
1919 in Wilmington. Del C.A.
hohler sailed from Baltimore and
was involved in the coastal trade,
under the command of Capt.
(ieorge Hopkins on her last, fatal
voyage. Departing Baltimore
with a cargo of dyewood bound
for Haiti, hohler encountered
hurricane winds and rough seas
off Cape Hatteras. Hopkins an-
chored the ship off
Chicamacomico (today's Rodan-
the) but on the evening of Aug.
23, 1933 strong northeast winds
drove the 212-foot long, 1,400
ton schooner ashore.
Coast Guard crews from
lifesaving stations at
Chicamacomico, Gull Shoal, Lit-
tle Kinnakeet, and Pea Island
iabored for hours to save the
nine-man crew and the ship's sole
passenger, a woman. When
storm waves finally subsided,
G.A. Kohler had been driven too
far ashore to be pulled off. The
stranded hulk was sold to a local
resident who stripped Kohler of
her masts and other removable
fixtures. The hohler hull re-
mained intact on the beach north
of Avon until the Second World
War, when the hulk was burned
for her metal fastenings.
The unburned bottom portion
of the hull remained buried in the
sand, though, and was visible in
the 1950s and 1960s. The last
recorded exposure of the hull was
in 1978. Stormdriven waves in
October of this year again un-
covered the charred bones of the
vessel; the archaeological team
was able to confirm the identity
of the ship by measuring her re-
mains and assessing the method
by which she was built.
Many of the wrecked vessels
documented by the team are
Zjr&svs s st, u,
HAVING PoBi�WJ
small fragments whose identity
may never be determined. Work
is progressing on the identifica-
tion of two vesselshowever. One
wreck, exposed at the same time
as G.A. Kohler, lies upside down
in the surf of Pea Island.
Previously seen in 1964, the
wreck was at that time identified
by local residents as the Margaret
Spencer, a schooner lost
sometime around 1925.
Another vessel, a steamship
whose battered machinerv pro-
trudes from the surf three miles
south of Rodanthe, has been ten-
tatively identified by the team as
the sidewheel steamer Pocahon-
tas. Built in 1829 for service on
Chesapeake Bay, Pocahontas
later operated on the James River
before being chartered by the
United States government as a
troop transport during the Civil
War. While carrying troops and
horses for General Ambrose E.
Burnside's successful foray
through Hatteras Inlet, Pocahon-
tas was caught in a gale and
driven ashore 20 miles north of-
Cape Hatteras on Jan. 18, 1862.
The troops and crewmembers
were saved, but most of the 108
horses on board drowned in the
surf. Preliminary measurements
made on a reconaissance dive, the
location of the wreck, and the
type of engine indicate the steam-
ship near Rodanthe is Pocahon-
tas, and when winter storms sub-
side additional underwater work
will be undertaken to confirm the
identity of the wreck.
The research team is the latest
group of ECU maritime ar-
chaelogists to evaluate significant
shipwrecks along North Carolin's
inland and offshore shores.
Previous efforts have included
surveys of Edenton and
Swansboro and work on U.S.S.
Monitor.
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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11:00am-8:00pm

-





I HI I-AST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVF.MRFK 27, IfBI P��� 6
Author Compiles Authentic Southern Sayings
(l'PI) � Among the other ludicrous things television has done to
us, opines country philosopher Roy Wilder Jr it has made our
language as bland as Blue John or grits.
Wilder Jr a self-described "Yellow-dog Democrat" and "Back-
slidin' Methodist" from Gourd Hollow, N.C wants to put the
"color" back in communication with You All Spoken Here (Vik-
ing, 215 pp. $16 95).
"Right here and now we are driving up a stob to inform the
world that no matter how the outer precincts of the nation may fare
with diluted diction, we in the South will have no part of it
Wilder writes.
"Raised up right, we are sticking with our heritage and because
of our bringing up, Southern speech is alive and doing well, thanky
� colorful, concise, irreverent, extravagant, bright-eyed and
bushy-tailed
"With two strong traditions � talking and standing up and be-
ing counted � and with two stout articles to sustain us � corn
bread and corn whiskey � we in the South aren't about to sur-
render. Not again
"We refuse to knuckle under to styledbook-bound semanticists.
We refuse to liquidate our native tongue, diverse and taterdemalion
though it may be Wilder writes.
According to You All Spoken Here some Southerners use words
prefixed by the Middle English 'a' and words with strong 'as
"Here in the South, where there is more folk speech than
anywhere else, we have no problem in accumulating new verbal
goods. We aren't inhibited in our talk. We turn the spigot and let it
burble Wilder writes.
And that's what his book does. Wilder has collected a mismash
of Southern sayings that, thanks to his oook, will now be preserv-
ed.
He divides the sayings into various categories such as character
and personality "defined flat out "The word for today and
"Some Strong Words and Loose Talk There are more than a
dozen other categories.
For example, Wilder defines such terms as "tight as a tick
meaning a cheapskate.
Another way of saying it is "He breathes through his nose to
keep from wearing out his false teeth; He's so stingy he squeaks
when he walks; He's too stingy to give you the time of day; He'd
skin a flea for the hide and tallow
Also, a really bad liar is someone who hires somebody else to call
his dog.
Someone low down could "wear a top hat and walk under a
snake's belly
"He's so crooked he couldn't sleep in a roundhouse
In "The Word for Today and Other Sage Advices Wilder in-
cludes: "The still sow gets the slops" meaning the smart one gets
the reward; "Good Likker needs no water and "You don't have
to hang from a tree to be a nut
Wilder's chapter about food, entitled "With your feet under the
table defines some oldtime favorites such as sawmill gravy which
he says is made from country ham grease, milk or water and flour.
Red eye gravy is made with coffee and country ham gravy. Texas
butter is made of steak grease, water and flour.
Hoe cakes are commeal cakes baked on a hoe held over an open
fire, Wilder writes.
Natives of Georgia and Florida are "crackers a term he said
originated from early livestock di overs and herdsmen in the
southern states who controlled their walking stock by the ex-
travagant use of a whip.
North Carolinians are Tar Heels and oner were known as Tar
Boilers, both nicknames pertain to the sta�e' earlv prominence in
the naval stores industry.
Kentuckians, Wilder notes, were known as corn cracker1- and
briars. West Virginians have also been known as briars. Both refer
torusticareas with thick briar patches.
Mississippi has been known as the Mudcat State for catfish.
South Carolinians are Sandlappers, another word for clayeaters.
Wilder said Virginians have been know as 5krebacks, a dirision
from the Civil War when a Virginia regiment, outnumbered, hugg-
ed the ground during an engagement with the Yankees.
The term Yellow-dog Democrat means a straight ticket man who
would vote for a Democrat even if he was a vellow dog, Wilder
writes.
You All Spoken Here has about ,(X)0 specimens of Southern
folk speech collected over the vear from bull sessions, newspapers,
semanitcists and listening to people while touring the southern
countryside.
Wilder says the book began as a project to "sell something to
tourists so they could prove they'd been somewhere
What it turned out was something that will utterly confuse
language experts in the 22nd century.
Madrigal Dinners Nov. 28-Dec. 1
Feasting Into The Spirit
With the holiday season just
around the corner, it is time to
purchase tickets to the Madrigal
Dinners, sponsored each year by
the ECl: Department of Lniver-
Mtv Unions. This year, these
Iliabethan Feasts will be held
Nov. 28 through Dec. 1 at 7 p.m.
in the Multi-Purpose Room of
Mendenhall Student Center.
The Department of University
Unions sponsors the Madrigal
Dinners each year to open the
holidav season in traditional
English fashion. The dinners are
modeled after an Elizabethan
Festival in a country manor
hi u e. The Ford and 1 adv of the
manor preside over the entire
feast; they are dressed in lux-
urious period costumes of velvet
and lace and stand ready to greet
their guests. Again this year, Jim
and Franceine Rees are the
gracious host and hostess.
Entertainment is provided by
magicians, tumblers, poets and
musicians. The Madrigal Singers,
under the direction of Dr.
Charles Moore of the School of
Music, are the highlight of the
evening. Resplendent in their
beautiful costumes, they sing a
number of age-old Madrigals and
Christmas selections. Besides
singing, they also perform iradi-
tional Fliabethan dances.
Dinner is served b costumed
waiters and waitresses. Wassail
and roast beef with all the trimm-
ings provide a delicious meal to
complement the exciting enter-
tainment. Fong banquet tables
covered with snowy white cloths
add to the feeling of a royal feast.
The meal is catered by Servoma-
tion Corp. under the direction of
Ira Simon.
Tickets may be purchased or
reserved at the Central Ticket Of-
fice located in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, or b telephone at
757-6611. e.xt. 266' The Office is
open Monday through Friday, 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. Ticket prices are
$9 for ECU students and a guest
and S14 for ECU faculty, staff
and the public. One dollar of the
S14 is a tax-deductible contribu-
tion to the School of Music
Scholarship Fund. Tickets must
be paid for within 72 hours after
they are ordered. You may direct
mail orders to: Central Ticket Of-
fice, Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make your check payable
to "Central ticket Office and
indicate the full names of all
ticket holders for whom sou are
ordering so we can place them on
our list of honoured quests.
Backward Boy George And Company
Reveal Mysterious Musical Messages
4
Sandra Bullock and Brian Cottle will appear in the East Carolina
Playiiouse production of Stage Door Nov. 27-30 and Iec. 1 at 8:15
p.m. in the Mc(,innis Theatre.
By PAT MOLLOY
I've had the most enlightening
week that I can recall. It all
started last Thursday. I was wat-
ching a show that featured a seg-
ment on satanic messages in
music. "Be real I thought,
"that crap went out with the
Beatles Remember that? If you
play the record backwards, you
supossedly hear a secret message.
"This has to be bullshit I
figured. Suddenly, I heard a
faint, yet distinctive voice say,
"Give me a wedgie! Give me a
wedgie The voice came from
the television. The host of the
show was playing "Stairway to
Heaven" backwards.
"Amazing I thought. It was
then that I decided to do some in-
vestigative research.
Give me a wedgie!
Give me a wedgie!
My first few attempts were
dismal failures, producing
nothing but an understanding of
the Japanese language. Then, as I
was about to concede, I played a
Carpenter's album backwards,
and as "We've Only Just Begun"
came on, I heard Karen
Carpenter grumble, "Humpty
Dumpty was pushed Richard
Carpenter chimed in, "Dance
faggot, dance A satanic riddle
perhaps? I decided I must forge
ahead � no matter the conse-
qences.
I somewhat defiently played
Billy Joel's "Piano Man cer-
tain that this classic wasn't tar-
nished. My convictions were pro-
ven wrong, as I heard him snarl,
in his sweet tenor voice, "Nuke
Walton's Mountain, damn it �
kill that little twerp "
BFASPHEMY I screamed.
"How could you turn little
Elizabeth into space dust?"
I played Van Halen � zip. I
tried Journey � still nothing.
Then (I hate to admit this), 1 put
on the Culture Club backwards. I
stepped back in shock. I just
couldn't believe my ears. I heard
Boy George growl, "No matter
where you go, theie you are
"Unreal I said. "It's amazing
how these people have such keen
insight on life I finally became
convinced that these messages
held the key to a happy life. If we
believe in them, all knowledge
will be ours.
I knew I was right, when I
played Ernest Angley's gospel
album backwards. Towards the
end, I heard the final truth. In his
twangy, nauseating voice, I heard
Ernest say, "No matter how thin
you slice it, it's still baloney
It's true; I believe!
Auditions For 'Diviners
Acting auditions for The
Diviners are scheduled for Thurs-
day and Friday, Nov. 29 and 30
at 7:30 p.m. in room 206 of the
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
The Diviners is the third major
production of the playhouse
season with performance dates
set for Feb. 6-9 in McGinnis
Theatre. The play, a folk story of
the 1930s, is about a special and
trusting relationship between a
teenager and a preacher. Under
the direction of ECU Theatre
Arts professor Don Biehn, the
play offers roles for 11 per-
formers, two of which are for
men in their 50s to 70s.
Biehn has posted audition
scenes outside room 206 of
Mrssick for actors to look over.
He commented, however, "If
reviewing these scenes is impossi-
ble I will be happy to work with
actors on an individual basis on
audition night " Copies of The
Diviners are in the Reserve
Reading Room of Joyner
Library.
Auditions are open to everyone
and all ECU students, faculty,
staff and local residents are en-
couraged to attend. For further
information, call 757-6390.
Students, faculty and their families are in-
vited to attend a special Christmas con-
cert, free of charge, to be presented by the
ECU Symphonic Wind Ensemble and
sponsored b the Friends of the School of
Music. The concert will be in Wright
Auditorium on Monday, Dec. 3. 'Tor the
benefit of the children who attend says
Herbert I . Carter, ensemble director,
"this concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. and
will be under an hour in length. We have
also planned a visit from St. Nick and au-
dience participation in the singing of
several familiar carols Carolyn Green
Ipock. an alumnus of the ECU School of
Music, will be soprano soloist on "Gesu
Bambino" and "The Christmas Song,
made popular by Mel Tonne. Other
familiar holiday tunes will include "Jingle
Bells "What Child Is This themes
from "The Nutcracker Suite "Jesn,
Joy of Man's Desiring "The Twelve
Days of Christmas and "Sleigh Ride
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Let Greenville Stu
dent Laundry Service pick up, wash
dry, fold, hang, as well as deliver
your laundry! Dry Cleaning Too
Call 758 3087
FOR SALE: 13" Color TV, $180 Mat
ching couch and chair $75 Kitchen
table and 4 chairs $85 Can 756 6672
after 5pm
BUYING: Brokendown, wrecked
cars and trucks Bring to Aluminum
Recycling Company, 700 North
Green St behind Riverside Oyster
Bar or call 756 5037 nights
BARGAIN CHRISTMAS DECORA
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and sleighs lighted (12 ait SIS each
Be unique sororities ano fratsi
757 3681
TYPING SERVICE: Neat
reasonable Call 355 206:
?as?
TYPING NEEDED?: ifyouneedso
meone to type papers of any kind for
you at reasonable ra'es please call
756 8934 after 5 30 p m
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing Spelling
electronically checked Term
papers and dissertations $1 75 a
page, paper included Can Mark
after 5pm at 757 344C
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM?
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IBM Selectric typewriter ;ane
Shive, 758 5301
PERSONAL
"PRE EXAM JAMM P Kappa
Phi and Sigma Phi Epsilon sponsors
Happy Hour at Pantana Bob's wim
Happy Hour prices and one cay only
half-price memberships, on Sunday.
Dec. 2 at 800 until Come siamm
down some cocktails ft ffti The
Boys"
EAT GOLDFISH: Anyone Nth they
can eaf goldfish and tnen r-ave sex,
come down to the Elbe Wed nigh
and find out!
NCSL: Have you Been watching that
special person from afar, out a
to get close. The NCSL match
makers may be the answc De'a s
coming soon
WHITNEY: I hepe your Tnanksg.v
ing was great! I'm looking forward
to Saturday night! I heard ne
manager's office will be locked but
they say the Jacuzzi will dc: What do
you think??
CHIP B The Cowboys aDcsec me
Eagles, and the Bins dareiy lost to
the Skins, but when A as" -g'or
comes to Texas, I'll oe ?aug ng
when Dallas wins Foo
TOM N Sorry it's a little 'ate ov
congratu ations on oomg sue" a a
ming job at work ano gooc uck as
the new general manager Your lit
Bro. TMH
B
With
right aroui
most peopj
to going
home ccx
fun Hovm
ho do
North C,
home can
course, thd
ear bodl
some.
Needles1
get home
You don:
plane, buv
ou can k
read. and
little time
econormel
alread o
this optic
those of us
I've beer
parents in
the past foj
luck, so I
tunates mi
the other
Next to
get home
preferable
know
schedule,
also a via
way to re
Some of
with a perse
on a bullet
turns out
but 1 d
seen fa
never met
that man
1. but 1 :r
Taking
ay to ti
money. 1 ni
times, and
WANTED
MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT:
For 1 nighrs listening pleasure. Fri-
day. May 24. 1985 Call George
Hamilton 757 6961
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share 2 bedroom apartment close
to campus $145 a month plus
utilities Can move in immediately
Nov. rent already paid start paying
Dec 1st. Call 756 5847
ROOMMATE WANTED. Furnish
ed, private room oehmo Beik on 14th
St. $140 a month Take over Jan. 1st
Call after 7 p.m. 758 7470
AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR: Ex
perienced aerobics instructor need
ed Apply in person between 8 9 p.m.
on weekdays except Wed at
Nautilus, or call 758 5065
FREE MEMBERSHIPS: Local
health spa will give free member
ships to females willing to babysit
for 2 hrs. pe�- week Call 758-5065
NON-SMOKING ROOMMATE
WANTED: Private bedroom.
spacious living room and fully ac
cessorized kitchen Completely fur
nished. $185 a month plus half phone
utilities, and cable Call 758 4519
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: Three bedroom duplex
East 3rd St. 1 mile from campus
$145 a month includes all but long
distance. Serious student or staff
preferred Jane. 757 2688, 8 5.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $105 a month plus 13 utilities.
Good location, low utilities. Prefer
someone for spring and summer ses
Sions. Call 751 6224.
NON�SMOKING ROOMATE
WANTED: Private bedroom fully
accessorized kitchen. Apt. is new,
clean and fully furnished
SltSmonth plus "a expenses
758 4519
Call
A

m






Sayings
I . said
in the
i he ex
. as lar
ei e in
k
iters
ision
' :iro :?��. 1 it Xna 15
1 11
r7i�
Reserve
l
en-
d For farther
751 go
i
families are in-
� Himas ron-
-ef np�l bv the
A m1 nvmhle and
of the School of
fot in Wright
id� hfc. 3 lor ihe
� ho attend sas
� rw-mhle director.
n at 7:30 p.m. and
� h if in length. We hae
i n from St. Niok and au-
rticipafion in the singing of
( �rnbn (;re�n
the Kl School of
�i soloist on "(jpsu
I he f hristioas Song
Mel Torme. Other
� 'II include "Jingle
Id Is Ibis themes
r Suite "Jese,
ing " The Twelve
�nr) sleigh Ride
IHtt AMAKOl I.MAN NOM.MBFR 2 1984 7
SALE
Various Ways To Get
Home For The Holidays
GREENVILLE STUOENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Let Greenville Stu
dent Laundry Service pick up, wash,
dry, fold, hang, as well as deliver
vour laundry! Dry Cleaning Tool!
Call 758 3087
FOR SALE: 13" Color TV, $180 Mat
ching couch and chair $75 Kitchen
table and 4 chairs $85 Cal
after 5pm
756 6672
BUYING: Brokendown, wrecked
cars and trucks Bring to Aluminum
Recycling Company 700 North
Green St behind Riverside Oyster
Bar or call 756 5037 nights.
BARGAIN CHRISTMAS DECORA
TIONSi: Large outdoor 7 candles
and sleighs lighted (12 at $15 each).
Be unique sororities and frats!
'57 3681
TYPING SERVICE: Neat
reasonable Call 355 2062
fast,
TYPING NEEDED?: Ifyouneedso
meone to type papers of any kind for
you at reasonable rates, please call
?S6 8934 after 5 30 p.m.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing. Spelling
electronically checked. Term
papers and dissertations $1.75 a
page paper included Call Mark
after 5 p.m. at 757 3440
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM?:
Absolutely "no charge" for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop. Call
757 nineteen eighty" We thought
vou d like to know
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
vears wants fulltime typing at home.
BM typewriter. Call 756 3660.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs;
758 5488 758 8241.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience, quality work,
BM Selectric typewriter. Lanie
Shive. 758 5301
PERSONAL
PRE EXAM JAMM Pi Kappa
Phi and Sigma Phi Epsilon sponsors
Happy Hour at Pantana Bob's with
Happy Hour prices and one day only
half price memberships, on Sunday,
Dec 2, at 800 until Come slamm
down some cocktails with "The
Boys
EAT GOLDFISH: Anyone think they
can eat goldfish and then have sex,
come down to the Elbo Wed. night
and find out!
NCSL Have ou been watching that
special person from afar, but want
to get close The NCSL match
makers may be the answer Details
; coming soon
WHITNEY: i hope your Thanksgiv
ing yas great! I'm looking forward
to Saturday night! I heard the
manager's office will be locked, but
the say the Jacuzzi will do! What do
you think??
CHIP B The Cowboys abused the
Eagles and the Bills barely lost to
the Skins, but when Washington
comes to Texas, I'll be laughing
when Dallas wins Foo.
TOM N Sorry it's a little late, but
congratulations on doing such a jam
ming iob at work and good luck as
the new general manager Your III'
Bro TMH
By LISA MCDONALD
SuffWiUar
With the Christmas holidays
right around the corner, I'm sure
most people are looking forward
to going home for some good
home cooking, relaxation and
fun. However, for those of us
who do not live near eastern
North Carolina, just getting
home can become a problem. Of
course, there are ways to get a
weary body home. Let's look at
some.
Needless to say, the best way to
get home is in a car of your own.
You don't have to comply to a
plane, bus or driver's schedule;
you can leave as soon as you're
ready, and can take as much or as
little time as you need. It is very
economical (provided you
already own the car). However,
this option isn't possible for
those of us who do not own cars.
I've been trying to talk my
parents into buying me one for
the past four years now, with no
luck, so I and many other unfor-
tunates must consider some of
the other options.
Next to driving, the best way to
get home is to ride with someone,
preferably with someone you
know. You have to go by their
schedule, not yours, but this is
also a pleasant and economical
way to reach your destination.
Some of you may choose to ride
with a person who saw your name
on a bulletin board. This usually
turns out fine for most people,
but I don't really enjoy riding for
seven hours with someone I've
never met before. It is an option
that many people use successful-
ly, but I try to stay away from it.
Taking a plane is a wonderful
way to travelif you have the
money. I have flown home a few
times, and loved it. But for this
WANTED
college student, it is much too ex-
pensive to fly every time we have
a break. Besides, the nearest air-
port is in Kinston, and every time
you want to go home you have to
find someone to take you there.
The worst way to get home, in
my opinion, is unfortunately the
option I usually have to take �
riding the bus. The bus doesn't
really have any good qualities,
except that the Greenville station
is within walking distance for
most students. Contrary to
popular belief, the fares are
rather steep ($80 round trip
across the state). The terminals,
for the most part, are rather
grimey, and some strange
characters ride the bus. The worst
part, however, is the amount of
time it takes to get where you're
going. My seven hour drive turns
into a ten hour bus trip. The
buses aren't all bad � you can
sleep fairly easily, and you don't
have to worry about traffic �
buy they are by far not the best
choice.
These are the most common
means of travel for the college
student. But no matter which you
choose, I'm sure you'll feel it was
worth it when you pull in that
driveway, see those welcoming
smiles, and think of the vacation
ahead of you.
Q
AOVERTISEO
ITEM POLICY
Eac
sal
sp
ch of these advertised items is required to be readily available tor
le at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store eicept as 1
ecitically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT AT A&PIN GREENVILLE, N(
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAI' ABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
III
UBLE COUPONS
SEE YOUR LOCAL A&P INGreenv.lle. NCFOR DETAILS
FRESH LEAN COUNTRY FARM
COMBINATION PACKAGE (CENTER & ENDS)
Pork Chops
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT:
For l night's listening pleasure, Fri
day, May 24, 1985. Call George
Hamilton 757 6961.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share 2 bedroom apartment close
to campus. $145 a month plus
utilities Can move in immediately.
Nov rent already paid; start paying
Dec 1st Call 756 5847.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Furnish
ed, private room behind Belk on 14th
St $140 a month. Take over Jan. 1st.
Call after 7 p.m. 758 7470.
AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR: Ex
perienced aerobics instructor need
ed Apply in person between 8 9 p.m.
on weekdays except Wed. at
Nautilus, or call 758 5065.
FREE MEMBERSHIPS: Local
health spa will give free member
ships to females willing to babysit
for 2 hrs. per week. Call 758 5065.
NON SMOKING ROOMMATE
WANTED: Private bedroom,
spacious living room and fully ac
cessorized kitchen. Completely fur
nished $185 a month plus half phone,
utilities, and cable. Call 758 4519.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: Three bedroom duplex,
East 3rd St. 1 mile from campus.
$145 a month includes all but long
distance Serious student or staff
preferred Jane, 757 2688, 8 5.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Rent $105 a month plus 13 utilities.
Good location, low utilities. Prefer
someone for spring and summer ses
sions Call 758 6224.
NON�SMOKING ROOMATE
WANTED: Private bedroom fully
accessorized kitchen. Apt. is new,
clean and fully furnished.
$185month plus Vi expenses. Call
758 4519.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Grccnnllt Btd
-u- mi3 - u hbv
24 hour Towing Service
t -Haul Rental
Sirloin Steak 1J Cubed Steak
Full Cut
With Tenderloin
THE ORIGINAL FAMILY STEAK HOUSE
Lome To Western Sizzlin For
Bigger, Juicy Beef Tips
JUST ASK FOR THE NO 3!

1 Lunch & Dinner
Special
ed. &. Thur.
No. 3 Beet Tips
$3.29
SWEET
EASTERN
Florida Tangelos
�3
m
for
only
!c7rGr0Cc?A
L Savings
Rome Apples 1
ANN PAGE' MARGAR�N
FREE Potato Fixins Bar
With Your Meal
Margarine Qtrs.
1 lb.
pkgs.
PETER PAN
Opr�
Peanut Butter
���� p-ft

4tjlHur
A&P COUPON �
y
7
mi
Tomato Ketchup
32 02.
btl.
Presents
LADIES LOCK OUT
and
ECU Rugby Team Benefit
Wednesday, Nov. 28th
with
v.
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT. DEC 1 AT A&P
'(P A&P COUPON �!
DIXIE CRYSTALS
vf
ure Cane Sugar

LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, DEC. 1 AT A&P
A&P COUPON
PLAIN � BREAD � SELF RISING
(pPillsbury Flour
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, DEC 1 AT A&P.
The Coulters
��� - ree wine & draft served bv the Rugbv 1 earn till I 0:00
��� $1 admission, donated to F.CU Rusbv Team
Free transportation to the club & home again! Call 758-5570
Men admitted at 10:00
��� I v(Three kegs to sororit uith the lartrst turnout (must be present
at midniht to u in)
�Starfr�
ltes.
C P yfr A&P COUPON ��
STAR KIST IN OIL � IN WATER
Chunk Light Tuna
6' 2 oz.
li
LIMIT TWO WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, DEC 1 AT A&P
679l
Now You Know Where The Party Is!
r or more into call 758-5570
Pn ate Club � All ABC I'ermi
Greenville Squce Shopping Center 703 Greenville Blvd.
j
- � . � �� l�0
gpMMMMMMMB
f





THfc EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
42- Year
NOVEMBER 27, 1984
Page 8
Slam, Bam, Jam
Bud Light Daredevils Tonight
The Bud Light Daredevils will perform their fabulous slam dunk extravaganza tonight at 7:30 p.m. at
ECUs season-opening basketball game in Minges Coliseum.
During halftime of ECU's
season-opening basketball game
against Central Connecticut State
(tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum), Pirate fans will
witness what Michael Jordan and
other basketball wizards can only
dream about � the ultimate slam
dunk. Below is a brief history of
the group that will provide
tonight's entertainment.
On October 30, the Bud Light
Daredevils embarked on their
1984-85 National Tour by perfor-
ming at halftime for the Portland
Trailblazers' National Basketball
Association home-opener against
the Seattle Supersonics. The Bud
Light Daredevils Tour will in-
clude over 70 performances in
more than 60 cities across the
United States from October, 1984
through April of 1985.
The Bud Light Daredevils,
formerly known as the Dixie
Daredevils, consists of brothers
Ty and Guy Cobb, and third
member Mack Hirshberg. The
act includes an eight minute slam
dunk and acrobatic half time
show highlighted by Ty Cobb's
incredible "Flip Dunk, Spider-
man Dunk" and "Slam Dunk"
routines, in addition to at least
one timeout performance.
During the past three years, the
Bud Light Daredevils have per-
formed before more than one
million fans m over 175 cities
across the country. The act has
received national media atten-
tion, highlighted by feature
segments on ABC's "That's In-
credible, NBC's evening news
and "PM Magazine
During their 1984-85 National
Tour, the Bud Light Daredevils
will perform during NCAA and
NA1A basketball games as well as
National Basketball Association
and Continental Basketball
Association games.
Bud Light is the exclusive title
sponsor and Adidas is the official
shoe of the Bud Light Daredevils
1984-85 National Tour. The act is
represented by Events, Inc a
Dallas-based sports marketing
firm.
Pirates Face Devils Tonight
By SCOTT COOPER
Slmff V rilr
Alter a convincing victory over
the Irish National team last week,
i he ECU basketball squad will
face Central Connecticut State
tonight in Minges Coliseum.
In ihe Pirates' opener against
Irish last week, ECU showed
their ability to push the ball up
and down the court. "We've got
more depth and guys that can
run assistant coach Tom Bar-
: se said. "Our guys got the ball
the court � that's why we
ced the fast tempo
The guard play was also a
strong point for the Pirates, as
ECU only turned the ball over 11
times in their transition game.
Ball-handling guard Scott Hardy
had a game-high seven assists,
while William Grady dished out
tour.
Another strong point for the
Pirates was the success they had
on the inside. Jack Turnbill was
impressive as he picked up where
left off last year when he was
the rookie-of-the-week in the last
carries of the '84 season.
Turnbill led the Pirates in scoring
with 21 points, while Curt
Vanderhoist snagged a team-high
eight rebounds. As a team. ECU
had a whopping lb offensive re-
bounds, doubling ihat of the
Irish.
The Pirates also made it ap-
parent that they have a deep
bench. Coach Harrison
substituted freel throughout the
game as ever) player saw action,
with Rov Smith being the onl
player to see less than 12 minutes
of action. However, 6-10
sophomore center Leon Bass
didn't see action due to a stress
fracture in his left shin. Bass
won't be ready for full-time ac-
tion until mid-December, but
may play sparingly against Cen-
tral Connecticut State.
ECU's seven-foot sophomore
Peter Dam made his debut by
scoring two points and grabbing
four rebounds and the coaches
were pleased with what they saw.
"He was a little nervous at first,
but he showed signs o being a
factor coach lorn Banise said.
"We're bringing him along slow-
ly, and hopefully he'll improve
with time
The game with the Irish
dosen't count on ECU's record,
but should help the Pirates as the
season gets underway. Overall,
the coaches were happy with the
team's performance a week ago.
"Our pluses outweighed our
minuses coach Barrise said. "I
believe we showed a good
effort Barrise also felt the
Pirates displayed a good pressure
defense, but did say the team will
show more trapping in the future.
Tonight in Minges Coliseum
the Pirates open their regular
season against the Blue Devils of
Central Connecticut State. CCU
is a Division II school who posted
an impressive 26-6 record last
year. They won the New England
Collegiate Conference Post-
Season Tournament and advanc-
ed to the NCAA Division II
playoffs.
Head coach Bill Detrick enters
his 26th season with an im-
pressive .663 winning percentage.
The Blue DeviIs3ost three starters
who combined for over 50 points
and nine rebounds a game from
last year. Their leading returning
scorer is Dwayne Jones who
averaged 9.2 points per game.
Their leading returning re-
bounder is Tyrone Canino who
averaged 8.6 rpg.
Central Connecticut's starting
line ap consists of three guards, a
cei ;er and a forward. Jones is a
5-9 sophomore who will be joined
in the backcourt by Renardo
Mack, a 5-10 sophomore who
averaged just under five ppg and
5-9 senior Johnny Kidd. At the
center spot will be 6-11
sophomore Constantine Yian-
noutsos who averaged 3.3 ppg as
a freshman. At the lone foward
position is 6-3 freshman Tony
Little.
Tonight's meeting will be the
first ever between the two
schools. Game time is set for 7:30
in Minges Coliseum, while the
Pirates host Viginia Com-
monwealth at the same time
Thursday evening.
Jack Turnbill (34) hopes to provide ECU with some inside scoring in
their season opener tonight in Minges Coliseum.
EC Associate AD Helmick Solves Problems
By TONY BROWN
sttff W rilet
ECU Associate Athletic Direc-
tor Bob Helmick has been a busy
fellow lately. While coordinating
the physical plant preparations
for athletic events and overseeing
the maintenance of the athletic
lities, it falls upon his
alders to sort out all kinds of
.ing into the athletic
department.
He is responsible for virtually
everything from making sure
there are ticket takers, game of-
ficials and hotdogs at various
ECU sporting events. "People
don't realize what is involved in
preparing for a game Helmick
said. "We have to make suie
there are electricians,
scorekeepers .everything.
The associate AD also handles
transportation problems for the
Pirate teams. "We're already
working on next year's needs
he stated. "A lot of my time is
taken up by football, largely
because ot the logistics involved.
"With next year's schedule it'll
probablv cost oer 160,000
dollars just for football travel.
On long trips we use a
112-passenger plane, as most
teams do. The same planes that
carry our team hae either just
dropped off teams like the Cin-
cinnati Bengals or Notre Dame,
or they're on their way to pick
them up. The plane usually
transports three or four teams
during the same day
Helmick has a personal view-
point on how to cut down foot-
ball overhead which directly
relates to his knowledge of the
amount of money involved. "I
think it would be a good policy
for the NCAA to limit the
number of players for football
he feels.
"The NCAA used to limit how
many players could travel with
the teams on road trips, but
didn't limit how many home
team players could suit up. If
both squads were limited to 60
players, for example, that would
be fair Helmick's view could be
a step toward reducing some of
the extreme recruiting competi-
tion currently taking place.
Helmick also works to keep the
athletic areas and equipment in
good shape. "We've built several
buildings to house equipment
which was deteriorating due to
being stored outdoors he said.
"We also added a tower to the
practice fields for videotaping
purposes
The basketball court at Minges
Coliseum has been brought up-
to-date as well, made feasible by
the recent roof repairs which
hopefully stopped leaking which
has occurred for years. After the
basketball court floor was strip-
ped, sanded and revarnished,
Helmick updated the markings
with new-style Pirates on each
side and changed "East
Carolina" to "Pirates" at each
end. The media area was also
moved to courtside, while the
lights are currently being upgrad-
ed.
After Helmick's tenth short
answer in response to a question
from a phone call, it was evident
just how varied his duties are.
"There's no job description for a
lot of the stuff that comes in
said the associate AD. "I usually
become responsible for it because
there's no specific area it relates
to. We get requests and problems
on all sorts of things
"Right nou, l"se got to figure
out what to do with about 90
yards of gold carpet he added.
"A carpet manufacturer donates
about a 100 yards of it every year.
We get offers of paint for the
stadium and other items from
alumni constantly. 1 have to take
care of all these things
Upon leaving his office, the
phone rang � another question
for Bob Helmick.
Lady Pirates Lose To Wolf pack, Tarheels In Classic
Over Thanksgiving break the
ECU women's basketball team
participated in the Dogwood
Classic in Fayetteville. Below is a
summary of both of their games,
as well as the other contests that
place during the course of the
tournament.
Bv RICK McCORMAC
Stiff Wrttrr
The ECU women's basketball
team gave N.C. State all they
could handle for the first 15
minutes in the opening round of
the Dogwood Classic Friday
night, then the 19th ranked
Wolf pack pulled away for a
93-63 victory.
The game was tight in the
beginning as Lisa Squirewell
broke a 10-10 tie on a follow
shot. Squirewell then hit a ten
footer and was fouled on the
play. She converted the free
throw and the Lady Pirates had a
15-10 lead.
Lorraine Foster then got a
Sylvia Bragg (25) shoots as teammate Jody Rodriquez watches. The
Lady Pirates will play Fayetteville State Wednesday night in Minges
break-away layup at the 14:18
mark and ECU was up 17-10.
Sylvia Bragg was then fouled at
the 11:52 mark, and she capitaliz-
ed on both ends of a one-and-one
giving the Lady Pirates their big-
gest lead of the game at 23-14.
ECU kept their lead until the
5:10 mark when the Pack came
back to tie the score at 29.
From that point on, the Lady
Pirates were outscored 19-7 as
State went to the lockerroom
with a 48-36 halftime lead.
In the second half ECU was
able to pull within eight points,
but the Wolfpack reeled off eight
straight points and were never
threatened again.
"The first 15 minutes we
played as well as we are capable
of playing ECU coach Emily
Manwaring said. "Our starters
used all of their energy during
that time, and when we
substituted we weren't able to
maintain the pace
The Lady Pirates lost their lead
in the first half by missing free
throws and committing two con-
secutive turnovers that led to
Wolfpack layups.
ECU converted only six of 17
free throw attempts in the first
half and committed 33 turnovers
for the game.
"We lost at least eleven points
in the first half on missed free
throws ECU assistant coach
JoAnne Bly said.
The Lady Pirates were led in
scoring by Lisa Squirewell with
17 points, while Sylvia Bragg
contributed 14.
Freshman center Alma Bethea
was also in double figures for the
Lady Pirates with 11 points.
Squirewell, in addition to being
the scoring leader for the Lady
Pirates, led the team in reboun-
ding with twelve.
N.C. State was led in scoring
by All-America Linda Page. She
was held to only nine points in
the first half, but poured in 17 in
the second for a game-high 26
points.
Many of Pages' points and
much of the final 30-point
margin came when NCSU was
still playing their starters and
ECU was playing reserves.
In tne opening game of the
Dogwood Classic on Friday,
UNC mauled UNC Charlotte
82-44.
By SCOTT POWERS
An outstanding 27-point,
14-rebound performance by
UNC sophomore center Dawn
Royster spelled doom for the
ECU Lady Pirates as they fell to
the Tarheels 77-65 despite
numerous comeback attempts in
the second half at last weekend's
Dogwood Classic in Fayetteville.
The Pirates led only once in the
game, pulling out to a 9-4 lead on
three early baskets by guard Lor-
raine Foster. The Tarheels took
the lead for good minutes later as
Royster hit three quick baskets to
put the Tarheels ahead 16-13.
ECU could get no closer than
five points throughout the rest of
the first half and the Heels took a
40-29 lead into the lockerroom.
The Pirates battled back in the
second half to pull to within
47-41 with 12:50 left in the game,
but three unanswered baskets by
UNC within the next minute put
the game out of reach.
The loss was the second to an
ACC school in as many nights for
the Lady Pirates, but head coach
Emily Manwaring saw positive
things against the Tarheels than
she did against N.C. State.
"We had some good play from
our girls in the second half
Manwaring commented. "We
matched them basket for basket
most of the time
Manwaring was pleased with
the play of Lisa Squirewell, who
finished the game with seven
points. "Lisa played the best on
both ends of the court for us
she said. "We're going to have to
get her the ball r -re
Squirewell hit on three jf her
seven shots and pulled down 11
rebounds despite being in foul
trouble for most of the game.
Manwaring was also pleased
with the play of the freshmen,
especially Victoria Watras and
Monique Pompili. Watras scored
eight points before fouling out
with just over three minutes left
in the game and Pompili ended
up with six points.
"I think that the freshmen
played well Manwaring said.
"Some of them have a lot of
physical potential. All they need
is the playing time � and they
will get that this vear
"The first loss (93-63 to N.C.
State) could have been demoraliz-
ing, but the girls showed promise
in the second game. The team
showed that they were not going
to give up just because they were
down, and I don't think that thev
did
Manwaring felt that the lack of
strong bench play hurt the tean.
both nights. "We can't play the
whole game with five people
she commented. "We're going to
have to get some strong, consis-
tent play from our bench
The coach also felt that her
team has to improve on its
ballhandling. "We had 33 tur-
novers against State and 22
tonight. It's going to be tough if
we give the ball away that
much
In the final game of the
Dogwood Classic, UNC
Charlotte, whom the Pirates play
this Saturday, took the 19th
ranked N.C. State into overtime
before finally succumbing 74-68.
CHICAGO (UP1) - While
many of his contemporaries
spend their Saturdays watching
college football. 42-year-old Stan
Smagala plays the game against
opponents young enough to be
his sons.
Smagala is a running back for
Moraine Valley Community Col-
lege, putting on the shoulder pads
and helmet again after a 23-yeai
absence from the game
The 6-foot-2, 190-pound in
surance salesman got married out
of high school, raised a family
and never went to college This
year he enrolled in some business
classes, learned that Moraine
Valley had started a football :
gram and decided he'd have to
play.
"I'd been working since 1 was
16. I felt it was time 1 took a ittle
rest he said "When I first talk-
ed to them. 1 think they the
it was a crank But I looked
athletic director right in the eye
He said, 'If you pass the pi
you can try out for the team'
Smagala, of Burbank, 111
passed the physical with
ranking eighth among
under 200 pounds in strength
speed.
"My immediate react, -
'You've got to be crazy
Coach Dennis Wierzal. who's
ly two years older than S
"But he convinced me
Wierzal said he had to
his coaching techniqu
Smagala.
a youn
v ierJ
and
SmaJ
sev J
vived t
hea
spr:
dummil
t sl
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ing an
garner
-
again;
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He
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Page 8
am
daredevils Tonight
across the country I he act has
m4
:vcd national media atten-
, highlighted by feature
B( 's "That's In-
NB( 's evening news
PM M
1984 85 National
- : Daredevils
- V and
� games as well as
v . .ition
i Basketball
rxclusive title
. da - the official
Daredevils
N The act is
b � 1 vents, Inc a
marketing

�"
ti
IMde K I with some inside scoring in
Mingesoliseum.
oblems
in.
D. "1 usually
ause
rea il relates
pr blems
w, I ve j r gure
about 90
he added.
rer donates
� �;� year.
p unt for the
take
the
. jestion
Classic
� Watras and
Watras a. �red
iling out
"�ree minutes left
- and Pomp -rided
ints.
� thai the freshmen
Manwanng said.
have a lot of
All they need
- and they
year
(93-63 to N.C.
ave been demoraliz-
the girls showed promise
id game. The team
it the) a ere not going
because they were
own. and I don't think that they
Manwanng felt that the lack of
strong bench play hurt the team
both nights. "We can't play the
whole game with five people
she commented. "We're going to
have to get some strong, consis-
tent play from our bench "
The coach also felt that her
team has to improve on its
ballhandling. "We had 33 tur-
novers against State and 22
tonight. It's going to be tough if
we give the ball away that
much
In the final game of the
Dogwood Classic, UNC
Charlotte, whom the Pirates play
this Saturday, took the 19th
ranked N.C. State into overtime
before finally succumbing 74
42-Year-Old Collegiate Star
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 27. 1984
CHICAGO (UPI) - While
many of his contemporaries
spend their Saturdays watching
college football, 42-year-old Stan
Smagala plays the game against
opponents young enough to be
his sons.
Smagala is a running back for
Moraine Valley Community Col-
lege, putting on the shoulder pads
and helmet again after a 23-year
absence from the game.
The 6-foot-2, 190-pound in-
surance salesman got married out
of high school, raised a family
and never went to college. This
year he enrolled in some business
classes, learned that Moraine
Valley had started a football pro-
gram and decided he'd have to
play.
"I'd been working since I was
16. I felt it was time I took a little
rest he said. "When I first talk-
ed to them, I think they thought
it was a crank. But I looked the
athletic director right in the eye.
He said, 'If you pass the physical,
you can try out for the team
Smagala, of Burbank, 111
passed the physical with ease,
ranking eighth among players
under 200 pounds in strength and
speed.
"My immediate reaction was,
You've got to be crazy said
Coach Dennis Wierzal, who's on-
ly two years older than Smagala.
"But he convinced me
Wierzal said he had to adjust
his coaching techniques for
Smagala.
(
!l:vzzy�?i� ��� c�mpSp gMe, but
a younger player for a mistake '
Wierzal said. "I'll look at Stan
and can't do it as easily
Smagala, clocked in 4 6
seconds for the 40-yard dash, sur-
vived two-a-day practices in the
heat of August � running wind
sprints, slamming into tackling
dummies and ramming the prac-
tice sleds.
Then he broke some ribs dur-
ing an early scrimmage. His in-
jury forced him to miss several
games, but returned to rush for
eight yards and a touchdown
against Wright College at
Chicago's Hanson Stadium.
"The last time I was at Hanson
Stadium was in 1960, and I
returned a kickoff 90 yards for a
touchdown Smagala said. He
was playing for Chicago Weber
High School at the time.
He injured an ankle against
Wright College and missed the
next two games, but resumed
play after that.
"To me it isn't an
experiment Smagala said, who
wears number 42. "I'm not a
fanatic about health, but I do
keep myself in good condition
Because he has to be a full-time
student to be eligible for football,
Smagala's wife, Cristine, has
taken over his insurance ac-
counts. They have a teen-age son
and daughter.
Moraine Valley's season ended
on Saturday with a loss to
DuPage in the Illinois Junior
is thinking
Smagala already
about next season.
He said he needs to put on
weight so he can run over
tacklers. "At 190 pounds I had a
little problem getting through the
line on drive plays
Because he played so little this
year, he could be redshirted and
play for four more seasons. That
means he would be playing at age
46, which Smagala says is not im-
possible.
"What's the big deal?" he
said. "It's just football
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 27, 1984
College Teams Down
(UPl) � Akeem Olajuwon,
Michael Jordan, Sam Perkins,
Sam Bowie and Melvin Turpin
are starting in the National
Basketball Association. Without
them, Houston, North Carolina
and Kentucky are starting over in
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association.
"I'm bordering on panic
Kentucky Coach Joe B. Hall
said.
"I'm trying to remember when
we were this inexperienced
North Carolina Coach Dean
Smith said.
"This year I'm more concern-
ed with rebounding than I have
been in 20 years Houston
Coach Guy Lewis said.
Any other year, such com-
ments might be greeted with
skepticism at best, as classic cases
of coaches trying to downplay
their team's expectations.
As the 1984-85 season dawns.
Hall, Smith and Lewis may be ac-
curate in their accounts.
Powerhouses the past three years,
their teams have suddenly lost
power.
If Phi Slama Jama isn't dead,
Houston's slam-dunking frater-
nity is now barely breathing.
After a taxicab pulled into the
Houston campus a few years ago
and Akeem "The Dream" Ola-
juwon of Nigeria unfolded his
7-foot frame, the Cougars
became the scourge of the
Southwest Conference. After
three straight trips to the Final
Four, Houston aren't ranked in
the Top Twenty in the pre-
season.
"This is just a completely dif-
ferent team than the past four
years Lewis said, who wrung
his red-and-white checkered
towel to an 88-16 record the past
three years, two consecutive
SWC titles and a record 39
straight league wins.
"There's no proven rebounder
on this team. Through the years,
the real strength has been reboun-
ding, which allowed us to do
what we liked to do � that's fast
break and control the tempo
And slam dunk.
"It's a high percentage shot
Lewis said with a smile.
But with Michael Young, the
conference's fourth all-time
leading scorer gone, from a 32-5
season, the Cougars have only
one frontcourt starter returning,
6-8 sophomore Ricky Winslow.
Their strength is in the backcourt
with Alvin Franklin and Reid
Gettys.
Gary Anderson, a 6-10
sophomore who was Olajuwon's
backup, carried 205 pounds on
his frame last season but plans to
come in much heavier this time
after Finding an all-you-can-eat
pizza joint on campus and stuff-
ing himself with peanut butter
sandwiches. Elvin Hayes, the
former All-Pro and Cougar All-
America, has been working with
him.
"I just want to get however
many rebounds and block
whatever shots I can and play to
my best ability Anderson said.
"Akeem was a great player. You
can fill his shoes or you can't fill
them
From challengers for No. 1 in
the country, Houston may be no
better than No. 3 in the con-
ference.
Southern Methodist and
Arkansas have solid big men
returning in Jon Koncak and Joe
Kleine, both Olympians, and ap-
pear ready to move into SWC
contention.
North Carolina lost three
starters, including national
Player of the Year Jordan, fellow
All-America Perkins and steady
forward Matt Doherty, from last
seasons 28-3 team. For the first
time since 1972, the Tar Heels are
not in the preseason Top Twenty,
and they rank behind Duke,
North Carolina State and
Georgia Tech in some ACC pro-
gnostications.
Still, in the ACC, there's a
natural fear of North Carolina,
which has not finished below se-
cond in the league in the 18 years.
Smith has won every title
available, including the Olympics
in 1976 and the NCAA in 1982.
"We're still the hunted, no
matter what sophomore guard
Kenny Smith said.
"I still pick them (North
Carolina) No. 1 Maryland
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OnOMCTWC
�Y�GAR�CeHT�R?
Drs. Hol'is and Scibal
Coach Lefty Driesell said
"They've got the best center and
the best point guard in the
league
"We really do have some fine
young players Dean Smith
said. "We don't know how well
we'll do as a team. I think it's
safe to say that we're just a big
question mark.
"I'm not worried about us of-
fensively, even though it was
easier with Jordan and Perkins,
obviously. It was fun to draw the
play to throw the lob to Michael
and they would work. We pro-
bably won't use those same plays.
It was fun to know we could get
the ball into Sam and know he
would score or get fouled and
score from the foul line
Back are 6-11 Brad Daugherty
at center and guard Kenny Smith,
whose midseason injury may
have cost the Tar Heels a chance
to go all the way last season.
Guard Steve Hale is the only
other player with a lot of ex-
perience.
Sophomore forwards Joe Wolf
and Dave Popson, who played
little as freshmen, and Curtis
Hunter and Warren Martin, both
medical redshirts last season, and
Buzz Peterson, hampered by in-
juries in the past, should see a lot
of action this season.
Kentucky is hurting - literally.
The perennial Southeastern
Conference champions made the
NCAA semifinals last season
before being routed by
Georgetown, but "Twin
Towers" Bowie and Turpin along
with two other starters are gone.
"In 29 years of coaching, I've
never had a situation like this
Hall said. "I've never had so
many inexperienced players com-
ing back. We'll struggle to have a
winning season, and I don't like
thj
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 27, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 27, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.378
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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